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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 01-31-2013
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02027

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 31, 2013 SCOUT HONORED TRAINING VP-45 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com SECNAV supports Women in Service ReviewSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus released the fol lowing statement Jan. 24 pertaining to the Women in Service Review. I fully support Defense Secretary Leon Panettas decision to rescind the 1994 Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule, that removes bar riers preventing women Sailors and Marines from reaching their potential in certain fields. I am pleased the Navy has completed an initiative I announced several months ago to open up one of the few areas not currently available to women that of service on Virginia Class submarines (SSN). Three years ago, we announced a policy change allow ing women to serve in guidedmissile attack (SSGN) and bal listic missile submarines (SSBN) and this is a planned continua tion of that effort. Newly commissioned female officers have been selected for assignment to Virginia Class submarines upon suc cessful completion of the Naval Nuclear Powered training pipeline. We expect these officers, along with female Supply Corps Officers, to report to their sub marines in FY15. We also plan to include female enlisted Sailors in this process. The Navy has a long history of inclusion and integration and I am proud we have achieved another important milestone during my tenure as Secretary. Along with the changes already being made in the submarine force, rescinding the Direct Ground Combat and Assignment Rule allows Navy to expand opportunities for women in our riverine forces and in Navy billets that directly support Marine infantry operations like hospital corpsman and chaplains. The Marine Corps has already opened officer and staff noncommissioned officer billets in unrestricted mission occupational specialties in ground combat units that were previously closed to women such as artillery, armor, low altitude air defense and combat engineer battalions. We will continue to seek female volunteers to train at the Infantry Officer Course to prepare women to serve in the infantry as part of a comprehensive research plan that will inform the Marine Corps implementation plan. The Marines are dedicated to maintaining the high est levels of combat readiness and capitalizing upon every opportunity to enhance our warfighting capa bilities and the contributions of every Marine its simply the right thing to do. As the Marine Corps moves forward with this pro cess, our focus will remain on combat readiness and generating combat-ready units while simultaneously ensuring maximum success for every Marine. Women continue to serve bravely and honorably at sea and ashore. Drawing from their talent in addi tional assignments increases our ability to maintain readiness. We will meet the goals and timeline laid out by Secretary Panetta and we will continue to deploy the finest naval force in the world. The Navy announced plans on Jan. 23 to promote safety and provide education and awareness on the dangers of irresponsible alcohol use and the negative impact it has on mission accomplishment, by intro ducing the use of alcohol detection devices (ADD) across the fleet. As part of the Secretary of the Navys (SECNAV) 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative, SECNAV approved the use of ADDs as another tool available for commanders to deter irresponsible use of alco hol and assist in identifying service members who may require support and assistance with alcohol use decisions. U.S. Fleet Forces conducted a pilot test on ADDs with 13 sea and shore commands during the 100 days of summer from May 24 through Sept. 30, 2012. The data collected fleet-wide was used to develop the processes and policy for how best to implement a program Navy wide. The office of the Chief of Naval Operations approved OPNAV Instruction 5350.8 Jan. 22, which established policies and procedures for the use of the hand-held devices Navy wide. Fleet feedback was instrumental in the develop ment of this policy, said Adm. Bill Gortney, com mander, U.S. Fleet Forces. The test verified that the majority of our ser vice members, who choose to drink alcohol, do so responsibly. It also verified that our command ing officers need a flexible program that serves to increase the Navys awareness about the impacts of alcohol. Gortney and Adm. Cecil Haney, commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet, in a joint-message to commanders said the new program will complement current com mand efforts to educate service members on the responsible use of alcohol. The program also promotes standards of safety, education and training, and awareness. According to the instruction, the objective of ADD Navy increases alcohol education, awareness efforts

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Jan. 31 1944 American amphibious landing on Kwajalein, Marshall Islands. 1961 Lt. Cmdr. Samuel Lee Gravely Jr. becomes first African-American to command a combat ship, USS Falgout. 1981 Era of enlisted naval aviators ends when last pilot retired. Feb. 1 1941 United States Fleet reorga nized, reviving Atlantic and Pacific Fleets. 1942 USS Enterprise and USS Yorktown make first World War II air strike, Japanese Marshall Islands. 1955 Operation Deep Freeze, a research task force, established in Antarctic. Feb. 2 1800 USS Constellation, under Capt. Thomas Truxtun, defeats La Vengeance. 1862 USS Hartford, commanded by Capt. David G. Farragut, departs Hampton Roads for Mississippi River campaign. Feb. 3 1801 Senate approves peace treaty with France ending undeclared naval war that began 1798. 1917 U.S. severs diplomatic relations with Germany. Feb. 4 1779 John Paul Jones takes com mand of Bonhomme Richard. 1959 Keel laying of USS Enterprise, first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, Newport News, Va. Feb. 5 1854 Dedication of first chapel built on Navy property, Annapolis, Md. 1941 Chief Navy Nurse Marion Olds and Nurse Leona Jackson arrive on Guam. 1971 Moonwalk by Capt. Alan B. Shepherd Jr., commander of Apollo 14 and Cmdr. Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot. During the 9-day mis sion, 94 lbs of lunar material was col lected and Shepard became the first person to hit a golf ball on the moon. Recovery was by helicopter from USS New Orleans (LPH-11). Feb. 6 1862 Union gunboat squadron cap tures Fort Henry, Tennessee River. 1922 World powers sign the Washington Naval Treaty providing for limitation of naval armament. 1973 In accordance with the agree ment at the Paris Peace Talks, Navy Task Force 78 begins Operation End Sweep, the mine clearance of North Vietnamese waters of mines laid in 1972. According to a recent news article in the Bangor Daily News, an unintended consequence of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 has been loads of apples and celery being dumped in the cafeteria trash can. I fear my son is guilty. The Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act, rolled out by first lady Michelle Obama and the USDA, overhauled school lunches and put the smack-down on basically everything one of my sons will eat: French fries, chicken nuggets, and sugary treats like yogurt (not the healthy kind of yogurt, but the flavored, mix-ins kind). This son, whom I cant name, has been a picky eater from the beginning. As young as 2-years-old, he went on food strikes that lasted for what felt like days and sent me into full blown panic attacks that he might die of starva tion. He wont, the doctor assured me with an infuriating smile. Just let him cry it out. This doctor, my sons first pediatrician, had silver hair and grown children. Did he even remember what its like listening to a hungry toddler moan and cry in his bed at night? Or did he, like my own husband, only know what its like to have waxed philosophical about childhood nutrition before retreating to the living room to watch ESPN, leaving his wife to deal with crying babies who wont go to bed? I struggled with my sons eating habits for years, and when he was still young enough, I stopped just short of force-feeding him all the right things. My standards of what is healthy dipped dangerously low. If my son was eating, it was a victory. When he ate a smidgen of spinach artichoke dip on a tortilla chip, I did the wave. When he agreed to put cheese on his buttered noodles, I thought confetti would fall from the ceiling. When he took one miniscule bite of scrambled egg, I wept with joy as I envisioned his bodys cells devouring the morsel. Any time I found a reasonably healthy food my son would eat, I went to great lengths to stock up on it. I once traveled an entire city in search of a specific kind of yogurt: one that is creamy and light, but doesnt have any bits in it. You see, for my son, its a texture-thing, not a taste-thing. I came home from the yogurt quest with bags of differ ent brands for him to try. None were right. Then we found the one, that blessed blend of creamy, light and bit-less yogurt that my son could eat by the gallons. And the next month, the manufacturer put it on their discontinued list. If I could find that yogurt companys decision-maker, Id fall on my knees before him and beg him to change his mind. Thats how bad the eating situation gets at my house. This was all a family secret a private torture until my son went to school, where hed eat lunch in public. What on earth could I pack for this texturallyand food-challenged kid? I knew what my son would eat for lunch, but thats a different thing than what he should eat. Would the teach ers think less of me if I packed his lunch with only peanut butter on bread and a bag of crackers? Would the other kids have baby carrots and hummus? A new rat race began. Apparently it isnt enough to get your child to school on time and in matching clothes; now you have to pack them an all-organic, balanced lunch, too. I was destined to lose. But I dutifully packed my sons lunch with carrots, applesauce and anything else that looked good, along with his peanut-butter bread and crackers. Then one day, his preschool teacher sent home a note: He doesnt eat the carrots. They just go in the trash. Feel free to pack what hell actually eat. Gulp. Ironically (or perhaps obviously), for all my sons tex ture problems, he will eat just about any type of candy or sweet. I could easily fill his lunch with chocolate and cookies. Hed eat those. But I dont, not even when his bag seems nearly empty, because Ive learned to compromise with lunch. Ill forgo the makes-me-feel-like-a-betterparent carrots, but I wont succumb to sweets and junk food. Then, at dinner, when I can oversee, I stand my ground about one bite of green beans and one piece of chicken. And once a month, my son agrees to buy school lunch. I have no idea what he eats from it, but I have my guesses: the roll with butter. The rest probably goes in the trash. So I understand the school lunch overhaul of 2010. Really, I do. And Im appreciative of our governments attention to childrens health. But Im not surprised, and maybe even a little comforted, that my kid isnt the only one dumping the greens in the trash bin.Hey, MoneyChic! I met the girl of my dreams a few months ago! Things have been going so well I want to ask her to marry me. The only catch is, I have noticed her spending habits are very differ ent than mine. Is there a way to find out how financially compatible we are? MoneyChic Sez: Congratulations to you on your upcoming engagement! You are very smart to want to compare your outlook on finances with that of your future wife. With the divorce rate said to be almost 50 percent in our country, it is best to not start your mar riage with one foot already out the door! The best way to approach this topic with your fianc (Ill call her Jane) is to do so in an open and honest manner. Ask Jane if you may schedule an appointment with her and tell her what exactly you would like to talk about. Do not bring up the topic of finances after a stressful week or busy day. Start with an easy topic such as how both of you view money. Be open and honest about expectations, goals, and needs. Who is the spender and who is the saver? What are your thoughts on making big purchases, taking vacations, or allowances? You do not have to agree, you only have to listen to each other and figure out how to make your finances work. Each individual has different thoughts on money because most people only know what they see their family doing. Ask Jane if her parents gave her any financial education and how they handled money. You share the same information with her. Discuss thoughts about bill paying. Will one person assume the role as bill payer? Jane may know how to balance her accounts and pay bills on time, all the time. You may learn something from her! Is Jane a good driver? Do you have lots of wrecks in your driving history? That plays a role in your finances as well. Lastly, you might want to look over each others credit reports so you are aware of exactly what you are working with. One persons debt becomes a couples debt once a marriage has taken place. Are you ready to assume her baggage and is she ready to take on yours? To obtain your credit reports, go to annualcreditreport.com. This website offers your reports from all three of the credit bureaus. Its a lot to consider, however you are going to want to know the ins and outs of Janes financial thinking once wedding planning is kicked into high gear. As always, the NavyMarine Corps Relief Society is here to moder ate a money conversation with your fianc and prepare a future budget with you. If you would like more information on how we can help, stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or give us a call at 542-2832. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an email at megan.stolle@nmcrs.org. Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act sends food to the trash Personnel needed for bus surveyThe Jacksonville Transportation Authority is con ducting a survey at NAS Jacksonville Feb. 8 to deter mine if a shuttle service is needed aboard the station to transport personnel to various facilities. Representatives will be available at Naval Hospital Jacksonville from 8-10 a.m.; Base Commissary from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and the Enlisted Barracks from 1:30-4 p.m. to conduct surveys. Personnel can also complete the survey by going to www.surveymonkey.com/s/veterans-and-militaryfamilies-transportation-options For more information, e-mail talks@jtafla.com or call 630-3100.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 3

