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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 01-17-2013
Frequency: weekly
regular
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Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
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System ID: UF00028307:02025

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The role of the chief petty officer (CPO) has long been an integral part of the Navy. When Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Mike Stevens took office last year, he recog nized that training chiefs for their new leadership role in six weeks, as the original CPO induction dictated, was hinder ing them in becoming as suc cessful as possible. We recognized that we wouldnt always have the time that we would like to provide the training for our first class petty officers (FCPO) to become chiefs. So two years ago we implemented the CPO 365 training process that would afford them a longer period of time to train, said Stevens. What weve done now is said, Why should we have a break six weeks prior to pinning and change the way weve been training? What weve decid ed to do is continue to train throughout the year, all the way up to the final night, and pro gressively make the training The perfect storm of budget uncer tainty howling around his department is the biggest immediate threat facing the U.S. military, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta told reporters Jan. 10. Panetta and Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, stressed during a regular Pentagon press conference that unless Congress acts, the nations military readiness will be compromised. The United States has a number of adversaries around the world, Panetta said, but the most immediate threat to our ability to achieve our mission is fiscal uncertainty: not knowing what our budget will be; not knowing if our budget will be drastically cut; and not knowing whether the strategy that we put in place can survive. Panetta emphasized that DOD is doing its part by implementing over the next decade the $487 billion spend ing reduction set by Congress. We designed a strategy; we know what the elements of that strategy are; we built a budget based on that, and we achieved our savings by virtue of that strategy, he said. But the additional half-trillion-dollar meat-axe cuts sequester would trigger still loom less than 50 days away, the secretary noted. While we appreciate that both parties came together to delay seques ter, the unfortunate thing is sequester itself, and the sequester threat, [was] not removed, Panetta said. And the prospect is undermining our abil ity to responsibly manage this depart ment. Two other fiscal crises are meanwhile converging on the nations forces, he added: appropriations act for fiscal 2013, DOD has been operating under a continu ing resolution and will do so at least through March 27. The continuing reso lution funds operations at fiscal 2012 levels, instead of the higher proposed fiscal 2013 levels Pentagon officials had anticipated. could create even further turmoil that could impact on our budget and our economy. Looking at all three factors, the secre tary said simply, We have no idea what the hell is going to happen. But DOD leaders do know that the worst-case scenario would mean serious harm to military readiness, he said. Panetta noted defense strategy plac es the highest priority on operations and maintenance funding as the key to a ready force. He described the triple threat facing those funds: priations bill for fiscal 2013 and instead extends the continuing resolution through the fiscal year, overall operat ing accounts would decrease by about 5 percent about $11 billion that would come out of [operations and mainte nance funds]. to cut, in this fiscal year, another 9 per cent, almost $18 billion from these operating accounts as well. Afghanistan from required cuts, We would again have to cut another 5 per cent, another $11 billion, from readi ness money available in the active-duty MCPON releases CPO 365 training guidance Panetta: Fiscal crisis poses perfect storm of budget uncertainty

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Jan. 17 1832 USS Peacock makes contact with Vietnamese court officials. 1899 Cmdr. Edward Taussig in USS Bennington (Gunboat #4) takes formal 1955 USS Nautilus (SSN-571), the first nuclear-powered submarine, casts off lines at 1100 and sends message under way on nuclear power. Jan. 18 1911 First aircraft landing on board a ship, USS Pennsylvania (ACR-4), by Eugene Ely. 1962 After a flash fire in the Persian Gulf on the Danish tanker Prima Maersk burned a crewman, USS Duxbury Bay (AVP-38) transfers a Navy doctor to help the Danish crewman and USS Soley (DD707) took him to the nearest hospital at 1968 Operation Coronado X begins in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. 1977 The Trident (C-4) missile devel opment flight test program commenced when C4X-1 was launched from a flight pad at Cape Canaveral, Fla. 1991 USS Nicholas attacks and cap Jan. 19 1840 Lt. Charles Wilkes is first American to discover Antarctic coast. Jan. 20 1783 Hostilities cease between Great Britain and the United States. 1903 Theodore Roosevelt issues exec jurisdiction of the Navy Department. 1914 School for naval air training opens in Pensacola, Fla. 1948 Establishment of U.S. Persian Gulf Area Command (later changed to Middle East Force in August 1948). Jan. 21 1954 Launching of Nautilus, first nuclear submarine, at Groton, Conn. 1961 USS George Washington com pletes first operational voyage of fleet ballistic missile submarine staying sub merged 66 days. Jan. 22 1800 Capt. Thomas Tingey ordered to duty as first superintendent of the Washington Navy Yard. 1944 Operation Shingle, allied land Jan. 23 1960 Bathyscaph Trieste descends the Marianas Trench the deepest part of the ocean. 1968 USS Pueblo (AGER-2) seized by North Korean forces in Sea of Japan. While off Wonsan, North Korea, Pueblo was attacked by local forces and seized. One crewmember was killed in the assault and the other 82 men on board were taken prisoner. After 11 months in captivity, often under inhumane condi tions, Pueblos crew was repatriated Dec. 23, 1968. My husband: Not afraid of scary bugs in the bathroom or mice in the attic; can lift heavy suitcases with one arm; able to run fast enough to catch our dog; the first to get up in the dark when we hear a strange noise downstairs. Navy pilot trained for war; a man who has been tested at Survival, Evasion, Resistance, Escape School and faced the helo dunker at Aviation Preflight traption that simulates a crash-landed, sunken aircraft? Flu. even before he said so. He rubbed his temple with his right hand and drove with his left. His eyes had red rings around them. Should you pull over and let me Actually, lets stop for lunch, he said. And then you can drive after. We took the next exit and found the loudest, most crowded franchise res taurant. Dustin rubbed his temples with both hands at the table. His face looked pale. he asked. than hospitalization to put me on the the restaurant to sleep in the car. Later, while Dustin slept, took pain medicine, and recounted how that headache had nearly floored him. ered our first baby, Dustin told the doc tor it was the most tired he had ever felt. When he watched a resident physi cian give me an epidural in my spine, Dustin said his back ached. He paced in labor with our third son, and before next weeks column. to sit down. When a doctor explained face lose color. Dustin is equipped with bravery for trained for the battlefield. But when it comes to good, old-fashioned sickness, he needs me to hold his hand. A few days after the headache, and before we left our hotel to go to the Boston Museum of Science, Dustin told me, Wear something comfortable so youll be in a good mood today. suitcase into the back of our van, Dustin pushed the button to automatically close the door. The van door came down on the small bloody wetness. Dustin leaped out of the drivers seat you there, he said. Honestly! Blood trickled down my nose. Do we need to take you to the hospi ice? Do you think you need stitches? Do we have any hydrogen peroxide? He was pacing around me in the park ing lot. Get me a tissue from the glove com museum before the kids want lunch. drove. My heart beat between my eyes only just below my forehead, not on But the kids wanted to go to the muse um, and it was the last day of our vaca tion. There was no time to take me to the hospital for stitches. through displays while Dustin and the older boys read every plaque with infor mation and tried the hands-on experi on a single plastic tray in the cafeteria while Dustin waited for something from the grill. My nose was hot and tender. My head ached. Lindell. probability. off from Dustin and the boys to look at the blood would move away from the knot on the bridge of my nose. Thats when Dustin found me. Where have you been? he said. You just ditched me with the kids, and know what to do or where you had gone . even though my nose hurt as it wrin kled. need?Hey, Money Chic! ing a few financial resolutions but dont know where to start. Can you point me in the right direction? Money Chic sez: resolution direction! The most beneficial thing you can do with your money for the future is to save it! Save for emergencies, retirement and big future purchases. How do you save for all three of those? Make saving for emergencies and future purchases an automatic payment each month. Pay your bills first, pay yourself as though you are a bill second, and what is leftover is used at your discretion. You can set up automatic payments to a savings account directly from your paycheck each month or you can have you bank pull a set amount out each month to another account once your paycheck has cleared your bank account. Retirement savings is offered through the military. Putting your Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) or Roth TSP to work for you is one of the best ways to make sure you are taken care of financially when you retire. Setting up your TSP (taxed later) or your Roth TSP (taxed now) can be done through myPay. Saving money is fantastic in theory, but how do you find the extra money to put into that emergency/spe cial purchase/retirement fund? You do this by scaling down your miscellaneous purchases. Ask yourself if you need the item before purchasing it. More than likely if you spend an extra minute thinking about the purchase, you will be more hesitant to throw your money away on an item that wont be used. Make conscious purchases; dont buy something just to spend money. Money that is extra at the end of the month can then be put into the savings account. The more you can scale back your everyday spending, the faster your cushion can grow! For more personal guidance, the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is available to provide advice or lend a helping hand. For more information on saving money, visit www.MilitarySaves.org. Husband trained for war gets man flu

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 3

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VP-26 unveiled their tribute to Tridents of past and present at their Hall of Heroes ribbon cutting ceremony on Dec. 13. The event marked nearly 70 years of proud squadron history and celebrated Team Tridents vigorous adherence to a culture of safety and operational excel lence. The guiding principles of pride, professionalism and pur pose have been indispensable to the squadrons long history, and instrumental in the commands 338,000 consecutive mishapfree flight hours over the last decade. VP-26 traces their history back to 1943 when the squad ron was called VB-114 and the Tridents flew and maintained the PB4Y-1 Liberator, a fourengine, land-based patrol air craft that specialized in locating and neutralizing U-boats. After several name and air frame changes, they became the third U.S. Navy patrol squadron known as VP-26. Team Trident has operated with excellence for nearly seven decades and has been recognized repeatedly by being awarded seven Navy Battle Excellence awards. The most recent came when VP-26 was named the Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven 2012 Battle E winner. The Hall of Heroes is designed to honor the many Sailors, chiefs and officers who have proudly served our great nation as a member of Team Trident. and aircraft from both past and present; a Prisoner of War/ table; the national ensign, U.S. flags. Also featured in the hall is a commemorative Team Trident runner with the squadron motto Trident Pride Runs Bone Deep, and a six-foot steel Trident. We are proud of our past and current tradition of excellence and it shows every day in the work all of our Sailors do, said VP-26 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Erik Thors. Special thanks goes out to MC2 Jesse Sharpe and AT2 Marquis Eure for compiling photos and set ting up the hall. The Hall of Heroes is located in Hangar 511, Segment 4. group tour, please contact the VP-26 PAO at 542-2592. When service members board the plane to return to the United States from deployment overseas, their family and friends are not the only ones wait ing for them. Scam artists are also busy setting up storefronts, phone lines, and websites specifically targeting service members. These consumer predators know that service members have to deal with unique pressures, such as spending extended periods of time abroad, mov ing to different cities multiple times, and being held to a higher standard for debt repayment under the Uniform service members are known for having a steady income and trying to do what is best for their families. At the Department of Justice, we are working hard to protect consumers like you. The Civil Divisions Consumer Protection Branch has made fighting fraud aimed at service members and veterans a top priority. We are work ing internally with the Departments Civil Rights Division to ensure that businesses respect the rights of service members. And we are working exter nally with other agencies, such as the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs, to identify potential fraud ear lier. We are also collaborating with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureaus Office of Servicemember Affairs, led by Holly Petreaus, to engage in a dialogue with military leadership about how we can prevent this fraud together. And we have joined forces with federal and state prosecutors as well as the JAG Corps to identify scammers and bring more cases against them. We are committed to using all of the tools at our disposal to hold these swin dlers responsible. But the best way to fight them is to deprive them of custom ers. Service members of each military branch have told us about their experi ences, and we are dedicated to getting their message out. Here are a few tips on how to protect yourself and your family. Be wary of up-front fees. access benefits, get a good rate on a loan, and make a great investment. All you need to do is pay me an up-front fee. The Defense: The military offers legal assistance, interest free emergency loans, and financial planning tools. Ask your military installation offices for details. Always find out what the total price is. refrigerator, or anything else you want. Just give me a little bit of money every installment. The Defense: Salespeople can offer misleading information about how much something really costs once all the payments and fees are added up. business elsewhere. Dont trust promises about the future. The Sales Pitch: Just buy the car with you. The Defense: Make sure that every one agrees to the final terms of a deal before you hand over any money. Find out who you are dealing with. armed forces. Sign up with my program VP-26 establishes Hall of Heroes Scams alert: How service members can fight for financial security at home 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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SCAM ALERT to make sure that your family has everything they need while deployed overseas. The Defense: Ask your base community-service office about the company or individual. You can also contact the Better Business Bureau. And, if you have been the victim of a scam, we encourage you to come forward and complain. So often, financial fraud goes unreported because victims feel embarrassed or foolish. But only when you complain is it possible for you to get the help you need. And only when we know there is a problem can we and our law enforcement partners work to stop it. So, consult your military installation legal assistance office or your state attorney general and log your complaint at www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov or at www.consumerfinance.gov/complaint/ Navy to commemorate Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Jan. 21 join the nation in observing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Jan. 21. Navy commands are encouraged to reflect on the recurring theme, Remember! Celebrate! Act! A Day On, Not A Day Off! and increase their knowledge and awareness of Dr. Kings contributions to American history and civil rights by participating in military and community events. Dr. King was the chief spokesman for nonviolent activism during the civil rights movement, which suc cessfully protested racial discrimination in federal and state law. Following in the footsteps of his father, King entered the Christian ministry in February 1948 at the age of 19. He was ordained at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta and in 1954, upon completion of gradu ate studies at Boston University, he accepted a call to serve at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Ala. While ministering there, King became an instru mental leader in the Montgomery Bus Boycott, made famous by the arrest of Rosa Parks. The boycott lasted over a year and led to the 1956 District Court ruling that racial segregation on buses was unconstitutional. Over the course of his lifetime, King was arrested 30 times for his participation in civil rights activi ties. Although King spent the majority of his life preaching on the issues of social justice, empower ment, love and peace which won him the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 his attention also included fight ing economic injustice. On April 4, 1968, King jour neyed to Memphis, Tenn., to help lead sanitation workers in a protest against low wages and intolerable working conditions. While standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel, King was shot and ultimately died. Luther King Jr. Day was established by President Ronald Reagan in 1983. The first observance was held Jan. 15, 1986, the anniversary of Kings birthday. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday would be observed every year on the third Monday of January. On Aug. 23, 1994 Congress passed the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday and Service Act, designating the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday as a day of national volunteer service. All Navy commands are strongly encouraged to increase their knowledge and awareness of Kings contributions to American history and civil rights through participation in military and community events and volunteerism within their communities. More information on the Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service, including a search engine to find volunteer opportunities near you can be found online at http:// www.mlkday.gov/about/serveonkingday.php. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 The NAS Jax Fuel Division Operations Center, or Fuel Farm, supports all air operations at NAS Jax through its air craft fueling/de-fueling and cryogenic services. A consistent winner of the American Petroleum Institute award for being an excellent facility, the Fuel Farm contin ues to provide outstanding service and mission-essential support to all of the squadrons at NAS Jax. Comprised of a computer-operat ed pump house, three above-ground storage tanks with a total capacity of 1,800,000 gallons, three bay stations for offloading fuel from commercial trucks, a cryogenics facility house, as well as multiple flight line fueler/de-fueler trucks, the Fuel Farm is operational 24/7 and always ready to deal with even the busiest air operations periods. The highly trained and motivated staff consists of a blend of military personnel and Doss Aviation contractors, who are committed to teamwork and the success of the mission. We operate on a one team, one fight perspective, and the goals we strive to bring to the table are customer service, safety, and quality assurance, com mented Michael Darling, project man ager with Doss Aviation. We want nothing but the best quality fuel put into these aircraft, and want the squadrons to be confident that the prod uct they receive is of the highest caliber. These three goals are what the Fuel Farm has excelled at. In fiscal year 2012, its average response time to aircraft fuel requests was 10 minutes, and it safely handled 66,528,924 gallons of JP-5 with zero mishaps. In addition, its quality assurance team tested 47,772 samples of JP-5, ensuring that the fuel was clean from sediment, water, and other impurities. Environmentally friendly practices are also a top priority of the Fuel Farm, with all used petroleum products being sold to a local recycling plant. Proceeds from these sales are donated to the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Program, with $36,147 being given last year. Over 405,480 pounds of petroleum products were sold to be recycled, also saving the government a waste disposal cost of $486,576. When we deal with 90,000 gallons of fuel requests per day, its essential that our team is meticulous and professional, as this is a hazardous product, Darling remarked. It means a lot to everyone here that we can support the squadrons and the missions they fly, and we will continue to do our absolute best to assure safety and quality to all of them. FUEL DIVISION MAINTAINS EXCELLENT MISSION SUPPORT

