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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 02-07-2013
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02028

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2013 CNO ON BUDGET SAR QUALS RETI R EES ASK Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com VP-16 unveils new P-8A tail flashOn Jan. 30, VP-16 ceremo niously commemorated the completion of their transition from the P-3C Orion and to make history as the first opera tional squadron to fly the P-8A Poseidon. The last time the maritime patrol community held a simi lar ceremony was in 1962, when the Tigers of VP-8 accepted the first P-3A Orion. Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group (CPRG) Rear Adm. Sean Buck was pres ent to offer the War Eagles his congratulations and his vision for the future of the communi ty in times much different than those 50 years ago. Also in attendance were Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11) Capt. Eric Wiese, VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens, Officer in Charge, Fleet Integration Team Cmdr. Andrew Miller, as well as Boeing Site Activation Lead Max Norgart and other repre sentatives from Boeing. Parked just outside NAS Jax Hangar 511 during the ceremo ny was VP-16s very own P-8A, side number 429, just recent ly painted with the new War Eagles tail flash and sporting the squadron designator LF. After presenting special commemorative coins to all hands via representatives of each of the 12 transition com bat aircrews and the lead petty officer of each of the mainte nance shops, Buck spoke to squadron personnel. He con gratulated them on a success ful final deployment in the P-3C, the completion of the rig orous transition syllabus, and for their outstanding perfor mance during their recent safe for flight inspection. Buck also thanked VP-30 for their steadfast work in train ing the War Eagles over the last six months. After recalling the eight-year history of the devel opment of the Poseidon, Buck explained that it was not yet complete. Were still writing the play book. Its really just the begin ning, commented Buck. The ceremony concluded with Buck presenting the key to Aircraft 429 to VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Molly Boron. VP-16 passed a major hurdle Jan.25 with the com pletion of their safe for flight inspection performed by repre sentatives from CPRG and CPRW11. The inspection focused on the maintenance Honoring P-2V Neptune LA-9Members of VP-5 took time to honor their maritime patrol and reconnaissance legacy Jan. 17 by washing the P-2V Neptune on display in NAS Jacksonvilles Heritage Park. Through teamwork and initiative, the Mad Foxes of VP-5 were able to return the luster to this historic aircraft. This particular P-2V was assigned to VP-5 at NAS Jacksonville during the 1960s and was placed in the park on Aug. 18, 1993. It is dedicated to the crew of VP-5 aircraft LA 9. It was a P-2V Neptune whose crew disappeared during a routine mission out of Keflavik, Iceland on Jan. 12, 1962. The search went on for a week before calling it off Jan. 19. LA-9 and its crew had van ished and were declared lost at sea. The Neptunes wreckage was eventually discovered Aug. 6, 1966 on Greenlands remote Kronborg gla CNRSE Sailors, civilians help build homes in local communitySailors and civilians from Commander Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) participated in a Habitat for Humanity (H4H) construction project Jan. 30. During the project, volunteers helped put the finishing touch es on four northside Jacksonville homes that will soon accomodate low-income families. According to Angie Leatherbury, operations director with H4H Jacksonville, the volunteer effort helped strengthen an already firm rela tionship between the Navy and the local community. The Navy has contributed hundreds of hours of time to HabiJax (Habitat for Humanity Jacksonville), both on the con struction site and at our restore facility, she said. For those who volunteered their time today, I would just like to say thank you for your time and commitment to HabiJax and we hope that your volunteer experi ence was very rewarding. We can not thank our volunteers enough for their contributions. H4Hs mission is to build afford able housing for low-income families and individuals. Those who receive homes from the pro gram work alongside volunteers under trained supervision to build their home. Upon comple tion, H4H grants them a no-inter est mortgage for the value of the home, making monthly payments affordable for those who can not afford a traditional mortgage payment. The organization built more than1,800 homes last year in Jacksonville alone. This is an organization that does a lot of good for the local community, and today was another opportunity for the CNRSE team to contribute to their efforts, said Twilla Smith, Navy Region Southeast community ser vice program coordinator. These kind of events give our Sailors and civilians an opportu nity to grow personally and have a positive impact on the local com munity at the same time. H4H volunteer opportunities consist of various tasks, depend ing on what stage of construction the house is in. In this case, the War Eagles complete safe for flight

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Feb. 7 1800 USS Essex becomes first U.S. Navy vessel to cross the Equator. 1815 The Board of Naval Commissioners, a group of senior offi cers, is established to oversee the oper ation and maintenance of the Navy, under the direction of the Secretary of the Navy. 1955 Seventh Fleet ships begin evac uation of Chinese nationalists from Tachen Islands. 1965 In response to a Viet Cong attack on barracks area at Pleiku, South Vietnam, aircraft from carriers, USS Coral Sea (CV 42), USS Hancock (CV 19) and USS Ranger (CV 61) attack North Vietnamese area near Donghoi. Feb. 8 1862 Joint amphibious force cap tures Roanoke Island, N.C. key to Albemarle Sound. 1890 USS Omaha sailors and marines assist Hodogary, Japan in sub duing large fire Feb. 9 1799 USS Constellation (under Capt. Truxtun) captures French lInsurgente. 1943 Organized Japanese resistance on Guadalcanal ends. Feb. 10 1862 Union gunboats destroy Confederate ships at Elizabeth City, N.C. 1900 Appointment of first naval gov ernor of Guam, Commodore Seaton Schroder. 1960 USS Sargo (SSN-583) surfaces at North Pole. Feb. 11 1862 SECNAV directs formation of organization to evaluate new inventions and technical development that eventu ally led to National Academy of Science. 1971 U.S. and USSR sign a treaty prohibiting the deployment of nuclear weapons on the ocean floor. Feb. 12 1945 USS Batfish (SS-310) sinks sec ond Japanese submarine within three days. 1947 First launching of guided mis sile (Loon) from a submarine, USS Cusk (SS-348). Feb. 13 1854 Admiral Perry anchors off Yokosuka, Japan to receive Emperors reply to treaty proposal. 1913 Naval Radio Station at Arlington, Va. begins operations. 1945 First naval units enter Manila Bay since 1942. 1968 Operation Coronado XI begins in Mekong Delta. According to a recent Associate Press article published in their Oddities department, a teacher in Ohio has sued her school district for discrimination. Maria Waltherr-Willard of Mariemont, Ohio, is not a minority. Her picture shows a middle-aged woman with short hair, glasses, red lipstick and three strands of pearls over a pink turtleneck sweater. In other words, she looks like 90-percent of the schoolteachers from my childhood. So what has Waltherr-Willard been discriminated against for? Well, shes afraid of children. Duh. What? You think someone who is pedophobic (the med ical term) doesnt belong in a classroom? Geez, I bet you think nurses shouldnt be afraid of blood either. The AP reported that Waltherr-Willard said that when she was transferred to the districts middle school in 2009, the seventhand eighth-graders triggered her phobia, causing her blood pressure to soar and forcing her to retire in the middle of the 2010-11 school year. And all this time, I thought high blood pressure and anxiety was part of the job description for middle school teachers! But the lawsuit states that, The mental anguish suffered by (Waltherr-Willard) is serious and of a nature that no reasonable person could be expected to endure the same. Oh. Okay then. Now, Im no stranger to phobias. I know firsthand that one persons anxiety is another persons punchline. When I was in labor with my oldest son, I walked up eight flights of stairs because I was afraid of getting stuck in the eleva tor. Ive flown once in 15 years. But I am not afraid of children. Or am I? After I read the story about Waltherr-Willard, I took inventory of my feelings around my own young children: Ford, 12, is a pre-teen. Shudder! Owen, 10, wont eat vegetables. Panic! And Lindell, 6, likes to moon people. Terror! Maybe Im pedophobic after all. I mean, I do have high blood pressure, and the fact that my children want din ner every single night does cause me mental anguish. Helping a 6-year-old put on his gloves and snow boots in the morning is more stressful than any reasonable person might expect to endure. And, well, have you ever watched a kid learn to ride a bike without training wheels? But wait. Lets not panic. Dustin always tells me not to jump to conclusions. Its important to look at the facts, to assess symptoms. So, do my children scare me? Have they caused my high blood pressure and mental anguish? Do I have pedopho bia? I made a list to sort it out. I feel afraid.... When my children pour their own syrup. When Lindell yells from the bathroom, What happens to Legos that go down the toilet? When anyone younger than 30 says uh oh. When I overhear my kids say, Maybe Mom wont notice, or Lets not tell Mom. When I look between the sofa cushions. When my kids try to cook or clean to be helpful on my birthday. When neighbors see the tennis balls, popped balloons, and rubber chicken stuck in the tree in our backyard. When I hear shattered glass and someone yells, It wasnt me. When my boys use passive sentences (The window was broken. The milk spilled.) When anyone gives my children sharp objects or sci ence kits that include experiments. When Santa brings a 300-piece Lego set to a 5-year-old. When Santa brings drum sets. When our lodging includes bunk beds. When the living room suddenly gets quiet. When even the dog doesnt want to follow the boys. When a teacher tells me my son is full of personality or has a lively disposition. When the boys and their friends run inside the house looking for jugs of water, duct tape, or a really long stick. When my 6-year-old asks anyone, Do you want to see something funny? When my preteen wants an e-mail account. Yeah, come to think of it, Im anxious quite a bit. Being around children is similar to having your heart, guts and nerves exist on the outside of your body. I just mopped the floors and careful, that might be dangerous means nothing to them. So, you know, this whole pedophobia thing seems kind of fishy. According to the lawyer representing the teacher in Ohio, it is a real disease. And maybe it is. But to me, its sounding a lot like plain old parenthood. Hey, MoneyChic! I was in San Diego a few months ago and stopped by the Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) for a Quick Assist Loan (QAL). The last time I received a QAL it was $300, but there it was $500. Did something change? MoneyChic Sez: You were one of the lucky ones! Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society was interested to see if an increase in the QAL amount would better serve our clients. The west coast was used as a pilot area for the study. As of Feb. 1, the $500 QAL launched at every office. What does that mean to service mem bers? If you qualify, you may take out a QAL for up to $500. The qualifications to receive a QAL have not changed even though the amount of the loan has. You would qualify if: you have no outstanding balance with NMCRS; you have not had a loan converted to a grant in the last six months; you have not already received two QALs in a 12-month time period; you have not had a deficit budget in the last four months; disciplinary action is not pend ing against you; and there are at least four months left on your military contract. The required paperwork and items nec essary to bring to the office for a QAL have also not changed. In order to receive a QAL in a timely manner, you must bring your: ings statement (we prefer it to be printed out, but will accept it being brought up on your smart phone) the office or it may also be printed online from our website, www.nmcrs.org) Just a reminder, it is NMCRSs policy to have a service member complete a finan cial fitness plan on the third QAL visit and a full budget with a caseworker on the sixth QAL visit. The financial fitness plan and full bud get review can help determine if a service member is aware of their financial situa tion or if more effort needs to be put forth when using their money. As always, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is here to lend a helping hand. For more information, stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or call 5422832. Have questions for Hey, MoneyChic ? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@ nmcrs.org I might be afraid of my children, too Survey for base shuttle serviceThe Jacksonville Transportation Authority is con ducting a survey at NAS Jacksonville Feb. 8 to deter mine is a shuttle service is needed aboard the station to transport personnel to various facilities. Representatives will be available at Naval Hospital Jacksonville from 8-10 a.m.; Base Commissary from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and the Enlisted Barracks from 1:30-4 p.m. to conduct surveys. Another survey will be conducted Feb. 13 from 7:3010 a.m. at Hangar 1122, the Flight Line Cafe from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and Hangar 1000 from 1-4 p.m. Personnel can also complete the survey by going to www.surveymonkey.com/s/veterans-and-militaryfamilies-transportation-options For more information, e-mail talks@jtafla.com or call 630-3100.

