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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 01-24-2013
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02026

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2013 TRUMAN SUPPOR T AUT O SKILLS HELPING HAIT I Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jacksonville welcomed Sen. Marco Rubio, (R-FL) for a familiariza tion tour of the station Jan. 15. Rubio and his staff members were greeted by Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. and NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders at the main gate before beginning a base familiarization tour. During the tour, NAS Jax Public Works Officer Cmdr. Anant Patel discussed several military construction projects recently completed, including the new P-8A Poseidon Integrated Training Center, those currently underway such as the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Unmanned Aircraft Systems Training Facility and future projects. Rubio also met with NAS Jax and ten ant command Sailors during lunch at the Flight Line Caf where he thanked them for their service as he learned more about how military families deal with deployments, some of the different career paths the Navy offers and physi cal fitness requirements. Anytime we have the chance to inter act with our men and women in uni form, its always enlightening and it reminds us of the great sacrifices they are making, said Rubio. We also came to see this facil ity which is so important, not only to End of an eraHSL-42 transitions to HSM-72The Proud Warriors of HSL-42 were disestablished Jan. 15 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1122 and, at the same ceremony, redesignated as HSM72. The change reflects their transi tion from flying the SH-60B Seahawk helicopter to the MH-60R Romeo Seahawk. It also marked the squadrons transi tion from a detachment-based, expe ditionary squadron to its new focus on anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and anti-surface warfare (ASuW) in support of a carrier air wing. HSM-72 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Troy Anderson said, Our first Romeo NAS Jacksonville Sailors and civil ians gathered at the All Saints Chapel Jan. 16 to celebrate the life and lega cy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during an observance sponsored by the NAS Jacksonville Multi-Cultural Awareness Committee (MCAC). Born Jan. 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Ga., King was an avid civil servant for equal ity. He not only focused on AfricanAmerican hardships, but on the bigger picture of equality for all Americans. The observance began with the sing ing of the national anthem by Valoria Volasgis. NAS Jax Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore delivered the invocation and ABH3 Calvin Davis was the master of ceremonies. Today we celebrate the courage and commitment of Dr. King one mans courage to change the course of American history so that we can live in a country of opportunity and con tribution, said NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders. The com mitment to make ever lasting change in a society which was built on the prem ise that every man is created equal. Guests also enjoyed a musical perfor mance by AT2 Thomas Oden who per formed several songs on his trombone. The guest speaker for the observance was Lt. Cmdr. Kenneth Vargas from Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast who read a letter he wrote to Rubio tours base, visits Sailors NAS Jax remembers Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 Jan. 24 1942 Battle of Makassar Strait, destroyer attack on Japanese convoy in first sur face action in the Pacific dur ing World War II. 1991 Helicopters from USS Leftwich (DD 984)and USS Nicholas (FFG 47) recapture first Kuwaiti territory from Iraqis. Jan. 25 1963 First Seabee Technical Assistance Team arrives in Vietnam. 1968 Operation Windsong I in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Jan. 26 1913 The body of John Paul Jones is laid at its final rest ing place in the U.S. Naval Academy Chapel. 1949 USS Norton Sound (AVM-1), the first guided-mis sile ship, launches a Loon mis sile. 1960 USS John S. McCain (DDG-36) rescues the entire 41-man crew of the sinking Japanese freighter, Shinwa Maru, in the East China Sea. Jan. 27 1942 USS Gudgeon (SS-211) is first U.S. submarine to sink a Japanese submarine (I-173) in action. 1945 Commissioning of USS Higbee (DD-806), first U.S. Navy ship named after a woman member of U.S. Navy. 1967 Lunar Module pilot Lt. Cmdr. Roger Chaffee and fellow astronauts Gus Grissom and Ed White died when a flash fire consumed their spacecraft at Cape Kennedy. 1973 Paris Peace Accords signed, ending U.S. participa tion in the Vietnam War. Jan. 28 1960 Navy demonstrates value of moon communication relay, used in fleet broadcasts. 1962 USS Cook (APD-130) rescues 25 survivors from after section of Panamanian tank er, SS Stanvac Sumatra, which broke in two in the South China Sea. 1986 Space Shuttle Challenger breaks apart 73 seconds into its flight, lead ing to the deaths of its seven crew members, including Cmdr. Michael Smith, Christa McAuliffe, Greg Jarvis, Ronald McNair, Ellison Onizuka, Judith Resnik and Dick Scobee. Jan. 29 1914 U.S. Marines land in Haiti to protect U.S. consulate. 1943 The two-day Battle of Rennell Island begins, after which U.S. transports reach Guadalcanal. Jan. 30 1862 Launching of USS Monitor, the Navys first iron clad warship with a revolving gun turret. She would become most famous for her participa tion in the Battle of Hampton Roads. 1968 Tet Offensive begins in Vietnam. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Ive been a Navy dependent a long timesince I was born, in fact. In the past 36 years, Ive never known the military to care about fashion. (Dont like your military ID card photo? Too bad. Next in line, please.) Ive also never known the military to care about whats comfortable. (I saw my hus bands bunk on the aircraft carrier.) Mostly, however, Ive never known the military to answer to whining. (Ive tried: But Im pregnant! Does he really have to leave?) So when someone recently pointed me to an August 2012 Navy Times article about a possible change to the Navys Working Uniform, I was shocked. I didnt believe it. But they just got those three years ago, I said. No way! Then I looked it up myself. Top-Level Talks Consider Eliminating Blue NWUs, the title reads. The blue NWU (Navy Working Uniform), which is patterned with blue digital camouflage, or aquaflage, has been a joke since 2009. The first time my husband came home wearing it, I asked, Who did you make angry? I mean, Dustin is a pilot; did the Navy want him to blend into the water? Or is there some kind of blue jungle I forgot to study in geography class? The aquaflage is not attrac tive. While almost any Navy pilot looks handsome in his khaki uniform (the same thing is true of cowboysthey all look cute in a hat), Ive yet to see anyone who looks good in the blue NWU. But what do I know about military uniforms? The Navy doesnt care about what looks good, right? The Navy spends a lot of time researching uniform chang es before making a decision, right? The Navy stands by their decision in order to save mili tary members the expense of buying more new uniforms. Right? Apparently not. According to the Navy Times article, top-level officials might have the blue NWUs on the chopping block, because get this people dont like them. The uniforms are hot and uncomfortable, and people make fun of them. They call it the blueberry uniform. Wait, since when did the mil itary care about what people dont like? This puts a whole new spin on my view of the military. Now they care about fashion? Now they care about what members like and dont like? Now they care about whats comfortable? Well, then, Ive got some other things to take up with the military: Yearlong deployments: Really, really uncomfortable. I dont like these. Most peo ple agree. It stinks not hav ing your spouse home for Christmas, birthdays and anniversaries, and its hard to manage the kids and all their after-school activities with just one parent at home to drive them. How can I be at two Little League games at once? Moving every three years: Really inconvenient and expensive. Who can own a home and build equity in itin this mar ket, especially when they have to sell again in a few years? Every time the military has transferred our family, it has been a losing proposition for us. Weve bought and sold more houses than most people will in their entire lifetimes. Weve lost furniture in cross-country moves, and I cant be sure that all my sons school records have followed us from schoolto-school. Cant we just stay in one place? The officer-enlisted thing: Uncomfortable and embarrass ing. I understand why the mili tary has rules against frater nization, but if I hit it off with an enlisted persons wife, and we cant do couples things because of our husbands, well, that just makes life really frustrating and confusing. I hate that moment when both parties realize, we prob ably cant be friends. Not really close friends, at least. What a bunch of wasted opportunities. Watch, duty and work-ups: So annoying! The military has a clever way of keeping our loved ones busier than we think they will be. Just when you think he will have a weekend at home, he calls to say, Actually, I have watch this weekend. Just when youve counted the days you have left before a deployment, he says, Oh, but Ill be away for a month on work-ups before I go. Just when you think hes coming home for dinner, he calls and says, I have duty. For all its regimentation and routine, the military throws us plenty of curveballs with surprise watch, duty and work-ups. Military healthcare: Too many hoops. I just want to see the doctor I want to see. I dont want to call first and make sure the mili tary approves. If I want to see a therapist or counselor, I dont want the military to evaluate me beforehand. When I find a doctor I like, I want to keep her for years to come. And last, for what its worth, the Marine Corpss uniforms look way better than the Navys, so maybe we should just switch them all. Hey, MoneyChic! I see lots of people handing over wads of coupons and having their smart phones scanned at stores, how do I hop on the coupon train and ride the rails to saving money every day? MoneyChic Sez: Coupons are a great way to save money on items you are already going to buy. There are many ways to get started! Savings money on groceries by using coupons will take a little more time than just perusing the grocery ads and making your list. You will need to print coupons from coupon sites or subscribe to the local newspaper (coupons only come in the Sunday paper). The Jax Air News also provides coupons in some of their editions. When shopping at the commissary, look for coupons hang ing under grocery items or being hand ed out as you arrive. Another way to obtain coupons is to ask friends and family who subscribe to a paper if you may have their leftover coupons. It is easy to start clipping every cou pon you see that is high value (over $1 off). Dont let the value of the coupon get you off track of your goal to save money. If you are not intending to pur chase that item, only clip what you know you are going to buy! You have clipped your coupons, now how do you organize them? Use bind ers, envelopes or paper clips. If you shop in a specific order, organize your cou pons in the order you shop. The main entrance to the commissary almost always has items that are necessary for the season. I write my list according to the layout of the store. To make sure I know which items I have coupons for, I put an *c next to the item. The coupon goes in a separate area if it has been used and I circle my mark on my list to know I used a coupon. Hand over that stack of coupons at the checkout coun ter and be proud that with a little work you saved yourself some money! Having a smart phone has really opened the door to savings at many stores. Stores now offer coupons via text for instant savings at checkout. Target sends mobile coupons if you sign up for their weekly deals via text (standard messaging rates apply). Target.com also offers Target specific coupons that can be printed and then stacked with a manufacturer coupon for even more savings! Wal-Mart, Target, Bed Bath and Beyond, BuyBuyBaby, BRU, and TRU (just to name a few) offer price match ing from both box stores (with ads) and online stores. If you are out shopping and want to find out if the store you are in has coupons that can be scanned right from your phone, download The Coupons App from the app store. Its free and has numerous coupons. There are many websites that specifi cally name deals at each store and how to take advantage of the deal. Check out these great resources: www.coupons.com hip2save.com www.totallytarget.com www.babycheapskate.com Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Do you want more couponing secrets or to shop the commissary for good deals with me? Drop me an email at megan. stolle@nmcrs.org. The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is always here to give advice or lend a helping hand. If you would like more information on how we can help, stop by our office outside the Yorktown Gate or give us a call at 542-2832.Since when does the military care about fashion?

