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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 01-10-2013
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02024

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 2013 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Vice Adm. William French, com mander, Navy Installations Command, announced Dec. 13 that NAS Jacksonville was the winner of the 2013 Commander, Navy Installations Command Installation Excellence Award (CINC IEA) (large category) worldwide for their outstanding efforts in shore installation management. CNIC is comprised of 11 regions and 72 bases worldwide. The competition was intense, but NAS Jacksonville dis played a well-defined understanding of CNIC and Office of the Secretary of Defense strategic goals and fiscal aus terity in execution of its mission. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders immediately congratulated base personnel. It gives me great pleasure to announce that you have once again won the Installation Excellence Award as the best large installation in the United States Navy! I could not be more proud of each and every one of you and your accomplish ments over the past year. Again, con gratulations. We are very fortunate to be part of this amazing organization. This award reflects the hard work by all who helped NAS Jax deliver the most effective and efficient readiness from the shore. The stations synergistic One Team, One Fight relationship with all ten ant commands targeted the best use of available resources to ensure all accom plished their assigned missions while at the same time focusing on energy innovation and management actions that increase productivity. Throughout the year, NAS Jax was the premier installation for delivering effective, sustained and improved shore readiness to its 14 home-based squad rons, Sailors and civilian personnel, as well as supporting numerous joint com mands, government agencies, and car rier readiness sustainment exercises along with visiting allied forces. Its personnel approached every chal lenge with a leading-edge mentality and continued their unprecedented, acci dent-free growth by exceeding the Chief of Naval Personnel mandated 75 per cent mishap reduction goal. Upon learning that NAS Jacksonville had again won the Navys Installation Excellence Award for the second con secutive year, Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. said that the men and women During a standard six-month deployment, Navy crews cele brate the halfway mark at three months. However, for HSL-42 Detachment 8, four-and-a-half months mark the midway point of its longer-than-usual deployment. On June 20 of last year, Det. 8 (nicknamed the Doomsday Detachment) embarked aboard guided missile destroyer USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) and departed Naval Station Norfolk with the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group for the 5th and 6th Fleet Areas of Responsibility (AOR). With four port visits and four-and-a-half months of operations under their belt, the Doomsday Detachment con tinues to conduct operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Following brief operations in the Mediterranean Sea and two port visits in Montenegro and Albania, the ship transited the Suez Canal and entered the 5th Fleet AOR to focus on counterpiracy operations. During an eastward transit in the Gulf of Oman on Aug. 20, the crew of Proud Warrior 424, led by the Detachment OfficerIn-Charge Lt. Cmdr. Jeremiah Binkley, executed an urgent medical evacuation of a criti cally injured sailor from the merchant vessel M/V Belde. Supported by the Churchill boarding team, the SH-60B Seahawk, additionally crewed by Lt. Alan Shingler and AWR1 Josh Wyckoff, lowered rescue swimmer AWR3 Kelvi Bonanofeliciano more than 120 feet onto the bridge wing of the Belde in order to place the injured patient in a litter and bring him safely aboard Proud Warrior 424. The patient was successful ly stabilized and transported to Salalah, Oman for further medical treatment and was expected to make a full recov ery. During the first half of the deployment, Detachment 8 personnel achieved numerous Mayor presents environmental award to NAS Jax Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and Chris Buckley, chairman of Keep Jacksonville Beautiful, presented NAS Jacksonville Environmental Director Kevin Gartland and NAS Jacksonville Public Works Officer Cmdr. Anant Patel with the Environmental Achievement Award for Government at the Mayors Environmental Award Luncheon on Dec. 13 at the Jacksonville Zoo. Brown told the audience, Our envi ronmental protection board selected Naval Air Station Jacksonville for this award because it has demonstrated its commitment to greening its facilities, properties and operations through sig nificant environmental, energy and encroachment conservation initiatives, NAS Jax Sailor earns top medal for non-combat heroismGSEC(SW) Bryain Williams of Transient Personnel Unit/Pre-Trial Confinement Facility (TPU/PCF) Jacksonville was presented the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for heroism by Commander, Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. during a ceremony on Jan. 3. Williams earned the presti gious presidential award for rescu ing 4-month-old Jimmy Knight from a burning house on May 11, 2010, in Jacksonville. Williams vividly recalls those NAS Jax best in Navy for second consecutive year HSL-42 Detachment 8 is halfway home

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Dustin has already been home from deployment for a month. Yes, its true. I know because I have a calendar. If I went with my gut instead, I would think Dustin just arrived. The month leading up to his homecoming crept by painfully slow, but the past four weeks have slipped past like a summers end. To say its been a good month would be an understatement. Dustin, the boys and I have been in a cocoon of family time. We even spent Christmas alone, just the five of us. This is the first Christmas when we didnt have other family visiting, Ford said, and I had to think about that for a minute. Dustin was home. We were together. Nothing really seemed to be missing. We are in that post-deployment period a honeymoon, of sorts when nothing else registers or matters except being together. According to my longtime militarywife friend, this is when spouses have to break-up with their deployment world in order to make room for their returning loved one. Or, put another way, military wives are serial rough weather friends: we cling to our sup port system during the deployment, then we shut out everything else, if only for a while, once its over. Since Dec.1, my friends have heard from me less, and I havent had much me time. I havent wanted it. But this post-deployment honey moon period always comes to end. Eventually, things return to a new normal. Eventually, a night out with the girls sounds better than a night in with the husband. Eventually, a mili tary wife asks herself, Doesnt he have somewhere hes supposed to be? Eventually came last week, during a family trip to Boston, when Dustin, on foot, took a left turn instead of a right and sent me this text message several minutes later: Im going down a hill. Now Im going up a hill. Im actually not sure where I am. Wait, lets stop and rewind: The day after Christmas, Dustin drove us to a hotel that is attached to an indoor water park. These are fairly common in the northeast, but when we first moved here four years ago, the idea took some getting use to. Swimming indoors in the south means swimming inside one of those screened enclosures that blow into your neighbors yard during a hurri cane. In the northeast, it means squeez ing into last summers bathing suit while freezing rain pelts the windows of your hotel. I walked dazed and confused through the steamy, chlorine-filled water park, and by the sheepish smiles on the other womens faces, I knew they felt the same. Our nods said, I forgot to shave, or My legs are white. But the kids had a blast. So did Dustin and every other husband in the building. When I saw mine run past with the older boys, on their way to a big slide while I sat in ankle-deep water in the baby pool with Lindell and the other moms, Dustins face looked 20 years younger. His wet hair stood up in all directions. Isnt this great? he said. Just one more time down the big slide! All at once, sitting in an unnatu rally warm pool, I felt angry for the first time since Dec. 1. My life was sup posed to get easier with Dustin home. Instead, he seemed to be having all the fun. When we were leaving the park, Dustin forgot something and had to go back inside. Ill meet you at the car, he said, so the boys and I went out the double doors and walked through the freezing rain and darkness. We went down a sidewalk and turned right in front of the hotel, where our car was parked. Review: we went straight and then turned right. Slush slid down the windshield and hot air warmed my feet as we sat in the car waiting for Dustin. Five minutes. Ten minutes. No Dustin. I drove around the parking lot to look for him. I bet he went the wrong way, I said aloud, my annoyance growing. But theres only one way to go, Ford said. PS: Ive known Dustin a lot longer than Ford has. This is when the text message came: Im going down a hill. Now Im going up a hill. Im actually not sure where I am. I called Dustin on the phone, and after a few confusing minutes (You were supposed to turn right. Can you see the hotel? Are you outside? Are you in the parking lot?), I figured out he was on the backside of the hotel, in the loading zone, walking in the opposite direction of our car. Maybe I took the long route, he said. Geez, its like having a fourth child, I said under my breath. And just then, in front of me in the rain, I saw him. He was standing in the middle of the road, his sweatshirt soaked and drops of water running down his cheeks. He was laughing and smiling like a little boy. We were still on the phone. Hey, its you, he said. Man, Im glad to see you. And though I was annoyed, I sort of fell in love all over again. Jan. 10 1847 American naval forces occupy Los Angeles. 1917 Navy places first production order for aerial photographic equip ment. 1934 VP-10F flies first non-stop for mation flight from San Francisco to Pearl Harbor, arriving the next day. 1956 Establishment of first Navy nuclear power school at Submarine Base New London, Conn. Jan. 11 1863 CSS Alabama sinks USS Hatteras off Galveston. 1944 Aircraft from USS Block Island (CVE-21) make first aircraft rocket attack on German submarine. Jan. 12 1813 U.S. frigate Chesapeake cap tures British Volunteer. 1848 Attack on sloop Lexington, San Blas, Mexico. 1953 Landings tested on board USS Antietam (CV-36), the first angled-deck aircraft carrier. 1991 Ranger battle group arrives on station in the northern Arabian Sea to participate in Operation Desert Shield. Jan. 13 1865 Amphibious attack on Fort Fisher in N.C. 1964 USS Manley (DD 940) evacu ates 54 American and 36 allied nation als after Zanzibar government is over thrown. Jan. 14 1813 U.S. frigate Chesapeake cap tures British brig Hero. 1863 Navy General Order 4, Emancipation Proclamation. 1943 In first submarine supply mis sion, USS Gudgeon (SS-211) lands six men, 2,000 pounds of equipment and supplies on Negros Island. Jan. 15 1815 HMS Endymion, Tenedos and Pomone capture USS President. 1865 In largest amphibious opera tion of war, Union forces capture Ft. Fisher near Wilmington, N.C. 1997 Navy physician Capt. Jerry Lineger joined the crew of the MIR space station after being launched on Atlantis during space Shuttle Mission STS-81. Prior to the mission, he trained at the Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia for more than a year. Jan. 16 1930 USS Lexington (CV-16) provides power to Tacoma, Wash., when floods knocked out city power plants. 1991 Operation Desert Storm begins for the liberation of Kuwait from Iraq. Hundreds of U.S. and coalition air strikes launched at missile and antiaircraft targets in Iraq and Kuwait to destroy Saddam Husseins offensive military capabilities. Six Navy battle groups, two battleships and a 31-ship amphibious task force were operating in the Red Sea, Persian Gulf and Arabian Sea areas. Post-deployment bliss? Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 a.m. Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at Chapel Complex Building 749 and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the barracks NAS Jacksonville Chapel Center Corner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road 542-3051

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The crew of a U.S. Navy P-3C Orion attached to VP-45 located a group of distressed South Korean mariners in the Philippine Sea, Dec. 22, and directed a Hong Kong-flagged vessel to the scene to ensure the mariners safety. The U.S. 7th Fleet staff was notified of the South Korean vessel in distress approximately 350 nautical miles southwest of Okinawa and directed VP-45 to respond. The squadron, operating from Kadena Air Base on Okinawa, promptly launched an aircraft with search and rescue resources to the distressed vessels last known position. We were told we were looking for a vessel in distress with an unknown number of people in a life raft, said Lt.j.g John Allen, a member of the crew. The crew utilized all of the aircrafts capabili ties including its radar and camera to locate the vessel in distress. We were the first search and rescue asset on the scene, Allen said. We found a South Korean container ship listing 25 degrees to the port side and a life raft floating next to it with 17 individuals in it. Nobody was injured. The crew contacted a nearby Hong Kong flagged merchant vessel and vectored the ves sel to the life raft. The merchant vessel crew was able to find the life raft and took all 17 survivors aboard. The success of the mission is a direct reflec tion on our squadrons training and mission readiness, Allen added.Based in Jacksonville, the VP-45 Pelicans under the command of Cmdr. Mike Vitali, are cur rently deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of opera tions as part of Commander, Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force 7th Fleet. Pelicans conduct SAR for missing Filipino fishermen Typhoon Bopha struck the Philippines in early December killing more than 1,000 and leaving 300,000 others without shelter. The storm also devas tated the Filipino tuna fishing fleet, which set sail in October and was at sea when the storm passed through their fishing grounds. About 300 fishermen were reported missing. VP-45, deployed to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan, responded to the crisis, sending two P-3 Orion aircraft to assist with search and rescue opera tions for the missing fish ermen. Conducting operations out of the Mactan Air Base in the Philippines, VP-45 crews flew more than 40 hours of Search and Rescue (SAR) in the Philippine Sea. We were proud to be able to provide assis tance to the people of the Philippines, said Lt. Troy Benbow, one of the pilots involved in the search effort. Thanks to the cooper ation and hospitality of the Filipino Air Force, the Search and Rescue oper ations were conducted safely and effectively.VP-45 search, rescue mission ensures safety of South Korean mariners JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 Richard Kemen Engine Test Facility FRCSE tests jet engines, reduces noise pollution Local residents are spared much of the ear-throbbing noise produced when Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) conducts out-of-airframe test ing to certify the reliability and perfor mance of gas turbine engines repaired at the facility. Annexed at the far end of NAS Jacksonville along the St. Johns River, the Richard Kemen Engine Test Facility is acoustically treated and aerodynami cally designed to reduce the powerful sound waves generated by jet engine combustion during testing. The walls around the concrete test chamber are 18 inches thick, said Mark Stogdon, an electronics engineer work ing at the testing facility. We used to test engines outside in the late 60s, but the sound carried right across the river. Testing inside is easier, and acoustics are contained. It is considerably safer. Performance testing in mirror image test chambers is routinely conducted on each engine serviced or repaired at the FRCSE Crinkley Engine Facility. Testing ensures its optimum operating perfor mance prior to returning the engine to Fleet inventory. Stogdon said about 140 engines are tested at FRCSE each year, and Kemen is the Navys only depot engine test facility still in use. He said in the hey day back in the 1970s, six facilities were to be built, but only one other was constructed at the military depot in Norfolk, Va. It was torn down years later following the depot closures in the mid1990s according to Stogdon. In the engine preparation area, a monorail system allows technicians to suspend each jet engine until it is rolled into a test chamber, an enormous room measuring about 90-feet long, 20-feet wide and 30-feet high. The monorail improves workflow and ensures opti mum efficiency, safety and ease of use for the technicians. Seated in the con trol room behind two inches of bul letproof glass, test cell operators put a variety of off-wing engines through their entire operating range to simulate the engines flight mission. The largest being the F414-GE-400 turbofan engine with 22,000 pounds of static thrust. The F/A-18 Super Hornet and the EA-18G Growler tactical aircraft are each pow ered by two of these engines according to the Navy Fact Files. Each computer-controlled test cell has a thrust capacity of 40,000 pounds and a bed capacity of 100,000 pounds. Military jet aircraft in afterburner produce exceedingly high noise lev els when at maximum power settings. These aircraft are tested by spraying more fuel into the exhaust that ignites to generate additional thrust power. A compressed air system supplies the energy required to start the jets turbine engine. A thrust stand securely holds the engine with interface connections for fuel, air, hydraulic, oil, electrical and other systems that tie into a computer in the control room. Repeatable opera tions are conducted to verify results fol lowing each engine repair and reassem bly. The FRCSE test cell is designed with special air intake baffles for optimal air flow and exhaust to ensure engine