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Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert addressed the impact of Department of Defense budget cuts and the Pentagons Pacific Pivot shift in operational focus during a visit to San Diego Jan. 31. His visit to the San Diego area commenced with a mass reenlist ment and all-hands call at Naval Base Coronado. Greenert then trav elled to the San Diego Convention Center to speak at the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA)/ U.S. Naval Institute (USNI) West 2013 confer ence. Greenert acknowl edged the brunt of the budget cuts would affect the Navys operation and maintenance activi ties, but emphasized the importance of keeping the Sailors and equip ment safe. We have seven months left in the year, and we have to go to where the money is. In San Diego, theres about $220 mil lion worth of private shipyard work in jeopar dy right now. We would have ships that perhaps wont get the mainte nance they need, and Id like to make that up as soon as possible, he said. But safety will be fund ed. The safety of people, equipment and deployed operations will be our top priority. We cannot risk safety. We wont do that. The cuts include elimi nating private-sector sur face ship maintenance availability and aircraft depot maintenance from April-September 2013, freezing civilian hiring and curtailing non-mis sion-essential travel and training. In the event seques tration is triggered in March, the Navy will have to cut an additional $4 billion for fiscal year 2013. These cuts could include stopping deploy ments to the Caribbean and South America; reducing the number of deployed ships and air craft, days at sea and fly ing hours; and limiting European deployments to those supporting ballistic missile defense missions. Greenert proceeded to join Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James Amos and Commandant of the Coast Guard Adm. Robert Papp Jr. in a round table discussion panel addressing the conven tions theme, Pivot to the Pacific: What are the Practical and Global Implications? President Barack Obamas November 2011 speech to the Australian parliament emphasized the Asia-Pacific regions value to the national defense strategy. As we end todays wars, I have directed my national security team to make our presence and mission in the AsiaPacific a top priority. As a result, reductions in U.S. defense spending will not I repeat, will not come at the expense of the Asia-Pacific, Obama said in the speech. Greenert discussed the role of the Navy in the defense strategy, noting the intrinsic value the Navy provides in achiev ing the missions through decades of experience. I think the defense strategy is solid and Im very comfortable with how we are aligned to support the strategy. I call it a rebalance. A pivot is a left face where you turn on your heels, but the Navy has been in Asia for about 10 years, he said. Weve had 40 to 50 ships out there for over 10 years and we will increase those numbers from 50 today to 60 by the end of the decade. Greenert noted the Navys budget measured the capabilities the Navy is buying and develop ing to the Asia-Pacific region. He also empha sized the importance of strengthening ties with Singapore, Japan, Korea and Australia. Its nourishing or renourishing relationships we already have, and developing new ones in and around there, and taking it to the next level to operate together bet ter and posture ourselves to deal with issues of the future, he said. The AFCEA/USNI West 2013 conference is the 22nd iteration of the event, and attracted more than 10,000 attendees over the course of three days. Mad Foxes meet Bartram Springs pen palsAfter a six month deployment to Japan the VP-5 Mad Foxes finally met their deployment pen pals at Bartram Springs Elementary school of Jacksonville on Jan. 11. VP-5 recently returned from a successful six-month Seventh Fleet deployment to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. While deployed, the Sailors adopted classrooms and wrote to the students about life away from home. The students, in return, showed their support by writing letters with many questions and encouragement from their respective classrooms. Each classroom was eager to finally meet their long awaited pen pals and learn even more about their experiences and the Mad Foxes. When the Sailors arrived they visited individual classrooms and answered any questions they had about aviation, CNO addresses budget concerns, discusses Pacific Pivot at San Diego JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 Aviation rescue swimmers with HSM-40 took a plunge into the St. Johns River on Jan. 29, executing search and res cue (SAR) training with one their squadrons MH-60R Seahawks, while being sup ported by a 40-foot SAR boat provided by the NAS Jacksonville Boathouse. The exercise is designed to keep the HSM squadrons res cue swimmers proficient in emergency water rescue situ ations, where good decision making skills can mean the difference between life and death. Six members of HSM-40 par ticipated in the SAR training, being paired together in res cued/rescuer roles and sub sequently jumping into the St. Johns River from the MH-60R Seahawk while it maintained a hover of 15 feet. Fifteen feet is the maxi mum altitude that these swim mers can safely execute a free fall into the water, comment ed EM1 Jason Nazelrod of the NAS Jax Boathouse. You have to remember that the downwash from the pro peller can increase the hazard of such a drop. Once both rescue swimmers were in the water, one would simulate being injured and in distress while the other would put their training to use and execute a rescue. The helicopter would lower a harness to the rescue swim mer, who would then attach it to the victim. After making sure the vic tim was secured and attach ing him/herself to the lowered cable, the MH-60R Seahawk would hoist both swimmers up to the aircrew compartment, completing the exercise. A reposition of both the SAR boat and the helo would fol low, in which the rescue swim mers would reverse their roles and repeat the training. According to Nazelrod, this type of training is essential for all the HSM squadrons and something that the NAS Jax Boathouse is always ready to assist with. We conduct SAR training all the time with the squad rons. They simply contact us and give us the details, and we will do whatever they need us to do. Weve had multiple squadrons execute this train ing before with up to 24 avia tion rescue swimmers on one of our SAR boats, remarked Nazelrod. In addition to SAR train ing with HSM squadrons, the Boathouse also works with students from the NAS Jax Rescue Swimmer School and multiple reserve squadrons. It also maintains control over hazardous spill respons es, and is considered the pri mary responder in the area. Nazelrod highly praised the 14 military members of the Boathouse. All the staff who work here are fantastic at the drills we conduct and the training we support, in addition to main taining the five boats we are responsible for. Todays SAR training with HSM-40 is some thing we are proud to sup port. NAS JA X BO A THOU S E S UPPORT S H SM-40 S E A RCH AN D RE S CUE TR A I N I N G

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 5 PHOTO S B Y LT. J.G. KEVI N WE N DT

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IT1(SW) Paul Voigt and YN2 Anthony Mitchell were named Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Sailor of the First Quarter, respec tively, Jan. 24. As the Regional Operations Center (ROC) lead information systems techni cian, Voigt supervises the training and develop ment of five Sailors and ensures the transmis sion and receipt of message traffic for CNRSE. Throughout the past quarter, he helped implement the Navy Interface for Command E-mail system and supervised the training of nearly 30 active duty and reserve Sailors on the new system, resulting in 100-percent effi ciency of transmitted messages from the ROC. Petty Officer Voigt is truly a model Sailor, said QMC(SW) Steven Davis, Voigts supervisor. He has great work ethic and outstand ing professional knowledge, which makes him a go-to guy when you need some one to brief high visibility items. His per formance has certainly warranted his selection as CNRSE Senior Sailor of the Quarter. In addition to his primary duties, Voigt also holds a number of key command col lateral duties and is an active volunteer. As a physical fitness assessment coordi nator, he leads fitness sessions for more than 40 Sailors. He also serves on the CNRSE Morale, Welfare and Recreation committee and helped to raise $8,000 for command events during the quarter. It feels great to be recognized by my chain of command for all the hard work that Ive put in, and its definitely an honor to have been selected as CNRSE Senior Sailor of the Quarter, he said. According to Voigt, he could never have accomplished so much without the help of his co-workers and chain of command. I definitely owe a a lot of gratitude to them because theyve had a great impact on my ability to perform my job at a high level, Voigt said. I work with people that have given me great support and have helped guide me from the first day I have checked on board. Mitchell serves as the executive assis tant to the regional command master chief (CMC), providing logistical support to the CMC during his travels. He also processes all periodic and transfer evalu ation and fitness reports and coordinates executive-level correspondence. According to YN1(SW) John Felizpolanco, CNRSE administra tive department leading petty officer, Mitchells contributions have been cru cial to the departments success. Hes an invaluable asset to our depart ment, Felizpolanco said. Hes an absolute expert when it comes to customer service and taking care of the Sailors at this command. Hes also truly one of the most dependable Sailors Ive ever had work for me. I can task him with literally anything and I know I can count on him to get the job done right and on time. Mitchell said he felt honored to receive such and award, but it was ultimately the result of a team effort. Its always an honor to be selected for something like this because its a remind er that hard work does pay off, he said. I also realize, though, that this wouldnt be possible without the encour agement and support I get from every member of the department. My success relies heavily on those around me and I really dont think I could have accom plished this without them. The selection is Mitchells second throughout the past year, a rare accom plishment at CNRSE. According to Mitchell, the key to his sustained success has been focus. You just have to come in and do your best every day, he said. The minute you lose focus and get relaxed, thats when you can start to make mistakes. Individual selection criteria for the awards was based upon exemplary per formance of tasks, contributions that enhanced organization accomplishment of command objectives, mission, team work or public image, and ones profes sional attitude toward self and others. CNRSE announces Senior, Junior Sailor of the First Quarter 2013 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 7

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volunteers had the opportunity to help finish four houses in one day. Throughout the day, they helped prepare and lay down 36 pallets of sod. I definitely enjoyed the opportunity to come out here and support the community, said QM2 Joshua Olds, a volunteer. You have to realize there are some people out there who are less fortunate than others. If we are not will ing to help them out, who will? According to Leatherbury, the participants should take a lot of pride in their efforts. She said volunteers dont always have the opportunity to meet the future owners of the houses they help build, but she can attest to the appreciation those owners have for the program and its volunteers. Given that our home buyers are required to com plete a minimum of 300 volunteer hours, or sweat equity, before they can purchase their home through HabiJax, they understand and greatly appreciate the commitment and time that community volunteers like Navy Sailors contribute. In this case, the volunteers did not meet the future owners of any of the four houses, but that did not affect their sense of satisfaction from volunteering, according to Olds. It definitely feels good, he said. Its kind of rejuve nating and it certainly makes you feel like you made something of your day to know that youre able to make a difference. HABITAT VP-5cier. All of the remains were laid to rest in a 2004 ceremony attended by former Mad Foxes who had served with the crew of LA-9. VP-5 is now beginning its transition from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A Poseidon. It was great to bring so many Mad Foxes come together before we separate into different transi tion curriculum, commented Lt. j.g. Wes Kang. Reflecting on our P-2V provided great perspective as we prepare to open a new chapter in our history with P-8A Poseidon. The P-2V Neptune served between 1945 and 1984 before being replaced by the P-3 Orion. The P-2V is directly responsible for VP-5 obtain ing the moniker of Mad Foxes that they use to this day. Before the P-2V, VP-5 was nicknamed the Blind Foxes, but due to the Neptunes new mag netic anomaly detector (MAD), they were renamed the Mad Foxes. PEN PALSthe United States Navy, or military life in gener al. Students received an additional surprise when many classrooms were visited by VP-5s very own Mad Fox mascot. This was a great opportunity to meet all the students who worked hard to write us letters over deployment, commented Ensign Sally Ranzau. Every student showed a tremendous amount of support for our Sailors. VP-5 adopted Bartram Springs Elementary in October 2011 and has been visiting the school weekly since. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013