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Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Strike Group (HSTSG) began its composite training unit exercise (COMPTUEX) after departing Naval Station Norfolk Jan. 14. COMPTUEX is a series of train ing scenarios designed to certify HSTSG as a deployment-ready fighting force capable of completing operations in overseas theaters. The exercise will be evaluated and graded by Commander, Strike Force Training Atlantic (CSFTA) through war fare scenarios that include simulated surface, air, undersea, strike and elec tronic attacks. In addition, events such as maritime interception operations (such as visit, board, search and seizure [VBSS]), livefire evolutions, and strike group forma tions will also be assessed by CSFTA. We can always run simulations, but nothing takes the place of real live sce narios with communication between various units and aircraft in real, tacti cal situations, said Cmdr. Jason Darish, Trumans combat direction center (CDC) officer. Proficiencies have been built at a very high rate in the months leading up to COMPTUEX and I think our Sailors are ready for this exercise. OSC(SW/AW) Michael Masley, CDCs leading chief petty officer said his Sailors are ready for the evaluation after months of training and preparation. This is the last time that we can prove we are proficient at our jobs and ready to go on deployment, said Masley. This scenario will be a final test of the crews deployment readiness and is intended to make sure everyone has the ability to fight and defend the ship in real-world scenarios. IS3 Erin Maisch, assigned to Trumans intelligence department, said COMPTUEX will verify her depart ments ability to accurately collect, ana lyze and disseminate information under stressful conditions. We need to be prepared for any thing, said Maisch. Throughout COMPTUEX, we need to show that we can do our jobs with 100 percent accuracy, within rules and regulations and within a certain time frame. Darish said he has confidence that every member of HSTSG will perform admirably during the upcoming sce narios. I have nothing but the highest expec tations, said Darish. I think were eager to prove our selves, eager to learn and to train. Everyone is ready and willing to get the job done. We will have the skills right out the door when it comes time to deploy. Units operating with HSTSG include: Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3, 1st Combined Destroyer Squadron (1CDS), USS Barry (DDG 52), USS Gravely (DDG 107), the German ship FGS Hamburg (F220), and the Canadian ships HMCS Ville De Quebec (FFH 332) and HMCS Preserver (AOR 510); USS Monterey (CG 61), USS Gettysburg (CG 64), and USS Kauffman (FFG 59). Truman Strike Group underway with COMPTUEX JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 MWR AUTO SKILL S CENTE R Sailors save money, doing their own work at MWR Auto Skills CenterCar maintenance is timely and expen sive. Even a simple oil change at an auto shop can run upwards of $30 and take hours out of a persons day. And the cost of labor can easily out weigh the cost of replacement parts for other types of automotive repairs. Fortunately, for service members attached to NAS Jax who are willing to get their hands dirty, there is a cost-sav ing alternative at the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Auto Skills Center. Located in a vintage hangar on Birmingham Road, the Auto Skills Center is a do-it-yourself shop that caters to anyone associated with NAS Jax, be it active duty, retired or depen dents. We welcome and readily assist any one who wants to work on their vehi cle, commented MWR Recreation Aide Elliot Herbert. All they need to do is sign in and bring their own parts and we pro vide the tools, lifts and expertise to help them when required. Featuring a wide array of tools, seven car lifts, a hydraulic press and weld ing center, as well as a paint booth, the MWR Auto Skills Center provides the means to tackle almost any mainte nance or repair job. Our tool shed is equipped with pretty much anything you can think of, includ ing diagnostic equipment. In reality, we can assist someone with just about any auto job they have, and weve had some big ones roll through here, remarked ASE Certified Mechanic Terry Ryker. According to Ryker, about 50 percent of maintenance jobs at the Auto Skills Center consist of basic tune-ups, oil changes and tire rotations. Even for personnel who have no expe rience with cars, the benefits of using the center can go along way in learning basic skills and saving money. We are always willing to help people learn. Sailors can save a lot of money and time just by bringing their car here and only paying for parts, Ryker noted. In addition to all the help the Auto Skills Center staff provides to base per sonnel, it also maintains an environ mentally friendly policy by collecting used oil and other automotive fluids to be recycled. If anyone has used oil and a filter from a do-it-yourself job at home, we highly encourage you to bring it to the Auto Skills Center for recycling at no charge. We can store up to 1,000 gal lons, and then sell it to a local recycling company which helps fund MWR pro grams as it also saves the Navy money in waste disposal, Ryker commented. Sailors are highly encouraged to uti lize the Auto Skills Center for all their automotive needs, and do-it-yourself classes are often scheduled weekly. The center is open Monday, Thursday and Friday from noon to 8 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed Tuesday and Wednesday. For more information, call 542-3227.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 Cmdr. Catherine Hagan and Lt. Cmdr. Angela Powell of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville will attend the third Military Health System (MHS) Building Stronger Female Physician Leadership (BSFPL) course Feb. 8-10 at National Harbor, Md. The course objective is to provide an interactive leadership develop ment opportunity targeted at emerging female physician-leaders in the MHS. The program is designed to challenge rising leaders skills, from all branches of the military, to help prepare them for senior military healthcare positions. NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer was delighted to nominate the two deserving candi dates. With only 20 slots available for more than 150 highly qualified appli cants, the honor is highly competitive. I know Cmdr. Hagan and Lt. Cmdr. Powell will represent Navy Medicine and the command very well at this course, says Shaffer. It was my plea sure to endorse these stellar physi cians. Since joining the NH Jacksonville ophthalmology staff in 2011, Hagan has impressed both peers and leadership. She has learned first-hand how they juggle priorities and is eager to hear from future mentors at the BSFPL. The (BSFPL) course was created to encourage women to continue pursu ing leadership roles in the military, explained Hagan. We learn to balance our careers, families and home life. Powell, an NH Jacksonville staff surgeon, considers herself privileged and honored to be counted among the selectees. Since joining NH Jacksonville, she has proven why she deserved to be included in this group. When asked how she felt about this opportunity, Powell said, I believe there will be a wealth of information provided to aid in advanc ing my career. I look forward to meet ing other female physician leaders and learning from their experiences. Shaffer added that promoting women doctors in military medicine to more leadership roles is an important goal for the Department of Defense and NH Jacksonville. MHS designed the BSFPL course as a tool to help mold these women by creating important relation ships and guidance; to mentor them into becoming exceptional senior lead ers. The Red Lancers deployed from NAS Jacksonville in early December to three for ward operating locations located across the Pacific: Naval Air Facility (NAF) in Misawa, Japan; Kadena Air Force Base in Okinawa, Japan; and Comalapa Air Base, El Salvador. Squadron members found festive ways to celebrate the season while far from home and their loved ones. In snowy Misawa, the Red Lancers kicked off their cel ebrations on Dec. 22 with a hearty holiday luncheon at the Misawa Enlisted Club. With a winter wonderland forming outside, many Lancers found themselves working in the snow and flying on Christmas Day. Fortunately, most everyone was able to take Dec. 26 off and relax, play in the snow, or con nect electronically with fam ily and friends who were just waking up for Christmas morn ing in the United States. The residents of Misawa Air Base made sure the squadron was taken care of during this holi day season by sending cards, treats and ending the year with a base-wide New Years Eve party. In the sunny climate south of Japan, the Red Lancers in Kadena found ways to cel ebrate and have fun as well. Former Red Lancer, Lt. Joshua Silva and his wife, Adrianna, graciously opened their home to squadron members for a Christmas Eve dinner. VP-45, also deployed to Kadena, host ed a VP-45/VP-10 Christmas bash, that included a sumptu ous holiday feast, wonderful door prizes, and socializing with friends and new acquain tances. Although many had to work on Christmas and New Years day, the Red Lancers band ed together in their off time to celebrate the holidays by attending religious services on Christmas Eve, watching the Japanese version of the New Years celebration in a room with friends at midnight, or staying up until two in the afternoon to herald in the New Year back home in Jacksonville. The Red Lancers in El Salvador continued their mis sion during the holidays with flights Christmas Eve through New Years Day. Although mission capabili ties were a priority, the men and women of VP-10 still found time to open presents with their families or ring in the New Year via Skype. In addition to celebrating long distance with families, the squadron was able to bring holiday cheer to the children of a local orphanage. VP-10s very own Santa Claus brought gifts for the children. The Red Lancer Wardroom also celebrated the first min utes of 2013 with the promotion of Lt. j.g. Richard Poudrier to Lieutenant. Although each group of Red Lancers had different holiday experiences, every member of the VP-10 family feels grateful for the continued love and sup port they received from every one back home. Using this holi day season to reflect on every thing that they have accom plished and been blessed with, the Red Lancers hope to make this next year as successful as the last. The VP-10 Red Lancers pro vide intelligence, reconnais sance and deterrence support from the air, in both an over land and open water capacity, in the U.S. 7th Fleet and U.S. 4th Fleet areas of responsibility. In a Presidential Proclamation, President Barack Obama designated January 2013 as National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month culminating in the celebration of National Freedom Day on Feb. 1. He called upon Americans to do what we can to end modern slavery with appro priate programs and activities. The VP-26 Tridents have answered the presidents call by supporting two local organizations during Freedom February K9s for Warriors and Rethreaded. canines to warriors who are suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a result of conflicts and war after 9/11. They help warriors return to civilian life by pairing, training and graduating K9/warrior teams. This year, K9s for Warriors is striving to graduate 50 K9/warrior teams from their pro gram located in Ponte Vedra, Fla. Team Trident is calling all NAS Jacksonville civilians, Sailors, Marines, chiefs, and officers to join them as vol unteers to feed, walk and acclimate service dogs and assist with grounds upkeep. Volunteers may also meet with wounded warriors each Saturday in February from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the K9s for Warriors facility. VP-26s goal is to coordinate the efforts of 40 volun teers in completing more than 1,000 volunteer service hours. dollar industry founded on the exploi tation of mostly women and children. Rethreaded is dedicated to assisting victims of human trafficking by fos tering a life-giving community. Their vision is to unravel the effects of the sex trade by fighting business to busi ness on a global and local level. They strive to provide safe, viable and dig nity-giving work to survivors of the sex trade. One of Rethreadeds 2013 goals is to employ several survivors of human traf ficking. To do so, they need resources in the form of clean, new/used, 100 per cent cotton T-shirts, that will be upcycled and sewn into garments and other resalable items. In an effort to assist Rethreaded in reaching their goal, Team Trident is holding a T-shirt drive Feb. 128. Our goal is to donate 2,600 T-shirts by Feb. 28, but we can only achieve our goal with the help of our teammates here at NAS Jax, said the VP-26 Trident Command Services Officer Lt. Cmdr. John Dzialoski. T-shirt drop-offs will be accepted at Hangar 511, Segment 4 in the VP-26 Duty Office, Auxiliary Retail Outlet, and Command Services Office during nor mal working hours. To learn more about K9s for Warriors or Rethreaded, visit them online at: http://www.k9sforwarriors.org or http://www.rethreaded.com. To volunteer for activities during Freedom February, please contact the VP-26 command services office at 5422592 or email VP26_JAXS_CSO@NAVY. MIL. Naval Hospital Jacksonville doctors selected for leadership course VP-10 Red Lancers celebrate overseas holidays Join Team Trident to raise awareness and celebrate Freedom February

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VP-8 demonstrates naval career opportunities to New England educators The Fighting Tigers of Patrol Squadron (VP) 8 wel comed a group of high school educators from the New England area to their work spaces Jan. 9. The group, including both high school teachers and career counselors, was visiting NAS Jacksonville to familiarize themselves with the opportunities avail able for high school students interested in pursuing a career in the Navy. The visit provided the opportunity to speak with many different Navy personnel about the career paths available both as an officer and an enlisted Sailor to high school students. The group was sponsored by Mr. Jim Tighe, educa tional specialist for the New England Navy Recruiting District. Each year, Mr. Tighe brings down groups of educators to expose them to life in the Navy. We love doing the trip because it provides a great public relations opportunity for the Navy, as well as allow the teachers to be able to talk about the Navy in a positive way, said Mr. Tighe. During a static display on the aircraft, sensor opera tors spoke about their specific jobs and how they affect the mission of the P-3C Orion. I am glad to see people getting out and seeing what the Navy is really about so they can better provide students with information about a career in the Navy, said AWO2 Michelle Workman, a native of Pensacola, Fla. I have learned so much. I did not realize the Navy provided so many opportunities to high school stu dents even in this tough job market. I will be able to take what Ive learned here and better present the Navy as a great career opportunity, said a high school counselor from New Berlin, New York. The NAS Jacksonville-based Fighting Tigers recently completed a deployment to the 4th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility. Back home in Jacksonville, VP-8 is conducting an Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle in preparation of their next deployment. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 7

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is scheduled to arrive from Sikorskys Owego, New York factory in February. When we receive our full complement of 11 Romeos, well join Carrier Air Wing-7 and deploy with the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) Carrier Strike Group. Established in October 1984, HSL-42 was the first East Coast LAMPS Mk III squadron to employ the now storied SH-60B airframe. Since that time, HSL-42 maintained a high standard of excellence that estab lished the Proud Warriors reputation as leaders in detached ASW and ASuW operations. Most recently, HSL-42 was award ed the Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic 2012 Battle Efficiency award for the third consecutive year, making it the recipient of this award six out of the last seven years. In its 28 years of exis tence, the squadron was awarded the Battle E an enviable 12 times. The squadron was also awarded the Arleigh Burke Fleet trophy, the Capt. Arnold Jay Isbell ASW trophy, the Talon award, a Golden Wrench award, and the Blue M for medical readiness. This reputation for operational excel lence led to HSL-42 being selected as the first operational naval aviation squadron to deploy with a vertical take off and landing unmanned aerial vehi cle the MQ-8B Fire Scout. HSL-42 deployed its third Fire Scout detachment in 2012 with great success, along with five traditional SH-60B detachments that supported three com batant commander areas of responsibil ity. The squadron achieved 6,023 hours of mishap-free flight time in 2012, having achieved 198,179 consecutive mishapfree flight hours since its only Class A Mishap in 1986. The Proud Warrior transition to HSM72 signifies the introduction of the MH-60R to the Proud Warrior hangar a change that has already required additional training and temporary duty for numerous aircrew and maintenance personnel. While the Romeo edition of the Sikorsky H-60 looks largely similar to its Bravo predecessor, the upgrades in avionics and mission systems gives the MH-60R one of the most advanced sen sor suites the Navy has ever employed, revolutionalizing the way helicopters will be employed by both carrier air wings and surface combatants. Though HSM-72 will take to the skies with one of the Navys newest aircraft, the young squadron will also have in its hangar a 28-year reputation for success that was hard earned by gener ations of HSL-42 pilots, aircrewmen, maintenance, and support personnel. And while HSM-72 stands with pride on the base of its historic LAMPS legacy, it eagerly awaits the challenges that lie ahead during its integration with carri er air wing and strike group operations. The heritage of the Proud Warriors, a namesake derived from Native Americans, will ensure that the initial chapters of HSM-72 history be writ ten in ways that reflect the Principled, Disciplined and Confident manner in which the squadron has always oper ated. HSL-42 Active duty service mem bers and their families will be unaffected when long-delayed reductions to areas where the TRICARE Prime option is offered take place Oct. 1, TRICARE officials said yester day. But as TRICARE seeks to syn chronize service area shifts once staggered by contract delays, some military retirees and their dependents will be moved to TRICARE Standard coverage, S. Dian Lawhon, ben eficiary education and support division director, said during a conference call with report ers. Those affected reside more than 40 miles from a military treatment facility or base clo sure site, she said. The new contracts limit Prime networks to regions within a 40-mile radius of mili tary treatment facilities and in areas affected by the 2005 base closure and realignment pro cess, she explained. But provisions will allow Prime beneficiaries who see providers outside the 40-mile service area to remain in Prime if they reside within 100 miles of an available primary care manager and sign an access waiver, she added. If TRICARE retirees and young adults live less than 100 miles away from a remaining Prime service area, they can re-enroll in Prime by waiving their drive standards and there will be room made for them, Lawhon said, adding that the networks are required to con nect providers to those who elect to waive their drive stan dards. Contractors such as United HealthCare Military & Veterans, Health Net Federal Services and Humana Military will continue to assist benefi ciaries in obtaining providers in their regions, she added. Health care is best if its local, Lawhon said. Weve established the drive standards [to enable] people to access their primary and spe cialty care within a reasonable period of time. Austin Camacho, TRICAREs benefit information and out reach branch chief, said the out-of-pocket, fee-for-service cost of TRICARE Standard would cost a bit more, depend ing on the frequency of health care use and visits. No cost applies for preventive care such as mammograms, vaccines, cancer screening, prostate examinations and rou tine check-ups, he added. Officials estimate the chang es will lower overall TRICARE costs by $45 million to $56 mil lion a year, depending on the number of beneficiaries who choose to remain in Prime, Camacho said. Lawhon and Camacho said beneficiaries should speak to their health care providers and families to assess the best course of action. Were hoping people will take a careful look at their health care needs, Lawhon said. We have seen that people using the Standard benefit are very pleased with it, and their customer satisfaction is the highest of all. To find out more, log on to www.tricare.mil or call Naval Hospital Jax TRICARE health benefits advisors at 5429164/9165.Officials announce TRICARE Prime service area changes Military retirees and their spouses from all branches of service are invited to attend the Retired Military Seminar Feb. 2 at the NAS Jacksonville Officers Club from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The seminar provides infor mation on a variety of top ics including healthcare, veterans benefits, assist ed living, long-term care, survivor benefit plan, pay and financial matters and other retiree issues. Retired Adm. Mark Fitzgerald, former com mander, U. S. Naval Forces Europe, com mander, U. S. Naval Forces Africa and com mander, Allied Joint Force Command, Naples will present the keynote address. Booths with addi tional information will be manned by officials from the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Defense Finance and Accounting Service, the Veterans Administration, Naval Hospital Jacksonville, legal services and other military organizations. Entrance to NAS Jacksonville requires a current Department of Defense military or dependent identification card. For more information, contact J.J. Ryan at 5425790 or james.j.ryan@ navy.mil .Military retiree seminar is Feb. 2 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013

