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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 02-14-2013
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02029

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2013 TOP NOT CH DIGIT AL AGE BLACK HIST ORY Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The Secretary of Defense delayed the deployment of USS Harry S. Truman and USS Gettysburg Feb. 6. The deployment was originally scheduled for Feb. 8, from Naval Station Norfolk, Va. The affected ships have begun formally notifying the men and women of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG) that they will not be deploy ing. Facing budget uncertainty including a Continuing Resolution and the looming potential for across-the-board sequestration cuts the U.S. Navy made this request to the secretary and he approved, said Pentagon Press Secretary George Little in a released statement. This prudent decision enables the U.S. Navy to maintain these ships to deploy on short notice in the event they are needed to respond to national security contingencies. In order to remain ready and capable to deploy, HST CSG will conduct underway evolutions and main tain proficiency until a future deployment date is announced. The United States will continue to maintain a robust military presence in the CENTCOM region, including the current carrier presence and a mix of other assets, to fulfill enduring commitments to our partners. The U.S. military continues to stand ready to respond to any contingency and to confront any threat in the region, said Little. HST CSG consists of approximately 5,000 Sailors and Marines, including coalition Sailors. Deploying units include Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 10; USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75); German frigate FGS Hamburg (F220); guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64), and 1st Combined Destroyer Squadron. Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 is embarked on board USS Harry S. Truman with its associated squadrons: Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 32 Swordsmen, VFA-37 Ragin Bulls, and VFA-105 Gunslingers, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 312 Checkerboards, Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 126 Seahawks, Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 130 Zappers, Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7 Dusty Dogs, and Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 74 Swamp Foxes. USS Harry S. Truman returned from its last deploy ment Dec. 2010. Following its last deployment, USS Harry S. Truman conducted a 16-month docking planned incremental availability from March July 2011 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard. NAS Jax to participate in Citadel ShieldOn Feb. 19-22, NAS Jacksonville will participate in Exercise Citadel Shield 2013. This annual train ing exercise will be conducted on naval bases and installations throughout the continental United States. The exercise is designed to enhance the training and readiness of naval security forces to respond to threats against installations and units -and is not a response to any specific threat. Exercise Citadel Shield 2013 objectives are to deter potential terrorist attacks by increasing awareness of the Navy security force response to threats. Measures are in place to minimize disruptions to normal base operations -but there may be times when the exercise causes increased traffic near the installation, as well as delays in base access. For more information about Exercise Citadel Shield 2013, contact the NAS Jacksonville Public Affairs Office at 904-543-5588 or 542-2415. DoD may absorb $45 billion in cuts over 6 monthsDeep, across-the-board spending cuts scheduled to take effect March 1 will have real national security consequenc es, the Defense Departments top civil ian and its senior military official said Feb. 7. In a meeting with reporters, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, addressed the looming crisis. The cuts known as sequestra tion will take place unless Congress acts to override the provision built into budget law that would mean cutting $45 billion from the defense budget by Sept. 30. This is not something that should be done as a way to blame the other party for what happens, Panetta said. This is going to hurt the United States and hurt our defense. The mere threat of sequestration is already affecting operations. The Defense Department postponed the deployment of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and guidedmissile cruiser USS Gettysburg CG 64) because of budget considerations. This wont be the last adjustment we will make to our global presence, Dempsey said. It is our first, because the deployment is imminent. With that action, the department is trying to preserve readiness as long as possible, he explained. Were trying to stretch our readi USS Harry S. Truman Strike Group deployment delayedPanetta, Dempsey list consequences of sequestration

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Feb. 14 1778 John Paul Jones in Ranger receives first official salute to U.S. Stars and Strips flag by a European country, at Quiberon, France. 1813 Essex becomes first U.S. war ship to round Cape Horn and enter the Pacific Ocean. 1814 USS Constitution captures British Lovely Ann and Pictou. 1840 Officers from USS Vincennes make first landing in Antarctica on floating ice. Feb. 15 1856 USS Supply, commanded by Lt. David Dixon Porter, sails from Smyrna, Syria, bound for Indianola, Texas, with a load of 21 camels intended for experi mental use in the American desert west of the Rockies. 1898 U.S. battleship Maine blows up in Havana Harbor. Feb. 16 1804 Lt. Stephen Decatur, with vol unteers from frigate Constitution and schooner Enterprise, enters Tripoli har bor by night in the ketch Intrepid to burn the captured frigate Philadelphia. Decaturs raid succeeds without American losses. Englands Lord Nelson calls this the most daring act of the age. 1815 USS Constitution captures British Susannah. 1967 Operation River Raider begins in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Feb. 17 1864 Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley sinks USS Housatonic. 1942 First Navy Construction Battalion (Seabees) arrive in Bora-Bora. 1944 Carrier aircraft strike Japanese fleet at Truk, sinking ships and destroy ing aircraft. Feb. 18 1846 General order on Port and Starboard. 1944 Amphibious Force under Rear Adm. Hill lands troops on Engebi Island, Eniwetok. 1955 First of 14 detonations in Operation Teapot nuclear test. Feb. 19 1814 USS Constitution captures British brig Catherine. 1945 Marines with naval gun fire support land on Iwo Jima. Island secured March 16. Feb. 20 1815 USS Constitution, under Captain Charles Stewart, captures HMS Cyane and sloop-of-war Levant. 1962 USMC Lt. Col. John Glenn becomes first American to orbit Earth. His flight in Friendship 7 (Mercury 6) consisted of 3 orbits in 88 minutes at a velocity of 17,544 mph with the highest altitude of 162.2 statute miles. Recovery was by USS Noa (DD-841). 1962 USS Dixie (AD-14) rescues lone crewman aboard a sailing yawl adrift for four days. 1974 S-3A Viking ASW aircraft (car rier jet) introduced officially by VS-41. The unflattering stereotype of Suzie-homemaker military wives who bake casseroles and follow their husbands wherever they go did not come from nowhere. It came from history. But times are chang ing, and I wonder, has our military culture kept up? Historically, military marriages were a no-brainer. Young men in the service had dependable work and pay at a young age. They were heroic and masculine, and they were naturally bent toward protecting others. This fit well with Americas long held view of women: nurturing, dependent and dedicated to being someones supporting cast. America ate this stuff up. We promoted it. (See Alfred Eisenstaedts famous V-J Day in Times Square photograph of a Sailor and nurse kissing). No one questioned it, even. What 1940s red-blooded American wouldnt love the idea of a dashing man in uniform and his pretty little wife? From this mindset, the storied, old-school military wives club emerged: white gloves, calling cards, tea parties. And from these, Americas sometimes derog atory view of all military wives grew. But as recently as the 1970s, part of a military members work evalu ation still included a category for his wife: Does she host parties? Is she supportive? American women, it seemed, had come a long way, but military wives were held in the past. Maybe military wives wanted to change, but how could they? Given what serving in the military requires, marriage to a service member all but guar anteed a life of dependency. When I first because a military wife in 1999, it was still customary for people to urge us (us being new military brides) to consider careers that could travel. Nursing and teaching were touted as especially mil itary-friendly because they are somewhat transport able. It was deemed incompatible to be a lawyer or doctor and marry a man in the military. How could you work your way up in the practice or firm? Im sure military wives thought about the same things in the 1970s, except that back then, many women still werent considering careers as lawyers or doctors. A military marriage wasnt yet detrimental to things like salary, retirement and professional fulfill ment. The system still worked. Today, however, women are gaining on men for the status of primary bread winner. Women are hold ing more high-level positions in companies. Their careers dont always travel well. Their aspirations arent easily put on hold or set aside. Our culture has tipped from one that automati cally casts women as the homemaker wife to one that views successful, career-oriented women as a given. In contrast, the military lifestyle has changed very little from the 1940s to now. Service members still make relatively decent pay at a young age. They still are heroic. Andheres the biggiethey still move every few years. This dilemma is creating new and increasing dif ficulties for military marriages. So far, the military hasnt responded. I suppose they cant. As my own military husband tells me, the military isnt in the business of making marriages. Or, If Uncle Sam had wanted service members to have a spouse, he would have issued them one. But as women make more money and have access to better jobs, they will be less ableand less will ingto follow a man wherever the military sends him. Whereas the uniform was once an asset for eli gible men, now it could be a deal breaker. And lets not forget: nothing aids service retention like a happy wife. Last year, my husband returned from a yearlong deployment overseas. When he came back, he was, of course, sent on a new military assignmentin a dif ferent state. We found ourselves up against the mod ern military dilemma: which spouse concedes to the others career? We wondered, should I give up everything Ive worked for and follow him? Or should he give up on a 16-year military career and stay with me? The decision-making process was agonizing. There were no easy answers. Dustin is within years of retirement, and Im finally on my way to building my own career, after a decade of following his. Eventually, we came to a compromise: Well live in both places. Well maintain a house in one city, an apartment in the other, and well commute back and forth. It isnt ideal, but it allows us both to pursue our goals without being resentful of the other. We arent alone. Many military families are mak ing similar arrangements. In military-speak, we call it geo-baching. But these are shortterm solutions. I can only agree to living in two cities at once for a single tour, not a whole career. Luckily, because of Dustins retirement, our arrangement will be brief. There are plenty of young couples at the beginning of their careers who will meet these dilemmas with less room for compromise. Is the military ready to address this new, evolving face of marriage? I doubt it. The institution has proven resistant to change. Service members will move every two to three years for decades to come. But the culture and the world around the military, especially as it pertains to women and familial roles, will continue to transform. Military marriages, it seems, will have to adapt on their own. Hey, MoneyChic! I finished filing my taxes and will be receiving a rather large refund. I was excited about all the things I could buy with my new found money, but then I thought, is that the smartest thing to do with it? What should I do with my refund? MoneyChic Sez: Isnt it nice to find such a large tax refund at the end of the year? It would be nice if it was lost money, but that money you will receive wasnt actually lost. You goofed up, unless the refund was due to service in a tax-free zone. You put that money away into the worlds worst savings plan, according to NAS Jax Navy and Marine Corps Society Director Dave Faraldo. That was likely money you overpaid our government in taxes because of your selected with holdings. The government paid you no interest on that money! What could you have done with it? You could have used that money in each paycheck to pay bills, earn interest in savings, or contribute more to your retirement account. Instead, you arent withholding enough and allowed your money to be used by some one else. Getting back to the point, you have this pile of money and want to know the smart thing to do with it. Heres what I think you should do (in this order!): 1. Get yourself out of debt! Take a closer look at what debt you have. Pay off the debt with the highest interest and lowest balance first. This debt will cost you more money over time because of the higher interest. Ex. Loan A has an interest rate of 10 percent and a balance of $500. Loan B has an interest rate of 6 percent and a balance of $700. Pay off Loan A first! 2. Start a savings or emergency savings plan. You never know when a tire is going to be ripped to shreds and you have to replace two of them (you normally cant replace only one tire, thats uneven). The best way to take a vacation or buy a high priced item is to save for it. 3. Retirement. Contribute to the Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) Lifecycle Fund. Consider putting your retire ment money into the Roth TSP (taxed now). You can always receive a loan for a car, house, school, but you can never take a loan out for retirement. 4. Spend a little on yourself and your family. It is never a bad idea to give a small portion of your refund to yourself, your spouse, or your family for a little treat. Studies have shown that, regardless of income, those with a plan are more successful savers. You may not follow my recommended guidelines completely but dont blow your refund all in one place. Try to use it wisely to make your financial future a little brighter. As always, NMCRS is here to lend a helping hand. If you would like more information on how we can help, call 904-542-2832. Have questions for Money Chic? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@nmcrs.org. The changing dynamics of military marriage

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IC2(SW) Michael Bean, of NAS Jax Ground Electronics Maintenance (GEM), was rec ognized Jan. 31 as CNRSE Air Traffic Control Technician of the Year by Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. I extend my sincere congrat ulations to petty officer Bean for being selected to represent NRSE for the Vice Admiral William P. Lawrence Naval Air Traffic Control Technician of the Year Award, said Scorby. This award is symbolic of out standing contributions to oper ational readiness and flight safety made possible by indi vidual Navy and Marine Corps ATC technicians. Bravo Zulu to this superb Sailor. I wish Bean the very best of luck as he moves forward to the CNICwide competition. As an interior communica tions technician with GEM, Bean performs maintenance, troubleshooting and repairs for air traffic control equipment. Bean is also an assistant coordinator of the NAS Jax GEM maintenance and mate rial management (3-M) team. The 3-M program is all about how Sailors take care of the equipment and systems on their ship or shore station. The program is used to schedule and track the maintenance of various systems across the base, such as radar, Enterprise Land Mobile Radio (ELMR), vessels at the boathouse, air field arresting gear and fire arms in the base security department armory. GEM leading chief petty offi cer ETC(SS) Steven David said Bean has a questioning atti tude and is always looking for ways to improve maintenance quality while controlling main tenance costs. In addition to his regular duties, Bean supported a run way lighting refurbishment project at Outlying Landing Field Whitehouse in November of 2012, said David. For pilots utilizing Whitehouse for their Field Carrier Landing Practice (FCLP), its vital to have dependable Improved Fresnel Lens Optical Landing System (IFLOLS), which is backed up by the Manually Operated Visual Landing Aid System (MOVLAS). Bean explained, In recent years these multi-million dol lar IFLOLS and MOVLAS units had degraded in life-cycle sus tainability and performance due to continuous weather exposure and deterioration. In just eight weeks, our GEM team disassembled, repaired and painted each IFLOLS and MOVLAS unit at a cost that saved the Navy about $386,000 over contractors bids. David added, Beans team did all the research, created formal work and wiring pack ages, established quality assur ance procedures, and con structed a detailed parts pro curement process that is now a benchmark for other naval air stations with the same lighting systems. Approaching the end of his eighth year in the Navy, Bean is studying for the E6 exam in March. NAS Jax Assistant Ground Electronics Maintenance Officer Steve Harper and Navy Gateway Inns & Suites (NGIS) Executive Housekeeper Patty Czarnecki have been named the 2012 NAS Jax Senior Civilian and Junior Civilian of the Year. Harper was selected for using his extensive technical expertise and lead ership to successfully steer a team of 32 military and five civilian technicians through a rigorous Naval Air Forces, Atlantic Radar and Navigational Aids and Landing Systems inspection. His efforts and oversight on more than 2,000 preventive and corrective maintenance actions achieved a 99.7 percent operational availability on air traffic control systems and directly sup ported over 75,000 annual flight hour operations. Harpers expert management and guidance on the refurbishment of two improved Fresnel Lens Optical Landing Systems and two manually operated visual landing aid systems at Outlying Landing Field Whitehouse saved the command more than $386,000. A native of Jacksonville, Fla., Harper has 36 years of government service including a tour in the U.S. Marine Corps and 31 years here at Ground Electronics. I am honored to be recognized by the command. I have to acknowledge the excellent performance of duties by the military and civilians at Ground Electronics which enabled me to receive this award, said Harper, who oversees the operations and mainte nance of air traffic control and ancillary electronic equipment at Air Operations. In his free time, Harper enjoys spend ing time with his family, playing golf, sailing and performing as a musician. Czarnecki was selected for her effec tive leadership of 27 housekeepers in the cleaning of 229 guest rooms. Her efforts ensured each housekeeper and laundry worker had the necessary skills, tools and supplied needed to pro vide guests with outstanding service while staying at NGIS. During an unannounced Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) accreditation inspec tion for NGIS, the CNIC team inspected 20 percent of guest rooms for cleanli ness and comfort and ensured all rooms were equipped with required items. Ultimately, Czarneckis teams efforts resulted in NGIS receiving a 5-Star Accreditation and the Adm. Zumwalt Award for Excellence, a first for NGIS and NAS Jax. Czarnecki, a native of New Kensington, Pa., retired from the Navy after 21 years in 1997 and has worked as a Non-Appropriated Fund employee for 10 years. As the housekeeping man ager, she is responsible for a staff of 34 employees and is a certified trainer for housekeeping and custodians. Once the shock wore off, it was truly a surprise and an honor to receive this award. All the long hours and hard work has paid off, said Czarnecki. When shes not working at NGIS, Czarnecki enjoys running, working in her yard and reading. She is also a certi fied nursing assistant and has worked in home healthcare. GEM technician selected for regional award NAS Jax Civilians of the Year announced JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 3

