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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 12-06-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02022

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The VP-8 Fighting Tigers start ed returning home Nov. 27 following a six-month deployment to the U.S. Pacific Command and U.S. Southern Command areas of responsibility (AOR). I am extremely proud of the work the Fighting Tigers did on this deployment. From executing missions in both 4th and 7th Fleets, to performing sched uled and unscheduled maintenance, to volunteering their time to help those in need VP-8 Sailors executed flaw lessly, said VP-8 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Michael Marston. While deployed, VP-8 flew 652 sorties totaling 3,065 mishap-free flight hours and achieved an exceptional 97 percent mission completion rate. These statistics are a true testament to the hard work and dedication put forth by the men and women of VP-8, said Operations Officer Lt. Cmdr. John Pianetta. Based out of Japans Naval Air Facility Misawa and Kadena Air Base, while in the 7th Fleet AOR, VP-8 performed anti-submarine warfare missions; intel ligence, surveillance, and reconnais The road to war between Japan and the United States began in the 1930s when differences over China drove the two nations apart. In 1931 Japan conquered Manchuria, which until then had been part of China. In 1937 Japan began a long and ultimately unsuccessful campaign to conquer the VP-8 home from dual-site deployment AWFAN Brett Parks of VP-30 was recognized by the City of Jacksonville when he was presented a proclamation for heroic action from Victor Guillory, director of Military Affairs, Veterans and Disabled Services Department on behalf of Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown Nov. 30. The proclamation designates Dec. 5 as Brett Parks Day to pay tribute to Parks who was shot while coming to the assis tance of a robbery suspect in October. Since then, Parks has been hospitalized at Shands Jacksonville Medical Center recovering from his life-threat ening wounds that resulted in the loss of a kidney and part of his right leg. He hopes to be transferred to the Tampa VA Hospital this week to continue his rehabilitation process and receive his prosthetic device. While telling his story, Parks says he does not consider him self a hero. I didnt look at what I was doing as heroic its just something that you do. I just heard a man screaming for help and I ran over there. The man attacking him took off so I chased after him. I stopped him but didnt see a gun. A couple seconds later, he shot me and I fell, said Parks, a native of Miami, who joined the Navy in 2008. Emergency personnel quick ly transported Parks to the hospital where he has since undergone numerous surger ies to save his life. The gun shot wound damaged a major artery incurring a great loss of blood. During his ordeal, Parks has required nearly 80 pints of blood. With his family, friends and co-workers rallying by his side, Parks is making strides City of Jacksonville recognizes VP-30 Sailor for heroic action Remembering Pearl Harbor ~ Dec. 7, 1941 ~

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS My middle son, Owen, doesnt get a lot of mention in this column. Or so he tells me. Of course, Owen also once told me never to write about him again. So Im in a bit of a predicament. If I read between the lines, what I hear from Owen is this: Write about me, but give me my own space. Therefore, in honor of his 10th birthday this week, I will attempt a feat that until now has seemed impossible: writing about Owen without mentioning (oldest sons name) and (youngest sons name). I went into labor with Owen while I was cleaning up from, ahem, someone elses second birthday party. He was nearly three weeks early, and I was glad, because my husband had volunteered me to roast five turkeys for the squad rons single-sailor Thanksgiving party. (Apparently Dustin had forgotten that I was nine months pregnant and that I didnt know how to cook one turkey.) Owen spent his first year of life sleep ing in a crib with a netted tent above it because we were worried that another well-meaning toddler might acciden tally throw a blanket or a handful of Legos on top of him. Each morning, as I unzipped the tent to get him out, Owen smiled and cooed. He almost never cried. So thoughtful of him, I thought, because there was already enough noise in our house. Our dog, a Shetland Sheepdog named Tanner, took a liking to baby Owen. Sometimes, she enjoyed laying on his head. Still, Owen didnt cry. And I was lucky because this other, um, boy would