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MLK RUBIOKing in respect for what he did for his nation. It said, Dearest Dr. King, First and foremost, Happy Birthday! Many of us gather across this great Promised Land to honor you these days, and all pledge to keep that light of hope you lit for all of us to follow you by. I want to thank you Dr. King for all you have done for us for bringing to the forefront the fact that we are all children of the same creator, born with dreams and gifts, and that all those dreams and gifts are important, no matter how our external features differ. Your struggle and spiritual leadership to this country has personally given me the opportunity to become educated; to become an officer in the greatest Navy in the world, and I cannot find the words to thank you enough. In your last sermon, you drew inspi ration from biblical teachings from a story of a people who were driven out of a land and forced to march in directions unknown in search for hope, opportu nity, and happiness. It brings to mem ory this story, of your people and my people a shared history of overcoming and following your heart to what the Great Spirit wants for us all. It is a story called Crossing Bok Chitto A Choctaw Story of Friendship and Freedom by fellow Choctaw Tim Tingle. In the days before the Great War between the North and the South, indeed, even before the trail of tears, the forced march from the homelands to parts of the earth unknown, there was a boundary that separated the invading colonizers and the Choctaw people. This boundary was Bok Chitto, a river in modern day Mississippi. The law of the land of the time did not allow slave owners to cross the river, so if a slave made it past the river, the slave would be free. And during this time, early in the morning on a beauti ful Mississippi day, a day the Choctaw would celebrate a wedding, a young Choctaw girl overslept and was awoken by her mother to get up and start her assigned duties of the day in prepara tion for the wedding; to collect berries to be shared at the ceremony. She was behind the power curve and could not find any berries. So, she looked across Bok Chitto, which in our native language means big river, and thought of all the berries that must be over there. But her people were not allowed to cross the Bok Chitto, for obvious reasons. The Choctaw had lived on the shores of the Bok Chitto way before this time; since the days of animals that shook the earth. They knew where the fiords were, and built up a stone passage when the river was up, and built it down when the river was down, always just a tad below the surface of the muddy waters of Bok Chitto. It was our own secret passage way across for centuries. The little girl made her way across and found what she was looking for, but in her excitement, she got lost on the slave side. She came upon a clear ing and heard a voice calling We are bound for the promised land. The young girl had stumbled into a hidden forbidden black church, in the woods, and was witnessing the gathering of the church service by the slaves. Once the Choctaw girl was discov ered, the slaves appointed a young boy to get the girl back to the shores of the river. Once they reach the river, the young girl decides to take the young boy across the river with her, which sur prises him because at first, it appears that she is walking on water! (What kind of witch are you, little girl?). They get to the Choctaw Village as the wedding ceremony is about to begin. After the ceremony, the girls mother reprimands her for crossing Bok Chitto and instructs her to take the boy back to the river. This begins a special friendship between the two cultures. The little girl would cross Bok Chitto on Sundays and join the little boy for the rogue church services. She would learn the hymns in English, and then sing them back to her family in Choctaw after she crossed the river back home. The day came that slaves would be sold on the plantations, and the little boys mother was to be sold. The little boy hatches a plan to cross Bok Chitto at night with his family, as he knew the secret of crossing Bok Chitto from his Choctaw friend. The family reaches the river shore as they hear the slave owners dogs approaching. The little boy finds his way across the river by himself to find his Choctaw friend and explains his familys dis tress. She tells them to go back to his family, that she would send a signal that would let them know how to cross Bok Chitto. The little girl and her moth er enlist all the women of the village to wear white dresses, bring a candle and meet her at the river to conduct a special ceremony. A crossing cere mony. The men with guns, dogs and lanterns on the other side of the river saw, through the fog, what looked like a band of angels forming on the opposing bank of Bok Chitto. And, as they took aim at the slaves with their rifles, they froze as they saw the smallest and most beautiful of angels leading the family with her hand stretched out, floating across the water as she sang a hymn the men recognized, but in the Choctaw language. The family made their way across Bok Chitto and the family was never to be seen on the slave side again. And you, Dr. King, said, But it really doesnt matter with me now, because Ive been to the mountaintop . Ive seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you . I submit to you sir, that promised land that you spoke of was what the people who crossed that river were searching for the chance to be seen as equals among people, to reap what you sow, to share what your hard work brought to you out of love and not out of whips and chains. To close out the observance, mem bers of the MCAC read several passag es of Kings I Have a Dream speech as ABH1(AW/SW) Nnamdi Emenogu played a djembe drum. Guests were also invited to enjoy a special meal in honor of King at the Flight Line Caf.Florida, but to the critical role of our national defense. I really enjoyed meeting the sena tor today. He seems really approachable and made everyone feel at ease. I was impressed that he wanted to know so much about what we do every day, said IT1 LaToya Brown of Naval Computers and Telecommunications Station Jacksonville. During the visit, Rubio also met with Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 Capt. Eric Wiese and Patrol Squadron (VP) 30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens for an operational briefing. After touring a P-3C Orion at VP-26, Rubio boarded the Navys newest air frame the P-8A Poseidon at VP-16. War Eagles Commanding Officer Cmdr. Molly Boron, was on hand along with other squadron members to answer questions of the senator and his staff. Tactical Coordinator Lt. Rodrigo Cunha explained the advantages of the new aircraft to Rubio. The sensor capabilities allow us to pass information near real-time to fleet commanders so they can properly allocate assets, said Cunha. Rubio also spent time on the aircrafts flight deck to learn about the flying qualities of the P-8. Pilots Lt. Amy Crisp and Boron described the differences in flying the Poseidon as opposed to the Orion. In response to the advances in tech nology between the two planes, Rubio commented, It seems like it ultimately makes life much easier, but in the imme diate term its a big jump. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 9

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Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert concluded a weeklong visit to Brazil. Jan. 19 where he spoke with naval leadership, toured multiple navy and marine corps bases, and expanded maritime partnership opportunities. One of the main objectives of the visit was for Greenert to meet with the Commander of the Brazilian Navy Adm. Julio Soares de Moura Neto, who Greenert refers to as a friend and steadfast partner in this economically vibrant country with growing military capabilities. Greenerts visit symbolically renewed the U.S. Navys commitment to the two navies maritime partnership with roots reaching back to World War II. Greenert officially prolonged the relationship through a personal invitation to Moura Neto and the Brazilian navy to take part in the multinational exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2014. Greenert and Moura Neto also secured future cooperation opportuni ties between the two nations through the joint signing of two memoran dums of understanding; one of which is to continue the Military Personnel Exchange Program (MPEP), that allows for Brazilian and U.S. officers to swap jobs and learn defense practices from the host country. The other memorandum signed by both naval service chiefs enacted the Foreign Liaison Officers memorandum of understanding, which appoints a liai son officer to a specific command to represent his or her country regarding matters of government policies, proce dures, laws and regulations. Moura Neto expressed his appreci ation for Greenert and the U.S. Navy by bestowing upon him the Brazilian Order of Merit Award for distinguished service and exceptional contributions to the citizens and country of Brazil. Greenert accepted the award on behalf of the U.S. Navy with a sincere declara tion of continued naval support. This visit has really emphasized the importance of my relationship with Adm. Moura Neto and our Navy, Greenert said. His trip began in the cap ital city of Brasilia on Monday where he, his naval counterpart Moura Neto and senior Brazilian naval officers sat down for a round table discussion about numerous maritime topics. The visit continued for Greenert with a tour of the Aramar Nuclear Facility and various military installations in Rio de Janeiro, including the Itaguai Submarine Base and Submarine Shipyard facility which is under con struction. While in Rio, Greenert stated the U.S. Navy will assist Brazil with les sons learned from the development of the U.S. nuclear submarine program to help foster Brazils subsurface capabili ties. I find it impressive, said Greenert of the Brazilian submarine program. I find it innovative and I think that the Brazilian navy, the Brazilian defense establishment and the government is very forward looking. Greenert added, Im very impressed with the profes sionalism, the investment of people and time and of the technology. In honor of Greenerts visit and as a military capabilities demonstration, the Brazilian navy and marine corps exe cuted a live amphibious assault exer cise, performed a simulated pilot rescue mission and paraded by marine forc es at the marine amphibious division headquarters near Rio de Janeiro. Greenert spoke at a joint press con ference with Moura Neto to discuss his visit, the impact it had on him after talking with the Brazilian navys lead ership and seeing their sailors and marines in person. I would put my opinion, or my impression of the Brazilian navy at the very top, Greenert said. The govern ment and the Brazilian navy have the best vision for what the right security is in the Atlantic and I would view them as the leader in that area. CNO expands U.S./Brazil partnership JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 11

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12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 With just 23 months until the end of the International Security Assistance Force mis sion in Afghanistan, Afghan forces are poised to move into the lead operationally as NATO and partner nations are discussing the scope and mis sions of the enduring presence force that will remain in the country. The conversations within NATO are about this transition, a senior NATO officer, speak ing on background, told report ers Jan. 17. The alliances chiefs of defense, including Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chair man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, are in Brussels for meetings. It has been less a conver sation about numbers than it has been about capabilities and requirements, the senior officer said of discussions con cerning NATOs role going for ward in Afghanistan. Milestone 2013 is the short hand NATO uses referring to Afghan forces taking the secu rity lead. Last week, President Barack Obama and Afghan President Karzai announced this will occur in the spring. This milestone marks a long road for the Afghan national security forces, the officer said. In 2012, Afghan forces demon strated their battlefield abili ties and proficiencies. Now, he said, the need in Afghanistan is for NATO support forces and advisors rather than the com bat troops Afghanistan needed in the past. The post-2014 needs are a training-and-advising capa bility and a focused counter terrorism capability, the offi cer said. How to execute those missions at various troop lev els are the conversations that are going on within NATO, in Afghanistan and in the capi tals of partner nations, he told reporters, adding that the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) has not been asked to provide advice with respect to a zero-troop option. The way forward can be seen with an eye to the past, the officer said. The nature of the enduring-presence force will be to facilitate an Afghan national security force that will still be conducting counterin surgency operations, he added. Just a year ago, the officer noted, people asked when ISAF was going to shift the main effort in Afghanistan from Regional Command South to Regional Command East. They didnt realize the main effort was already shifting, he said, because that mission was shift ing to Afghan forces. For a counterinsurgency to succeed, the officer said, indig enous forces have to be the lead. Foreign forces can pro vide the breathing space for these forces to develop their capabilities, but ultimately it is up to local forces to work with the people. Thats been what has been happening over the last 18 months, he said. The drawdown of U.S. surge forces in Afghanistan created the space and necessitated innovation for Afghan forces. They are doing corps-level operations today using coun terinsurgency type tactics, techniques and procedures, with us firmly in an advisory role, he said. In 2015 and beyond, the nature of NATO presence will be on training, advising and assisting to ensure the con tinued development of the Afghan forces, the officer said, and the counterterrorism mis sion will be to prevent al-Qai da from putting down roots in Afghanistan again. The Afghan forces will be ready for the full security load by 2015, the officer said, but the road hasnt been easy. Were building this military virtually from scratch, he noted. Once trained, the officer said, the Afghan military has gone from the training field to the battlefield, it has gone from training straight into combat. The Afghan military needs to have cohesion and loyalty to the nation, but it still must incorporate and adjust to the dynamic of tribalism and eth nicity, he added. And on top of this, he said, less than a quarter of all Afghans are literate, and the use of modern weapons and tactics requires literacy. There are problems, he acknowledged, and ISAF and the Afghan ministries are addressing them. Attrition in the army is an unsustainable 3.5 percent per month, the offi cer said. Other national secu rity elements such as the police and air force are within the norms needed, around 1.4 per cent per month. The armys difficulties, he told reporters, stem from four basic problems: quality of lead ership, quality of life, access to leave, and pay. The pay issue has been large ly solved with the adoption of electronic funds transfer. Quality of life issues are being addressed by building new gar risons, the officer said. Were getting these soldiers out of barracks that are fall ing down, that are cast-offs, and getting them into the new facilities and bases that we are building for them, he said. Leave was a problem last year and directly contributed to a rise in the attrition rate, the officer said, noting these soldiers went straight from the training ground to a tough fighting season in 2012. We have worked very closely with the Afghan army and the Ministry of Defense to get leave back on the books for these kids, he said. Finally, the officer said, leadership is a systemic prob lem that is being addressed. The Afghan defense minister is scrubbing the leadership of the Afghan military and weed ing out those who cant cut the mustard or are corrupt, while promoting those who have demonstrated their worth. The attrition is coming down, the officer said. All this is important for the Afghan security forces in 2013, the officer said. This is the first summer where Afghans are in the lead for security operations throughout the country, he said. We want their forces to come out of this fighting sea son to be successful, but really to be confident in their abili ties. The Afghans already are con ducting corps-level operations around Afghanistan and rou tinely oversee 10,000 to 12,000 Afghan troops in an opera tion from multiple brigades, the officer said. Between 1,000 and 1,500 ISAF personnel will be scattered about the battle space as advisors or providing support capabilities. One Taliban tactic is simply to wait out the NATO ISAF mis sion and take on the Afghan national security force, the offi cer said, but he added he does not believe that is the Talibans strategy. There is enthusiasm in NATO to continue to make a differ ence in Afghanistan, the offi cer said. Weve put 11 years of fighting into this, and the right kind of force in the post-2014 period can sustain these gains for a long time, he said. Over the next 23 months, commanders must work to maintain the cohesion of the coalition 50 nations have been successful working together in the country and they must guard the integrity of the campaign plan, the offi cer said. Beyond that, he added, commanders must lead and manage the redeployment of the force, the retrograde of materiel and the closing of more than 200 bases. That requires extraordinari ly detailed planning, and 23 months is the blink of an eye, he said. We are seriously going to use every second to fight the campaign, clear the theater and set the enduring presence force. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus rolled out his new Four Ps during a speech at the 25th Annual Surface Navy Association Symposium in Arlington, Va. Jan. 17. Mabus said the Four Ps of People, Platforms, Power and Partnerships are a way to bind key areas that are interrelated priorities for the Navy. A top priority of mine and of our Navy is people...taking care of our peo ple, said Mabus. Unlike most organizations, we push responsibility down... down in rank, down in age, and day-in, day-out we get the type of positive results we need and expect. Mabus added that although the majority of Sailors are responsible and successful, leadership realized that there needed to be more attention paid to programs to ensure their mental, emotional and physical well being. In response, the Navy introduced the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initia tive to maintain or improve the resil ience of the force. Recognizing abuse of alcohol was a common factor in sexual abuse, domestic violence, suicide and other issues, breathalyzers were brought into com mands to help prevent alcohol-related incidents. This is not intended to be punitive. But, if you pop positive when reporting for duty, were going to get you into a program to help you, he said. We dont want a careeror lifethreatening alcohol-related incident. We have to focus on health physical, mental and emotional. Mabus also noted that part of main taining the health of the fleet means taking steps to help Sailors as they transition out of the Navy by ensuring they have access to education, training and employment opportunities. This is especially true for wounded warriors. Last year, we set a goal to hire one wounded warrior a day in the Navy, he said. We tripled it... we hired over 1,000 wounded veterans. The Navy is also helping those want to join the military, by reestablishing the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps in universities such as Harvard, Yale and Columbia, and implementing it for the first time at other colleges like Arizona State University. No one should be denied the honor of serving this country, said Mabus. The second P, platforms, refers to the ships, aircraft, submarines, unmanned vehicles and hardware the Navy buys and builds. For the Surface Navy Association audience, Mabus focused on shipbuilding programs as a strategic priority for the Navy today and in the future. I think that we have made great strides in ship building, said Mabus. Were getting the ships we need, the mix we need and the numbers we need while being good stewards of the tax payers money. Im proud of where we are. We owe the shipbuilding industry transparency I feel were giving them that, he said. In turn, they owe us that every ship built without major design changes, should cost us less than the one before it. This is happening, and we currently have 288 ships. Additionally, Mabus noted that the Navy has 42 ships currently under con tract and is making steady progress toward building a fleet of 300 ships by the end of the decade. The third P, power, focuses on Mabus five energy goals that include pursu ing energy efficiencies and alternative sources of energy. The U.S. military is the largest single consumer of fossil fuels in the world, he said. Every time a barrel of oil goes up one dollar, it costs the Navy $30 mil lion. Mabus illustrated that additional cost in terms of steaming days, saying it was roughly the equivalent of 142 steaming days for LHDs or 293 days of combat operations for an Arleigh Burke class destroyer. Last year the Navy demonstrated the Great Green Fleet in Hawaii, as part of RIMPAC. The Great Green Fleet includ ed a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, aircraft and ships operating on 50/50 blends of traditional and advanced bio fuels, and several firsts such as under way and air-to-air refueling using bio fuels. Something truly remarkable hap pened when we demonstrated the Great Green Fleet, said Mabus. Nothing. Not a single engine or pro cess had to be changed. They simply did not know the difference, continued Mabus. I dont want to fly less, steam less or deploy less. And I dont think we have to, but we have to make this move. Partnerships may be the last P, but theyre a top priority according to Mabus who links it back to the new Defense Strategy and its focus on inno vative, small-footprint engagements around the world. The Navy is Americas away team, he said. When were working, were usual ly a long way from home. Because of that we need to build partnerships, build capacity around the world. Our presence around the world, working with our friends and allies, is impor tant, and the demand will continue to increase. Mabus concluded by telling the audience that the Navy and Marine Corps team, Americas Away Team, stands ready to answer all bells. We are and will continue to be the finest fighting force the world has ever known, said Mabus. NATO planners look to enduring force in Afghanistan SECNAV Mabus presents his focus areas