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Rear Adm. Greg Horn, Deputy Chief of Chaplains for Reserve Affairs recently visited NAS Jacksonville and talked to members of VP-62, VR-58 and VR-62. The topic of the day was the current budget situation and looming defense cuts. The financial environment from time to time can be chal lenging but it doesnt change who we are in the Navy or how we treat each other, said Horn. Some people are elected to a job. You were selected at a time when only 10 percent of Americans are serving in uni form. This is an opportunity for us to demonstrate the kind of people we are. Horn talked about Reserve Individual Augmentee (IA) assignments and Reserve sup port of overseas contingency operations. The goal is to put the major ity of IA missions that remain validated in the Reserve, because that is what we do. We mobilize for a year and then we return to our Reserve and civil ian lives. It makes more sense than pulling someone from an active-duty ship or squadron to fill an IA mission. Were going to accept as many of those missions as we can with our manning and skillsets, he added. Speaking to the more senior members of the crowd and those looking to make a career of the Navy Reserve, Horn said. Retirement may change for new people coming in to the Navy, but yours is not going to change. If youre close to 20 years and working toward retirement, keep going. To the more junior members of the audience, he stressed the importance of being top per formers. Dont be hanging on the low end of the performance curve thinking youre going to stay for 20 years, he said. After his all-hands call, Horn toured squadron spaces and presented an admirals coin to VR-58s SELRES Sailor of the Year AWF1 Antonio Freeman. Just to have the opportunity to speak to someone at his level and get the information that is important at the deckplate is a huge morale boost to the troops, said Command Master Chief Chuck Slaton, VR-58 senior enlisted leader. Switch4Good is a free, innovative energy savings program for residents of NAS Jacksonville. Offered by Balfour Beatty Communities in partnership with WattzOn, Switch4Good provides you with energy savings help during the transition to individual utility billing. The program is funded by a grant from the Department of Energy and is offered on select Navy bases. The program provides free energy saving tips and reminders through per sonalized statements and digital nudg es, including Facebook and Twitter. Additionally, the program provides up to $1,000 in community rewards for reaching participation goals. These rewards go towards a project of the communitys choosing such as a holiday party or playground refur bishment. Our current challenge ends March 31. Sign up for tips and alerts, save energy and help us earn $500 for the NAS Jacksonville community. The program is designed to encour age energy awareness and good energy habits, helping residents save money with minimal effort. In fact, Switch4Good is based on a pilot pro gram where military residents saved an average of 18 percent annually, so sign up today its free. Switch4Good is not a billing service, were here to help you save energy and money. For billing questions, please contact your local Balfour Beatty office or call YES at 647-3210. To sign up: Visit nasjacksonville. switch4good.org, or your Balfour Beatty housing office.Switch4Good helps NAS Jax residents save money, energyDeputy Chief of Chaplains visits NAS Jacksonville squadrons Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 a.m. Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at Chapel Complex Building 749 and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the barracksNAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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Broadarrows and Red Lancers support San Salvador orphanageA VP-62 aircrew arrived at Comalopa, El Salvador at the end of January with several hundred pounds of clothing and toys for a local orphanage. The donations were collected at NAS Jacksonville by members of VP-62 and VP-10 for delivery during a crew turnover mission. The tradition of bringing gifts for the orphanage began several years ago, as crews rotated in and out of the country conducting counter-narcotics operations in the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico. This is something weve been doing for a while, said CWO4 Dan Buechler of VP-10. Its a wonderful gesture on everyones part to help out the kids. Members of VP-10 even organized a Christmas party for the orphanage that included an appearance from Santa Claus. Its nice to be able to build upon the success of pre vious VP squadrons in El Salvador and give back to our host nation, said AWVCS Jason Reimer, a member of VP-62. Another member said he asked his young children if they wanted to send some toys to children in El Salvador who were orphans. They each picked out a well-loved stuffed animal, kissed them goodbye and said, go be friends with another little boy or girl. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 By continuing to adopt ever-changing technology, Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Document Services at NAS Jacksonville continues to stay in the game through upgrades of state-of-the-art energy efficient equipment and improving the skills of its workforce. As one of 10 regional office groups within the world wide DLA Document Services enterprise, the local office has management responsibility for more than 20 satellite production facilities throughout the south east region serving customers from South Carolina to the Caribbean. The facility has been located in the same building here since 1949 but obviously much has changed over the years. When I started working here in 1979, we had a facility full of offset printing presses, letter presses and linotype machines which were replaced long ago as our organization migrated to a digital environ ment. We still provide printing services however, the primary mission of our organization is to serve as the catalyst for document automation and to accelerate the transition of our customers to the use of online documents and services, said local DLA Document Services Director Joe Barrett. To stay viable in todays competitive digital world, Document Services employees are skilled webmas ters, graphic designers, multi-media specialists and desktop publishers. We do everything from design to deliver. Our graphic artists create designs for print, multi-media and the web. We have top-of-the-line equipment for specialty output such as large format onto different substrates such as tile, foam board, banners, carpet, etc., said Barrett. Were doing a lot more of these types of job in house where in the past it had to be contracted out. We have a lot more capabili ties and its quite interesting how this has all evolved. In addition to the different facets of design and specialty output, Document Services also offers docu ment scanning and conversion and electronic docu ment management to its Department of Defense and other federal agency customers. This entails scanning and converting paper docu ments into a digital format and providing various solutions for indexing, storing and accessing those documents. They currently have several ongoing proj ects including digitalization of shipping and transpor tation documents for the DLAs Distribution and avia tion communities. Scanning experts also convert training manuals into compact discs or onto web servers while informa tion technology specialists create training videos for basically any type of maintenance procedure aboard ships or on military aircraft to better prepare new arti sans in the workforce. Another large project they have been supporting for nearly three years is the ongoing digitization of various real property records for the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast. The scope of this project has also expanded to include the other NAVFAC regional offices. Craig Hollis serves as the DLA Document Services project manager for this NAVFAC-wide project. Weve actually embedded people in NAVFAC spac es to assist with this project. They organize and bring us the real estate documents such as deeds, titles and other property records, which are scanned and uploaded into a document management system for future access, Hollis explained. I think our most unique items were documents signed in 1802 by the Spanish Governor of Florida bartering for land at Fort Barrancas. Weve seen a lot of records with significant historical value. Digital conversion also ensures the preservation of these old and historic documents. Another aspect of Document Services is equipment management solutions. If you have a multifunctional copier, most likely, they manage the contract on that piece of equipment. These types of devices are much more cost effective than having stand-alone copi ers, printers, scanners and fax machines installed in individual office spaces. Our organization currently manages approximately 36,000 of these devices across the globe and we manage about 3,000 of these locally, added Barrett. Defense Logistics Agency Document Services continues to evolve in digital age

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 7 As technology continues to change, Document Services strives to serve its customers with new prod ucts and services. Our business is basically founded on three pillars our comprehensive portfolio of inhouse capabilities, the management of customer selfservice office equipment, and the commercial pro curement of various specialty products and services, added Hollis. We also offer a robust electronic com merce solution that enables our customers to con duct business with us on-line from their desktops. Of course, printing capabilities are still used for the production of such products as change of command and retirement programs. With the use of the DLA Document Services e-commerce solution, customers can submit their orders, obtain a quote, and review/ approve a pre-production proof all online. Barrett is also quick to praise his staff many of who have worked at the facility for decades. We have an outstanding team of professionals who strive to create quality and cost-effective products and offer first-class service to our customers, he said. For more information on DLA Document Services, go to www.documentservices.dla.mil or call 5423446. DLA

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ness out by keeping this par ticular carrier in homeport in our global response force, so if something happens elsewhere in the world, we can respond to it, the chairman said. Had we deployed it and consumed that readiness, we could have created a situ ation where downstream we wouldnt have a carrier present in certain parts of the world at all. The Truman strike group was to have deployed to the Persian Gulf an area where the U.S. Navy has maintained two carrier battle groups. One carrier group will remain, and we also have other options to augment our capabilities in the region, Dempsey said. But make no mistake about it, he added, this is the first adjustment of what will be a series of adjustments across the services as we try to pre serve our readiness for as long as possible. Cancelling the deployment does change the equation in the Middle East, Dempsey told reporters. When you have carrierbased aircraft, you have com plete autonomy and control over when you use them, he said. When you use land-based aircraft, you often have to have host-nation permission to use them. So the increased risk is not in the number or type of capabilities its in how responsive they can be with the autonomy that we might desire. Would I prefer to have two carriers in the Gulf, given the tension with Iran? Sure I would, the general continued. But this allows us to meet the requirements in the Gulf and manage the risk and preserve readiness. Concerns about readiness span all services. Dempsey said the department will spend all it takes to ensure the forces deployed or getting ready to deploy will have all they need. Its actually the time after [the next deployment] where it really gets difficult, he said. We dont want to get into the position where we have to extend deployments or deploy someone who is not ready to deploy. Were not anywhere near there, but the nearterm actions we are taking are intended to preserve and stretch readiness as long as possible so we dont face that eventuality. The changes being made now also enable the depart ment to reverse them if seques tration doesnt happen and the Defense Department gets a full appropriation, Panetta noted. Dempsey said the military needs budget certainty, not ing that the budget process has been laced with uncertainty for the past two years. We need time, he said. Given 10 years to spread reductions, we can manage it. When you have to absorb $45 billion [in spending cuts] over six months, thats not enough time which is why you raid the accounts that are most vulnerable: the readiness accounts. The budget process also needs flexibility, Dempsey said. We have to have the abil ity to reach into every part of the budget, he explained, so no one part of the budget is overburdened or else the force gets out of balance. BUDGET CUTS Recognizing the importance of education and its continuing rising costs, Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation is once again offering scholarships for the 2013-14 academic year to high school and undergraduate students of military members residing in family housing. We encourage our family housing residents with high school and under graduate students to apply for Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation schol arships, said Chris Williams, president of BBC Foundation. Its a difficult economy out there and every bit helps. Scholarships are valued up to $2,500 with the possibility of being larger for exceptional submissions. The applica tion details and requirements can be found at www.bbcommunitiesfounda tion.org. The application deadline is April 15. Balfour Beatty Communities, respon sible for the privatized family housing at NAS Jacksonville formed Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, a non-profit organization committed to honoring military personnel active, disabled and fallen and their families in 2009. One of the primary goals of the Foundation is to promote the pursuit of education and a commitment to com munity leadership through educational scholarships to the children of active duty military members that reside in family housing. According to Williams, Balfour Beatty Communities is committed to providing a quality living environ ment that supports the diverse inter ests and needs of our military families. Through Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, we say thank you for the work that military members do and the sacrifices their families make. Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation seeks applications for academic scholarship to children of military housing residents 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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It is time for Sailors to lace up their athletic shoes and get moving to prepare for the 2013 Cycle 1 Semi-Annual Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA), Navy Physical Readiness Program officials said Feb. 4. Sailors should be main taining a good health and fit ness routine year round, but with holiday leave periods and gatherings competing for time, cold weather and early sunsets some Sailors may have succumbed to the win ter doldrums, said Lt. Cmdr. Austin Latour, Command Fitness Leader program man ager, Navy Physical Readiness Program. According to the Navys Physical Readiness Information Management System (PRIMS) most com mands conduct their Cycle 1 PFA in May. Body Composition Assessment (BCA) is passed when a member is within Navy BCA standards. These standards are determined by established maximum weight for height standards listed in Guide 4 BCA of the Physical Readiness Program Operating Guide, available at http:// www.public.navy.mil/bupersnpc/support/physical/Pages/ Guides.aspx. Sailors can also contact their command fitness leader (CFL) and ask for a courtesy BCA. Sailors who discover their BCA exceeds Navy standards need to start working out now. Failing the BCA portion of the PFA is an overall PFA fail ure. Decreasing your percent age of body fat can be more difficult than just decreasing weight. In order to reach BCA stan dards, Sailors need to focus on proper nutrition and exercise. Registered dieticians are avail able to help Sailors improve their nutrition at most Navy installations. The physical readiness test (PRT) portion of the PFA con sists of curl-ups, push-ups and a 1.5 mile run. Some com mands may offer bike, ellip tical, treadmill and swim options based on command ing officers discretion and cri teria in the Physical Readiness Program Instruction, OPNAVINST 6110.1J. According to Latour, Sailors can improve their curl-up scores by conducting a variety of abdominal strengthening exercises and core strength ening exercises to increase abdominal strength and endurance. A good way to test your curlup endurance is to perform a full workout and then test yourself with the Navy curl-up test, said Latour. If you do well after a work out, you will do much better when youre well rested for the PRT. When training for pushups, Sailors need to focus on reaching 90 degrees with their elbows and pushing all the way up. Push-ups should be slow and controlled during training for best results, according to Latour. Slow down during train ing to make your muscles work harder. The benefits will be noticed during the PRT, he said. Sailors can have a friend watch or even take a video recording on a smart phone of the push-up so the mem ber can see what they need to improve in their form. Additional strengthen ing exercises include wide or narrow stance pushups and strengthening the core with exercises like the plank. Sailors should complete strength training exercises two times a week. When it comes to distance running, 1.5 miles is not that far, said Latour. Sailors will use three different energy sys tems to finish the test; long distance, intermediate and sprint. To train for this, Latour rec ommends a training regimen of a twoto three-mile dis tance run, 400 to 800 meter interval fast paced runs and 40 to 50 yard interval sprints. These workouts can be split up throughout the week. Sailors should aim for 150 minutes of cardio a week which can be broken down to 30 minute sessions, five days a week. By incorporating all three of these types of running into your PRT preparation, your 1.5 mile PRT run will be much improved, said Latour. The goal of the Navy Physical Readiness Program is to ensure Sailors maintain a level of physical fitness required to support the Navys overall mis sion readiness and ensure that all Sailors meet minimum physical fitness standards for continued Naval service. Participation in the semiannual PFA is required for all active duty and drilling Reservists, regardless of gen der, age, rank, title, billet or retirement request status. All service members are required to participate in one PFA per cycle. Cycle I is Jan. 1 through June 30. Cycle 2 is July 1 through Dec. 31. Prepare for Cycle 1 Physical Fitness Assessment JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 9