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 7 NAS JAX FUEL FARM PHOTOS BY LT. J.G. KEVIN WEN D T

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base budget, and more for the Army and the Marine Corps. Panetta summed up: Were looking at a 19 to 20 percent reduction in the base budget operating dollars for active units, including a cut of what looks like almost 30 percent for the Army. The secretary said practical results of these cuts would be less training for units not imminently deploying to Afghanistan; less shipboard train ing for all but the highest priority mis sions; less pilot training and fewer flight hours; curtailed ship maintenance and disruption to research and weapons modernization programs. Civilian employees would also take a hit, he said: unpaid layoffs, which the government calls furloughs, would put civilian employees temporarily out of work. This would further harm our readiness, and create hardship on them and their families, Panetta noted. A plan is in place to implement such layoffs if sequester happens, the secre tary said. This action is strictly precau obligation to let Congress know that hope that we will not have to furlough anyone. But weve got to be prepared to do that if we face this situation. Panetta said the net result of seques ter under a continuing resolution would the defense budget, which is to hollow out the defense force of this nation. Rather than let that happen, Panetta added, DOD leaders have decided to take steps to minimize the damage that would follow Congressional inaction. We still have an obligation to protect this country, the secretary said. So services and the other components to immediately begin implementing pru dent measures that will help mitigate our budget risk. Panetta said he has directed any actions taken must be reversible to the extent feasible and must minimize harmful effects on readiness. But, he added, We really have no choice but to prepare for the worst. First steps to containing budget risk will include cutting back on facility main tenance, freezing civilian hiring and delaying some contract awards, the sec retary said. Panetta has also directed the services to develop detailed plans for how they will implement sequester-triggered cuts, if required, he said, because there will be so little time to respond in the halfway through the fiscal year. The secretary said the intensive plan ning effort now under way will ensure the military is prepared to accomplish its core missions. no amount of planning that we do can fully offset the harm that would result from sequestration, if that happens, he added. Panetta said U.S. service members are working and fighting, and some are dying, every day. Those of us in Washington need to have the same courage as they do to do the right thing and try to protect the security of this country, he added. We must ensure we have the resources we need to defend the nation and meet our commitments to our troops, to our civilian employees, and to their fami lies, after more than a decade of war. Congress must pass a balanced deficit reduction plan, de-trigger sequester, and pass the appropriations bills for fis cal 2013, he said. to try to work with the Congress to resolve these issues, Panetta said. We have a vital mission to perform, one that the American people expect and that they are entitled to, which is to protect their safety and to protect our national security. Congress must be a partner Dempsey offered his view of what wreckage the fiscal storm would leave behind. self-inflicted wound on national secu sponsible way to manage our nations ness is whats now in jeopardy. Were on the brink of creating a hollow force, the very thing we said we must avoid. Dempsey noted sequestration may now hit while the department, under a continuing resolution, is also imple menting the deep cuts already made in the Budget Control Act and fighting a war in Afghanistan. Any one of these would be a seri ous challenge on its own, Dempsey said. Together, they set the conditions for readiness to pass a tipping point as early as March. DOD wont shortchange those in combat, and will resource those who are next to deploy while still caring for wounded warriors and their families, the chairman said. But for the rest of the force, opera tions, maintenance and training will be gutted, Dempsey said. Well ground aircraft, return ships to port, and sharp ly curtail training across the force. [W]e may be forced to furlough civilians at the expense of maintenance and even health care. Well be unable to reset the force following a decade of war. Military readiness will begin to erode immediately, Dempsey said, telling reporters, Within months, well be less prepared. Within a year, well be unpre pared. The crisis can and must be avoided, the sooner, the better, the chairman said. We need budget certainty; we need time to absorb the budget reductions; we need the flexibility to manage those reductions across the entire budget, he said. We have none of these things right now. And without them, we have no choice but to steel ourselves for the consequences.more intense and more relevant as they get ready to become chief petty officers. CPO 365, a yearlong develop ment and training for FCPOs, was first introduced in 2010 under former MCPON Rick the first of which begins in September each year. Under MCPON Stevens revised pro gram, detailed in his 2012-2013 CPO 365 Guidance, all FCPOs will participate through the duration of Phase One, whether they are board-eligible or not. CPO 365 depends a lot on a continuous process of learn ing and development. What we dont want to do is have a clean break from CPO 365 where the FCPOs who were not selected to chief, are no longer involved in the training. We want to maintain that momentum, and continue to train. We recognize that there will be some events where all FCPOs wont be able to participate in, but by and large, well keep them together and continue to do the training theyve been doing, because its vitally important that all of our petty officers continue to learn and develop. Phase Two of training begins when CPO selectees are announced and concludes with the pinning ceremony. Upon announcement, each command will hold a congratulatory meetand-greet for the selectees and their families, after which they will continue with training while maintaining good order and discipline. Phase Two will continue to contain many timehonored traditions, such as CPO Charge Books and a cap stone event focused on team work and resilience. We wanted to continue a program that set the condi tions for every FCPO to be a successful and effective chief, and remove any road blocks that would interfere with that opportunity for success. Well add in various things that would afford them a greater opportunity to be successful chief petty officers. One process that will no lon ger be a part of CPO 365 is the word induction. Effective immediately, were respectfully sundowning the word induction, and in its place well use CPO 365 as the believe that induction is more about a moment in time, and CPO 365 and the development of our FCPOs to become CPOs is about a continuous time. This is something were going to do every day, 365 days a year, and so we want to make sure the term we are using is matching what we are doing. MCPON added that the term CPO 365 was coined by CPOs in the fleet, due to their belief that developing leaders is a yearround process. This train ing is far more by the fleet, for the fleet than it is from folks in Washington, said Stevens. was working with then-MCPON Rick West to help develop the seas talking to a CPO Mess don, and on it was written 365. by that and what they shared with me was, We believe that developing FCPOs to become chiefs is a year-round process, so we use the term CPO 365. So, this is a title that was developed by the fleet and we just adopted it. Additionally, Stevens said that although the CPO 365 is primarily geared towards FCPO and CPOs, all Sailors will ben efit from the training. To develop great leaders we must have a training pro cess that is ongoing in a Sailors we do starts and stops with leadership, then every Sailor will benefit from a more effec tive leader. MCPON PANETTA 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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NAS Jacksonville Rescue Swimmer School back in businessRescue swimmer students returned to the NAS Jax Rescue Swimmer School (RSS) for the first time in months on Jan. 8, after debris from an old ceiling had fallen into the pool and caused a safety concern, shutting the building down for repairs. The rescue swimmer course is a rigor ous four-week endeavor, subjecting stu dents to all types of mental and physical stress in a water environment. The end goal is to create a group of rescue swim mers who are at home in a water envi ronment with calm, collected heads and good decision-making skills. According to AWR2 Lyle ODell, instructor with the NAS Jax RSS, We like to think of this course as: Would my mother or grandmother if she was drowning? We purposely subject these students to rigorous tests and harsh conditions, because in the real world, they could be the difference in life or death for an overboard Sailor. The students are selected by their respective ships to attend the course in either Jacksonville or San Diego, as all ships must have a minimum of two certified rescue swimmers before they can get underway. After arriving at either site, students attend both class room courses and exercises in the pool designed to strengthen their lifesav ing knowledge and swimming skills. Typical classroom training includes first aid and CPR, while pool training encompasses advanced swimming, use of all types of water gear, and rescuing a drowning victim with multiple injuries. The course progressively gets harder as the weeks go on, and the instructors never let up in trying to mold the stu dents into experts in the water. We stress a crawl, walk, run men tality. This course is extremely chal anyone drop on request, there can be no mistake that we need to weed out the students who just arent suited to do this job, commented ODell. We will do everything we can to push these students to their mental breaking points, and the ones who cope and keep their heads in the game are like the stress of basic training, but in a water environment, which is already uncomfortable for most. course described above, designated as tion search and rescue course, the latter designed to teach senior enlisted how to document training and evaluations of rescue swimmers in their helicopter squadron or wing. With the repairs to the RSS ceiling completed, the staff was enthusiastic about getting back to business. and running, and we will remain com mitted to providing the best training to these students that we possibly can, said NAS Jax RSS Officer in Charge Lt. Kevin Harrington. The lifesaving skill sets we teach these Sailors are invalu able to the fleet. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 9

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Air Ops Sailor returns home from IA tourABH1(AW/SW) Elmer Mojica of the NAS Jax Air Terminal was welcomed home by base leader ship and his co-workers Jan. 11 after serving a 10-month Afghanistan. Mojica worked as a career coun selor to Sailors serving in a vari ety of capabilities throughout the chaplain and we traveled more than 20,000 miles to meet with bad things there from the living conditions to what our Sailors are doing there every day. Mojica also stressed some of the danger he faced. The second day on our base. And, one of the heli copters we were supposed to be in gerous place but you go through training to help you prepare, said Mojica. you need to be prepared for any thing once you get picked up for going to certain place and then with the Army, Air Force or NATO, he continued. But his greatest reward was com and to see everyone, he said. Mojica will continue to work at the air terminal until he transfers to USS Nimitz (CVN-68), home ported in Everett, Wash. in April. get there. Thats what being a Sailor is all about, he said. Getting fit rates high among resolutions people make at the start of the New Year, and Navys Physical Readiness Program has resources and information to help Sailors and families achieve their fitness goals, officials said Jan. 8. Whether you exercise and want to increase your current level of fitness or you are looking to start a routine to attain a healthy level of fitness we can help, said Bill Moore, director, Navy Physical Readiness Program. Focusing on the wellness of Sailors and their fami lies by providing the skills and tools for fitness and nutrition is one of our primary objectives. While it is common for Sailors to skip or reduce workouts over the holidays according to Moore, Sailors should be able to resume their normal fitness routine if little time elapsed between workouts over the holidays. Most commands wrap up their fall physical fit ness assessments before Thanksgiving and there are gatherings and shopping that may eat into fitness time over the holidays, so it is natural for people to exercise less, said Moore. Missing four to five days of exercise over the holi days should have little impact on fitness routines. Sailors who missed more than six days between workouts may experience some muscle soreness when resuming their routine. For those who havent worked out since the last semiannual physical readiness test Moore recom mends starting off slowly and building up slowly. Start with a shorter duration for cardio-respiratory exercise and less weight for strength training. Build up from there, said Moore. Sailors can start with 20 minutes of some sort of exercise two or three days per week, slowly increasing time by five minutes per week until they reach their desired level of activity. a routine, then you should consult your physician before performing exercise, he added. Once you establish fitness routine Moore rec ommends making it part of a weekly schedule. Consistency is the key, he said, adding that whether serving on shore duty, on board ship or submarine, or in the dirt and sand, the Navy provides its Sailors resources and equipment to remain fit to fight. Navy guidance recommends Sailors complete at least 150 minutes of moderate physical activity each week and perform strength-training exercises at least twice a week to work all major muscle groups. Examples of moderate-intensity cardio-respiratory activities include brisk walking (3 mph or faster), bicy cling (slower than 10 mph) and water aerobics. High-intensity activities include jogging or running, lap swimming, jumping rope and circuit training. Strength training includes pushups, lifting weights, and working with resistance bands. that work all the different parts of the body (legs, hips, back, chest, abs, shoulders and arms) repeated for 10-12 reps each can improve fitness, decrease muscle loss and help maintain a healthy weight. The Navy Physical Readiness Program website at http://www.public.navy.mil/bupers-npc/support/ physical/Pages/default2.aspx has links to sample warm-ups and workouts users may choose. One sample workout specifically addresses techniques to improve performance on the Navys physical readi ness test. Sailors and families will also find links to nutrition information that when followed compliment a good fitness routine. No matter what your fitness goals are, good nutri tion can help improve your exercise performance, decrease your recovery time from strenuous exercise, prevent injuries due to fatigue, and provide the fuel required during times of high-intensity training and weight control, said Lt. Cmdr Jennifer Wallinger, reg istered dietitian, Navy Physical Readiness Program. The site also contains a Navy registered dietitian locator so Sailors and family members may meet faceto-face with an expert and learn more about incor porating proper nutrition to maximize the benefits of their fitness routine. Whether it is maintaining or seeking to attain a healthy level of fitness the Navy provides Sailors and family members the tools to reach their goals, accord ing to Moore. Retiree seminar coming Feb. 2 A retired military semi nar will be held at the NAS Jax Officers Club Feb. 2 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. to provide military retirees and their spouses information on a variety of topics. The following topics will be discussed: Healthcare, veterans benefits, long term care, Survivor Benefit Plan, pay matters, assisted liv ing, Delta Dental and other retiree issues. Military retirees from all branches of service and their spouses and those planning to retire in 2013 are invited to attend. For more infor mation, call 542-5790 or email JAXS_NAS_RAO@ navy.mil Navy experts weigh-in on staying and getting fitPlace your marquee message The new NAS Jacksonville marquee message board on Yorktown Avenue is available for official messages. The fol lowing are the guidelines for submitting a message to be dis played on the marquee: All requests must be on an official NAS Jax Marquee Request Form. Submit the request at least two days in advance to the Public Affairs Office, prior to the posting date no exceptions! be edited. Please follow the guidelines on the form. Do not add spaces or break words. Each space represents one letter or character and you must put a space between words. Completed request forms may be faxed to 542-1534 or dropped off at Building 1, Room 203 Monday through Friday 8 nasjaxpao@navy.mil. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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Although the state of Washington has recently updated the law on the use of marijuana, essentially decriminalizing use for civilians, zero tolerance drug policy regulations remain unaffected for Sailors. The Zero Tolerance Drug Policy was implemented after a fatal crash of an EA-6B Prowler on board USS Nimitz in 1981, killing 14 crewmembers and injur ing 45 others. Autopsies were performed and several members of the flight deck crew tested positive for marijuana. Following this discovery, then-President Ronald Reagan instituted a Zero Tolerance Drug Policy for all U.S. Armed Forces. As a result regular, random urinalysis drug checks are conducted on all mili tary personnel. Marijuana can stay in the system for up to 30 days depending on the persons metabolism, dosage and method of con sumption, said HM3 David Johnson. Because its lipid-based, it can stay in the fat cells for a long period of time, whereas water-based substances would flow through very quickly. Marijuana, or cannabis, induces mul tiple psychological affects to the users mental state. Being under the influence of marijua na can result in slow reaction speed and poor judgment, and can negatively affect operational success, said LN1 Michael Lightsey. could get hurt. You dont want anyone to be high while operating a jet. sale, transfer of controlled substances, or any attempt to commit drug offens es results in maximum punishment under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, which includes forfeiture of a half months pay for two months, reduc tion in rank, courts martial, three days confinement on bread and water (for E-3 and below Sailors), 45 days of extra duty and 45 days on restriction or 60 days of restriction and discharge from military service. Aside from the typical punishment that follows drug use, there are collateral consequences to getting kicked out of the military, said Lt. Cmdr. Ryan Anderson, Nimitz command judge advocate. Aside from increasing the difficulty of with marijuana because its not worth it. Before you eat that pot brownie, ask your self if its worth losing $90,000. For more information about the misuse of controlled substances and its conse quences, reference Milpersman 1910-146. Can you imagine life without the essential to almost every aspect of our life. We use email to communi cate at work. We attend virtual meet ings and trainings. We keep in touch with loved ones across the world. answer to any question in the blink of an eye and download that song we just cant get out of our head. The cyber dream can also quickly turn into a nightmare that could cost thou sands of dollars. Recently, there have been increasing numbers of individu als who have been notified by their tified as a copyright infringer. The let that some entity has filed a lawsuit alleging a copyright infringement has been committed (usually an improper file upload/ download). they release the personal identifying Address. For some, this is the first time they realize that they may have down loaded something illegally. For oth has been compromised and that they should have secured their wire less router or uninstalled a file-shar wrong and the customer associated even downloaded any copyrighted material. Whether you downloaded some thing without thinking, used a file sharing software (e.g. bit torrent, pirate bay, gnutella), or think your neighbor may have been mooching off of your router, you could be held liable for copyright infringement and ordered to pay anywhere between $200 and $150,000 in damages, in addition to attorney fees and court costs! Even if you (or your mooching neighbor) never actually downloaded the copyrighted material, release of your information to threats to settle the case, still poten tially costing thousands of dollars. pany usually informs you that your name, address, and other information be released if you do not take action of these letters, it is essential that you see an attorney as soon as possible, as they can help drop your name as a defendant in a lawsuit, get the case dismissed or help prove that you should not be held liable. Think before you download. Just as you would not steal a CD from a music store, you shouldnt download some thing without permission. File sharing programs may seem like a great way to build your music collection or catch up on that episode you missed, but much of this free entertainment is copy righted, meaning that the download can end up costing you thousands of dollars in a lawsuit. No act online is private, every visit secure, not only can your neighbors could download something illegally. one who illegally downloaded the file, then you may still be on the hook. and think before you click, you can live the cyber dream without exposing yourself to a cyber nightmare. If you have any other questions, please contact your local legal assistance office. This article is not intended to substi tute for the personal advice of a licensed attorney. Sailors cautioned after legalization of marijuana healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchofdimes.com/vfwA free wellness program that supports military moms before, during and after pregnancy. Created by the March of Dimes, with the VFW and the Ladies Auxiliary VFW. Think before you clickBeware what you (or your neighbors) download JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 11