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After 20 years of honorable and dedicated service in the United States Navy, AWF1 Gordon Richards flew his last flight as a P-3C flight engineer Dec. 31 while deployed to El Salvador. Upon landing, Richards was met by senior and junior Sailors alike who thanked him for his service and wished him well in future endeavors. Richards joined the Navy from Leesburg, Fla., in August 1992 and upon completion of basic training in Great Lakes, Ill., he reported to VFA-86 at Cecil Field. While attached to VFA-86, he deployed on both the USS America and the USS George Washington. After two successful cruises, Richards transferred to Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) Jacksonville in 1998. Assigned to the Power Plants Division, he built and tested T-56 engines, the same engines that power the P-3C Orion. In 2001, Richards was select ed to attend flight engineer training at VP-30. He reported to VP-16 in 2002, where over the next three years, he honed his craft as a naval flight engineer. From 2006-07 while assigned to AIMD 400 Division he deployed on board USS Dwight D. Eisenhower where he earned his enlisted surface warfare specialist designation and became a Shellback, join ing the many Sailors before him who sailed across the equator. In June 2007, Richards joined the VP-10 Red Lancers and will retire May 31, 2013. I wouldnt trade anything that Ive experienced over the past 20 years, good or bad for anything in the world, Richards said. As an instructor flight engi neer, Richards mentored junior Sailors daily, providing expert advice and instruction. It was great watching young Sailors mature and advance through the ranks, knowing you played a role in their suc cess, he said. Richards ended his career with 3,722 mishap free flight hours. VP-10 bids farewell to AWF1 Richards JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 13

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14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 Haitian students attend rib bon cutting events Jan. 10 for the inauguration of newlyconstructed community clus ters at Les Cayes and Torbeck, both located within the Sud Department of Haiti as part of U.S. Southern Commands Humanitarian Assistance Program (HAP) in Haiti. Each community cluster built by the United States for the local municipality consists of an 8-classroom school, com munity center building, medi cal clinic, and water well. The complex provides much need ed facilities to the local popu lation, explained Lt. j.g. Don Pasteur, the Resident Officer in Charge of Construction (ROICC) Haiti with Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast. They will also function as evacuation centers in the case of hurricanes or other natural disasters. The community clusters are part of eight similar com munity cluster projects that were awarded by NAVFAC in Jacksonville. The lead con tractor on the Les Cayes and Torbeck community clusters is Palgag Building Technologies. School children were sing ing a welcome song and pre senting flowers as the ceremo ny began, said Pasteur. This was a wonderful thank you dis played by the children to the U.S. Ambassador to Haiti, the Minister of Education, and the Minister of Public Health. Participants in the inau guration ceremony included The Honorable Pamela White, U.S. Ambassador to Haiti; Serge Chery, Departmental Delegate, Government of Haiti; CDR Richter Tipton, Senior Defense Official, U.S. Embassy; Vanneur Pierre, Minister of Education, Government of Haiti; and Florence D Guillaume, Minister of Public Health, Government of Haiti. Also in attendance were the Mayors of Les Cayes and Torbeck; Lt. j.g. Don Pasteur, ROICC Haiti; and Sgt. 1st Class Roland Laforest, the U.S. Southern Command HAP pro gram manager. The celebrations will con tinue as additional projects are completed in the Haiti pro gram. The next big event is tentatively scheduled for midFebruary with a ribbon cutting ceremony for the Emergency Operations Center and Disaster Relief Warehouse in Les Cayes. In support of the American Heart Associations National Heart Health Month, your commissary offers shop pers a myriad of special events and instore promotions highlighting health, nutrition and great savings. Take a look around your commissary in February and youll find what we call healthy bundling promotions, said Chris Burns, DeCA sales director. Companies are combining their efforts to offer shoppers even better savings. An example of this is having name-brand breakfast cereals posi tioned next to fresh fruit. Throughout February, DeCAs indus try partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborating with com missaries to offer discounts beyond everyday savings. Customers are asked to check their local commissary for details on dates and times for the following promotions: With their Build a Heart Healthy Pantry promotion, Quaker and Naked Juice encourage shoppers to stay on the right path for a tip-top ticker. Pamphlets about Quaker and Naked Juice products, along with coupons and recipes, will be available. Their exclu sive savings website, www.quakermili tary.com, will highlight heart healthy recipes and additional education al information. This promotion runs throughout February. The Just Add Milk promotion fea tures high-value coupons offered on General Mills cereals. A coupon for free milk is available with multiple purchas es. This event runs Feb. 7-20. Unilever and Advantage Sales, LLC, will sponsor their fourth annual Focus on Fitness contest, Feb. 7-20. The purchase of any Unilever Brand contributes to the wellness of military installations by helping them move closer to winning healthy rewards. More than 75,000 in-store coupon flyers will be distributed, offering $6 in sav ings per flyer. The winning military installations will be awarded more than $40,000 in wellness prizes that support fitness and healthy lifestyles. The J.M. Smucker Company and their broker, Overseas Service Corporation, are running the 8th Annual Serving Our Countrys Finest event, Feb. 21-March 6. They will hand out more than 400,000 free military calendars to shoppers. The calendars feature highvalue coupons and recipes. ConAgra Foods will feature the Ready-Set-Eat: Free Groceries for a Year! event, Feb. 7-March 6. Shoppers can receive coupon booklets featuring convenient meal solutions and up to $10 in savings. Customers can also visit www.conagracommissarydeals.com where they can enter to win the grand prize of free commissary groceries for a year. Shoppers who sign up will also get a high value thank you coupon to redeem in their commissary. Dixon Marketing will sponsor their 15th Multi-Brand Heartfelt event, Feb. 7-March 6. Giveaways include: 100 $50 commissary gift cards, one $1,500 scholarship for military children, highvalue coupons to enhance shopper sav ings, and 500,000 in-store flyers with worldwide circulation. Shoppers automatically qualify for the opportunity to receive one of 100 $50 commissary gift cards by register ing online at www.familymedia.com/ dmi. Your commissary offers great sav ings every day of the year. Burns said. The Defense Commissary Agency does everything in its power to keep your savings high and prices low. Due to the longer wingspan of the P-8A Poseidon, the fixedwing aircraft rinse rack located in the taxiway near NAS Jax Hangar 113 is being replaced. We removed the old trans former, pump house and asso ciated equipment and started with a fresh design, said Keshia Torruella, site superintendent for Cape Design Engineering Company. Along with a 5,000-gal. fresh water tank, we just installed a 10,000-gal. oil/water separator tank so nothing environmen tally harmful escapes the rinse rack. We will also build a cast-inplace underground vault to house a new sump pump and control equipment, she said. As tax season nears, Military OneSource and H&R Block have again joined forces to provide a free online tax preparation ser vice for service members. Tony Jackson, a program analyst for the Military OneSource program office, detailed the services available for troops and their families. Military OneSource is a gateway to a free tax preparation service, partnered with H&R Block, he said. We also have tax consultants who can provide assis tance, whether its seeking and filling out tax forms or any other tax-related informa tion. Jackson emphasized it is a safe and secure way for service members to prepare their taxes online. Military OneSource and H&R block def initely meet industry standards for secu rity for websites, he said. Also, encryption software is used and theres also no selling of information, so service members and family members can be assured that their information is secure, and it stays within Military OneSource and H&R Block. Jackson noted that two services -basic and premium are provided through H&R Block, with one notable difference. The basic service is free, he said, and the pre mium service would apply to taxpayers who must file Schedule C returns, gener ally to report gains or losses from business ownership. When you start getting into premium, youre going to incur some additional costs, where basic is free, Jackson said. For those not sure which service they should use, Jackson encouraged them to use the Military OneSource website as a guide. The site lists answers to frequently asked questions. You can always contact Military OneSource at 1-800-342-9647, Jackson said. Were open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, so any questions you have, you can use the website or the call center at the [toll-free] number. Jackson said both methods are effective in contacting Military OneSource tax con sultants offering useful services for troops and their families. Not only do they provide forms and basic information relative to military-spe cific tax issues and questions, they are a gateway to get you to H&R Block, he said. If your tax situation warrants, theyll get you to a volunteer income tax assistance clinic on your local military installation or larger command. Its one-stop shopping. These tax consultants cannot prepare tax forms or direct people to do anything, Jackson said. Everything is on a recom mended basis. All members of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps are eli gible to use the service, he said, includ ing members of the National Guard and Reserve components, regardless of activa tion status. Coast Guard reservists acti vated under Title 10 authority to serve with the Navy also are eligible and so are spouses and other family members enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System. Family members that have been des ignated to provide support to deployed service members, medically discharged retirees and discharged service members within 180 days of their discharge date are eligible for Military OneSource services, Jackson added. The key to these services is financial readiness, which is a Defense Department priority. We understand that financial readiness is a readiness issue. If you have a service member whos concerned about their financial situation then that detracts from the mission. Jackson also provided his personal tes tament to using the free tax preparation program, having served on active duty in the Marine Corps as a personnel officer for more than 20 years. He said his family still uses the service. My daughter is a military spouse and she continues to use it as well, he said. This programs ultimate goal is to ensure service members and their families know that Military OneSource is an option. We hope its the first option for getting your taxes prepared or answering any ques tions or issues you have with taxes, said Jackson. Just know that Military OneSource is there to help you. Haitian students excited to see new classrooms open Celebrate heart health this February at your commissary Military OneSource offers tax assistance service Combating aircraft corrosion

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Deweys Big Game Party Feb. 3, doors open at 5 p.m., food served at 6 p.m. $10 per person, includes buffet and door prizesFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238 The gym is relocated in The Zone, Bldg. 798 through June 30. Check-out our new fitness schedule! New classes include Muscle Max, Extreme Bootcamp and Max Core Pick-up the latest copy at the fitness center.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Wild Florida Airboats & Wild Animal Park Kenansville, Fla. $17-$46.50 Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus Jan.1821, $13 per person ShenYun at the Times Union Center Jan. 2930, $55 $163 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Preferred seating $41, lower level seat ing $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Dream Girls May 21 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! Blue Man Group in Orlando Special until March 31, Adult $44, child $29, military $29 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4-day hopper $153.25 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discounted tick ets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT! Daytona 500 Feb. 24 Tickets on sale now! $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Deweys Super Bowl Party Feb 3 at 5 p.m. $5 per person, advance purchase only SNAG Golf Lesson Feb. 6 & Feb. 21 at 6 p.m. NAS Jax Golf Course Free Mall & Movie Trip Feb. 8 at 6 p.m. Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater Free Burger Night Feb. 19, 510 p.m. Stop by Liberty to pick-up your coupon for a free Deweys burger!NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green feesFeb. 5 & 19 for active duty Jan. 24, February 7 & 21 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 12:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DOD and guests. Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Feb. 22, 6 p.m. at Patriots Grove Free popcorn and $.50 drinksFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School March 18 April 24 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 15