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NAS Jacksonville recognized 97 top Sailors from the base and tenant commands for the first quarter during the Sailor of the Quarter (SOQ) luncheon at the NAS Jax Officers Club Feb. 7. It is my distinct honor to welcome you to the Team Jax SOQ Appreciation Luncheon. Around the world right now, its extremely hectic with about 317,000 Sailors serving in vari ous capacities around the world. Its truly a privilege to live in America and we contin ue to defend the freedoms we enjoy, said NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd. Today, we are here to rec ognize the elite our very best SOQs for their contributions to their commands. MU2 Laura Carey of Navy Band Southeast sang the national anthem and NAS Jacksonville Command Chaplain (Lt. Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore delivered the invoca tion. The events guest speaker was NAS Jax Senior Sailor of the Quarter AC1 Sindy Thomas of NAS Jax Air Operations. Being nominated and selected as Senior Sailor of the Quarter is truly an honor and privi lege. The Navy has been such a learning and rewarding experi ence, said Thomas. As a native of Costa Rica, this is the land of opportuni ty. Sixteen years ago, I wasnt certain whether I would be here. I attribute my decision to my mentors and the support and leadership that Ive had throughout my career. I cant stress enough the importance of taking care of our Sailors by mentoring them. I would like to thank my men tor, ACC Andre Chester for his guidance and my chain of command for their continual support, Thomas stated. Following lunch, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders thanked the Sailors and their spouses. First, I want to say, con gratulations! You have earned the right to say you are the best at your command and in the Navy, he said. I know it took a lot of hard work to get where youre sitting right now and in some cases a lot of support from your fami lies. I want to thank all the spouses and significant others here and if you have someone at home who supports your Navy career, make sure you thank them as well. Whether youre an E-3 or a first class petty officer, you are a leader in your command. Every Sailor now looks up to you and every chief and officer now expects more from you. You are the future of the United States Navy, he concluded. Sanders then presented each SOQ an award envelope with a $25 gift card from VyStar Credit Union and a special coin from First Command Financial Services. The NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department, USAA and the University of Phoenix picked up the cost of the buf fet luncheon for the SOQs and their family members. The luncheon was coordinated by OS1(SW) Winston Earley. I think its really great to be recognized it shows how hard work pays off. Im really excited that Im being honored today, said VP-62 Blue Jacket of the Quarter ADAN Dulcina Bravo. This is kind of overwhelm ing because its the first time Ive been honored for some thing like this. I hope there are more opportunities like this in the future. Im grateful to my command for putting me in for this award. Its a nice honor to be recognized at this level, added Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Sea Sailor of the Quarter AE2(AW) Michael Sipah.Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal govern ment officially endorses any com pany, sponsor or its products or services. NAS Jax honors quarters best at luncheon 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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Linda Ayres and Sandy Hancock were named Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Civilians of the Fourth Quarter, respec tively, Jan. 31. As a management and program ana lyst in the CNRSE Strategy and Future Requirements Department, Ayres pro vides Gateway 2.0 support to CNRSE headquarters and installations. According to her supervisor, Denise Johnson, Ayres efforts during the past quarter contributed significantly to the accomplishment of CNRSE strategic objectives. Linda is always willing to assist others, she said. She is ready to help anyone with any task, which is often demonstrated by the number of person nel seeking her assistance. This is a key component to her get it done attitude. According to Ayres, it is an extreme honor to be selected, but it was also unexpected. Quite frankly, I was very surprised. I am humbled to be selected and to be part of such a great organization. Our regional employees are always lead ing the charge when it comes to better serving the fleet, family and fighter. We have so many wonderful folks on our team, she said. Ayres also said she feels there are numerous circumstances that led to her selection. I think my selection was twofold. For one, I am not afraid to do what it takes to get my job done, and the continued support from the command makes my job easier, she said. Secondly, at the end of my day, I always think about the folks at the ground level doing the hard jobs this is why I come to work. Were here to support the people at the instal lations. If I can provide tools or pro cesses that will make their jobs easier and more effective, I am all over it. We should be part of the solution, not the problem. Hancock also works under Johnson as a program analayst, ensuring CNRSE senior leadership remains aware of the readiness status of installations and the region headquarters. Additionally, she provides monthly readiness status briefs to the region commander and chief of staff. Sandy takes pride in her work, Johnson said. Her concern for getting things right the first time, her desire to continue to learn and grow, and the quality of her knowledge and skills are what stand her above the rest. Hancock said it was an honor to be selected and that her success can be attributed to a number of individuals working at installations throughout the region. Considering the number of hard working, dedicated individuals that work for Navy Region Southeast, who could have been selected, I consider it a tremendous honor, she said. The Defense Readiness Reporting SystemNavy allows me to work with a multi tude of individuals across the region. The support and influence of these individuals contributed to my selection. I try to be courteous and professional in my day-to-day assignments while keeping in mind that each task is its own unique part of a larger process a process that supports the our mission: enabling and sustaining warfighter readiness from the shore. Individual selection criteria for the awards was based upon exemplary per formance of tasks, contributions that enhanced organization accomplish ment of command objectives, mission, teamwork or public image, and ones professional attitude toward self and others.CNRSE announces senior, junior civilians of the 4th quarter JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 11

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February is Black History MonthJesse LeRoy Brown was born in Hattiesburg, Miss. on Oct. 13, 1926. Educated in the pub lic schools of Hattiesburg, he attend ed Ohio State University College of Engineering, prior to enlisting in the U.S. Naval Reserve on July 8, 1946. Brown reported for active duty the following year at Glenview, Ill. His enlistment was terminated to accept appointment as Midshipman, U.S. Navy, and on Apr. 9, 1947, he reported to the Navy PreFlight School, Ottumwa, Iowa, for flight training. Ensign Brown received further flight training at NAS Pensacola. He was detached June 22, 1948 to NAS Jacksonville, Fla. for duty with Fighter Advanced Training Unit (VF-ATU) 2 flying the Grumman F6F Hellcat. Brown was designated a naval aviator (heavier-than-air) Oct. 21, 1948. Wearing his new wings of gold, Brown reported to Fighter Squadron (VF) 32 on Jan. 4, 1949, where he flew the F4U-4 Corsair and subsequently deployed with his squadron on USS Leyte (CV-32). He took the oath of his commissioning at sea, administered by Capt. W. I. Erdmann, commanding officer of the Leyte, in June 1949. Ensign Brown flew 20 mis sions while assigned to VF-32, with the Leyte having joined the 7th Fleet by then, in the combat operating area off the northeast coast of Korea. For this service, Brown earned the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps Air Medal. The citation reads: For meritorious achieve ment in aerial flight as pilot of a fighter plane in Fighter Squadron 32, attached to the USS Leyte, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from Oct. 12. to Nov. 7, 1950. Completing 10 missions dur ing this period, Ensign Brown participated in close-air support flights and carried out daring bombing and strafing attacks against enemy lines of com munication, transportation facilities, military instillations and troop concentrations at Wonsan, Chongjin, Songjin and Sinanju. Leading his section in the face of hostile antiaircraft fire, he vigorously pressed home his attacks, thereby contribut ing materially to the success of his division in inflicting seri ous losses upon the enemy and in providing effective support for friendly ground forces. His courage, skilled airmanship and unswerving devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Brown was also the first African-American Naval offi cer to loose his life in com bat. On Dec. 4, 1950, while flying with Lt. j.g. Thomas Hudner Jr. in close-air support for Marines fighting near the Chosin Reservoir, Browns plane was hit by enemy gunfire and crashed. Hudner crash-landed his own plane nearby to help the injured pilot. Risking his own life to save Brown, who was trapped in the burning wreck age, Hudner packed snow bare handedly around the fuselage while under continuing enemy attack, but in vain. Ensign Brown was entitled to the Korean Service Medal. He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart Medal and the Distinguished Flying Cross. His citation for the DFC reads: For heroism and extraor dinary achievement in aerial flight as a fighter pilot and section leader in VF-32, attached to the USS Leyte, in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Korean Area from Oct. 12 to Dec. 4, 1950. Participating in 20 air strikes during this period, Ensign Brown led his section in daring attacks on enemy military instillations, lines of communications, transporta tion facilities and troop concen trations at Chosin Reservoir, Ta-ku-shan, Manpojin, Linchiang, Sinuiju, Kesan, Wonsan, Chongjin, Songjin, Kilchu and Sinanju. Flying in support of units of the 1st Marine Division sur rounded by enemy in the vicin ity of the Chosin Reservoir, he pressed home numerous attacks on hostile troops moving to attack our forces, continuing his aggressive behavior runs despite heavy opposition until his plane was fatally struck by enemy anti-aircraft fire. His exceptional courage, airman ship and devotion to duty in the face of great danger reflect this highest credit upon Ensign Brown and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. The first U.S. Navy ship to be named in honor of a black Navy officer was named in honor of Brown. USS Jesse L. Brown (DE 1089), a Knox-class ocean escort ship, was launched March 18, 1972 at Avondale Shipyards in Westwego, La. She was designed to operate as an anti-subma rine ship, a screening unit, or as a patrol or convoy ship. Upon commissioning early in 1973, she was homeported at Newport, R.I., as a unit of Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla Two. Ensign Browns widow served as sponsor of the ship, and the principle address was given by Capt. Thomas Hudner Jr. In July 1975, she was reclassi fied as a frigate and designated FF-1089. Her career was spent with the Atlantic Fleet, and included several deployments to the Mediterranean Sea, the Persian Gulf and northern European waters. Jesse L. Brown was trans ferred to the Naval Reserve in January 1992, and was redesig nated FFT-1089. Jesse L. Brown was decommissioned in July 1994 and transferred to the Egyptian Navy, in which she served as Damietta (F-961). Remembering the Navys first black combat aviator JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 13