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 5 ENGINEperformance consistency and to suppress noise to Occupational Safety and Health Administration acceptable levels. An exhaust collector and transfer tube, exhaust diffuser, exhaust plenum and exhaust stack with baffles aid in reducing heat and vibration from engine exhaust during testing. We are not noisy, said Curtis Kimbler, the former test engine supervisor who now serves as the TF34 engine supervisor. It is one of the most people-friend ly cells around. We have testing capability for the J52, TF34, F414 and the F404 engine. The Richard Kemen Engine Test Facility was dedi cated in 1978 and underwent a major upgrade in 2011. Photos by Victor Pitts

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Cmdr. Alex Ellermann was relieved by Cmdr. Anthony Scarpino as VR-62s com manding officer Dec. 8 at NAS Jacksonville. The guest speaker was Fleet Logistics Support Wing Deputy Commodore Capt. Mark Bailey. Scarpino, a native of Pittsburgh, graduated from the University of Memphis in 1995. During his collegiate career, he was elected captain of the var sity football team and played as starting quarterback during the 1994 season. Electing to pursue his dream of becoming a naval avia tor, he graduated from Officer Candidate School in February 1996. He reported for initial flight training in Pensacola, Fla., and was designated a naval aviator in October 1997. Following initial P-3 Orion training at VP-30 in Jacksonville, Scarpino reported to the VP-4 Skinny Dragons based in Kaneohe, Hawaii. He completed three extended operational deployments to Japan, Oman and Bahrain fly ing surveillance and recon naissance missions in direct support of Operation Enduring Freedom. During this tour, he was designated as a P-3 Orion patrol plane commander, mis sion commander, P-3 instruc tor pilot and primary pilot NATOPS evaluator. He also served as the commands per sonnel officer, communication security officer, aircraft divi sion officer and pilot NATOPS officer. In February 2002, Scarpino was nominated and selected as a Fleet Replacement Squadron instructor pilot assigned to VP-30. While serving in this capacity, he was instrumental in the training of more than 200 U.S. and international pilots and naval flight officers. Beyond his primary duties as an instructor pilot, he served as a P-3 Orion tactics instructor, flight engineer division officer and operations flight officer. In August 2004, Scarpino transitioned to the full time support community and reported to the VR-62 NorEasters based in Brunswick, Maine, where he flew the C-130 Hercules. During this assignment, he served as the training depart ment head, administrative department head and main tenance department head. In November 2007, he reported to the VR-64 Condors based in Willow Grove, Pa., where he served as operations depart ment head. While assigned to VR-62 and VR-64, Scarpino has flown over 200 sorties providing direct logistical support to Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. In November 2009, Scarpino reported to Capitol Hill serv ing as a defense legislative fel low for U. S. Sen. Christopher Bond (R-MO). In December 2010, he reported to the Office of the Chief of Navy Reserves to head the Congressional Liaison branch. Selected to Operational Command, Scarpino became VR-62s exec utive officer in September 2011. Scarpino earned a Masters Degree in Business Administration from Touro University International, completed Joint Professional Military Education (Phase 1) and has accumulated nearly 3,000 flight hours in the P-3 Orion and C-130 Hercules air craft. The Career Management System Interactive Detailing (CMS/ID) applica tion phase is scheduled to begin Jan. 10, and remain open until 5 a.m. Jan. 22 for Sailors in their permanent change of station (PCS) orders negotiation win dow. CMS/ID is the web-based program enlisted Sailors use to review and apply for PCS orders when it is time to transfer duty stations. Sailors may access the site at https:// www.cmsid.navy.mil or from the CMS/ ID link at www.npc.navy.mil. Sailors are in their orders nego tiation window when they are within nine through seven months from their projected rotation date (PRD). This is the first application phase for Sailors with an October 2013 PRD, the second application phase for Sailors with a September 2013 PRD and the last appli cation phase for Sailors with an August 2013 PRD. These Sailors may review advertised billets in CMS/ID during the applica tion phase and apply for up to five jobs, either directly using CMS/ID or through a command career counselor. The application phase is typically 10 days, allowing Sailors time to review available jobs, research billets and discuss options with their family and chain of command before the applica tion phase closes. Updated detailing business rules announced last July in NAVADMIN 226/12 eliminated red zone and green zone job advertisements in CMS/ID and now detailers fill all advertised active-duty billets each month using the available Sailors who are in their orders-negotiation window. Sailors can be more proactive in getting an assign Nomads hold change of command January app phase to open for Sailors seeking PCS orders 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 7

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HERO HSL-42assigned to the installation had earned the recogni tion with a balance of initiative and hard work. This years competition and all nomination pack ages reflected the great accomplishments that CNIC installations made worldwide, said Scorby. However, for the second year in a row, NAS Jacksonville distin guished itself and made the best use of its available resources to accomplish its assigned missions. They continue to set the standard, and I couldnt be more proud of Capt. Sanders and his team of professionals. Sanders attributed their continued success to con ducting business using an integrated team approach that includes the support of Navy Southeast leader ship, the Jacksonville mayor, county, state, federal agencies and area communities. This award belongs not only to the NAS Jax team, but also to the people of Northeast Florida. They work with us throughout the year and ensure our mission, military members and their families are well cared for, Sanders said. It is a happy day in Jacksonville. The second and third place winners in the large cat egory were: Fleet Activity Yokosuka and Naval Station Norfolk. In the small category the winners were: Naval Activity Panama City, Naval Air Facility El Centro followed by Naval Support Activity Mid-South and Commander, Fleet Activities Okinawa tying for third place. accomplishments. Five maintainers, AD2 Aaron Carvalho, AM3 Caleb Moyers, AM3 Amanda Verga, AT3 Jonathan Youmans, and AEAN Armida Guerra all earned their Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist (EAWS) qualifications. The Doomsdayers also welcomed two new mem bers into the Proud Warrior tribe as Carvalho, Wyckoff and their wives celebrated the births of their first children. Two extended port calls in Bahrain allowed the Churchill a much-needed break from the high operational tempo of the 5th Fleet AOR. Churchill and Det. 8 departed Bahrain for addi tional support of Operation Enduring Freedom and other tasking may come their way. Proud of their accomplishments up to this point and eager to face future assignments and chal lenges, HSL-42 Det. 8 and the Churchill crew look forward to a safe return to families and friends fol lowing a successful deployment. education outreach and environmental partnership with the city of Jacksonville and state of Florida. Gartland thanked the mayor and said, NAS Jacksonville is extremely proud to receive the Environmental Achievement Award for Government Agency. We are very thankful for the great support we receive from our local com munity, state and federal government leaders, agencies and citizens. The City of Jacksonville Environmental Protection Board consists of nine members, appointed for four-year terms, who are chosen to represent industry, conservationist organizations, professional engineers, the medical profession, and the general public. This board develops regulations nec essary for administration and enforce ment of the citys environmental laws. It conducts investigations of complaints, takes testimony in matters under its jurisdiction and provides a hearing platform for envi ronmental matters within the city. The board also conducts public out reach programs for schools, teachers, civic and private organizations. intense minutes as he risked his life to save the young child. My family and I had gone to the home to look at a dog we were considering adopting. After meet ing the dog and his owner, Melinda Knight, we had decided we wanted him. We put him in the car and were leaving when Melinda came running out screaming her house was on fire and she couldnt find her baby in all the smoke, said Williams. I ran into the smoke-filled house and located Jimmy in his playpen. I picked him up and found my way back out the front door, handing the infant to my wife. Then I heard Melinda yelling at the back door and went to help. During the confu sion, I didnt tell her that I had rescued her son and assumed she had another child inside, he continued. So I tried to get in the back door but the flames were too intense. After a few minutes, everyone realized no one else was in the house and the baby was safe. As Scorby presented the award in front of Williams and Knights family members and Sailors from his command, he stated, Its an absolute honor and privilege for me to be here today and present this award. You dont see this award given very often. The only time Ive seen this award pre sented was after 9-11 for some of the rescues at the Pentagon. Chief, I cant say how much admiration and respect I have for what you did by putting your life on the line to save another human being. After receiving the award, Williams said humbly, Im thrilled to be given this award. I just went to Jimmys third birthday party the other day and am just so happy that he is still here to celebrate it. Bryain definitely deserves this award. If it wasnt for him saving my son, he probably would not be here today. Our families have become close and we spend time together. Weve been there for one another through some hardships Bryains wife Kathy passed away and although I didnt know her long, she was very special to me. And, Jimmy knows that this is the man who saved his life, said Knight. CNIC AWARDENVIROMENTAL AWARD ment of their choice by using all five choices when applying. CMS/ID features a Sailor Preference section under the Sailor Info Tab where Sailors may rank duty preferences by type, command, location, platform and community, as well as indicate which special programs and schools they would like and leave com ments for the detailer. Detailers will always attempt to fill billets using a Sailors desired selections first; however, fleet readi ness requirements are the guiding factor in filling bil lets. Detailers must also follow sea-shore flow guidelines outlined in NAVADMIN 201/11, so unless a Sailor requests Sea Duty Incentive Pay or the Voluntary Sea Duty Program to take consecutive sea duty orders, a Sailor up for shore duty should not be involuntarily assigned another sea tour. It may mean a Sailor hop ing for shore duty in Florida or California may receive shore duty someplace else, where the need is greater. A single set of sea billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and a single set of shore billets, pri oritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command and Bureau of Naval Personnel are advertised each application cycle as the Navy seeks to fill gaps at sea and place Sailors with the right experience levels and skill sets into high-priority Fleet billets. Some factors a detailer must weigh when matching Sailors to jobs include the Sailors desires, qualifica tions, training availability, career progression and cost to the Navy. Detailers wont assign Sailors to advertised jobs until after the close of the application phase, during the detailer selection phase. Sailors may log into CMS/ ID anytime after the detailer selection phase to see if they have been selected for orders. PCS The F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighter jet will be a strategic deterrent for the nation because of its huge leap in capability, a Marine Corps pilot said in a recent interview on the Pentagon Channel. Lt. Col. Jeffrey Scott, commander of the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wings Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 121 at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz., recently told the Pentagon Channel the F-35 will allow Marines to perform missions in high-threat areas, unlike existing aircraft. The F-35 will be able to do every mission now per formed by the AV-8 Harrier, but will be able to do it in more situations, said Scott, who is involved with flight testing the new aircraft. The new fighter will provide access to more areas, he explained, and will allow more time for rolling back enemy defenses. The Defense Department and Lockheed Martin reached an agreement in principle in December to manufacture 32 F-35s in the Pentagons largest weap ons program. That includes 22 F-35A conventional takeoff and landing variants for the Air Force, three F-35B short-takeoff and vertical landing variants for the Marine Corps, and seven F-35C carrier variants for the Navy. Scott said flying the F-35 is an easy transition from the Harrier, and that it did exceptionally well during a recent trial at sea. The sensors and systems are the big leap driving the aircraft in terms of tactics, he said. The Lightning will fulfill a lot of the functions of Marine Corps aviation such as [our] air support role, air-to-air combat, targeting enemy ground locations and supporting the troops on the ground as Harriers and [F/A-18] Hornets do now, he added. But it brings more in one aircraft in its ability to protect itself from the enemy. Scott said the F-35 will give the military a huge leap in capability, probably five or six steps beyond what we now have. Were going to have this aircraft for a long time, he said. As we get more and more of these aircraft in all of the services, were going to see a lot of the benefits that the aircraft has in terms of commonality. As we start operating tactically, some of the communica tions [and] capabilities will become more and more valuable to the services and it will be in demand to combatant commanders around the world.Pilot calls F-35 big leap in fighter/attack capability 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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The VP-45 Pelicans began their Western Pacific deployment with a week-long detachment to Clark Air Base in the Philippines. The Pelicans were joined by members of the VP-5 Mad Foxes to facilitate a smooth transition and provide turn over. The squadrons participated in mari time domain awareness missions designed to strengthen military-to-mil itary relations between the Philippines and the United States. Daily interactions provided an opportunity to culti vate relationships with the local com munity and build ties support channels laying a solid foundation for operations from Clark Air Base. The aircrew and maintenance team were also grateful for the opportuni ty to participate in military and com munity relationship building. When asked about his experience during the detachment, AD2(AW) Keilbenjamine Diaz from Pampanga, Philippines responded, Its been six years since Ive been back to my home country of the Philippines. I feel great to be part of the VP-45 detachment crew that went and worked with the Philippine Air Force. It really brings back memories from the past. A highlight during the detachment was the opportunity to share in cultural exchanges with the host nation. Being able to operate out of the Philippines was a great experience. It was excit ing to be able to experience the local culture while completing our mission, said AWO2 Jonathon Cuff. Our host nations hospitality was more than we could have asked for. Based in Jacksonville, the Pelicans and Mad Foxes are currently deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibil ity as part of Commander, Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Seventh Fleet. P-3C Orion aircraft from the VP-8 Fighting Tigers and the VP-10 Red Lancers worked with the Royal Canadian Navy frigate HMCS Ottawa (FFH-341) to recover 1,086 kilograms of cocaine, valued in excess of $75 million during an interdiction in the 4th Fleet Area of Responsibility in late November. Operating outside the territorial waters of Costa Rica, the P-3C aircrew noted suspicious activity aboard a fishing vessel. Maintaining observa tion of the vessel, the aircrew coordi nated with the Ottawa for search and potential seizure of the vessel. Upon arrival the HMCS Ottawa deployed its helicopter and a boarding team via fast boat. The intercept and search of the fishing vessel resulted in the seizure of 1,086 kilograms of cocaine, valued in excess of $75 mil lion. It was pretty awesome to not only catch drug smugglers in the act, but to be able to coordinate and witness a successful interdiction with the Canadians. We are looking forward to many busts like this in the future, said Lt. j.g. Matt Willard of VP-10. VP-8 and VP-10 are both based out of NAS Jacksonville. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative rela tionships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneu ver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stabil ity, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. Pelicans and Mad Foxes conduct joint detachment to Philippines VP squadrons, HMCS Ottawa coordinate drug seizure JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 9