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Suicide pre vention is not new, the senior enlisted advi sor to the chair man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said Jan. 17, but its our prob lem. Building resil ience into the force is essential to preventing suicides, Marine Corps Sgt. Major Bryan Battaglia said during one of several enlist ed calls. The military, he said, doesnt teach turning around and running away from problems. Total Force Fitness, a holistic approach to mental and physical health intended to build resilience, will help service members and their families deal with challenges, the sergeant major said. The concept, developed by Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, the Joint Chiefs chair man, consists of eight wedges, each with a particular influence on mental and physical health. You hit adversity every day, Battaglia told the service mem bers at Keesler Air Force Base in Mississippi. The military teaches service members to assess a prob lem and develop courses of action, the sergeant major said, adding that service members should take that same approach to their per sonal lives. Be in a preventive posture, he said. Building resilience is both an art and a science, Battaglia said. This isnt all about medicine, he said. Its not strictly, The answer is some sort of medica tion. Part of the art of resilience hing es on leader engagement, he said. He called on enlisted leaders to help in pre paring service members accus tomed to a warf ighting setting to serve in a gar rison-focused environment. Total Force Fitness plans will differ from person to per son, he said, as each tailors it to meet their own needs to improve and stay resilient. Military lead ers in all the ser vices are com mitted to reduc ing suicides, Battaglia said. With regards to education, engage ment, intervention when a service member is feeling down or even pos sibly falling down, [leaders] need to engage, and they are, Battaglia noted. When a service member or fam ily member is struggling, they need to intervene. And they are. Suicide is a total-force issue, and were going to con tinue to work hard in order to make it a total-force solution. Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their fami lies. Preregistration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handi capped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: Feb. 4-6 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), May 13-16 (5:30-10 p.m.), Aug. 19-21 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Nov. 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.) (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) Feb. 4-8, Feb. 11-15, March 4-8, March 11-15, April 1-5, April. 8-12, May 6-10, May 13-17, June 3-7, June 17-21, July 8-12, July 15-19, Aug. 5-9, Aug. 19-23, Sept. 9-13, Sept. 16-20, Oct. 7-11, Oct. 21-25, Nov. 4-8, Dec. 2-6. (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Jan. 28-Feb. 1, Feb. 25-March 1, March 25-29, April 15-19, May 20-24, June 24-28, July 22-26, Aug. 26-30, Sept. 23-27, Oct. 28-Nov. 1, Nov. 18-22, Dec. 16-20. (9 a.m.-noon) Feb. 19, March 20, April 22, May 3, June 12, Aug. 16, Sept. 6, Oct. 17, Nov. 27, Dec. 11. (Noon-3 p.m.) Jan. 22, July 2. (8-9:30 a.m.) Jan. 23, April 10, May 30, July 15, Sept. 5, Nov. 25. (9:40 a.m.-noon) Jan. 23, April 10, May 30, July 15, Sept. 5, Nov. 25. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Feb. 20-21, May 1-2, Aug. 14-15, Nov. 13-14. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) March 18-22, June 10-14, Sept. 30-Oct. 4, Dec. 9-13. (8-11 a.m.) Jan. 22, April 30, July 2, Oct. 15. (1-3:30 p.m.) April 22, May 29, Sept. 4. (9-10:30 a.m.) Feb. 22, May 29, Aug. 12, Nov. 26. (1:30-3 p.m.) Feb. 14, April 11, June 13, Aug. 8, Oct. 10, Dec. 12. (1:304 p.m.) March 14, May 9, July 11, Sept. 12, Nov. 14. Jan. 28 (9-10:30 a.m.), March 16 (1011:30 a.m.), May 21 (5-6:30 p.m.), July 18 (1-2:30 p.m.) Sept. 14 (1-2:30 p.m.) Nov. 21 (5-6:30 p.m.) (9-11 a.m.) Feb. 11, March 11, April 8, May 13, June 10, July 8, Aug. 12, Sept. 9, Oct. 7, Nov. 4, Dec. 9. (9-10:30 a.m.) Feb. 12, March 12, April 9, May 14, June 11, July 9, Aug. 13, Sept. 10, Oct. 8, Nov. 5, Dec. 10. (8 a.m.-noon) April 16 & 30, July 16 & 30, Oct. 15 & 29. (8 a.m.-noon) Jan. 22, Feb. 26, March 26, April 23, May 21, June 25, July 23, Aug. 27, Sept. 24, Oct. 22, Nov. 26, Dec. 17. March 12 April 16 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.), May 2 June 6 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), June 25 July 30 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.), Aug. 15 Sept. 19 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), Oct. 8 Nov. 12 (2-4 p.m.) (11 a.m.1 p.m.) March 19, May 14, July 9, Sept. 10, Nov. 19. (1-3 p.m.) Jan. 22, 29; March 5, 12, 19, 26; May 7, 14, 21, 28; July 9, 16, 23, 30; Sept. 3, 10, 17, 24; Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26. (1-4 p.m.) Feb. 6, 13, 20, 27; April 3, 10, 17, 24; June 5, 12, 19, 26; Aug. 7, 14, 21, 28; Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23. (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) March 5, June 4, Sept. 16, Dec. 3. (10 a.m.-noon) Jan. 22; Feb. 5, 19; March 5, 19; April 2, 16, 30; May 14, 18; June 11, 25; July 9, 23; Aug. 6, 20; Sept. 3, 17; Oct. 1, 15, 29; Nov. 12, 16; Dec. 10, 17. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) March 7, May. 2, July 3, Sept. 5, Nov. 7. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) Feb. 7, April 4, June 6, Aug. 1, Oct. 3, Dec. 5.To register for any of the above work shops please contact 542-5745.FFSC offers life skills workshopsSuicide prevention our problem, Battaglia says 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2013 TRUMAN SUPPORT AUTO SKILLS HELPING HAITI Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jacksonville welcomed Sen. Marco Rubio, (R-FL) for a familiariza tion tour of the station Jan. 15. Rubio and his staff members were greeted by Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. and NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders at the main gate before beginning a base familiarization tour. During the tour, NAS Jax Public Works Officer Cmdr. Anant Patel discussed several military construction projects recently completed, including the new P-8A Poseidon Integrated Training Center, those currently underway such as the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Unmanned Aircraft Systems Training Facility and future projects. Rubio also met with NAS Jax and ten ant command Sailors during lunch at the Flight Line Caf where he thanked them for their service as he learned more about how military families deal with deployments, some of the different career paths the Navy offers and physi cal fitness requirements. Anytime we have the chance to interact with our men and women in uni form, its always enlightening and it reminds us of the great sacrifices they are making, said Rubio. We also came to see this facil ity which is so important, not only to End of an eraHSL-42 transitions to HSM-72The Proud Warriors of HSL-42 were disestablished Jan. 15 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1122 and, at the same ceremony, redesignated as HSM72. The change reflects their transi tion from flying the SH-60B Seahawk helicopter to the MH-60R Romeo Seahawk. It also marked the squadrons transi tion from a detachment-based, expe ditionary squadron to its new focus on anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and anti-surface warfare (ASuW) in support of a carrier air wing. HSM-72 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Troy Anderson said, Our first Romeo NAS Jacksonville Sailors and civil ians gathered at the All Saints Chapel Jan. 16 to celebrate the life and lega cy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during an observance sponsored by the NAS Jacksonville Multi-Cultural Awareness Committee (MCAC). Born Jan. 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Ga., King was an avid civil servant for equality. He not only focused on AfricanAmerican hardships, but on the bigger picture of equality for all Americans. The observance began with the sing ing of the national anthem by Valoria Volasgis. NAS Jax Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore delivered the invocation and ABH3 Calvin Davis was the master of ceremonies. Today we celebrate the courage and commitment of Dr. King one mans courage to change the course of American history so that we can live in a country of opportunity and con tribution, said NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders. The com mitment to make ever lasting change in a society which was built on the premise that every man is created equal. Guests also enjoyed a musical performance by AT2 Thomas Oden who per formed several songs on his trombone. The guest speaker for the observance was Lt. Cmdr. Kenneth Vargas from Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast who read a letter he wrote to Rubio tours base, visits Sailors NAS Jax remembers Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 Jan. 24 1942 Battle of Makassar Strait, destroyer attack on Japanese convoy in first sur face action in the Pacific dur ing World War II. 1991 Helicopters from USS Leftwich (DD 984)and USS Nicholas (FFG 47) recapture first Kuwaiti territory from Iraqis. Jan. 25 1963 First Seabee Technical Assistance Team arrives in Vietnam. 1968 Operation Windsong I in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Jan. 26 1913 The body of John Paul Jones is laid at its final rest ing place in the U.S. Naval Academy Chapel. 1949 USS Norton Sound (AVM-1), the first guided-mis sile ship, launches a Loon missile. 1960 USS John S. McCain (DDG-36) rescues the entire 41-man crew of the sinking Japanese freighter, Shinwa Maru, in the East China Sea. Jan. 27 1942 USS Gudgeon (SS-211) is first U.S. submarine to sink a Japanese submarine (I-173) in action. 1945 Commissioning of USS Higbee (DD-806), first U.S. Navy ship named after a woman member of U.S. Navy. 1967 Lunar Module pilot Lt. Cmdr. Roger Chaffee and fellow astronauts Gus Grissom and Ed White died when a flash fire consumed their spacecraft at Cape Kennedy. 1973 Paris Peace Accords signed, ending U.S. participa tion in the Vietnam War. Jan. 28 1960 Navy demonstrates value of moon communication relay, used in fleet broadcasts. 1962 USS Cook (APD-130) rescues 25 survivors from after section of Panamanian tank er, SS Stanvac Sumatra, which broke in two in the South China Sea. 1986 Space Shuttle Challenger breaks apart 73 seconds into its flight, lead ing to the deaths of its seven crew members, including Cmdr. Michael Smith, Christa McAuliffe, Greg Jarvis, Ronald McNair, Ellison Onizuka, Judith Resnik and Dick Scobee. Jan. 29 1914 U.S. Marines land in Haiti to protect U.S. consulate. 1943 The two-day Battle of Rennell Island begins, after which U.S. transports reach Guadalcanal. Jan. 30 1862 Launching of USS Monitor, the Navys first iron clad warship with a revolving gun turret. She would become most famous for her participation in the Battle of Hampton Roads. 1968 Tet Offensive begins in Vietnam. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Ive been a Navy dependent a long timesince I was born, in fact. In the past 36 years, Ive never known the military to care about fashion. (Dont like your military ID card photo? Too bad. Next in line, please.) Ive also never known the military to care about whats comfortable. (I saw my hus bands bunk on the aircraft carrier.) Mostly, however, Ive never known the military to answer to whining. (Ive tried: But Im pregnant! Does he really have to leave?) So when someone recently pointed me to an August 2012 Navy Times article about a possible change to the Navys Working Uniform, I was shocked. I didnt believe it. But they just got those three years ago, I said. No way! Then I looked it up myself. Top-Level Talks Consider Eliminating Blue NWUs, the title reads. The blue NWU (Navy Working Uniform), which is patterned with blue digital camouflage, or aquaflage, has been a joke since 2009. The first time my husband came home wearing it, I asked, Who did you make angry? I mean, Dustin is a pilot; did the Navy want him to blend into the water? Or is there some kind of blue jungle I forgot to study in geography class? The aquaflage is not attrac tive. While almost any Navy pilot looks handsome in his khaki uniform (the same thing is true of cowboysthey all look cute in a hat), Ive yet to see anyone who looks good in the blue NWU. But what do I know about military uniforms? The Navy doesnt care about what looks good, right? The Navy spends a lot of time researching uniform chang es before making a decision, right? The Navy stands by their decision in order to save mili tary members the expense of buying more new uniforms. Right? Apparently not. According to the Navy Times article, top-level officials might have the blue NWUs on the chopping block, because get this people dont like them. The uniforms are hot and uncomfortable, and people make fun of them. They call it the blueberry uniform. Wait, since when did the military care about what people dont like? This puts a whole new spin on my view of the military. Now they care about fashion? Now they care about what members like and dont like? Now they care about whats comfortable? Well, then, Ive got some other things to take up with the military: Yearlong deployments: Really, really uncomfortable. I dont like these. Most peo ple agree. It stinks not hav ing your spouse home for Christmas, birthdays and anniversaries, and its hard to manage the kids and all their after-school activities with just one parent at home to drive them. How can I be at two Little League games at once? Moving every three years: Really inconvenient and expensive. Who can own a home and build equity in itin this mar ket, especially when they have to sell again in a few years? Every time the military has transferred our family, it has been a losing proposition for us. Weve bought and sold more houses than most people will in their entire lifetimes. Weve lost furniture in cross-country moves, and I cant be sure that all my sons school records have followed us from schoolto-school. Cant we just stay in one place? The officer-enlisted thing: Uncomfortable and embarrassing. I understand why the mili tary has rules against frater nization, but if I hit it off with an enlisted persons wife, and we cant do couples things because of our husbands, well, that just makes life really frustrating and confusing. I hate that moment when both parties realize, we prob ably cant be friends. Not really close friends, at least. What a bunch of wasted opportunities. Watch, duty and work-ups: So annoying! The military has a clever way of keeping our loved ones busier than we think they will be. Just when you think he will have a weekend at home, he calls to say, Actually, I have watch this weekend. Just when youve counted the days you have left before a deployment, he says, Oh, but Ill be away for a month on work-ups before I go. Just when you think hes coming home for dinner, he calls and says, I have duty. For all its regimentation and routine, the military throws us plenty of curveballs with surprise watch, duty and work-ups. Military healthcare: Too many hoops. I just want to see the doctor I want to see. I dont want to call first and make sure the mili tary approves. If I want to see a therapist or counselor, I dont want the military to evaluate me beforehand. When I find a doctor I like, I want to keep her for years to come. And last, for what its worth, the Marine Corpss uniforms look way better than the Navys, so maybe we should just switch them all. Hey, MoneyChic! I see lots of people handing over wads of coupons and having their smart phones scanned at stores, how do I hop on the coupon train and ride the rails to saving money every day? MoneyChic Sez: Coupons are a great way to save money on items you are already going to buy. There are many ways to get started! Savings money on groceries by using coupons will take a little more time than just perusing the grocery ads and making your list. You will need to print coupons from coupon sites or subscribe to the local newspaper (coupons only come in the Sunday paper). The Jax Air News also provides coupons in some of their editions. When shopping at the commissary, look for coupons hang ing under grocery items or being handed out as you arrive. Another way to obtain coupons is to ask friends and family who subscribe to a paper if you may have their leftover coupons. It is easy to start clipping every cou pon you see that is high value (over $1 off). Dont let the value of the coupon get you off track of your goal to save money. If you are not intending to pur chase that item, only clip what you know you are going to buy! You have clipped your coupons, now how do you organize them? Use bind ers, envelopes or paper clips. If you shop in a specific order, organize your cou pons in the order you shop. The main entrance to the commissary almost always has items that are necessary for the season. I write my list according to the layout of the store. To make sure I know which items I have coupons for, I put an *c next to the item. The coupon goes in a separate area if it has been used and I circle my mark on my list to know I used a coupon. Hand over that stack of coupons at the checkout counter and be proud that with a little work you saved yourself some money! Having a smart phone has really opened the door to savings at many stores. Stores now offer coupons via text for instant savings at checkout. Target sends mobile coupons if you sign up for their weekly deals via text (standard messaging rates apply). Target.com also offers Target specific coupons that can be printed and then stacked with a manufacturer coupon for even more savings! Wal-Mart, Target, Bed Bath and Beyond, BuyBuyBaby, BRU, and TRU (just to name a few) offer price matching from both box stores (with ads) and online stores. If you are out shopping and want to find out if the store you are in has coupons that can be scanned right from your phone, download The Coupons App from the app store. Its free and has numerous coupons. There are many websites that specifically name deals at each store and how to take advantage of the deal. Check out these great resources: www.coupons.com hip2save.com www.totallytarget.com www.babycheapskate.com Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Do you want more couponing secrets or to shop the commissary for good deals with me? Drop me an email at megan. stolle@nmcrs.org. The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is always here to give advice or lend a helping hand. If you would like more information on how we can help, stop by our office outside the Yorktown Gate or give us a call at 542-2832.Since when does the military care about fashion?

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Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Strike Group (HSTSG) began its composite training unit exercise (COMPTUEX) after departing Naval Station Norfolk Jan. 14. COMPTUEX is a series of training scenarios designed to certify HSTSG as a deployment-ready fighting force capable of completing operations in overseas theaters. The exercise will be evaluated and graded by Commander, Strike Force Training Atlantic (CSFTA) through warfare scenarios that include simulated surface, air, undersea, strike and elec tronic attacks. In addition, events such as maritime interception operations (such as visit, board, search and seizure [VBSS]), livefire evolutions, and strike group forma tions will also be assessed by CSFTA. We can always run simulations, but nothing takes the place of real live sce narios with communication between various units and aircraft in real, tacti cal situations, said Cmdr. Jason Darish, Trumans combat direction center (CDC) officer. Proficiencies have been built at a very high rate in the months leading up to COMPTUEX and I think our Sailors are ready for this exercise. OSC(SW/AW) Michael Masley, CDCs leading chief petty officer said his Sailors are ready for the evaluation after months of training and preparation. This is the last time that we can prove we are proficient at our jobs and ready to go on deployment, said Masley. This scenario will be a final test of the crews deployment readiness and is intended to make sure everyone has the ability to fight and defend the ship in real-world scenarios. IS3 Erin Maisch, assigned to Trumans intelligence department, said COMPTUEX will verify her depart ments ability to accurately collect, analyze and disseminate information under stressful conditions. We need to be prepared for any thing, said Maisch. Throughout COMPTUEX, we need to show that we can do our jobs with 100 percent accuracy, within rules and regulations and within a certain time frame. Darish said he has confidence that every member of HSTSG will perform admirably during the upcoming sce narios. I have nothing but the highest expec tations, said Darish. I think were eager to prove our selves, eager to learn and to train. Everyone is ready and willing to get the job done. We will have the skills right out the door when it comes time to deploy. Units operating with HSTSG include: Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3, 1st Combined Destroyer Squadron (1CDS), USS Barry (DDG 52), USS Gravely (DDG 107), the German ship FGS Hamburg (F220), and the Canadian ships HMCS Ville De Quebec (FFH 332) and HMCS Preserver (AOR 510); USS Monterey (CG 61), USS Gettysburg (CG 64), and USS Kauffman (FFG 59). Truman Strike Group underway with COMPTUEX JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 MWR AUTO SKILL S CENTE R Sailors save money, doing their own work at MWR Auto Skills CenterCar maintenance is timely and expensive. Even a simple oil change at an auto shop can run upwards of $30 and take hours out of a persons day. And the cost of labor can easily out weigh the cost of replacement parts for other types of automotive repairs. Fortunately, for service members attached to NAS Jax who are willing to get their hands dirty, there is a cost-saving alternative at the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Auto Skills Center. Located in a vintage hangar on Birmingham Road, the Auto Skills Center is a do-it-yourself shop that caters to anyone associated with NAS Jax, be it active duty, retired or depen dents. We welcome and readily assist any one who wants to work on their vehi cle, commented MWR Recreation Aide Elliot Herbert. All they need to do is sign in and bring their own parts and we pro vide the tools, lifts and expertise to help them when required. Featuring a wide array of tools, seven car lifts, a hydraulic press and weld ing center, as well as a paint booth, the MWR Auto Skills Center provides the means to tackle almost any mainte nance or repair job. Our tool shed is equipped with pretty much anything you can think of, including diagnostic equipment. In reality, we can assist someone with just about any auto job they have, and weve had some big ones roll through here, remarked ASE Certified Mechanic Terry Ryker. According to Ryker, about 50 percent of maintenance jobs at the Auto Skills Center consist of basic tune-ups, oil changes and tire rotations. Even for personnel who have no experience with cars, the benefits of using the center can go along way in learning basic skills and saving money. We are always willing to help people learn. Sailors can save a lot of money and time just by bringing their car here and only paying for parts, Ryker noted. In addition to all the help the Auto Skills Center staff provides to base per sonnel, it also maintains an environ mentally friendly policy by collecting used oil and other automotive fluids to be recycled. If anyone has used oil and a filter from a do-it-yourself job at home, we highly encourage you to bring it to the Auto Skills Center for recycling at no charge. We can store up to 1,000 gal lons, and then sell it to a local recycling company which helps fund MWR programs as it also saves the Navy money in waste disposal, Ryker commented. Sailors are highly encouraged to uti lize the Auto Skills Center for all their automotive needs, and do-it-yourself classes are often scheduled weekly. The center is open Monday, Thursday and Friday from noon to 8 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed Tuesday and Wednesday. For more information, call 542-3227.