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DEWEYS All Hands ClubCall 542-3521 Monday Pizza Madness 2 9 p.m., $5 one-topping pizza Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 7 9 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Friday Free Entertainment at 7 p.m. Feb. 15 Pam Affronti Feb. 22 Ace WinnFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for active duty free bowling Every Thursday (begins Feb. 28) 11 a.m. 1 p.m. New Wednesday hours of operation (begins Feb. 27) Open 4 10 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 4 6 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 12 6 p.m., $1.50 games Bowling Tournament Feb. 16 at 12 p.m. $20 entry fee per person Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 The Gym equipment is temporarily relocated to The Zone, Bldg. 798 now through June 30, 2013. Check-out our new fitness schedule! New classes include Muscle Max, Extreme Bootcamp and Max Core Pick-up the latest copy at the fitness center Outdoor swimming pool opens April 1I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Sleeping Beauty $25 $41 Fiddler On The Roof $33 $49 Daytona 500 Feb. 24 $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50 Gatornationals March 15 17 Friday Reserved from $35 $39 Sat & Sun Reserved from $50 $54 Friday General Seating from $28 $32 Sat & Sun General Seating from $38 $42 Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10 and May 11 2 day ticket $52 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3. Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7. Blockout Dates: March 23 April 5. Call for pricing NBA Orlando Magic $18 $268 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Entertainment Books $30 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline Monster Truck Jam February 23 Preferred seating $41, lower-level seat ing $22 Live Broadway Series Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Dream Girls May 21 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations MOSH $7 $12 Blue Man Group in Orlando Special until March 31, adult $44, child $29, military $29 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4-day hopper $153.25 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discounted tick ets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Free Burger Night Feb. 19, 5 -10 p.m. Stop by liberty to pick-up your coupon for a free Deweys burger. Free Bowling at NAS Freedom Lanes Feb. 20, 7 -10 p.m. Shoes are not included SNAG Golf Lesson Feb. 21 @ 6 p.m. at NAS Jax Golf Club Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Free admissionNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Feb. 19 for active duty Feb. 21 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 12:30 p.m. every day Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DD and guests. Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center open Mon.Fri., 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you. Movie Under the Stars featuring WreckIt Ralph Feb. 22 6 p.m. at Patriots Grove Free popcorn and $.50 drinksFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School March 18 April 24 $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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Two U.S. Navy Sailors came to the assistance of an injured child while on liberty in the Philippines, Feb. 5. Lt. j.g. Joshua Stokes, assigned to VP-45 and Lt. Chris Davis, assigned to Reconnaissance Force Seventh Fleet Detachment Kadena, were at a wake boarding facil ity near Angeles City, Republic of the Philippines, when they heard loud screams nearby. Both Sailors rushed to the waters edge and found the young child being carried from the water by a struggling fam ily member. The child was suf fering severe facial lacerations after being violently struck by a wake boarder. Stokes carried the child ashore and to a nearby build ing while Davis notified the facilitys staff and coordinated their assistance. Both Sailors then administered first aid until a van arrived to transport the child to a local hospital. Stokes and Davis are in the Philippines with Combined Task Unit 72.2, providing P3-C Orion support to the salvage of USS Guardian (MCM 5), which ran aground Jan. 17. The P3-C Orion is a maritime patrol air craft and is flying from Clark Air Base, near Angeles City. If you are going to have your 17-foot bass boat cap size in a vacant St. Johns River, stranding a 60-some thing and two 70-somethings in the chilly river waters and a small Maltese dog trapped in an air pocket underneath the boat, then having several Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) techs from Naval Station Mayport training nearby is the right way to do it. Thats what happened to boat owner Don Weita, 74, and his fishing buddies, Larry Haller, 67, Mancell Boyd, 75, and Boyds dog, Sassy a couple weeks ago near where the Trout and St. Johns rivers meet. The three men and Sassy ended up in the water after a wave tipped the boat and trap ping the dog. They would wait about 30 minutes in the 62-degree water, listening to Sassy bark before members of the Mayports Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 6 noticed things werent right. EODCS Jonah Toy said the group was performing boat ops training when he noticed movement in the water. At first he said he thought it was a wind surfer hed seen earlier in the day, but when he noticed arms waving then he knew that something wasnt right. When they pulled up to the capsized boat, they found the men clinging to it and Boyd not willing to be rescued without his dog. Mancell was adamant, said Toy. He would not leave with out Sassy. You could hear the dog barking, EOD1 Zach Phillips. So Phillips headed into the water and with a little maneu vering was able to grab the dog and bring her to the surface. By this time, the three men were in EODs boat beginning to warm up and tell their story. Phillips said that Boyd would only accept a jacket to wrap lit tle Sassy in. He got a little misty eyed [after Sassy was rescued], Phillips said. His wife had died and he had gotten the dog to replace her. With everyone safe, EOD was able to slowly tow the boat back to Arlington Lions Club Park. The guys were able to right the boat and get it back on Weitas trailer. The men were checked out by local EMTs and given a good bill of health, none the worse for wear for their experience. EOD rescues boaters and little dog, tooSailors aid severely injured child in the Philippines The secretaries of Defense and Veterans Affairs announced their departments will speed implementation of the Integrated Electronic Health Record program allowing service mem bers and veterans better access and, more importantly, better medical care. This approach is affordable, achievable, and if we refocus our efforts we believe we can achieve the key goal of a seamless system for health records between VA and DoD on a greatly accelerated schedule, said Defense Secretary Leon Panetta following a meeting with Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki at VA headquar ters. The departments are able to step up the records program because of advances in infor mation technology while working with existing platforms. The original goal was to have the sys tem deployed by 2018. Now the expectation is by the end of next year. The goal is to provide one set of electronic records from entry into the military through veteran status. The program is designed to allow service members or veterans to download infor mation and present it to doctors or other health care providers without delays. Previously, service members had to hand carry paper files from DoD facilities to Veterans Affairs. Once complete, the record program will pro vide DoD and VA clinicians with the complete medical records of more than 18 million service members, veterans and their beneficiaries. Weve agreed to improve interoperabil ity before the end of this year by standardizing health care data, Shinseki said. The two depart ments will also accelerate the exchange of realtime data by September. The departments are upgrading the graphical user interface to display the new standardized VA and DoD healthcare date by the end of this year, Shinseki said.DoD, VA to speed integration of health records 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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The aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) refueling complex overhaul (RCOH) will not start due to a lack of funding, Navy officials said Feb. 8. Lincoln was expected to move to Newport News shipyard next week to begin the overhaul. However, as a result of the fiscal con straints resulting from the ongoing con tinuing resolution (CR), the contract for the refueling complex overhaul (RCOH) has not been issued to Huntington Ingalls Industries, Inc. Lincoln will remain pier side at Naval Station Norfolk until sufficient funding is received to start the execution of the RCOH. In the meantime, the ships Sailors continue to conduct maintenance. In their 50-year life spans, one RCOH is scheduled for the midpoint of an air craft carriers service life. Lincoln was commissioned 23 years ago on Nov. 11, 1989. The impact of indefinitely postponing CVN 72 RCOH is three-fold: will have to be lengthened because the overhaul wont begin when it was expected; fleet; money/jobs and can delay subsequent scheduled availabilities). Canceling or delaying maintenance creates a significant backlog of deferred maintenance and affects future year schedules and costs, as well as future readiness. The delay in Lincolns RCOH will affect other carrier work. Because of the short time available between sequential dockings, the delay will also result in day-for-day impacts to the defueling of the recently inactivated Enterprise (CVN 65) and the start of USS George Washingtons (CVN 73) RCOH. A yearlong CR impacts funds for fuel, parts, ship and aircraft repairs, base operations, maintenance for buildings, roads and runways, and salaries for government employees and contractors. The fiscal uncertainties created by not having an appropriations bill and the measures the Navy is forced to take as a result, place significant stress on an already strained force and undermine the stability of a fragile industrial base. Lack of funding delays USS Lincoln RCOH JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 17

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 By this summer, DoD and VA will field and begin conducting a pilot program on the common interface for doctors at seven joint rehab centers across the country and well also expand its use at two other sites, Panetta said. All of these facilities will be interoperable by the end of July 2013, so fast time track, but we think we can get it done. These centers will be in San Antonio, Minneapolis, Palo Alto, Calif., Tampa, Fla., Richmond, Va., Anchorage, Alaska, and Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. Rather than building a single, integrated system from scratch, we will focus our immediate efforts on integrating VA and DoD health data as quickly as possible by upgrading our existing systems, Panetta said. HEALTH RECORDS For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil Training aid filmed at FRCSE to improve fleet maintainer skills Video cameras began rolling Jan. 22 at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) as airframe mechanics, engineers and techni cal experts collaborated to docu ment the exacting work required to maintain and repair sophisticated military aircraft. Specialists from FRCSE, Airborne Electronic Attack/EA-6B Program Manager Air (PMA-234), Marine Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron ONE (VMAQ-1), Naval Air Technical Data & Engineering Service Command (NATEC) and Job Performance Associates (JPA) concluded a two-week effort to videotape rigging procedures for the main landing gear of an EA-6B Prowler Feb. 1. The Navy is creating multimedia training aids to provide fleet main tainersSailors and Marines with visual tools to augment textbased instruction, predicted to reduce repair errors and improve mission readiness. Engineer Becky Thacker, the P-8 Poseidon Fleet Support Team (FST) lead, said this integrated technol ogy is the wave of the future. Thacker worked closely with Andy Porter, PMA 234 Air Vehicle, Deputy Assistant Program Manager, Logistics (DAPML), who she said did the heavy lifting for the manpower and support. We brought a team of two Marines from Cherry Point, said Porter. Weve been having issues with (Prowler) nose and main landing gears for quite a while. We are relying on the expertise of the FRCSE artisans. This airplane is 30 years old. The training track is robust, but students cant possi bly cover all aircraft subsystems in a three-week period. Sgt. Jonathan Williams and Cpl. Victor Lopez, both airframe mechanics with VMAQ-1 at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., dem onstrated the maintenance pro cedures as the video cameras rolled. Lopez said the aids will clarify some of the more detailed aspects involved in rigging landing gear and provide a better under standing of specific techniques not covered extensively in the military trade school or technical publica tions. Matt Waters, JPA chief executive officer, said his company has been creating job performance aids for the Navy contracted through the Defense Logistics Agency Document Services since 2004. He said JPA puts visual and audio tools at the fingertips of the maintainer to improve accuracy, save time and reduce cost. This is the first effort at Jax, but weve been doing JPAs at Cherry Point for a long time, said Waters. The Marine Corps is one of the most aggressive agencies. We are collaborating to introduce the same kinds of learning tools for the Navy. We are leveraging so much from FRCSEs expertise. We are capturing knowledge from experts for mentoring segments and turn ing text-based manuals into multi media tools, step by step, to read, see, hear and do. NATEC field service represen tative, Bob Szarmach who has worked with the Marines as a civil ian since 1995 at Cherry Point, said the team laid out step by step rig ging procedures for the main land ing gear before each session and conducted a dry run before film ing each day. We targeted 19 para graphs in one work package with one add-on, said Szarmach of the teams efforts to update the techni cal publications. Steve Faulk, the FRCSE EA-6B FST lead, who arranged for the shoot in Jacksonville, said the loca tion rested on the availability of a Prowler that could be used dur ing filming. We couldnt get a fleet aircraft set aside for two weeks, said Faulk. It was all about avail ability. This aircraft wasnt in work here; prior to being removed from service, it was being used for a landing gear engineering investi gation. Faulk said the Prowler used for this effort will soon be struck from the Fleet. He is locating another so the team can reassemble this sum mer to film the nose landing gear rigging procedures. On the last day of filming at FRCSE, Winston Scott, a retired Navy captain and former astro naut, met with the team to observe the technical aspects and JPA film ing efforts headed by the execu tive producer for the segment, Ken Nakanishi and videotaped by Nick Solorzano. Scott reported to the military depot in 1985 as an aerospace engineering duty officer assigned as the F/A-18 Hornet strike fighter project officer and production test pilot flying F/A-18, F-14 Tomcat and A-7 Corsair aircraft. Today, Scott serves as the senior vice president for external relations and econom ic development at Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Fla. He hopes to integrate the train ing toolsat the private technical university. The Navys multime dia training aid is scheduled for release to fleet maintainers at the end of 2013. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast recently heard the following cases: vened at NS Mayport, a lieutenant (junior grade) was found guilty of attempted wrongful sexual contact, vio lating a lawful general regulation by wrongfully engaging in sexual conduct with an E-3, and wrongful sexual con tact. The military judge sentenced the accused to three months confinement, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and a dismissal. vened at NAS Jacksonville, a petty offi cer first class was found guilty of solicit ing to transfer control of a minor with knowledge that the minor would engage in prostitution, traveling for the pur pose of engaging in unlawful sexual conduct with a person believed to be a child after using a cell phone to solicit a person believed to be a custodian or guardian of a child to consent to the participation of the child in sexual con duct, and using a cell phone to solic it to transfer control of a minor with knowledge that, as a consequence of the transfer, the minor would engage in prostitution. The military judge sen tenced the accused to 14 years con finement, total forfeiture of all pay and allowances, reduction in rate to E-1, and a dishonorable discharge. vened at NAS Jacksonville, an airman was found guilty of failure to obey a lawful order (three specifications) and assault consummated by a bat tery (three specifications). The mili tary judge sentenced the accused to 18 months confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, and a bad conduct discharge. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast are tried with few exceptions at NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, and NAS Pensacola. Therefore, the location of where a court-martial described above was convened does not necessarily corre late to the command that convened the court-martial. Adjudged sentences may be modified by pre-trial agreement or clemency.

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Being a parent myself, I know how stressful it can be to ensure that your children will be taken care of, be it for an hour or for the length of a deploy ment. We want what is best for them. As parents, we need to understand all legal means available to ensure that our children are cared for in our absence; this will in turn prevent legal complications and our children get ting caught in the crossfire. Some of these legal means include: family care plans, in loco parentis powers of attorney, guardianship, and adoption. Family care plans Single parent service members, dual-military couples with depen dents, or those who have a legal custo dy arrangement with a non-spouse are required to have a family care plan per OPNAVINST 1740.4D and DODINST 1342.19. A family care plan includes form NAVPERS 1740/6 signed by both the service member(s) and the party, who is to care for the child(ren). Family care plans are not legal documents. The person named to care for the children cannot enroll the children in school, make medi cal decisions, and if a custody dispute arose, in a court of law. This is only an administrative tool the military uses to ensure that service members have all their ducks in a row in order to maintain worldwide assignability. It is a military requirement that can be changed at your election, but it has no legal effect. In loco parentis power of attorney A power of attorney (POA) is a legal document authorizing someone else to do something that previously only you were able to do; however, there is no legal obligation for any third party (school, hospital, etc.) to accept it if a third party does accept it, the docu ment assures them that they will not be sued. An in loco parentis POA can be used to authorize someone else to make decisions for the benefit of your chil dren. These POAs expire after a speci fied period of time. They are practical because they are fairly easy and quick to create. Most legal offices can draft one up on a walk-in basis. If you need someone to be able to make decisions for the benefit of your children for you for a short period of time, an in loco parentis POA may be the way to go. These types of POAs cannot be used to enroll a child in DEERS Also, some schools may not accept it; for this rea son, it would be wise to first determine whether the school has its own forms/ POA they would like you to fill out. ; Guardianship If you need someone to take care of your child for about a year or more, you should seriously consider guardianship. A guardian is a courtappointed individual, who accepts responsibility for the care of a child. Obtaining a guardian does not cut off the biological parents rights. A guard ianship requires court intervention which means that a petition needs to be filed at family court. Some jurisdic tions allow pro se (without an attor ney) filings, but it is always encour aged to hire one in order to ensure the guardianship is done correctly. After the petition is filed, a court investigator may interview the peti tioner, the child, and the biological parents to make a recommendation. After giving an opportunity for all par ties to speak, and considering the best interests of the child, the court will grant or deny the request. Normally, all parties are consenting, but guard ianship can also be awarded in cases of abandonment or neglect. While the biological parents are still legally responsible for financially support ing their children, often the guard ian shoulders this responsibility. The guardian can expect court oversight until the guardianship expires, when the child turns 18, or when the judge says its no longer necessary. Third parties are more likely to accept proof of guardianship over an in loco paren tis POA. Adoption Adoption requires termination of the biological parents rights. This is also court ordered, so it requires some time and money. Unlike a guardian ship, it lasts forever. The child is treat ed as if they were biological. All paren tal rights or responsibilities are transferred to the adopting parent. Again, if you are thinking of adoption, you should utilize an attorney to ensure everything goes correctly. As parents, we need to be educated on these issues so that we can make the best decisions for our children. Please come and see a legal assistance attorney to further flush out these options and what they may mean to you and your family. You can find us at www.jag.navy.mil under the tab Legal Services at Legal Assistance. Please visit us at http://www.jag. navy.mil/legal_services/rlso/rlso_ southeast.htm for more information or to find out the location of the nearest legal assistance office.Caring for kidsFrom family care plans to adoptions JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 19