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department, but encompassed a look into the operations of the entire squad ron. During the three-day event, all administrative aspects of 41 programs were inspected. The programs ranged from tool control and manpower man agement to maintenance training and plane captain qualification. Programs were scored as being ontrack, needing more attention (NMA), or off-track. The score given was based on the overall safety, efficiency and effectiveness of each program. Thirty-five of the programs were graded as on-track, and the other six received an NMA, largely due to the infancy of those areas. There were no programs deter mined to be off-track. One basis for grading programs is a practical, in which a squadron member must demonstrate a particular process of a program. Fifty-nine practical exercises were performed over the three days with overall outstanding results. In addition, eight different emergency drills were run, including several aircraft mishap drills, a man down first aid drill, and a hazardous material exposure drill. VP-16 successfully and promptly ful filled all of their duties in response to these situations. After reviewing the results of the safe for flight inspection, Buck told the War Eagles, Congratulations for your hard work and dedication. I am confident that you will continue to display the same level of pride and professionalism, and will execute safe operations while maintaining your new aircraft. This historic occasion only happens once in a half century. VP-16 has a solid plan for the P-8A introduction and is ready to execute. Again, congratulations on a job well done. After a ceremonial cake cutting to close the event, Buck took a quick opportunity to honor standout aviators and maintenance professionals who excelled during the transition. While to most it was never understood to be a competition, a few select individu als went above and beyond to really embrace the transition training. Now that VP-16 is in possession of two P-8A aircraft and is qualified to main tain, launch and recover them, they are forging full-speed ahead. Over the next 10 months, the War Eagles will send all 12 combat air crews through an Advanced Readiness Program led by the instructors of CPRW-11. The fleet can expect to see a lot more of the Navys newest plane while VP-16 personnel train and maintain readiness supporting a wide range of exercises continuing to further develop the tacti cal employment of the aircraft. The ultimate goal for the War Eagles is to take six Poseidon aircraft on the first operational P-8A deployment to 7th Fleet at the end of this year. Accomplishing that feat will not be an easy task, but as the War Eagles have demonstrated in the past six months, there is no task too great. Boron had this to say to the War Eagles about their performance during this historic transition, You have every right to be proud of our accomplish ment. Thank you for the extra time put into your job, your attention to detail and shining motivation throughout this process. Keep the pack on! Our next challenges lie ahead as we kick off the inter-deployment readiness cycle. VP-16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 9

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Members of VP-5 continued to exhib it their dedication to their community by assisting with vision tests at Bartram Springs Elementary School Jan. 30. Several Mad Foxes helped screen stu dents with a short vision test to alert parents of children who may need new eyeglass prescriptions. Throughout the day the VP-5 volun teers screened students from 15 class rooms. The tests were conducted in the Bartram Springs Library with students determining the direction letters were facing on an eye chart from afar with each eye. Depending on the standards for the students age VP-5 members recorded the results and referred them to an optometrist if needed. Good vision is such an essential part of a childs education and life in gen eral, commented IT1 Cedrick Green. This is a great service the school is providing parents and I am more than excited to be helping. VP-5 adopted Bartram Springs Elementary in October 2011 and has been visiting the school weekly since. Members and special guests of the Navy Jax Yacht Club came together at the NAS Jax Officers Club Feb. 2 for the 2013 Change of Command as outgoing officers were recognized for their out standing job for the past year and the new officers were inducted. The new Navy Jax Yacht Club offi cers are Commodore Robert Quick, Vice Commodore Bob Sharkey, Rear Commodore of Power Dave Bailey, Rear Commodore of Sail Lynn Quick, Secretary Jeanne Bailey and Treasurer Frank Houghton. The Navy Jax Yacht Club has gone through a transition this past year. Due to the land lease expiring, the club, which was founded in 1956 at Mulberry Cove Marina, has moved to the NAS Jax Officers Club. The Navy Jax Yacht Club meets the first Wednesday of every month at the club and everyone is invited. Navy Jax Yacht Club members partic ipate in the intramural racing program and help with the sailing program. Members also provide powerboat training for the safe operation of all sizes of boats. Several events are held throughout the year, starting with a Mardi Gras Raft Up on the St. Johns River Feb. 23. For more information on upcoming events, call 703-7411 or 778-0805. For more information about sailing classes, contact the Mulberry Cove Marina at 542-3260. Mad Foxes conduct eye screeningsNavy Jax Yacht Club holds change of command JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 11

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Each of the 57,000 patients with a primary care manager (PCM) at NH Jacksonvilleits hospital and five branch health clinics in Albany, Jacksonville, Key West, Kings Bay and Mayport belongs to a primary care team as part of Medical Home Port. Medical Home Port is Navy Medicines approach to the nationwide medical home model of care. Medical Home Port places our patients in the center of a collaborative team of caregiversfrom doc tors to nurses to case manag ersled by their primary care manager, said NH Jacksonville Director for Medical Services Cmdr. Troy Borema. Our patients and their Medical Home Port teams work togeth er for a coordinated, wholeperson approach to health. This comprehensive approach is designed to meet the full range of patients health and wellness needs. Medical Home Port increases continu ity of care and the use of pre ventive services, which can lead to better outcomes for people with chronic condi tions. It also reduces emergen cy room visits and hospitaliza tions because the care teams provide urgent caresome thing that boosts both patient and staff satisfaction My Medical Home Port team keeps me current on my appointments, immuniza tions and blood checks that I need regularly, said Patricia Wampler, a family medicine red team patient. Medical Home Port also offers a new way for patients and their care teams to con nectvia Medical Home Port Online secure e-mail. Patients can email their care team directly for nonurgent issues, like requesting an appointment, lab results or medication refills. And patients can still call Central Appointments and After Hours Nurse Advice Line at (800) 5294677. To register and log onto Medical Home Port Online, patients can visit the com mands website at www.med. navy.mil/sites/navalhospital jax NH Jacksonvilles Medical Home Port is seeking health care industry recognition from the National Committee for Quality Assurance, the gold standard in the patient-cen tered medical home model. The application process includes a site visit to evaluate continuous adherence to mul tiple standards. "Patientand family-cen tered care has always been at the core of Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles delivery of health care whether at our hospital or one of our branch health clinics," said Borema. "Medical Home Port enhanc es this, offering increased coordination and access to the highest quality care for our patients." NH Jacksonvilles priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. To find out more, visit the command website at www. med.navy.mil/sites/naval hospitaljax, like the Facebook page at www.facebook/naval hospitaljacksonville, follow on Twitter at www.twitter.com/ NHJax and view the YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/ user/navalhospitaljax. Sign up for email updates at nhjaxconnect@med.navy.mil. Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville and five branch health clinics in Florida (Jacksonville, Key West and Mayport) and Georgia (Albany and Kings Bay)takes pride in the time and care provided to its patients. And while some appointment cancellations are inevitable, when a patient doesnt show up, it prevents another patient with an urgent need from being seen at that time. Last year in one clinic alone (pediatrics), eight percent of appointments were lost due to patient no-shows. Thats nearly seven appointments a day (1,519 total)at a cost of $107 each ($162,533 total)that couldnt be used by other patients. NH Jacksonville wants to partner with its patients to reverse this trend. In the private sector, some health providers charge a no-show fee for cancellations made less than 24 hours beforehandsome go as far as charging a fee for each 15 minutes a patient is late. While military treatment facilities dont function that way, its important that patients understand the impact of no-shows on others. To cancel or reschedule, please call Central Appointments at (800) 529-4677 (or the clinic directly) well in advance24 hours in advance is recommendedso the time slot can be used by another patient who needs care. The care team and all of its patients appreciate it. Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. To find out more, visit the command website at www. med.navy.mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax like the Facebook page at www.facebook/ NavalHospitalJacksonville follow on Twitter at www.twitter.com/NHJax and view the YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/user/ NavalHospitalJax Sign up for email updates at nhjaxconnect@med.navy.mil Medical Home Port teams coordinate patients care Medical/dental appointment no-shows affect patient access 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013

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Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handi capped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: To register for any of the above work shops please contact 542-5745.FFSC offers life skills workshops JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 13

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More than 200 military retirees and their spouses from all branches of service attended the Retired Military Seminar Feb. 2 at the NAS Jax Officers Club. The event was sponsored by NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center, Retired Activities Office. The daylong program provided infor mation of a variety of topics including healthcare, veterans benefits, assisted living, long-term care, survivor benefit plan and other retiree issues. Retired Adm. Mark Fitzgerald, former commander, U. S. Naval Forces Europe, commander, U. S. Naval Forces Africa presented the keynote address. Information booths were manned by officials from the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Veterans Administration, Naval Hospital Jacksonville, legal services and other orga nizations. For more information about the FFSC Retired Activities Office, contact J.J. Ryan at 542-5790 or james.j.ryan@navy. mil Hundreds attend retiree seminar 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013

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Changes to how the Navy processes awards makes it easier for Sailors to confirm their personal decorations and medals are reflected in their Official Military Personnel File (OMPF), offi cials said Jan. 29. NAVADMIN 016/13 outlines the steps Sailors should take to verify their awards are accurately reflected in the Navy Department Awards Web Service (NDAWS) and their OMPF. All personal awards, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and higher, should be showing in a service members record. In the past, award citations or certifi cates received directly from the mem ber for the OMPF were not accepted, since they were required to be mailed from the command authorized to enter the award into NDAWS, said Jim Giger, head of Records Management Policy Branch (PERS-313), Navy Personnel Command (NPC). Sailors will now be able to send in copies of their own award citations or certificates for their OMPF if the award is accurately reflected in NDAWS. Before a Sailor requests a missing award citation or certificate be added to their OMPF, they should verify the award is recorded in NDAWS by vis iting the U.S. Navy Awards website at https://awards.navy.mil and launching the Personal Awards Query. If a Sailors award is recorded in NDAWS, but missing in their OMPF, they should mail a legible, clean copy of the signed award citation, or certificate in the case of Navy and Marine Corps Commendation and Achievement Medals, with the service members full social security number printed in the upper right hand corner, to PERS-313 at: Navy Personnel Command PERS313 5720 Integrity Drive Millington, TN, 38055-3130. According to Giger, if a Sailors award is not reflected in the NDAWS database, the citation will not be accepted by NPC for entry into the service members OMPF. To resolve this conflict, a Sailor must contact their commands NDAWS coor dinator, since only NDAWS coordina tors can enter approved awards into the NDAWS database. The NDAWS coordinator will need an original copy of the award citation/ certificate and, if available, a copy of the orders from the service or joint approval authorities. Once an award is entered and reflect ed in the database, the NDAWS coordi nator will then submit the award cita tion or certificate to NPC for entry into the service members OMPF. Awarding authorities must sub mit a completed OPNAV Form 1650/3 and award citations or certificates to their NDAWS coordinator for entry into NDAWS. A list of NDAWS coordinators is available on the U.S. Navy Awards Web site. It is important that only authorized personal awards are reflected in both NDAWS and in a service members OMPF, said Giger. And ensuring only those award cita tions or certificates that are accurately reflecting in NDAWS are included in the OMPF will increase the integrity of both NDAWS and the OMPF. Per NAVADMIN 016/13, Sailors sub mitting a selection board package with an award citation or certificate not already in their OMPF, but recorded in NDAWS, will automatically have the award added to their OMPF. Those Sailors can expect to see the award citation added to their OMPF four to six weeks after the selection board has adjourned, said Giger. Ensure your awards are in your record JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 15