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Sailors from the VP-45 Pelicans and VP-10 Red Lancers participated in the annual Christmas gift exchange between Commander, Fleet Activities Okinawa and Sailors from the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Forces (JMSDF) Dec. 19 at White Beach in Okinawa, Japan. Each year, the two organi zations exchange tradition al American and Okinawan Christmas decorations with the JMSDF receiving a Christmas tree in exchange for a set of kadomatsu Japanese ornaments made from bamboo and pine boughs. The event was hosted by the JMSDF and included a mochi pounding. Mochi is a Japanese rice cake made of glutinous rice pounded into paste and molded into the desired shape. In Japan it is traditionally made in a ceremony called mochitsuki. While eaten year-round, mochi is a traditional food for the Japanese new year. PR2 Nichole Oveido of VP-45 was particularly impressed with the Japanese hospital ity and closing ceremony where all the participants clapped in unison to symbolize bringing good fortune for all in the new year. It was very interesting and the Japanese were extremely friendly, remarked Oveido. Making the mochi cakes was very similar to my family tradition of making pupusas. Experiencing foreign cultures sometimes doesnt seem so for eign after all. Based in Jacksonville, the Pelicans and Red Lancers are currently on a six-month deployment to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility as part of Commander, Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Seventh Fleet. VP-45 Pelicans Volunteer at Yara Youth Centers Christmas PartySeven Sailors from the VP-45 Pelicans visited the Yara Youth Center in Kadena Town, Okinawa Dec. 22 to take part in their annual Christmas party. The Sailors sang and danced with local youth to music ranging from popular Top-40 hits to classic Christmas carols. When Santa made an appearance at the party, VP-45 Sailors also lent a hand passing out gifts. It was awesome to see that other countries celebrate the holidays almost exactly the way we do back in the States, said LS2 Elena Cruz from Guatemala City, Guatemala. It was fun to interact and play games with the youth of our host country. The experience put smiles on the faces of everyone involved. Based at NAS Jacksonville, and under command of Cmdr. Mike Vitali, the Pelicans are deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility in support of Commander Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force 7th Fleet. The Veterans Administration (VA) has created the Fully Developed Claim (FDC) Program, a new and innovative program designed to pro vide swift and expeditious treatment of eligible fully developed compen sation or pension claims. The FDC Program is the fastest means of getting a claim processed. A participating Veteran with an eli gible claim will have his/her claim expeditiously routed through the claims process for a swift decision. Participation will not affect the qual ity of care a Veteran receives or the benefits to which a Veteran is enti tled. The FDC program is not a predischarge program associated with active duty service members. To start the process, a veteran can lock in an effective date with an informal claim. The informal claim includes the statement below in the form of a letter: The purpose of the informal claim is to allow the veter an time to gather pertinent evidence needed to complete a claim. I intend to apply for compensa tion/pension benefits under the FDC Program. This statement is to pre serve my effective date for entitle ment to benefits. I am in the process of assembling my claim package for submission. This statement must be accom panied by the veteran or claimants name (if other than the veteran), claim number, and signature. To participate, the FDC Program requires that a veteran complete and submit a Fully Developed Claim Certification and either a VA Form 21-526EZ, Fully Developed Claim (Compensation), for a compensation Pelicans, Red Lancers participate in mochi pounding VA creates new program to process claims faster 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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claim, or a VA Form 21-527EZ, Fully Developed Claim (Pension), for a pen sion claim. The veteran must also sub mit, with the application and certifica tion, all relevant and pertinent evidence to fully develop the claim. VA Form 21-526EZ and VA Form 21-527EZ pro vide, in detail, claims eligible for the FDC program as well as notification of all information and evidence neces sary to fully develop and substantiate these claims. How does it work? VA, traditionally, after it receives a claim from a veteran will only then provide the veteran noti fication of what is required from him/ her to substantiate the claim via the Duty to Assist letter. The FDC program is unique in that it provides notifica tion of the evidence necessary to sub stantiate an eligible claim at the time of application, allowing the veteran to understand what is required of him/her at that time. A veteran participating in the FDC program will send the required evi dence with the claim and certify that he/she has nothing further to provide. By doing this, a veteran dramatically reduces the processing time of his/her claim by eliminating the time VA would normally spend developing for evidence from that veteran. VA is able to process these claims far more quickly than claims going through the traditional claims process. In addition, VA has established priority channels to expeditiously route FDCs. Once the fully developed claim is received by VA, any subsequent infor mation or evidence submitted to VA may serve to remove that claim from the FDC program. At that time the claim will be processed the traditional way. For detailed information on the FDC program and downloadable forms look up benefits.va.gov/transformation/fast claims or call 1-800827-1000. VA JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 11

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12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 Apoyan has been recognized as the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jacksonvilles 2012 Sailor of the Year. Apoyan is currently assigned as leading petty officer for Maintenance Training Unit 3032, supervising 26 instruc tors. As a mechanical support equipment instructor, he has completed 16 support equip ment formal course reviews, four course revisions, and was responsible for the upkeep of 78 support equipment mainte nance trainers valued at $2.2 million. Apoyan coordinated numer ous command events as MWR president, leading 14 Sailors and Marines and collecting over $7,500 for MWR fundrais ers. He is currently attending Southern Illinois University pursuing a bachelors degree in workforce education. Additionally, he is an active member of the Owens Lodge No. 162 Freemasons and has dedicated numerous hours to the I.D., a program identifying runaway and missing children. He also volunteers off-duty time to local programs such as Adopt-A-Highway and Habitat for Humanity. Apoyans professionalism, leadership and community service have contributed sig nificantly to command mission and the local Jacksonville com munity. Wagner was selected as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2012 Junior Sailor of the Year. He is currently assigned as an aviation support equipment instructor at Maintenance Training Unit 3032, where he trains Sailors and Marines on mechanical upkeep and main tenance of support equipment afloat. Wagner has provided 500 hours of instruction, achieving a 100 percent graduation rate with an overall student GPA of 96.7 percent. His collateral duties include public affairs photographer and writer, MWR and Petty Officer Association event coor dinator which raised $2,600 in funds. Additionally, he assists in the facilitation of the Command Indoctrination program, pro viding information and train ing on programs such as sexual assault prevention, domestic violence, and drinking and driving. Wagner serves his local community as the home own ers association president for Meadow Glenn, and is respon sible for the maintenance and upkeep of his community that contains three retention ponds and 250 family homes. Wagners dedication and pro fessionalism have made him invaluable to his command and an easy choice as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2012 Junior Sailor of the Year. Charles Beene has been selected as the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonvilles 2012 Senior Civilian of the Year. Beene is the information technologys (IT) director of 276 NMCI computers at two CNATTU sites, aboard NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport. His dedicated efforts have been invaluable in provid ing the highest quality, most up-to-date computer network and software support to staff, instructors and students. He continually lends his vast tech nical knowledge and expertise to assist other commands and IT managers across the CNATT domain, always seeking a more efficient, protected network in support of the Naval Education and Training Commands training mission. John Torres was selected as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2012 Junior Civilian of the Year. Torres is the student manage ment supervisor responsible for the accurate and timely processing of all students at CNATTU Jacksonville. He is the liaison between fleet commands and CNATTU Jacksonvilles Maintenance Training Units coordinating classes and mobile training teams. Jeffrey Hayes is CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2012 Civilian Instructor of the Year. Hayes is assigned as P-3 avionics phase instructor for Maintenance Training Unit 1011. His vast technical exper tise and cross certification in 10 maintenance courses of instruction have made him an invaluable asset to the com mand. Hayes was responsible for the completion of all but one scheduled P-3 Avionics related courses of instruc tion in 2012. Additionally, he recently completed his mas ters degree through Webster University. Disposition Services Reservist recognizedLSCS Gregory Evans, a Reservist with Navy Operational Support Center Jax who is assigned to Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Disposition Services, was among those recognized at the 45th annual Employee Recognition Program Ceremony Dec. 12 at the McNamara Headquarters Complex at Fort Belvoir, Va. During the ceremony, DLA Director Vice Adm. Mark Harnitchek presented Evans with the DLA Reserve Forces Senior Enlisted Person of the Year Award for his achievements while deployed to Afghanistan as part of the one of the Expeditionary Disposal Remediation Teams (EDRT). He was specifically cited for work he did to improve the speed and safety of the movement of DLA Disposition Services military, civilian and contrac tor personnel onto and off forward operating bases. EDRTs and other Disposition Services personnel trav el to remote forward bases to help front line units with scrap handling, demilitarization of equipment and turn ins, especially when units are wrapping up their deployments. Evans is the senior enlisted leader of a team assigned to DLA Disposition Services Jacksonville when not deployed. Recognizing the achievements of individuals and teams across the DLA enterprise occurs each December. The annual event includes naming 10 people as DLA employees of the year, team performance awards, civilian and military leadership awards, and DLA Joint Reserve awards. CNATTU selects Sailors of the Year Walker was selected as the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonvilles 2012 Senior Instructor of the Year. Walker is currently assigned as leading chief petty officer for Maintenance Training Unit 1005 and is a qualified mainte nance training specialist. He provided 800 hours of instruction to 26 students, teaching MH-60 Weapons Load, Armament and Release courses while maintaining a 100 per cent graduation rate with an overall 98.3 percent class GPA. As the command suicide pre vention coordinator, Walker has provided over 60 hours of suicide awareness training for CNATTU Jacksonville staff and 4,200 students. Additionally, Walker has been at the forefront of a multi-bil lion dollar program to provide MH-60 Romeo training for the Royal Australian Navy. His leadership was instru mental to the readiness and training for both U.S. Navy and Royal Australian Navy Sailors during this highly visible inter national collaboration. Lucy was selected as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2012 Instructor of the Year. Currently assigned as Maintenance Training Unit 1011, Aviation Ordnance/ Electrical Division lead ing petty officer and P-3C Armament/Ordnance System Maintenance Course, P-3C Conventional Weapons Loading Course Leading Aviation Ordnanceman instructor, she provided over 240 hours of instruction to 104 students while maintaining an impres sive 100 percent graduation rate. Lucy was responsible for the completion of 12 formal course and safety reviews, and the maintenance and upkeep of three ordnance trainers valued at $1.3 million. As a master training special ist mentor, she provided 36 hours of training to command personnel which resulted in the qualification of seven master training specialists. As a drug and alcohol pro gram advisor (DAPA), she pro vided training to 167 military and civilian staff as well as 1,300 students. Her assignment as a sex ual assault and prevention response (SAPR) coordinator ensured a highly effective pro gram and training. was selected as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2012 Junior Instructor of the Year. Delpivo is the sole SH-60B instructor on board CNATTU Jacksonville. He is qualified to instruct four maintenance courses, and manages the initial and career SH-60B courses for both Jacksonville and North Island as the course curriculum model manager, while also being a qualified master training spe cialist. Delpivo has maintained a stu dent class average of 98.7 per cent while instructing 36 stu dents. He has dedicated numerous hours to command level collat eral duties such as SAPR and assistant DAPA representative, command sponsor, and Second Class Petty Officers Association treasurer. He is also a member of the U.S. Navy Rugby team, and has assisted the University of Northern Florida rugby team coaching staff. CNATTU Jax names Instructors of Year CNATTU Jax announces Civilians of Year