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Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation (WOASF) is accepting prequalification forms for its scholarships. Pre-qualification deadline is March 1 and full application deadline is April 1. WOASF, a 501(c) 3 non-profit foun dation, annually sponsors more than 40 scholarships ranging from $2,000 to $10,000 for students who have chosen to continue their education. Scholarship recipients are selected on the basis of scholastic merit, communi ty service and extracurricular activities. Our mission is to provide college scholarships to dependent children and spouses of US Navy personnel with service in naval aviation com mands; Officer and Enlisted, active duty, retired, honorably discharged or deceased. The Foundation has awarded more than $530,000 to outstanding students since 1987. The foundation is funded solely through the generous contributions of private and corporate sources. For more info on eligibility and appli cation process, go to www.wingsovera merica.us or call 757-671-3200, x 2. WOASF scholarships app due March 1 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2013 TOP NOTCH DIGITAL AGE BLACK HISTORY Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The Secretary of Defense delayed the deployment of USS Harry S. Truman and USS Gettysburg Feb. 6. The deployment was originally scheduled for Feb. 8, from Naval Station Norfolk, Va. The affected ships have begun formally notifying the men and women of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG) that they will not be deploy ing. Facing budget uncertainty including a Continuing Resolution and the looming potential for across-the-board sequestration cuts the U.S. Navy made this request to the secretary and he approved, said Pentagon Press Secretary George Little in a released statement. This prudent decision enables the U.S. Navy to maintain these ships to deploy on short notice in the event they are needed to respond to national security contingencies. In order to remain ready and capable to deploy, HST CSG will conduct underway evolutions and main tain proficiency until a future deployment date is announced. The United States will continue to maintain a robust military presence in the CENTCOM region, including the current carrier presence and a mix of other assets, to fulfill enduring commitments to our partners. The U.S. military continues to stand ready to respond to any contingency and to confront any threat in the region, said Little. HST CSG consists of approximately 5,000 Sailors and Marines, including coalition Sailors. Deploying units include Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 10; USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75); German frigate FGS Hamburg (F220); guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64), and 1st Combined Destroyer Squadron. Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 is embarked on board USS Harry S. Truman with its associated squadrons: Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 32 Swordsmen, VFA-37 Ragin Bulls, and VFA-105 Gunslingers, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 312 Checkerboards, Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 126 Seahawks, Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 130 Zappers, Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7 Dusty Dogs, and Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 74 Swamp Foxes. USS Harry S. Truman returned from its last deployment Dec. 2010. Following its last deployment, USS Harry S. Truman conducted a 16-month docking planned incremental availability from March July 2011 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard. NAS Jax to participate in Citadel ShieldOn Feb. 19-22, NAS Jacksonville will participate in Exercise Citadel Shield 2013. This annual training exercise will be conducted on naval bases and installations throughout the continental United States. The exercise is designed to enhance the training and readiness of naval security forces to respond to threats against installations and units -and is not a response to any specific threat. Exercise Citadel Shield 2013 objectives are to deter potential terrorist attacks by increasing awareness of the Navy security force response to threats. Measures are in place to minimize disruptions to normal base operations -but there may be times when the exercise causes increased traffic near the installation, as well as delays in base access. For more information about Exercise Citadel Shield 2013, contact the NAS Jacksonville Public Affairs Office at 904-543-5588 or 542-2415. DoD may absorb $45 billion in cuts over 6 monthsDeep, across-the-board spending cuts scheduled to take effect March 1 will have real national security consequenc es, the Defense Departments top civil ian and its senior military official said Feb. 7. In a meeting with reporters, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, addressed the looming crisis. The cuts known as sequestra tion will take place unless Congress acts to override the provision built into budget law that would mean cutting $45 billion from the defense budget by Sept. 30. This is not something that should be done as a way to blame the other party for what happens, Panetta said. This is going to hurt the United States and hurt our defense. The mere threat of sequestration is already affecting operations. The Defense Department postponed the deployment of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and guidedmissile cruiser USS Gettysburg CG 64) because of budget considerations. This wont be the last adjustment we will make to our global presence, Dempsey said. It is our first, because the deployment is imminent. With that action, the department is trying to preserve readiness as long as possible, he explained. Were trying to stretch our readi USS Harry S. Truman Strike Group deployment delayedPanetta, Dempsey list consequences of sequestration

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Feb. 14 1778 John Paul Jones in Ranger receives first official salute to U.S. Stars and Strips flag by a European country, at Quiberon, France. 1813 Essex becomes first U.S. war ship to round Cape Horn and enter the Pacific Ocean. 1814 USS Constitution captures British Lovely Ann and Pictou. 1840 Officers from USS Vincennes make first landing in Antarctica on floating ice. Feb. 15 1856 USS Supply, commanded by Lt. David Dixon Porter, sails from Smyrna, Syria, bound for Indianola, Texas, with a load of 21 camels intended for experimental use in the American desert west of the Rockies. 1898 U.S. battleship Maine blows up in Havana Harbor. Feb. 16 1804 Lt. Stephen Decatur, with volunteers from frigate Constitution and schooner Enterprise, enters Tripoli harbor by night in the ketch Intrepid to burn the captured frigate Philadelphia. Decaturs raid succeeds without American losses. Englands Lord Nelson calls this the most daring act of the age. 1815 USS Constitution captures British Susannah. 1967 Operation River Raider begins in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Feb. 17 1864 Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley sinks USS Housatonic. 1942 First Navy Construction Battalion (Seabees) arrive in Bora-Bora. 1944 Carrier aircraft strike Japanese fleet at Truk, sinking ships and destroying aircraft. Feb. 18 1846 General order on Port and Starboard. 1944 Amphibious Force under Rear Adm. Hill lands troops on Engebi Island, Eniwetok. 1955 First of 14 detonations in Operation Teapot nuclear test. Feb. 19 1814 USS Constitution captures British brig Catherine. 1945 Marines with naval gun fire support land on Iwo Jima. Island secured March 16. Feb. 20 1815 USS Constitution, under Captain Charles Stewart, captures HMS Cyane and sloop-of-war Levant. 1962 USMC Lt. Col. John Glenn becomes first American to orbit Earth. His flight in Friendship 7 (Mercury 6) consisted of 3 orbits in 88 minutes at a velocity of 17,544 mph with the highest altitude of 162.2 statute miles. Recovery was by USS Noa (DD-841). 1962 USS Dixie (AD-14) rescues lone crewman aboard a sailing yawl adrift for four days. 1974 S-3A Viking ASW aircraft (car rier jet) introduced officially by VS-41. The unflattering stereotype of Suzie-homemaker military wives who bake casseroles and follow their husbands wherever they go did not come from nowhere. It came from history. But times are changing, and I wonder, has our military culture kept up? Historically, military marriages were a no-brainer. Young men in the service had dependable work and pay at a young age. They were heroic and masculine, and they were naturally bent toward protecting others. This fit well with Americas long held view of women: nurturing, dependent and dedicated to being someones supporting cast. America ate this stuff up. We promoted it. (See Alfred Eisenstaedts famous V-J Day in Times Square photograph of a Sailor and nurse kissing). No one questioned it, even. What 1940s red-blooded American wouldnt love the idea of a dashing man in uniform and his pretty little wife? From this mindset, the storied, old-school military wives club emerged: white gloves, calling cards, tea parties. And from these, Americas sometimes derogatory view of all military wives grew. But as recently as the 1970s, part of a military members work evaluation still included a category for his wife: Does she host parties? Is she supportive? American women, it seemed, had come a long way, but military wives were held in the past. Maybe military wives wanted to change, but how could they? Given what serving in the military requires, marriage to a service member all but guaranteed a life of dependency. When I first because a military wife in 1999, it was still customary for people to urge us (us being new military brides) to consider careers that could travel. Nursing and teaching were touted as especially mil itary-friendly because they are somewhat transport able. It was deemed incompatible to be a lawyer or doctor and marry a man in the military. How could you work your way up in the practice or firm? Im sure military wives thought about the same things in the 1970s, except that back then, many women still werent considering careers as lawyers or doctors. A military marriage wasnt yet detrimental to things like salary, retirement and professional fulfillment. The system still worked. Today, however, women are gaining on men for the status of primary bread winner. Women are hold ing more high-level positions in companies. Their careers dont always travel well. Their aspirations arent easily put on hold or set aside. Our culture has tipped from one that automati cally casts women as the homemaker wife to one that views successful, career-oriented women as a given. In contrast, the military lifestyle has changed very little from the 1940s to now. Service members still make relatively decent pay at a young age. They still are heroic. Andheres the biggiethey still move every few years. This dilemma is creating new and increasing dif ficulties for military marriages. So far, the military hasnt responded. I suppose they cant. As my own military husband tells me, the military isnt in the business of making marriages. Or, If Uncle Sam had wanted service members to have a spouse, he would have issued them one. But as women make more money and have access to better jobs, they will be less ableand less will ingto follow a man wherever the military sends him. Whereas the uniform was once an asset for eligible men, now it could be a deal breaker. And lets not forget: nothing aids service retention like a happy wife. Last year, my husband returned from a yearlong deployment overseas. When he came back, he was, of course, sent on a new military assignmentin a different state. We found ourselves up against the modern military dilemma: which spouse concedes to the others career? We wondered, should I give up everything Ive worked for and follow him? Or should he give up on a 16-year military career and stay with me? The decision-making process was agonizing. There were no easy answers. Dustin is within years of retirement, and Im finally on my way to building my own career, after a decade of following his. Eventually, we came to a compromise: Well live in both places. Well maintain a house in one city, an apartment in the other, and well commute back and forth. It isnt ideal, but it allows us both to pursue our goals without being resentful of the other. We arent alone. Many military families are mak ing similar arrangements. In military-speak, we call it geo-baching. But these are shortterm solutions. I can only agree to living in two cities at once for a single tour, not a whole career. Luckily, because of Dustins retirement, our arrangement will be brief. There are plenty of young couples at the beginning of their careers who will meet these dilemmas with less room for compromise. Is the military ready to address this new, evolving face of marriage? I doubt it. The institution has proven resistant to change. Service members will move every two to three years for decades to come. But the culture and the world around the military, especially as it pertains to women and familial roles, will continue to transform. Military marriages, it seems, will have to adapt on their own. Hey, MoneyChic! I finished filing my taxes and will be receiving a rather large refund. I was excited about all the things I could buy with my new found money, but then I thought, is that the smartest thing to do with it? What should I do with my refund? MoneyChic Sez: Isnt it nice to find such a large tax refund at the end of the year? It would be nice if it was lost money, but that money you will receive wasnt actually lost. You goofed up, unless the refund was due to service in a tax-free zone. You put that money away into the worlds worst savings plan, according to NAS Jax Navy and Marine Corps Society Director Dave Faraldo. That was likely money you overpaid our government in taxes because of your selected with holdings. The government paid you no interest on that money! What could you have done with it? You could have used that money in each paycheck to pay bills, earn interest in savings, or contribute more to your retirement account. Instead, you arent withholding enough and allowed your money to be used by someone else. Getting back to the point, you have this pile of money and want to know the smart thing to do with it. Heres what I think you should do (in this order!): 1. Get yourself out of debt! Take a closer look at what debt you have. Pay off the debt with the highest interest and lowest balance first. This debt will cost you more money over time because of the higher interest. Ex. Loan A has an interest rate of 10 percent and a balance of $500. Loan B has an interest rate of 6 percent and a balance of $700. Pay off Loan A first! 2. Start a savings or emergency savings plan. You never know when a tire is going to be ripped to shreds and you have to replace two of them (you normally cant replace only one tire, thats uneven). The best way to take a vacation or buy a high priced item is to save for it. 3. Retirement. Contribute to the Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) Lifecycle Fund. Consider putting your retire ment money into the Roth TSP (taxed now). You can always receive a loan for a car, house, school, but you can never take a loan out for retirement. 4. Spend a little on yourself and your family. It is never a bad idea to give a small portion of your refund to yourself, your spouse, or your family for a little treat. Studies have shown that, regardless of income, those with a plan are more successful savers. You may not follow my recommended guidelines completely but dont blow your refund all in one place. Try to use it wisely to make your financial future a little brighter. As always, NMCRS is here to lend a helping hand. If you would like more information on how we can help, call 904-542-2832. Have questions for Money Chic? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@nmcrs.org. The changing dynamics of military marriage

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IC2(SW) Michael Bean, of NAS Jax Ground Electronics Maintenance (GEM), was rec ognized Jan. 31 as CNRSE Air Traffic Control Technician of the Year by Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. I extend my sincere congratulations to petty officer Bean for being selected to represent NRSE for the Vice Admiral William P. Lawrence Naval Air Traffic Control Technician of the Year Award, said Scorby. This award is symbolic of outstanding contributions to operational readiness and flight safety made possible by indi vidual Navy and Marine Corps ATC technicians. Bravo Zulu to this superb Sailor. I wish Bean the very best of luck as he moves forward to the CNICwide competition. As an interior communica tions technician with GEM, Bean performs maintenance, troubleshooting and repairs for air traffic control equipment. Bean is also an assistant coordinator of the NAS Jax GEM maintenance and mate rial management (3-M) team. The 3-M program is all about how Sailors take care of the equipment and systems on their ship or shore station. The program is used to schedule and track the maintenance of various systems across the base, such as radar, Enterprise Land Mobile Radio (ELMR), vessels at the boathouse, air field arresting gear and fire arms in the base security department armory. GEM leading chief petty officer ETC(SS) Steven David said Bean has a questioning atti tude and is always looking for ways to improve maintenance quality while controlling main tenance costs. In addition to his regular duties, Bean supported a run way lighting refurbishment project at Outlying Landing Field Whitehouse in November of 2012, said David. For pilots utilizing Whitehouse for their Field Carrier Landing Practice (FCLP), its vital to have dependable Improved Fresnel Lens Optical Landing System (IFLOLS), which is backed up by the Manually Operated Visual Landing Aid System (MOVLAS). Bean explained, In recent years these multi-million dol lar IFLOLS and MOVLAS units had degraded in life-cycle sustainability and performance due to continuous weather exposure and deterioration. In just eight weeks, our GEM team disassembled, repaired and painted each IFLOLS and MOVLAS unit at a cost that saved the Navy about $386,000 over contractors bids. David added, Beans team did all the research, created formal work and wiring pack ages, established quality assurance procedures, and con structed a detailed parts pro curement process that is now a benchmark for other naval air stations with the same lighting systems. Approaching the end of his eighth year in the Navy, Bean is studying for the E6 exam in March. NAS Jax Assistant Ground Electronics Maintenance Officer Steve Harper and Navy Gateway Inns & Suites (NGIS) Executive Housekeeper Patty Czarnecki have been named the 2012 NAS Jax Senior Civilian and Junior Civilian of the Year. Harper was selected for using his extensive technical expertise and lead ership to successfully steer a team of 32 military and five civilian technicians through a rigorous Naval Air Forces, Atlantic Radar and Navigational Aids and Landing Systems inspection. His efforts and oversight on more than 2,000 preventive and corrective maintenance actions achieved a 99.7 percent operational availability on air traffic control systems and directly supported over 75,000 annual flight hour operations. Harpers expert management and guidance on the refurbishment of two improved Fresnel Lens Optical Landing Systems and two manually operated visual landing aid systems at Outlying Landing Field Whitehouse saved the command more than $386,000. A native of Jacksonville, Fla., Harper has 36 years of government service including a tour in the U.S. Marine Corps and 31 years here at Ground Electronics. I am honored to be recognized by the command. I have to acknowledge the excellent performance of duties by the military and civilians at Ground Electronics which enabled me to receive this award, said Harper, who oversees the operations and mainte nance of air traffic control and ancillary electronic equipment at Air Operations. In his free time, Harper enjoys spending time with his family, playing golf, sailing and performing as a musician. Czarnecki was selected for her effective leadership of 27 housekeepers in the cleaning of 229 guest rooms. Her efforts ensured each housekeeper and laundry worker had the necessary skills, tools and supplied needed to provide guests with outstanding service while staying at NGIS. During an unannounced Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) accreditation inspection for NGIS, the CNIC team inspected 20 percent of guest rooms for cleanli ness and comfort and ensured all rooms were equipped with required items. Ultimately, Czarneckis teams efforts resulted in NGIS receiving a 5-Star Accreditation and the Adm. Zumwalt Award for Excellence, a first for NGIS and NAS Jax. Czarnecki, a native of New Kensington, Pa., retired from the Navy after 21 years in 1997 and has worked as a Non-Appropriated Fund employee for 10 years. As the housekeeping manager, she is responsible for a staff of 34 employees and is a certified trainer for housekeeping and custodians. Once the shock wore off, it was truly a surprise and an honor to receive this award. All the long hours and hard work has paid off, said Czarnecki. When shes not working at NGIS, Czarnecki enjoys running, working in her yard and reading. She is also a certified nursing assistant and has worked in home healthcare. GEM technician selected for regional award NAS Jax Civilians of the Year announced JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 3