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill. bonser@navy.mil DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Friday Free Entertainment at 7 p.m. Feb. 8 Evans Acoustic Trio Feb. 15 Pam Affronti Feb. 22 Ace WinnFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 126 p.m., $1.50 games Bowling Tournament Feb. 16 at 12 p.m. $20 entry fee per person Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238. The gym equipment is temporarily relocated to The Zone, Bldg. 798 now through June 30. Check-out our new fitness schedule! New classes include Muscle Max, Extreme Bootcamp and Max Core Pick-up the latest copy at the fitness center.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Sleeping Beauty $25 $41 Fiddler On The Roof $33 $49 Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 Two-day ticket $52 Gatornationals March 15,16,17, 2013 Friday Reserved from $35 $39 Saturday & Sunday Reserved from $50 $54 Friday General Seating from $28 $32 Saturday & Sunday General Seating from $38 $42 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3. Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7. Blockout Dates: March 23 April 5. Call for pricing Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Entertainment Books $30 Gatorland military member is free, tick ets available for family members at ITT$19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Preferred seating $41, lower level seat ing $22 2012-13 Live Broadway Series Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Dream Girls May 21 MOSH $7 $12 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4 day hopper $153.25 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discounted tick ets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT! Daytona 500 Feb. 24 tickets on sale now! $62-$209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Free Mall & Movie Trip Feb. 8 at 6 p.m. Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater Free Burger Night Feb. 19, 510 p.m. Stop by liberty to pick-up your coupon for a free Deweys burger! Free Bowling at NAS Freedom Lanes Feb. 20, 710 p.m. Shoes are not includedNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Feb. 19 for active duty Feb. 7 & 21 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 12:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DOD and guests. Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars featuring WreckIt Ralph Feb. 22, 6 p.m. at Patriots Grove Free popcorn and $.50 drinksFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School March 18 April 24 $500 per person Foam Fest volunteers neededVolunteers are needed to help Special Olympics Duval County during the 5K Foam Fest which will be held March 2 at the Jacksonville Equestrian Center on Normandy Boulevard, Jacksonville. This national race is cleaning up runners and walkers as they traverse obstacles loaded with soap and muddy water. Volunteers ages 16 and older will assist with obstacle course set up, race day events and tear down. There are opportunities for volunteers Feb. 26March 3. For more information, go to: www.SignUpGenius. com/go/30E0B4AA4A929A20-5kfoam/3704168. Navy Entomology Center of Excellences (NECE) in-house training program helps keep some of Navy Medicines brightest scientific minds at the top of their game, providing timely and accurate preven tive medicine services that impact medical readi ness across the Department of the Navy (DoN). HM1(SCW) Dominick Spatola has played a criti cal role in maintaining and improving training at NECE since his arriv al onboard in March 2012. Developing and managing a ciriculum for Navy entomolo gists and preventive medicine techni cians is no small task and Spatola has been a force to be reckoned with, increasing capacity building across several training plat forms at the command. HM1 Spatola has done an incredible job expanding our train ing portfolio to include topics not necessarily related to our core vector con trol mission, but addressing the more general fields of public health and preventive medicine, said Training program keeps Navy entomologists on the cutting edge 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 17 Florida veterans will have access to free training, certification and job placement in the states home building, remodeling and light commercial con struction sectors through a new HBI veterans skills training and job placement program. HBI and the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity are partnering to help re-employ vet erans with training and job placement in con struction. The HBI programlocated throughout the state with sites in Jacksonville, Tampa and Orlandois open to all veterans who are residents of the state of Florida. Construction employers report difficulty find ing qualified workers at all levels of the indus try, including entry-level and semi-skilled craft workers, apprentices, managers and subcontrac tors. With more than 20,000 employers in Florida, the state is the nations fourth largest market for home building. In fact, 12 of the top 20 hot jobs in Florida are construction industry related, and seven of the 80 local U.S. housing markets showing signs of improvement in June 2012 are in the state of Florida. Veterans participating in the HBI program will receive training in all facets of facilities mainte nance and general construction, including car pentry, electrical wiring, landscaping, masonry, painting, plumbing and weatherization. Program graduates earn an industry-sponsored and vali dated pre-apprenticeship certificate. HBI provides this free comprehensive training program to veterans that include support services, job placement and follow-up services for successful re-employment. Each veteran participating in the HBI program receives: develop an individualized training plan percent tools in hand training) equipment during training HBI is an approved Chapter 31 training site for the Department of Veterans Affairs. Classes are open enrollment. Contact LaTanya Guillory, HBI PACT for Veterans program manager at lguillory@ hbi.org or 904-625-3299 for information about how to register! For additional information about HBI, please visit www.hbi.org U.S. Navy ships named in honor of African-Americans named for an African-American, Harmon honored Mess Attendant First Class Leonard Roy Harmon, who posthu mously was awarded the Navy Cross for heroism during the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, 13 November 1942. 1993. Named in honor of the noted scientist George Washington Carver (1864-1943). 1089), 1973-1994. Named in honor of Ensign Jesse L. Brown, USN (1926-1950), the first African-American Naval Aviator, who was killed in action during the Korean War. Cook Third Class Doris (Dorie) Miller, who was award ed the Navy Cross for heroism during the Pearl Harbor Raid, 7 December 1941. honor of Private First Class James Anderson, Jr., USMC (1947-1967), who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism during the Vietnam War. Sergeant Rodney M. Davis, USMC (1942-1967), who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism during the Vietnam War. Arctic Explorer Matthew Alexander Henson (1866-1955). George Watson, U.S. Army, who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism during the Second World War. Private First Class Oscar P. Austin, USMC (1948-1969), who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism during the Vietnam War. Cross recipient Ships Cook 3rd Class William Pinckney who rescued a fellow crew member onboard the car rier Enterprise during the Battle of Santa Cruz in October 1942. Master Chief Boatswains Mate (Master Diver) Carl M. Brashear (1931-2006), who joined the U.S. Navy in 1948. He was a pioneer in the Navy as one of the first AfricanAmericans to graduate from the Navy Diving School and was designated a Navy salvage diver. He was the first African-American to qualify and serve as a master diver while on active duty and the first U.S. Navy diver to be restored to full active duty as an amputee, the result of a leg injury he sustained during a salvage operation. After 31 years of service, Brashear officially retired from the U.S. Navy on April 1, 1979. Brashear was the subject of the 2000 movie Men of Honor starring Cuba Gooding Jr. Adm. Samuel L. Gravely Jr. (1922-2004), who was the first African American in the U.S. Navy to be commissioned an officer, the first African American to command a war ship (USS Theodore E. Chandler); to command a major warship (USS Jouett); to achieve flag rank and eventually vice admiral; and to command a numbered fleet (3rd). Twenty-six cadets from the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps (USNSCC) recently visited the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville. The purpose of their visit was to expose cadets to the vari ous rating designations (job specifications) and the envi ronment of the Navy. Lt. j.g. Robert Long, commanding officer, stated, I appreciate the opportunity to have the cadets conduct their exercise at CNATTU as it strengthens the ties between the Navy and the community. The U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps was founded in 1958 and has since been committed to fostering leadership abilities and responsibility through hands on training while pro moting a drug and alcohol free environment. The Franklin D. Roosevelt Squadron of Jacksonville was commis sioned Sept. 1, 1961. They are considered one of the oldest Sea Cadet squad rons in America and currently comprised of 47 cadets. Long, a former combat Army engi neer, and Lt. j.g. David Welch, a retired U.S. Air Force officer, have been involved in the pro gram for over five years. The U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps is for ages 1317 while the Navy League Cadet Corps are from 10-12 years old. Both programs start with a twoweek boot camp after which the cadets must complete basic military requirements courses and various leadership courses to advance in pay grade. The Navy League Cadet Corps advance from E-1 (recruit cadet) thru E-6 (ships leading petty officer), while the Naval Sea Cadet Corps range from E-1 (seaman recruit) to E-7 (chief petty officer). The 26 cadets were instruct ed in the basic aspects of the aviation warfare systems oper ator, aviation electronics tech nician, and aviation structural mechanic ratings as well as the overall mission of CNATTU. The facilitators ATCS(AW) David Schmidt, AWV1(AW) Austin Combs and AWV1(AW) Wesley Lewis presented vari ous stations, equipment and systems operated and main tained on the P-3 Orion air craft. Topics included radar and radio systems, MAD/ESM, APS-137, global positioning and inertial navigation systems as well as the duties of each air crew member during missions. The cadets then visited the student trainers and had the opportunity to operate some of the equipment used to train aircrew and enlisted maintain ers in the fleet. The cadets also visited the aviation structural mechanic trainers and briefly covered the landing gear, hydraulic system components, flight control sur face components, and environ mental control systems used on the P-3 Orion aircraft. The facilitators also assisted the cadets with building remote ly operated vehicles (ROVs) called SeaPerch. SeaPerch is part of an under water robotics program spon sored by various business and technology based organiza tions that equips teachers and students with the resources needed to build ROVs. The program teaches basic engineering and science con cepts as well as teamwork. Upon completing their ROVs, the cadets participated in chal lenges based on the SeaPerch program. The SeaPerch program emphasizes teamwork with the opportunity to hone much needed skills in mathemat ics, science and engineering, Welch explained. Here theyre given a kit with parts and an instruction manual to build a basic concept design. As they go through the pro cess, they learn the funda mentals needed to explore various aspects and skills of engineering, including solder ing, ship design, propulsion, movement and the basic phys ics of motion. Cadets are also encouraged to come up with unique designs as well. This program is geared towards boosting interest in the engi neering field, for the military as well as the civilian sector. Its a rewarding experience, Long commented, We expose the cadets to a type of disci pline and structure you would normally only find in a military environment.Sea Cadets visit CNATTU Jax Free skills training and job placement for veteransNECE Officer in Charge Cmdr. Eric Hoffman. These courses advertise NECEs capabilities to potential customers aligning with the Navy surgeon generals priorities of readiness and value. New classes offered at NECE include Basic Life Support, Food Service Managers Class as well as a tri-base Enlisted Advancement program this past December. The Advancement Program for 25 first class hospital corps men prepared eligible first class petty officers for the chiefs exam, said Hoffman. This local program served to provide cost efficient training meeting the needs of our customers. This one course alone saved DoN over $30,000 in training costs. HM1 Spatola has also reached out to locally-based fleet medical departments to offer assistance in their preparations for required medical and quarantine inspec tions before standing out to sea and while deployed, said Dr. Andrew Beck, Head of Training at NECE. He is an exceptionally valuable asset to this department, this center, and the Navy. His efforts have a direct impact on the read iness of Navy personnel as well as indirect effects on the efficient operation of preventive medi cine in our region, he added. Spatola has also advocated for a professional development series, which is taught once a week at NECE to military, researchers and civilians. My job here at NECE is to ensure that Navy PMTs and entomolo gists are trained and ready to meet medical readiness chal lenges in an ever-changing oper ational environment increasing their overall value, said Spatola. The courses cover topics rang ing from how to write enlisted performance evaluations to human parasites focusing on leadership, scientific knowledge and general Navy knowledge. Classes are not the only prod ucts that the NECE training department has to offer. NECE also boasts a state-of-the-art classroom with 19 wi-fi con nected laptops that can accom modate up to 40 students and is available to anyone at NAS Jax who wishes to book the room. For more information, contact Dave Wolfert at David.Wolfert@ med.navy.mil. NECE