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Capt. Michael Johansson, command ing officer of Naval Support Activity Hampton Roads awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to the following nine officers at VP-30 on Jan. 11. The following officers were recog nized during the ceremony: Ensign John Baker, Ensign Kyle Galarneau, Lt. j.g. Ryan Goulet, Ensign Thomas Lane, Ensign Samuel Lepley, Ensign Kelly Miller, Ensign Jake Peterson, Ensign Aaron Rosa, and Lt. j.g. Kelly Wehle. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer (UMFO) syllabus at VP-30, earning their coveted wings of gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the CAT I Fleet Replacement Squadron syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT I syl labus, they will report to operational Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance squadrons to begin their initial sea tours in either Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, Whidbey Island, Wash., or NAS Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola where all aviation officers undergo a classroom syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation, which includes aerody namics, meteorology and principles of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transi tion from a classroom learning environ ment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3, EP-3 or P-8 training pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. VP-30 wings Navys newest naval flight officersis to promote safety and education on the effects of alcohol use decisions, and enhances leadership awareness and understanding of their units alco hol use culture. Deterring irresponsible use of alcohol is essen tial to the readiness of our fleet and ensuring the health and safety of our service members and units, said Gortney. Fleet Forces, in partnership with Pacific Fleet, will remain engaged in provid ing service members the tools and resources to make these responsible choices. The ADD is one of many tools commanders have to educate service members. Focused on those in a duty status and during normal working hours, the device is not intend ed to test those in an authorized leave or liberty status. Commanding officers may also use ADD results as a basis to further evaluate a service members fitness for duty through use of a com petence for duty examination. The instruction applies to all active duty, reserve and personnel from other services assigned to Navy units in any capacity. Alcohol detection devices will begin arriving to commands in February. ALCOHOL AWARENESS The Navy is seeking motivated first and second class petty officers with career counselor experience to consider applying for a rating conversion to Navy Counselor (NC). The Navys goal is to make 81 active-duty Navy counselors this fiscal year, said NCCM Darryl Blackmon, NC technical advisor, Bureau of Naval Personnel, enlisted community management division. Unlike other ratings, NC is not open to incom ing recruits and the rating must attract experienced Sailors from the fleet. Applicants must be active duty first and second class petty officers with six to 14 years of active naval service; have no marks below 3.0 in the previous three years performance evaluations; have an Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test score of VE+AR=105, minimum 50 AR; have at least 12 consecutive months experience as a command, departmental or divisional career counselor during the previous three years prior to application date. This rating requires a thorough knowledge of the Navys personnel and administrative procedures and policies. Any Sailor who intends to apply for the NC rating should be ready to accept the responsibility as command career counselor and provide a positive lasting impact to the Navys greatest asset; its Sailors, said Blackmon. The NC rating assists commands in planning and implementation of the enlisted command career development and retention program. NCs are the commands principal advisors on poli cies and regulations related to Navy career planning matters. Responsibilities include execution of enlisted reten tion programs of the Navy and counseling Sailors and their families on active duty and post-retirement incentives, opportunities and benefits. Successful NCs work hard to develop strong coun seling techniques, as well as exemplary organizational and administrative habits, said Blackmon. The community relies on strong oral and written communication skills to keep our Sailors informed, and ensure the right Sailor fills the right billet, he continued. There are currently more than 600 NCs providing career management services to fleet Sailors. Opportunity for advancement consistently exceeds the Navy advancement average. Sailors competing for first class petty officer typi cally have 100 percent advancement opportunity. The NC rating was established in 1972 to assist in managing retention and augmenting recruiting with subject matter experts. Sailors who wish to apply for conversion should speak with an NC and read MILPERSMAN 1440-020 available at www.npc.navy.mil. Navy announces conversion opportunities to NC 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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Eagle Scout commended for NAS Jax wildlife projectCory Parker of Boy Scout Troop 101, was pre sented a letter of commendation Jan. 22 by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Robert Sanders in recog nition of Parkers renovation of the stations butterfly garden located at the Black Point Watchable Wildlife Area. I wish to express my appreciation for your out standing leadership in the scouting movement and the Jacksonville community. Your design of the but terfly garden entrance and replacement of broken fencing was welcomed and approved by the NAS Jax Environmental Department, said Sanders. I was impressed by your commitment to this project and your initiative in contacting donors to fund the proj ect. On construction day, Parker led four groups from Troop 101 in building the arbor, digging post holes and installing recycled plastic lattice fencing, as well as planting two jasmine vines. Parker, a student at Mandarin High School, said that Troop 101 has completed a number of lifestyleenhancing projects at NAS Jax over the past 12 years. Kevin Parker, Corys father, said the scouts of Troop 101 are always looking for their next project aboard NAS Jax. The parents of many of our scouts serve in the mili tary or have prior military experience so its impor tant for the Boy Scouts in Troop 101 to be engaged in worthwhile projects here on base, said Mr. Parker, who is also chairman of the troop. Kevin thanked skipper Sanders for the letter of com mendation and command coin. Im very proud to have designed this environmental program at Black Point. My thanks go out to my parents, base leader ship, my troop leader and all my fellow scouts who worked with me. Military retiree seminar is Feb. 2Military retirees and their spouses from all branch es of service are invited to attend the Retired Military Seminar Feb. 2 at the NAS Jacksonville Officers Club from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The seminar provides infor mation on a variety of top ics including healthcare, vet erans benefits, assisted living, long-term care, survivor ben efit plan, pay and financial matters and other retiree issues. Retired Adm. Mark Fitzgerald, former commander, U. S. Naval Forces Europe, commander, U. S. Naval Forces Africa and commander, Allied Joint Force Command, Naples will present the keynote address. Booths with additional information will be manned by officials from the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Defense Finance and Accounting Service, the Veterans Administration, Naval Hospital Jacksonville, legal services and other military organizations. Entrance to NAS Jacksonville requires a current Department of Defense military or dependent identi fication card. For more information, contact J.J. Ryan at 542-5790 or james.j.ryan@navy.mil The Navy Exchange (NEX) wants to help its customers finance their childrens college edu cation through its A-OK Student Reward Program. All qualified students will participate in a quar terly drawing for mon etary awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500 for a total of $5,500 per quar ter. The next drawing will be held at the end of February 2013. Any eligible fulltime student that has a B-grade point aver age equivalent or better, as determined by their school system, may enter the drawing. Eligible stu -NEX rewards students with A-OK Program JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 Special aircraft test defenses of carrier strike group A six-plane detachment of F/A18A+ Hornets from Fighter Squadron Composite (VFC) 12, along with a sixplane detachment operated by Airborne Tactical Advantage Company (ATAC), a two-plane detachment from L-3, and a two-plane detachment from Phoenix Air are operating from NAS Jacksonville to provide adversary threat training for the Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Strike Group that is currently underway in the Atlantic for its Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). Together, aircraft from VFC-12, plus contractor adversary support providers such as ATAC, L-3 and Phoenix Air rep resent a formidable and realistic hostile opposing force to sharpen the war fight ing capabilities of Navy expeditionary forces preparing for deployment. Cmdr. Jeff Menna, a pilot with VFC12, explained that the Fighting Omars are the Naval Reserves premier adver sary squadron for providing threat tactics training to Navy strike fighter squadrons, Based at NAS Oceana in Virginia Beach, our main job is to provide tacti cal dissimilar air combat training for Navy, Marine Corps and other aviation units when tasked. For COMPTUEX, we primarily oppose air strikes from the carrier air wing as they enter or leave the air space of Pinecastle Range Complex, said Menna. Our goal is to enable strike fighter aircrew to hone their war fighting skills against a credit able adversary prior to deploying in the face of real threats. In late 2012, VFC-12 began their tran sition from the blue camouflage F/A

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 7 18C Hornet that they flew for seven years to the upgraded F/A-18A+ Hornet painted in the bold SU-35 Flanker Arctic Splinter camouflage. The unique challenges inherent to the squadrons mission make the Fighting Omars one of the Navys most sought after aviation duty assignments in the Navy. Although highly skilled and qualified in the art of aerial combat, all newly assigned pilots must com plete a thorough and unique flight syllabus. Among the squadrons most frequent deployment sites are NAS Jax, NAS Key West and NAS Fallon, Nev. ATAC pilot Rob DeStasio said, According to daily tasking from Commander, Strike Force Training Atlantic (CSFTA), ATAC aircraft present a variety of threat profiles either against Carrier Air Wing-3, sur face ships in the strike group, or both. We may also fly joint missions against the strike group with Hornets from VFC-12 or Lear jets from L-3, said DeStasio. L-3 has provided the Navy with COMPTUEX adversary support for a number of years, explained Jim Bailey. Our Lear jets deliver threat simulations for ship attacks, as well as towing aerial targets for ships and fighter aircraft. Depending on the training requirements of CSFTA, we may also fly joint missions with ATAC and other threat providers. COMPTUEX is a series of training scenarios designed to certify Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Strike Group as a deployment-ready fighting force capable of completing operations in overseas theaters. COMPTUEXPhotos by Clark Pierce

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The VP-45 Pelicans helped preserve the memory of thou sands of fallen American and Filipino war heroes during a recent detachment to Clark Air Force Base in Angeles City, Philippines. Working along side the volunteers of VFW Post 2485, aircrew and main tenance personnel spent a day grooming the properties of Clark Veterans Cemetery. The cemetery is run entirely from donations and relies on volun teers to maintain it. The project demonstrated one of the many ways that U.S. and Filipino forces have ben efitted from their historically strong relationship since the departure of U.S. Air Force per sonnel following the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991. The Clark Veterans Cemetery is rich in history and is testa ment to the long-standing alliance of the American and Philippines governments. Interred at the site are hun dreds of Filipino Scouts, men that fought alongside U.S. forces in the period follow ing the Spanish American War. The site is also the final resting place for the count less Filipino-Americans who courageously fought and died during the course of WWI and WWII. The cemetery also hon ors those of Filipino descent who have given the ultimate sacrifice in campaigns such as Operation Enduring Freedom, and performs military honors for approximately 40 burials a year. The Pelicans found the expe rience to be both educational and rewarding. Lt. j.g. Joseph Tompkins, the crews newest pilot, said this of his experi ence, It really opened my eyes. I never realized how much of a role the Philippines played in American history. I feel it is part of our duty as Sailors to help preserve these memories. This was the general con sensus among the crew, espe cially after they gained valu able insight from Post 2485 Commander and Clark Veterans Cemetery Chairman, John Gilbert. Gilbert is dedicat ed to the remembrance of these individuals, and has been essential in the rebuilding and maintenance of the cemetery since VFW Post 2485 assumed control of the facility from the Air Force. Not only did VP-45 get a chance to work alongside the local community, they also flew alongside their Filipino counterparts during a mari time patrol flight. This event allowed them to observe how the maritime patrol and recon naissance aircraft community patrols sea space both along its coastlines and abroad. The crew felt this was extremely helpful in building confidence and trust between the two countries and was a great way to improve joint operations efficiency. While most of the detach ment was spent complet ing essential 7th Fleet mis VP-45 Pelicans help preserve pride abroad 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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Recreational boaters at NAS Jacksonville will soon enjoy safe haven thanks to a new con crete floating dock system with quality boating amenities, said NAVFAC Southeast Public Works Department Construction Manager Lt. j.g. John Berube. The renovation of NAS Jacksonvilles Mulberry Cove Marina is on schedule for comple tion Feb. 10, he said. New dock boxes, water and electrical connections, a station ary pump-out and fueling station will provide a higher level of ame nities for boaters. Crews were busy Jan. 24 put ting the finishing touches on the 3,000-gal. gasoline fueling system. Were finishing up the hydro static tests to ensure that there are no leaks in the system before we introduce fuel to the storage tank and lines, said Berube. Also, the City of Jacksonville is on site today to perform our fuel tank compliance inspection. The Defense Department website for military children has added new fea tures to help parents and educators explain difficult topics of the military lifestyle to children. Since its launch in January 2012, MilitaryKidsConnect.org has served more than 125,000 visitors and won five industry excellence awards. To mark the one-year anniversary, the website added new content designed for children, parents and educators. The new features include: plans for teachers, school counselors, and educators to better understand the differences between military and civil ian youth; taries by military kids sharing their experiences; ents on handling grief, loss and physical injury. The website, created by the Defense Departments National Center for Telehealth and Technology, known as T2, uses innovative ways to help mili tary youth cope with the unique strains of military life. In addition to disruptions from par ents deploying to assignments away from home, military children are affect ed by moving frequently, changing schools and making new friends. They also have to live with readjust ment issues when a parent returns from deployments. These issues may include post-traumatic stress and physical dis abilities. After watching the interaction with kids on MilitaryKidsConnect this past year, we saw many conversations about trying to understand the issues they live with, said Dr. Kelly Blasko, T2 psy chologist. We developed the added features to help parents and teachers answer the questions the kids were sharing with each other. Blasko said the Web site is continu ing to add features and information to military children with the special chal lenges of living in a military family. Separations, moving and changing friends frequently may be unusual for civilian children, but its a normal life style for military children. The website helps them live in that world and, hope fully, makes it more fun for them. The National Center for Telehealth and Technology serves as the primary Defense Department office for cuttingedge approaches in applying technol ogy to psychological health. Military kids website also helps parents, educators Mulberry Cove Marina taking shape JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 11