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Rear Adm. Greg Horn, Deputy Chief of Chaplains for Reserve Affairs recently visited NAS Jacksonville and talked to members of VP-62, VR-58 and VR-62. The topic of the day was the current budget situation and looming defense cuts. The financial environment from time to time can be challenging but it doesnt change who we are in the Navy or how we treat each other, said Horn. Some people are elected to a job. You were selected at a time when only 10 percent of Americans are serving in uni form. This is an opportunity for us to demonstrate the kind of people we are. Horn talked about Reserve Individual Augmentee (IA) assignments and Reserve sup port of overseas contingency operations. The goal is to put the majority of IA missions that remain validated in the Reserve, because that is what we do. We mobilize for a year and then we return to our Reserve and civilian lives. It makes more sense than pulling someone from an active-duty ship or squadron to fill an IA mission. Were going to accept as many of those missions as we can with our manning and skillsets, he added. Speaking to the more senior members of the crowd and those looking to make a career of the Navy Reserve, Horn said. Retirement may change for new people coming in to the Navy, but yours is not going to change. If youre close to 20 years and working toward retirement, keep going. To the more junior members of the audience, he stressed the importance of being top per formers. Dont be hanging on the low end of the performance curve thinking youre going to stay for 20 years, he said. After his all-hands call, Horn toured squadron spaces and presented an admirals coin to VR-58s SELRES Sailor of the Year AWF1 Antonio Freeman. Just to have the opportunity to speak to someone at his level and get the information that is important at the deckplate is a huge morale boost to the troops, said Command Master Chief Chuck Slaton, VR-58 senior enlisted leader. Switch4Good is a free, innovative energy savings program for residents of NAS Jacksonville. Offered by Balfour Beatty Communities in partnership with WattzOn, Switch4Good provides you with energy savings help during the transition to individual utility billing. The program is funded by a grant from the Department of Energy and is offered on select Navy bases. The program provides free energy saving tips and reminders through personalized statements and digital nudges, including Facebook and Twitter. Additionally, the program provides up to $1,000 in community rewards for reaching participation goals. These rewards go towards a project of the communitys choosing such as a holiday party or playground refur bishment. Our current challenge ends March 31. Sign up for tips and alerts, save energy and help us earn $500 for the NAS Jacksonville community. The program is designed to encour age energy awareness and good energy habits, helping residents save money with minimal effort. In fact, Switch4Good is based on a pilot pro gram where military residents saved an average of 18 percent annually, so sign up today its free. Switch4Good is not a billing service, were here to help you save energy and money. For billing questions, please contact your local Balfour Beatty office or call YES at 647-3210. To sign up: Visit nasjacksonville. switch4good.org, or your Balfour Beatty housing office.Switch4Good helps NAS Jax residents save money, energyDeputy Chief of Chaplains visits NAS Jacksonville squadrons Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 a.m. Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at Chapel Complex Building 749 and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the barracksNAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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Broadarrows and Red Lancers support San Salvador orphanageA VP-62 aircrew arrived at Comalopa, El Salvador at the end of January with several hundred pounds of clothing and toys for a local orphanage. The donations were collected at NAS Jacksonville by members of VP-62 and VP-10 for delivery during a crew turnover mission. The tradition of bringing gifts for the orphanage began several years ago, as crews rotated in and out of the country conducting counter-narcotics operations in the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico. This is something weve been doing for a while, said CWO4 Dan Buechler of VP-10. Its a wonderful gesture on everyones part to help out the kids. Members of VP-10 even organized a Christmas party for the orphanage that included an appearance from Santa Claus. Its nice to be able to build upon the success of previous VP squadrons in El Salvador and give back to our host nation, said AWVCS Jason Reimer, a member of VP-62. Another member said he asked his young children if they wanted to send some toys to children in El Salvador who were orphans. They each picked out a well-loved stuffed animal, kissed them goodbye and said, go be friends with another little boy or girl. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 By continuing to adopt ever-changing technology, Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Document Services at NAS Jacksonville continues to stay in the game through upgrades of state-of-the-art energy efficient equipment and improving the skills of its workforce. As one of 10 regional office groups within the world wide DLA Document Services enterprise, the local office has management responsibility for more than 20 satellite production facilities throughout the southeast region serving customers from South Carolina to the Caribbean. The facility has been located in the same building here since 1949 but obviously much has changed over the years. When I started working here in 1979, we had a facility full of offset printing presses, letter presses and linotype machines which were replaced long ago as our organization migrated to a digital environ ment. We still provide printing services however, the primary mission of our organization is to serve as the catalyst for document automation and to accelerate the transition of our customers to the use of online documents and services, said local DLA Document Services Director Joe Barrett. To stay viable in todays competitive digital world, Document Services employees are skilled webmas ters, graphic designers, multi-media specialists and desktop publishers. We do everything from design to deliver. Our graphic artists create designs for print, multi-media and the web. We have top-of-the-line equipment for specialty output such as large format onto different substrates such as tile, foam board, banners, carpet, etc., said Barrett. Were doing a lot more of these types of job in house where in the past it had to be contracted out. We have a lot more capabilities and its quite interesting how this has all evolved. In addition to the different facets of design and specialty output, Document Services also offers document scanning and conversion and electronic docu ment management to its Department of Defense and other federal agency customers. This entails scanning and converting paper docu ments into a digital format and providing various solutions for indexing, storing and accessing those documents. They currently have several ongoing projects including digitalization of shipping and transportation documents for the DLAs Distribution and aviation communities. Scanning experts also convert training manuals into compact discs or onto web servers while information technology specialists create training videos for basically any type of maintenance procedure aboard ships or on military aircraft to better prepare new artisans in the workforce. Another large project they have been supporting for nearly three years is the ongoing digitization of various real property records for the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast. The scope of this project has also expanded to include the other NAVFAC regional offices. Craig Hollis serves as the DLA Document Services project manager for this NAVFAC-wide project. Weve actually embedded people in NAVFAC spaces to assist with this project. They organize and bring us the real estate documents such as deeds, titles and other property records, which are scanned and uploaded into a document management system for future access, Hollis explained. I think our most unique items were documents signed in 1802 by the Spanish Governor of Florida bartering for land at Fort Barrancas. Weve seen a lot of records with significant historical value. Digital conversion also ensures the preservation of these old and historic documents. Another aspect of Document Services is equipment management solutions. If you have a multifunctional copier, most likely, they manage the contract on that piece of equipment. These types of devices are much more cost effective than having stand-alone copi ers, printers, scanners and fax machines installed in individual office spaces. Our organization currently manages approximately 36,000 of these devices across the globe and we manage about 3,000 of these locally, added Barrett. Defense Logistics Agency Document Services continues to evolve in digital age

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 7 As technology continues to change, Document Services strives to serve its customers with new products and services. Our business is basically founded on three pillars our comprehensive portfolio of inhouse capabilities, the management of customer selfservice office equipment, and the commercial pro curement of various specialty products and services, added Hollis. We also offer a robust electronic commerce solution that enables our customers to con duct business with us on-line from their desktops. Of course, printing capabilities are still used for the production of such products as change of command and retirement programs. With the use of the DLA Document Services e-commerce solution, customers can submit their orders, obtain a quote, and review/ approve a pre-production proof all online. Barrett is also quick to praise his staff many of who have worked at the facility for decades. We have an outstanding team of professionals who strive to create quality and cost-effective products and offer first-class service to our customers, he said. For more information on DLA Document Services, go to www.documentservices.dla.mil or call 5423446. DLA

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ness out by keeping this par ticular carrier in homeport in our global response force, so if something happens elsewhere in the world, we can respond to it, the chairman said. Had we deployed it and consumed that readiness, we could have created a situ ation where downstream we wouldnt have a carrier present in certain parts of the world at all. The Truman strike group was to have deployed to the Persian Gulf an area where the U.S. Navy has maintained two carrier battle groups. One carrier group will remain, and we also have other options to augment our capabilities in the region, Dempsey said. But make no mistake about it, he added, this is the first adjustment of what will be a series of adjustments across the services as we try to pre serve our readiness for as long as possible. Cancelling the deployment does change the equation in the Middle East, Dempsey told reporters. When you have carrierbased aircraft, you have com plete autonomy and control over when you use them, he said. When you use land-based aircraft, you often have to have host-nation permission to use them. So the increased risk is not in the number or type of capabilities its in how responsive they can be with the autonomy that we might desire. Would I prefer to have two carriers in the Gulf, given the tension with Iran? Sure I would, the general continued. But this allows us to meet the requirements in the Gulf and manage the risk and preserve readiness. Concerns about readiness span all services. Dempsey said the department will spend all it takes to ensure the forces deployed or getting ready to deploy will have all they need. Its actually the time after [the next deployment] where it really gets difficult, he said. We dont want to get into the position where we have to extend deployments or deploy someone who is not ready to deploy. Were not anywhere near there, but the nearterm actions we are taking are intended to preserve and stretch readiness as long as possible so we dont face that eventuality. The changes being made now also enable the depart ment to reverse them if sequestration doesnt happen and the Defense Department gets a full appropriation, Panetta noted. Dempsey said the military needs budget certainty, not ing that the budget process has been laced with uncertainty for the past two years. We need time, he said. Given 10 years to spread reductions, we can manage it. When you have to absorb $45 billion [in spending cuts] over six months, thats not enough time which is why you raid the accounts that are most vulnerable: the readiness accounts. The budget process also needs flexibility, Dempsey said. We have to have the abil ity to reach into every part of the budget, he explained, so no one part of the budget is overburdened or else the force gets out of balance. BUDGET CUTS Recognizing the importance of education and its continuing rising costs, Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation is once again offering scholarships for the 2013-14 academic year to high school and undergraduate students of military members residing in family housing. We encourage our family housing residents with high school and under graduate students to apply for Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation scholarships, said Chris Williams, president of BBC Foundation. Its a difficult economy out there and every bit helps. Scholarships are valued up to $2,500 with the possibility of being larger for exceptional submissions. The applica tion details and requirements can be found at www.bbcommunitiesfounda tion.org. The application deadline is April 15. Balfour Beatty Communities, responsible for the privatized family housing at NAS Jacksonville formed Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, a non-profit organization committed to honoring military personnel active, disabled and fallen and their families in 2009. One of the primary goals of the Foundation is to promote the pursuit of education and a commitment to com munity leadership through educational scholarships to the children of active duty military members that reside in family housing. According to Williams, Balfour Beatty Communities is committed to providing a quality living environ ment that supports the diverse inter ests and needs of our military families. Through Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, we say thank you for the work that military members do and the sacrifices their families make. Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation seeks applications for academic scholarship to children of military housing residents 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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It is time for Sailors to lace up their athletic shoes and get moving to prepare for the 2013 Cycle 1 Semi-Annual Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA), Navy Physical Readiness Program officials said Feb. 4. Sailors should be main taining a good health and fit ness routine year round, but with holiday leave periods and gatherings competing for time, cold weather and early sunsets some Sailors may have succumbed to the win ter doldrums, said Lt. Cmdr. Austin Latour, Command Fitness Leader program man ager, Navy Physical Readiness Program. According to the Navys Physical Readiness Information Management System (PRIMS) most com mands conduct their Cycle 1 PFA in May. Body Composition Assessment (BCA) is passed when a member is within Navy BCA standards. These standards are determined by established maximum weight for height standards listed in Guide 4 BCA of the Physical Readiness Program Operating Guide, available at http:// www.public.navy.mil/bupersnpc/support/physical/Pages/ Guides.aspx. Sailors can also contact their command fitness leader (CFL) and ask for a courtesy BCA. Sailors who discover their BCA exceeds Navy standards need to start working out now. Failing the BCA portion of the PFA is an overall PFA fail ure. Decreasing your percent age of body fat can be more difficult than just decreasing weight. In order to reach BCA stan dards, Sailors need to focus on proper nutrition and exercise. Registered dieticians are available to help Sailors improve their nutrition at most Navy installations. The physical readiness test (PRT) portion of the PFA con sists of curl-ups, push-ups and a 1.5 mile run. Some com mands may offer bike, ellip tical, treadmill and swim options based on command ing officers discretion and cri teria in the Physical Readiness Program Instruction, OPNAVINST 6110.1J. According to Latour, Sailors can improve their curl-up scores by conducting a variety of abdominal strengthening exercises and core strength ening exercises to increase abdominal strength and endurance. A good way to test your curlup endurance is to perform a full workout and then test yourself with the Navy curl-up test, said Latour. If you do well after a work out, you will do much better when youre well rested for the PRT. When training for pushups, Sailors need to focus on reaching 90 degrees with their elbows and pushing all the way up. Push-ups should be slow and controlled during training for best results, according to Latour. Slow down during train ing to make your muscles work harder. The benefits will be noticed during the PRT, he said. Sailors can have a friend watch or even take a video recording on a smart phone of the push-up so the mem ber can see what they need to improve in their form. Additional strengthen ing exercises include wide or narrow stance pushups and strengthening the core with exercises like the plank. Sailors should complete strength training exercises two times a week. When it comes to distance running, 1.5 miles is not that far, said Latour. Sailors will use three different energy sys tems to finish the test; long distance, intermediate and sprint. To train for this, Latour rec ommends a training regimen of a twoto three-mile dis tance run, 400 to 800 meter interval fast paced runs and 40 to 50 yard interval sprints. These workouts can be split up throughout the week. Sailors should aim for 150 minutes of cardio a week which can be broken down to 30 minute sessions, five days a week. By incorporating all three of these types of running into your PRT preparation, your 1.5 mile PRT run will be much improved, said Latour. The goal of the Navy Physical Readiness Program is to ensure Sailors maintain a level of physical fitness required to support the Navys overall mission readiness and ensure that all Sailors meet minimum physical fitness standards for continued Naval service. Participation in the semiannual PFA is required for all active duty and drilling Reservists, regardless of gen der, age, rank, title, billet or retirement request status. All service members are required to participate in one PFA per cycle. Cycle I is Jan. 1 through June 30. Cycle 2 is July 1 through Dec. 31. Prepare for Cycle 1 Physical Fitness Assessment JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 9