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2013 CNO ON BUDGET SAR QUALS RETI REES ASK Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com VP-16 unveils new P-8A tail flashOn Jan. 30, VP-16 ceremo niously commemorated the completion of their transition from the P-3C Orion and to make history as the first operational squadron to fly the P-8A Poseidon. The last time the maritime patrol community held a simi lar ceremony was in 1962, when the Tigers of VP-8 accepted the first P-3A Orion. Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group (CPRG) Rear Adm. Sean Buck was present to offer the War Eagles his congratulations and his vision for the future of the community in times much different than those 50 years ago. Also in attendance were Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11) Capt. Eric Wiese, VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens, Officer in Charge, Fleet Integration Team Cmdr. Andrew Miller, as well as Boeing Site Activation Lead Max Norgart and other repre sentatives from Boeing. Parked just outside NAS Jax Hangar 511 during the ceremony was VP-16s very own P-8A, side number 429, just recent ly painted with the new War Eagles tail flash and sporting the squadron designator LF. After presenting special commemorative coins to all hands via representatives of each of the 12 transition com bat aircrews and the lead petty officer of each of the mainte nance shops, Buck spoke to squadron personnel. He con gratulated them on a success ful final deployment in the P-3C, the completion of the rigorous transition syllabus, and for their outstanding perfor mance during their recent safe for flight inspection. Buck also thanked VP-30 for their steadfast work in train ing the War Eagles over the last six months. After recalling the eight-year history of the development of the Poseidon, Buck explained that it was not yet complete. Were still writing the play book. Its really just the beginning, commented Buck. The ceremony concluded with Buck presenting the key to Aircraft 429 to VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Molly Boron. VP-16 passed a major hurdle Jan.25 with the com pletion of their safe for flight inspection performed by repre sentatives from CPRG and CPRW11. The inspection focused on the maintenance Honoring P-2V Neptune LA-9Members of VP-5 took time to honor their maritime patrol and reconnaissance legacy Jan. 17 by washing the P-2V Neptune on display in NAS Jacksonvilles Heritage Park. Through teamwork and initiative, the Mad Foxes of VP-5 were able to return the luster to this historic aircraft. This particular P-2V was assigned to VP-5 at NAS Jacksonville during the 1960s and was placed in the park on Aug. 18, 1993. It is dedicated to the crew of VP-5 aircraft LA 9. It was a P-2V Neptune whose crew disappeared during a routine mission out of Keflavik, Iceland on Jan. 12, 1962. The search went on for a week before calling it off Jan. 19. LA-9 and its crew had vanished and were declared lost at sea. The Neptunes wreckage was eventually discovered Aug. 6, 1966 on Greenlands remote Kronborg gla CNRSE Sailors, civilians help build homes in local communitySailors and civilians from Commander Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) participated in a Habitat for Humanity (H4H) construction project Jan. 30. During the project, volunteers helped put the finishing touch es on four northside Jacksonville homes that will soon accomodate low-income families. According to Angie Leatherbury, operations director with H4H Jacksonville, the volunteer effort helped strengthen an already firm rela tionship between the Navy and the local community. The Navy has contributed hundreds of hours of time to HabiJax (Habitat for Humanity Jacksonville), both on the con struction site and at our restore facility, she said. For those who volunteered their time today, I would just like to say thank you for your time and commitment to HabiJax and we hope that your volunteer experi ence was very rewarding. We cannot thank our volunteers enough for their contributions. H4Hs mission is to build affordable housing for low-income families and individuals. Those who receive homes from the program work alongside volunteers under trained supervision to build their home. Upon comple tion, H4H grants them a no-interest mortgage for the value of the home, making monthly payments affordable for those who can not afford a traditional mortgage payment. The organization built more than1,800 homes last year in Jacksonville alone. This is an organization that does a lot of good for the local community, and today was another opportunity for the CNRSE team to contribute to their efforts, said Twilla Smith, Navy Region Southeast community service program coordinator. These kind of events give our Sailors and civilians an opportu nity to grow personally and have a positive impact on the local com munity at the same time. H4H volunteer opportunities consist of various tasks, depend ing on what stage of construction the house is in. In this case, the War Eagles complete safe for flight

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Feb. 7 1800 USS Essex becomes first U.S. Navy vessel to cross the Equator. 1815 The Board of Naval Commissioners, a group of senior offi cers, is established to oversee the operation and maintenance of the Navy, under the direction of the Secretary of the Navy. 1955 Seventh Fleet ships begin evacuation of Chinese nationalists from Tachen Islands. 1965 In response to a Viet Cong attack on barracks area at Pleiku, South Vietnam, aircraft from carriers, USS Coral Sea (CV 42), USS Hancock (CV 19) and USS Ranger (CV 61) attack North Vietnamese area near Donghoi. Feb. 8 1862 Joint amphibious force cap tures Roanoke Island, N.C. key to Albemarle Sound. 1890 USS Omaha sailors and marines assist Hodogary, Japan in subduing large fire Feb. 9 1799 USS Constellation (under Capt. Truxtun) captures French lInsurgente. 1943 Organized Japanese resistance on Guadalcanal ends. Feb. 10 1862 Union gunboats destroy Confederate ships at Elizabeth City, N.C. 1900 Appointment of first naval governor of Guam, Commodore Seaton Schroder. 1960 USS Sargo (SSN-583) surfaces at North Pole. Feb. 11 1862 SECNAV directs formation of organization to evaluate new inventions and technical development that eventually led to National Academy of Science. 1971 U.S. and USSR sign a treaty prohibiting the deployment of nuclear weapons on the ocean floor. Feb. 12 1945 USS Batfish (SS-310) sinks second Japanese submarine within three days. 1947 First launching of guided mis sile (Loon) from a submarine, USS Cusk (SS-348). Feb. 13 1854 Admiral Perry anchors off Yokosuka, Japan to receive Emperors reply to treaty proposal. 1913 Naval Radio Station at Arlington, Va. begins operations. 1945 First naval units enter Manila Bay since 1942. 1968 Operation Coronado XI begins in Mekong Delta. According to a recent Associate Press article published in their Oddities department, a teacher in Ohio has sued her school district for discrimination. Maria Waltherr-Willard of Mariemont, Ohio, is not a minority. Her picture shows a middle-aged woman with short hair, glasses, red lipstick and three strands of pearls over a pink turtleneck sweater. In other words, she looks like 90-percent of the schoolteachers from my childhood. So what has Waltherr-Willard been discriminated against for? Well, shes afraid of children. Duh. What? You think someone who is pedophobic (the medical term) doesnt belong in a classroom? Geez, I bet you think nurses shouldnt be afraid of blood either. The AP reported that Waltherr-Willard said that when she was transferred to the districts middle school in 2009, the seventhand eighth-graders triggered her phobia, causing her blood pressure to soar and forcing her to retire in the middle of the 2010-11 school year. And all this time, I thought high blood pressure and anxiety was part of the job description for middle school teachers! But the lawsuit states that, The mental anguish suffered by (Waltherr-Willard) is serious and of a nature that no reasonable person could be expected to endure the same. Oh. Okay then. Now, Im no stranger to phobias. I know firsthand that one persons anxiety is another persons punchline. When I was in labor with my oldest son, I walked up eight flights of stairs because I was afraid of getting stuck in the elevator. Ive flown once in 15 years. But I am not afraid of children. Or am I? After I read the story about Waltherr-Willard, I took inventory of my feelings around my own young children: Ford, 12, is a pre-teen. Shudder! Owen, 10, wont eat vegetables. Panic! And Lindell, 6, likes to moon people. Terror! Maybe Im pedophobic after all. I mean, I do have high blood pressure, and the fact that my children want din ner every single night does cause me mental anguish. Helping a 6-year-old put on his gloves and snow boots in the morning is more stressful than any reasonable person might expect to endure. And, well, have you ever watched a kid learn to ride a bike without training wheels? But wait. Lets not panic. Dustin always tells me not to jump to conclusions. Its important to look at the facts, to assess symptoms. So, do my children scare me? Have they caused my high blood pressure and mental anguish? Do I have pedophobia? I made a list to sort it out. I feel afraid.... When my children pour their own syrup. When Lindell yells from the bathroom, What happens to Legos that go down the toilet? When anyone younger than 30 says uh oh. When I overhear my kids say, Maybe Mom wont notice, or Lets not tell Mom. When I look between the sofa cushions. When my kids try to cook or clean to be helpful on my birthday. When neighbors see the tennis balls, popped balloons, and rubber chicken stuck in the tree in our backyard. When I hear shattered glass and someone yells, It wasnt me. When my boys use passive sentences (The window was broken. The milk spilled.) When anyone gives my children sharp objects or sci ence kits that include experiments. When Santa brings a 300-piece Lego set to a 5-year-old. When Santa brings drum sets. When our lodging includes bunk beds. When the living room suddenly gets quiet. When even the dog doesnt want to follow the boys. When a teacher tells me my son is full of personality or has a lively disposition. When the boys and their friends run inside the house looking for jugs of water, duct tape, or a really long stick. When my 6-year-old asks anyone, Do you want to see something funny? When my preteen wants an e-mail account. Yeah, come to think of it, Im anxious quite a bit. Being around children is similar to having your heart, guts and nerves exist on the outside of your body. I just mopped the floors and careful, that might be dangerous means nothing to them. So, you know, this whole pedophobia thing seems kind of fishy. According to the lawyer representing the teacher in Ohio, it is a real disease. And maybe it is. But to me, its sounding a lot like plain old parenthood. Hey, MoneyChic! I was in San Diego a few months ago and stopped by the Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) for a Quick Assist Loan (QAL). The last time I received a QAL it was $300, but there it was $500. Did something change? MoneyChic Sez: You were one of the lucky ones! Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society was interested to see if an increase in the QAL amount would better serve our clients. The west coast was used as a pilot area for the study. As of Feb. 1, the $500 QAL launched at every office. What does that mean to service mem bers? If you qualify, you may take out a QAL for up to $500. The qualifications to receive a QAL have not changed even though the amount of the loan has. You would qualify if: you have no outstanding balance with NMCRS; you have not had a loan converted to a grant in the last six months; you have not already received two QALs in a 12-month time period; you have not had a deficit budget in the last four months; disciplinary action is not pend ing against you; and there are at least four months left on your military contract. The required paperwork and items necessary to bring to the office for a QAL have also not changed. In order to receive a QAL in a timely manner, you must bring your: ings statement (we prefer it to be printed out, but will accept it being brought up on your smart phone) the office or it may also be printed online from our website, www.nmcrs.org) Just a reminder, it is NMCRSs policy to have a service member complete a financial fitness plan on the third QAL visit and a full budget with a caseworker on the sixth QAL visit. The financial fitness plan and full budget review can help determine if a service member is aware of their financial situa tion or if more effort needs to be put forth when using their money. As always, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is here to lend a helping hand. For more information, stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or call 5422832. Have questions for Hey, MoneyChic ? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@ nmcrs.org I might be afraid of my children, too Survey for base shuttle serviceThe Jacksonville Transportation Authority is con ducting a survey at NAS Jacksonville Feb. 8 to deter mine is a shuttle service is needed aboard the station to transport personnel to various facilities. Representatives will be available at Naval Hospital Jacksonville from 8-10 a.m.; Base Commissary from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and the Enlisted Barracks from 1:30-4 p.m. to conduct surveys. Another survey will be conducted Feb. 13 from 7:3010 a.m. at Hangar 1122, the Flight Line Cafe from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and Hangar 1000 from 1-4 p.m. Personnel can also complete the survey by going to www.surveymonkey.com/s/veterans-and-militaryfamilies-transportation-options For more information, e-mail talks@jtafla.com or call 630-3100.