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12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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Just five months after Navy officials broke ground at NAS Jacksonville on Sept. 7, 2012, the first walls went up for a new training facility that will house both the MQ-4C Triton Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) unmanned aircraft operator training program, and the P-8A Poseidon maintenance program. Jacksonville was awarded a $15,057,000 fixed-price contract for the project that is scheduled for completion by Dec. 2013. Muhammad Raoof, assistant project manager for Elkins, said, What were doing here is casting concrete in wood five inches of an outer face panel, three inches of insulation and 12 inches of the inner face. Called a tilt-up job, a wall panel may weigh up to 170,000 pounds (85 tons). The tilt-up erection process is engi neered for quick assembly through predrilled panel footing connections. Each wall panel has been cast in place adjacent its footer, said Steven Wetherell, Elkins director of government and defense services. Due to its predrilled panel footing connections, the tilt-up erection process goes together faster than most people expect. When the walls are up and secured, iron work ers will begin installing structural steel to support the walls and roof, said Wetherell. The two construction projects are located on a common site to the west of Yorktown Avenue. Parking and storm water management areas will be located to the south of the site and adjacent to the Fleet and Family Support Center. The P-8A Maintenance Training Facility project will provide 58,262-sq.ft. of operational and maintenance training support. The two-story, concrete and steel facility will support the fol lowing training devices: opera tional load trainer; integrated avi onics trainer; maintenance train ing for fuel system, flight control/ hydraulics, landing gear, engine, and environmental control systems. The MQ-4C Triton BAMS UAS project consists of an 8,938-sq.-ft., single-story training facility to teach operators of the new unmanned platform. The facility will include classrooms, mission control rooms and briefing rooms, along with support spaces for administrators and instructors. Triton will expand the Navys mari time patrol and reconnaissance force mission to provide unmanned aircraft systems with persistent maritime intelli gence, surveillance and reconnaissance data collection and dissemination capa bility to the Fleet. Three men and a crane erect 85-ton wall JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Hold em Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way NFL Playoffs will be playing at Deweys Enjoy $.50 wings during the gamesFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental includedFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238 Gym is temporarily relocated to The Zone (Bldg. 798) Jan. 14 June 30.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Wild Florida Airboats & Wild Animal Park Kenansville, Fla. $17 $46.50 Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus Jan. 1821, $13 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Preferred seating $41, lower-level seat ing $22 Live Broadway Series Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Dream Girls May 21 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park is valid for up to 14 days from first use. 31 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about special discounted tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park Gold pass $71 Daytona 500 Feb. 24 $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50 The Vault Liberty Recreation Center Trips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Paintball Trip Jan. 19 at 9 a.m. St. Augustine Ghost Tour Jan. 26, 6 p.m. Super Bowl Party Feb. 3, 5 p.m. at Deweys $5 per person, advance purchase onlyNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Jan. 22 for active duty Jan. 24 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Daily Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for $16 after 12:30 p.m. Monday & Tuesday Play 18 holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 Auto Skills 101 Class Jan. 17, 57 p.m. Learn general auto maintenance.Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Movie Under the Stars Jan. 18, 6 p.m. at Patriots Grove Featuring Finding NemoFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School March 18 April 24 $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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Navy Medicine recently announced the launch of a new informational video and post er regarding the health risks and dangers of the synthetic amphetamine known as bath salts as well as other designer drugs. The public service announcement video and post er will be distributed for dis play throughout the fleet and are available for download at http://www.med.navy.mil/ Pages/Syntheticdrugs.aspx. The campaign focuses on the dangers of bath salts and is part of the long-term aware ness and deterrence campaign Navy Medicine launched last year on synthetic and designer drugs. This effort is also part of an overall Navy communications plan with partners at the Naval Personnel Command and the Service and other commands. The campaigns goal is to decrease the number of active duty service members who use designer drugs like bath salts and the synthetic marijuana Spice because they are falsely marketed as a legal way to get high. According to Navy Medicine psychiatry resident Lt. George Loeffler at the Naval Medical Center San Diego,, the adverse health effects from bath salt use can range from lack of appetite to kidney failure, mus cle spasms, severe paranoid delusions, and psychosis. Several cases of long-term inpatient hospitalization and suicide have been reported and Loeffler has firsthand experi ence treating service members at Navy military treatment facilities with these symptoms. naval officer, but as your doc tor, bath salts will not only jack up your family and your career, it will jack up your mind and body, too, said Loeffler in the PSA now available online. The Bath Salts campaigns its a nightmare, reflects the hallucinogenic effect of bath salts, which are a non-regulat ed designer drug comprised of a synthetic cathinone, or amphetamine, that can have a dangerous or debilitating effect on the user. As the leader of the medical community for the Navy and size enough to our Sailors and Marines that using synthetic drugs really is just like play ing Russian roulette with their health not to mention their career, said U.S. Navy Surgeon General Vice Adm. Matthew Nathan in an editorial written for the Union Tribune in San Diego. The bath salts campaign further supports the Navy Surgeon Generals mission for all commanding officers and others in positions of leader ship to be fully engaged in their commands implementation plan to continually commu nicate and educate all hands as to the Navys zero-tolerance policy on designer drug use. The U.S. military repre sents a microcosm of our much larger general population and in many ways strives to be a reflection of the society we serve, so we share many of the same health and safety issues, including the increased use of these dangerous and debilitat ing drugs that not only affect our service members health, but also our readiness as a mil itary force, said Nathan. For nearly two years now, Navy leaders have taken a multi-tiered approach to com bating this escalating issue in our forces, and with our part ners in the Naval Criminal Personnel Command and throughout our naval enter prise, we have made progress in deterring and detecting use. Nathan affirmed that the Navy will continue to highlight the issue of synthetic drug use by delivering sustained and targeted messages throughout the Navy and Marine Corps. We cannot over-communi cate this issue, said Nathan. Accountability for those who abuse these substances will help deter their use. Navy Medicine is a global health care network of more than 63,000 Navy medical per sonnel around the world who provide high quality health care to more than one million eligible beneficiaries. Navy Medicine person nel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the battlefield. The Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD) has released the 2013 edition of the Naval Leader Planning Guide (NLPG) and the Naval Leader Weekly Planner (NLWP), CPPD leadership said Jan. 3. Both versions of the planner are avail able online, and commands can down load the PDF version free-of-charge from Navy Knowledge Online. Users can also download a file that can be imported into Microsoft Outlook that will populate personal calendars with the dates found in the product. Commands are authorized to use the downloaded source files to arrange for printing at local facilities to satisfy unitlevel requests for the resource. We did a hard scrub of this years Naval Leader Planning Guide and the Naval Leader Weekly Planner to ensure we had the best possible product, said CPPD commanding officer Capt. John Newcomer. We see delivering this product as part of our commitment to provide the fleet with the tools to lead with cour age, respect and trust and to men tor future leaders to do the same. The Naval Leader Planning Guide and the Weekly Planner are full of information to help leaders do just that. The NLPG brings together a large amount of information in a compact, portable format. This years edition includes a 15-month calendar (January 2013 to March 2014), a complete list of CPPD courses and services, con tact information for all CPPD learning sites and Navy College Offices around the world, the Principles of Naval Leadership, and Navy and Marine Corps Selection Board and Fitness Report/Evaluation schedules. munity managers and technical advi sors at Navy Personnel Command. The weekly version of this product contains a 13-month calendar, but all other sections contained in it are the same resources as the monthly guide, includ ing the personal and professional devel opment sections and the career man agement points of contact. The 2013 product includes the lat est Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Professional Reading Program list. The Marine Corps Professional Reading Program list was also updated. We strive to provide the most upto-date information possible to ensure the fleet has the information needed to meet mission, said Newcomer. Of course theres always an oppor tunity to improve, and we greatly value feedback from everyone on the Navy Navy Medicine rolls out new campaign to deter Bath Salts drug use Naval Leader Planning Guide and Weekly Planner now available JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 15

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and Marine Corps team on how we can make it even better so please send us your suggestions. To download the 2013 NLPG, log on to www.nko.navy.mil and select the Leadership tab. The guide can be downloaded as either a PDF file for printing or as an Excel file, which can be imported into Microsoft Outlook. CPPD is responsible for providing a wide range of personal and profession al development courses and materials, including General Military Training, Navy instructor training, alcohol and drug awareness program training, sui cide and sexual assault prevention, bystander intervention, and personal responsibility classes. CPPDs required leadership training is delivered multiple times throughout a Sailors career via command-deliv ered enlisted leadership training mate rial and officer leadership courses in a schoolhouse setting. CPPD also administers the Navys voluntary education program, which provides Sailors with the opportunity to earn college degrees. CPPD additionally manages the United Services Military Apprenticeship Program, which offers Sailors the opportunity to earn civilian apprenticeship certifications. CPPD 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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Did you know that Comcomputers and monitors con sume 1,100,000 kilowatt hours (kWh) annually over weekends, leave, temporary duty (TDY) and other absences when computers are in sleep mode. Another 650,000 kWh are con sumed after hours during a work week. The total potential energy assets is 1,750,000 kWh across $251,000 per year. ees, using the following simple guidelines, will contribute to goals: after saving data and closing all programs, use Start-Shut Down and select Shut Down option. Using the other options (Log off, Restart, Standby) will leave your computer drawing power over night. the week, especially before long absences like vacation or TDY, shut down as normal, and then turn off power at the power strip. This is required for computers switch will deny power to the that would otherwise wake the computer while users are away on extended absences. printers, scanners, etc.) should be turned off during off-duty and weekend hours to fur ther increase energy savings on equipment not actively in use. should also be shut down at night and on weekends provided shut ting down the computer does not directly impact watch standers. ware update requests upon next log on if the computer does not have the 0400 wake feature. Following the above steps, a user with only a computer and monitor will individually save approximately 52 kWh per com puter. The 2012 Florida Youth Substance Abuse Survey shows declines in substance abuse among Duval County students. Statewide, 70,859 middle and high school students partici pated in the survey and 2,221 Duval County students were surveyed. Alcohol and marijuana remain the most used sub stances for both middle and high school youth in Duval of students reported lifetime use of alcohol and 25.6 percent reported lifetime use of mari juana. Those numbers declined in 2012 to 45.6 percent and 23 per cent respectively. Current mar ijuana use by Duval County students has also declined from 14 percent in 2010 to 11.5 percent in 2012. This puts Duval County below the state wide average (12.4 percent). The survey also shows sig nificant declines in prescrip tion drug use. The current nonmedical use of prescription pain relievers for Duval County students declined from 7.3 per cent in 2010 to 6.7 percent in 2012. Of students surveyed state wide, 68.6 percent perceived a great risk of harm associated with the use of prescription drugs without a doctors order. We are very encouraged by these statistics as evidence that the positive efforts in our local communities are making a healthy impact on students in Duval County, said Susan Pitman, executive director of Safe & Health Duval Coalition. We are enthusiastic as we move into 2013 and remain committed to continuously improving resources, policies and prevention programs for students and their families in Duval County. The Florida Youth Substance Abuse Survey is a collabora tive effort between the Florida Departments of Health, Education, Children and Families, Juvenile Justice, and the Governors Office of the Communities That Care survey, assessing risk and pro tective factors for substance abuse, in addition to substance abuse prevalence. Safe & Healthy Duval Coalition consists of mem bers of the community com ing together to address alcohol, prescription drug use, mari juana and other illicit drug use in Duval County among young adults and middle and high school students, by systemi cally changing the culture and promoting the use of evidencebased environmental preven tion strategies. For more information, visit http://www.shdcfl.org. Free SAT/ACT test preparation programs from eKnowledge are being offered to mili tary families to prepare students for the 2013 SAT/ACT exams. The programs include 11 hours of video instruction, practice tests, sample questions and supplemental test prep material. Testing dates for the 2013 SAT exams are Jan. 26, March 9, May 4 and June 1. Testing dates for the 2013 ACT exams are Feb. 9, April 13, June 8 and Sept. 21. For more information, call (951) 256-4076 or e-mail loricaputo@eknowledge.com.Florida youth substance abuse surveyReveals Duval County trends in alcohol, tobacco and other drug use Free SAT/ACT test preparation programs for military families JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 17