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NAS Jacksonville recognized 97 top Sailors from the base and tenant commands for the first quarter during the Sailor of the Quarter (SOQ) luncheon at the NAS Jax Officers Club Feb. 7. It is my distinct honor to welcome you to the Team Jax SOQ Appreciation Luncheon. Around the world right now, its extremely hectic with about 317,000 Sailors serving in various capacities around the world. Its truly a privilege to live in America and we continue to defend the freedoms we enjoy, said NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd. Today, we are here to rec ognize the elite our very best SOQs for their contributions to their commands. MU2 Laura Carey of Navy Band Southeast sang the national anthem and NAS Jacksonville Command Chaplain (Lt. Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore delivered the invocation. The events guest speaker was NAS Jax Senior Sailor of the Quarter AC1 Sindy Thomas of NAS Jax Air Operations. Being nominated and selected as Senior Sailor of the Quarter is truly an honor and privi lege. The Navy has been such a learning and rewarding experience, said Thomas. As a native of Costa Rica, this is the land of opportuni ty. Sixteen years ago, I wasnt certain whether I would be here. I attribute my decision to my mentors and the support and leadership that Ive had throughout my career. I cant stress enough the importance of taking care of our Sailors by mentoring them. I would like to thank my men tor, ACC Andre Chester for his guidance and my chain of command for their continual support, Thomas stated. Following lunch, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders thanked the Sailors and their spouses. First, I want to say, con gratulations! You have earned the right to say you are the best at your command and in the Navy, he said. I know it took a lot of hard work to get where youre sitting right now and in some cases a lot of support from your fami lies. I want to thank all the spouses and significant others here and if you have someone at home who supports your Navy career, make sure you thank them as well. Whether youre an E-3 or a first class petty officer, you are a leader in your command. Every Sailor now looks up to you and every chief and officer now expects more from you. You are the future of the United States Navy, he concluded. Sanders then presented each SOQ an award envelope with a $25 gift card from VyStar Credit Union and a special coin from First Command Financial Services. The NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department, USAA and the University of Phoenix picked up the cost of the buf fet luncheon for the SOQs and their family members. The luncheon was coordinated by OS1(SW) Winston Earley. I think its really great to be recognized it shows how hard work pays off. Im really excited that Im being honored today, said VP-62 Blue Jacket of the Quarter ADAN Dulcina Bravo. This is kind of overwhelm ing because its the first time Ive been honored for some thing like this. I hope there are more opportunities like this in the future. Im grateful to my command for putting me in for this award. Its a nice honor to be recognized at this level, added Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Sea Sailor of the Quarter AE2(AW) Michael Sipah.Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal govern ment officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. NAS Jax honors quarters best at luncheon 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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Linda Ayres and Sandy Hancock were named Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Civilians of the Fourth Quarter, respectively, Jan. 31. As a management and program ana lyst in the CNRSE Strategy and Future Requirements Department, Ayres pro vides Gateway 2.0 support to CNRSE headquarters and installations. According to her supervisor, Denise Johnson, Ayres efforts during the past quarter contributed significantly to the accomplishment of CNRSE strategic objectives. Linda is always willing to assist others, she said. She is ready to help anyone with any task, which is often demonstrated by the number of personnel seeking her assistance. This is a key component to her get it done attitude. According to Ayres, it is an extreme honor to be selected, but it was also unexpected. Quite frankly, I was very surprised. I am humbled to be selected and to be part of such a great organization. Our regional employees are always lead ing the charge when it comes to better serving the fleet, family and fighter. We have so many wonderful folks on our team, she said. Ayres also said she feels there are numerous circumstances that led to her selection. I think my selection was twofold. For one, I am not afraid to do what it takes to get my job done, and the continued support from the command makes my job easier, she said. Secondly, at the end of my day, I always think about the folks at the ground level doing the hard jobs this is why I come to work. Were here to support the people at the installations. If I can provide tools or pro cesses that will make their jobs easier and more effective, I am all over it. We should be part of the solution, not the problem. Hancock also works under Johnson as a program analayst, ensuring CNRSE senior leadership remains aware of the readiness status of installations and the region headquarters. Additionally, she provides monthly readiness status briefs to the region commander and chief of staff. Sandy takes pride in her work, Johnson said. Her concern for getting things right the first time, her desire to continue to learn and grow, and the quality of her knowledge and skills are what stand her above the rest. Hancock said it was an honor to be selected and that her success can be attributed to a number of individuals working at installations throughout the region. Considering the number of hard working, dedicated individuals that work for Navy Region Southeast, who could have been selected, I consider it a tremendous honor, she said. The Defense Readiness Reporting SystemNavy allows me to work with a multi tude of individuals across the region. The support and influence of these individuals contributed to my selection. I try to be courteous and professional in my day-to-day assignments while keeping in mind that each task is its own unique part of a larger process a process that supports the our mission: enabling and sustaining warfighter readiness from the shore. Individual selection criteria for the awards was based upon exemplary performance of tasks, contributions that enhanced organization accomplish ment of command objectives, mission, teamwork or public image, and ones professional attitude toward self and others.CNRSE announces senior, junior civilians of the 4th quarter JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 11

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February is Black History MonthJesse LeRoy Brown was born in Hattiesburg, Miss. on Oct. 13, 1926. Educated in the pub lic schools of Hattiesburg, he attend ed Ohio State University College of Engineering, prior to enlisting in the U.S. Naval Reserve on July 8, 1946. Brown reported for active duty the following year at Glenview, Ill. His enlistment was terminated to accept appointment as Midshipman, U.S. Navy, and on Apr. 9, 1947, he reported to the Navy PreFlight School, Ottumwa, Iowa, for flight training. Ensign Brown received further flight training at NAS Pensacola. He was detached June 22, 1948 to NAS Jacksonville, Fla. for duty with Fighter Advanced Training Unit (VF-ATU) 2 flying the Grumman F6F Hellcat. Brown was designated a naval aviator (heavier-than-air) Oct. 21, 1948. Wearing his new wings of gold, Brown reported to Fighter Squadron (VF) 32 on Jan. 4, 1949, where he flew the F4U-4 Corsair and subsequently deployed with his squadron on USS Leyte (CV-32). He took the oath of his commissioning at sea, administered by Capt. W. I. Erdmann, commanding officer of the Leyte, in June 1949. Ensign Brown flew 20 mis sions while assigned to VF-32, with the Leyte having joined the 7th Fleet by then, in the combat operating area off the northeast coast of Korea. For this service, Brown earned the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps Air Medal. The citation reads: For meritorious achieve ment in aerial flight as pilot of a fighter plane in Fighter Squadron 32, attached to the USS Leyte, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from Oct. 12. to Nov. 7, 1950. Completing 10 missions dur ing this period, Ensign Brown participated in close-air support flights and carried out daring bombing and strafing attacks against enemy lines of com munication, transportation facilities, military instillations and troop concentrations at Wonsan, Chongjin, Songjin and Sinanju. Leading his section in the face of hostile antiaircraft fire, he vigorously pressed home his attacks, thereby contribut ing materially to the success of his division in inflicting seri ous losses upon the enemy and in providing effective support for friendly ground forces. His courage, skilled airmanship and unswerving devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Brown was also the first African-American Naval offi cer to loose his life in com bat. On Dec. 4, 1950, while flying with Lt. j.g. Thomas Hudner Jr. in close-air support for Marines fighting near the Chosin Reservoir, Browns plane was hit by enemy gunfire and crashed. Hudner crash-landed his own plane nearby to help the injured pilot. Risking his own life to save Brown, who was trapped in the burning wreck age, Hudner packed snow bare handedly around the fuselage while under continuing enemy attack, but in vain. Ensign Brown was entitled to the Korean Service Medal. He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart Medal and the Distinguished Flying Cross. His citation for the DFC reads: For heroism and extraor dinary achievement in aerial flight as a fighter pilot and section leader in VF-32, attached to the USS Leyte, in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Korean Area from Oct. 12 to Dec. 4, 1950. Participating in 20 air strikes during this period, Ensign Brown led his section in daring attacks on enemy military instillations, lines of communications, transporta tion facilities and troop concen trations at Chosin Reservoir, Ta-ku-shan, Manpojin, Linchiang, Sinuiju, Kesan, Wonsan, Chongjin, Songjin, Kilchu and Sinanju. Flying in support of units of the 1st Marine Division sur rounded by enemy in the vicinity of the Chosin Reservoir, he pressed home numerous attacks on hostile troops moving to attack our forces, continuing his aggressive behavior runs despite heavy opposition until his plane was fatally struck by enemy anti-aircraft fire. His exceptional courage, airman ship and devotion to duty in the face of great danger reflect this highest credit upon Ensign Brown and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. The first U.S. Navy ship to be named in honor of a black Navy officer was named in honor of Brown. USS Jesse L. Brown (DE 1089), a Knox-class ocean escort ship, was launched March 18, 1972 at Avondale Shipyards in Westwego, La. She was designed to operate as an anti-subma rine ship, a screening unit, or as a patrol or convoy ship. Upon commissioning early in 1973, she was homeported at Newport, R.I., as a unit of Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla Two. Ensign Browns widow served as sponsor of the ship, and the principle address was given by Capt. Thomas Hudner Jr. In July 1975, she was reclassified as a frigate and designated FF-1089. Her career was spent with the Atlantic Fleet, and included several deployments to the Mediterranean Sea, the Persian Gulf and northern European waters. Jesse L. Brown was trans ferred to the Naval Reserve in January 1992, and was redesig nated FFT-1089. Jesse L. Brown was decommissioned in July 1994 and transferred to the Egyptian Navy, in which she served as Damietta (F-961). Remembering the Navys first black combat aviator JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 13