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Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert addressed the impact of Department of Defense budget cuts and the Pentagons Pacific Pivot shift in operational focus during a visit to San Diego Jan. 31. His visit to the San Diego area commenced with a mass reenlist ment and all-hands call at Naval Base Coronado. Greenert then trav elled to the San Diego Convention Center to speak at the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA)/ U.S. Naval Institute (USNI) West 2013 conference. Greenert acknowl edged the brunt of the budget cuts would affect the Navys operation and maintenance activi ties, but emphasized the importance of keeping the Sailors and equip ment safe. We have seven months left in the year, and we have to go to where the money is. In San Diego, theres about $220 mil lion worth of private shipyard work in jeopar dy right now. We would have ships that perhaps wont get the mainte nance they need, and Id like to make that up as soon as possible, he said. But safety will be fund ed. The safety of people, equipment and deployed operations will be our top priority. We cannot risk safety. We wont do that. The cuts include eliminating private-sector surface ship maintenance availability and aircraft depot maintenance from April-September 2013, freezing civilian hiring and curtailing non-mis sion-essential travel and training. In the event seques tration is triggered in March, the Navy will have to cut an additional $4 billion for fiscal year 2013. These cuts could include stopping deploy ments to the Caribbean and South America; reducing the number of deployed ships and air craft, days at sea and flying hours; and limiting European deployments to those supporting ballistic missile defense missions. Greenert proceeded to join Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James Amos and Commandant of the Coast Guard Adm. Robert Papp Jr. in a round table discussion panel addressing the conven tions theme, Pivot to the Pacific: What are the Practical and Global Implications? President Barack Obamas November 2011 speech to the Australian parliament emphasized the Asia-Pacific regions value to the national defense strategy. As we end todays wars, I have directed my national security team to make our presence and mission in the AsiaPacific a top priority. As a result, reductions in U.S. defense spending will not I repeat, will not come at the expense of the Asia-Pacific, Obama said in the speech. Greenert discussed the role of the Navy in the defense strategy, noting the intrinsic value the Navy provides in achiev ing the missions through decades of experience. I think the defense strategy is solid and Im very comfortable with how we are aligned to support the strategy. I call it a rebalance. A pivot is a left face where you turn on your heels, but the Navy has been in Asia for about 10 years, he said. Weve had 40 to 50 ships out there for over 10 years and we will increase those numbers from 50 today to 60 by the end of the decade. Greenert noted the Navys budget measured the capabilities the Navy is buying and develop ing to the Asia-Pacific region. He also empha sized the importance of strengthening ties with Singapore, Japan, Korea and Australia. Its nourishing or renourishing relationships we already have, and developing new ones in and around there, and taking it to the next level to operate together bet ter and posture ourselves to deal with issues of the future, he said. The AFCEA/USNI West 2013 conference is the 22nd iteration of the event, and attracted more than 10,000 attendees over the course of three days. Mad Foxes meet Bartram Springs pen palsAfter a six month deployment to Japan the VP-5 Mad Foxes finally met their deployment pen pals at Bartram Springs Elementary school of Jacksonville on Jan. 11. VP-5 recently returned from a successful six-month Seventh Fleet deployment to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. While deployed, the Sailors adopted classrooms and wrote to the students about life away from home. The students, in return, showed their support by writing letters with many questions and encouragement from their respective classrooms. Each classroom was eager to finally meet their long awaited pen pals and learn even more about their experiences and the Mad Foxes. When the Sailors arrived they visited individual classrooms and answered any questions they had about aviation, CNO addresses budget concerns, discusses Pacific Pivot at San Diego JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 Aviation rescue swimmers with HSM-40 took a plunge into the St. Johns River on Jan. 29, executing search and res cue (SAR) training with one their squadrons MH-60R Seahawks, while being sup ported by a 40-foot SAR boat provided by the NAS Jacksonville Boathouse. The exercise is designed to keep the HSM squadrons rescue swimmers proficient in emergency water rescue situ ations, where good decision making skills can mean the difference between life and death. Six members of HSM-40 participated in the SAR training, being paired together in res cued/rescuer roles and sub sequently jumping into the St. Johns River from the MH-60R Seahawk while it maintained a hover of 15 feet. Fifteen feet is the maxi mum altitude that these swimmers can safely execute a free fall into the water, comment ed EM1 Jason Nazelrod of the NAS Jax Boathouse. You have to remember that the downwash from the pro peller can increase the hazard of such a drop. Once both rescue swimmers were in the water, one would simulate being injured and in distress while the other would put their training to use and execute a rescue. The helicopter would lower a harness to the rescue swim mer, who would then attach it to the victim. After making sure the vic tim was secured and attach ing him/herself to the lowered cable, the MH-60R Seahawk would hoist both swimmers up to the aircrew compartment, completing the exercise. A reposition of both the SAR boat and the helo would fol low, in which the rescue swimmers would reverse their roles and repeat the training. According to Nazelrod, this type of training is essential for all the HSM squadrons and something that the NAS Jax Boathouse is always ready to assist with. We conduct SAR training all the time with the squad rons. They simply contact us and give us the details, and we will do whatever they need us to do. Weve had multiple squadrons execute this train ing before with up to 24 avia tion rescue swimmers on one of our SAR boats, remarked Nazelrod. In addition to SAR train ing with HSM squadrons, the Boathouse also works with students from the NAS Jax Rescue Swimmer School and multiple reserve squadrons. It also maintains control over hazardous spill respons es, and is considered the pri mary responder in the area. Nazelrod highly praised the 14 military members of the Boathouse. All the staff who work here are fantastic at the drills we conduct and the training we support, in addition to main taining the five boats we are responsible for. Todays SAR training with HSM-40 is something we are proud to sup port. NAS JAX BOA THOU SE S UPPORT S H SM-40 SEA RCH AN D RE S CUE TR AINING

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 5 PHOTO S BY LT. J.G. KEVI N WEN DT

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IT1(SW) Paul Voigt and YN2 Anthony Mitchell were named Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Sailor of the First Quarter, respectively, Jan. 24. As the Regional Operations Center (ROC) lead information systems techni cian, Voigt supervises the training and develop ment of five Sailors and ensures the transmis sion and receipt of message traffic for CNRSE. Throughout the past quarter, he helped implement the Navy Interface for Command E-mail system and supervised the training of nearly 30 active duty and reserve Sailors on the new system, resulting in 100-percent efficiency of transmitted messages from the ROC. Petty Officer Voigt is truly a model Sailor, said QMC(SW) Steven Davis, Voigts supervisor. He has great work ethic and outstanding professional knowledge, which makes him a go-to guy when you need some one to brief high visibility items. His performance has certainly warranted his selection as CNRSE Senior Sailor of the Quarter. In addition to his primary duties, Voigt also holds a number of key command col lateral duties and is an active volunteer. As a physical fitness assessment coordi nator, he leads fitness sessions for more than 40 Sailors. He also serves on the CNRSE Morale, Welfare and Recreation committee and helped to raise $8,000 for command events during the quarter. It feels great to be recognized by my chain of command for all the hard work that Ive put in, and its definitely an honor to have been selected as CNRSE Senior Sailor of the Quarter, he said. According to Voigt, he could never have accomplished so much without the help of his co-workers and chain of command. I definitely owe a a lot of gratitude to them because theyve had a great impact on my ability to perform my job at a high level, Voigt said. I work with people that have given me great support and have helped guide me from the first day I have checked on board. Mitchell serves as the executive assistant to the regional command master chief (CMC), providing logistical support to the CMC during his travels. He also processes all periodic and transfer evaluation and fitness reports and coordinates executive-level correspondence. According to YN1(SW) John Felizpolanco, CNRSE administra tive department leading petty officer, Mitchells contributions have been cru cial to the departments success. Hes an invaluable asset to our department, Felizpolanco said. Hes an absolute expert when it comes to customer service and taking care of the Sailors at this command. Hes also truly one of the most dependable Sailors Ive ever had work for me. I can task him with literally anything and I know I can count on him to get the job done right and on time. Mitchell said he felt honored to receive such and award, but it was ultimately the result of a team effort. Its always an honor to be selected for something like this because its a reminder that hard work does pay off, he said. I also realize, though, that this wouldnt be possible without the encouragement and support I get from every member of the department. My success relies heavily on those around me and I really dont think I could have accom plished this without them. The selection is Mitchells second throughout the past year, a rare accom plishment at CNRSE. According to Mitchell, the key to his sustained success has been focus. You just have to come in and do your best every day, he said. The minute you lose focus and get relaxed, thats when you can start to make mistakes. Individual selection criteria for the awards was based upon exemplary per formance of tasks, contributions that enhanced organization accomplishment of command objectives, mission, team work or public image, and ones profes sional attitude toward self and others. CNRSE announces Senior, Junior Sailor of the First Quarter 2013 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013

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volunteers had the opportunity to help finish four houses in one day. Throughout the day, they helped prepare and lay down 36 pallets of sod. I definitely enjoyed the opportunity to come out here and support the community, said QM2 Joshua Olds, a volunteer. You have to realize there are some people out there who are less fortunate than others. If we are not willing to help them out, who will? According to Leatherbury, the participants should take a lot of pride in their efforts. She said volunteers dont always have the opportunity to meet the future owners of the houses they help build, but she can attest to the appreciation those owners have for the program and its volunteers. Given that our home buyers are required to com plete a minimum of 300 volunteer hours, or sweat equity, before they can purchase their home through HabiJax, they understand and greatly appreciate the commitment and time that community volunteers like Navy Sailors contribute. In this case, the volunteers did not meet the future owners of any of the four houses, but that did not affect their sense of satisfaction from volunteering, according to Olds. It definitely feels good, he said. Its kind of rejuvenating and it certainly makes you feel like you made something of your day to know that youre able to make a difference. HABITAT VP-5cier. All of the remains were laid to rest in a 2004 ceremony attended by former Mad Foxes who had served with the crew of LA-9. VP-5 is now beginning its transition from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A Poseidon. It was great to bring so many Mad Foxes come together before we separate into different transi tion curriculum, commented Lt. j.g. Wes Kang. Reflecting on our P-2V provided great perspective as we prepare to open a new chapter in our history with P-8A Poseidon. The P-2V Neptune served between 1945 and 1984 before being replaced by the P-3 Orion. The P-2V is directly responsible for VP-5 obtaining the moniker of Mad Foxes that they use to this day. Before the P-2V, VP-5 was nicknamed the Blind Foxes, but due to the Neptunes new magnetic anomaly detector (MAD), they were renamed the Mad Foxes. PEN PALSthe United States Navy, or military life in gener al. Students received an additional surprise when many classrooms were visited by VP-5s very own Mad Fox mascot. This was a great opportunity to meet all the students who worked hard to write us letters over deployment, commented Ensign Sally Ranzau. Every student showed a tremendous amount of support for our Sailors. VP-5 adopted Bartram Springs Elementary in October 2011 and has been visiting the school weekly since. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013