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The Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) is a federal law that protects the job rights service members who have voluntarily or involuntarily left their civilian jobs to serve in the mili tary. USERRA protections are easiest to understand when broken into three cat egories: reemployment rights, the right to be free from discrimination, and health insurance protection. Reemployment rights Under USERRA, servicemembers have the right to be reemployed in their civil ian job if they leave that job to perform military service, so long as: The employer receives advance notice of the service members service; The total length of all absences from civilian employment by reason of ser vice in the military does not exceed five years; The service member returns to work or applies for reemployment in a timely manner after their military service has ended; and The service member has not been sep arated from service with a disqualifying discharge or under other than honor able conditions. met, employers must restore service members to the position (both job posi tion and benefits) that they would have been in if they had not left their civilian job to perform their military service. Right to be free from discrimination and retaliation Under USERRA, those who have served or will serve in the military can not be denied certain rights by their civilian employer. These rights include initial employment, reemployment, retention in employment, promotion, or any benefit of employment by an employer on the basis of the employees military service or the employees appli cation to serve in the military. Health insurance protection Under USERRA, servicemembers and their dependants can continue their employer-based health plan coverage while serving in the military. The maxi mum period of coverage is the lesser of: 24 months from the date on which the service members absence begins; or The day after the date on which the service member fails to apply for or return to a position of employment. violated or if you have any other ques tions, please contact your local legal assistance office. This article is not intended to substitute for the personal advice of a licensed attorney. list of New Years resolutions Sailors should create a plan, write down goals and review saving and spending strat egies, said a Navy financial specialist Jan. 3. State your financial resolutions simply and clearly for the new year, said Stacy Livingstone-Hoyte, finan cial counselor, Fleet and Family set too many or unrealistic financial goals, they may not be able to accom plish any of them. To stay account able, maintain a checklist, track how you are doing throughout the year and make modifications as needed. Livingstone-Hoyte also suggests Sailors meet with their local com mand financial specialist (CFS) or other financial counseling resource to review the plans they have set in place to achieve their goals. A CFS provides financial education and training, counseling, and information refer ral at the command level at no cost to Sailors and their families. After Sailors create their financial plan, Livingstone-Hoyte encourages them to make S.M.A.R.T. goals; this money management acronym refers to making Specific, Measureable, ActionOriented, Realistic and Timely finan cial goals. And dont forget to write them down. A crucial part of any money manage ment plan is to establish or review financial goals, evaluate accomplish ments, anticipate, and make and implement changes where necessary. With a proposed 1.7 percent pay increase in 2013, Sailors should con sider viewing this as found or new money, said Livingstone-Hoyte. New money can be saved, spent, invested or a combination of each. The idea being that what isnt seen cannot be spent. Sailors are also encouraged to review their credit reports. Activeduty service members and spouses report from their base financial coun selor. Paying off debt is one of the top financial resolutions for many and there are several methods for Sailors to consider when doing this, said Livingstone-Hoyte. One strategy is to tackle the debt that has the highest interest rate first. Mathematically, this is usually the most advantageous way to pay off debt. Once that is paid off, move on to the next highest interest rate debt. This way, an individual is making more progress by reducing how much of their money goes to pay ing interest each month. Smallest balance and shortest term are a few other debt-elimination choices. For some people, paying off the smallest balance can provide a strong sense of accomplishment and Your rights under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights ActMaking financial goals for a new year 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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As tax season nears, Military OneSource and H&R Block have again joined forces to pro vide a free online tax prepara tion service for service mem bers. Tony Jackson, a program analyst for the Military OneSource program office, detailed the services available for troops and their families. Military OneSource is a gateway to a free tax prepara tion service, partnered with H&R Block, he said. We also have tax consul tants who can provide assis tance, whether its seeking and filling out tax forms or any other tax-related information. Jackson emphasized it is a safe and secure way for service members to prepare their taxes online. Military OneSource and H&R block definitely meet industry standards for security for websites, he said. Also, encryption software is used and theres also no sell ing of information, so service members and family members can be assured that their infor mation is secure, and it stays within Military OneSource and H&R Block. Jackson noted that two ser vices basic and premium are provided through H&R Block, with one notable difference. The basic service is free, he said, and the premium service would apply to taxpayers who must file Schedule C returns, generally to report gains or losses from business owner ship. When you start getting into premium, youre going to incur some additional costs, where basic is free, Jackson said. For those not sure which ser vice they should use, Jackson encouraged them to use the Military OneSource website as a guide. The site lists answers to frequently asked questions. You can always contact Military OneSource at 1-800342-9647, Jackson said. Were open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, so any ques tions you have, you can use the website or the call center at the [toll-free] number. Jackson said both methods are effective in contacting Military OneSource tax consul tants offering useful services for troops and their families. Not only do they provide forms and basic information relative to military-specific tax issues and questions, they are a gateway to get you to H&R Block, he said. rants, theyll get you to a volun teer income tax assistance clin ic on your local military instal one-stop shopping. These tax consultants can not prepare tax forms or direct people to do anything, Jackson said. Everything is on a recom mended basis. All members of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps are eligible to use the service, he said, includ ing members of the National Guard and Reserve compo nents, regardless of activation status. Coast Guard reservists acti vated under Title 10 authority to serve with the Navy also are eligible and so are spouses and other family members enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System. Family members that have been designated to pro vide support to deployed ser vice members, medically discharged retirees and dis charged service members within 180 days of their dis charge date are eligible for Military OneSource services, Jackson added. The key to these services is financial readiness, which is a Defense Department priority. We understand that financial readiness is a readiness issue. whos concerned about their financial situation then that detracts from the mission. Jackson also provided his personal testament to using the free tax preparation program, having served on active duty in the Marine Corps as a per sonnel officer for more than 20 years. He said his family still uses the service. My daughter is a military spouse and she con tinues to use it as well, he said. This programs ultimate goal is to ensure service mem bers and their families know that Military OneSource is an option. We hope its the first option for getting your taxes pre pared or answering any ques tions or issues you have with taxes, said Jackson. Just know that Military OneSource is there to help you. Since 1998, the Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) has sur veyed its customers to find out how its NEXs are doing in a number of differ ent areas including customer service, pricing, problem resolution, customer experience and more. The Customer for 2012 show a two point increase to 85, based on a 100 point scale. This puts NEXs at the satisfaction level as some of Americas most customer focused retailers, such as Nordstrom and Kohls. The most recent industry average for Over the past 14 years that weve of the fact that our results have steadily increased, said Robert Bianchi, chief executive officer, NEXCOM. We take the results of this survey very seriously. This is where we hear directly from our customers about the good things were doing, but also about the areas where we can improve. attention on sales flyers, pricing and merchandise selection. For sales fly ers, the survey asked about satisfaction with prices advertised in the sales flyer, the availability of merchandise and if the merchandise fit the customers if merchandise reflected value for the money, whether the NEX had merchan dise to fit most budgets and if the NEX adjusted prices based on its competi tion. Finally, in merchandise selection, the customers were asked how they felt about the merchandise selection, whether the merchandise was what the customer wanted, and whether it was in stock. The survey showed that sales flyers and pricing increased one point each to 84 while merchandise rose two points to 82. Satisfaction with each of these three high priority areas is now at a record high. Other areas where NEXs received high scores were associates (92), which rated associates on courte sy, knowledge and availability; returns (90), which rated the NEX on the flexibility of its return policy, ease of making a return and the time it took to return merchandise at the store; and checkout (88), which rated cashier courtesy, how long it took to checkout and whether new lanes were open when more than Military OneSource provides tax assistance serviceResults of NEX 2012 customer survey shows a job well done! JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 19

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The Navy Wives Clubs of America approves 30 scholarships annually in amounts from $1,000 to $1,500. Those eligible for these scholarships include naturally born, legally adopted or stepchildren of an enlisted or retired member of the Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard or the son/daughter of a deceased member of the Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard. The applicant must have a valid Privilege Card). The applicant must show basis of need for financial assistance, have a scholastic standing of a least a 2.5 grade point average and be a graduate of an accredited high school or equivalent or will qualify for graduation prior to beginning eligibility for assistance. The applicant should be physical ly capable of completing the courses undertaken and be of good character. Scholarships cover tuition, room and board, fees and books. The deadline for applications is May 30. Please send a self-addressed stamp envelope when requesting an applica tion. Scholarship applications can be obtained from: Scholarship Director Linda Hedden, 1300 Hampton Drive, Summerville, SC 29483 Applications may also be download ed by going to: www.navywivesclubso famerica.org. Jax Air News welcomes articles and photographs pertaining to base employees, family members, com mands and community events. The newspaper is published every Thursday. The deadline for submissions is the pre vious Friday at 4 p.m. The following are some tips on writing articles and taking photographs for the paper: No call signs. ple have no idea what they all stand for. your readers are on a sixth grade read ing level. How about some feature stories about the people in your command? Everyone has a unique story to tell. Do a story on someones hobby, if they volunteer out in town, something interesting that happened to them, etc. We are a weekly newspaper. We dont want something that happened a month or two ago. Send us a story right after it happens. Email ensures faster submissions. Do not embed photos into Word docu ments. Send photos, with captions, as a separate jpg file. remember we will chop them as need ed. We normally start chopping at the bottom so make sure you put your more important information up front. Photographs: eras to highest quality settings). extra cards, so you dont have to jeopar dize quality for number of photos. 2mb will not reproduce well in print for newspaper purposes. faces. your angle as best you can. indoor shooting, and lowlight settings can vastly improve indoor shots. that can wash out your photos, either by flash bounce back or direct sunlight coming in. shots do not always reproduce well and may not be used when submitted. Articles and photos can be submitted via e-mail to Jaxairnews@comcast.net For more information, call 542-3531. Guidelines for submitting articles, photos to Jax Air NewsNavy Wives Clubs offer scholarships 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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the motivation to keep moving forward. Using a simple debt repayment calculator can help a person make this decision. Set a goal, make a plan and save automatically this is the theme of the 2013 Military Saves campaign, said Livingstone-Hoyte. The focus here is to master the funda mentals of money management by implementing good habits and sticking to your plans. Service members can visit www.MilitarySaves.org to take the Savers Pledge, read success stories of other mili tary families and sign-up to receive objective year-round advice about personal finances. Financial matters that occur from overspending or bad bud geting, such as failure to pay bills, bad credit, bankruptcy and foreclosures can negatively impact a Sailors career. Financial management is a key quality of life issue that affects every Sailor, their family members and the command, said Livingstone-Hoyte. Bad financial decisions can drastically affect the morale, readiness and retention of Sailors. Sailors experiencing finan cial challenges should notify their chain of command and work with their CFS to develop a budget and explore additional options such as military relief societies, eligibility for interest rate reductions and other strat egies. For more information on financial planning, budget ing or investing, contact CFS, the local FFSC or call the Navy Personnel Command customer service center at 1-866-U-ASKNPC or email CSCMailbox@ navy.mil. FINANCESNEXs will again focus attention on sales flyers, merchandise and pricing as these have the highest impact on overall cus tomer satisfaction. stores scored above 80 com pared to 84 percent last year and 77 percent in 2010. For the third year in a row, there were no NEXs with scores below 70. These scores show us that we have consistently strong performance in all of our stores around the world, said Bianchi. Each NEX reports to a dis trict which is overseen by a NEXCOM District Vice President. Scores for each NEX within a district were aver aged out to calculate each dis tricts score. Districts in the continental United States rose one point to 85 while over seas districts rose two points scores for 2012 were as fol lows: Hawaii up one point to 87; Mid-South remained the same at 86; Tidewater and Western rose one point each to 86; Southeast rose two points to 85; Japan rose four points to 85; Northwest rose one point to 84; Northern rose two points to 84; Europe rose one point to 81 and Guam decreased one point to 84. While we do survey our cus tomers once per year to attain tinually ask for their feedback through surveys on our web store, www.MyNavyExchange. com, said Bianchi. NEX Multi-Event Control Line Model Airplane Competition will be held Jan. 18-20 at Outlying Landing Field Whitehouse. The field opens at 7 a.m. each day and will feature precision stunt and combat competitions. The schedule is as follows: Friday Practice day, afternoon com bat rounds Saturday Basic stunt, profile stunt, old-time stunt, classic stunt, N-30 stunt, 75 mph combat and racing. Sunday Beginner stunt, intermedi ate stunt, advanced stunt, expert stunt, fly-off for the perpetual trophy, vintage combat and racing. The event is sponsored by the X47 Flyers, Academy of Model Aeronautics, Florida Racing & Sport Flyers, Jax area Soaring Society, Jax Jets Club and the Boy Scouts of America. Catering will be available onsite. No weapons, alcohol or open flames are allowed. For more information, call Lynn Weedman at (904) 669-3242 or e-mail x47weed@aol.com. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government official ly endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Model Airplane Contest coming Jan. 18-20 visit friends and family who we only see occasionally and are often surprised at their condition. For the family of a struggling veteran, this can be especially difficult if that veteran doesnt want to seek treatment. Fortunately, there is a pro gram specifically for those trying to help a veteran who wont seek treatment. The program will coach you through working with your vet. Family members are key resources for service mem bers and veterans. They know when something is wrong and can encourage each other to seek help. Unfortunately, sometimes misunderstandings, dis agreements and conflicts get in the way of helping. Here are some suggestions for working with your service member or veteran when you think he or she is troubled and experiencing depression, posttraumatic stress disor der (PTSD) or another mental health concern. You can help by being informed about some of the following topics: PTSD, fam ily reintegration, combat stresses, depression, alcohol and drug use. Often the best thing for families is to talk openly about their thoughts, feel ings and behaviors. This includes concerns you have about how the veteran is feeling or reacting to situa tions. However, its easy for your worries to come across as criticisms this hap pens when we use the word you, as in, You need to do something about your support or concern. Try say going well right now, but member or veterans choices Mental health care is help ful only if your service mem ber or veteran makes the decision to seek it by him or herself. Someone can accept making changes only when he or she truly feels there is a choice. Demanding someone seek help can backfire, mak ing him or her less likely to go for help. Avoid making threats. Try not to say, You need to go for help, or else. Talk about choices. You can say, you go to see somebody, but to help, let me know. Only the individual can make the choice and commitment to improve their lives, but your support can make this more likely. Get help from others about talking with your loved one talking to your service mem ber about mental health concerns or just want to know about the right treat ment resources, Military OneSource at 800-342-9647 can be a good start. For those family members concerned about a military veteran, you can contact 823-7458. This program, provided by Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), helps family members assist their veteran inaccessing health and men tal health care. The telephone responders understand the enrollment procedures, what docu ments your veteran needs and what to do with them, as well as other VA resourc youre worried about your veteran and dont seem to be able to find the right words to tell them, a coach can help you come up with the best approach. Take care of yourself Taking care of yourself is helpful in several ways: you have the most to give when youre doing well, you make better decisions, and you provide a good exam ple to your veteran in mak ing good health decisions. Taking care of yourself can include getting enough sleep, eating well, getting help from friends, familyor your church, or getting profession al help from someone such as a counselor or therapist. For more support resources, visit the http:// www.dcoe.health.mil/ PsychologicalHealth/ Products.aspx resources sec tion of the DCoE Web site, and select the topic youre interested in learning more. And, remember the DCoE Outreach Center is available 24/7 at 866-966-1020 and resources@dcoeoutreach.org to provide information and resources on psychological health and traumatic brain injury issues.Tips for encouraging your loved one to access mental health services Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preven tive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregis modations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: To register for any of the above workshops please contact 542-5745.FFSC offers life skills workshops JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 21