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Deweys Big Game Party Feb. 3, doors open at 5 p.m., food served at 6 p.m. $10 per person, includes buffet and door prizesFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not includedSaturday Night Extreme Bowling7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental includedFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 The gym equipment is tempo rarily relocated to The Zone, Bldg. 798 now through June 30. Check-out our new fitness schedule! New classes include Muscle Max, Extreme Bootcamp and Max Core Pick-up the latest copy at the fitness centerI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Sleeping Beauty $25 $41 Fiddler On The Roof $33 $49 Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 2-day ticket $52 Gatornationals March 15,16,17, 2013 Fri Reserved from $35 $39 Sat & Sun Reserved from $50 $54 Fri General Seating from $28 $32 Sat & Sun General Seating from $38 $42 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3. Tickets are valid for redemp tion through June 7. Blockout Dates: March 23 April 5, 2013 Call for pricing Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Entertainment Books $30 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23. Preferred seating $41, lower level seating $22 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Dream Girls May 21 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discount ed tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off prop erty hotels near attractions at ITT! Daytona 500 Feb. 24, 2013 tick ets on sale now! $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. SNAG Golf Lesson Feb. 6 & Feb. 21 at 6 p.m. NAS Jax Golf Course Free Mall & Movie Trip Feb. 8 at 6 p.m. Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater Free Burger Night Feb. 19, 5 10 p.m. Stop by liberty to pick-up your coupon for a free Deweys burger!NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees February 5 & 19 for active duty February 7 & 21 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 12:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holi days.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recre ation are available!Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m.Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more infor mation. Movie Under the Stars Feb. 22, 6 p.m. at Patriots Grove Free popcorn and $.50 drinksFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School March 18 April 24 $500 per person FREE Live Entertainment Friday, Feb. 1 at 7 p.m.KevinThe Human Jukebox Let him Rock You! Friday, Feb. 8 at 7 p.m.Evans Acoustic TrioEnjoy songs of the 50s through today!Friday, Feb. 15 at 7 p.m. Pam AffrontiOutstanding songwriting and exceptionally compelling performances!Friday, Feb. 22 at 7 p.m. Ace WinnAn acoustic guitar, naked lyrics style, nothing shy about it, stretching syllables out as if each word is being torn from him.Call (904) 542-3900 for more info. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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Volunteers are needed to help Special Olympics Duval County during the 5K Foam Fest which will be held March 2 at the Jacksonville Equestrian Center on Normandy Boulevard, Jacksonville. This national race is cleaning up run ners and walkers as they traverse obsta cles loaded with soap and muddy water. Volunteers ages 16 and older will assist with obstacle course set up, race day events and tear down. There are opportunities for volun teers Feb. 26 through March 3. For more information and to sign up, go to: www.SignUpGenius.com/go/ 30E0B4AA4A929A20-5kfoam/3704168.Volunteers needed for Special Olympics JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 The Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville announces their Sailors and Instructors of the Quarter. AS1(AW/SW) Daphne Guzman was selected as Sailor of the Quarter First Quarter FY-13. As Support Equipment Electrical Phase leading petty officer, Guzman managed 12 courses and 13 instructors ensuring a 100 percent grad uation rate for over 60 students. Additionally, she completed three college courses through Southern Illinois University and represented the Navy as an ambassador by volunteering 48 off-duty hours to Jacksonville Airport USO, CCD teacher for St. Patricks Catholic Church, and San Mateo Elementary Big Sister program. AS1(AW/SW/NAC) James Forbes was selected as Senior Instructor of the Quarter, Fourth Quarter, CY-12. As Mobile Electric Power Plants Intermediate Maintenance Training Unit instructor, Forbes provided 128 hours of instruction this Quarter to 11 students while achieving an impres sive 100 percent graduation rate with an average GPA of 94.4 percent. AT2(AW/SW) Marnicca Gomez was selected as Junior Sailor of the Quarter, First Quarter FY-13. As MTU 1005 MH-60R Avionics, Laser Safety, and H-60 Wire System Repair instructor, she provided 2,700 hours of instruc tion to eight students with a 100 percent graduation rate and average GPA of 97.8 percent. Gomez also spent 100 hours coordinating the Girls on the Run event through the Sea Service Leadership Association for which she is acting president of one of the six national chapters. AO2(AW/SW) Andrew Stokes was selected as Junior Instructor of the Quarter, Fourth Quarter, CY-12. As MTU 1005 Aviation Ordnance leading petty officer, Stokes is the course super visor of the Weapons Load, Armament and Release courses as well as a quali fied instructor for H-60 Wire System Repair and Laser Safety courses. He has provided over 580 hours of instruction this quarter to 14 students achieving a 100 percent graduation rate and an average GPA of 96.7 percent. A five-plane training detachment from VAQ-129 of NAS Whidbey Island, Wash., recently traveled cross-coun try to complete Basic Fighter Maneuvers (BFM) and Fighter Weapons Deployment for instructors of the squadrons EA-15G Growler airborne elec tronic attack aircraft. This is an all-instruc tor detachment for EA-15G pilots and naval flight officers (NFOs), explained NFO Lt. Jason Windom. We like training in NAS Jax air space at this time of year because the weather at our home base of NAS Whidbey Island, Wash., is horrible in comparison to your blue sky and mild temperatures. Instructor pilot Lt. James Laird noted, The Navy is still transitioning from the EA-6B Prowler to the EA-15G Growler, so there are two sides to our house much like the P-3 to P-8 transition going on here at NAS Jacksonville. BFM consist of tactical turns, rolls and other actions to get behind or above an enemy, before the opponent can do the same. BFM are typically uni versal maneuvers that can be performed in most any fighter aircraft, and are usually con sidered to be training maneu vers. Training usually begins with pilots flying the same type of aircraft, pitting only their skills against each other. VAQ-129 Vikings train at NAS Jax CNATTU Jax recognizes Sailors/Instructors of the Quarter Awards Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service mem bers and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. The following is the schedule for 2013: FFSC offers life skills workshops to benefit military and families VA disability assistance available for those retiring/separating If you are retiring or separating from active duty and need assistance submitting your claim for disability and compensation to the Veterans Administration, you can start one year prior to retir ing/separating by getting medical information in order. AMVETS is the Veterans Service Organization advocate for separating or retiring service members and families providing assistance with submission of claims to the VA for benefits, disabilities and com pensation. AMVETS is a national Veterans Service Organization authorized to submit claims to the VA and advocate for veterans and their families with the VA nationwide. Assistance is free and you are not required to become a member of AMVETS. Call 542-2834 or david.d.sanders@navy.mil

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VP-16s CWO4 Goodwin retires after 30 years of serviceThe VP-16 War Eagles honored the 30 years of service of CWO4 Windell Goodwin during his retirement cere mony at the VP-30 auditorium Jan. 18. The guest speaker was Lt. Cmdr. Shannon Clark. In attendance were Goodwins wife, Melissa, their two daughters, Kristyn and Kalese, and numerous coworkers, friends and fam ily members. Goodwin, originally from Orangeburg, S.C., began his Navy career in 1982 through the Delayed Entry Program. After completing basic training at Naval Recruit Training Center Great Lakes, Ill., he reported to Basic Electricity and Electronic A School in Millington, Tenn. as an antisubmarine warfare technician. His first operational squadron was VS-28 at NAS Cecil Field. Goodwin departed VS-28 in 1987 as a third class petty officer after being deployed on board USS Independence and USS Forrestal to the Mediterranean Sea, Indian Ocean, and North Arabian Sea. Goodwin then reported to Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Detachment (AIMD), Naval Air Facility, Mayport, as an SH-60B anti-submarine warfare avi onics small system technician. While there, he advanced to second class petty officer and qualified as col lateral duty inspector. Goodwins fol lowing tour was with Sea Operational Detachment at NAS Jacksonville in August 1990. He worked in support of the SH-3 and SH-60F and deployed twice on board USS Theodore Roosevelt in support of multiple operations, including Desert Shield and Desert Storm. During this time, he also completed an associ ate degree in military studies and was advanced to first class petty officer. In 1994, Goodwin transferred to AIMD at NAS Cecil Field, where he was assistant test director and leading petty officer. During this tour, he was promoted to chief petty officer and earned the titles of NAS Cecil Fields 1997 Military Representative of the Year and 1996 Sailor of the Year Finalist. Goodwin returned to USS Theodore Roosevelt in 1998 as part of AIMD. Laboring diligently in his work cen ters, he also completed a bachelors degree in business administration from Columbia College, and in 2001 he earned his commission as a chief war rant officer. After completing the Aviation Maintenance Officer Course, Goodwin transferred to NAS North Island in San Diego deploying with USS Nimitz to the Western Pacific/Arabian Gulf in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. His next tour brought him back to NS Mayport to join HSL-48 as the material control officer in 2004. As a Viper, Goodwin earned the honor of being the squadrons Maintenance Officer of the Year for two consecutive years. In 2007, he transferred to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Detachment Mayport as the maintenance material control officer (MMCO). In 2009, Goodwin joined VP-16 at NAS Jacksonville to serve as assistant maintenance officer and MMCO. As a War Eagle, he was critical in the success of two deployments to the 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility. He has also been vitally important in the squadrons transition from the P-3C to the P-8A Poseidon. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 17

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While theres a lot of talk about influenza (flu) in the national news lately, were staying pretty healthy locally. Across Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles patient popula tions in Albany, Jacksonville, Key West, Kings Bay and Mayport were seeing flulike illness activity thats simi lar to last year at this time. This might be due in part to the success of the vaccination campaign at each of the five bases where NH Jacksonville has a facility. At our hospital and branch health clinics this flu season, we were early in meeting our goal to vaccinate 100 percent of active duty. We also vacci nated nearly two-thirds of our pregnant patientswhile the national average is about 10 percent. Influenza is a serious illness, leading to numerous hospital izations and deaths each year, and its important to protect against it. What can people do? The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recom mends flu vaccine for everyone age six months and up. Its still worthwhile to get vaccinated if you havent alreadyand the hospital and branch health clinics have vaccine on-hand. More recommendations from the CDC include: Avoid close contact with sick people. If youre sick, stay home. Sneeze or cough into your elbow or a tissue. Dont sneeze or cough into your hands. Wash or sanitize your hands often. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Practice good healthkeep your home and workplace clean, get plenty of sleep, be active, manage stress, drink fluids and eat nutritious food. For information, check out www.cdc.gov or call Immunizations at 542-7810 (open for walk-ins 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays; and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thursdays). And as always, to reach your Medical Home Port team, call Central Appointments and After-Hours Nurse Advice Line at 800-529-4677 (at Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville during clinic hours, call 5467094/7095). Find out more about ser vices at the hospital and branch health clinics on NH Jacksonvilles website (www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax) and keep up with current news on Facebook (www.facebook.com/ NavalHospitalJacksonville). As tax season nears, Military OneSource and H&R Block have again joined forces to provide a free online tax preparation service for service mem bers. Tony Jackson, a program analyst for the Military OneSource program office, detailed the services available for troops and their families. Military OneSource is a gateway to a free tax preparation service, partnered with H&R Block, he said. We also have tax consultants who can provide assis tance, whether its seeking and filling out tax forms or any other tax-related information. Jackson emphasized it is a safe and secure way for service members to pre pare their taxes online. Military OneSource and H&R block definitely meet industry standards for security for websites, he said. Also, encryption software is used and theres also no selling of informa tion, so service members and fam ily members can be assured that their information is secure, and it stays with in Military OneSource and H&R Block. Jackson noted that two services basic and premium are provided through H&R Block, with one notable difference. The basic service is free, he said, and the premium service would apply to taxpayers who must file Schedule C returns, generally to report gains or losses from business ownership. When you start getting into pre mium, youre going to incur some additional costs, where basic is free, Jackson said. For those not sure which service they should use, Jackson encouraged them to use the Military OneSource website as a guide. The site lists answers to fre quently asked questions. You can always contact Military OneSource at 1-800-342-9647, Jackson said. Were open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, so any questions you have, you can use the website or the call cen ter at the [toll-free] number. Jackson said both methods are effec tive in contacting Military OneSource tax consultants offering useful services for troops and their families. Not only do they provide forms and basic information relative to militaryspecific tax issues and questions, they are a gateway to get you to H&R Block, he said. If your tax situation warrants, theyll get you to a volunteer income tax assistance clinic on your local mili tary installation or larger command. Its one-stop shopping. These tax consultants cannot prepare tax forms or direct people to do any thing, Jackson said. Everything is on a recommended basis. All members of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps are eligible to use the service, he said, including mem bers of the National Guard and Reserve components, regardless of activation status. Coast Guard reservists activated under Title 10 authority to serve with the Navy also are eligible and so are spouses and other family members enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System. Family members that have been des ignated to provide support to deployed service members, medically discharged retirees and discharged service mem bers within 180 days of their discharge date are eligible for Military OneSource services, Jackson added. The key to these services is finan cial readiness, which is a Defense Department priority. We understand that financial readiness is a readiness issue. If you have a service member whos concerned about their financial situation then that detracts from the mission. Jackson also provided his personal testament to using the free tax prepara tion program, having served on active duty in the Marine Corps as a personnel officer for more than 20 years. He said his family still uses the ser vice. My daughter is a military spouse and she continues to use it as well, he said. This programs ultimate goal is to ensure service members and their fami lies know that Military OneSource is an option. We hope its the first option for getting your taxes prepared or answer ing any questions or issues you have with taxes, said Jackson. Just know that Military OneSource is there to help you.Do we have a flu epidemic? Military OneSource provides tax assistance service 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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NAS Jacksonville is doing its part to protect the environment from hazard ous materials and reduce the amount of electronic components in landfills through the base Electronic Recycling (eRecycling) program. The program, initiated nearly five years ago, is man aged by the NAS Jax Environmental Department. This program has proven to be extremely successful. We intake elec tronic items from individuals and com mands aboard the station, salvage any metal items and send the electronics to a state-approved recycling center. They recover any precious metals and melt the plastic for reuse, said NAS Jax Assistant Hazardous Waste Manager Jody Smith. We send out about 20, 700-pound pallets of electronic waste every six weeks which could end up in a landfill if we didnt have this program. A lot of the electronic waste has lead solder in circuit boards which would be haz ardous if it got into the ground water, Smith added. Scrap metal is then taken to the base recycling center where it is sold for a profit to the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department which uses the funds to benefit Sailors. The eRecycling Center, located off Mustin Road in Building 1948 is open every Thursday from 9:3011:30 a.m. to accept all types of electronic equipment to be sorted and recycled. We take pretty much all electronic equipment from microwaves to old TVs to computer equipment, said Smith. This program is a win-win for the sta tion because its cost effective and is helping the environment. For more information about eRecy cling at NAS Jax, contact Hazardous Waste Program Manager Jane Beason at 542-5251, Jody Smith at 542-4283 or Billie Brownfield at 542-3492. NAS Jax protects the environment through eRecycling Jurisdiction for family law cases Where to file for divorce or other mat ters related to family law can be very confusing. Before judging the merits of a case, a court must be satisfied that it has personal jurisdiction (power over the parties in the suit) and subject mat ter jurisdiction (power to handle the matter at issue). Personal jurisdiction is determined by the parties domicile, the state where a party resides and intends to remain indefinitely. Generally the law of the state in which the petitioner is domiciled at the time of filing governs, unless the petitioner consents to fil ing in or is compelled to file in another state. Many service members have ties to multiple states. In order to determine domicile, the following are important considerations: the location of real property, the state where one is regis tered to vote, the state where ones vehi cles are licensed and registered, and the state listed on a LES for state income tax withholding purposes. Every state has its own specif ic requirements to establish per sonal jurisdiction. In order to file for divorce in Florida, the petitioner must have lived in Florida for six months immediately prior to filing. Alabama, Mississippi, and Texas require that at least one party be a resident of the state for six months prior to filing. Louisiana requires that the petitioner be a resident of the state for twelve months prior to filing. In the event that both spouses live in separate states, either party may file in their respective state, provided that they meet the jurisdictional require ments. Some states offer residency exceptions to service members who are stationed there, allowing them to file a petition for divorce in their jurisdiction, even if they are not a legal resident. If a party is not satisfied with where the petition has been filed they can initiate a proceeding to challenge a states juris diction. The Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act (UCCJEA), which is enforced in every state except Massachusetts, establishes exclusive and continuing jurisdiction for child custody litigation to the childs home state; all suits where child cus tody is an issue need to be brought in the childs home state. A childs home state is established when he/she has lived in that particu lar state for six consecutive months. If the child is less than six months old, then the child must have lived in the state since birth. Alternatively, if the child has not lived in any one state for six consecutive months, then the state which has the most significant con nections with the child and at least one of the parents will be considered the home state. A state can lose jurisdiction if it is determined that the child or the parents no longer have a significant connection with the state. In order to modify an existing child support order, the parties would have to go back to the original state that issued the order or file in the childs new home state. Once jurisdiction has been estab lished and an order is finally entered, the Full Faith and Credit clause of the United States Constitution ensures that the order holds true in all states. Identifying the proper jurisdiction for filing a legal petition is complicated, and will require examination of mul tiple factors. For assistance contact the nearest Region Legal Service Office legal assis tance department. Please visit http://www.jag.navy.mil/ legal_services/rlso/rlso_southeast.htm for more information or for office loca tions. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 19