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 Cmdr. Catherine Hagan and Lt. Cmdr. Angela Powell of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville will attend the third Military Health System (MHS) Building Stronger Female Physician Leadership (BSFPL) course Feb. 8-10 at National Harbor, Md. The course objective is to provide an interactive leadership develop ment opportunity targeted at emerging female physician-leaders in the MHS. The program is designed to challenge rising leaders skills, from all branches of the military, to help prepare them for senior military healthcare positions. NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer was delighted to nominate the two deserving candi dates. With only 20 slots available for more than 150 highly qualified appli cants, the honor is highly competitive. I know Cmdr. Hagan and Lt. Cmdr. Powell will represent Navy Medicine and the command very well at this course, says Shaffer. It was my plea sure to endorse these stellar physi cians. Since joining the NH Jacksonville ophthalmology staff in 2011, Hagan has impressed both peers and leadership. She has learned first-hand how they juggle priorities and is eager to hear from future mentors at the BSFPL. The (BSFPL) course was created to encourage women to continue pursu ing leadership roles in the military, explained Hagan. We learn to balance our careers, families and home life. Powell, an NH Jacksonville staff surgeon, considers herself privileged and honored to be counted among the selectees. Since joining NH Jacksonville, she has proven why she deserved to be included in this group. When asked how she felt about this opportunity, Powell said, I believe there will be a wealth of information provided to aid in advanc ing my career. I look forward to meet ing other female physician leaders and learning from their experiences. Shaffer added that promoting women doctors in military medicine to more leadership roles is an important goal for the Department of Defense and NH Jacksonville. MHS designed the BSFPL course as a tool to help mold these women by creating important relation ships and guidance; to mentor them into becoming exceptional senior lead ers. The Red Lancers deployed from NAS Jacksonville in early December to three for ward operating locations located across the Pacific: Naval Air Facility (NAF) in Misawa, Japan; Kadena Air Force Base in Okinawa, Japan; and Comalapa Air Base, El Salvador. Squadron members found festive ways to celebrate the season while far from home and their loved ones. In snowy Misawa, the Red Lancers kicked off their cel ebrations on Dec. 22 with a hearty holiday luncheon at the Misawa Enlisted Club. With a winter wonderland forming outside, many Lancers found themselves working in the snow and flying on Christmas Day. Fortunately, most everyone was able to take Dec. 26 off and relax, play in the snow, or connect electronically with fam ily and friends who were just waking up for Christmas morning in the United States. The residents of Misawa Air Base made sure the squadron was taken care of during this holi day season by sending cards, treats and ending the year with a base-wide New Years Eve party. In the sunny climate south of Japan, the Red Lancers in Kadena found ways to cel ebrate and have fun as well. Former Red Lancer, Lt. Joshua Silva and his wife, Adrianna, graciously opened their home to squadron members for a Christmas Eve dinner. VP-45, also deployed to Kadena, host ed a VP-45/VP-10 Christmas bash, that included a sumptu ous holiday feast, wonderful door prizes, and socializing with friends and new acquain tances. Although many had to work on Christmas and New Years day, the Red Lancers band ed together in their off time to celebrate the holidays by attending religious services on Christmas Eve, watching the Japanese version of the New Years celebration in a room with friends at midnight, or staying up until two in the afternoon to herald in the New Year back home in Jacksonville. The Red Lancers in El Salvador continued their mis sion during the holidays with flights Christmas Eve through New Years Day. Although mission capabili ties were a priority, the men and women of VP-10 still found time to open presents with their families or ring in the New Year via Skype. In addition to celebrating long distance with families, the squadron was able to bring holiday cheer to the children of a local orphanage. VP-10s very own Santa Claus brought gifts for the children. The Red Lancer Wardroom also celebrated the first min utes of 2013 with the promotion of Lt. j.g. Richard Poudrier to Lieutenant. Although each group of Red Lancers had different holiday experiences, every member of the VP-10 family feels grateful for the continued love and support they received from every one back home. Using this holi day season to reflect on every thing that they have accom plished and been blessed with, the Red Lancers hope to make this next year as successful as the last. The VP-10 Red Lancers pro vide intelligence, reconnais sance and deterrence support from the air, in both an over land and open water capacity, in the U.S. 7th Fleet and U.S. 4th Fleet areas of responsibility. In a Presidential Proclamation, President Barack Obama designated January 2013 as National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month culminating in the celebration of National Freedom Day on Feb. 1. He called upon Americans to do what we can to end modern slavery with appro priate programs and activities. The VP-26 Tridents have answered the presidents call by supporting two local organizations during Freedom February K9s for Warriors and Rethreaded. canines to warriors who are suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a result of conflicts and war after 9/11. They help warriors return to civilian life by pairing, training and graduating K9/warrior teams. This year, K9s for Warriors is striving to graduate 50 K9/warrior teams from their pro gram located in Ponte Vedra, Fla. Team Trident is calling all NAS Jacksonville civilians, Sailors, Marines, chiefs, and officers to join them as vol unteers to feed, walk and acclimate service dogs and assist with grounds upkeep. Volunteers may also meet with wounded warriors each Saturday in February from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the K9s for Warriors facility. VP-26s goal is to coordinate the efforts of 40 volun teers in completing more than 1,000 volunteer service hours. dollar industry founded on the exploi tation of mostly women and children. Rethreaded is dedicated to assisting victims of human trafficking by fos tering a life-giving community. Their vision is to unravel the effects of the sex trade by fighting business to busi ness on a global and local level. They strive to provide safe, viable and dig nity-giving work to survivors of the sex trade. One of Rethreadeds 2013 goals is to employ several survivors of human trafficking. To do so, they need resources in the form of clean, new/used, 100 percent cotton T-shirts, that will be upcycled and sewn into garments and other resalable items. In an effort to assist Rethreaded in reaching their goal, Team Trident is holding a T-shirt drive Feb. 128. Our goal is to donate 2,600 T-shirts by Feb. 28, but we can only achieve our goal with the help of our teammates here at NAS Jax, said the VP-26 Trident Command Services Officer Lt. Cmdr. John Dzialoski. T-shirt drop-offs will be accepted at Hangar 511, Segment 4 in the VP-26 Duty Office, Auxiliary Retail Outlet, and Command Services Office during nor mal working hours. To learn more about K9s for Warriors or Rethreaded, visit them online at: http://www.k9sforwarriors.org or http://www.rethreaded.com. To volunteer for activities during Freedom February, please contact the VP-26 command services office at 5422592 or email VP26_JAXS_CSO@NAVY. MIL. Naval Hospital Jacksonville doctors selected for leadership course VP-10 Red Lancers celebrate overseas holidays Join Team Trident to raise awareness and celebrate Freedom February

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VP-8 demonstrates naval career opportunities to New England educators The Fighting Tigers of Patrol Squadron (VP) 8 welcomed a group of high school educators from the New England area to their work spaces Jan. 9. The group, including both high school teachers and career counselors, was visiting NAS Jacksonville to familiarize themselves with the opportunities avail able for high school students interested in pursuing a career in the Navy. The visit provided the opportunity to speak with many different Navy personnel about the career paths available both as an officer and an enlisted Sailor to high school students. The group was sponsored by Mr. Jim Tighe, educational specialist for the New England Navy Recruiting District. Each year, Mr. Tighe brings down groups of educators to expose them to life in the Navy. We love doing the trip because it provides a great public relations opportunity for the Navy, as well as allow the teachers to be able to talk about the Navy in a positive way, said Mr. Tighe. During a static display on the aircraft, sensor operators spoke about their specific jobs and how they affect the mission of the P-3C Orion. I am glad to see people getting out and seeing what the Navy is really about so they can better provide students with information about a career in the Navy, said AWO2 Michelle Workman, a native of Pensacola, Fla. I have learned so much. I did not realize the Navy provided so many opportunities to high school stu dents even in this tough job market. I will be able to take what Ive learned here and better present the Navy as a great career opportunity, said a high school counselor from New Berlin, New York. The NAS Jacksonville-based Fighting Tigers recently completed a deployment to the 4th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility. Back home in Jacksonville, VP-8 is conducting an Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle in preparation of their next deployment. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 7

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is scheduled to arrive from Sikorskys Owego, New York factory in February. When we receive our full complement of 11 Romeos, well join Carrier Air Wing-7 and deploy with the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) Carrier Strike Group. Established in October 1984, HSL-42 was the first East Coast LAMPS Mk III squadron to employ the now storied SH-60B airframe. Since that time, HSL-42 maintained a high standard of excellence that established the Proud Warriors reputation as leaders in detached ASW and ASuW operations. Most recently, HSL-42 was award ed the Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic 2012 Battle Efficiency award for the third consecutive year, making it the recipient of this award six out of the last seven years. In its 28 years of exis tence, the squadron was awarded the Battle E an enviable 12 times. The squadron was also awarded the Arleigh Burke Fleet trophy, the Capt. Arnold Jay Isbell ASW trophy, the Talon award, a Golden Wrench award, and the Blue M for medical readiness. This reputation for operational excellence led to HSL-42 being selected as the first operational naval aviation squadron to deploy with a vertical takeoff and landing unmanned aerial vehi cle the MQ-8B Fire Scout. HSL-42 deployed its third Fire Scout detachment in 2012 with great success, along with five traditional SH-60B detachments that supported three combatant commander areas of responsibility. The squadron achieved 6,023 hours of mishap-free flight time in 2012, having achieved 198,179 consecutive mishapfree flight hours since its only Class A Mishap in 1986. The Proud Warrior transition to HSM72 signifies the introduction of the MH-60R to the Proud Warrior hangar a change that has already required additional training and temporary duty for numerous aircrew and maintenance personnel. While the Romeo edition of the Sikorsky H-60 looks largely similar to its Bravo predecessor, the upgrades in avionics and mission systems gives the MH-60R one of the most advanced sensor suites the Navy has ever employed, revolutionalizing the way helicopters will be employed by both carrier air wings and surface combatants. Though HSM-72 will take to the skies with one of the Navys newest aircraft, the young squadron will also have in its hangar a 28-year reputation for success that was hard earned by gener ations of HSL-42 pilots, aircrewmen, maintenance, and support personnel. And while HSM-72 stands with pride on the base of its historic LAMPS legacy, it eagerly awaits the challenges that lie ahead during its integration with carrier air wing and strike group operations. The heritage of the Proud Warriors, a namesake derived from Native Americans, will ensure that the initial chapters of HSM-72 history be writ ten in ways that reflect the Principled, Disciplined and Confident manner in which the squadron has always oper ated. HSL-42 Active duty service mem bers and their families will be unaffected when long-delayed reductions to areas where the TRICARE Prime option is offered take place Oct. 1, TRICARE officials said yesterday. But as TRICARE seeks to synchronize service area shifts once staggered by contract delays, some military retirees and their dependents will be moved to TRICARE Standard coverage, S. Dian Lawhon, beneficiary education and support division director, said during a conference call with report ers. Those affected reside more than 40 miles from a military treatment facility or base clo sure site, she said. The new contracts limit Prime networks to regions within a 40-mile radius of military treatment facilities and in areas affected by the 2005 base closure and realignment pro cess, she explained. But provisions will allow Prime beneficiaries who see providers outside the 40-mile service area to remain in Prime if they reside within 100 miles of an available primary care manager and sign an access waiver, she added. If TRICARE retirees and young adults live less than 100 miles away from a remaining Prime service area, they can re-enroll in Prime by waiving their drive standards and there will be room made for them, Lawhon said, adding that the networks are required to con nect providers to those who elect to waive their drive standards. Contractors such as United HealthCare Military & Veterans, Health Net Federal Services and Humana Military will continue to assist benefi ciaries in obtaining providers in their regions, she added. Health care is best if its local, Lawhon said. Weve established the drive standards [to enable] people to access their primary and spe cialty care within a reasonable period of time. Austin Camacho, TRICAREs benefit information and out reach branch chief, said the out-of-pocket, fee-for-service cost of TRICARE Standard would cost a bit more, depending on the frequency of health care use and visits. No cost applies for preventive care such as mammograms, vaccines, cancer screening, prostate examinations and routine check-ups, he added. Officials estimate the changes will lower overall TRICARE costs by $45 million to $56 million a year, depending on the number of beneficiaries who choose to remain in Prime, Camacho said. Lawhon and Camacho said beneficiaries should speak to their health care providers and families to assess the best course of action. Were hoping people will take a careful look at their health care needs, Lawhon said. We have seen that people using the Standard benefit are very pleased with it, and their customer satisfaction is the highest of all. To find out more, log on to www.tricare.mil or call Naval Hospital Jax TRICARE health benefits advisors at 5429164/9165.Officials announce TRICARE Prime service area changes Military retirees and their spouses from all branches of service are invited to attend the Retired Military Seminar Feb. 2 at the NAS Jacksonville Officers Club from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The seminar provides infor mation on a variety of topics including healthcare, veterans benefits, assist ed living, long-term care, survivor benefit plan, pay and financial matters and other retiree issues. Retired Adm. Mark Fitzgerald, former com mander, U. S. Naval Forces Europe, com mander, U. S. Naval Forces Africa and com mander, Allied Joint Force Command, Naples will present the keynote address. Booths with addi tional information will be manned by officials from the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Defense Finance and Accounting Service, the Veterans Administration, Naval Hospital Jacksonville, legal services and other military organizations. Entrance to NAS Jacksonville requires a current Department of Defense military or dependent identification card. For more information, contact J.J. Ryan at 5425790 or james.j.ryan@ navy.mil .Military retiree seminar is Feb. 2 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013