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THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The role of the chief petty officer (CPO) has long been an integral part of the Navy. When Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Mike Stevens took office last year, he recog nized that training chiefs for their new leadership role in six weeks, as the original CPO induction dictated, was hinder ing them in becoming as suc cessful as possible. We recognized that we wouldnt always have the time that we would like to provide the training for our first class petty officers (FCPO) to become chiefs. So two years ago we implemented the CPO 365 training process that would afford them a longer period of time to train, said Stevens. What weve done now is said, Why should we have a break six weeks prior to pinning and change the way weve been training? What weve decid ed to do is continue to train throughout the year, all the way up to the final night, and pro gressively make the training The perfect storm of budget uncer tainty howling around his department is the biggest immediate threat facing the U.S. military, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta told reporters Jan. 10. Panetta and Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, stressed during a regular Pentagon press conference that unless Congress acts, the nations military readiness will be compromised. The United States has a number of adversaries around the world, Panetta said, but the most immediate threat to our ability to achieve our mission is fiscal uncertainty: not knowing what our budget will be; not knowing if our budget will be drastically cut; and not knowing whether the strategy that we put in place can survive. Panetta emphasized that DOD is doing its part by implementing over the next decade the $487 billion spending reduction set by Congress. We designed a strategy; we know what the elements of that strategy are; we built a budget based on that, and we achieved our savings by virtue of that strategy, he said. But the additional half-trillion-dollar meat-axe cuts sequester would trigger still loom less than 50 days away, the secretary noted. While we appreciate that both parties came together to delay seques ter, the unfortunate thing is sequester itself, and the sequester threat, [was] not removed, Panetta said. And the prospect is undermining our abil ity to responsibly manage this depart ment. Two other fiscal crises are meanwhile converging on the nations forces, he added: appropriations act for fiscal 2013, DOD has been operating under a continu ing resolution and will do so at least through March 27. The continuing resolution funds operations at fiscal 2012 levels, instead of the higher proposed fiscal 2013 levels Pentagon officials had anticipated. could create even further turmoil that could impact on our budget and our economy. Looking at all three factors, the secretary said simply, We have no idea what the hell is going to happen. But DOD leaders do know that the worst-case scenario would mean serious harm to military readiness, he said. Panetta noted defense strategy plac es the highest priority on operations and maintenance funding as the key to a ready force. He described the triple threat facing those funds: priations bill for fiscal 2013 and instead extends the continuing resolution through the fiscal year, overall operating accounts would decrease by about 5 percent about $11 billion that would come out of [operations and mainte nance funds]. to cut, in this fiscal year, another 9 percent, almost $18 billion from these operating accounts as well. Afghanistan from required cuts, We would again have to cut another 5 per cent, another $11 billion, from readi ness money available in the active-duty MCPON releases CPO 365 training guidance Panetta: Fiscal crisis poses perfect storm of budget uncertainty

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Jan. 17 1832 USS Peacock makes contact with Vietnamese court officials. 1899 Cmdr. Edward Taussig in USS Bennington (Gunboat #4) takes formal 1955 USS Nautilus (SSN-571), the first nuclear-powered submarine, casts off lines at 1100 and sends message under way on nuclear power. Jan. 18 1911 First aircraft landing on board a ship, USS Pennsylvania (ACR-4), by Eugene Ely. 1962 After a flash fire in the Persian Gulf on the Danish tanker Prima Maersk burned a crewman, USS Duxbury Bay (AVP-38) transfers a Navy doctor to help the Danish crewman and USS Soley (DD707) took him to the nearest hospital at 1968 Operation Coronado X begins in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. 1977 The Trident (C-4) missile devel opment flight test program commenced when C4X-1 was launched from a flight pad at Cape Canaveral, Fla. 1991 USS Nicholas attacks and cap Jan. 19 1840 Lt. Charles Wilkes is first American to discover Antarctic coast. Jan. 20 1783 Hostilities cease between Great Britain and the United States. 1903 Theodore Roosevelt issues execjurisdiction of the Navy Department. 1914 School for naval air training opens in Pensacola, Fla. 1948 Establishment of U.S. Persian Gulf Area Command (later changed to Middle East Force in August 1948). Jan. 21 1954 Launching of Nautilus, first nuclear submarine, at Groton, Conn. 1961 USS George Washington com pletes first operational voyage of fleet ballistic missile submarine staying sub merged 66 days. Jan. 22 1800 Capt. Thomas Tingey ordered to duty as first superintendent of the Washington Navy Yard. 1944 Operation Shingle, allied land Jan. 23 1960 Bathyscaph Trieste descends the Marianas Trench the deepest part of the ocean. 1968 USS Pueblo (AGER-2) seized by North Korean forces in Sea of Japan. While off Wonsan, North Korea, Pueblo was attacked by local forces and seized. One crewmember was killed in the assault and the other 82 men on board were taken prisoner. After 11 months in captivity, often under inhumane condi tions, Pueblos crew was repatriated Dec. 23, 1968. My husband: Not afraid of scary bugs in the bathroom or mice in the attic; can lift heavy suitcases with one arm; able to run fast enough to catch our dog; the first to get up in the dark when we hear a strange noise downstairs. Navy pilot trained for war; a man who has been tested at Survival, Evasion, Resistance, Escape School and faced the helo dunker at Aviation Preflight traption that simulates a crash-landed, sunken aircraft? Flu. even before he said so. He rubbed his temple with his right hand and drove with his left. His eyes had red rings around them. Should you pull over and let me Actually, lets stop for lunch, he said. And then you can drive after. We took the next exit and found the loudest, most crowded franchise res taurant. Dustin rubbed his temples with both hands at the table. His face looked pale. he asked. than hospitalization to put me on the the restaurant to sleep in the car. Later, while Dustin slept, took pain medicine, and recounted how that headache had nearly floored him. ered our first baby, Dustin told the doctor it was the most tired he had ever felt. When he watched a resident physi cian give me an epidural in my spine, Dustin said his back ached. He paced in labor with our third son, and before next weeks column. to sit down. When a doctor explained face lose color. Dustin is equipped with bravery for trained for the battlefield. But when it comes to good, old-fashioned sickness, he needs me to hold his hand. A few days after the headache, and before we left our hotel to go to the Boston Museum of Science, Dustin told me, Wear something comfortable so youll be in a good mood today. suitcase into the back of our van, Dustin pushed the button to automatically close the door. The van door came down on the small bloody wetness. Dustin leaped out of the drivers seat you there, he said. Honestly! Blood trickled down my nose. Do we need to take you to the hospiice? Do you think you need stitches? Do we have any hydrogen peroxide? He was pacing around me in the parking lot. Get me a tissue from the glove com museum before the kids want lunch. drove. My heart beat between my eyes only just below my forehead, not on But the kids wanted to go to the museum, and it was the last day of our vacation. There was no time to take me to the hospital for stitches. through displays while Dustin and the older boys read every plaque with information and tried the hands-on experi on a single plastic tray in the cafeteria while Dustin waited for something from the grill. My nose was hot and tender. My head ached. Lindell. probability. off from Dustin and the boys to look at the blood would move away from the knot on the bridge of my nose. Thats when Dustin found me. Where have you been? he said. You just ditched me with the kids, and know what to do or where you had gone . even though my nose hurt as it wrin kled. need?Hey, Money Chic! ing a few financial resolutions but dont know where to start. Can you point me in the right direction? Money Chic sez: resolution direction! The most beneficial thing you can do with your money for the future is to save it! Save for emergencies, retirement and big future purchases. How do you save for all three of those? Make saving for emergencies and future purchases an automatic payment each month. Pay your bills first, pay yourself as though you are a bill second, and what is leftover is used at your discretion. You can set up automatic payments to a savings account directly from your paycheck each month or you can have you bank pull a set amount out each month to another account once your paycheck has cleared your bank account. Retirement savings is offered through the military. Putting your Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) or Roth TSP to work for you is one of the best ways to make sure you are taken care of financially when you retire. Setting up your TSP (taxed later) or your Roth TSP (taxed now) can be done through myPay. Saving money is fantastic in theory, but how do you find the extra money to put into that emergency/special purchase/retirement fund? You do this by scaling down your miscellaneous purchases. Ask yourself if you need the item before purchasing it. More than likely if you spend an extra minute thinking about the purchase, you will be more hesitant to throw your money away on an item that wont be used. Make conscious purchases; dont buy something just to spend money. Money that is extra at the end of the month can then be put into the savings account. The more you can scale back your everyday spending, the faster your cushion can grow! For more personal guidance, the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is available to provide advice or lend a helping hand. For more information on saving money, visit www.MilitarySaves.org. Husband trained for war gets man flu

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 3

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VP-26 unveiled their tribute to Tridents of past and present at their Hall of Heroes ribbon cutting ceremony on Dec. 13. The event marked nearly 70 years of proud squadron history and celebrated Team Tridents vigorous adherence to a culture of safety and operational excel lence. The guiding principles of pride, professionalism and pur pose have been indispensable to the squadrons long history, and instrumental in the commands 338,000 consecutive mishapfree flight hours over the last decade. VP-26 traces their history back to 1943 when the squad ron was called VB-114 and the Tridents flew and maintained the PB4Y-1 Liberator, a fourengine, land-based patrol air craft that specialized in locating and neutralizing U-boats. After several name and air frame changes, they became the third U.S. Navy patrol squadron known as VP-26. Team Trident has operated with excellence for nearly seven decades and has been recognized repeatedly by being awarded seven Navy Battle Excellence awards. The most recent came when VP-26 was named the Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven 2012 Battle E winner. The Hall of Heroes is designed to honor the many Sailors, chiefs and officers who have proudly served our great nation as a member of Team Trident. and aircraft from both past and present; a Prisoner of War/ table; the national ensign, U.S. flags. Also featured in the hall is a commemorative Team Trident runner with the squadron motto Trident Pride Runs Bone Deep, and a six-foot steel Trident. We are proud of our past and current tradition of excellence and it shows every day in the work all of our Sailors do, said VP-26 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Erik Thors. Special thanks goes out to MC2 Jesse Sharpe and AT2 Marquis Eure for compiling photos and set ting up the hall. The Hall of Heroes is located in Hangar 511, Segment 4. group tour, please contact the VP-26 PAO at 542-2592. When service members board the plane to return to the United States from deployment overseas, their family and friends are not the only ones waiting for them. Scam artists are also busy setting up storefronts, phone lines, and websites specifically targeting service members. These consumer predators know that service members have to deal with unique pressures, such as spending extended periods of time abroad, mov ing to different cities multiple times, and being held to a higher standard for debt repayment under the Uniform service members are known for having a steady income and trying to do what is best for their families. At the Department of Justice, we are working hard to protect consumers like you. The Civil Divisions Consumer Protection Branch has made fighting fraud aimed at service members and veterans a top priority. We are work ing internally with the Departments Civil Rights Division to ensure that businesses respect the rights of service members. And we are working exter nally with other agencies, such as the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs, to identify potential fraud ear lier. We are also collaborating with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureaus Office of Servicemember Affairs, led by Holly Petreaus, to engage in a dialogue with military leadership about how we can prevent this fraud together. And we have joined forces with federal and state prosecutors as well as the JAG Corps to identify scammers and bring more cases against them. We are committed to using all of the tools at our disposal to hold these swindlers responsible. But the best way to fight them is to deprive them of customers. Service members of each military branch have told us about their experiences, and we are dedicated to getting their message out. Here are a few tips on how to protect yourself and your family. Be wary of up-front fees. access benefits, get a good rate on a loan, and make a great investment. All you need to do is pay me an up-front fee. The Defense: The military offers legal assistance, interest free emergency loans, and financial planning tools. Ask your military installation offices for details. Always find out what the total price is. refrigerator, or anything else you want. Just give me a little bit of money every installment. The Defense: Salespeople can offer misleading information about how much something really costs once all the payments and fees are added up. business elsewhere. Dont trust promises about the future. The Sales Pitch: Just buy the car with you. The Defense: Make sure that every one agrees to the final terms of a deal before you hand over any money. Find out who you are dealing with. armed forces. Sign up with my program VP-26 establishes Hall of Heroes Scams alert: How service members can fight for financial security at home 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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SCAM ALERT to make sure that your family has everything they need while deployed overseas. The Defense: Ask your base community-service office about the company or individual. You can also contact the Better Business Bureau. And, if you have been the victim of a scam, we encourage you to come forward and complain. So often, financial fraud goes unreported because victims feel embarrassed or foolish. But only when you complain is it possible for you to get the help you need. And only when we know there is a problem can we and our law enforcement partners work to stop it. So, consult your military installation legal assistance office or your state attorney general and log your complaint at www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov or at www.consumerfinance.gov/complaint/ Navy to commemorate Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Jan. 21 join the nation in observing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Jan. 21. Navy commands are encouraged to reflect on the recurring theme, Remember! Celebrate! Act! A Day On, Not A Day Off! and increase their knowledge and awareness of Dr. Kings contributions to American history and civil rights by participating in military and community events. Dr. King was the chief spokesman for nonviolent activism during the civil rights movement, which successfully protested racial discrimination in federal and state law. Following in the footsteps of his father, King entered the Christian ministry in February 1948 at the age of 19. He was ordained at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta and in 1954, upon completion of gradu ate studies at Boston University, he accepted a call to serve at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Ala. While ministering there, King became an instru mental leader in the Montgomery Bus Boycott, made famous by the arrest of Rosa Parks. The boycott lasted over a year and led to the 1956 District Court ruling that racial segregation on buses was unconstitutional. Over the course of his lifetime, King was arrested 30 times for his participation in civil rights activi ties. Although King spent the majority of his life preaching on the issues of social justice, empower ment, love and peace which won him the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 his attention also included fighting economic injustice. On April 4, 1968, King jour neyed to Memphis, Tenn., to help lead sanitation workers in a protest against low wages and intolerable working conditions. While standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel, King was shot and ultimately died. Luther King Jr. Day was established by President Ronald Reagan in 1983. The first observance was held Jan. 15, 1986, the anniversary of Kings birthday. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday would be observed every year on the third Monday of January. On Aug. 23, 1994 Congress passed the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday and Service Act, designating the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday as a day of national volunteer service. All Navy commands are strongly encouraged to increase their knowledge and awareness of Kings contributions to American history and civil rights through participation in military and community events and volunteerism within their communities. More information on the Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service, including a search engine to find volunteer opportunities near you can be found online at http:// www.mlkday.gov/about/serveonkingday.php. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 The NAS Jax Fuel Division Operations Center, or Fuel Farm, supports all air operations at NAS Jax through its air craft fueling/de-fueling and cryogenic services. A consistent winner of the American Petroleum Institute award for being an excellent facility, the Fuel Farm contin ues to provide outstanding service and mission-essential support to all of the squadrons at NAS Jax. Comprised of a computer-operat ed pump house, three above-ground storage tanks with a total capacity of 1,800,000 gallons, three bay stations for offloading fuel from commercial trucks, a cryogenics facility house, as well as multiple flight line fueler/de-fueler trucks, the Fuel Farm is operational 24/7 and always ready to deal with even the busiest air operations periods. The highly trained and motivated staff consists of a blend of military personnel and Doss Aviation contractors, who are committed to teamwork and the success of the mission. We operate on a one team, one fight perspective, and the goals we strive to bring to the table are customer service, safety, and quality assurance, com mented Michael Darling, project man ager with Doss Aviation. We want nothing but the best quality fuel put into these aircraft, and want the squadrons to be confident that the product they receive is of the highest caliber. These three goals are what the Fuel Farm has excelled at. In fiscal year 2012, its average response time to aircraft fuel requests was 10 minutes, and it safely handled 66,528,924 gallons of JP-5 with zero mishaps. In addition, its quality assurance team tested 47,772 samples of JP-5, ensuring that the fuel was clean from sediment, water, and other impurities. Environmentally friendly practices are also a top priority of the Fuel Farm, with all used petroleum products being sold to a local recycling plant. Proceeds from these sales are donated to the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Program, with $36,147 being given last year. Over 405,480 pounds of petroleum products were sold to be recycled, also saving the government a waste disposal cost of $486,576. When we deal with 90,000 gallons of fuel requests per day, its essential that our team is meticulous and professional, as this is a hazardous product, Darling remarked. It means a lot to everyone here that we can support the squadrons and the missions they fly, and we will continue to do our absolute best to assure safety and quality to all of them. FUEL DIVISION MAINTAINS EXCELLENT MISSION SUPPORT