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One of the unique things about the military is that unlike the private sec tor, commands can be contacted by spouses, ex-spouses and ex-partners who claim that the service member is not providing (any or enough) financial support. Financial support to a (former) spouse is called alimony or spousal support while support for the children is child support. If a person is ordered by a court to pay alimony, the individu al paying the alimony may deduct that from their income taxes and the person who receives the alimony must declare it on his/her taxes. Alimony is not an automatic entitlement. Judges will con sider many factors such as the length of the marriage, the age and health of the spouse, education, previous salaries and earning potential when they decide if that spouse needs alimony, how much and for how long. Child support, on the other hand, is never tax deductible no matter how high the payment. For the service member (or anyone else about to go through a divorce), it is vital to leave a paper trail to docu ment support. Why? Because divorces and custody battles get ugly, and (bitter) soon-to-be-exes may lie to receive more support. One day, the parties may be very agreeable, but the next day things can be very different. It is better to get an agreement in writing (i.e. email) so that it doesnt become one persons word against anothers. Instead of giv ing the soon-to-be-ex cash, it is best to give him/her a check memo, an elec tronic transfer, or an allotment (keeping bank statements handy) followed up by an email. This protects the service member when their senior enlisted/ OIC/etc. asks about your spouses/exs claims of non-support; it also helps pre vent the ex from getting back support (also known as arrearages), a penalty paid on top of the required support. What are the guidelines for each ser vice? http://www.public.navy. mil/bupers-npc/reference/ milpersman/1000/1700Morale/ Documents/1754-030.pdf The Navys guideline is suggested in the absence of a mutual agreement or court order. If a spouse claims nonsupport, but there is a written agree ment between the two parties, that agreement is valid and will govern. The MILPERSMAN is not an entitlement or a punitive order, so commands cannot directly punish NAVY service members (i.e. Captains Mast) for disregarding the MILPERSMAN standards. That doesnt mean that commands cant take indi rect measures such as denying reenlist ment. Once support becomes a court order, Commanding Officers can pun ish a service member for failing to fol low the court order or the amount can be garnished directly from the service members wages by DFAS. http://www.apd.army.mil/pdffiles/ r608_99.pdf In contrast to the Navy, the Army Regulation is punitive. This means that in the absence of an agreement or a court order, the Army Battalion com mander can order the service member to pay a specific amount based on the formula located in AR 608-99. If the service member fails to pay, then the Battalion Commander can take him/ her to an Article 15. Marine Corps Legal Admin Manual Chapter 15: http://www.donsapro.navy.mil/ PolicyandInsturctions/MCO%20 P5800.16A%20CH%201-5.pdf Like the Army, if there is no agree ment between the parties or a court order, the Marines commanding officer can order the Marine to provide sup port. The order is punitive, and Marines who refuse to provide support are sub ject to punishment under the UCMJ and/or adverse administrative action. M1600.2 (pp. 2-27 to 2-34): http://www.uscg.mil/directives/ cim/1000-1999/CIM_1600_2.pdf In the absence of a court order or mutual agreement, the levels of sup port set forth in the instruction gov ern. Coastguardsmen who fail to sup port their dependents may face negative counseling on their performance evalu ations, and/or administrative separa tions. branches, the Air Force does not list any specific dollar amount or fraction for support. If the service member gets an allowance for dependent support, the service member should use it for support. If an Airman receives BAH (or basic allowance for housing) at the higher with dependents rate but doesnt support his/ her dependents, that BAH may be reduced to the without depen dents rate for the months of non-sup port. Commanders have to authority to consider disciplinary or administrative action. Sometimes, the Navy and the Coast Guard allow the service member to con tact DFAS if the spouse has deserted the service member without cause, physi cally abused the service member, or committed adultery. The Army allows spousal support to be waived when the spouses income is greater than the sol dier, if the soldier has been substan tially abused by the spouse, the spouse is in jail, or the soldier provided support for 18 months. The Marine Corps allows waiver when the spouses income is greater than the Marines, the Marine has been abused by the spouse, the Marine provided support for 12 months, or the Marine is already providing reg ular support such as rent or car pay ments, medical bills, etc. If granted, spousal support may be waived, but not child support. Although in some branches, the absence of a court order a spouses misbehavior (i.e. adultery, abuse, abandonment, or incarceration) may excuse the service member from paying spousal support, child support can never be excused. If there is a court order directing sup port payments, garnishment can take several weeks or even months. To pre vent arrearages (i.e. a penalty for missed child support payments) contact the state child support agency to arrange payment to them. In sum, these guidelines apply when the service member is on active duty and there is no court order and no agreement between the parties. The unsupported spouse/ex cannot go into court and ask for support under the mil itary guidelines; she/he would refer to the states specific guidelines. For assistance contact the nearest Region Legal Service Office legal assis tance department. Please visit us at www.jag.navy.mil/legal_services/rlso/ rlso_southeast.htm for more informa tion or for office locations.Navigating non-support claims 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 21 The U.S. Navy Marksmanship Team (USNMT) is looking for new members to participate in Navy and inter-service rifle and pistol matches. All activeduty and reserve Sailors are welcomed and encouraged to participate. Sailors receive limited small arms training as they pro cess through Navy Individual Augmentee (IA) training at var ious U.S. Army training cen ters, said Cmdr. Mick Glancey, USNMT officer in charge. All Sailors serving IA/GSA tours are issued a service rifle (M-16) or a service pistol (M9), some receive both prior to deploy ment. Small arms marksman ship is a basic fundamen tal skill set all our Sailors are required to possess. The USNMT is the lead ing proponent of small arms marksmanship and safety training for U.S. Navy person nel. Each year, the team con ducts the U.S. Fleet (Atlantic and Pacific) Rifle and Pistol Matches, where hundreds of Sailors are trained in service rifle and service pistol marksmanship. Sailors participating in fleet matches represent their commands in individual and team events, earn marksman ship medals and badges, and qualify to stand armed watches aboard ships and at other com mands. USNMT also conducts the annual All Navy (East and West) Rifle and Pistol Championships, in which the top 100 Sailors who have fired qualifying scores in fleet matches compete. As members of the rifle and pistol teams, the top 20 Sailors from each coast represent the Navy in the annual Inter Service Rifle and Pistol Matches where the best of the best come to compete from the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard. I/S Pistol Championships are held at Fort Benning, Ga. while the I/S Rifle Championships are held at MCB Quantico, Va. The Civilian Marksmanship Programs National Rifle and Pistol Matches and the National Rifle Associations National Rifle and Pistol Championships are held at Camp Perry, Ohio. Both fleet matches begin with classroom and range training to familiarize shoot ers of all skill levels with safety and proper practices on the range as well as the fundamen tals of marksmanship. Then the shooting starts. There are warm-up matches before the 1,000-point rifle matches fired at distances of 200, 300 and 500 yards and the 1,000-point pis tol matches fired one-handed from 25 and 50 yards. Competitors also shoot in both pistol and rifle excellencein-competition (EIC) matches. EIC competitions are qualifica tion matches in which compet itors earn leg points toward the distinguished marksman and the distinguished pistol shot badges. We want to get the word out to everybody, said Glancey. We want more new shooters to come out and participate in the matches. Sailors do not have to be experienced shooters to benefit from competitive shooting-nor do they even need to own fire arms. Throughout the match season, Naval Sea Systems Command Crane Division pro vides an armorers van with match grade rifles, pistols, ammunition, and a workshop where a group of veteran gun smiths build and maintain these precision firearms for Navy shooters. They even have all the small gear for matches like spotting scopes, shooting coats, mats, and folding stools used to carry gear up and down the 600-yard rifle range. Most shooters buy their own gear once they get involved in the sport, but if you dont already own the guns and gear, its best to try competing before you buy so youre sure of get ting what you need, said Lt. Eric Palmer, west coast match director, who got his start like most Navy shootershe heard about a match and decided he wanted to shoot. Once youve shot for a while and are ready to buy your own equip ment and guns, there are a lot of manufacturers that offer discounts to team members on rifles, ammunition, and just about everything else you need. Weve had shooters shoot their whole careers with a van rifle, said Master Chief Utilities Constructionman Scott Hancock. They just keep track of the rifle number and shoot the same one at every match. One common area of con fusion for Sailors wanting to shoot is how to join the team. It couldnt be easier. The Navy Marksmanship Team is not a commissioned unit of the Navy. It has no unit identifi cation code and there are no billets. Team leadership is a collateral duty and team mem bership is entirely voluntary. The Navy team doesnt hire professional shooters like the Army Marksmanship Unit and it doesnt have permanent change of station assignments like the Marine Corps team. It is made entirely of Sailors who love to shoot and want to com pete. Joining the Navy shooting team and shooting either of the fleet matches is the same thing. Interested shooters need to read the annual message, announcing match dates and locations that came out recent ly and contact their commands to request orders to attend. The annual match announcement message and team details may be found at the team web site www.usnst.org. Depending on funding avail ability, active duty Sailors may have to pay some of their travel and messing expenses out of pocket. No-cost TAD orders are the norm, said Glancey. However, our USMC friends at Quantico routinely provide free barracks out at Camp Upshur, open-Bay style living but it is free! Reservists can use any type or combination of orders, with command approval. However, if funding is unavailable, some Reservists do have to come on unpaid annual training orders. Healthy eating for a healthy weight A healthy lifestyle involves many choices, includ ing a healthy eating plan. According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010, a healthy eating plan: fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products nuts trans fats, cholesterol, salt (sodium), and added sugars A healthy eating plan that helps you manage your weight includes a variety of foods you may not have considered. Fresh fruits Dont think just apples or bananas. Be sure to try some exotic fruits, too. How about a mango? Or a juicy pineapple or kiwi fruit? When your favorite fresh fruits arent in season, try a frozen, canned, or dried variety of a fresh fruit you enjoy. Fresh vegetables You may find that you love grilled vegetables or steamed vegetables with an herb you havent tried like rosemary. You can saut vegeta bles in a non-stick pan with a small amount of cooking spray. Calcium-rich foods How about low-fat and fat-free yogurts without added sugars? These come in a wide variety of flavors and can be a great dessert substitute for those with a sweet tooth. Jax Air News welcomes articles and photographs per taining to base employees, family members, commands and community events. The newspaper is published every Thursday. The deadline for submissions is the previous Friday at 4 p.m. The following are some tips on writing articles and taking photographs for the paper: and last names. No call signs. they all stand for. sixth grade reading level. stories about the people in your command? Everyone has a unique story to tell. Do a story on someones hobby, if they volunteer out in town, something interesting that happened to them, etc. newspaper. We dont want something that happened a month or two ago. Send us a story right after it happens. Email ensures faster submissions. into Word documents. Send photos, with captions, as a chop them as needed. We normally start chopping at the bottom so make sure you put your more important information up front.Photographs settings). have to jeopardize quality for number of photos. well in print for newspaper purposes. only. Include faces. can. lowlight settings can vastly improve indoor shots. your photos, either by ash bounce back or direct sunlight coming in. reproduce well and may not be used when submitted. Articles and photos can be submitted via email to Jaxairnews@comcast.net For more information, call 5423531.Navy competitive shooting season starts soon Guidelines for submitting articles/photos to Jax Air News