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It was a cool Florida day as 125 people showed up for the annual Jingle Bell Jog Dec. 13. The event is each year by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department and was sponsored by Allied American University and the University of Phoenix. Placing first overall and in the mens 19 and under category was Jacob Schmit of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven with a time of 19:42. Taking first overall for the women and in the womens 35-39 cat egory, was Nicole Amador of Navy Operational Support Command with a time of 24:08. Other winners were: The next run will be the Valentines 5K in February. For more information and to sign up, call 542-3239/3518. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, spon sor or its products or services. Naval Hospital Jax wins Greybeard Fall Basketball ChampionshipNaval Hospital Jax won their second consecutive Greybeard Fall Basketball Championship Dec. 13. The 2013 Greybeard Basketball League was shortened by two months due to the gymnasium closing for renovations for six months. There were seven teams competing in a double elimination playoff format to determine the 2013 Captains Cup Greybeard Basketball Champion. Naval Hospital Jax won their first game of the playoffs against Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), but lost their second game to VP-16 sending them to the losers bracket. Naval Hospital Jax rebounded by win ning their next three games against Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast, FRCSE, and VP-16 to set up a shot at the championship against Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station (NCTS) Jax. NCTS had not lost in the playoffs so Naval Hospital Jax had to beat them twice to win the champi onship due to the double elimination playoff format. Naval Hospital Jax responded in the championship game defeat ing NCTS 54-30 led by the scoring of Shannon Carswell with 19 points and Jonathan Scott added 14 points. The win forced a second and final game for the 2013 Captains Cup Greybeard Fall Basketball Championship. In the second game, NCTS had no answer for Naval Hospital Jaxs offen sive barrage with Simario Pious hit ting five three-pointers and scoring 25 points to lead the team to a lopsided 64-32 victory over NCTS to win the 2013 Captains Cup Greybeard Fall Basketball Championship and their second consecutive Greybeard Fall Basketball Championship. VR-58 wins flag football championshipThe VR-58 Sunseekers defeat ed VP-30 Pros (Officers) 27-13 to win the base 7-on-7 Flag Football Championship at Sea King Park Dec 10. Both teams had advanced through the 20-team single elimination tournament to the championship game during the week. The game was played in the driv ing rain and featured wild snaps, balls slipping out of player hands and crazy pitchouts. In the championship game, VP-30 scored first on their initial drive to take Brown tossed a 9-yard touchdown pass to John Fitzgerald to cap a 9-play drive. But VR-58 C-came back to tie the his first seven passes and then hit Joel Rogers with a TD pass to tie the score 7-7. Both teams defenses continued to keep the game scoreless and with less than 2 minutes left in the half it looked like 7-7 would be the score. However VR-58s Zack Jackson picked off a pass and set up a touchdown pass from Mitchum to Josh Saras to give VR-58 a 14-7 halftime lead. The wet conditions made it difficult for the teams to score as both teams had drives stalled due to wet ball errors. VR-58 had key play when Mike McCoy made an interception and Mitchum moved VR-58 to the 3-yard line hitting six of seven passes. Mitchum easily took the ball in for the touchdown putting VR-58 in the lead 20-7. In the fourth quarter, VP-30 went for a fourth and long from deep in its own territory and turned the ball over on downs at its own 10-yard line. VR-58 then scored to make it 27-7 and VP-30 could not come back from there. Mitchumconnected on 31 of 43 passes during the night while Saras and Rogers each had seven catches for VR-58. Fitzgerald had five catches and two touchdowns in a losing effort for VP-30. Army/Navy Golf Tournament heldFifty-seven players took to the NAS Jax Golf Course Dec. 6 for the 13th Army/Navy alumni golf tournament. This annual battle for bragging rights in the River City takes place prior to the football game and it always proves to be a fun and competitive event. For the past two years, the Army team has taken home the trophy, however, this year the Blue and Gold team was victorious, winning by a wide margin. The Chapter President of the Navy Alumni Association, Mike Borns (70) graciously accepted the trophy during the awards presentation. Greg Streeter (58) won the award for the oldest class represented and Peter Garfield (70) was presented with the Jungle award, for his many forays into the unknown wil derness in search of his elusive golf ball. The honored guest speaker from the Wounded Warrior Project was retired Marine Capt. Denis Oliveiro. During the tournament, Denis paired up with Bill Farnsworth (65) and they took third place net and a couple clos est to the pin prizes. Deniss talk dur ing dinner was inspirational and his service truly heroic. Denis was pre sented with donations to WWP from both the Jax chapter as well as the West Point Society. Runners enjoy annual Jingle Bell Jog JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Hold em Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way NFL Playoffs will be playing at Deweys Enjoy $.50 wings during the gamesFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental includedFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238 Gym is temporarily relocated to The Zone (Bldg. 798) Jan. 14 June 30.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Wild Florida Airboats & Wild Animal Park Kenansville, Fla. $17 $46.50 Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus Jan. 1821, $13 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Preferred seating $41, lower-level seat ing $22 Live Broadway Series Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Dream Girls May 21 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets available at ITT through March 31 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about special discounted tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park Gold pass $71 Daytona 500 Feb. 24 $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Orange Park Mall & Movie Trip Jan. 11 at 6 p.m. Ice Skating Trip Jan. 12 at 6 p.m. Paintball Trip Jan. 19 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Jan. 22 for active duty Jan. 10 & 24 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Daily Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for $16 after 12:30 p.m. Monday & Tuesday Play 18 holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 Auto Skills 101 Class Jan. 17, 57 p.m. Learn general auto maintenance.Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Movie Under the Stars Jan. 18, 6 p.m. at Patriots Grove Featuring Finding NemoFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School March 18 April 24 $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 Sixty-three kinder garten students from Assumption Catholic School visited the VP-62 Broadarrows at NAS Jax Dec. 12. The children were given a tour of the Jay Beasley maritime patrol hangar where they were educated on the P-3 Orion and the squadrons role in the Navy. At the end of the tour, the kindergarteners had the opportunity to board a fully operational P-3. All of the teachers and the adults who were chaperoning the trip raved about the visit, said Mildred Churchill, one of the teachers. We were so impressed with how smoothly it all went. It seemed like they rolled out the red carpet for us. We all learned so much and the visit just reinforced our gratitude to our military and the Navy in particular. This was the first visit to NAS Jax in about 10 years, said Churchill, whose husband is a retired Army veteran. The kindergarten teacher jumped at the opportunity when VP-62 Executive Officer Cmdr. John Townsend invit ed the students to visit the squadron, his own daughter being among the children in her class. As both a parent and a representative of the Navy, there is no time better spent than with Americas youth, said Townsend. The responsibility to parent and mentor all of our children in a positive way will certainly deter mine the strength of our future in this country. The time spent shar ing our squadrons pur pose with those children was fun and exciting for them, and highly moti vating for our squad ron members. Best case result would be that a memory of their VP-62 visit would influence one of those children to fol low in our footsteps and choose to become the next Broadarrow Sailor. All of the students were enthralled with the visit, said Churchill. Many of the children said afterwards they, wanted to be pilots when they grow up. VP-62 is a reserve patrol and reconnais sance squadron based at NAS Jacksonville. They have provided supplemental maritime support to the fleet since 1972. Fleet Forces explores protective clothing solutions NWU Type I is not flame-resistant Commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command reached out to fleet leaders in a Navy message Dec. 12 to ensure Sailors understand the minimal flame resistant quali ties of the Navy Working Uniform Type I. Adm. Bill Gortney explained the current requirement for work ing uniforms and organizational clothing and discussed recent uniform testing results. In coordination with the uniform board, Adm. Haney (Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet) and I will continue to review the requirements for, and flameresistant qualities of, working uniforms including the Type I NWUs, Gortney explained in his message. The latest push for awareness stems from an impromptu test the Navy Clothing Textile Research Facility conducted Oct. 15, in Natick, Mass. The test reinforced the fact that the NWU Type I is not flame-resistant. We will explore long-term solu tions that afford our Sailors the right protective clothing, aligned with the tasks they are required to perform in various operating environments, said Gortney. In 2012, fire-retardant NWU Type II/III and coveralls became part of the Navys organization al clothing inventory. The Navy began issuing flame resistant organizational gear (FROG) I and II, in the NWU Type II and III pat tern, to Navy ground force per sonnel deploying to Afghanistan and those conducting operations in environments where impro vised explosive devices (IEDs) are a common threat. Navy leadership removed the flame-resistant requirements from NWUs in 1996, and com mands since then have been required to purchase flame-resis tant organizational clothing for Sailors. VP-62 hosts local students

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 17 Last Cuban nationals retire from government serviceCuban nationals Harry Henry and Luis La Rosa retired from gov ernment service Dec. 31, mark ing the end of an era. Both were honored at a ceremony aboard Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (GTMO) Dec. 14. At the end of their final day of service New Years Eve, U.S. Marines opened GTMOs North East Gate allow ing Henry and La Rosa to pass through for the final time. The North East Gate is the northern entry point sepa rating GTMO from the rest of Cuba. When the U.S. leased the 45-square mile plot of land that is the naval station from the Cuban government in 1903, the North East Gate was established as the checkpoint for up to Cuban com muters who would move in and out of the base daily. In 1958, when vehicle traffic was prohibited, the number of com muters dropped to 300. Today only two remain, Henry and La Rosa. Henry, 83, and La Rosa, 79, worked at the naval station for a combined 120 years. La Rosa began working on base in 1957 as a welder. Throughout his nearly 60 years of service, he held numerous positions. A few of the most notable projects he worked include the famous GTMO light house; the dock at Ferry Landing and his last project, the stairwell at the Northeast Gate. Henry, a supply technician at Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville, began work in 1946 as a waiter at the Chief Petty Officers Club. In April 1951, he was selected for his first federal service posi tion as a messenger and duplicat ing equipment operator within the naval station ships repair department earning an annual salary of $1,089. He eventually worked his way up to a GS-05 stock control clerk position. As the result of a reorganization effort, Henry was moved to the supply department in 1972 where he became a stock clerk. In 1999, the supply department was again reorganized under NAVSUP, where Henry attained his supply technician position. He has remained in this position from 1999 until today. When asked how he felt about retirement, Henry simply said, I feel excited. After spending more than six decades working at GTMO, he reflected on his experi ences, I never figured I would be the last one leaving as a commuter through the gates; this has been my home, he added with a tear in his eye.. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Head attended the historic cer emony. It was remarkable to be part of this momentous event, and it was a real pleasure to present Mr. Henry with the Meritorious Civilian Service Medal during the ceremony. With nearly 62 years of service, he has truly earned it, Head said. Twenty-four Sailors and civilian employees from three Navy Medicine commands and detachments in Jacksonville helped the Salvation Army provide needed items to more than 450 families via the Clay County Corps of the Salvation Armys Holiday Angel Tree program distribution Dec. 20-21. Volunteers from NAS Jacksonville-based Navy Medicine Education and Training Command (NMETC), Jacksonville detachment; Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Jacksonville detachment; and the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence distrib uted new clothing and toys for children from lowincome Jacksonville-area households. We are very grateful for the hard work and fan tastic attitudes of the Sailors and civilians who have helped us over the last two days said Lt. Ben Bridges of the Salvation Army. Much of the support for our programs comes from local volunteers. This includes everything from ringing bells for the kettle drive to assisting at rehabilitation centers to helping with distribution of donations as part of our Angel Tree program. The Salvation Army administers the Angel Tree program each year by placing a Christmas tree in a local mall or business. The tree is decorated with numbered paper Angel Tags with the first name, age and gender of the child who will receive the gift. Angel Tree donors across Jacksonville remove one or more tags from the Angel Tree and purchase appro priate gifts for the children on the tags. The toys are then delivered to The Salvation Army, sorted and prepared for distribution just in time for the holi days. Navy Medicine Jacksonville volunteers helped in a variety of roles, including organizing the warehouse distribution, record keeping and helping families load their gifts. This is a great opportunity to give back, in a small way, to the local community that is so supportive of the Navy family here in Jacksonville, said HM1 Teresa Adams, NMETC Administrative Department leading petty officer and one of the volunteers. Besides, helping to make sure every child has some thing special under the Christmas tree is a fantastic feeling. NMETC manages Navy Medicines education and training and is part of the Navy Medicine team, a global health care network of Navy medical profes sionals around the world who provide high-quality health care to more than 1 million eligible beneficia ries. Navy Medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ships, in the air, under the sea and on the battlefield. Fiscal cliff legislation affects military, civilian paychecksThe legislation that President Barack Obama signed Jan. 2 that postponed the fiscal cliff means changes to military and civilian paychecks, Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) officials said today. The legislation increases Social Security withhold ing taxes to 6.2 percent. For the past two years during the tax holiday the rate was 4.2 percent. The increase in Social Security withholding taxes affects both military and civilian paychecks, officials said. mean a 2 percent reduction in net pay. affected by a variety of additional factors such as increases in basic allowances for housing, subsis tence, longevity basic pay raises and promotions. Service members could see an increase in net pay, no change or a decrease, military personnel and readi ness officials said. is located on their leave and earnings statement in the blocks marked FICA taxes for Federal Insurance Contributions Act. and earnings statement under OASDI -for old age, survivors, and disability insurance. see potential changes in their net pay as a result of the law, DFAS officials said. Changes will be reflected in their January paychecks. Active duty military personnel will see pay adjust ments in their January mid-month paycheck and will be reflected on the January leave and earnings state ment. ing changes reflected in paychecks based on the pay period ending December 29, 2012, for pay dates begin ning in January. DFAS stresses that all personnel should review pay statements carefully. The arrival of the January and the new means that we are bound for colder temperatures in the coming months. Visions of a skiing, curling up by the fire and all their preparations create eager anticipation, but the winters frigid temperatures, blizzards, and storms make emergency preparedness especially crucial at this time of year. With advanced planning in three key areas, you can be ready for any unexpected hazard that surfaces amidst winters delight. Ready Navy is here to help. Visit www.ready.navy.mil. Be and stay informed: Learn about hazards that are common in winter months and most likely to happen in your area, such as winter storms and power outag es. The Ready Navy website Be and Stay Informed tabs offer specific instructions, information, and resources you may need to know regarding winter storms, power outages and home fires. Make a plan: As a family, make an emergency plan so that everyone in the family understands what to do, where to go, and what to take in the event of a fire or any emergency. Additionally, winter fire hazards, ice and winter winds can bring down power lines, making traditional communication difficult. Your emergency plan should include how your family will communi cate with each other, particularly if normal communi cation methods, such as phone lines or cell towers, are out. Road conditions and other hazards can limit ease of movement. Have a contact person outside the area that each member of the family can notify that they are safe, if separated. The Ready Navy website pro vides printable forms and contact cards to guide you in your planning. Winter fires: Did you know that heating sources are the second leading cause of home fires every year, especially during winter months? Kerosene heaters, candles, and wood burning fireplaces are big culprits, with December being the peak time for home candle fires. Freeze winter fires by using these items safely: Keep anything combustible at least three feet away from any heat source. Use kerosene heaters only where approved by authorities, and refuel outside and only after the heat er has cooled. Never leave a burning candle unattended or aban doned. Use fire screens to keep the fire in the fireplace and have your chimney cleaned every year. Make sure that your home has at least one smoke detector. Build a Kit: The best way to prepare for the unex pected is to create one or more emergency kits that include enough water and non-perishable supplies for every family member to survive at least three days. Keep a kit prepared at home, and consider having kits in your car, at work, and a portable version in your home ready to take with you. These kits will enable you and your family to respond to a winter (or any emergency) more effectively. Your various emergency kits will be useful whether you have to shelter-inplace, are stranded at work or on the road, or move to another location. Be sure your kits address the needs of small children, individuals with special needs, and your pets. For information about Ready Navy and tips, forms, and guidance to be prepared for and stay informed about all hazards, visit www.ready.navy.mil. Navy Medicine volunteers help more than 450 Jacksonville families Advanced planning can help you survive winter