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 7 NAS JAX FUEL FARM PHOTOS BY LT. J.G. KEVIN WEN DT

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base budget, and more for the Army and the Marine Corps. Panetta summed up: Were looking at a 19 to 20 percent reduction in the base budget operating dollars for active units, including a cut of what looks like almost 30 percent for the Army. The secretary said practical results of these cuts would be less training for units not imminently deploying to Afghanistan; less shipboard train ing for all but the highest priority missions; less pilot training and fewer flight hours; curtailed ship maintenance and disruption to research and weapons modernization programs. Civilian employees would also take a hit, he said: unpaid layoffs, which the government calls furloughs, would put civilian employees temporarily out of work. This would further harm our readiness, and create hardship on them and their families, Panetta noted. A plan is in place to implement such layoffs if sequester happens, the secretary said. This action is strictly precauobligation to let Congress know that hope that we will not have to furlough anyone. But weve got to be prepared to do that if we face this situation. Panetta said the net result of seques ter under a continuing resolution would the defense budget, which is to hollow out the defense force of this nation. Rather than let that happen, Panetta added, DOD leaders have decided to take steps to minimize the damage that would follow Congressional inaction. We still have an obligation to protect this country, the secretary said. So services and the other components to immediately begin implementing pru dent measures that will help mitigate our budget risk. Panetta said he has directed any actions taken must be reversible to the extent feasible and must minimize harmful effects on readiness. But, he added, We really have no choice but to prepare for the worst. First steps to containing budget risk will include cutting back on facility main tenance, freezing civilian hiring and delaying some contract awards, the secretary said. Panetta has also directed the services to develop detailed plans for how they will implement sequester-triggered cuts, if required, he said, because there will be so little time to respond in the halfway through the fiscal year. The secretary said the intensive planning effort now under way will ensure the military is prepared to accomplish its core missions. no amount of planning that we do can fully offset the harm that would result from sequestration, if that happens, he added. Panetta said U.S. service members are working and fighting, and some are dying, every day. Those of us in Washington need to have the same courage as they do to do the right thing and try to protect the security of this country, he added. We must ensure we have the resources we need to defend the nation and meet our commitments to our troops, to our civilian employees, and to their fami lies, after more than a decade of war. Congress must pass a balanced deficit reduction plan, de-trigger sequester, and pass the appropriations bills for fiscal 2013, he said. to try to work with the Congress to resolve these issues, Panetta said. We have a vital mission to perform, one that the American people expect and that they are entitled to, which is to protect their safety and to protect our national security. Congress must be a partner Dempsey offered his view of what wreckage the fiscal storm would leave behind. self-inflicted wound on national secu sponsible way to manage our nations ness is whats now in jeopardy. Were on the brink of creating a hollow force, the very thing we said we must avoid. Dempsey noted sequestration may now hit while the department, under a continuing resolution, is also imple menting the deep cuts already made in the Budget Control Act and fighting a war in Afghanistan. Any one of these would be a seri ous challenge on its own, Dempsey said. Together, they set the conditions for readiness to pass a tipping point as early as March. DOD wont shortchange those in combat, and will resource those who are next to deploy while still caring for wounded warriors and their families, the chairman said. But for the rest of the force, opera tions, maintenance and training will be gutted, Dempsey said. Well ground aircraft, return ships to port, and sharply curtail training across the force. [W]e may be forced to furlough civilians at the expense of maintenance and even health care. Well be unable to reset the force following a decade of war. Military readiness will begin to erode immediately, Dempsey said, telling reporters, Within months, well be less prepared. Within a year, well be unprepared. The crisis can and must be avoided, the sooner, the better, the chairman said. We need budget certainty; we need time to absorb the budget reductions; we need the flexibility to manage those reductions across the entire budget, he said. We have none of these things right now. And without them, we have no choice but to steel ourselves for the consequences.more intense and more relevant as they get ready to become chief petty officers. CPO 365, a yearlong development and training for FCPOs, was first introduced in 2010 under former MCPON Rick the first of which begins in September each year. Under MCPON Stevens revised pro gram, detailed in his 2012-2013 CPO 365 Guidance, all FCPOs will participate through the duration of Phase One, whether they are board-eligible or not. CPO 365 depends a lot on a continuous process of learn ing and development. What we dont want to do is have a clean break from CPO 365 where the FCPOs who were not selected to chief, are no longer involved in the training. We want to maintain that momentum, and continue to train. We recognize that there will be some events where all FCPOs wont be able to participate in, but by and large, well keep them together and continue to do the training theyve been doing, because its vitally important that all of our petty officers continue to learn and develop. Phase Two of training begins when CPO selectees are announced and concludes with the pinning ceremony. Upon announcement, each command will hold a congratulatory meetand-greet for the selectees and their families, after which they will continue with training while maintaining good order and discipline. Phase Two will continue to contain many timehonored traditions, such as CPO Charge Books and a cap stone event focused on team work and resilience. We wanted to continue a program that set the condi tions for every FCPO to be a successful and effective chief, and remove any road blocks that would interfere with that opportunity for success. Well add in various things that would afford them a greater opportunity to be successful chief petty officers. One process that will no longer be a part of CPO 365 is the word induction. Effective immediately, were respectfully sundowning the word induction, and in its place well use CPO 365 as the believe that induction is more about a moment in time, and CPO 365 and the development of our FCPOs to become CPOs is about a continuous time. This is something were going to do every day, 365 days a year, and so we want to make sure the term we are using is matching what we are doing. MCPON added that the term CPO 365 was coined by CPOs in the fleet, due to their belief that developing leaders is a yearround process. This train ing is far more by the fleet, for the fleet than it is from folks in Washington, said Stevens. was working with then-MCPON Rick West to help develop the seas talking to a CPO Mess don, and on it was written 365. by that and what they shared with me was, We believe that developing FCPOs to become chiefs is a year-round process, so we use the term CPO 365. So, this is a title that was developed by the fleet and we just adopted it. Additionally, Stevens said that although the CPO 365 is primarily geared towards FCPO and CPOs, all Sailors will ben efit from the training. To develop great leaders we must have a training pro cess that is ongoing in a Sailors we do starts and stops with leadership, then every Sailor will benefit from a more effec tive leader. MCPON PANETTA 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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NAS Jacksonville Rescue Swimmer School back in businessRescue swimmer students returned to the NAS Jax Rescue Swimmer School (RSS) for the first time in months on Jan. 8, after debris from an old ceiling had fallen into the pool and caused a safety concern, shutting the building down for repairs. The rescue swimmer course is a rigorous four-week endeavor, subjecting students to all types of mental and physical stress in a water environment. The end goal is to create a group of rescue swimmers who are at home in a water envi ronment with calm, collected heads and good decision-making skills. According to AWR2 Lyle ODell, instructor with the NAS Jax RSS, We like to think of this course as: Would my mother or grandmother if she was drowning? We purposely subject these students to rigorous tests and harsh conditions, because in the real world, they could be the difference in life or death for an overboard Sailor. The students are selected by their respective ships to attend the course in either Jacksonville or San Diego, as all ships must have a minimum of two certified rescue swimmers before they can get underway. After arriving at either site, students attend both class room courses and exercises in the pool designed to strengthen their lifesav ing knowledge and swimming skills. Typical classroom training includes first aid and CPR, while pool training encompasses advanced swimming, use of all types of water gear, and rescuing a drowning victim with multiple injuries. The course progressively gets harder as the weeks go on, and the instructors never let up in trying to mold the stu dents into experts in the water. We stress a crawl, walk, run men tality. This course is extremely chal anyone drop on request, there can be no mistake that we need to weed out the students who just arent suited to do this job, commented ODell. We will do everything we can to push these students to their mental breaking points, and the ones who cope and keep their heads in the game are like the stress of basic training, but in a water environment, which is already uncomfortable for most. course described above, designated as tion search and rescue course, the latter designed to teach senior enlisted how to document training and evaluations of rescue swimmers in their helicopter squadron or wing. With the repairs to the RSS ceiling completed, the staff was enthusiastic about getting back to business. and running, and we will remain committed to providing the best training to these students that we possibly can, said NAS Jax RSS Officer in Charge Lt. Kevin Harrington. The lifesaving skill sets we teach these Sailors are invalu able to the fleet. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 9

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Air Ops Sailor returns home from IA tourABH1(AW/SW) Elmer Mojica of the NAS Jax Air Terminal was welcomed home by base leader ship and his co-workers Jan. 11 after serving a 10-month Afghanistan. Mojica worked as a career counselor to Sailors serving in a vari ety of capabilities throughout the chaplain and we traveled more than 20,000 miles to meet with bad things there from the living conditions to what our Sailors are doing there every day. Mojica also stressed some of the danger he faced. The second day on our base. And, one of the heli copters we were supposed to be in gerous place but you go through training to help you prepare, said Mojica. you need to be prepared for any thing once you get picked up for going to certain place and then with the Army, Air Force or NATO, he continued. But his greatest reward was comand to see everyone, he said. Mojica will continue to work at the air terminal until he transfers to USS Nimitz (CVN-68), home ported in Everett, Wash. in April. get there. Thats what being a Sailor is all about, he said. Getting fit rates high among resolutions people make at the start of the New Year, and Navys Physical Readiness Program has resources and information to help Sailors and families achieve their fitness goals, officials said Jan. 8. Whether you exercise and want to increase your current level of fitness or you are looking to start a routine to attain a healthy level of fitness we can help, said Bill Moore, director, Navy Physical Readiness Program. Focusing on the wellness of Sailors and their families by providing the skills and tools for fitness and nutrition is one of our primary objectives. While it is common for Sailors to skip or reduce workouts over the holidays according to Moore, Sailors should be able to resume their normal fitness routine if little time elapsed between workouts over the holidays. Most commands wrap up their fall physical fit ness assessments before Thanksgiving and there are gatherings and shopping that may eat into fitness time over the holidays, so it is natural for people to exercise less, said Moore. Missing four to five days of exercise over the holi days should have little impact on fitness routines. Sailors who missed more than six days between workouts may experience some muscle soreness when resuming their routine. For those who havent worked out since the last semiannual physical readiness test Moore recom mends starting off slowly and building up slowly. Start with a shorter duration for cardio-respiratory exercise and less weight for strength training. Build up from there, said Moore. Sailors can start with 20 minutes of some sort of exercise two or three days per week, slowly increasing time by five minutes per week until they reach their desired level of activity. a routine, then you should consult your physician before performing exercise, he added. Once you establish fitness routine Moore rec ommends making it part of a weekly schedule. Consistency is the key, he said, adding that whether serving on shore duty, on board ship or submarine, or in the dirt and sand, the Navy provides its Sailors resources and equipment to remain fit to fight. Navy guidance recommends Sailors complete at least 150 minutes of moderate physical activity each week and perform strength-training exercises at least twice a week to work all major muscle groups. Examples of moderate-intensity cardio-respiratory activities include brisk walking (3 mph or faster), bicycling (slower than 10 mph) and water aerobics. High-intensity activities include jogging or running, lap swimming, jumping rope and circuit training. Strength training includes pushups, lifting weights, and working with resistance bands. that work all the different parts of the body (legs, hips, back, chest, abs, shoulders and arms) repeated for 10-12 reps each can improve fitness, decrease muscle loss and help maintain a healthy weight. The Navy Physical Readiness Program website at http://www.public.navy.mil/bupers-npc/support/ physical/Pages/default2.aspx has links to sample warm-ups and workouts users may choose. One sample workout specifically addresses techniques to improve performance on the Navys physical readi ness test. Sailors and families will also find links to nutrition information that when followed compliment a good fitness routine. No matter what your fitness goals are, good nutrition can help improve your exercise performance, decrease your recovery time from strenuous exercise, prevent injuries due to fatigue, and provide the fuel required during times of high-intensity training and weight control, said Lt. Cmdr Jennifer Wallinger, registered dietitian, Navy Physical Readiness Program. The site also contains a Navy registered dietitian locator so Sailors and family members may meet faceto-face with an expert and learn more about incor porating proper nutrition to maximize the benefits of their fitness routine. Whether it is maintaining or seeking to attain a healthy level of fitness the Navy provides Sailors and family members the tools to reach their goals, according to Moore. Retiree seminar coming Feb. 2 A retired military seminar will be held at the NAS Jax Officers Club Feb. 2 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. to provide military retirees and their spouses information on a variety of topics. The following topics will be discussed: Healthcare, veterans benefits, long term care, Survivor Benefit Plan, pay matters, assisted liv ing, Delta Dental and other retiree issues. Military retirees from all branches of service and their spouses and those planning to retire in 2013 are invited to attend. For more infor mation, call 542-5790 or email JAXS_NAS_RAO@ navy.mil Navy experts weigh-in on staying and getting fitPlace your marquee message The new NAS Jacksonville marquee message board on Yorktown Avenue is available for official messages. The fol lowing are the guidelines for submitting a message to be displayed on the marquee: All requests must be on an official NAS Jax Marquee Request Form. Submit the request at least two days in advance to the Public Affairs Office, prior to the posting date no exceptions! be edited. Please follow the guidelines on the form. Do not add spaces or break words. Each space represents one letter or character and you must put a space between words. Completed request forms may be faxed to 542-1534 or dropped off at Building 1, Room 203 Monday through Friday 8 nasjaxpao@navy.mil. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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Although the state of Washington has recently updated the law on the use of marijuana, essentially decriminalizing use for civilians, zero tolerance drug policy regulations remain unaffected for Sailors. The Zero Tolerance Drug Policy was implemented after a fatal crash of an EA-6B Prowler on board USS Nimitz in 1981, killing 14 crewmembers and injur ing 45 others. Autopsies were performed and several members of the flight deck crew tested positive for marijuana. Following this discovery, then-President Ronald Reagan instituted a Zero Tolerance Drug Policy for all U.S. Armed Forces. As a result regular, random urinalysis drug checks are conducted on all mili tary personnel. Marijuana can stay in the system for up to 30 days depending on the persons metabolism, dosage and method of con sumption, said HM3 David Johnson. Because its lipid-based, it can stay in the fat cells for a long period of time, whereas water-based substances would flow through very quickly. Marijuana, or cannabis, induces mul tiple psychological affects to the users mental state. Being under the influence of marijuana can result in slow reaction speed and poor judgment, and can negatively affect operational success, said LN1 Michael Lightsey. could get hurt. You dont want anyone to be high while operating a jet. sale, transfer of controlled substances, or any attempt to commit drug offens es results in maximum punishment under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, which includes forfeiture of a half months pay for two months, reduc tion in rank, courts martial, three days confinement on bread and water (for E-3 and below Sailors), 45 days of extra duty and 45 days on restriction or 60 days of restriction and discharge from military service. Aside from the typical punishment that follows drug use, there are collateral consequences to getting kicked out of the military, said Lt. Cmdr. Ryan Anderson, Nimitz command judge advocate. Aside from increasing the difficulty of with marijuana because its not worth it. Before you eat that pot brownie, ask yourself if its worth losing $90,000. For more information about the misuse of controlled substances and its conse quences, reference Milpersman 1910-146. Can you imagine life without the essential to almost every aspect of our life. We use email to communi cate at work. We attend virtual meet ings and trainings. We keep in touch with loved ones across the world. answer to any question in the blink of an eye and download that song we just cant get out of our head. The cyber dream can also quickly turn into a nightmare that could cost thousands of dollars. Recently, there have been increasing numbers of individu als who have been notified by their tified as a copyright infringer. The let that some entity has filed a lawsuit alleging a copyright infringement has been committed (usually an improper file upload/ download). they release the personal identifying Address. For some, this is the first time they realize that they may have down loaded something illegally. For oth has been compromised and that they should have secured their wire less router or uninstalled a file-shar wrong and the customer associated even downloaded any copyrighted material. Whether you downloaded some thing without thinking, used a file sharing software (e.g. bit torrent, pirate bay, gnutella), or think your neighbor may have been mooching off of your router, you could be held liable for copyright infringement and ordered to pay anywhere between $200 and $150,000 in damages, in addition to attorney fees and court costs! Even if you (or your mooching neighbor) never actually downloaded the copyrighted material, release of your information to threats to settle the case, still potentially costing thousands of dollars. pany usually informs you that your name, address, and other information be released if you do not take action of these letters, it is essential that you see an attorney as soon as possible, as they can help drop your name as a defendant in a lawsuit, get the case dismissed or help prove that you should not be held liable. Think before you download. Just as you would not steal a CD from a music store, you shouldnt download some thing without permission. File sharing programs may seem like a great way to build your music collection or catch up on that episode you missed, but much of this free entertainment is copy righted, meaning that the download can end up costing you thousands of dollars in a lawsuit. No act online is private, every visit secure, not only can your neighbors could download something illegally. one who illegally downloaded the file, then you may still be on the hook. and think before you click, you can live the cyber dream without exposing yourself to a cyber nightmare. If you have any other questions, please contact your local legal assistance office. This article is not intended to substi tute for the personal advice of a licensed attorney. Sailors cautioned after legalization of marijuana healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchofdimes.com/vfwA free wellness program that supports military moms before, during and after pregnancy. Created by the March of Dimes, with the VFW and the Ladies Auxiliary VFW. Think before you clickBeware what you (or your neighbors) download JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 11