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 31, 2013 SCOUT HONORED TRAINING VP-45 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com SECNAV supports Women in Service ReviewSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus released the fol lowing statement Jan. 24 pertaining to the Women in Service Review. I fully support Defense Secretary Leon Panettas decision to rescind the 1994 Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule, that removes bar riers preventing women Sailors and Marines from reaching their potential in certain fields. I am pleased the Navy has completed an initiative I announced several months ago to open up one of the few areas not currently available to women that of service on Virginia Class submarines (SSN). Three years ago, we announced a policy change allow ing women to serve in guidedmissile attack (SSGN) and bal listic missile submarines (SSBN) and this is a planned continua tion of that effort. Newly commissioned female officers have been selected for assignment to Virginia Class submarines upon suc cessful completion of the Naval Nuclear Powered training pipeline. We expect these officers, along with female Supply Corps Officers, to report to their sub marines in FY15. We also plan to include female enlisted Sailors in this process. The Navy has a long history of inclusion and integration and I am proud we have achieved another important milestone during my tenure as Secretary. Along with the changes already being made in the submarine force, rescinding the Direct Ground Combat and Assignment Rule allows Navy to expand opportunities for women in our riverine forces and in Navy billets that directly support Marine infantry operations like hospital corpsman and chaplains. The Marine Corps has already opened officer and staff noncommissioned officer billets in unrestricted mission occupational specialties in ground combat units that were previously closed to women such as artillery, armor, low altitude air defense and combat engineer battalions. We will continue to seek female volunteers to train at the Infantry Officer Course to prepare women to serve in the infantry as part of a comprehensive research plan that will inform the Marine Corps implementation plan. The Marines are dedicated to maintaining the highest levels of combat readiness and capitalizing upon every opportunity to enhance our warfighting capa bilities and the contributions of every Marine its simply the right thing to do. As the Marine Corps moves forward with this pro cess, our focus will remain on combat readiness and generating combat-ready units while simultaneously ensuring maximum success for every Marine. Women continue to serve bravely and honorably at sea and ashore. Drawing from their talent in addi tional assignments increases our ability to maintain readiness. We will meet the goals and timeline laid out by Secretary Panetta and we will continue to deploy the finest naval force in the world. The Navy announced plans on Jan. 23 to promote safety and provide education and awareness on the dangers of irresponsible alcohol use and the negative impact it has on mission accomplishment, by introducing the use of alcohol detection devices (ADD) across the fleet. As part of the Secretary of the Navys (SECNAV) 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative, SECNAV approved the use of ADDs as another tool available for commanders to deter irresponsible use of alco hol and assist in identifying service members who may require support and assistance with alcohol use decisions. U.S. Fleet Forces conducted a pilot test on ADDs with 13 sea and shore commands during the 100 days of summer from May 24 through Sept. 30, 2012. The data collected fleet-wide was used to develop the processes and policy for how best to implement a program Navy wide. The office of the Chief of Naval Operations approved OPNAV Instruction 5350.8 Jan. 22, which established policies and procedures for the use of the hand-held devices Navy wide. Fleet feedback was instrumental in the develop ment of this policy, said Adm. Bill Gortney, com mander, U.S. Fleet Forces. The test verified that the majority of our ser vice members, who choose to drink alcohol, do so responsibly. It also verified that our command ing officers need a flexible program that serves to increase the Navys awareness about the impacts of alcohol. Gortney and Adm. Cecil Haney, commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet, in a joint-message to commanders said the new program will complement current com mand efforts to educate service members on the responsible use of alcohol. The program also promotes standards of safety, education and training, and awareness. According to the instruction, the objective of ADD Navy increases alcohol education, awareness efforts

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Jan. 31 1944 American amphibious landing on Kwajalein, Marshall Islands. 1961 Lt. Cmdr. Samuel Lee Gravely Jr. becomes first African-American to command a combat ship, USS Falgout. 1981 Era of enlisted naval aviators ends when last pilot retired. Feb. 1 1941 United States Fleet reorga nized, reviving Atlantic and Pacific Fleets. 1942 USS Enterprise and USS Yorktown make first World War II air strike, Japanese Marshall Islands. 1955 Operation Deep Freeze, a research task force, established in Antarctic. Feb. 2 1800 USS Constellation, under Capt. Thomas Truxtun, defeats La Vengeance. 1862 USS Hartford, commanded by Capt. David G. Farragut, departs Hampton Roads for Mississippi River campaign. Feb. 3 1801 Senate approves peace treaty with France ending undeclared naval war that began 1798. 1917 U.S. severs diplomatic relations with Germany. Feb. 4 1779 John Paul Jones takes com mand of Bonhomme Richard. 1959 Keel laying of USS Enterprise, first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, Newport News, Va. Feb. 5 1854 Dedication of first chapel built on Navy property, Annapolis, Md. 1941 Chief Navy Nurse Marion Olds and Nurse Leona Jackson arrive on Guam. 1971 Moonwalk by Capt. Alan B. Shepherd Jr., commander of Apollo 14 and Cmdr. Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot. During the 9-day mis sion, 94 lbs of lunar material was col lected and Shepard became the first person to hit a golf ball on the moon. Recovery was by helicopter from USS New Orleans (LPH-11). Feb. 6 1862 Union gunboat squadron cap tures Fort Henry, Tennessee River. 1922 World powers sign the Washington Naval Treaty providing for limitation of naval armament. 1973 In accordance with the agreement at the Paris Peace Talks, Navy Task Force 78 begins Operation End Sweep, the mine clearance of North Vietnamese waters of mines laid in 1972. According to a recent news article in the Bangor Daily News, an unintended consequence of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 has been loads of apples and celery being dumped in the cafeteria trash can. I fear my son is guilty. The Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act, rolled out by first lady Michelle Obama and the USDA, overhauled school lunches and put the smack-down on basically everything one of my sons will eat: French fries, chicken nuggets, and sugary treats like yogurt (not the healthy kind of yogurt, but the flavored, mix-ins kind). This son, whom I cant name, has been a picky eater from the beginning. As young as 2-years-old, he went on food strikes that lasted for what felt like days and sent me into full blown panic attacks that he might die of starvation. He wont, the doctor assured me with an infuriating smile. Just let him cry it out. This doctor, my sons first pediatrician, had silver hair and grown children. Did he even remember what its like listening to a hungry toddler moan and cry in his bed at night? Or did he, like my own husband, only know what its like to have waxed philosophical about childhood nutrition before retreating to the living room to watch ESPN, leaving his wife to deal with crying babies who wont go to bed? I struggled with my sons eating habits for years, and when he was still young enough, I stopped just short of force-feeding him all the right things. My standards of what is healthy dipped dangerously low. If my son was eating, it was a victory. When he ate a smidgen of spinach artichoke dip on a tortilla chip, I did the wave. When he agreed to put cheese on his buttered noodles, I thought confetti would fall from the ceiling. When he took one miniscule bite of scrambled egg, I wept with joy as I envisioned his bodys cells devouring the morsel. Any time I found a reasonably healthy food my son would eat, I went to great lengths to stock up on it. I once traveled an entire city in search of a specific kind of yogurt: one that is creamy and light, but doesnt have any bits in it. You see, for my son, its a texture-thing, not a taste-thing. I came home from the yogurt quest with bags of different brands for him to try. None were right. Then we found the one, that blessed blend of creamy, light and bit-less yogurt that my son could eat by the gallons. And the next month, the manufacturer put it on their discontinued list. If I could find that yogurt companys decision-maker, Id fall on my knees before him and beg him to change his mind. Thats how bad the eating situation gets at my house. This was all a family secret a private torture until my son went to school, where hed eat lunch in public. What on earth could I pack for this texturallyand food-challenged kid? I knew what my son would eat for lunch, but thats a different thing than what he should eat. Would the teachers think less of me if I packed his lunch with only peanut butter on bread and a bag of crackers? Would the other kids have baby carrots and hummus? A new rat race began. Apparently it isnt enough to get your child to school on time and in matching clothes; now you have to pack them an all-organic, balanced lunch, too. I was destined to lose. But I dutifully packed my sons lunch with carrots, applesauce and anything else that looked good, along with his peanut-butter bread and crackers. Then one day, his preschool teacher sent home a note: He doesnt eat the carrots. They just go in the trash. Feel free to pack what hell actually eat. Gulp. Ironically (or perhaps obviously), for all my sons texture problems, he will eat just about any type of candy or sweet. I could easily fill his lunch with chocolate and cookies. Hed eat those. But I dont, not even when his bag seems nearly empty, because Ive learned to compromise with lunch. Ill forgo the makes-me-feel-like-a-betterparent carrots, but I wont succumb to sweets and junk food. Then, at dinner, when I can oversee, I stand my ground about one bite of green beans and one piece of chicken. And once a month, my son agrees to buy school lunch. I have no idea what he eats from it, but I have my guesses: the roll with butter. The rest probably goes in the trash. So I understand the school lunch overhaul of 2010. Really, I do. And Im appreciative of our governments attention to childrens health. But Im not surprised, and maybe even a little comforted, that my kid isnt the only one dumping the greens in the trash bin.Hey, MoneyChic! I met the girl of my dreams a few months ago! Things have been going so well I want to ask her to marry me. The only catch is, I have noticed her spending habits are very differ ent than mine. Is there a way to find out how financially compatible we are? MoneyChic Sez: Congratulations to you on your upcoming engagement! You are very smart to want to compare your outlook on finances with that of your future wife. With the divorce rate said to be almost 50 percent in our country, it is best to not start your marriage with one foot already out the door! The best way to approach this topic with your fianc (Ill call her Jane) is to do so in an open and honest manner. Ask Jane if you may schedule an appointment with her and tell her what exactly you would like to talk about. Do not bring up the topic of finances after a stressful week or busy day. Start with an easy topic such as how both of you view money. Be open and honest about expectations, goals, and needs. Who is the spender and who is the saver? What are your thoughts on making big purchases, taking vacations, or allowances? You do not have to agree, you only have to listen to each other and figure out how to make your finances work. Each individual has different thoughts on money because most people only know what they see their family doing. Ask Jane if her parents gave her any financial education and how they handled money. You share the same information with her. Discuss thoughts about bill paying. Will one person assume the role as bill payer? Jane may know how to balance her accounts and pay bills on time, all the time. You may learn something from her! Is Jane a good driver? Do you have lots of wrecks in your driving history? That plays a role in your finances as well. Lastly, you might want to look over each others credit reports so you are aware of exactly what you are working with. One persons debt becomes a couples debt once a marriage has taken place. Are you ready to assume her baggage and is she ready to take on yours? To obtain your credit reports, go to annualcreditreport.com. This website offers your reports from all three of the credit bureaus. Its a lot to consider, however you are going to want to know the ins and outs of Janes financial thinking once wedding planning is kicked into high gear. As always, the NavyMarine Corps Relief Society is here to moderate a money conversation with your fianc and prepare a future budget with you. If you would like more information on how we can help, stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or give us a call at 542-2832. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an email at megan.stolle@nmcrs.org. Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act sends food to the trash Personnel needed for bus surveyThe Jacksonville Transportation Authority is con ducting a survey at NAS Jacksonville Feb. 8 to determine if a shuttle service is needed aboard the station to transport personnel to various facilities. Representatives will be available at Naval Hospital Jacksonville from 8-10 a.m.; Base Commissary from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and the Enlisted Barracks from 1:30-4 p.m. to conduct surveys. Personnel can also complete the survey by going to www.surveymonkey.com/s/veterans-and-militaryfamilies-transportation-options For more information, e-mail talks@jtafla.com or call 630-3100.