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 2013 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Vice Adm. William French, com mander, Navy Installations Command, announced Dec. 13 that NAS Jacksonville was the winner of the 2013 Commander, Navy Installations Command Installation Excellence Award (CINC IEA) (large category) worldwide for their outstanding efforts in shore installation management. CNIC is comprised of 11 regions and 72 bases worldwide. The competition was intense, but NAS Jacksonville dis played a well-defined understanding of CNIC and Office of the Secretary of Defense strategic goals and fiscal aus terity in execution of its mission. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders immediately congratulated base personnel. It gives me great pleasure to announce that you have once again won the Installation Excellence Award as the best large installation in the United States Navy! I could not be more proud of each and every one of you and your accomplish ments over the past year. Again, con gratulations. We are very fortunate to be part of this amazing organization. This award reflects the hard work by all who helped NAS Jax deliver the most effective and efficient readiness from the shore. The stations synergistic One Team, One Fight relationship with all ten ant commands targeted the best use of available resources to ensure all accomplished their assigned missions while at the same time focusing on energy innovation and management actions that increase productivity. Throughout the year, NAS Jax was the premier installation for delivering effective, sustained and improved shore readiness to its 14 home-based squad rons, Sailors and civilian personnel, as well as supporting numerous joint commands, government agencies, and car rier readiness sustainment exercises along with visiting allied forces. Its personnel approached every chal lenge with a leading-edge mentality and continued their unprecedented, acci dent-free growth by exceeding the Chief of Naval Personnel mandated 75 per cent mishap reduction goal. Upon learning that NAS Jacksonville had again won the Navys Installation Excellence Award for the second con secutive year, Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. said that the men and women During a standard six-month deployment, Navy crews cele brate the halfway mark at three months. However, for HSL-42 Detachment 8, four-and-a-half months mark the midway point of its longer-than-usual deployment. On June 20 of last year, Det. 8 (nicknamed the Doomsday Detachment) embarked aboard guided missile destroyer USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) and departed Naval Station Norfolk with the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group for the 5th and 6th Fleet Areas of Responsibility (AOR). With four port visits and four-and-a-half months of operations under their belt, the Doomsday Detachment con tinues to conduct operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Following brief operations in the Mediterranean Sea and two port visits in Montenegro and Albania, the ship transited the Suez Canal and entered the 5th Fleet AOR to focus on counterpiracy operations. During an eastward transit in the Gulf of Oman on Aug. 20, the crew of Proud Warrior 424, led by the Detachment OfficerIn-Charge Lt. Cmdr. Jeremiah Binkley, executed an urgent medical evacuation of a criti cally injured sailor from the merchant vessel M/V Belde. Supported by the Churchill boarding team, the SH-60B Seahawk, additionally crewed by Lt. Alan Shingler and AWR1 Josh Wyckoff, lowered rescue swimmer AWR3 Kelvi Bonanofeliciano more than 120 feet onto the bridge wing of the Belde in order to place the injured patient in a litter and bring him safely aboard Proud Warrior 424. The patient was successful ly stabilized and transported to Salalah, Oman for further medical treatment and was expected to make a full recov ery. During the first half of the deployment, Detachment 8 personnel achieved numerous Mayor presents environmental award to NAS Jax Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and Chris Buckley, chairman of Keep Jacksonville Beautiful, presented NAS Jacksonville Environmental Director Kevin Gartland and NAS Jacksonville Public Works Officer Cmdr. Anant Patel with the Environmental Achievement Award for Government at the Mayors Environmental Award Luncheon on Dec. 13 at the Jacksonville Zoo. Brown told the audience, Our envi ronmental protection board selected Naval Air Station Jacksonville for this award because it has demonstrated its commitment to greening its facilities, properties and operations through significant environmental, energy and encroachment conservation initiatives, NAS Jax Sailor earns top medal for non-combat heroismGSEC(SW) Bryain Williams of Transient Personnel Unit/Pre-Trial Confinement Facility (TPU/PCF) Jacksonville was presented the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for heroism by Commander, Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. during a ceremony on Jan. 3. Williams earned the presti gious presidential award for rescu ing 4-month-old Jimmy Knight from a burning house on May 11, 2010, in Jacksonville. Williams vividly recalls those NAS Jax best in Navy for second consecutive year HSL-42 Detachment 8 is halfway home

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Dustin has already been home from deployment for a month. Yes, its true. I know because I have a calendar. If I went with my gut instead, I would think Dustin just arrived. The month leading up to his homecoming crept by painfully slow, but the past four weeks have slipped past like a summers end. To say its been a good month would be an understatement. Dustin, the boys and I have been in a cocoon of family time. We even spent Christmas alone, just the five of us. This is the first Christmas when we didnt have other family visiting, Ford said, and I had to think about that for a minute. Dustin was home. We were together. Nothing really seemed to be missing. We are in that post-deployment period a honeymoon, of sorts when nothing else registers or matters except being together. According to my longtime militarywife friend, this is when spouses have to break-up with their deployment world in order to make room for their returning loved one. Or, put another way, military wives are serial rough weather friends: we cling to our support system during the deployment, then we shut out everything else, if only for a while, once its over. Since Dec.1, my friends have heard from me less, and I havent had much me time. I havent wanted it. But this post-deployment honey moon period always comes to end. Eventually, things return to a new normal. Eventually, a night out with the girls sounds better than a night in with the husband. Eventually, a mili tary wife asks herself, Doesnt he have somewhere hes supposed to be? Eventually came last week, during a family trip to Boston, when Dustin, on foot, took a left turn instead of a right and sent me this text message several minutes later: Im going down a hill. Now Im going up a hill. Im actually not sure where I am. Wait, lets stop and rewind: The day after Christmas, Dustin drove us to a hotel that is attached to an indoor water park. These are fairly common in the northeast, but when we first moved here four years ago, the idea took some getting use to. Swimming indoors in the south means swimming inside one of those screened enclosures that blow into your neighbors yard during a hurri cane. In the northeast, it means squeez ing into last summers bathing suit while freezing rain pelts the windows of your hotel. I walked dazed and confused through the steamy, chlorine-filled water park, and by the sheepish smiles on the other womens faces, I knew they felt the same. Our nods said, I forgot to shave, or My legs are white. But the kids had a blast. So did Dustin and every other husband in the building. When I saw mine run past with the older boys, on their way to a big slide while I sat in ankle-deep water in the baby pool with Lindell and the other moms, Dustins face looked 20 years younger. His wet hair stood up in all directions. Isnt this great? he said. Just one more time down the big slide! All at once, sitting in an unnatu rally warm pool, I felt angry for the first time since Dec. 1. My life was supposed to get easier with Dustin home. Instead, he seemed to be having all the fun. When we were leaving the park, Dustin forgot something and had to go back inside. Ill meet you at the car, he said, so the boys and I went out the double doors and walked through the freezing rain and darkness. We went down a sidewalk and turned right in front of the hotel, where our car was parked. Review: we went straight and then turned right. Slush slid down the windshield and hot air warmed my feet as we sat in the car waiting for Dustin. Five minutes. Ten minutes. No Dustin. I drove around the parking lot to look for him. I bet he went the wrong way, I said aloud, my annoyance growing. But theres only one way to go, Ford said. PS: Ive known Dustin a lot longer than Ford has. This is when the text message came: Im going down a hill. Now Im going up a hill. Im actually not sure where I am. I called Dustin on the phone, and after a few confusing minutes (You were supposed to turn right. Can you see the hotel? Are you outside? Are you in the parking lot?), I figured out he was on the backside of the hotel, in the loading zone, walking in the opposite direction of our car. Maybe I took the long route, he said. Geez, its like having a fourth child, I said under my breath. And just then, in front of me in the rain, I saw him. He was standing in the middle of the road, his sweatshirt soaked and drops of water running down his cheeks. He was laughing and smiling like a little boy. We were still on the phone. Hey, its you, he said. Man, Im glad to see you. And though I was annoyed, I sort of fell in love all over again. Jan. 10 1847 American naval forces occupy Los Angeles. 1917 Navy places first production order for aerial photographic equip ment. 1934 VP-10F flies first non-stop formation flight from San Francisco to Pearl Harbor, arriving the next day. 1956 Establishment of first Navy nuclear power school at Submarine Base New London, Conn. Jan. 11 1863 CSS Alabama sinks USS Hatteras off Galveston. 1944 Aircraft from USS Block Island (CVE-21) make first aircraft rocket attack on German submarine. Jan. 12 1813 U.S. frigate Chesapeake cap tures British Volunteer. 1848 Attack on sloop Lexington, San Blas, Mexico. 1953 Landings tested on board USS Antietam (CV-36), the first angled-deck aircraft carrier. 1991 Ranger battle group arrives on station in the northern Arabian Sea to participate in Operation Desert Shield. Jan. 13 1865 Amphibious attack on Fort Fisher in N.C. 1964 USS Manley (DD 940) evacu ates 54 American and 36 allied nationals after Zanzibar government is over thrown. Jan. 14 1813 U.S. frigate Chesapeake cap tures British brig Hero. 1863 Navy General Order 4, Emancipation Proclamation. 1943 In first submarine supply mission, USS Gudgeon (SS-211) lands six men, 2,000 pounds of equipment and supplies on Negros Island. Jan. 15 1815 HMS Endymion, Tenedos and Pomone capture USS President. 1865 In largest amphibious opera tion of war, Union forces capture Ft. Fisher near Wilmington, N.C. 1997 Navy physician Capt. Jerry Lineger joined the crew of the MIR space station after being launched on Atlantis during space Shuttle Mission STS-81. Prior to the mission, he trained at the Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia for more than a year. Jan. 16 1930 USS Lexington (CV-16) provides power to Tacoma, Wash., when floods knocked out city power plants. 1991 Operation Desert Storm begins for the liberation of Kuwait from Iraq. Hundreds of U.S. and coalition air strikes launched at missile and antiaircraft targets in Iraq and Kuwait to destroy Saddam Husseins offensive military capabilities. Six Navy battle groups, two battleships and a 31-ship amphibious task force were operating in the Red Sea, Persian Gulf and Arabian Sea areas. Post-deployment bliss? Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 a.m. Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at Chapel Complex Building 749 and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the barracks NAS Jacksonville Chapel Center Corner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road 542-3051

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The crew of a U.S. Navy P-3C Orion attached to VP-45 located a group of distressed South Korean mariners in the Philippine Sea, Dec. 22, and directed a Hong Kong-flagged vessel to the scene to ensure the mariners safety. The U.S. 7th Fleet staff was notified of the South Korean vessel in distress approximately 350 nautical miles southwest of Okinawa and directed VP-45 to respond. The squadron, operating from Kadena Air Base on Okinawa, promptly launched an aircraft with search and rescue resources to the distressed vessels last known position. We were told we were looking for a vessel in distress with an unknown number of people in a life raft, said Lt.j.g John Allen, a member of the crew. The crew utilized all of the aircrafts capabili ties including its radar and camera to locate the vessel in distress. We were the first search and rescue asset on the scene, Allen said. We found a South Korean container ship listing 25 degrees to the port side and a life raft floating next to it with 17 individuals in it. Nobody was injured. The crew contacted a nearby Hong Kong flagged merchant vessel and vectored the ves sel to the life raft. The merchant vessel crew was able to find the life raft and took all 17 survivors aboard. The success of the mission is a direct reflec tion on our squadrons training and mission readiness, Allen added.Based in Jacksonville, the VP-45 Pelicans under the command of Cmdr. Mike Vitali, are cur rently deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations as part of Commander, Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force 7th Fleet. Pelicans conduct SAR for missing Filipino fishermen Typhoon Bopha struck the Philippines in early December killing more than 1,000 and leaving 300,000 others without shelter. The storm also devas tated the Filipino tuna fishing fleet, which set sail in October and was at sea when the storm passed through their fishing grounds. About 300 fishermen were reported missing. VP-45, deployed to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan, responded to the crisis, sending two P-3 Orion aircraft to assist with search and rescue operations for the missing fishermen. Conducting operations out of the Mactan Air Base in the Philippines, VP-45 crews flew more than 40 hours of Search and Rescue (SAR) in the Philippine Sea. We were proud to be able to provide assis tance to the people of the Philippines, said Lt. Troy Benbow, one of the pilots involved in the search effort. Thanks to the cooper ation and hospitality of the Filipino Air Force, the Search and Rescue oper ations were conducted safely and effectively.VP-45 search, rescue mission ensures safety of South Korean mariners JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 Richard Kemen Engine Test Facility FRCSE tests jet engines, reduces noise pollution Local residents are spared much of the ear-throbbing noise produced when Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) conducts out-of-airframe test ing to certify the reliability and performance of gas turbine engines repaired at the facility. Annexed at the far end of NAS Jacksonville along the St. Johns River, the Richard Kemen Engine Test Facility is acoustically treated and aerodynamically designed to reduce the powerful sound waves generated by jet engine combustion during testing. The walls around the concrete test chamber are 18 inches thick, said Mark Stogdon, an electronics engineer working at the testing facility. We used to test engines outside in the late 60s, but the sound carried right across the river. Testing inside is easier, and acoustics are contained. It is considerably safer. Performance testing in mirror image test chambers is routinely conducted on each engine serviced or repaired at the FRCSE Crinkley Engine Facility. Testing ensures its optimum operating perfor mance prior to returning the engine to Fleet inventory. Stogdon said about 140 engines are tested at FRCSE each year, and Kemen is the Navys only depot engine test facility still in use. He said in the heyday back in the 1970s, six facilities were to be built, but only one other was constructed at the military depot in Norfolk, Va. It was torn down years later following the depot closures in the mid1990s according to Stogdon. In the engine preparation area, a monorail system allows technicians to suspend each jet engine until it is rolled into a test chamber, an enormous room measuring about 90-feet long, 20-feet wide and 30-feet high. The monorail improves workflow and ensures opti mum efficiency, safety and ease of use for the technicians. Seated in the con trol room behind two inches of bul letproof glass, test cell operators put a variety of off-wing engines through their entire operating range to simulate the engines flight mission. The largest being the F414-GE-400 turbofan engine with 22,000 pounds of static thrust. The F/A-18 Super Hornet and the EA-18G Growler tactical aircraft are each powered by two of these engines according to the Navy Fact Files. Each computer-controlled test cell has a thrust capacity of 40,000 pounds and a bed capacity of 100,000 pounds. Military jet aircraft in afterburner produce exceedingly high noise lev els when at maximum power settings. These aircraft are tested by spraying more fuel into the exhaust that ignites to generate additional thrust power. A compressed air system supplies the energy required to start the jets turbine engine. A thrust stand securely holds the engine with interface connections for fuel, air, hydraulic, oil, electrical and other systems that tie into a computer in the control room. Repeatable operations are conducted to verify results following each engine repair and reassembly. The FRCSE test cell is designed with special air intake baffles for optimal air flow and exhaust to ensure engine