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MLK RUBIOKing in respect for what he did for his nation. It said, Dearest Dr. King, First and foremost, Happy Birthday! Many of us gather across this great Promised Land to honor you these days, and all pledge to keep that light of hope you lit for all of us to follow you by. I want to thank you Dr. King for all you have done for us for bringing to the forefront the fact that we are all children of the same creator, born with dreams and gifts, and that all those dreams and gifts are important, no matter how our external features differ. Your struggle and spiritual leadership to this country has personally given me the opportunity to become educated; to become an officer in the greatest Navy in the world, and I cannot find the words to thank you enough. In your last sermon, you drew inspi ration from biblical teachings from a story of a people who were driven out of a land and forced to march in directions unknown in search for hope, opportu nity, and happiness. It brings to memory this story, of your people and my people a shared history of overcoming and following your heart to what the Great Spirit wants for us all. It is a story called Crossing Bok Chitto A Choctaw Story of Friendship and Freedom by fellow Choctaw Tim Tingle. In the days before the Great War between the North and the South, indeed, even before the trail of tears, the forced march from the homelands to parts of the earth unknown, there was a boundary that separated the invading colonizers and the Choctaw people. This boundary was Bok Chitto, a river in modern day Mississippi. The law of the land of the time did not allow slave owners to cross the river, so if a slave made it past the river, the slave would be free. And during this time, early in the morning on a beautiful Mississippi day, a day the Choctaw would celebrate a wedding, a young Choctaw girl overslept and was awoken by her mother to get up and start her assigned duties of the day in prepara tion for the wedding; to collect berries to be shared at the ceremony. She was behind the power curve and could not find any berries. So, she looked across Bok Chitto, which in our native language means big river, and thought of all the berries that must be over there. But her people were not allowed to cross the Bok Chitto, for obvious reasons. The Choctaw had lived on the shores of the Bok Chitto way before this time; since the days of animals that shook the earth. They knew where the fiords were, and built up a stone passage when the river was up, and built it down when the river was down, always just a tad below the surface of the muddy waters of Bok Chitto. It was our own secret passage way across for centuries. The little girl made her way across and found what she was looking for, but in her excitement, she got lost on the slave side. She came upon a clear ing and heard a voice calling We are bound for the promised land. The young girl had stumbled into a hidden forbidden black church, in the woods, and was witnessing the gathering of the church service by the slaves. Once the Choctaw girl was discov ered, the slaves appointed a young boy to get the girl back to the shores of the river. Once they reach the river, the young girl decides to take the young boy across the river with her, which surprises him because at first, it appears that she is walking on water! (What kind of witch are you, little girl?). They get to the Choctaw Village as the wedding ceremony is about to begin. After the ceremony, the girls mother reprimands her for crossing Bok Chitto and instructs her to take the boy back to the river. This begins a special friendship between the two cultures. The little girl would cross Bok Chitto on Sundays and join the little boy for the rogue church services. She would learn the hymns in English, and then sing them back to her family in Choctaw after she crossed the river back home. The day came that slaves would be sold on the plantations, and the little boys mother was to be sold. The little boy hatches a plan to cross Bok Chitto at night with his family, as he knew the secret of crossing Bok Chitto from his Choctaw friend. The family reaches the river shore as they hear the slave owners dogs approaching. The little boy finds his way across the river by himself to find his Choctaw friend and explains his familys dis tress. She tells them to go back to his family, that she would send a signal that would let them know how to cross Bok Chitto. The little girl and her moth er enlist all the women of the village to wear white dresses, bring a candle and meet her at the river to conduct a special ceremony. A crossing cere mony. The men with guns, dogs and lanterns on the other side of the river saw, through the fog, what looked like a band of angels forming on the opposing bank of Bok Chitto. And, as they took aim at the slaves with their rifles, they froze as they saw the smallest and most beautiful of angels leading the family with her hand stretched out, floating across the water as she sang a hymn the men recognized, but in the Choctaw language. The family made their way across Bok Chitto and the family was never to be seen on the slave side again. And you, Dr. King, said, But it really doesnt matter with me now, because Ive been to the mountaintop . Ive seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you . I submit to you sir, that promised land that you spoke of was what the people who crossed that river were searching for the chance to be seen as equals among people, to reap what you sow, to share what your hard work brought to you out of love and not out of whips and chains. To close out the observance, mem bers of the MCAC read several passag es of Kings I Have a Dream speech as ABH1(AW/SW) Nnamdi Emenogu played a djembe drum. Guests were also invited to enjoy a special meal in honor of King at the Flight Line Caf.Florida, but to the critical role of our national defense. I really enjoyed meeting the sena tor today. He seems really approachable and made everyone feel at ease. I was impressed that he wanted to know so much about what we do every day, said IT1 LaToya Brown of Naval Computers and Telecommunications Station Jacksonville. During the visit, Rubio also met with Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 Capt. Eric Wiese and Patrol Squadron (VP) 30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens for an operational briefing. After touring a P-3C Orion at VP-26, Rubio boarded the Navys newest air frame the P-8A Poseidon at VP-16. War Eagles Commanding Officer Cmdr. Molly Boron, was on hand along with other squadron members to answer questions of the senator and his staff. Tactical Coordinator Lt. Rodrigo Cunha explained the advantages of the new aircraft to Rubio. The sensor capabilities allow us to pass information near real-time to fleet commanders so they can properly allocate assets, said Cunha. Rubio also spent time on the aircrafts flight deck to learn about the flying qualities of the P-8. Pilots Lt. Amy Crisp and Boron described the differences in flying the Poseidon as opposed to the Orion. In response to the advances in tech nology between the two planes, Rubio commented, It seems like it ultimately makes life much easier, but in the immediate term its a big jump. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 9

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Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert concluded a weeklong visit to Brazil. Jan. 19 where he spoke with naval leadership, toured multiple navy and marine corps bases, and expanded maritime partnership opportunities. One of the main objectives of the visit was for Greenert to meet with the Commander of the Brazilian Navy Adm. Julio Soares de Moura Neto, who Greenert refers to as a friend and steadfast partner in this economically vibrant country with growing military capabilities. Greenerts visit symbolically renewed the U.S. Navys commitment to the two navies maritime partnership with roots reaching back to World War II. Greenert officially prolonged the relationship through a personal invitation to Moura Neto and the Brazilian navy to take part in the multinational exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2014. Greenert and Moura Neto also secured future cooperation opportunities between the two nations through the joint signing of two memoran dums of understanding; one of which is to continue the Military Personnel Exchange Program (MPEP), that allows for Brazilian and U.S. officers to swap jobs and learn defense practices from the host country. The other memorandum signed by both naval service chiefs enacted the Foreign Liaison Officers memorandum of understanding, which appoints a liaison officer to a specific command to represent his or her country regarding matters of government policies, proce dures, laws and regulations. Moura Neto expressed his appreci ation for Greenert and the U.S. Navy by bestowing upon him the Brazilian Order of Merit Award for distinguished service and exceptional contributions to the citizens and country of Brazil. Greenert accepted the award on behalf of the U.S. Navy with a sincere declaration of continued naval support. This visit has really emphasized the importance of my relationship with Adm. Moura Neto and our Navy, Greenert said. His trip began in the capital city of Brasilia on Monday where he, his naval counterpart Moura Neto and senior Brazilian naval officers sat down for a round table discussion about numerous maritime topics. The visit continued for Greenert with a tour of the Aramar Nuclear Facility and various military installations in Rio de Janeiro, including the Itaguai Submarine Base and Submarine Shipyard facility which is under con struction. While in Rio, Greenert stated the U.S. Navy will assist Brazil with lessons learned from the development of the U.S. nuclear submarine program to help foster Brazils subsurface capabilities. I find it impressive, said Greenert of the Brazilian submarine program. I find it innovative and I think that the Brazilian navy, the Brazilian defense establishment and the government is very forward looking. Greenert added, Im very impressed with the profes sionalism, the investment of people and time and of the technology. In honor of Greenerts visit and as a military capabilities demonstration, the Brazilian navy and marine corps exe cuted a live amphibious assault exer cise, performed a simulated pilot rescue mission and paraded by marine forc es at the marine amphibious division headquarters near Rio de Janeiro. Greenert spoke at a joint press con ference with Moura Neto to discuss his visit, the impact it had on him after talking with the Brazilian navys lead ership and seeing their sailors and marines in person. I would put my opinion, or my impression of the Brazilian navy at the very top, Greenert said. The govern ment and the Brazilian navy have the best vision for what the right security is in the Atlantic and I would view them as the leader in that area. CNO expands U.S./Brazil partnership JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 11

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12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 With just 23 months until the end of the International Security Assistance Force mis sion in Afghanistan, Afghan forces are poised to move into the lead operationally as NATO and partner nations are discussing the scope and mis sions of the enduring presence force that will remain in the country. The conversations within NATO are about this transition, a senior NATO officer, speak ing on background, told reporters Jan. 17. The alliances chiefs of defense, including Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chair man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, are in Brussels for meetings. It has been less a conver sation about numbers than it has been about capabilities and requirements, the senior officer said of discussions concerning NATOs role going for ward in Afghanistan. Milestone 2013 is the shorthand NATO uses referring to Afghan forces taking the secu rity lead. Last week, President Barack Obama and Afghan President Karzai announced this will occur in the spring. This milestone marks a long road for the Afghan national security forces, the officer said. In 2012, Afghan forces demonstrated their battlefield abili ties and proficiencies. Now, he said, the need in Afghanistan is for NATO support forces and advisors rather than the com bat troops Afghanistan needed in the past. The post-2014 needs are a training-and-advising capa bility and a focused counter terrorism capability, the offi cer said. How to execute those missions at various troop lev els are the conversations that are going on within NATO, in Afghanistan and in the capi tals of partner nations, he told reporters, adding that the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) has not been asked to provide advice with respect to a zero-troop option. The way forward can be seen with an eye to the past, the officer said. The nature of the enduring-presence force will be to facilitate an Afghan national security force that will still be conducting counterin surgency operations, he added. Just a year ago, the officer noted, people asked when ISAF was going to shift the main effort in Afghanistan from Regional Command South to Regional Command East. They didnt realize the main effort was already shifting, he said, because that mission was shifting to Afghan forces. For a counterinsurgency to succeed, the officer said, indigenous forces have to be the lead. Foreign forces can pro vide the breathing space for these forces to develop their capabilities, but ultimately it is up to local forces to work with the people. Thats been what has been happening over the last 18 months, he said. The drawdown of U.S. surge forces in Afghanistan created the space and necessitated innovation for Afghan forces. They are doing corps-level operations today using coun terinsurgency type tactics, techniques and procedures, with us firmly in an advisory role, he said. In 2015 and beyond, the nature of NATO presence will be on training, advising and assisting to ensure the con tinued development of the Afghan forces, the officer said, and the counterterrorism mission will be to prevent al-Qaida from putting down roots in Afghanistan again. The Afghan forces will be ready for the full security load by 2015, the officer said, but the road hasnt been easy. Were building this military virtually from scratch, he noted. Once trained, the officer said, the Afghan military has gone from the training field to the battlefield, it has gone from training straight into combat. The Afghan military needs to have cohesion and loyalty to the nation, but it still must incorporate and adjust to the dynamic of tribalism and eth nicity, he added. And on top of this, he said, less than a quarter of all Afghans are literate, and the use of modern weapons and tactics requires literacy. There are problems, he acknowledged, and ISAF and the Afghan ministries are addressing them. Attrition in the army is an unsustainable 3.5 percent per month, the officer said. Other national secu rity elements such as the police and air force are within the norms needed, around 1.4 percent per month. The armys difficulties, he told reporters, stem from four basic problems: quality of leadership, quality of life, access to leave, and pay. The pay issue has been largely solved with the adoption of electronic funds transfer. Quality of life issues are being addressed by building new garrisons, the officer said. Were getting these soldiers out of barracks that are fall ing down, that are cast-offs, and getting them into the new facilities and bases that we are building for them, he said. Leave was a problem last year and directly contributed to a rise in the attrition rate, the officer said, noting these soldiers went straight from the training ground to a tough fighting season in 2012. We have worked very closely with the Afghan army and the Ministry of Defense to get leave back on the books for these kids, he said. Finally, the officer said, leadership is a systemic prob lem that is being addressed. The Afghan defense minister is scrubbing the leadership of the Afghan military and weeding out those who cant cut the mustard or are corrupt, while promoting those who have demonstrated their worth. The attrition is coming down, the officer said. All this is important for the Afghan security forces in 2013, the officer said. This is the first summer where Afghans are in the lead for security operations throughout the country, he said. We want their forces to come out of this fighting sea son to be successful, but really to be confident in their abili ties. The Afghans already are conducting corps-level operations around Afghanistan and rou tinely oversee 10,000 to 12,000 Afghan troops in an opera tion from multiple brigades, the officer said. Between 1,000 and 1,500 ISAF personnel will be scattered about the battle space as advisors or providing support capabilities. One Taliban tactic is simply to wait out the NATO ISAF mission and take on the Afghan national security force, the officer said, but he added he does not believe that is the Talibans strategy. There is enthusiasm in NATO to continue to make a differ ence in Afghanistan, the offi cer said. Weve put 11 years of fighting into this, and the right kind of force in the post-2014 period can sustain these gains for a long time, he said. Over the next 23 months, commanders must work to maintain the cohesion of the coalition 50 nations have been successful working together in the country and they must guard the integrity of the campaign plan, the officer said. Beyond that, he added, commanders must lead and manage the redeployment of the force, the retrograde of materiel and the closing of more than 200 bases. That requires extraordinarily detailed planning, and 23 months is the blink of an eye, he said. We are seriously going to use every second to fight the campaign, clear the theater and set the enduring presence force. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus rolled out his new Four Ps during a speech at the 25th Annual Surface Navy Association Symposium in Arlington, Va. Jan. 17. Mabus said the Four Ps of People, Platforms, Power and Partnerships are a way to bind key areas that are interrelated priorities for the Navy. A top priority of mine and of our Navy is people...taking care of our people, said Mabus. Unlike most organizations, we push responsibility down... down in rank, down in age, and day-in, day-out we get the type of positive results we need and expect. Mabus added that although the majority of Sailors are responsible and successful, leadership realized that there needed to be more attention paid to programs to ensure their mental, emotional and physical well being. In response, the Navy introduced the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initia tive to maintain or improve the resil ience of the force. Recognizing abuse of alcohol was a common factor in sexual abuse, domestic violence, suicide and other issues, breathalyzers were brought into com mands to help prevent alcohol-related incidents. This is not intended to be punitive. But, if you pop positive when reporting for duty, were going to get you into a program to help you, he said. We dont want a careeror lifethreatening alcohol-related incident. We have to focus on health physical, mental and emotional. Mabus also noted that part of main taining the health of the fleet means taking steps to help Sailors as they transition out of the Navy by ensuring they have access to education, training and employment opportunities. This is especially true for wounded warriors. Last year, we set a goal to hire one wounded warrior a day in the Navy, he said. We tripled it... we hired over 1,000 wounded veterans. The Navy is also helping those want to join the military, by reestablishing the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps in universities such as Harvard, Yale and Columbia, and implementing it for the first time at other colleges like Arizona State University. No one should be denied the honor of serving this country, said Mabus. The second P, platforms, refers to the ships, aircraft, submarines, unmanned vehicles and hardware the Navy buys and builds. For the Surface Navy Association audience, Mabus focused on shipbuilding programs as a strategic priority for the Navy today and in the future. I think that we have made great strides in ship building, said Mabus. Were getting the ships we need, the mix we need and the numbers we need while being good stewards of the tax payers money. Im proud of where we are. We owe the shipbuilding industry transparency I feel were giving them that, he said. In turn, they owe us that every ship built without major design changes, should cost us less than the one before it. This is happening, and we currently have 288 ships. Additionally, Mabus noted that the Navy has 42 ships currently under contract and is making steady progress toward building a fleet of 300 ships by the end of the decade. The third P, power, focuses on Mabus five energy goals that include pursu ing energy efficiencies and alternative sources of energy. The U.S. military is the largest single consumer of fossil fuels in the world, he said. Every time a barrel of oil goes up one dollar, it costs the Navy $30 million. Mabus illustrated that additional cost in terms of steaming days, saying it was roughly the equivalent of 142 steaming days for LHDs or 293 days of combat operations for an Arleigh Burke class destroyer. Last year the Navy demonstrated the Great Green Fleet in Hawaii, as part of RIMPAC. The Great Green Fleet included a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, aircraft and ships operating on 50/50 blends of traditional and advanced biofuels, and several firsts such as under way and air-to-air refueling using bio fuels. Something truly remarkable hap pened when we demonstrated the Great Green Fleet, said Mabus. Nothing. Not a single engine or process had to be changed. They simply did not know the difference, continued Mabus. I dont want to fly less, steam less or deploy less. And I dont think we have to, but we have to make this move. Partnerships may be the last P, but theyre a top priority according to Mabus who links it back to the new Defense Strategy and its focus on innovative, small-footprint engagements around the world. The Navy is Americas away team, he said. When were working, were usual ly a long way from home. Because of that we need to build partnerships, build capacity around the world. Our presence around the world, working with our friends and allies, is impor tant, and the demand will continue to increase. Mabus concluded by telling the audience that the Navy and Marine Corps team, Americas Away Team, stands ready to answer all bells. We are and will continue to be the finest fighting force the world has ever known, said Mabus. NATO planners look to enduring force in Afghanistan SECNAV Mabus presents his focus areas