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Capt. Michael Johansson, command ing officer of Naval Support Activity Hampton Roads awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to the following nine officers at VP-30 on Jan. 11. The following officers were recog nized during the ceremony: Ensign John Baker, Ensign Kyle Galarneau, Lt. j.g. Ryan Goulet, Ensign Thomas Lane, Ensign Samuel Lepley, Ensign Kelly Miller, Ensign Jake Peterson, Ensign Aaron Rosa, and Lt. j.g. Kelly Wehle. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer (UMFO) syllabus at VP-30, earning their coveted wings of gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the CAT I Fleet Replacement Squadron syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT I syl labus, they will report to operational Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance squadrons to begin their initial sea tours in either Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, Whidbey Island, Wash., or NAS Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola where all aviation officers undergo a classroom syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation, which includes aerody namics, meteorology and principles of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transi tion from a classroom learning environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3, EP-3 or P-8 training pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. VP-30 wings Navys newest naval flight officersis to promote safety and education on the effects of alcohol use decisions, and enhances leadership awareness and understanding of their units alcohol use culture. Deterring irresponsible use of alcohol is essen tial to the readiness of our fleet and ensuring the health and safety of our service members and units, said Gortney. Fleet Forces, in partnership with Pacific Fleet, will remain engaged in provid ing service members the tools and resources to make these responsible choices. The ADD is one of many tools commanders have to educate service members. Focused on those in a duty status and during normal working hours, the device is not intend ed to test those in an authorized leave or liberty status. Commanding officers may also use ADD results as a basis to further evaluate a service members fitness for duty through use of a com petence for duty examination. The instruction applies to all active duty, reserve and personnel from other services assigned to Navy units in any capacity. Alcohol detection devices will begin arriving to commands in February. ALCOHOL AWARENESS The Navy is seeking motivated first and second class petty officers with career counselor experience to consider applying for a rating conversion to Navy Counselor (NC). The Navys goal is to make 81 active-duty Navy counselors this fiscal year, said NCCM Darryl Blackmon, NC technical advisor, Bureau of Naval Personnel, enlisted community management division. Unlike other ratings, NC is not open to incom ing recruits and the rating must attract experienced Sailors from the fleet. Applicants must be active duty first and second class petty officers with six to 14 years of active naval service; have no marks below 3.0 in the previous three years performance evaluations; have an Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test score of VE+AR=105, minimum 50 AR; have at least 12 consecutive months experience as a command, departmental or divisional career counselor during the previous three years prior to application date. This rating requires a thorough knowledge of the Navys personnel and administrative procedures and policies. Any Sailor who intends to apply for the NC rating should be ready to accept the responsibility as command career counselor and provide a positive lasting impact to the Navys greatest asset; its Sailors, said Blackmon. The NC rating assists commands in planning and implementation of the enlisted command career development and retention program. NCs are the commands principal advisors on policies and regulations related to Navy career planning matters. Responsibilities include execution of enlisted retention programs of the Navy and counseling Sailors and their families on active duty and post-retirement incentives, opportunities and benefits. Successful NCs work hard to develop strong counseling techniques, as well as exemplary organizational and administrative habits, said Blackmon. The community relies on strong oral and written communication skills to keep our Sailors informed, and ensure the right Sailor fills the right billet, he continued. There are currently more than 600 NCs providing career management services to fleet Sailors. Opportunity for advancement consistently exceeds the Navy advancement average. Sailors competing for first class petty officer typi cally have 100 percent advancement opportunity. The NC rating was established in 1972 to assist in managing retention and augmenting recruiting with subject matter experts. Sailors who wish to apply for conversion should speak with an NC and read MILPERSMAN 1440-020 available at www.npc.navy.mil. Navy announces conversion opportunities to NC 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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Eagle Scout commended for NAS Jax wildlife projectCory Parker of Boy Scout Troop 101, was pre sented a letter of commendation Jan. 22 by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Robert Sanders in recognition of Parkers renovation of the stations butterfly garden located at the Black Point Watchable Wildlife Area. I wish to express my appreciation for your out standing leadership in the scouting movement and the Jacksonville community. Your design of the but terfly garden entrance and replacement of broken fencing was welcomed and approved by the NAS Jax Environmental Department, said Sanders. I was impressed by your commitment to this project and your initiative in contacting donors to fund the project. On construction day, Parker led four groups from Troop 101 in building the arbor, digging post holes and installing recycled plastic lattice fencing, as well as planting two jasmine vines. Parker, a student at Mandarin High School, said that Troop 101 has completed a number of lifestyleenhancing projects at NAS Jax over the past 12 years. Kevin Parker, Corys father, said the scouts of Troop 101 are always looking for their next project aboard NAS Jax. The parents of many of our scouts serve in the military or have prior military experience so its important for the Boy Scouts in Troop 101 to be engaged in worthwhile projects here on base, said Mr. Parker, who is also chairman of the troop. Kevin thanked skipper Sanders for the letter of commendation and command coin. Im very proud to have designed this environmental program at Black Point. My thanks go out to my parents, base leader ship, my troop leader and all my fellow scouts who worked with me. Military retiree seminar is Feb. 2Military retirees and their spouses from all branches of service are invited to attend the Retired Military Seminar Feb. 2 at the NAS Jacksonville Officers Club from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The seminar provides infor mation on a variety of top ics including healthcare, veterans benefits, assisted living, long-term care, survivor ben efit plan, pay and financial matters and other retiree issues. Retired Adm. Mark Fitzgerald, former commander, U. S. Naval Forces Europe, commander, U. S. Naval Forces Africa and commander, Allied Joint Force Command, Naples will present the keynote address. Booths with additional information will be manned by officials from the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Defense Finance and Accounting Service, the Veterans Administration, Naval Hospital Jacksonville, legal services and other military organizations. Entrance to NAS Jacksonville requires a current Department of Defense military or dependent identi fication card. For more information, contact J.J. Ryan at 542-5790 or james.j.ryan@navy.mil The Navy Exchange (NEX) wants to help its customers finance their childrens college edu cation through its A-OK Student Reward Program. All qualified students will participate in a quarterly drawing for mon etary awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500 for a total of $5,500 per quarter. The next drawing will be held at the end of February 2013. Any eligible fulltime student that has a B-grade point aver age equivalent or better, as determined by their school system, may enter the drawing. Eligible stu-NEX rewards students with A-OK Program JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 Special aircraft test defenses of carrier strike group A six-plane detachment of F/A18A+ Hornets from Fighter Squadron Composite (VFC) 12, along with a sixplane detachment operated by Airborne Tactical Advantage Company (ATAC), a two-plane detachment from L-3, and a two-plane detachment from Phoenix Air are operating from NAS Jacksonville to provide adversary threat training for the Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Strike Group that is currently underway in the Atlantic for its Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). Together, aircraft from VFC-12, plus contractor adversary support providers such as ATAC, L-3 and Phoenix Air represent a formidable and realistic hostile opposing force to sharpen the war fighting capabilities of Navy expeditionary forces preparing for deployment. Cmdr. Jeff Menna, a pilot with VFC12, explained that the Fighting Omars are the Naval Reserves premier adver sary squadron for providing threat tactics training to Navy strike fighter squadrons, Based at NAS Oceana in Virginia Beach, our main job is to provide tactical dissimilar air combat training for Navy, Marine Corps and other aviation units when tasked. For COMPTUEX, we primarily oppose air strikes from the carrier air wing as they enter or leave the air space of Pinecastle Range Complex, said Menna. Our goal is to enable strike fighter aircrew to hone their war fighting skills against a creditable adversary prior to deploying in the face of real threats. In late 2012, VFC-12 began their transition from the blue camouflage F/A

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 7 18C Hornet that they flew for seven years to the upgraded F/A-18A+ Hornet painted in the bold SU-35 Flanker Arctic Splinter camouflage. The unique challenges inherent to the squadrons mission make the Fighting Omars one of the Navys most sought after aviation duty assignments in the Navy. Although highly skilled and qualified in the art of aerial combat, all newly assigned pilots must complete a thorough and unique flight syllabus. Among the squadrons most frequent deployment sites are NAS Jax, NAS Key West and NAS Fallon, Nev. ATAC pilot Rob DeStasio said, According to daily tasking from Commander, Strike Force Training Atlantic (CSFTA), ATAC aircraft present a variety of threat profiles either against Carrier Air Wing-3, surface ships in the strike group, or both. We may also fly joint missions against the strike group with Hornets from VFC-12 or Lear jets from L-3, said DeStasio. L-3 has provided the Navy with COMPTUEX adversary support for a number of years, explained Jim Bailey. Our Lear jets deliver threat simulations for ship attacks, as well as towing aerial targets for ships and fighter aircraft. Depending on the training requirements of CSFTA, we may also fly joint missions with ATAC and other threat providers. COMPTUEX is a series of training scenarios designed to certify Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Strike Group as a deployment-ready fighting force capable of completing operations in overseas theaters. COMPTUEXPhotos by Clark Pierce

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The VP-45 Pelicans helped preserve the memory of thou sands of fallen American and Filipino war heroes during a recent detachment to Clark Air Force Base in Angeles City, Philippines. Working along side the volunteers of VFW Post 2485, aircrew and main tenance personnel spent a day grooming the properties of Clark Veterans Cemetery. The cemetery is run entirely from donations and relies on volunteers to maintain it. The project demonstrated one of the many ways that U.S. and Filipino forces have ben efitted from their historically strong relationship since the departure of U.S. Air Force personnel following the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991. The Clark Veterans Cemetery is rich in history and is testa ment to the long-standing alliance of the American and Philippines governments. Interred at the site are hun dreds of Filipino Scouts, men that fought alongside U.S. forces in the period follow ing the Spanish American War. The site is also the final resting place for the count less Filipino-Americans who courageously fought and died during the course of WWI and WWII. The cemetery also honors those of Filipino descent who have given the ultimate sacrifice in campaigns such as Operation Enduring Freedom, and performs military honors for approximately 40 burials a year. The Pelicans found the experience to be both educational and rewarding. Lt. j.g. Joseph Tompkins, the crews newest pilot, said this of his experi ence, It really opened my eyes. I never realized how much of a role the Philippines played in American history. I feel it is part of our duty as Sailors to help preserve these memories. This was the general con sensus among the crew, espe cially after they gained valu able insight from Post 2485 Commander and Clark Veterans Cemetery Chairman, John Gilbert. Gilbert is dedicated to the remembrance of these individuals, and has been essential in the rebuilding and maintenance of the cemetery since VFW Post 2485 assumed control of the facility from the Air Force. Not only did VP-45 get a chance to work alongside the local community, they also flew alongside their Filipino counterparts during a mari time patrol flight. This event allowed them to observe how the maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft community patrols sea space both along its coastlines and abroad. The crew felt this was extremely helpful in building confidence and trust between the two countries and was a great way to improve joint operations efficiency. While most of the detach ment was spent complet ing essential 7th Fleet mis VP-45 Pelicans help preserve pride abroad 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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Recreational boaters at NAS Jacksonville will soon enjoy safe haven thanks to a new con crete floating dock system with quality boating amenities, said NAVFAC Southeast Public Works Department Construction Manager Lt. j.g. John Berube. The renovation of NAS Jacksonvilles Mulberry Cove Marina is on schedule for completion Feb. 10, he said. New dock boxes, water and electrical connections, a station ary pump-out and fueling station will provide a higher level of amenities for boaters. Crews were busy Jan. 24 put ting the finishing touches on the 3,000-gal. gasoline fueling system. Were finishing up the hydro static tests to ensure that there are no leaks in the system before we introduce fuel to the storage tank and lines, said Berube. Also, the City of Jacksonville is on site today to perform our fuel tank compliance inspection. The Defense Department website for military children has added new fea tures to help parents and educators explain difficult topics of the military lifestyle to children. Since its launch in January 2012, MilitaryKidsConnect.org has served more than 125,000 visitors and won five industry excellence awards. To mark the one-year anniversary, the website added new content designed for children, parents and educators. The new features include: plans for teachers, school counselors, and educators to better understand the differences between military and civilian youth; taries by military kids sharing their experiences; ents on handling grief, loss and physical injury. The website, created by the Defense Departments National Center for Telehealth and Technology, known as T2, uses innovative ways to help mili tary youth cope with the unique strains of military life. In addition to disruptions from par ents deploying to assignments away from home, military children are affected by moving frequently, changing schools and making new friends. They also have to live with readjust ment issues when a parent returns from deployments. These issues may include post-traumatic stress and physical disabilities. After watching the interaction with kids on MilitaryKidsConnect this past year, we saw many conversations about trying to understand the issues they live with, said Dr. Kelly Blasko, T2 psychologist. We developed the added features to help parents and teachers answer the questions the kids were sharing with each other. Blasko said the Web site is continu ing to add features and information to military children with the special challenges of living in a military family. Separations, moving and changing friends frequently may be unusual for civilian children, but its a normal life style for military children. The website helps them live in that world and, hopefully, makes it more fun for them. The National Center for Telehealth and Technology serves as the primary Defense Department office for cuttingedge approaches in applying technol ogy to psychological health. Military kids website also helps parents, educators Mulberry Cove Marina taking shape JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 11