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 5 ENGINEperformance consistency and to suppress noise to Occupational Safety and Health Administration acceptable levels. An exhaust collector and transfer tube, exhaust diffuser, exhaust plenum and exhaust stack with baffles aid in reducing heat and vibration from engine exhaust during testing. We are not noisy, said Curtis Kimbler, the former test engine supervisor who now serves as the TF34 engine supervisor. It is one of the most people-friendly cells around. We have testing capability for the J52, TF34, F414 and the F404 engine. The Richard Kemen Engine Test Facility was dedicated in 1978 and underwent a major upgrade in 2011. Photos by Victor Pitts

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Cmdr. Alex Ellermann was relieved by Cmdr. Anthony Scarpino as VR-62s com manding officer Dec. 8 at NAS Jacksonville. The guest speaker was Fleet Logistics Support Wing Deputy Commodore Capt. Mark Bailey. Scarpino, a native of Pittsburgh, graduated from the University of Memphis in 1995. During his collegiate career, he was elected captain of the var sity football team and played as starting quarterback during the 1994 season. Electing to pursue his dream of becoming a naval avia tor, he graduated from Officer Candidate School in February 1996. He reported for initial flight training in Pensacola, Fla., and was designated a naval aviator in October 1997. Following initial P-3 Orion training at VP-30 in Jacksonville, Scarpino reported to the VP-4 Skinny Dragons based in Kaneohe, Hawaii. He completed three extended operational deployments to Japan, Oman and Bahrain fly ing surveillance and recon naissance missions in direct support of Operation Enduring Freedom. During this tour, he was designated as a P-3 Orion patrol plane commander, mis sion commander, P-3 instruc tor pilot and primary pilot NATOPS evaluator. He also served as the commands per sonnel officer, communication security officer, aircraft divi sion officer and pilot NATOPS officer. In February 2002, Scarpino was nominated and selected as a Fleet Replacement Squadron instructor pilot assigned to VP-30. While serving in this capacity, he was instrumental in the training of more than 200 U.S. and international pilots and naval flight officers. Beyond his primary duties as an instructor pilot, he served as a P-3 Orion tactics instructor, flight engineer division officer and operations flight officer. In August 2004, Scarpino transitioned to the full time support community and reported to the VR-62 NorEasters based in Brunswick, Maine, where he flew the C-130 Hercules. During this assignment, he served as the training depart ment head, administrative department head and main tenance department head. In November 2007, he reported to the VR-64 Condors based in Willow Grove, Pa., where he served as operations depart ment head. While assigned to VR-62 and VR-64, Scarpino has flown over 200 sorties providing direct logistical support to Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. In November 2009, Scarpino reported to Capitol Hill serv ing as a defense legislative fel low for U. S. Sen. Christopher Bond (R-MO). In December 2010, he reported to the Office of the Chief of Navy Reserves to head the Congressional Liaison branch. Selected to Operational Command, Scarpino became VR-62s executive officer in September 2011. Scarpino earned a Masters Degree in Business Administration from Touro University International, completed Joint Professional Military Education (Phase 1) and has accumulated nearly 3,000 flight hours in the P-3 Orion and C-130 Hercules air craft. The Career Management System Interactive Detailing (CMS/ID) application phase is scheduled to begin Jan. 10, and remain open until 5 a.m. Jan. 22 for Sailors in their permanent change of station (PCS) orders negotiation window. CMS/ID is the web-based program enlisted Sailors use to review and apply for PCS orders when it is time to transfer duty stations. Sailors may access the site at https:// www.cmsid.navy.mil or from the CMS/ ID link at www.npc.navy.mil. Sailors are in their orders nego tiation window when they are within nine through seven months from their projected rotation date (PRD). This is the first application phase for Sailors with an October 2013 PRD, the second application phase for Sailors with a September 2013 PRD and the last application phase for Sailors with an August 2013 PRD. These Sailors may review advertised billets in CMS/ID during the applica tion phase and apply for up to five jobs, either directly using CMS/ID or through a command career counselor. The application phase is typically 10 days, allowing Sailors time to review available jobs, research billets and discuss options with their family and chain of command before the applica tion phase closes. Updated detailing business rules announced last July in NAVADMIN 226/12 eliminated red zone and green zone job advertisements in CMS/ID and now detailers fill all advertised active-duty billets each month using the available Sailors who are in their orders-negotiation window. Sailors can be more proactive in getting an assignNomads hold change of command January app phase to open for Sailors seeking PCS orders 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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HERO HSL-42assigned to the installation had earned the recogni tion with a balance of initiative and hard work. This years competition and all nomination pack ages reflected the great accomplishments that CNIC installations made worldwide, said Scorby. However, for the second year in a row, NAS Jacksonville distinguished itself and made the best use of its available resources to accomplish its assigned missions. They continue to set the standard, and I couldnt be moreproud of Capt. Sanders and his team of professionals. Sanders attributed their continued success to con ducting business using an integrated team approach that includes the support of Navy Southeast leader ship, the Jacksonville mayor, county, state, federal agencies and area communities. This award belongs not only to the NAS Jax team, but also to the people of Northeast Florida. They work with us throughout the year and ensure our mission, military members and their families are well cared for, Sanders said. It is a happy day in Jacksonville. The second and third place winners in the large category were: Fleet Activity Yokosuka and Naval Station Norfolk. In the small category the winners were: Naval Activity Panama City, Naval Air Facility El Centro followed by Naval Support Activity Mid-South and Commander, Fleet Activities Okinawa tying for third place. accomplishments. Five maintainers, AD2 Aaron Carvalho, AM3 Caleb Moyers, AM3 Amanda Verga, AT3 Jonathan Youmans, and AEAN Armida Guerra all earned their Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist (EAWS) qualifications. The Doomsdayers also welcomed two new members into the Proud Warrior tribe as Carvalho, Wyckoff and their wives celebrated the births of their first children. Two extended port calls in Bahrain allowed the Churchill a much-needed break from the high operational tempo of the 5th Fleet AOR. Churchill and Det. 8 departed Bahrain for addi tional support of Operation Enduring Freedom and other tasking may come their way. Proud of their accomplishments up to this point and eager to face future assignments and chal lenges, HSL-42 Det. 8 and the Churchill crew look forward to a safe return to families and friends following a successful deployment. education outreach and environmental partnership with the city of Jacksonville and state of Florida. Gartland thanked the mayor and said, NAS Jacksonville is extremely proud to receive the Environmental Achievement Award for Government Agency. We are very thankful for the great support we receive from our local community, state and federal government leaders, agencies and citizens. The City of Jacksonville Environmental Protection Board consists of nine members, appointed for four-year terms, who are chosen to represent industry, conservationist organizations, professional engineers, the medical profession, and the general public. This board develops regulations nec essary for administration and enforce ment of the citys environmental laws. It conducts investigations of complaints, takes testimony in matters under its jurisdiction and provides a hearing platform for envi ronmental matters within the city. The board also conducts public out reach programs for schools, teachers, civic and private organizations. intense minutes as he risked his life to save the young child. My family and I had gone to the home to look at a dog we were considering adopting. After meet ing the dog and his owner, Melinda Knight, we had decided we wanted him. We put him in the car and were leaving when Melinda came running out screaming her house was on fire and she couldnt find her baby in all the smoke, said Williams. I ran into the smoke-filled house and located Jimmy in his playpen. I picked him up and found my way back out the front door, handing the infant to my wife. Then I heard Melinda yelling at the back door and went to help. During the confu sion, I didnt tell her that I had rescued her son and assumed she had another child inside, he continued. So I tried to get in the back door but the flames were too intense. After a few minutes, everyone realized no one else was in the house and the baby was safe. As Scorby presented the award in front of Williams and Knights family members and Sailors from his command, he stated, Its an absolute honor and privilege for me to be here today and present this award. You dont see this award given very often. The only time Ive seen this award presented was after 9-11 for some of the rescues at the Pentagon. Chief, I cant say how much admiration and respect I have for what you did by putting your life on the line to save another human being. After receiving the award, Williams said humbly, Im thrilled to be given this award. I just went to Jimmys third birthday party the other day and am just so happy that he is still here to celebrate it. Bryain definitely deserves this award. If it wasnt for him saving my son, he probably would not be here today. Our families have become close and we spend time together. Weve been there for one another through some hardships Bryains wife Kathy passed away and although I didnt know her long, she was very special to me. And, Jimmy knows that this is the man who saved his life, said Knight. CNIC AWARDENVIROMENTAL AWARD ment of their choice by using all five choices when applying. CMS/ID features a Sailor Preference section under the Sailor Info Tab where Sailors may rank duty preferences by type, command, location, platform and community, as well as indicate which special programs and schools they would like and leave comments for the detailer. Detailers will always attempt to fill billets using a Sailors desired selections first; however, fleet readi ness requirements are the guiding factor in filling billets. Detailers must also follow sea-shore flow guidelines outlined in NAVADMIN 201/11, so unless a Sailor requests Sea Duty Incentive Pay or the Voluntary Sea Duty Program to take consecutive sea duty orders, a Sailor up for shore duty should not be involuntarily assigned another sea tour. It may mean a Sailor hop ing for shore duty in Florida or California may receive shore duty someplace else, where the need is greater. A single set of sea billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and a single set of shore billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command and Bureau of Naval Personnel are advertised each application cycle as the Navy seeks to fill gaps at sea and place Sailors with the right experience levels and skill sets into high-priority Fleet billets. Some factors a detailer must weigh when matching Sailors to jobs include the Sailors desires, qualifica tions, training availability, career progression and cost to the Navy. Detailers wont assign Sailors to advertised jobs until after the close of the application phase, during the detailer selection phase. Sailors may log into CMS/ ID anytime after the detailer selection phase to see if they have been selected for orders. PCS The F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighter jet will be a strategic deterrent for the nation because of its huge leap in capability, a Marine Corps pilot said in a recent interview on the Pentagon Channel. Lt. Col. Jeffrey Scott, commander of the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wings Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 121 at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz., recently told the Pentagon Channel the F-35 will allow Marines to perform missions in high-threat areas, unlike existing aircraft. The F-35 will be able to do every mission now per formed by the AV-8 Harrier, but will be able to do it in more situations, said Scott, who is involved with flight testing the new aircraft. The new fighter will provide access to more areas, he explained, and will allow more time for rolling back enemy defenses. The Defense Department and Lockheed Martin reached an agreement in principle in December to manufacture 32 F-35s in the Pentagons largest weapons program. That includes 22 F-35A conventional takeoff and landing variants for the Air Force, three F-35B short-takeoff and vertical landing variants for the Marine Corps, and seven F-35C carrier variants for the Navy. Scott said flying the F-35 is an easy transition from the Harrier, and that it did exceptionally well during a recent trial at sea. The sensors and systems are the big leap driving the aircraft in terms of tactics, he said. The Lightning will fulfill a lot of the functions of Marine Corps aviation such as [our] air support role, air-to-air combat, targeting enemy ground locations and supporting the troops on the ground as Harriers and [F/A-18] Hornets do now, he added. But it brings more in one aircraft in its ability to protect itself from the enemy. Scott said the F-35 will give the military a huge leap in capability, probably five or six steps beyond what we now have. Were going to have this aircraft for a long time, he said. As we get more and more of these aircraft in all of the services, were going to see a lot of the benefits that the aircraft has in terms of commonality. As we start operating tactically, some of the communica tions [and] capabilities will become more and more valuable to the services and it will be in demand to combatant commanders around the world.Pilot calls F-35 big leap in fighter/attack capability 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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The VP-45 Pelicans began their Western Pacific deployment with a week-long detachment to Clark Air Base in the Philippines. The Pelicans were joined by members of the VP-5 Mad Foxes to facilitate a smooth transition and provide turn over. The squadrons participated in mari time domain awareness missions designed to strengthen military-to-military relations between the Philippines and the United States. Daily interactions provided an opportunity to cultivate relationships with the local com munity and build ties support channels laying a solid foundation for operations from Clark Air Base. The aircrew and maintenance team were also grateful for the opportuni ty to participate in military and com munity relationship building. When asked about his experience during the detachment, AD2(AW) Keilbenjamine Diaz from Pampanga, Philippines responded, Its been six years since Ive been back to my home country of the Philippines. I feel great to be part of the VP-45 detachment crew that went and worked with the Philippine Air Force. It really brings back memories from the past. A highlight during the detachment was the opportunity to share in cultural exchanges with the host nation. Being able to operate out of the Philippines was a great experience. It was excit ing to be able to experience the local culture while completing our mission, said AWO2 Jonathon Cuff. Our host nations hospitality was more than we could have asked for. Based in Jacksonville, the Pelicans and Mad Foxes are currently deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility as part of Commander, Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Seventh Fleet. P-3C Orion aircraft from the VP-8 Fighting Tigers and the VP-10 Red Lancers worked with the Royal Canadian Navy frigate HMCS Ottawa (FFH-341) to recover 1,086 kilograms of cocaine, valued in excess of $75 million during an interdiction in the 4th Fleet Area of Responsibility in late November. Operating outside the territorial waters of Costa Rica, the P-3C aircrew noted suspicious activity aboard a fishing vessel. Maintaining observa tion of the vessel, the aircrew coordinated with the Ottawa for search and potential seizure of the vessel. Upon arrival the HMCS Ottawa deployed its helicopter and a boarding team via fast boat. The intercept and search of the fishing vessel resulted in the seizure of 1,086 kilograms of cocaine, valued in excess of $75 mil lion. It was pretty awesome to not only catch drug smugglers in the act, but to be able to coordinate and witness a successful interdiction with the Canadians. We are looking forward to many busts like this in the future, said Lt. j.g. Matt Willard of VP-10. VP-8 and VP-10 are both based out of NAS Jacksonville. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stabil ity, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. Pelicans and Mad Foxes conduct joint detachment to Philippines VP squadrons, HMCS Ottawa coordinate drug seizure JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 9