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department, but encompassed a look into the operations of the entire squadron. During the three-day event, all administrative aspects of 41 programs were inspected. The programs ranged from tool control and manpower man agement to maintenance training and plane captain qualification. Programs were scored as being ontrack, needing more attention (NMA), or off-track. The score given was based on the overall safety, efficiency and effectiveness of each program. Thirty-five of the programs were graded as on-track, and the other six received an NMA, largely due to the infancy of those areas. There were no programs deter mined to be off-track. One basis for grading programs is a practical, in which a squadron member must demonstrate a particular process of a program. Fifty-nine practical exercises were performed over the three days with overall outstanding results. In addition, eight different emergency drills were run, including several aircraft mishap drills, a man down first aid drill, and a hazardous material exposure drill. VP-16 successfully and promptly ful filled all of their duties in response to these situations. After reviewing the results of the safe for flight inspection, Buck told the War Eagles, Congratulations for your hard work and dedication. I am confident that you will continue to display the same level of pride and professionalism, and will execute safe operations while maintaining your new aircraft. This historic occasion only happens once in a half century. VP-16 has a solid plan for the P-8A introduction and is ready to execute. Again, congratulations on a job well done. After a ceremonial cake cutting to close the event, Buck took a quick opportunity to honor standout aviators and maintenance professionals who excelled during the transition. While to most it was never understood to be a competition, a few select individu als went above and beyond to really embrace the transition training. Now that VP-16 is in possession of two P-8A aircraft and is qualified to main tain, launch and recover them, they are forging full-speed ahead. Over the next 10 months, the War Eagles will send all 12 combat air crews through an Advanced Readiness Program led by the instructors of CPRW-11. The fleet can expect to see a lot more of the Navys newest plane while VP-16 personnel train and maintain readiness supporting a wide range of exercises continuing to further develop the tactical employment of the aircraft. The ultimate goal for the War Eagles is to take six Poseidon aircraft on the first operational P-8A deployment to 7th Fleet at the end of this year. Accomplishing that feat will not be an easy task, but as the War Eagles have demonstrated in the past six months, there is no task too great. Boron had this to say to the War Eagles about their performance during this historic transition, You have every right to be proud of our accomplish ment. Thank you for the extra time put into your job, your attention to detail and shining motivation throughout this process. Keep the pack on! Our next challenges lie ahead as we kick off the inter-deployment readiness cycle. VP-16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 9

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Members of VP-5 continued to exhibit their dedication to their community by assisting with vision tests at Bartram Springs Elementary School Jan. 30. Several Mad Foxes helped screen students with a short vision test to alert parents of children who may need new eyeglass prescriptions. Throughout the day the VP-5 volunteers screened students from 15 class rooms. The tests were conducted in the Bartram Springs Library with students determining the direction letters were facing on an eye chart from afar with each eye. Depending on the standards for the students age VP-5 members recorded the results and referred them to an optometrist if needed. Good vision is such an essential part of a childs education and life in gen eral, commented IT1 Cedrick Green. This is a great service the school is providing parents and I am more than excited to be helping. VP-5 adopted Bartram Springs Elementary in October 2011 and has been visiting the school weekly since. Members and special guests of the Navy Jax Yacht Club came together at the NAS Jax Officers Club Feb. 2 for the 2013 Change of Command as outgoing officers were recognized for their out standing job for the past year and the new officers were inducted. The new Navy Jax Yacht Club offi cers are Commodore Robert Quick, Vice Commodore Bob Sharkey, Rear Commodore of Power Dave Bailey, Rear Commodore of Sail Lynn Quick, Secretary Jeanne Bailey and Treasurer Frank Houghton. The Navy Jax Yacht Club has gone through a transition this past year. Due to the land lease expiring, the club, which was founded in 1956 at Mulberry Cove Marina, has moved to the NAS Jax Officers Club. The Navy Jax Yacht Club meets the first Wednesday of every month at the club and everyone is invited. Navy Jax Yacht Club members participate in the intramural racing program and help with the sailing program. Members also provide powerboat training for the safe operation of all sizes of boats. Several events are held throughout the year, starting with a Mardi Gras Raft Up on the St. Johns River Feb. 23. For more information on upcoming events, call 703-7411 or 778-0805. For more information about sailing classes, contact the Mulberry Cove Marina at 542-3260. Mad Foxes conduct eye screeningsNavy Jax Yacht Club holds change of command JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 11

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Each of the 57,000 patients with a primary care manager (PCM) at NH Jacksonvilleits hospital and five branch health clinics in Albany, Jacksonville, Key West, Kings Bay and Mayport belongs to a primary care team as part of Medical Home Port. Medical Home Port is Navy Medicines approach to the nationwide medical home model of care. Medical Home Port places our patients in the center of a collaborative team of caregiversfrom doc tors to nurses to case manag ersled by their primary care manager, said NH Jacksonville Director for Medical Services Cmdr. Troy Borema. Our patients and their Medical Home Port teams work togeth er for a coordinated, wholeperson approach to health. This comprehensive approach is designed to meet the full range of patients health and wellness needs. Medical Home Port increases continu ity of care and the use of pre ventive services, which can lead to better outcomes for people with chronic condi tions. It also reduces emergency room visits and hospitaliza tions because the care teams provide urgent caresome thing that boosts both patient and staff satisfaction My Medical Home Port team keeps me current on my appointments, immuniza tions and blood checks that I need regularly, said Patricia Wampler, a family medicine red team patient. Medical Home Port also offers a new way for patients and their care teams to con nectvia Medical Home Port Online secure e-mail. Patients can email their care team directly for nonurgent issues, like requesting an appointment, lab results or medication refills. And patients can still call Central Appointments and After Hours Nurse Advice Line at (800) 5294677. To register and log onto Medical Home Port Online, patients can visit the com mands website at www.med. navy.mil/sites/navalhospital jax NH Jacksonvilles Medical Home Port is seeking health care industry recognition from the National Committee for Quality Assurance, the gold standard in the patient-cen tered medical home model. The application process includes a site visit to evaluate continuous adherence to mul tiple standards. "Patientand family-cen tered care has always been at the core of Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles delivery of health care whether at our hospital or one of our branch health clinics," said Borema. "Medical Home Port enhances this, offering increased coordination and access to the highest quality care for our patients." NH Jacksonvilles priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. To find out more, visit the command website at www. med.navy.mil/sites/naval hospitaljax, like the Facebook page at www.facebook/naval hospitaljacksonville, follow on Twitter at www.twitter.com/ NHJax and view the YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/ user/navalhospitaljax. Sign up for email updates at nhjaxconnect@med.navy.mil. Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville and five branch health clinics in Florida (Jacksonville, Key West and Mayport) and Georgia (Albany and Kings Bay)takes pride in the time and care provided to its patients. And while some appointment cancellations are inevitable, when a patient doesnt show up, it prevents another patient with an urgent need from being seen at that time. Last year in one clinic alone (pediatrics), eight percent of appointments were lost due to patient no-shows. Thats nearly seven appointments a day (1,519 total)at a cost of $107 each ($162,533 total)that couldnt be used by other patients. NH Jacksonville wants to partner with its patients to reverse this trend. In the private sector, some health providers charge a no-show fee for cancellations made less than 24 hours beforehandsome go as far as charging a fee for each 15 minutes a patient is late. While military treatment facilities dont function that way, its important that patients understand the impact of no-shows on others. To cancel or reschedule, please call Central Appointments at (800) 529-4677 (or the clinic directly) well in advance24 hours in advance is recommendedso the time slot can be used by another patient who needs care. The care team and all of its patients appreciate it. Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. To find out more, visit the command website at www. med.navy.mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax like the Facebook page at www.facebook/ NavalHospitalJacksonville follow on Twitter at www.twitter.com/NHJax and view the YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/user/ NavalHospitalJax Sign up for email updates at nhjaxconnect@med.navy.mil Medical Home Port teams coordinate patients care Medical/dental appointment no-shows affect patient access 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013

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Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handi capped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: To register for any of the above workshops please contact 542-5745.FFSC offers life skills workshops JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 13

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More than 200 military retirees and their spouses from all branches of service attended the Retired Military Seminar Feb. 2 at the NAS Jax Officers Club. The event was sponsored by NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center, Retired Activities Office. The daylong program provided information of a variety of topics including healthcare, veterans benefits, assisted living, long-term care, survivor benefit plan and other retiree issues. Retired Adm. Mark Fitzgerald, former commander, U. S. Naval Forces Europe, commander, U. S. Naval Forces Africa presented the keynote address. Information booths were manned by officials from the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Veterans Administration, Naval Hospital Jacksonville, legal services and other orga nizations. For more information about the FFSC Retired Activities Office, contact J.J. Ryan at 542-5790 or james.j.ryan@navy. mil Hundreds attend retiree seminar 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013

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Changes to how the Navy processes awards makes it easier for Sailors to confirm their personal decorations and medals are reflected in their Official Military Personnel File (OMPF), offi cials said Jan. 29. NAVADMIN 016/13 outlines the steps Sailors should take to verify their awards are accurately reflected in the Navy Department Awards Web Service (NDAWS) and their OMPF. All personal awards, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and higher, should be showing in a service members record. In the past, award citations or certificates received directly from the mem ber for the OMPF were not accepted, since they were required to be mailed from the command authorized to enter the award into NDAWS, said Jim Giger, head of Records Management Policy Branch (PERS-313), Navy Personnel Command (NPC). Sailors will now be able to send in copies of their own award citations or certificates for their OMPF if the award is accurately reflected in NDAWS. Before a Sailor requests a missing award citation or certificate be added to their OMPF, they should verify the award is recorded in NDAWS by vis iting the U.S. Navy Awards website at https://awards.navy.mil and launching the Personal Awards Query. If a Sailors award is recorded in NDAWS, but missing in their OMPF, they should mail a legible, clean copy of the signed award citation, or certificate in the case of Navy and Marine Corps Commendation and Achievement Medals, with the service members full social security number printed in the upper right hand corner, to PERS-313 at: Navy Personnel Command PERS313 5720 Integrity Drive Millington, TN, 38055-3130. According to Giger, if a Sailors award is not reflected in the NDAWS database, the citation will not be accepted by NPC for entry into the service members OMPF. To resolve this conflict, a Sailor must contact their commands NDAWS coor dinator, since only NDAWS coordina tors can enter approved awards into the NDAWS database. The NDAWS coordinator will need an original copy of the award citation/ certificate and, if available, a copy of the orders from the service or joint approval authorities. Once an award is entered and reflected in the database, the NDAWS coordinator will then submit the award cita tion or certificate to NPC for entry into the service members OMPF. Awarding authorities must sub mit a completed OPNAV Form 1650/3 and award citations or certificates to their NDAWS coordinator for entry into NDAWS. A list of NDAWS coordinators is available on the U.S. Navy Awards Web site. It is important that only authorized personal awards are reflected in both NDAWS and in a service members OMPF, said Giger. And ensuring only those award citations or certificates that are accurately reflecting in NDAWS are included in the OMPF will increase the integrity of both NDAWS and the OMPF. Per NAVADMIN 016/13, Sailors sub mitting a selection board package with an award citation or certificate not already in their OMPF, but recorded in NDAWS, will automatically have the award added to their OMPF. Those Sailors can expect to see the award citation added to their OMPF four to six weeks after the selection board has adjourned, said Giger. Ensure your awards are in your record JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 15