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Deweys Big Game Party Feb. 3, doors open at 5 p.m., food served at 6 p.m. $10 per person, includes buffet and door prizesFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not includedSaturday Night Extreme Bowling7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental includedFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 The gym equipment is temporarily relocated to The Zone, Bldg. 798 now through June 30. Check-out our new fitness schedule! New classes include Muscle Max, Extreme Bootcamp and Max Core Pick-up the latest copy at the fitness centerI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Sleeping Beauty $25 $41 Fiddler On The Roof $33 $49 Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 2-day ticket $52 Gatornationals March 15,16,17, 2013 Fri Reserved from $35 $39 Sat & Sun Reserved from $50 $54 Fri General Seating from $28 $32 Sat & Sun General Seating from $38 $42 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3. Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7. Blockout Dates: March 23 April 5, 2013 Call for pricing Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Entertainment Books $30 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23. Preferred seating $41, lower level seating $22 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Dream Girls May 21 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discounted tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT! Daytona 500 Feb. 24, 2013 tickets on sale now! $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. SNAG Golf Lesson Feb. 6 & Feb. 21 at 6 p.m. NAS Jax Golf Course Free Mall & Movie Trip Feb. 8 at 6 p.m. Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater Free Burger Night Feb. 19, 5 10 p.m. Stop by liberty to pick-up your coupon for a free Deweys burger!NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees February 5 & 19 for active duty February 7 & 21 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 12:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available!Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m.Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Feb. 22, 6 p.m. at Patriots Grove Free popcorn and $.50 drinksFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School March 18 April 24 $500 per person FREE Live Entertainment Friday, Feb. 1 at 7 p.m.KevinThe Human Jukebox Let him Rock You! Friday, Feb. 8 at 7 p.m.Evans Acoustic TrioEnjoy songs of the 50s through today!Friday, Feb. 15 at 7 p.m. Pam AffrontiOutstanding songwriting and exceptionally compelling performances!Friday, Feb. 22 at 7 p.m. Ace WinnAn acoustic guitar, naked lyrics style, nothing shy about it, stretching syllables out as if each word is being torn from him.Call (904) 542-3900 for more info. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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Volunteers are needed to help Special Olympics Duval County during the 5K Foam Fest which will be held March 2 at the Jacksonville Equestrian Center on Normandy Boulevard, Jacksonville. This national race is cleaning up runners and walkers as they traverse obstacles loaded with soap and muddy water. Volunteers ages 16 and older will assist with obstacle course set up, race day events and tear down. There are opportunities for volun teers Feb. 26 through March 3. For more information and to sign up, go to: www.SignUpGenius.com/go/ 30E0B4AA4A929A20-5kfoam/3704168.Volunteers needed for Special Olympics JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 The Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville announces their Sailors and Instructors of the Quarter. AS1(AW/SW) Daphne Guzman was selected as Sailor of the Quarter First Quarter FY-13. As Support Equipment Electrical Phase leading petty officer, Guzman managed 12 courses and 13 instructors ensuring a 100 percent graduation rate for over 60 students. Additionally, she completed three college courses through Southern Illinois University and represented the Navy as an ambassador by volunteering 48 off-duty hours to Jacksonville Airport USO, CCD teacher for St. Patricks Catholic Church, and San Mateo Elementary Big Sister program. AS1(AW/SW/NAC) James Forbes was selected as Senior Instructor of the Quarter, Fourth Quarter, CY-12. As Mobile Electric Power Plants Intermediate Maintenance Training Unit instructor, Forbes provided 128 hours of instruction this Quarter to 11 students while achieving an impres sive 100 percent graduation rate with an average GPA of 94.4 percent. AT2(AW/SW) Marnicca Gomez was selected as Junior Sailor of the Quarter, First Quarter FY-13. As MTU 1005 MH-60R Avionics, Laser Safety, and H-60 Wire System Repair instructor, she provided 2,700 hours of instruc tion to eight students with a 100 percent graduation rate and average GPA of 97.8 percent. Gomez also spent 100 hours coordinating the Girls on the Run event through the Sea Service Leadership Association for which she is acting president of one of the six national chapters. AO2(AW/SW) Andrew Stokes was selected as Junior Instructor of the Quarter, Fourth Quarter, CY-12. As MTU 1005 Aviation Ordnance leading petty officer, Stokes is the course supervisor of the Weapons Load, Armament and Release courses as well as a quali fied instructor for H-60 Wire System Repair and Laser Safety courses. He has provided over 580 hours of instruction this quarter to 14 students achieving a 100 percent graduation rate and an average GPA of 96.7 percent. A five-plane training detachment from VAQ-129 of NAS Whidbey Island, Wash., recently traveled cross-coun try to complete Basic Fighter Maneuvers (BFM) and Fighter Weapons Deployment for instructors of the squadrons EA-15G Growler airborne electronic attack aircraft. This is an all-instruc tor detachment for EA-15G pilots and naval flight officers (NFOs), explained NFO Lt. Jason Windom. We like training in NAS Jax air space at this time of year because the weather at our home base of NAS Whidbey Island, Wash., is horrible in comparison to your blue sky and mild temperatures. Instructor pilot Lt. James Laird noted, The Navy is still transitioning from the EA-6B Prowler to the EA-15G Growler, so there are two sides to our house much like the P-3 to P-8 transition going on here at NAS Jacksonville. BFM consist of tactical turns, rolls and other actions to get behind or above an enemy, before the opponent can do the same. BFM are typically uni versal maneuvers that can be performed in most any fighter aircraft, and are usually con sidered to be training maneu vers. Training usually begins with pilots flying the same type of aircraft, pitting only their skills against each other. VAQ-129 Vikings train at NAS Jax CNATTU Jax recognizes Sailors/Instructors of the Quarter Awards Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. The following is the schedule for 2013: FFSC offers life skills workshops to benefit military and families VA disability assistance available for those retiring/separating If you are retiring or separating from active duty and need assistance submitting your claim for disability and compensation to the Veterans Administration, you can start one year prior to retiring/separating by getting medical information in order. AMVETS is the Veterans Service Organization advocate for separating or retiring service members and families providing assistance with submission of claims to the VA for benefits, disabilities and compensation. AMVETS is a national Veterans Service Organization authorized to submit claims to the VA and advocate for veterans and their families with the VA nationwide. Assistance is free and you are not required to become a member of AMVETS. Call 542-2834 or david.d.sanders@navy.mil

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VP-16s CWO4 Goodwin retires after 30 years of serviceThe VP-16 War Eagles honored the 30 years of service of CWO4 Windell Goodwin during his retirement cere mony at the VP-30 auditorium Jan. 18. The guest speaker was Lt. Cmdr. Shannon Clark. In attendance were Goodwins wife, Melissa, their two daughters, Kristyn and Kalese, and numerous coworkers, friends and family members. Goodwin, originally from Orangeburg, S.C., began his Navy career in 1982 through the Delayed Entry Program. After completing basic training at Naval Recruit Training Center Great Lakes, Ill., he reported to Basic Electricity and Electronic A School in Millington, Tenn. as an antisubmarine warfare technician. His first operational squadron was VS-28 at NAS Cecil Field. Goodwin departed VS-28 in 1987 as a third class petty officer after being deployed on board USS Independence and USS Forrestal to the Mediterranean Sea, Indian Ocean, and North Arabian Sea. Goodwin then reported to Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Detachment (AIMD), Naval Air Facility, Mayport, as an SH-60B anti-submarine warfare avionics small system technician. While there, he advanced to second class petty officer and qualified as col lateral duty inspector. Goodwins following tour was with Sea Operational Detachment at NAS Jacksonville in August 1990. He worked in support of the SH-3 and SH-60F and deployed twice on board USS Theodore Roosevelt in support of multiple operations, including Desert Shield and Desert Storm. During this time, he also completed an associ ate degree in military studies and was advanced to first class petty officer. In 1994, Goodwin transferred to AIMD at NAS Cecil Field, where he was assistant test director and leading petty officer. During this tour, he was promoted to chief petty officer and earned the titles of NAS Cecil Fields 1997 Military Representative of the Year and 1996 Sailor of the Year Finalist. Goodwin returned to USS Theodore Roosevelt in 1998 as part of AIMD. Laboring diligently in his work cen ters, he also completed a bachelors degree in business administration from Columbia College, and in 2001 he earned his commission as a chief war rant officer. After completing the Aviation Maintenance Officer Course, Goodwin transferred to NAS North Island in San Diego deploying with USS Nimitz to the Western Pacific/Arabian Gulf in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. His next tour brought him back to NS Mayport to join HSL-48 as the material control officer in 2004. As a Viper, Goodwin earned the honor of being the squadrons Maintenance Officer of the Year for two consecutive years. In 2007, he transferred to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Detachment Mayport as the maintenance material control officer (MMCO). In 2009, Goodwin joined VP-16 at NAS Jacksonville to serve as assistant maintenance officer and MMCO. As a War Eagle, he was critical in the success of two deployments to the 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility. He has also been vitally important in the squadrons transition from the P-3C to the P-8A Poseidon. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 17

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While theres a lot of talk about influenza (flu) in the national news lately, were staying pretty healthy locally. Across Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles patient popula tions in Albany, Jacksonville, Key West, Kings Bay and Mayport were seeing flulike illness activity thats simi lar to last year at this time. This might be due in part to the success of the vaccination campaign at each of the five bases where NH Jacksonville has a facility. At our hospital and branch health clinics this flu season, we were early in meeting our goal to vaccinate 100 percent of active duty. We also vacci nated nearly two-thirds of our pregnant patientswhile the national average is about 10 percent. Influenza is a serious illness, leading to numerous hospital izations and deaths each year, and its important to protect against it. What can people do? The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends flu vaccine for everyone age six months and up. Its still worthwhile to get vaccinated if you havent alreadyand the hospital and branch health clinics have vaccine on-hand. More recommendations from the CDC include: Avoid close contact with sick people. If youre sick, stay home. Sneeze or cough into your elbow or a tissue. Dont sneeze or cough into your hands. Wash or sanitize your hands often. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Practice good healthkeep your home and workplace clean, get plenty of sleep, be active, manage stress, drink fluids and eat nutritious food. For information, check out www.cdc.gov or call Immunizations at 542-7810 (open for walk-ins 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays; and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thursdays). And as always, to reach your Medical Home Port team, call Central Appointments and After-Hours Nurse Advice Line at 800-529-4677 (at Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville during clinic hours, call 5467094/7095). Find out more about ser vices at the hospital and branch health clinics on NH Jacksonvilles website (www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax) and keep up with current news on Facebook (www.facebook.com/ NavalHospitalJacksonville). As tax season nears, Military OneSource and H&R Block have again joined forces to provide a free online tax preparation service for service mem bers. Tony Jackson, a program analyst for the Military OneSource program office, detailed the services available for troops and their families. Military OneSource is a gateway to a free tax preparation service, partnered with H&R Block, he said. We also have tax consultants who can provide assistance, whether its seeking and filling out tax forms or any other tax-related information. Jackson emphasized it is a safe and secure way for service members to prepare their taxes online. Military OneSource and H&R block definitely meet industry standards for security for websites, he said. Also, encryption software is used and theres also no selling of informa tion, so service members and fam ily members can be assured that their information is secure, and it stays within Military OneSource and H&R Block. Jackson noted that two services basic and premium are provided through H&R Block, with one notable difference. The basic service is free, he said, and the premium service would apply to taxpayers who must file Schedule C returns, generally to report gains or losses from business ownership. When you start getting into pre mium, youre going to incur some additional costs, where basic is free, Jackson said. For those not sure which service they should use, Jackson encouraged them to use the Military OneSource website as a guide. The site lists answers to frequently asked questions. You can always contact Military OneSource at 1-800-342-9647, Jackson said. Were open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, so any questions you have, you can use the website or the call center at the [toll-free] number. Jackson said both methods are effec tive in contacting Military OneSource tax consultants offering useful services for troops and their families. Not only do they provide forms and basic information relative to militaryspecific tax issues and questions, they are a gateway to get you to H&R Block, he said. If your tax situation warrants, theyll get you to a volunteer income tax assistance clinic on your local military installation or larger command. Its one-stop shopping. These tax consultants cannot prepare tax forms or direct people to do any thing, Jackson said. Everything is on a recommended basis. All members of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps are eligible to use the service, he said, including members of the National Guard and Reserve components, regardless of activation status. Coast Guard reservists activated under Title 10 authority to serve with the Navy also are eligible and so are spouses and other family members enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System. Family members that have been designated to provide support to deployed service members, medically discharged retirees and discharged service mem bers within 180 days of their discharge date are eligible for Military OneSource services, Jackson added. The key to these services is finan cial readiness, which is a Defense Department priority. We understand that financial readiness is a readiness issue. If you have a service member whos concerned about their financial situation then that detracts from the mission. Jackson also provided his personal testament to using the free tax preparation program, having served on active duty in the Marine Corps as a personnel officer for more than 20 years. He said his family still uses the ser vice. My daughter is a military spouse and she continues to use it as well, he said. This programs ultimate goal is to ensure service members and their families know that Military OneSource is an option. We hope its the first option for getting your taxes prepared or answer ing any questions or issues you have with taxes, said Jackson. Just know that Military OneSource is there to help you.Do we have a flu epidemic? Military OneSource provides tax assistance service 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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NAS Jacksonville is doing its part to protect the environment from hazard ous materials and reduce the amount of electronic components in landfills through the base Electronic Recycling (eRecycling) program. The program, initiated nearly five years ago, is man aged by the NAS Jax Environmental Department. This program has proven to be extremely successful. We intake elec tronic items from individuals and commands aboard the station, salvage any metal items and send the electronics to a state-approved recycling center. They recover any precious metals and melt the plastic for reuse, said NAS Jax Assistant Hazardous Waste Manager Jody Smith. We send out about 20, 700-pound pallets of electronic waste every six weeks which could end up in a landfill if we didnt have this program. A lot of the electronic waste has lead solder in circuit boards which would be haz ardous if it got into the ground water, Smith added. Scrap metal is then taken to the base recycling center where it is sold for a profit to the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department which uses the funds to benefit Sailors. The eRecycling Center, located off Mustin Road in Building 1948 is open every Thursday from 9:3011:30 a.m. to accept all types of electronic equipment to be sorted and recycled. We take pretty much all electronic equipment from microwaves to old TVs to computer equipment, said Smith. This program is a win-win for the station because its cost effective and is helping the environment. For more information about eRecy cling at NAS Jax, contact Hazardous Waste Program Manager Jane Beason at 542-5251, Jody Smith at 542-4283 or Billie Brownfield at 542-3492. NAS Jax protects the environment through eRecycling Jurisdiction for family law cases Where to file for divorce or other matters related to family law can be very confusing. Before judging the merits of a case, a court must be satisfied that it has personal jurisdiction (power over the parties in the suit) and subject matter jurisdiction (power to handle the matter at issue). Personal jurisdiction is determined by the parties domicile, the state where a party resides and intends to remain indefinitely. Generally the law of the state in which the petitioner is domiciled at the time of filing governs, unless the petitioner consents to fil ing in or is compelled to file in another state. Many service members have ties to multiple states. In order to determine domicile, the following are important considerations: the location of real property, the state where one is regis tered to vote, the state where ones vehicles are licensed and registered, and the state listed on a LES for state income tax withholding purposes. Every state has its own specif ic requirements to establish per sonal jurisdiction. In order to file for divorce in Florida, the petitioner must have lived in Florida for six months immediately prior to filing. Alabama, Mississippi, and Texas require that at least one party be a resident of the state for six months prior to filing. Louisiana requires that the petitioner be a resident of the state for twelve months prior to filing. In the event that both spouses live in separate states, either party may file in their respective state, provided that they meet the jurisdictional require ments. Some states offer residency exceptions to service members who are stationed there, allowing them to file a petition for divorce in their jurisdiction, even if they are not a legal resident. If a party is not satisfied with where the petition has been filed they can initiate a proceeding to challenge a states jurisdiction. The Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act (UCCJEA), which is enforced in every state except Massachusetts, establishes exclusive and continuing jurisdiction for child custody litigation to the childs home state; all suits where child custody is an issue need to be brought in the childs home state. A childs home state is established when he/she has lived in that particu lar state for six consecutive months. If the child is less than six months old, then the child must have lived in the state since birth. Alternatively, if the child has not lived in any one state for six consecutive months, then the state which has the most significant con nections with the child and at least one of the parents will be considered the home state. A state can lose jurisdiction if it is determined that the child or the parents no longer have a significant connection with the state. In order to modify an existing child support order, the parties would have to go back to the original state that issued the order or file in the childs new home state. Once jurisdiction has been estab lished and an order is finally entered, the Full Faith and Credit clause of the United States Constitution ensures that the order holds true in all states. Identifying the proper jurisdiction for filing a legal petition is complicated, and will require examination of mul tiple factors. For assistance contact the nearest Region Legal Service Office legal assis tance department. Please visit http://www.jag.navy.mil/ legal_services/rlso/rlso_southeast.htm for more information or for office loca tions. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 19