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Sailors from the VP-45 Pelicans and VP-10 Red Lancers participated in the annual Christmas gift exchange between Commander, Fleet Activities Okinawa and Sailors from the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Forces (JMSDF) Dec. 19 at White Beach in Okinawa, Japan. Each year, the two organi zations exchange tradition al American and Okinawan Christmas decorations with the JMSDF receiving a Christmas tree in exchange for a set of kadomatsu Japanese ornaments made from bamboo and pine boughs. The event was hosted by the JMSDF and included a mochi pounding. Mochi is a Japanese rice cake made of glutinous rice pounded into paste and molded into the desired shape. In Japan it is traditionally made in a ceremony called mochitsuki. While eaten year-round, mochi is a traditional food for the Japanese new year. PR2 Nichole Oveido of VP-45 was particularly impressed with the Japanese hospital ity and closing ceremony where all the participants clapped in unison to symbolize bringing good fortune for all in the new year. It was very interesting and the Japanese were extremely friendly, remarked Oveido. Making the mochi cakes was very similar to my family tradition of making pupusas. Experiencing foreign cultures sometimes doesnt seem so foreign after all. Based in Jacksonville, the Pelicans and Red Lancers are currently on a six-month deployment to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility as part of Commander, Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Seventh Fleet. VP-45 Pelicans Volunteer at Yara Youth Centers Christmas PartySeven Sailors from the VP-45 Pelicans visited the Yara Youth Center in Kadena Town, Okinawa Dec. 22 to take part in their annual Christmas party. The Sailors sang and danced with local youth to music ranging from popular Top-40 hits to classic Christmas carols. When Santa made an appearance at the party, VP-45 Sailors also lent a hand passing out gifts. It was awesome to see that other countries celebrate the holidays almost exactly the way we do back in the States, said LS2 Elena Cruz from Guatemala City, Guatemala. It was fun to interact and play games with the youth of our host country. The experience put smiles on the faces of everyone involved. Based at NAS Jacksonville, and under command of Cmdr. Mike Vitali, the Pelicans are deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility in support of Commander Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force 7th Fleet. The Veterans Administration (VA) has created the Fully Developed Claim (FDC) Program, a new and innovative program designed to provide swift and expeditious treatment of eligible fully developed compensation or pension claims. The FDC Program is the fastest means of getting a claim processed. A participating Veteran with an eli gible claim will have his/her claim expeditiously routed through the claims process for a swift decision. Participation will not affect the quality of care a Veteran receives or the benefits to which a Veteran is enti tled. The FDC program is not a predischarge program associated with active duty service members. To start the process, a veteran can lock in an effective date with an informal claim. The informal claim includes the statement below in the form of a letter: The purpose of the informal claim is to allow the veter an time to gather pertinent evidence needed to complete a claim. I intend to apply for compensa tion/pension benefits under the FDC Program. This statement is to pre serve my effective date for entitle ment to benefits. I am in the process of assembling my claim package for submission. This statement must be accom panied by the veteran or claimants name (if other than the veteran), claim number, and signature. To participate, the FDC Program requires that a veteran complete and submit a Fully Developed Claim Certification and either a VA Form 21-526EZ, Fully Developed Claim (Compensation), for a compensation Pelicans, Red Lancers participate in mochi pounding VA creates new program to process claims faster 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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claim, or a VA Form 21-527EZ, Fully Developed Claim (Pension), for a pen sion claim. The veteran must also sub mit, with the application and certification, all relevant and pertinent evidence to fully develop the claim. VA Form 21-526EZ and VA Form 21-527EZ pro vide, in detail, claims eligible for the FDC program as well as notification of all information and evidence neces sary to fully develop and substantiate these claims. How does it work? VA, traditionally, after it receives a claim from a veteran will only then provide the veteran notification of what is required from him/ her to substantiate the claim via the Duty to Assist letter. The FDC program is unique in that it provides notifica tion of the evidence necessary to sub stantiate an eligible claim at the time of application, allowing the veteran to understand what is required of him/her at that time. A veteran participating in the FDC program will send the required evi dence with the claim and certify that he/she has nothing further to provide. By doing this, a veteran dramatically reduces the processing time of his/her claim by eliminating the time VA would normally spend developing for evidence from that veteran. VA is able to process these claims far more quickly than claims going through the traditional claims process. In addition, VA has established priority channels to expeditiously route FDCs. Once the fully developed claim is received by VA, any subsequent infor mation or evidence submitted to VA may serve to remove that claim from the FDC program. At that time the claim will be processed the traditional way. For detailed information on the FDC program and downloadable forms look up benefits.va.gov/transformation/fastclaims or call 1-800827-1000. VA JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 11

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12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 Apoyan has been recognized as the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jacksonvilles 2012 Sailor of the Year. Apoyan is currently assigned as leading petty officer for Maintenance Training Unit 3032, supervising 26 instruc tors. As a mechanical support equipment instructor, he has completed 16 support equip ment formal course reviews, four course revisions, and was responsible for the upkeep of 78 support equipment maintenance trainers valued at $2.2 million. Apoyan coordinated numer ous command events as MWR president, leading 14 Sailors and Marines and collecting over $7,500 for MWR fundrais ers. He is currently attending Southern Illinois University pursuing a bachelors degree in workforce education. Additionally, he is an active member of the Owens Lodge No. 162 Freemasons and has dedicated numerous hours to the I.D., a program identifying runaway and missing children. He also volunteers off-duty time to local programs such as Adopt-A-Highway and Habitat for Humanity. Apoyans professionalism, leadership and community service have contributed sig nificantly to command mission and the local Jacksonville community. Wagner was selected as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2012 Junior Sailor of the Year. He is currently assigned as an aviation support equipment instructor at Maintenance Training Unit 3032, where he trains Sailors and Marines on mechanical upkeep and main tenance of support equipment afloat. Wagner has provided 500 hours of instruction, achieving a 100 percent graduation rate with an overall student GPA of 96.7 percent. His collateral duties include public affairs photographer and writer, MWR and Petty Officer Association event coor dinator which raised $2,600 in funds. Additionally, he assists in the facilitation of the Command Indoctrination program, pro viding information and train ing on programs such as sexual assault prevention, domestic violence, and drinking and driving. Wagner serves his local community as the home own ers association president for Meadow Glenn, and is respon sible for the maintenance and upkeep of his community that contains three retention ponds and 250 family homes. Wagners dedication and professionalism have made him invaluable to his command and an easy choice as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2012 Junior Sailor of the Year. Charles Beene has been selected as the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonvilles 2012 Senior Civilian of the Year. Beene is the information technologys (IT) director of 276 NMCI computers at two CNATTU sites, aboard NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport. His dedicated efforts have been invaluable in provid ing the highest quality, most up-to-date computer network and software support to staff, instructors and students. He continually lends his vast technical knowledge and expertise to assist other commands and IT managers across the CNATT domain, always seeking a more efficient, protected network in support of the Naval Education and Training Commands training mission. John Torres was selected as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2012 Junior Civilian of the Year. Torres is the student manage ment supervisor responsible for the accurate and timely processing of all students at CNATTU Jacksonville. He is the liaison between fleet commands and CNATTU Jacksonvilles Maintenance Training Units coordinating classes and mobile training teams. Jeffrey Hayes is CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2012 Civilian Instructor of the Year. Hayes is assigned as P-3 avionics phase instructor for Maintenance Training Unit 1011. His vast technical exper tise and cross certification in 10 maintenance courses of instruction have made him an invaluable asset to the com mand. Hayes was responsible for the completion of all but one scheduled P-3 Avionics related courses of instruc tion in 2012. Additionally, he recently completed his mas ters degree through Webster University. Disposition Services Reservist recognizedLSCS Gregory Evans, a Reservist with Navy Operational Support Center Jax who is assigned to Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Disposition Services, was among those recognized at the 45th annual Employee Recognition Program Ceremony Dec. 12 at the McNamara Headquarters Complex at Fort Belvoir, Va. During the ceremony, DLA Director Vice Adm. Mark Harnitchek presented Evans with the DLA Reserve Forces Senior Enlisted Person of the Year Award for his achievements while deployed to Afghanistan as part of the one of the Expeditionary Disposal Remediation Teams (EDRT). He was specifically cited for work he did to improve the speed and safety of the movement of DLA Disposition Services military, civilian and contrac tor personnel onto and off forward operating bases. EDRTs and other Disposition Services personnel travel to remote forward bases to help front line units with scrap handling, demilitarization of equipment and turn ins, especially when units are wrapping up their deployments. Evans is the senior enlisted leader of a team assigned to DLA Disposition Services Jacksonville when not deployed. Recognizing the achievements of individuals and teams across the DLA enterprise occurs each December. The annual event includes naming 10 people as DLA employees of the year, team performance awards, civilian and military leadership awards, and DLA Joint Reserve awards. CNATTU selects Sailors of the Year Walker was selected as the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonvilles 2012 Senior Instructor of the Year. Walker is currently assigned as leading chief petty officer for Maintenance Training Unit 1005 and is a qualified mainte nance training specialist. He provided 800 hours of instruction to 26 students, teaching MH-60 Weapons Load, Armament and Release courses while maintaining a 100 per cent graduation rate with an overall 98.3 percent class GPA. As the command suicide prevention coordinator, Walker has provided over 60 hours of suicide awareness training for CNATTU Jacksonville staff and 4,200 students. Additionally, Walker has been at the forefront of a multi-bil lion dollar program to provide MH-60 Romeo training for the Royal Australian Navy. His leadership was instru mental to the readiness and training for both U.S. Navy and Royal Australian Navy Sailors during this highly visible inter national collaboration. Lucy was selected as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2012 Instructor of the Year. Currently assigned as Maintenance Training Unit 1011, Aviation Ordnance/ Electrical Division lead ing petty officer and P-3C Armament/Ordnance System Maintenance Course, P-3C Conventional Weapons Loading Course Leading Aviation Ordnanceman instructor, she provided over 240 hours of instruction to 104 students while maintaining an impres sive 100 percent graduation rate. Lucy was responsible for the completion of 12 formal course and safety reviews, and the maintenance and upkeep of three ordnance trainers valued at $1.3 million. As a master training special ist mentor, she provided 36 hours of training to command personnel which resulted in the qualification of seven master training specialists. As a drug and alcohol pro gram advisor (DAPA), she pro vided training to 167 military and civilian staff as well as 1,300 students. Her assignment as a sex ual assault and prevention response (SAPR) coordinator ensured a highly effective pro gram and training. was selected as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2012 Junior Instructor of the Year. Delpivo is the sole SH-60B instructor on board CNATTU Jacksonville. He is qualified to instruct four maintenance courses, and manages the initial and career SH-60B courses for both Jacksonville and North Island as the course curriculum model manager, while also being a qualified master training spe cialist. Delpivo has maintained a student class average of 98.7 per cent while instructing 36 stu dents. He has dedicated numerous hours to command level collat eral duties such as SAPR and assistant DAPA representative, command sponsor, and Second Class Petty Officers Association treasurer. He is also a member of the U.S. Navy Rugby team, and has assisted the University of Northern Florida rugby team coaching staff. CNATTU Jax names Instructors of Year CNATTU Jax announces Civilians of Year