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DEWEYS All Hands ClubCall 542-3521 Monday Pizza Madness 2 9 p.m., $5 one-topping pizza Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 7 9 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Friday Free Entertainment at 7 p.m. Feb. 15 Pam Affronti Feb. 22 Ace WinnFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for active duty free bowling Every Thursday (begins Feb. 28) 11 a.m. 1 p.m. New Wednesday hours of operation (begins Feb. 27) Open 4 10 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 4 6 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 12 6 p.m., $1.50 games Bowling Tournament Feb. 16 at 12 p.m. $20 entry fee per person Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 The Gym equipment is temporarily relocated to The Zone, Bldg. 798 now through June 30, 2013. Check-out our new fitness schedule! New classes include Muscle Max, Extreme Bootcamp and Max Core Pick-up the latest copy at the fitness center Outdoor swimming pool opens April 1I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Sleeping Beauty $25 $41 Fiddler On The Roof $33 $49 Daytona 500 Feb. 24 $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50 Gatornationals March 15 17 Friday Reserved from $35 $39 Sat & Sun Reserved from $50 $54 Friday General Seating from $28 $32 Sat & Sun General Seating from $38 $42 Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10 and May 11 2 day ticket $52 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3. Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7. Blockout Dates: March 23 April 5. Call for pricing NBA Orlando Magic $18 $268 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Entertainment Books $30 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline Monster Truck Jam February 23 Preferred seating $41, lower-level seating $22 Live Broadway Series Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Dream Girls May 21 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations MOSH $7 $12 Blue Man Group in Orlando Special until March 31, adult $44, child $29, military $29 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4-day hopper $153.25 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discounted tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Free Burger Night Feb. 19, 5 -10 p.m. Stop by liberty to pick-up your coupon for a free Deweys burger. Free Bowling at NAS Freedom Lanes Feb. 20, 7 -10 p.m. Shoes are not included SNAG Golf Lesson Feb. 21 @ 6 p.m. at NAS Jax Golf Club Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Free admissionNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Feb. 19 for active duty Feb. 21 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 12:30 p.m. every day Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DD and guests. Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center open Mon.Fri., 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you. Movie Under the Stars featuring WreckIt Ralph Feb. 22 6 p.m. at Patriots Grove Free popcorn and $.50 drinksFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School March 18 April 24 $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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Two U.S. Navy Sailors came to the assistance of an injured child while on liberty in the Philippines, Feb. 5. Lt. j.g. Joshua Stokes, assigned to VP-45 and Lt. Chris Davis, assigned to Reconnaissance Force Seventh Fleet Detachment Kadena, were at a wake boarding facil ity near Angeles City, Republic of the Philippines, when they heard loud screams nearby. Both Sailors rushed to the waters edge and found the young child being carried from the water by a struggling fam ily member. The child was suffering severe facial lacerations after being violently struck by a wake boarder. Stokes carried the child ashore and to a nearby build ing while Davis notified the facilitys staff and coordinated their assistance. Both Sailors then administered first aid until a van arrived to transport the child to a local hospital. Stokes and Davis are in the Philippines with Combined Task Unit 72.2, providing P3-C Orion support to the salvage of USS Guardian (MCM 5), which ran aground Jan. 17. The P3-C Orion is a maritime patrol aircraft and is flying from Clark Air Base, near Angeles City. If you are going to have your 17-foot bass boat capsize in a vacant St. Johns River, stranding a 60-some thing and two 70-somethings in the chilly river waters and a small Maltese dog trapped in an air pocket underneath the boat, then having several Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) techs from Naval Station Mayport training nearby is the right way to do it. Thats what happened to boat owner Don Weita, 74, and his fishing buddies, Larry Haller, 67, Mancell Boyd, 75, and Boyds dog, Sassy a couple weeks ago near where the Trout and St. Johns rivers meet. The three men and Sassy ended up in the water after a wave tipped the boat and trapping the dog. They would wait about 30 minutes in the 62-degree water, listening to Sassy bark before members of the Mayports Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 6 noticed things werent right. EODCS Jonah Toy said the group was performing boat ops training when he noticed movement in the water. At first he said he thought it was a wind surfer hed seen earlier in the day, but when he noticed arms waving then he knew that something wasnt right. When they pulled up to the capsized boat, they found the men clinging to it and Boyd not willing to be rescued without his dog. Mancell was adamant, said Toy. He would not leave with out Sassy. You could hear the dog barking, EOD1 Zach Phillips. So Phillips headed into the water and with a little maneu vering was able to grab the dog and bring her to the surface. By this time, the three men were in EODs boat beginning to warm up and tell their story. Phillips said that Boyd would only accept a jacket to wrap little Sassy in. He got a little misty eyed [after Sassy was rescued], Phillips said. His wife had died and he had gotten the dog to replace her. With everyone safe, EOD was able to slowly tow the boat back to Arlington Lions Club Park. The guys were able to right the boat and get it back on Weitas trailer. The men were checked out by local EMTs and given a good bill of health, none the worse for wear for their experience. EOD rescues boaters and little dog, tooSailors aid severely injured child in the Philippines The secretaries of Defense and Veterans Affairs announced their departments will speed implementation of the Integrated Electronic Health Record program allowing service members and veterans better access and, more importantly, better medical care. This approach is affordable, achievable, and if we refocus our efforts we believe we can achieve the key goal of a seamless system for health records between VA and DoD on a greatly accelerated schedule, said Defense Secretary Leon Panetta following a meeting with Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki at VA headquarters. The departments are able to step up the records program because of advances in infor mation technology while working with existing platforms. The original goal was to have the system deployed by 2018. Now the expectation is by the end of next year. The goal is to provide one set of electronic records from entry into the military through veteran status. The program is designed to allow service members or veterans to download information and present it to doctors or other health care providers without delays. Previously, service members had to hand carry paper files from DoD facilities to Veterans Affairs. Once complete, the record program will provide DoD and VA clinicians with the complete medical records of more than 18 million service members, veterans and their beneficiaries. Weve agreed to improve interoperabil ity before the end of this year by standardizing health care data, Shinseki said. The two departments will also accelerate the exchange of realtime data by September. The departments are upgrading the graphical user interface to display the new standardized VA and DoD healthcare date by the end of this year, Shinseki said.DoD, VA to speed integration of health records 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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The aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) refueling complex overhaul (RCOH) will not start due to a lack of funding, Navy officials said Feb. 8. Lincoln was expected to move to Newport News shipyard next week to begin the overhaul. However, as a result of the fiscal constraints resulting from the ongoing continuing resolution (CR), the contract for the refueling complex overhaul (RCOH) has not been issued to Huntington Ingalls Industries, Inc. Lincoln will remain pier side at Naval Station Norfolk until sufficient funding is received to start the execution of the RCOH. In the meantime, the ships Sailors continue to conduct maintenance. In their 50-year life spans, one RCOH is scheduled for the midpoint of an aircraft carriers service life. Lincoln was commissioned 23 years ago on Nov. 11, 1989. The impact of indefinitely postponing CVN 72 RCOH is three-fold: will have to be lengthened because the overhaul wont begin when it was expected; fleet; money/jobs and can delay subsequent scheduled availabilities). Canceling or delaying maintenance creates a significant backlog of deferred maintenance and affects future year schedules and costs, as well as future readiness. The delay in Lincolns RCOH will affect other carrier work. Because of the short time available between sequential dockings, the delay will also result in day-for-day impacts to the defueling of the recently inactivated Enterprise (CVN 65) and the start of USS George Washingtons (CVN 73) RCOH. A yearlong CR impacts funds for fuel, parts, ship and aircraft repairs, base operations, maintenance for buildings, roads and runways, and salaries for government employees and contractors. The fiscal uncertainties created by not having an appropriations bill and the measures the Navy is forced to take as a result, place significant stress on an already strained force and undermine the stability of a fragile industrial base. Lack of funding delays USS Lincoln RCOH JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 17

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 By this summer, DoD and VA will field and begin conducting a pilot program on the common interface for doctors at seven joint rehab centers across the country and well also expand its use at two other sites, Panetta said. All of these facilities will be interoperable by the end of July 2013, so fast time track, but we think we can get it done. These centers will be in San Antonio, Minneapolis, Palo Alto, Calif., Tampa, Fla., Richmond, Va., Anchorage, Alaska, and Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. Rather than building a single, integrated system from scratch, we will focus our immediate efforts on integrating VA and DoD health data as quickly as possible by upgrading our existing systems, Panetta said. HEALTH RECORDS For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil Training aid filmed at FRCSE to improve fleet maintainer skills Video cameras began rolling Jan. 22 at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) as airframe mechanics, engineers and techni cal experts collaborated to docu ment the exacting work required to maintain and repair sophisticated military aircraft. Specialists from FRCSE, Airborne Electronic Attack/EA-6B Program Manager Air (PMA-234), Marine Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron ONE (VMAQ-1), Naval Air Technical Data & Engineering Service Command (NATEC) and Job Performance Associates (JPA) concluded a two-week effort to videotape rigging procedures for the main landing gear of an EA-6B Prowler Feb. 1. The Navy is creating multimedia training aids to provide fleet maintainersSailors and Marines with visual tools to augment textbased instruction, predicted to reduce repair errors and improve mission readiness. Engineer Becky Thacker, the P-8 Poseidon Fleet Support Team (FST) lead, said this integrated technol ogy is the wave of the future. Thacker worked closely with Andy Porter, PMA 234 Air Vehicle, Deputy Assistant Program Manager, Logistics (DAPML), who she said did the heavy lifting for the manpower and support. We brought a team of two Marines from Cherry Point, said Porter. Weve been having issues with (Prowler) nose and main landing gears for quite a while. We are relying on the expertise of the FRCSE artisans. This airplane is 30 years old. The training track is robust, but students cant possi bly cover all aircraft subsystems in a three-week period. Sgt. Jonathan Williams and Cpl. Victor Lopez, both airframe mechanics with VMAQ-1 at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., dem onstrated the maintenance pro cedures as the video cameras rolled. Lopez said the aids will clarify some of the more detailed aspects involved in rigging landing gear and provide a better under standing of specific techniques not covered extensively in the military trade school or technical publica tions. Matt Waters, JPA chief executive officer, said his company has been creating job performance aids for the Navy contracted through the Defense Logistics Agency Document Services since 2004. He said JPA puts visual and audio tools at the fingertips of the maintainer to improve accuracy, save time and reduce cost. This is the first effort at Jax, but weve been doing JPAs at Cherry Point for a long time, said Waters. The Marine Corps is one of the most aggressive agencies. We are collaborating to introduce the same kinds of learning tools for the Navy. We are leveraging so much from FRCSEs expertise. We are capturing knowledge from experts for mentoring segments and turn ing text-based manuals into multimedia tools, step by step, to read, see, hear and do. NATEC field service represen tative, Bob Szarmach who has worked with the Marines as a civilian since 1995 at Cherry Point, said the team laid out step by step rigging procedures for the main landing gear before each session and conducted a dry run before film ing each day. We targeted 19 paragraphs in one work package with one add-on, said Szarmach of the teams efforts to update the technical publications. Steve Faulk, the FRCSE EA-6B FST lead, who arranged for the shoot in Jacksonville, said the location rested on the availability of a Prowler that could be used dur ing filming. We couldnt get a fleet aircraft set aside for two weeks, said Faulk. It was all about avail ability. This aircraft wasnt in work here; prior to being removed from service, it was being used for a landing gear engineering investi gation. Faulk said the Prowler used for this effort will soon be struck from the Fleet. He is locating another so the team can reassemble this summer to film the nose landing gear rigging procedures. On the last day of filming at FRCSE, Winston Scott, a retired Navy captain and former astro naut, met with the team to observe the technical aspects and JPA filming efforts headed by the execu tive producer for the segment, Ken Nakanishi and videotaped by Nick Solorzano. Scott reported to the military depot in 1985 as an aerospace engineering duty officer assigned as the F/A-18 Hornet strike fighter project officer and production test pilot flying F/A-18, F-14 Tomcat and A-7 Corsair aircraft. Today, Scott serves as the senior vice president for external relations and economic development at Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Fla. He hopes to integrate the train ing toolsat the private technical university. The Navys multime dia training aid is scheduled for release to fleet maintainers at the end of 2013. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast recently heard the following cases: vened at NS Mayport, a lieutenant (junior grade) was found guilty of attempted wrongful sexual contact, violating a lawful general regulation by wrongfully engaging in sexual conduct with an E-3, and wrongful sexual con tact. The military judge sentenced the accused to three months confinement, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and a dismissal. vened at NAS Jacksonville, a petty officer first class was found guilty of soliciting to transfer control of a minor with knowledge that the minor would engage in prostitution, traveling for the pur pose of engaging in unlawful sexual conduct with a person believed to be a child after using a cell phone to solicit a person believed to be a custodian or guardian of a child to consent to the participation of the child in sexual conduct, and using a cell phone to solic it to transfer control of a minor with knowledge that, as a consequence of the transfer, the minor would engage in prostitution. The military judge sentenced the accused to 14 years con finement, total forfeiture of all pay and allowances, reduction in rate to E-1, and a dishonorable discharge. vened at NAS Jacksonville, an airman was found guilty of failure to obey a lawful order (three specifications) and assault consummated by a bat tery (three specifications). The mili tary judge sentenced the accused to 18 months confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, and a bad conduct discharge. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast are tried with few exceptions at NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, and NAS Pensacola. Therefore, the location of where a court-martial described above was convened does not necessarily corre late to the command that convened the court-martial. Adjudged sentences may be modified by pre-trial agreement or clemency.

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Being a parent myself, I know how stressful it can be to ensure that your children will be taken care of, be it for an hour or for the length of a deploy ment. We want what is best for them. As parents, we need to understand all legal means available to ensure that our children are cared for in our absence; this will in turn prevent legal complications and our children get ting caught in the crossfire. Some of these legal means include: family care plans, in loco parentis powers of attorney, guardianship, and adoption. Family care plans Single parent service members, dual-military couples with depen dents, or those who have a legal custody arrangement with a non-spouse are required to have a family care plan per OPNAVINST 1740.4D and DODINST 1342.19. A family care plan includes form NAVPERS 1740/6 signed by both the service member(s) and the party, who is to care for the child(ren). Family care plans are not legal documents. The person named to care for the children cannot enroll the children in school, make medi cal decisions, and if a custody dispute arose, in a court of law. This is only an administrative tool the military uses to ensure that service members have all their ducks in a row in order to maintain worldwide assignability. It is a military requirement that can be changed at your election, but it has no legal effect. In loco parentis power of attorney A power of attorney (POA) is a legal document authorizing someone else to do something that previously only you were able to do; however, there is no legal obligation for any third party (school, hospital, etc.) to accept it if a third party does accept it, the docu ment assures them that they will not be sued. An in loco parentis POA can be used to authorize someone else to make decisions for the benefit of your chil dren. These POAs expire after a specified period of time. They are practical because they are fairly easy and quick to create. Most legal offices can draft one up on a walk-in basis. If you need someone to be able to make decisions for the benefit of your children for you for a short period of time, an in loco parentis POA may be the way to go. These types of POAs cannot be used to enroll a child in DEERS Also, some schools may not accept it; for this reason, it would be wise to first determine whether the school has its own forms/ POA they would like you to fill out. ; Guardianship If you need someone to take care of your child for about a year or more, you should seriously consider guardianship. A guardian is a courtappointed individual, who accepts responsibility for the care of a child. Obtaining a guardian does not cut off the biological parents rights. A guardianship requires court intervention which means that a petition needs to be filed at family court. Some jurisdictions allow pro se (without an attor ney) filings, but it is always encour aged to hire one in order to ensure the guardianship is done correctly. After the petition is filed, a court investigator may interview the peti tioner, the child, and the biological parents to make a recommendation. After giving an opportunity for all parties to speak, and considering the best interests of the child, the court will grant or deny the request. Normally, all parties are consenting, but guard ianship can also be awarded in cases of abandonment or neglect. While the biological parents are still legally responsible for financially support ing their children, often the guard ian shoulders this responsibility. The guardian can expect court oversight until the guardianship expires, when the child turns 18, or when the judge says its no longer necessary. Third parties are more likely to accept proof of guardianship over an in loco parentis POA. Adoption Adoption requires termination of the biological parents rights. This is also court ordered, so it requires some time and money. Unlike a guardian ship, it lasts forever. The child is treated as if they were biological. All parental rights or responsibilities are transferred to the adopting parent. Again, if you are thinking of adoption, you should utilize an attorney to ensure everything goes correctly. As parents, we need to be educated on these issues so that we can make the best decisions for our children. Please come and see a legal assistance attorney to further flush out these options and what they may mean to you and your family. You can find us at www.jag.navy.mil under the tab Legal Services at Legal Assistance. Please visit us at http://www.jag. navy.mil/legal_services/rlso/rlso_ southeast.htm for more information or to find out the location of the nearest legal assistance office.Caring for kidsFrom family care plans to adoptions JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013 19

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Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation (WOASF) is accepting prequalification forms for its scholarships. Pre-qualification deadline is March 1 and full application deadline is April 1. WOASF, a 501(c) 3 non-profit foun dation, annually sponsors more than 40 scholarships ranging from $2,000 to $10,000 for students who have chosen to continue their education. Scholarship recipients are selected on the basis of scholastic merit, community service and extracurricular activities. Our mission is to provide college scholarships to dependent children and spouses of US Navy personnel with service in naval aviation com mands; Officer and Enlisted, active duty, retired, honorably discharged or deceased. The Foundation has awarded more than $530,000 to outstanding students since 1987. The foundation is funded solely through the generous contributions of private and corporate sources. For more info on eligibility and application process, go to www.wingsovera merica.us or call 757-671-3200, x 2. WOASF scholarships app due March 1 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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