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One of the unique things about the military is that unlike the private sec tor, commands can be contacted by spouses, ex-spouses and ex-partners who claim that the service member is not providing (any or enough) financial support. Financial support to a (former) spouse is called alimony or spousal support while support for the children is child support. If a person is ordered by a court to pay alimony, the individual paying the alimony may deduct that from their income taxes and the person who receives the alimony must declare it on his/her taxes. Alimony is not an automatic entitlement. Judges will consider many factors such as the length of the marriage, the age and health of the spouse, education, previous salaries and earning potential when they decide if that spouse needs alimony, how much and for how long. Child support, on the other hand, is never tax deductible no matter how high the payment. For the service member (or anyone else about to go through a divorce), it is vital to leave a paper trail to docu ment support. Why? Because divorces and custody battles get ugly, and (bitter) soon-to-be-exes may lie to receive more support. One day, the parties may be very agreeable, but the next day things can be very different. It is better to get an agreement in writing (i.e. email) so that it doesnt become one persons word against anothers. Instead of giv ing the soon-to-be-ex cash, it is best to give him/her a check memo, an elec tronic transfer, or an allotment (keeping bank statements handy) followed up by an email. This protects the service member when their senior enlisted/ OIC/etc. asks about your spouses/exs claims of non-support; it also helps prevent the ex from getting back support (also known as arrearages), a penalty paid on top of the required support. What are the guidelines for each service? http://www.public.navy. mil/bupers-npc/reference/ milpersman/1000/1700Morale/ Documents/1754-030.pdf The Navys guideline is suggested in the absence of a mutual agreement or court order. If a spouse claims nonsupport, but there is a written agree ment between the two parties, that agreement is valid and will govern. The MILPERSMAN is not an entitlement or a punitive order, so commands cannot directly punish NAVY service members (i.e. Captains Mast) for disregarding the MILPERSMAN standards. That doesnt mean that commands cant take indi rect measures such as denying reenlistment. Once support becomes a court order, Commanding Officers can pun ish a service member for failing to fol low the court order or the amount can be garnished directly from the service members wages by DFAS. http://www.apd.army.mil/pdffiles/ r608_99.pdf In contrast to the Navy, the Army Regulation is punitive. This means that in the absence of an agreement or a court order, the Army Battalion com mander can order the service member to pay a specific amount based on the formula located in AR 608-99. If the service member fails to pay, then the Battalion Commander can take him/ her to an Article 15. Marine Corps Legal Admin Manual Chapter 15: http://www.donsapro.navy.mil/ PolicyandInsturctions/MCO%20 P5800.16A%20CH%201-5.pdf Like the Army, if there is no agree ment between the parties or a court order, the Marines commanding officer can order the Marine to provide sup port. The order is punitive, and Marines who refuse to provide support are subject to punishment under the UCMJ and/or adverse administrative action. M1600.2 (pp. 2-27 to 2-34): http://www.uscg.mil/directives/ cim/1000-1999/CIM_1600_2.pdf In the absence of a court order or mutual agreement, the levels of sup port set forth in the instruction gov ern. Coastguardsmen who fail to sup port their dependents may face negative counseling on their performance evaluations, and/or administrative separa tions. branches, the Air Force does not list any specific dollar amount or fraction for support. If the service member gets an allowance for dependent support, the service member should use it for support. If an Airman receives BAH (or basic allowance for housing) at the higher with dependents rate but doesnt support his/ her dependents, that BAH may be reduced to the without depen dents rate for the months of non-sup port. Commanders have to authority to consider disciplinary or administrative action. Sometimes, the Navy and the Coast Guard allow the service member to contact DFAS if the spouse has deserted the service member without cause, physi cally abused the service member, or committed adultery. The Army allows spousal support to be waived when the spouses income is greater than the soldier, if the soldier has been substan tially abused by the spouse, the spouse is in jail, or the soldier provided support for 18 months. The Marine Corps allows waiver when the spouses income is greater than the Marines, the Marine has been abused by the spouse, the Marine provided support for 12 months, or the Marine is already providing reg ular support such as rent or car pay ments, medical bills, etc. If granted, spousal support may be waived, but not child support. Although in some branches, the absence of a court order a spouses misbehavior (i.e. adultery, abuse, abandonment, or incarceration) may excuse the service member from paying spousal support, child support can never be excused. If there is a court order directing support payments, garnishment can take several weeks or even months. To pre vent arrearages (i.e. a penalty for missed child support payments) contact the state child support agency to arrange payment to them. In sum, these guidelines apply when the service member is on active duty and there is no court order and no agreement between the parties. The unsupported spouse/ex cannot go into court and ask for support under the military guidelines; she/he would refer to the states specific guidelines. For assistance contact the nearest Region Legal Service Office legal assis tance department. Please visit us at www.jag.navy.mil/legal_services/rlso/ rlso_southeast.htm for more informa tion or for office locations.Navigating non-support claims 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 31, 2013 21 The U.S. Navy Marksmanship Team (USNMT) is looking for new members to participate in Navy and inter-service rifle and pistol matches. All activeduty and reserve Sailors are welcomed and encouraged to participate. Sailors receive limited small arms training as they pro cess through Navy Individual Augmentee (IA) training at various U.S. Army training cen ters, said Cmdr. Mick Glancey, USNMT officer in charge. All Sailors serving IA/GSA tours are issued a service rifle (M-16) or a service pistol (M9), some receive both prior to deploy ment. Small arms marksman ship is a basic fundamen tal skill set all our Sailors are required to possess. The USNMT is the lead ing proponent of small arms marksmanship and safety training for U.S. Navy person nel. Each year, the team con ducts the U.S. Fleet (Atlantic and Pacific) Rifle and Pistol Matches, where hundreds of Sailors are trained in service rifle and service pistol marksmanship. Sailors participating in fleet matches represent their commands in individual and team events, earn marksman ship medals and badges, and qualify to stand armed watches aboard ships and at other commands. USNMT also conducts the annual All Navy (East and West) Rifle and Pistol Championships, in which the top 100 Sailors who have fired qualifying scores in fleet matches compete. As members of the rifle and pistol teams, the top 20 Sailors from each coast represent the Navy in the annual Inter Service Rifle and Pistol Matches where the best of the best come to compete from the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard. I/S Pistol Championships are held at Fort Benning, Ga. while the I/S Rifle Championships are held at MCB Quantico, Va. The Civilian Marksmanship Programs National Rifle and Pistol Matches and the National Rifle Associations National Rifle and Pistol Championships are held at Camp Perry, Ohio. Both fleet matches begin with classroom and range training to familiarize shoot ers of all skill levels with safety and proper practices on the range as well as the fundamentals of marksmanship. Then the shooting starts. There are warm-up matches before the 1,000-point rifle matches fired at distances of 200, 300 and 500 yards and the 1,000-point pistol matches fired one-handed from 25 and 50 yards. Competitors also shoot in both pistol and rifle excellencein-competition (EIC) matches. EIC competitions are qualification matches in which competitors earn leg points toward the distinguished marksman and the distinguished pistol shot badges. We want to get the word out to everybody, said Glancey. We want more new shooters to come out and participate in the matches. Sailors do not have to be experienced shooters to benefit from competitive shooting-nor do they even need to own firearms. Throughout the match season, Naval Sea Systems Command Crane Division provides an armorers van with match grade rifles, pistols, ammunition, and a workshop where a group of veteran gun smiths build and maintain these precision firearms for Navy shooters. They even have all the small gear for matches like spotting scopes, shooting coats, mats, and folding stools used to carry gear up and down the 600-yard rifle range. Most shooters buy their own gear once they get involved in the sport, but if you dont already own the guns and gear, its best to try competing before you buy so youre sure of get ting what you need, said Lt. Eric Palmer, west coast match director, who got his start like most Navy shootershe heard about a match and decided he wanted to shoot. Once youve shot for a while and are ready to buy your own equip ment and guns, there are a lot of manufacturers that offer discounts to team members on rifles, ammunition, and just about everything else you need. Weve had shooters shoot their whole careers with a van rifle, said Master Chief Utilities Constructionman Scott Hancock. They just keep track of the rifle number and shoot the same one at every match. One common area of con fusion for Sailors wanting to shoot is how to join the team. It couldnt be easier. The Navy Marksmanship Team is not a commissioned unit of the Navy. It has no unit identifi cation code and there are no billets. Team leadership is a collateral duty and team membership is entirely voluntary. The Navy team doesnt hire professional shooters like the Army Marksmanship Unit and it doesnt have permanent change of station assignments like the Marine Corps team. It is made entirely of Sailors who love to shoot and want to compete. Joining the Navy shooting team and shooting either of the fleet matches is the same thing. Interested shooters need to read the annual message, announcing match dates and locations that came out recently and contact their commands to request orders to attend. The annual match announcement message and team details may be found at the team web site www.usnst.org. Depending on funding availability, active duty Sailors may have to pay some of their travel and messing expenses out of pocket. No-cost TAD orders are the norm, said Glancey. However, our USMC friends at Quantico routinely provide free barracks out at Camp Upshur, open-Bay style living but it is free! Reservists can use any type or combination of orders, with command approval. However, if funding is unavailable, some Reservists do have to come on unpaid annual training orders. Healthy eating for a healthy weight A healthy lifestyle involves many choices, includ ing a healthy eating plan. According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010, a healthy eating plan: fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products nuts trans fats, cholesterol, salt (sodium), and added sugars A healthy eating plan that helps you manage your weight includes a variety of foods you may not have considered. Fresh fruits Dont think just apples or bananas. Be sure to try some exotic fruits, too. How about a mango? Or a juicy pineapple or kiwi fruit? When your favorite fresh fruits arent in season, try a frozen, canned, or dried variety of a fresh fruit you enjoy. Fresh vegetables You may find that you love grilled vegetables or steamed vegetables with an herb you havent tried like rosemary. You can saut vegetables in a non-stick pan with a small amount of cooking spray. Calcium-rich foods How about low-fat and fat-free yogurts without added sugars? These come in a wide variety of flavors and can be a great dessert substitute for those with a sweet tooth. Jax Air News welcomes articles and photographs per taining to base employees, family members, commands and community events. The newspaper is published every Thursday. The deadline for submissions is the previous Friday at 4 p.m. The following are some tips on writing articles and taking photographs for the paper: and last names. No call signs. they all stand for. sixth grade reading level. stories about the people in your command? Everyone has a unique story to tell. Do a story on someones hobby, if they volunteer out in town, something interesting that happened to them, etc. newspaper. We dont want something that happened a month or two ago. Send us a story right after it happens. Email ensures faster submissions. into Word documents. Send photos, with captions, as a chop them as needed. We normally start chopping at the bottom so make sure you put your more important information up front.Photographs settings). have to jeopardize quality for number of photos. well in print for newspaper purposes. only. Include faces. can. lowlight settings can vastly improve indoor shots. your photos, either by ash bounce back or direct sunlight coming in. reproduce well and may not be used when submitted. Articles and photos can be submitted via email to Jaxairnews@comcast.net For more information, call 5423531.Navy competitive shooting season starts soon Guidelines for submitting articles/photos to Jax Air News

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