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It was a cool Florida day as 125 people showed up for the annual Jingle Bell Jog Dec. 13. The event is each year by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department and was sponsored by Allied American University and the University of Phoenix. Placing first overall and in the mens 19 and under category was Jacob Schmit of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven with a time of 19:42. Taking first overall for the women and in the womens 35-39 cat egory, was Nicole Amador of Navy Operational Support Command with a time of 24:08. Other winners were: The next run will be the Valentines 5K in February. For more information and to sign up, call 542-3239/3518. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, spon sor or its products or services. Naval Hospital Jax wins Greybeard Fall Basketball ChampionshipNaval Hospital Jax won their second consecutive Greybeard Fall Basketball Championship Dec. 13. The 2013 Greybeard Basketball League was shortened by two months due to the gymnasium closing for renovations for six months. There were seven teams competing in a double elimination playoff format to determine the 2013 Captains Cup Greybeard Basketball Champion. Naval Hospital Jax won their first game of the playoffs against Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), but lost their second game to VP-16 sending them to the losers bracket. Naval Hospital Jax rebounded by winning their next three games against Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast, FRCSE, and VP-16 to set up a shot at the championship against Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station (NCTS) Jax. NCTS had not lost in the playoffs so Naval Hospital Jax had to beat them twice to win the champi onship due to the double elimination playoff format. Naval Hospital Jax responded in the championship game defeat ing NCTS 54-30 led by the scoring of Shannon Carswell with 19 points and Jonathan Scott added 14 points. The win forced a second and final game for the 2013 Captains Cup Greybeard Fall Basketball Championship. In the second game, NCTS had no answer for Naval Hospital Jaxs offen sive barrage with Simario Pious hit ting five three-pointers and scoring 25 points to lead the team to a lopsided 64-32 victory over NCTS to win the 2013 Captains Cup Greybeard Fall Basketball Championship and their second consecutive Greybeard Fall Basketball Championship. VR-58 wins flag football championshipThe VR-58 Sunseekers defeat ed VP-30 Pros (Officers) 27-13 to win the base 7-on-7 Flag Football Championship at Sea King Park Dec 10. Both teams had advanced through the 20-team single elimination tournament to the championship game during the week. The game was played in the driving rain and featured wild snaps, balls slipping out of player hands and crazy pitchouts. In the championship game, VP-30 scored first on their initial drive to take Brown tossed a 9-yard touchdown pass to John Fitzgerald to cap a 9-play drive. But VR-58 C-came back to tie the his first seven passes and then hit Joel Rogers with a TD pass to tie the score 7-7. Both teams defenses continued to keep the game scoreless and with less than 2 minutes left in the half it looked like 7-7 would be the score. However VR-58s Zack Jackson picked off a pass and set up a touchdown pass from Mitchum to Josh Saras to give VR-58 a 14-7 halftime lead. The wet conditions made it difficult for the teams to score as both teams had drives stalled due to wet ball errors. VR-58 had key play when Mike McCoy made an interception and Mitchum moved VR-58 to the 3-yard line hitting six of seven passes. Mitchum easily took the ball in for the touchdown putting VR-58 in the lead 20-7. In the fourth quarter, VP-30 went for a fourth and long from deep in its own territory and turned the ball over on downs at its own 10-yard line. VR-58 then scored to make it 27-7 and VP-30 could not come back from there. Mitchumconnected on 31 of 43 passes during the night while Saras and Rogers each had seven catches for VR-58. Fitzgerald had five catches and two touchdowns in a losing effort for VP-30. Army/Navy Golf Tournament heldFifty-seven players took to the NAS Jax Golf Course Dec. 6 for the 13th Army/Navy alumni golf tournament. This annual battle for bragging rights in the River City takes place prior to the football game and it always proves to be a fun and competitive event. For the past two years, the Army team has taken home the trophy, however, this year the Blue and Gold team was victorious, winning by a wide margin. The Chapter President of the Navy Alumni Association, Mike Borns (70) graciously accepted the trophy during the awards presentation. Greg Streeter (58) won the award for the oldest class represented and Peter Garfield (70) was presented with the Jungle award, for his many forays into the unknown wil derness in search of his elusive golf ball. The honored guest speaker from the Wounded Warrior Project was retired Marine Capt. Denis Oliveiro. During the tournament, Denis paired up with Bill Farnsworth (65) and they took third place net and a couple closest to the pin prizes. Deniss talk dur ing dinner was inspirational and his service truly heroic. Denis was pre sented with donations to WWP from both the Jax chapter as well as the West Point Society. Runners enjoy annual Jingle Bell Jog JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Hold em Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way NFL Playoffs will be playing at Deweys Enjoy $.50 wings during the gamesFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental includedFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238 Gym is temporarily relocated to The Zone (Bldg. 798) Jan. 14 June 30.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Wild Florida Airboats & Wild Animal Park Kenansville, Fla. $17 $46.50 Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus Jan. 1821, $13 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Preferred seating $41, lower-level seating $22 Live Broadway Series Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Dream Girls May 21 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets available at ITT through March 31 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about special discounted tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park Gold pass $71 Daytona 500 Feb. 24 $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Orange Park Mall & Movie Trip Jan. 11 at 6 p.m. Ice Skating Trip Jan. 12 at 6 p.m. Paintball Trip Jan. 19 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Jan. 22 for active duty Jan. 10 & 24 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Daily Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for $16 after 12:30 p.m. Monday & Tuesday Play 18 holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 Auto Skills 101 Class Jan. 17, 57 p.m. Learn general auto maintenance.Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Movie Under the Stars Jan. 18, 6 p.m. at Patriots Grove Featuring Finding NemoFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School March 18 April 24 $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 Sixty-three kinder garten students from Assumption Catholic School visited the VP-62 Broadarrows at NAS Jax Dec. 12. The children were given a tour of the Jay Beasley maritime patrol hangar where they were educated on the P-3 Orion and the squadrons role in the Navy. At the end of the tour, the kindergarteners had the opportunity to board a fully operational P-3. All of the teachers and the adults who were chaperoning the trip raved about the visit, said Mildred Churchill, one of the teachers. We were so impressed with how smoothly it all went. It seemed like they rolled out the red carpet for us. We all learned so much and the visit just reinforced our gratitude to our military and the Navy in particular. This was the first visit to NAS Jax in about 10 years, said Churchill, whose husband is a retired Army veteran. The kindergarten teacher jumped at the opportunity when VP-62 Executive Officer Cmdr. John Townsend invit ed the students to visit the squadron, his own daughter being among the children in her class. As both a parent and a representative of the Navy, there is no time better spent than with Americas youth, said Townsend. The responsibility to parent and mentor all of our children in a positive way will certainly deter mine the strength of our future in this country. The time spent shar ing our squadrons pur pose with those children was fun and exciting for them, and highly moti vating for our squad ron members. Best case result would be that a memory of their VP-62 visit would influence one of those children to fol low in our footsteps and choose to become the next Broadarrow Sailor. All of the students were enthralled with the visit, said Churchill. Many of the children said afterwards they, wanted to be pilots when they grow up. VP-62 is a reserve patrol and reconnais sance squadron based at NAS Jacksonville. They have provided supplemental maritime support to the fleet since 1972. Fleet Forces explores protective clothing solutions NWU Type I is not flame-resistant Commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command reached out to fleet leaders in a Navy message Dec. 12 to ensure Sailors understand the minimal flame resistant quali ties of the Navy Working Uniform Type I. Adm. Bill Gortney explained the current requirement for working uniforms and organizational clothing and discussed recent uniform testing results. In coordination with the uniform board, Adm. Haney (Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet) and I will continue to review the requirements for, and flameresistant qualities of, working uniforms including the Type I NWUs, Gortney explained in his message. The latest push for awareness stems from an impromptu test the Navy Clothing Textile Research Facility conducted Oct. 15, in Natick, Mass. The test reinforced the fact that the NWU Type I is not flame-resistant. We will explore long-term solutions that afford our Sailors the right protective clothing, aligned with the tasks they are required to perform in various operating environments, said Gortney. In 2012, fire-retardant NWU Type II/III and coveralls became part of the Navys organization al clothing inventory. The Navy began issuing flame resistant organizational gear (FROG) I and II, in the NWU Type II and III pattern, to Navy ground force per sonnel deploying to Afghanistan and those conducting operations in environments where impro vised explosive devices (IEDs) are a common threat. Navy leadership removed the flame-resistant requirements from NWUs in 1996, and com mands since then have been required to purchase flame-resistant organizational clothing for Sailors. VP-62 hosts local students

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 10, 2013 17 Last Cuban nationals retire from government serviceCuban nationals Harry Henry and Luis La Rosa retired from government service Dec. 31, mark ing the end of an era. Both were honored at a ceremony aboard Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (GTMO) Dec. 14. At the end of their final day of service New Years Eve, U.S. Marines opened GTMOs North East Gate allow ing Henry and La Rosa to pass through for the final time. The North East Gate is the northern entry point sepa rating GTMO from the rest of Cuba. When the U.S. leased the 45-square mile plot of land that is the naval station from the Cuban government in 1903, the North East Gate was established as the checkpoint for up to Cuban commuters who would move in and out of the base daily. In 1958, when vehicle traffic was prohibited, the number of com muters dropped to 300. Today only two remain, Henry and La Rosa. Henry, 83, and La Rosa, 79, worked at the naval station for a combined 120 years. La Rosa began working on base in 1957 as a welder. Throughout his nearly 60 years of service, he held numerous positions. A few of the most notable projects he worked include the famous GTMO light house; the dock at Ferry Landing and his last project, the stairwell at the Northeast Gate. Henry, a supply technician at Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville, began work in 1946 as a waiter at the Chief Petty Officers Club. In April 1951, he was selected for his first federal service posi tion as a messenger and duplicating equipment operator within the naval station ships repair department earning an annual salary of $1,089. He eventually worked his way up to a GS-05 stock control clerk position. As the result of a reorganization effort, Henry was moved to the supply department in 1972 where he became a stock clerk. In 1999, the supply department was again reorganized under NAVSUP, where Henry attained his supply technician position. He has remained in this position from 1999 until today. When asked how he felt about retirement, Henry simply said, I feel excited. After spending more than six decades working at GTMO, he reflected on his experiences, I never figured I would be the last one leaving as a commuter through the gates; this has been my home, he added with a tear in his eye.. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Head attended the historic cer emony. It was remarkable to be part of this momentous event, and it was a real pleasure to present Mr. Henry with the Meritorious Civilian Service Medal during the ceremony. With nearly 62 years of service, he has truly earned it, Head said. Twenty-four Sailors and civilian employees from three Navy Medicine commands and detachments in Jacksonville helped the Salvation Army provide needed items to more than 450 families via the Clay County Corps of the Salvation Armys Holiday Angel Tree program distribution Dec. 20-21. Volunteers from NAS Jacksonville-based Navy Medicine Education and Training Command (NMETC), Jacksonville detachment; Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Jacksonville detachment; and the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence distrib uted new clothing and toys for children from lowincome Jacksonville-area households. We are very grateful for the hard work and fan tastic attitudes of the Sailors and civilians who have helped us over the last two days said Lt. Ben Bridges of the Salvation Army. Much of the support for our programs comes from local volunteers. This includes everything from ringing bells for the kettle drive to assisting at rehabilitation centers to helping with distribution of donations as part of our Angel Tree program. The Salvation Army administers the Angel Tree program each year by placing a Christmas tree in a local mall or business. The tree is decorated with numbered paper Angel Tags with the first name, age and gender of the child who will receive the gift. Angel Tree donors across Jacksonville remove one or more tags from the Angel Tree and purchase appropriate gifts for the children on the tags. The toys are then delivered to The Salvation Army, sorted and prepared for distribution just in time for the holi days. Navy Medicine Jacksonville volunteers helped in a variety of roles, including organizing the warehouse distribution, record keeping and helping families load their gifts. This is a great opportunity to give back, in a small way, to the local community that is so supportive of the Navy family here in Jacksonville, said HM1 Teresa Adams, NMETC Administrative Department leading petty officer and one of the volunteers. Besides, helping to make sure every child has something special under the Christmas tree is a fantastic feeling. NMETC manages Navy Medicines education and training and is part of the Navy Medicine team, a global health care network of Navy medical professionals around the world who provide high-quality health care to more than 1 million eligible beneficiaries. Navy Medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ships, in the air, under the sea and on the battlefield. Fiscal cliff legislation affects military, civilian paychecksThe legislation that President Barack Obama signed Jan. 2 that postponed the fiscal cliff means changes to military and civilian paychecks, Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) officials said today. The legislation increases Social Security withholding taxes to 6.2 percent. For the past two years during the tax holiday the rate was 4.2 percent. The increase in Social Security withholding taxes affects both military and civilian paychecks, officials said. mean a 2 percent reduction in net pay. affected by a variety of additional factors such as increases in basic allowances for housing, subsis tence, longevity basic pay raises and promotions. Service members could see an increase in net pay, no change or a decrease, military personnel and readi ness officials said. is located on their leave and earnings statement in the blocks marked FICA taxes for Federal Insurance Contributions Act. and earnings statement under OASDI -for old age, survivors, and disability insurance. see potential changes in their net pay as a result of the law, DFAS officials said. Changes will be reflected in their January paychecks. Active duty military personnel will see pay adjust ments in their January mid-month paycheck and will be reflected on the January leave and earnings state ment. ing changes reflected in paychecks based on the pay period ending December 29, 2012, for pay dates beginning in January. DFAS stresses that all personnel should review pay statements carefully. The arrival of the January and the new means that we are bound for colder temperatures in the coming months. Visions of a skiing, curling up by the fire and all their preparations create eager anticipation, but the winters frigid temperatures, blizzards, and storms make emergency preparedness especially crucial at this time of year. With advanced planning in three key areas, you can be ready for any unexpected hazard that surfaces amidst winters delight. Ready Navy is here to help. Visit www.ready.navy.mil. Be and stay informed: Learn about hazards that are common in winter months and most likely to happen in your area, such as winter storms and power outages. The Ready Navy website Be and Stay Informed tabs offer specific instructions, information, and resources you may need to know regarding winter storms, power outages and home fires. Make a plan: As a family, make an emergency plan so that everyone in the family understands what to do, where to go, and what to take in the event of a fire or any emergency. Additionally, winter fire hazards, ice and winter winds can bring down power lines, making traditional communication difficult. Your emergency plan should include how your family will communi cate with each other, particularly if normal communication methods, such as phone lines or cell towers, are out. Road conditions and other hazards can limit ease of movement. Have a contact person outside the area that each member of the family can notify that they are safe, if separated. The Ready Navy website pro vides printable forms and contact cards to guide you in your planning. Winter fires: Did you know that heating sources are the second leading cause of home fires every year, especially during winter months? Kerosene heaters, candles, and wood burning fireplaces are big culprits, with December being the peak time for home candle fires. Freeze winter fires by using these items safely: Keep anything combustible at least three feet away from any heat source. Use kerosene heaters only where approved by authorities, and refuel outside and only after the heater has cooled. Never leave a burning candle unattended or abandoned. Use fire screens to keep the fire in the fireplace and have your chimney cleaned every year. Make sure that your home has at least one smoke detector. Build a Kit: The best way to prepare for the unex pected is to create one or more emergency kits that include enough water and non-perishable supplies for every family member to survive at least three days. Keep a kit prepared at home, and consider having kits in your car, at work, and a portable version in your home ready to take with you. These kits will enable you and your family to respond to a winter (or any emergency) more effectively. Your various emergency kits will be useful whether you have to shelter-inplace, are stranded at work or on the road, or move to another location. Be sure your kits address the needs of small children, individuals with special needs, and your pets. For information about Ready Navy and tips, forms, and guidance to be prepared for and stay informed about all hazards, visit www.ready.navy.mil. Navy Medicine volunteers help more than 450 Jacksonville families Advanced planning can help you survive winter

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