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill. bonser@navy.mil DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Friday Free Entertainment at 7 p.m. Feb. 8 Evans Acoustic Trio Feb. 15 Pam Affronti Feb. 22 Ace WinnFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 126 p.m., $1.50 games Bowling Tournament Feb. 16 at 12 p.m. $20 entry fee per person Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238. The gym equipment is temporarily relocated to The Zone, Bldg. 798 now through June 30. Check-out our new fitness schedule! New classes include Muscle Max, Extreme Bootcamp and Max Core Pick-up the latest copy at the fitness center.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Sleeping Beauty $25 $41 Fiddler On The Roof $33 $49 Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 Two-day ticket $52 Gatornationals March 15,16,17, 2013 Friday Reserved from $35 $39 Saturday & Sunday Reserved from $50 $54 Friday General Seating from $28 $32 Saturday & Sunday General Seating from $38 $42 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3. Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7. Blockout Dates: March 23 April 5. Call for pricing Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Entertainment Books $30 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT$19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Preferred seating $41, lower level seating $22 2012-13 Live Broadway Series Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Dream Girls May 21 MOSH $7 $12 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4 day hopper $153.25 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discounted tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT! Daytona 500 Feb. 24 tickets on sale now! $62-$209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Free Mall & Movie Trip Feb. 8 at 6 p.m. Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater Free Burger Night Feb. 19, 510 p.m. Stop by liberty to pick-up your coupon for a free Deweys burger! Free Bowling at NAS Freedom Lanes Feb. 20, 710 p.m. Shoes are not includedNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Feb. 19 for active duty Feb. 7 & 21 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 12:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DOD and guests. Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars featuring WreckIt Ralph Feb. 22, 6 p.m. at Patriots Grove Free popcorn and $.50 drinksFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School March 18 April 24 $500 per person Foam Fest volunteers neededVolunteers are needed to help Special Olympics Duval County during the 5K Foam Fest which will be held March 2 at the Jacksonville Equestrian Center on Normandy Boulevard, Jacksonville. This national race is cleaning up runners and walkers as they traverse obstacles loaded with soap and muddy water. Volunteers ages 16 and older will assist with obstacle course set up, race day events and tear down. There are opportunities for volunteers Feb. 26March 3. For more information, go to: www.SignUpGenius. com/go/30E0B4AA4A929A20-5kfoam/3704168. Navy Entomology Center of Excellences (NECE) in-house training program helps keep some of Navy Medicines brightest scientific minds at the top of their game, providing timely and accurate preventive medicine services that impact medical readi ness across the Department of the Navy (DoN). HM1(SCW) Dominick Spatola has played a criti cal role in maintaining and improving training at NECE since his arriv al onboard in March 2012. Developing and managing a ciriculum for Navy entomolo gists and preventive medicine techni cians is no small task and Spatola has been a force to be reckoned with, increasing capacity building across several training plat forms at the command. HM1 Spatola has done an incredible job expanding our train ing portfolio to include topics not necessarily related to our core vector control mission, but addressing the more general fields of public health and preventive medicine, said Training program keeps Navy entomologists on the cutting edge 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 7, 2013 17 Florida veterans will have access to free training, certification and job placement in the states home building, remodeling and light commercial con struction sectors through a new HBI veterans skills training and job placement program. HBI and the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity are partnering to help re-employ veterans with training and job placement in con struction. The HBI programlocated throughout the state with sites in Jacksonville, Tampa and Orlandois open to all veterans who are residents of the state of Florida. Construction employers report difficulty find ing qualified workers at all levels of the indus try, including entry-level and semi-skilled craft workers, apprentices, managers and subcontrac tors. With more than 20,000 employers in Florida, the state is the nations fourth largest market for home building. In fact, 12 of the top 20 hot jobs in Florida are construction industry related, and seven of the 80 local U.S. housing markets showing signs of improvement in June 2012 are in the state of Florida. Veterans participating in the HBI program will receive training in all facets of facilities mainte nance and general construction, including car pentry, electrical wiring, landscaping, masonry, painting, plumbing and weatherization. Program graduates earn an industry-sponsored and vali dated pre-apprenticeship certificate. HBI provides this free comprehensive training program to veterans that include support services, job placement and follow-up services for successful re-employment. Each veteran participating in the HBI program receives: develop an individualized training plan percent tools in hand training) equipment during training HBI is an approved Chapter 31 training site for the Department of Veterans Affairs. Classes are open enrollment. Contact LaTanya Guillory, HBI PACT for Veterans program manager at lguillory@ hbi.org or 904-625-3299 for information about how to register! For additional information about HBI, please visit www.hbi.org U.S. Navy ships named in honor of African-Americans named for an African-American, Harmon honored Mess Attendant First Class Leonard Roy Harmon, who posthumously was awarded the Navy Cross for heroism during the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, 13 November 1942. 1993. Named in honor of the noted scientist George Washington Carver (1864-1943). 1089), 1973-1994. Named in honor of Ensign Jesse L. Brown, USN (1926-1950), the first African-American Naval Aviator, who was killed in action during the Korean War. Cook Third Class Doris (Dorie) Miller, who was awarded the Navy Cross for heroism during the Pearl Harbor Raid, 7 December 1941. honor of Private First Class James Anderson, Jr., USMC (1947-1967), who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism during the Vietnam War. Sergeant Rodney M. Davis, USMC (1942-1967), who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism during the Vietnam War. Arctic Explorer Matthew Alexander Henson (1866-1955). George Watson, U.S. Army, who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism during the Second World War. Private First Class Oscar P. Austin, USMC (1948-1969), who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism during the Vietnam War. Cross recipient Ships Cook 3rd Class William Pinckney who rescued a fellow crew member onboard the car rier Enterprise during the Battle of Santa Cruz in October 1942. Master Chief Boatswains Mate (Master Diver) Carl M. Brashear (1931-2006), who joined the U.S. Navy in 1948. He was a pioneer in the Navy as one of the first AfricanAmericans to graduate from the Navy Diving School and was designated a Navy salvage diver. He was the first African-American to qualify and serve as a master diver while on active duty and the first U.S. Navy diver to be restored to full active duty as an amputee, the result of a leg injury he sustained during a salvage operation. After 31 years of service, Brashear officially retired from the U.S. Navy on April 1, 1979. Brashear was the subject of the 2000 movie Men of Honor starring Cuba Gooding Jr. Adm. Samuel L. Gravely Jr. (1922-2004), who was the first African American in the U.S. Navy to be commissioned an officer, the first African American to command a warship (USS Theodore E. Chandler); to command a major warship (USS Jouett); to achieve flag rank and eventually vice admiral; and to command a numbered fleet (3rd). Twenty-six cadets from the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps (USNSCC) recently visited the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville. The purpose of their visit was to expose cadets to the vari ous rating designations (job specifications) and the envi ronment of the Navy. Lt. j.g. Robert Long, commanding officer, stated, I appreciate the opportunity to have the cadets conduct their exercise at CNATTU as it strengthens the ties between the Navy and the community. The U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps was founded in 1958 and has since been committed to fostering leadership abilities and responsibility through hands on training while pro moting a drug and alcohol free environment. The Franklin D. Roosevelt Squadron of Jacksonville was commis sioned Sept. 1, 1961. They are considered one of the oldest Sea Cadet squad rons in America and currently comprised of 47 cadets. Long, a former combat Army engi neer, and Lt. j.g. David Welch, a retired U.S. Air Force officer, have been involved in the pro gram for over five years. The U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps is for ages 1317 while the Navy League Cadet Corps are from 10-12 years old. Both programs start with a twoweek boot camp after which the cadets must complete basic military requirements courses and various leadership courses to advance in pay grade. The Navy League Cadet Corps advance from E-1 (recruit cadet) thru E-6 (ships leading petty officer), while the Naval Sea Cadet Corps range from E-1 (seaman recruit) to E-7 (chief petty officer). The 26 cadets were instruct ed in the basic aspects of the aviation warfare systems oper ator, aviation electronics tech nician, and aviation structural mechanic ratings as well as the overall mission of CNATTU. The facilitators ATCS(AW) David Schmidt, AWV1(AW) Austin Combs and AWV1(AW) Wesley Lewis presented various stations, equipment and systems operated and main tained on the P-3 Orion air craft. Topics included radar and radio systems, MAD/ESM, APS-137, global positioning and inertial navigation systems as well as the duties of each aircrew member during missions. The cadets then visited the student trainers and had the opportunity to operate some of the equipment used to train aircrew and enlisted maintainers in the fleet. The cadets also visited the aviation structural mechanic trainers and briefly covered the landing gear, hydraulic system components, flight control surface components, and environmental control systems used on the P-3 Orion aircraft. The facilitators also assisted the cadets with building remote ly operated vehicles (ROVs) called SeaPerch. SeaPerch is part of an underwater robotics program spon sored by various business and technology based organiza tions that equips teachers and students with the resources needed to build ROVs. The program teaches basic engineering and science con cepts as well as teamwork. Upon completing their ROVs, the cadets participated in challenges based on the SeaPerch program. The SeaPerch program emphasizes teamwork with the opportunity to hone much needed skills in mathemat ics, science and engineering, Welch explained. Here theyre given a kit with parts and an instruction manual to build a basic concept design. As they go through the pro cess, they learn the funda mentals needed to explore various aspects and skills of engineering, including solder ing, ship design, propulsion, movement and the basic phys ics of motion. Cadets are also encouraged to come up with unique designs as well. This program is geared towards boosting interest in the engi neering field, for the military as well as the civilian sector. Its a rewarding experience, Long commented, We expose the cadets to a type of disci pline and structure you would normally only find in a military environment.Sea Cadets visit CNATTU Jax Free skills training and job placement for veteransNECE Officer in Charge Cmdr. Eric Hoffman. These courses advertise NECEs capabilities to potential customers aligning with the Navy surgeon generals priorities of readiness and value. New classes offered at NECE include Basic Life Support, Food Service Managers Class as well as a tri-base Enlisted Advancement program this past December. The Advancement Program for 25 first class hospital corps men prepared eligible first class petty officers for the chiefs exam, said Hoffman. This local program served to provide cost efficient training meeting the needs of our customers. This one course alone saved DoN over $30,000 in training costs. HM1 Spatola has also reached out to locally-based fleet medical departments to offer assistance in their preparations for required medical and quarantine inspec tions before standing out to sea and while deployed, said Dr. Andrew Beck, Head of Training at NECE. He is an exceptionally valuable asset to this department, this center, and the Navy. His efforts have a direct impact on the readiness of Navy personnel as well as indirect effects on the efficient operation of preventive medi cine in our region, he added. Spatola has also advocated for a professional development series, which is taught once a week at NECE to military, researchers and civilians. My job here at NECE is to ensure that Navy PMTs and entomolo gists are trained and ready to meet medical readiness chal lenges in an ever-changing operational environment increasing their overall value, said Spatola. The courses cover topics ranging from how to write enlisted performance evaluations to human parasites focusing on leadership, scientific knowledge and general Navy knowledge. Classes are not the only products that the NECE training department has to offer. NECE also boasts a state-of-the-art classroom with 19 wi-fi con nected laptops that can accom modate up to 40 students and is available to anyone at NAS Jax who wishes to book the room. For more information, contact Dave Wolfert at David.Wolfert@ med.navy.mil. NECE

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