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Just five months after Navy officials broke ground at NAS Jacksonville on Sept. 7, 2012, the first walls went up for a new training facility that will house both the MQ-4C Triton Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) unmanned aircraft operator training program, and the P-8A Poseidon maintenance program. Jacksonville was awarded a $15,057,000 fixed-price contract for the project that is scheduled for completion by Dec. 2013. Muhammad Raoof, assistant project manager for Elkins, said, What were doing here is casting concrete in wood five inches of an outer face panel, three inches of insulation and 12 inches of the inner face. Called a tilt-up job, a wall panel may weigh up to 170,000 pounds (85 tons). The tilt-up erection process is engi neered for quick assembly through predrilled panel footing connections. Each wall panel has been cast in place adjacent its footer, said Steven Wetherell, Elkins director of government and defense services. Due to its predrilled panel footing connections, the tilt-up erection process goes together faster than most people expect. When the walls are up and secured, iron workers will begin installing structural steel to support the walls and roof, said Wetherell. The two construction projects are located on a common site to the west of Yorktown Avenue. Parking and storm water management areas will be located to the south of the site and adjacent to the Fleet and Family Support Center. The P-8A Maintenance Training Facility project will provide 58,262-sq.ft. of operational and maintenance training support. The two-story, concrete and steel facility will support the fol lowing training devices: opera tional load trainer; integrated avi onics trainer; maintenance train ing for fuel system, flight control/ hydraulics, landing gear, engine, and environmental control systems. The MQ-4C Triton BAMS UAS project consists of an 8,938-sq.-ft., single-story training facility to teach operators of the new unmanned platform. The facility will include classrooms, mission control rooms and briefing rooms, along with support spaces for administrators and instructors. Triton will expand the Navys mari time patrol and reconnaissance force mission to provide unmanned aircraft systems with persistent maritime intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance data collection and dissemination capability to the Fleet. Three men and a crane erect 85-ton wall JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Hold em Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way NFL Playoffs will be playing at Deweys Enjoy $.50 wings during the gamesFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental includedFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238 Gym is temporarily relocated to The Zone (Bldg. 798) Jan. 14 June 30.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Wild Florida Airboats & Wild Animal Park Kenansville, Fla. $17 $46.50 Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus Jan. 1821, $13 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Preferred seating $41, lower-level seating $22 Live Broadway Series Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Dream Girls May 21 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park is valid for up to 14 days from first use. 31 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about special discounted tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park Gold pass $71 Daytona 500 Feb. 24 $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50 The Vault Liberty Recreation Center Trips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Paintball Trip Jan. 19 at 9 a.m. St. Augustine Ghost Tour Jan. 26, 6 p.m. Super Bowl Party Feb. 3, 5 p.m. at Deweys $5 per person, advance purchase onlyNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Jan. 22 for active duty Jan. 24 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Daily Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for $16 after 12:30 p.m. Monday & Tuesday Play 18 holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 Auto Skills 101 Class Jan. 17, 57 p.m. Learn general auto maintenance.Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Movie Under the Stars Jan. 18, 6 p.m. at Patriots Grove Featuring Finding NemoFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School March 18 April 24 $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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Navy Medicine recently announced the launch of a new informational video and post er regarding the health risks and dangers of the synthetic amphetamine known as bath salts as well as other designer drugs. The public service announcement video and post er will be distributed for dis play throughout the fleet and are available for download at http://www.med.navy.mil/ Pages/Syntheticdrugs.aspx. The campaign focuses on the dangers of bath salts and is part of the long-term aware ness and deterrence campaign Navy Medicine launched last year on synthetic and designer drugs. This effort is also part of an overall Navy communications plan with partners at the Naval Personnel Command and the Service and other commands. The campaigns goal is to decrease the number of active duty service members who use designer drugs like bath salts and the synthetic marijuana Spice because they are falsely marketed as a legal way to get high. According to Navy Medicine psychiatry resident Lt. George Loeffler at the Naval Medical Center San Diego,, the adverse health effects from bath salt use can range from lack of appetite to kidney failure, muscle spasms, severe paranoid delusions, and psychosis. Several cases of long-term inpatient hospitalization and suicide have been reported and Loeffler has firsthand experi ence treating service members at Navy military treatment facilities with these symptoms. naval officer, but as your doc tor, bath salts will not only jack up your family and your career, it will jack up your mind and body, too, said Loeffler in the PSA now available online. The Bath Salts campaigns its a nightmare, reflects the hallucinogenic effect of bath salts, which are a non-regulated designer drug comprised of a synthetic cathinone, or amphetamine, that can have a dangerous or debilitating effect on the user. As the leader of the medical community for the Navy and size enough to our Sailors and Marines that using synthetic drugs really is just like play ing Russian roulette with their health not to mention their career, said U.S. Navy Surgeon General Vice Adm. Matthew Nathan in an editorial written for the Union Tribune in San Diego. The bath salts campaign further supports the Navy Surgeon Generals mission for all commanding officers and others in positions of leader ship to be fully engaged in their commands implementation plan to continually commu nicate and educate all hands as to the Navys zero-tolerance policy on designer drug use. The U.S. military repre sents a microcosm of our much larger general population and in many ways strives to be a reflection of the society we serve, so we share many of the same health and safety issues, including the increased use of these dangerous and debilitat ing drugs that not only affect our service members health, but also our readiness as a military force, said Nathan. For nearly two years now, Navy leaders have taken a multi-tiered approach to com bating this escalating issue in our forces, and with our part ners in the Naval Criminal Personnel Command and throughout our naval enter prise, we have made progress in deterring and detecting use. Nathan affirmed that the Navy will continue to highlight the issue of synthetic drug use by delivering sustained and targeted messages throughout the Navy and Marine Corps. We cannot over-communi cate this issue, said Nathan. Accountability for those who abuse these substances will help deter their use. Navy Medicine is a global health care network of more than 63,000 Navy medical per sonnel around the world who provide high quality health care to more than one million eligible beneficiaries. Navy Medicine person nel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the battlefield. The Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD) has released the 2013 edition of the Naval Leader Planning Guide (NLPG) and the Naval Leader Weekly Planner (NLWP), CPPD leadership said Jan. 3. Both versions of the planner are available online, and commands can download the PDF version free-of-charge from Navy Knowledge Online. Users can also download a file that can be imported into Microsoft Outlook that will populate personal calendars with the dates found in the product. Commands are authorized to use the downloaded source files to arrange for printing at local facilities to satisfy unitlevel requests for the resource. We did a hard scrub of this years Naval Leader Planning Guide and the Naval Leader Weekly Planner to ensure we had the best possible product, said CPPD commanding officer Capt. John Newcomer. We see delivering this product as part of our commitment to provide the fleet with the tools to lead with cour age, respect and trust and to men tor future leaders to do the same. The Naval Leader Planning Guide and the Weekly Planner are full of information to help leaders do just that. The NLPG brings together a large amount of information in a compact, portable format. This years edition includes a 15-month calendar (January 2013 to March 2014), a complete list of CPPD courses and services, con tact information for all CPPD learning sites and Navy College Offices around the world, the Principles of Naval Leadership, and Navy and Marine Corps Selection Board and Fitness Report/Evaluation schedules. munity managers and technical advi sors at Navy Personnel Command. The weekly version of this product contains a 13-month calendar, but all other sections contained in it are the same resources as the monthly guide, including the personal and professional development sections and the career man agement points of contact. The 2013 product includes the lat est Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Professional Reading Program list. The Marine Corps Professional Reading Program list was also updated. We strive to provide the most upto-date information possible to ensure the fleet has the information needed to meet mission, said Newcomer. Of course theres always an oppor tunity to improve, and we greatly value feedback from everyone on the Navy Navy Medicine rolls out new campaign to deter Bath Salts drug use Naval Leader Planning Guide and Weekly Planner now available JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 15

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and Marine Corps team on how we can make it even better so please send us your suggestions. To download the 2013 NLPG, log on to www.nko.navy.mil and select the Leadership tab. The guide can be downloaded as either a PDF file for printing or as an Excel file, which can be imported into Microsoft Outlook. CPPD is responsible for providing a wide range of personal and professional development courses and materials, including General Military Training, Navy instructor training, alcohol and drug awareness program training, sui cide and sexual assault prevention, bystander intervention, and personal responsibility classes. CPPDs required leadership training is delivered multiple times throughout a Sailors career via command-deliv ered enlisted leadership training material and officer leadership courses in a schoolhouse setting. CPPD also administers the Navys voluntary education program, which provides Sailors with the opportunity to earn college degrees. CPPD additionally manages the United Services Military Apprenticeship Program, which offers Sailors the opportunity to earn civilian apprenticeship certifications. CPPD 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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Did you know that Comcomputers and monitors con sume 1,100,000 kilowatt hours (kWh) annually over weekends, leave, temporary duty (TDY) and other absences when computers are in sleep mode. Another 650,000 kWh are con sumed after hours during a workweek. The total potential energy assets is 1,750,000 kWh across $251,000 per year. ees, using the following simple guidelines, will contribute to goals: after saving data and closing all programs, use Start-Shut Down and select Shut Down option. Using the other options (Log off, Restart, Standby) will leave your computer drawing power over night. the week, especially before long absences like vacation or TDY, shut down as normal, and then turn off power at the power strip. This is required for computers switch will deny power to the that would otherwise wake the computer while users are away on extended absences. printers, scanners, etc.) should be turned off during off-duty and weekend hours to fur ther increase energy savings on equipment not actively in use. should also be shut down at night and on weekends provided shutting down the computer does not directly impact watch standers. ware update requests upon next log on if the computer does not have the 0400 wake feature. Following the above steps, a user with only a computer and monitor will individually save approximately 52 kWh per com puter. The 2012 Florida Youth Substance Abuse Survey shows declines in substance abuse among Duval County students. Statewide, 70,859 middle and high school students partici pated in the survey and 2,221 Duval County students were surveyed. Alcohol and marijuana remain the most used sub stances for both middle and high school youth in Duval of students reported lifetime use of alcohol and 25.6 percent reported lifetime use of mari juana. Those numbers declined in 2012 to 45.6 percent and 23 percent respectively. Current marijuana use by Duval County students has also declined from 14 percent in 2010 to 11.5 percent in 2012. This puts Duval County below the state wide average (12.4 percent). The survey also shows sig nificant declines in prescrip tion drug use. The current nonmedical use of prescription pain relievers for Duval County students declined from 7.3 percent in 2010 to 6.7 percent in 2012. Of students surveyed state wide, 68.6 percent perceived a great risk of harm associated with the use of prescription drugs without a doctors order. We are very encouraged by these statistics as evidence that the positive efforts in our local communities are making a healthy impact on students in Duval County, said Susan Pitman, executive director of Safe & Health Duval Coalition. We are enthusiastic as we move into 2013 and remain committed to continuously improving resources, policies and prevention programs for students and their families in Duval County. The Florida Youth Substance Abuse Survey is a collabora tive effort between the Florida Departments of Health, Education, Children and Families, Juvenile Justice, and the Governors Office of the Communities That Care survey, assessing risk and protective factors for substance abuse, in addition to substance abuse prevalence. Safe & Healthy Duval Coalition consists of mem bers of the community com ing together to address alcohol, prescription drug use, mari juana and other illicit drug use in Duval County among young adults and middle and high school students, by systemi cally changing the culture and promoting the use of evidencebased environmental preven tion strategies. For more information, visit http://www.shdcfl.org. Free SAT/ACT test preparation programs from eKnowledge are being offered to military families to prepare students for the 2013 SAT/ACT exams. The programs include 11 hours of video instruction, practice tests, sample questions and supplemental test prep material. Testing dates for the 2013 SAT exams are Jan. 26, March 9, May 4 and June 1. Testing dates for the 2013 ACT exams are Feb. 9, April 13, June 8 and Sept. 21. For more information, call (951) 256-4076 or e-mail loricaputo@eknowledge.com.Florida youth substance abuse surveyReveals Duval County trends in alcohol, tobacco and other drug use Free SAT/ACT test preparation programs for military families JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 17