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After 20 years of honorable and dedicated service in the United States Navy, AWF1 Gordon Richards flew his last flight as a P-3C flight engineer Dec. 31 while deployed to El Salvador. Upon landing, Richards was met by senior and junior Sailors alike who thanked him for his service and wished him well in future endeavors. Richards joined the Navy from Leesburg, Fla., in August 1992 and upon completion of basic training in Great Lakes, Ill., he reported to VFA-86 at Cecil Field. While attached to VFA-86, he deployed on both the USS America and the USS George Washington. After two successful cruises, Richards transferred to Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) Jacksonville in 1998. Assigned to the Power Plants Division, he built and tested T-56 engines, the same engines that power the P-3C Orion. In 2001, Richards was selected to attend flight engineer training at VP-30. He reported to VP-16 in 2002, where over the next three years, he honed his craft as a naval flight engineer. From 2006-07 while assigned to AIMD 400 Division he deployed on board USS Dwight D. Eisenhower where he earned his enlisted surface warfare specialist designation and became a Shellback, join ing the many Sailors before him who sailed across the equator. In June 2007, Richards joined the VP-10 Red Lancers and will retire May 31, 2013. I wouldnt trade anything that Ive experienced over the past 20 years, good or bad for anything in the world, Richards said. As an instructor flight engi neer, Richards mentored junior Sailors daily, providing expert advice and instruction. It was great watching young Sailors mature and advance through the ranks, knowing you played a role in their suc cess, he said. Richards ended his career with 3,722 mishap free flight hours. VP-10 bids farewell to AWF1 Richards JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 13

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14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 Haitian students attend rib bon cutting events Jan. 10 for the inauguration of newlyconstructed community clus ters at Les Cayes and Torbeck, both located within the Sud Department of Haiti as part of U.S. Southern Commands Humanitarian Assistance Program (HAP) in Haiti. Each community cluster built by the United States for the local municipality consists of an 8-classroom school, community center building, medi cal clinic, and water well. The complex provides much need ed facilities to the local popu lation, explained Lt. j.g. Don Pasteur, the Resident Officer in Charge of Construction (ROICC) Haiti with Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast. They will also function as evacuation centers in the case of hurricanes or other natural disasters. The community clusters are part of eight similar com munity cluster projects that were awarded by NAVFAC in Jacksonville. The lead con tractor on the Les Cayes and Torbeck community clusters is Palgag Building Technologies. School children were sing ing a welcome song and pre senting flowers as the ceremo ny began, said Pasteur. This was a wonderful thank you displayed by the children to the U.S. Ambassador to Haiti, the Minister of Education, and the Minister of Public Health. Participants in the inau guration ceremony included The Honorable Pamela White, U.S. Ambassador to Haiti; Serge Chery, Departmental Delegate, Government of Haiti; CDR Richter Tipton, Senior Defense Official, U.S. Embassy; Vanneur Pierre, Minister of Education, Government of Haiti; and Florence D Guillaume, Minister of Public Health, Government of Haiti. Also in attendance were the Mayors of Les Cayes and Torbeck; Lt. j.g. Don Pasteur, ROICC Haiti; and Sgt. 1st Class Roland Laforest, the U.S. Southern Command HAP pro gram manager. The celebrations will con tinue as additional projects are completed in the Haiti pro gram. The next big event is tentatively scheduled for midFebruary with a ribbon cutting ceremony for the Emergency Operations Center and Disaster Relief Warehouse in Les Cayes. In support of the American Heart Associations National Heart Health Month, your commissary offers shop pers a myriad of special events and instore promotions highlighting health, nutrition and great savings. Take a look around your commissary in February and youll find what we call healthy bundling promotions, said Chris Burns, DeCA sales director. Companies are combining their efforts to offer shoppers even better savings. An example of this is having name-brand breakfast cereals posi tioned next to fresh fruit. Throughout February, DeCAs industry partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborating with com missaries to offer discounts beyond everyday savings. Customers are asked to check their local commissary for details on dates and times for the following promotions: With their Build a Heart Healthy Pantry promotion, Quaker and Naked Juice encourage shoppers to stay on the right path for a tip-top ticker. Pamphlets about Quaker and Naked Juice products, along with coupons and recipes, will be available. Their exclu sive savings website, www.quakermili tary.com, will highlight heart healthy recipes and additional education al information. This promotion runs throughout February. The Just Add Milk promotion fea tures high-value coupons offered on General Mills cereals. A coupon for free milk is available with multiple purchases. This event runs Feb. 7-20. Unilever and Advantage Sales, LLC, will sponsor their fourth annual Focus on Fitness contest, Feb. 7-20. The purchase of any Unilever Brand contributes to the wellness of military installations by helping them move closer to winning healthy rewards. More than 75,000 in-store coupon flyers will be distributed, offering $6 in sav ings per flyer. The winning military installations will be awarded more than $40,000 in wellness prizes that support fitness and healthy lifestyles. The J.M. Smucker Company and their broker, Overseas Service Corporation, are running the 8th Annual Serving Our Countrys Finest event, Feb. 21-March 6. They will hand out more than 400,000 free military calendars to shoppers. The calendars feature highvalue coupons and recipes. ConAgra Foods will feature the Ready-Set-Eat: Free Groceries for a Year! event, Feb. 7-March 6. Shoppers can receive coupon booklets featuring convenient meal solutions and up to $10 in savings. Customers can also visit www.conagracommissarydeals.com where they can enter to win the grand prize of free commissary groceries for a year. Shoppers who sign up will also get a high value thank you coupon to redeem in their commissary. Dixon Marketing will sponsor their 15th Multi-Brand Heartfelt event, Feb. 7-March 6. Giveaways include: 100 $50 commissary gift cards, one $1,500 scholarship for military children, highvalue coupons to enhance shopper savings, and 500,000 in-store flyers with worldwide circulation. Shoppers automatically qualify for the opportunity to receive one of 100 $50 commissary gift cards by register ing online at www.familymedia.com/ dmi. Your commissary offers great sav ings every day of the year. Burns said. The Defense Commissary Agency does everything in its power to keep your savings high and prices low. Due to the longer wingspan of the P-8A Poseidon, the fixedwing aircraft rinse rack located in the taxiway near NAS Jax Hangar 113 is being replaced. We removed the old trans former, pump house and asso ciated equipment and started with a fresh design, said Keshia Torruella, site superintendent for Cape Design Engineering Company. Along with a 5,000-gal. fresh water tank, we just installed a 10,000-gal. oil/water separator tank so nothing environmen tally harmful escapes the rinse rack. We will also build a cast-inplace underground vault to house a new sump pump and control equipment, she said. As tax season nears, Military OneSource and H&R Block have again joined forces to provide a free online tax preparation ser vice for service members. Tony Jackson, a program analyst for the Military OneSource program office, detailed the services available for troops and their families. Military OneSource is a gateway to a free tax preparation service, partnered with H&R Block, he said. We also have tax consultants who can provide assis tance, whether its seeking and filling out tax forms or any other tax-related information. Jackson emphasized it is a safe and secure way for service members to prepare their taxes online. Military OneSource and H&R block definitely meet industry standards for secu rity for websites, he said. Also, encryption software is used and theres also no selling of information, so service members and family members can be assured that their information is secure, and it stays within Military OneSource and H&R Block. Jackson noted that two services -basic and premium are provided through H&R Block, with one notable difference. The basic service is free, he said, and the pre mium service would apply to taxpayers who must file Schedule C returns, gener ally to report gains or losses from business ownership. When you start getting into premium, youre going to incur some additional costs, where basic is free, Jackson said. For those not sure which service they should use, Jackson encouraged them to use the Military OneSource website as a guide. The site lists answers to frequently asked questions. You can always contact Military OneSource at 1-800-342-9647, Jackson said. Were open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, so any questions you have, you can use the website or the call center at the [toll-free] number. Jackson said both methods are effective in contacting Military OneSource tax consultants offering useful services for troops and their families. Not only do they provide forms and basic information relative to military-spe cific tax issues and questions, they are a gateway to get you to H&R Block, he said. If your tax situation warrants, theyll get you to a volunteer income tax assistance clinic on your local military installation or larger command. Its one-stop shopping. These tax consultants cannot prepare tax forms or direct people to do anything, Jackson said. Everything is on a recom mended basis. All members of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps are eli gible to use the service, he said, includ ing members of the National Guard and Reserve components, regardless of activation status. Coast Guard reservists acti vated under Title 10 authority to serve with the Navy also are eligible and so are spouses and other family members enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System. Family members that have been des ignated to provide support to deployed service members, medically discharged retirees and discharged service members within 180 days of their discharge date are eligible for Military OneSource services, Jackson added. The key to these services is financial readiness, which is a Defense Department priority. We understand that financial readiness is a readiness issue. If you have a service member whos concerned about their financial situation then that detracts from the mission. Jackson also provided his personal tes tament to using the free tax preparation program, having served on active duty in the Marine Corps as a personnel officer for more than 20 years. He said his family still uses the service. My daughter is a military spouse and she continues to use it as well, he said. This programs ultimate goal is to ensure service members and their families know that Military OneSource is an option. We hope its the first option for getting your taxes prepared or answering any ques tions or issues you have with taxes, said Jackson. Just know that Military OneSource is there to help you. Haitian students excited to see new classrooms open Celebrate heart health this February at your commissary Military OneSource offers tax assistance service Combating aircraft corrosion

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Deweys Big Game Party Feb. 3, doors open at 5 p.m., food served at 6 p.m. $10 per person, includes buffet and door prizesFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238 The gym is relocated in The Zone, Bldg. 798 through June 30. Check-out our new fitness schedule! New classes include Muscle Max, Extreme Bootcamp and Max Core Pick-up the latest copy at the fitness center.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Wild Florida Airboats & Wild Animal Park Kenansville, Fla. $17-$46.50 Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus Jan.1821, $13 per person ShenYun at the Times Union Center Jan. 2930, $55 $163 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Preferred seating $41, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Dream Girls May 21 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! Blue Man Group in Orlando Special until March 31, Adult $44, child $29, military $29 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4-day hopper $153.25 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discounted tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT! Daytona 500 Feb. 24 Tickets on sale now! $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Deweys Super Bowl Party Feb 3 at 5 p.m. $5 per person, advance purchase only SNAG Golf Lesson Feb. 6 & Feb. 21 at 6 p.m. NAS Jax Golf Course Free Mall & Movie Trip Feb. 8 at 6 p.m. Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater Free Burger Night Feb. 19, 510 p.m. Stop by Liberty to pick-up your coupon for a free Deweys burger!NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green feesFeb. 5 & 19 for active duty Jan. 24, February 7 & 21 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 12:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DOD and guests. Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Feb. 22, 6 p.m. at Patriots Grove Free popcorn and $.50 drinksFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School March 18 April 24 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013 15

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Suicide pre vention is not new, the senior enlisted advi sor to the chair man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said Jan. 17, but its our prob lem. Building resilience into the force is essential to preventing suicides, Marine Corps Sgt. Major Bryan Battaglia said during one of several enlisted calls. The military, he said, doesnt teach turning around and running away from problems. Total Force Fitness, a holistic approach to mental and physical health intended to build resilience, will help service members and their families deal with challenges, the sergeant major said. The concept, developed by Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, the Joint Chiefs chairman, consists of eight wedges, each with a particular influence on mental and physical health. You hit adversity every day, Battaglia told the service mem bers at Keesler Air Force Base in Mississippi. The military teaches service members to assess a problem and develop courses of action, the sergeant major said, adding that service members should take that same approach to their per sonal lives. Be in a preventive posture, he said. Building resilience is both an art and a science, Battaglia said. This isnt all about medicine, he said. Its not strictly, The answer is some sort of medica tion. Part of the art of resilience hinges on leader engagement, he said. He called on enlisted leaders to help in pre paring service members accus tomed to a warfighting setting to serve in a garrison-focused environment. Total Force Fitness plans will differ from person to per son, he said, as each tailors it to meet their own needs to improve and stay resilient. Military lead ers in all the services are com mitted to reduc ing suicides, Battaglia said. With regards to education, engage ment, intervention when a service member is feeling down or even pos sibly falling down, [leaders] need to engage, and they are, Battaglia noted. When a service member or fam ily member is struggling, they need to intervene. And they are. Suicide is a total-force issue, and were going to continue to work hard in order to make it a total-force solution. Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handi capped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: Feb. 4-6 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), May 13-16 (5:30-10 p.m.), Aug. 19-21 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Nov. 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.) (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) Feb. 4-8, Feb. 11-15, March 4-8, March 11-15, April 1-5, April. 8-12, May 6-10, May 13-17, June 3-7, June 17-21, July 8-12, July 15-19, Aug. 5-9, Aug. 19-23, Sept. 9-13, Sept. 16-20, Oct. 7-11, Oct. 21-25, Nov. 4-8, Dec. 2-6. (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Jan. 28-Feb. 1, Feb. 25-March 1, March 25-29, April 15-19, May 20-24, June 24-28, July 22-26, Aug. 26-30, Sept. 23-27, Oct. 28-Nov. 1, Nov. 18-22, Dec. 16-20. (9 a.m.-noon) Feb. 19, March 20, April 22, May 3, June 12, Aug. 16, Sept. 6, Oct. 17, Nov. 27, Dec. 11. (Noon-3 p.m.) Jan. 22, July 2. (8-9:30 a.m.) Jan. 23, April 10, May 30, July 15, Sept. 5, Nov. 25. (9:40 a.m.-noon) Jan. 23, April 10, May 30, July 15, Sept. 5, Nov. 25. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Feb. 20-21, May 1-2, Aug. 14-15, Nov. 13-14. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) March 18-22, June 10-14, Sept. 30-Oct. 4, Dec. 9-13. (8-11 a.m.) Jan. 22, April 30, July 2, Oct. 15. (1-3:30 p.m.) April 22, May 29, Sept. 4. (9-10:30 a.m.) Feb. 22, May 29, Aug. 12, Nov. 26. (1:30-3 p.m.) Feb. 14, April 11, June 13, Aug. 8, Oct. 10, Dec. 12. (1:304 p.m.) March 14, May 9, July 11, Sept. 12, Nov. 14. Jan. 28 (9-10:30 a.m.), March 16 (1011:30 a.m.), May 21 (5-6:30 p.m.), July 18 (1-2:30 p.m.) Sept. 14 (1-2:30 p.m.) Nov. 21 (5-6:30 p.m.) (9-11 a.m.) Feb. 11, March 11, April 8, May 13, June 10, July 8, Aug. 12, Sept. 9, Oct. 7, Nov. 4, Dec. 9. (9-10:30 a.m.) Feb. 12, March 12, April 9, May 14, June 11, July 9, Aug. 13, Sept. 10, Oct. 8, Nov. 5, Dec. 10. (8 a.m.-noon) April 16 & 30, July 16 & 30, Oct. 15 & 29. (8 a.m.-noon) Jan. 22, Feb. 26, March 26, April 23, May 21, June 25, July 23, Aug. 27, Sept. 24, Oct. 22, Nov. 26, Dec. 17. March 12 April 16 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.), May 2 June 6 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), June 25 July 30 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.), Aug. 15 Sept. 19 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), Oct. 8 Nov. 12 (2-4 p.m.) (11 a.m.1 p.m.) March 19, May 14, July 9, Sept. 10, Nov. 19. (1-3 p.m.) Jan. 22, 29; March 5, 12, 19, 26; May 7, 14, 21, 28; July 9, 16, 23, 30; Sept. 3, 10, 17, 24; Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26. (1-4 p.m.) Feb. 6, 13, 20, 27; April 3, 10, 17, 24; June 5, 12, 19, 26; Aug. 7, 14, 21, 28; Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23. (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) March 5, June 4, Sept. 16, Dec. 3. (10 a.m.-noon) Jan. 22; Feb. 5, 19; March 5, 19; April 2, 16, 30; May 14, 18; June 11, 25; July 9, 23; Aug. 6, 20; Sept. 3, 17; Oct. 1, 15, 29; Nov. 12, 16; Dec. 10, 17. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) March 7, May. 2, July 3, Sept. 5, Nov. 7. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) Feb. 7, April 4, June 6, Aug. 1, Oct. 3, Dec. 5.To register for any of the above work shops please contact 542-5745.FFSC offers life skills workshopsSuicide prevention our problem, Battaglia says 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 24, 2013

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