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The Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) is a federal law that protects the job rights service members who have voluntarily or involuntarily left their civilian jobs to serve in the mili tary. USERRA protections are easiest to understand when broken into three categories: reemployment rights, the right to be free from discrimination, and health insurance protection. Reemployment rights Under USERRA, servicemembers have the right to be reemployed in their civilian job if they leave that job to perform military service, so long as: The employer receives advance notice of the service members service; The total length of all absences from civilian employment by reason of ser vice in the military does not exceed five years; The service member returns to work or applies for reemployment in a timely manner after their military service has ended; and The service member has not been separated from service with a disqualifying discharge or under other than honor able conditions. met, employers must restore service members to the position (both job position and benefits) that they would have been in if they had not left their civilian job to perform their military service. Right to be free from discrimination and retaliation Under USERRA, those who have served or will serve in the military cannot be denied certain rights by their civilian employer. These rights include initial employment, reemployment, retention in employment, promotion, or any benefit of employment by an employer on the basis of the employees military service or the employees application to serve in the military. Health insurance protection Under USERRA, servicemembers and their dependants can continue their employer-based health plan coverage while serving in the military. The maxi mum period of coverage is the lesser of: 24 months from the date on which the service members absence begins; or The day after the date on which the service member fails to apply for or return to a position of employment. violated or if you have any other ques tions, please contact your local legal assistance office. This article is not intended to substitute for the personal advice of a licensed attorney. list of New Years resolutions Sailors should create a plan, write down goals and review saving and spending strategies, said a Navy financial specialist Jan. 3. State your financial resolutions simply and clearly for the new year, said Stacy Livingstone-Hoyte, finan cial counselor, Fleet and Family set too many or unrealistic financial goals, they may not be able to accomplish any of them. To stay account able, maintain a checklist, track how you are doing throughout the year and make modifications as needed. Livingstone-Hoyte also suggests Sailors meet with their local com mand financial specialist (CFS) or other financial counseling resource to review the plans they have set in place to achieve their goals. A CFS provides financial education and training, counseling, and information refer ral at the command level at no cost to Sailors and their families. After Sailors create their financial plan, Livingstone-Hoyte encourages them to make S.M.A.R.T. goals; this money management acronym refers to making Specific, Measureable, ActionOriented, Realistic and Timely finan cial goals. And dont forget to write them down. A crucial part of any money manage ment plan is to establish or review financial goals, evaluate accomplish ments, anticipate, and make and implement changes where necessary. With a proposed 1.7 percent pay increase in 2013, Sailors should con sider viewing this as found or new money, said Livingstone-Hoyte. New money can be saved, spent, invested or a combination of each. The idea being that what isnt seen cannot be spent. Sailors are also encouraged to review their credit reports. Activeduty service members and spouses report from their base financial counselor. Paying off debt is one of the top financial resolutions for many and there are several methods for Sailors to consider when doing this, said Livingstone-Hoyte. One strategy is to tackle the debt that has the highest interest rate first. Mathematically, this is usually the most advantageous way to pay off debt. Once that is paid off, move on to the next highest interest rate debt. This way, an individual is making more progress by reducing how much of their money goes to paying interest each month. Smallest balance and shortest term are a few other debt-elimination choices. For some people, paying off the smallest balance can provide a strong sense of accomplishment and Your rights under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights ActMaking financial goals for a new year 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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As tax season nears, Military OneSource and H&R Block have again joined forces to provide a free online tax preparation service for service mem bers. Tony Jackson, a program analyst for the Military OneSource program office, detailed the services available for troops and their families. Military OneSource is a gateway to a free tax prepara tion service, partnered with H&R Block, he said. We also have tax consul tants who can provide assis tance, whether its seeking and filling out tax forms or any other tax-related information. Jackson emphasized it is a safe and secure way for service members to prepare their taxes online. Military OneSource and H&R block definitely meet industry standards for security for websites, he said. Also, encryption software is used and theres also no sell ing of information, so service members and family members can be assured that their information is secure, and it stays within Military OneSource and H&R Block. Jackson noted that two ser vices basic and premium are provided through H&R Block, with one notable difference. The basic service is free, he said, and the premium service would apply to taxpayers who must file Schedule C returns, generally to report gains or losses from business owner ship. When you start getting into premium, youre going to incur some additional costs, where basic is free, Jackson said. For those not sure which service they should use, Jackson encouraged them to use the Military OneSource website as a guide. The site lists answers to frequently asked questions. You can always contact Military OneSource at 1-800342-9647, Jackson said. Were open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, so any questions you have, you can use the website or the call center at the [toll-free] number. Jackson said both methods are effective in contacting Military OneSource tax consultants offering useful services for troops and their families. Not only do they provide forms and basic information relative to military-specific tax issues and questions, they are a gateway to get you to H&R Block, he said. rants, theyll get you to a volunteer income tax assistance clinic on your local military instalone-stop shopping. These tax consultants can not prepare tax forms or direct people to do anything, Jackson said. Everything is on a recommended basis. All members of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps are eligible to use the service, he said, including members of the National Guard and Reserve compo nents, regardless of activation status. Coast Guard reservists acti vated under Title 10 authority to serve with the Navy also are eligible and so are spouses and other family members enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System. Family members that have been designated to pro vide support to deployed ser vice members, medically discharged retirees and dis charged service members within 180 days of their dis charge date are eligible for Military OneSource services, Jackson added. The key to these services is financial readiness, which is a Defense Department priority. We understand that financial readiness is a readiness issue. whos concerned about their financial situation then that detracts from the mission. Jackson also provided his personal testament to using the free tax preparation program, having served on active duty in the Marine Corps as a per sonnel officer for more than 20 years. He said his family still uses the service. My daughter is a military spouse and she con tinues to use it as well, he said. This programs ultimate goal is to ensure service mem bers and their families know that Military OneSource is an option. We hope its the first option for getting your taxes pre pared or answering any ques tions or issues you have with taxes, said Jackson. Just know that Military OneSource is there to help you. Since 1998, the Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) has surveyed its customers to find out how its NEXs are doing in a number of differ ent areas including customer service, pricing, problem resolution, customer experience and more. The Customer for 2012 show a two point increase to 85, based on a 100 point scale. This puts NEXs at the satisfaction level as some of Americas most customer focused retailers, such as Nordstrom and Kohls. The most recent industry average for Over the past 14 years that weve of the fact that our results have steadily increased, said Robert Bianchi, chief executive officer, NEXCOM. We take the results of this survey very seriously. This is where we hear directly from our customers about the good things were doing, but also about the areas where we can improve. attention on sales flyers, pricing and merchandise selection. For sales fly ers, the survey asked about satisfaction with prices advertised in the sales flyer, the availability of merchandise and if the merchandise fit the customers if merchandise reflected value for the money, whether the NEX had merchandise to fit most budgets and if the NEX adjusted prices based on its competi tion. Finally, in merchandise selection, the customers were asked how they felt about the merchandise selection, whether the merchandise was what the customer wanted, and whether it was in stock. The survey showed that sales flyers and pricing increased one point each to 84 while merchandise rose two points to 82. Satisfaction with each of these three high priority areas is now at a record high. Other areas where NEXs received high scores were associates (92), which rated associates on courte sy, knowledge and availability; returns (90), which rated the NEX on the flexibility of its return policy, ease of making a return and the time it took to return merchandise at the store; and checkout (88), which rated cashier courtesy, how long it took to checkout and whether new lanes were open when more than Military OneSource provides tax assistance serviceResults of NEX 2012 customer survey shows a job well done! JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 19

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The Navy Wives Clubs of America approves 30 scholarships annually in amounts from $1,000 to $1,500. Those eligible for these scholarships include naturally born, legally adopted or stepchildren of an enlisted or retired member of the Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard or the son/daughter of a deceased member of the Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard. The applicant must have a valid Privilege Card). The applicant must show basis of need for financial assistance, have a scholastic standing of a least a 2.5 grade point average and be a graduate of an accredited high school or equivalent or will qualify for graduation prior to beginning eligibility for assistance. The applicant should be physical ly capable of completing the courses undertaken and be of good character. Scholarships cover tuition, room and board, fees and books. The deadline for applications is May 30. Please send a self-addressed stamp envelope when requesting an applica tion. Scholarship applications can be obtained from: Scholarship Director Linda Hedden, 1300 Hampton Drive, Summerville, SC 29483 Applications may also be download ed by going to: www.navywivesclubso famerica.org. Jax Air News welcomes articles and photographs pertaining to base employees, family members, com mands and community events. The newspaper is published every Thursday. The deadline for submissions is the previous Friday at 4 p.m. The following are some tips on writing articles and taking photographs for the paper: No call signs. ple have no idea what they all stand for. your readers are on a sixth grade reading level. How about some feature stories about the people in your command? Everyone has a unique story to tell. Do a story on someones hobby, if they volunteer out in town, something interesting that happened to them, etc. We are a weekly newspaper. We dont want something that happened a month or two ago. Send us a story right after it happens. Email ensures faster submissions. Do not embed photos into Word docu ments. Send photos, with captions, as a separate jpg file. remember we will chop them as need ed. We normally start chopping at the bottom so make sure you put your more important information up front. Photographs: eras to highest quality settings). extra cards, so you dont have to jeopardize quality for number of photos. 2mb will not reproduce well in print for newspaper purposes. faces. your angle as best you can. indoor shooting, and lowlight settings can vastly improve indoor shots. that can wash out your photos, either by flash bounce back or direct sunlight coming in. shots do not always reproduce well and may not be used when submitted. Articles and photos can be submitted via e-mail to Jaxairnews@comcast.net For more information, call 542-3531. Guidelines for submitting articles, photos to Jax Air NewsNavy Wives Clubs offer scholarships 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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the motivation to keep moving forward. Using a simple debt repayment calculator can help a person make this decision. Set a goal, make a plan and save automatically this is the theme of the 2013 Military Saves campaign, said Livingstone-Hoyte. The focus here is to master the funda mentals of money management by implementing good habits and sticking to your plans. Service members can visit www.MilitarySaves.org to take the Savers Pledge, read success stories of other mili tary families and sign-up to receive objective year-round advice about personal finances. Financial matters that occur from overspending or bad budgeting, such as failure to pay bills, bad credit, bankruptcy and foreclosures can negatively impact a Sailors career. Financial management is a key quality of life issue that affects every Sailor, their family members and the command, said Livingstone-Hoyte. Bad financial decisions can drastically affect the morale, readiness and retention of Sailors. Sailors experiencing finan cial challenges should notify their chain of command and work with their CFS to develop a budget and explore additional options such as military relief societies, eligibility for interest rate reductions and other strategies. For more information on financial planning, budget ing or investing, contact CFS, the local FFSC or call the Navy Personnel Command customer service center at 1-866-U-ASKNPC or email CSCMailbox@ navy.mil. FINANCESNEXs will again focus attention on sales flyers, merchandise and pricing as these have the highest impact on overall cus tomer satisfaction. stores scored above 80 com pared to 84 percent last year and 77 percent in 2010. For the third year in a row, there were no NEXs with scores below 70. These scores show us that we have consistently strong performance in all of our stores around the world, said Bianchi. Each NEX reports to a dis trict which is overseen by a NEXCOM District Vice President. Scores for each NEX within a district were aver aged out to calculate each dis tricts score. Districts in the continental United States rose one point to 85 while over seas districts rose two points scores for 2012 were as fol lows: Hawaii up one point to 87; Mid-South remained the same at 86; Tidewater and Western rose one point each to 86; Southeast rose two points to 85; Japan rose four points to 85; Northwest rose one point to 84; Northern rose two points to 84; Europe rose one point to 81 and Guam decreased one point to 84. While we do survey our customers once per year to attain tinually ask for their feedback through surveys on our web store, www.MyNavyExchange. com, said Bianchi. NEX Multi-Event Control Line Model Airplane Competition will be held Jan. 18-20 at Outlying Landing Field Whitehouse. The field opens at 7 a.m. each day and will feature precision stunt and combat competitions. The schedule is as follows: Friday Practice day, afternoon combat rounds Saturday Basic stunt, profile stunt, old-time stunt, classic stunt, N-30 stunt, 75 mph combat and racing. Sunday Beginner stunt, intermediate stunt, advanced stunt, expert stunt, fly-off for the perpetual trophy, vintage combat and racing. The event is sponsored by the X47 Flyers, Academy of Model Aeronautics, Florida Racing & Sport Flyers, Jax area Soaring Society, Jax Jets Club and the Boy Scouts of America. Catering will be available onsite. No weapons, alcohol or open flames are allowed. For more information, call Lynn Weedman at (904) 669-3242 or e-mail x47weed@aol.com. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government official ly endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Model Airplane Contest coming Jan. 18-20 visit friends and family who we only see occasionally and are often surprised at their condition. For the family of a struggling veteran, this can be especially difficult if that veteran doesnt want to seek treatment. Fortunately, there is a program specifically for those trying to help a veteran who wont seek treatment. The program will coach you through working with your vet. Family members are key resources for service mem bers and veterans. They know when something is wrong and can encourage each other to seek help. Unfortunately, sometimes misunderstandings, dis agreements and conflicts get in the way of helping. Here are some suggestions for working with your service member or veteran when you think he or she is troubled and experiencing depression, posttraumatic stress disor der (PTSD) or another mental health concern. You can help by being informed about some of the following topics: PTSD, fam ily reintegration, combat stresses, depression, alcohol and drug use. Often the best thing for families is to talk openly about their thoughts, feel ings and behaviors. This includes concerns you have about how the veteran is feeling or reacting to situa tions. However, its easy for your worries to come across as criticisms this hap pens when we use the word you, as in, You need to do something about your support or concern. Try say going well right now, but member or veterans choices Mental health care is helpful only if your service member or veteran makes the decision to seek it by him or herself. Someone can accept making changes only when he or she truly feels there is a choice. Demanding someone seek help can backfire, making him or her less likely to go for help. Avoid making threats. Try not to say, You need to go for help, or else. Talk about choices. You can say, you go to see somebody, but to help, let me know. Only the individual can make the choice and commitment to improve their lives, but your support can make this more likely. Get help from others about talking with your loved one talking to your service member about mental health concerns or just want to know about the right treat ment resources, Military OneSource at 800-342-9647 can be a good start. For those family members concerned about a military veteran, you can contact 823-7458. This program, provided by Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), helps family members assist their veteran inaccessing health and mental health care. The telephone responders understand the enrollment procedures, what docu ments your veteran needs and what to do with them, as well as other VA resourc youre worried about your veteran and dont seem to be able to find the right words to tell them, a coach can help you come up with the best approach. Take care of yourself Taking care of yourself is helpful in several ways: you have the most to give when youre doing well, you make better decisions, and you provide a good exam ple to your veteran in mak ing good health decisions. Taking care of yourself can include getting enough sleep, eating well, getting help from friends, familyor your church, or getting professional help from someone such as a counselor or therapist. For more support resources, visit the http:// www.dcoe.health.mil/ PsychologicalHealth/ Products.aspx resources sec tion of the DCoE Web site, and select the topic youre interested in learning more. And, remember the DCoE Outreach Center is available 24/7 at 866-966-1020 and resources@dcoeoutreach.org to provide information and resources on psychological health and traumatic brain injury issues.Tips for encouraging your loved one to access mental health services Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preven tive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregis modations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: To register for any of the above workshops please contact 542-5745.FFSC offers life skills workshops JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 17, 2013 21