say, Mom, Tanner is sitting on Owens head again. Otherwise, it could have been dangerous. One tuft of hair grew straight up from the top of Owens head, which led to his nickname Rooster. His dark brown eyes glistened and seemed to sparkle. Whenever this big kid who lived in our house drew pictures of Owen, he included sparkly eyes and sticking up hair. Owen didnt talk until well after his second birthday. He was a late walk er, too. He spent most of his time sit ting in my lap or on my hip. I worried that something was wrong. The doctors did all kinds of tests, and eventually, after the results came back normal, the pediatrician told us, Owen has just one problem, and his name begins with F. After that, a constant refrain became, Let Owen do it himself and Let Owen talk for himself. Owens favorite song was Nina Simones version of Here Comes the Sun. He called it the Little Darling song, and I can still recall the vision of him in the rearview mirror as it played: sunk in his car seat; hair sticking up; eyes twinkling; a little bit of drool fall ing down his chin as he smiled and grabbed at the toe of his shoe. When Owen was 4, he had oral sur gery and double pneumonia in the same winter. He had always been small and skinny, but by his fourth Christmas, he was fitting in old 2T clothing. I said he was like a kitten: long, bendy and skinny. He was still quiet, never complained and hardly ever cried, not even after surgery or when he was sick. Soon after, another little person joined our family. Owen seemed to grow faster after that. In another year, I referred to him as a sunflower. While some children consistently grow and change almost without detection year-to-year, Owen pushed through the soil and sprouted in a years time. Everything from his button nose to his pudgy knees took shape. Today, Owen is quiet but cheerful. It is impossible not to smile when he does. He doesnt get into trouble at school or home. He seldom needs help with any thing. He makes few demands. When other people want to be right, he lets them be. When other people want their way, he lets them have it. (Dear future daughter-in-law: youre welcome.) And . (sigh), I wanted to make this all about Owen. But I cant. You see, Owen is who he is in part because of his older and younger brothers. His place as the middle child is as much a part of his character as being the baby of the fam ily is part of our other boys (you know, the one who is leaning over my shoulder right now squealing, What about me? Write about me? I dont see my name on the screen!) All three of my boys play off and to one another. They are shaping each other in ways they might not appreci ate until years from now. Except that, one son already gets a lot of attention for being the oldest, and another gets atten tion for being the youngest. And Owen, I fear, gets lost in the shuffle. Hed never ask for it to be different. He wants them to be happy, but mostly, he wants peace. He even told me to include the youngests name so hed stop cry ing. But I wont. Everyone needs his own day. Today is Owens. I just hope that, uh, the others can appreciate that. Dec. 6 1830 Naval Observatory, the first U.S. national observatory, established at Washington, D.C, under command of Lt. Louis Malesherbes. 1917 German submarine torpe does sink USS Jacob Jones (DD-61) off England. 1968 Operation Giant Slingshot begins in Mekong Delta. Dec. 7 1917 Four U.S. battleships (USS Delaware (BB-28), USS Florida (BB-30), USS New York (BB-34) and USS Wyoming (BB-32) arrive at Scapa Flow, England taking on the role of the British Grand Fleets 6th Battle Squadron. 1941 Japanese carrier aircraft attack U.S. Pacific Fleet based in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 1944 Seventh Fleet forces land Army troops at Ormoc Bay. Kamikazes attack Task Force, damaging several ships. Dec. 8 1933 Secretary of the Navy estab lishes Fleet Marine Force, integrating a ready-to-deploy Marine force with its own aircraft into Fleet organization. 1941 U.S. declares war on Japan. 1941 USS Wake (PR-3), a river gunboat moored at Shanghai, is only U.S. vessel to surrender during World War II. 1942 Eight PT boats (PT 36, PT 37, PT 40, PT 43, PT 44, PT 48, PT 59, and PT 109) turn back eight Japanese destroyers attempting to reinforce Japanese forces on Guadalcanal. Dec. 9 1938 Prototype shipboard radar, designed and built by the Naval Research Laboratory, is installed on USS New York (BB-34). 1941 USS Swordfish (SS-193) makes initial U.S. submarine attack on Japanese ship. 1952 Strike by aircraft from Task Force 77 destroys munitions factory and rail facilities near Rashin, North Korea. Dec. 10 1941 Guam surrenders to Japanese. 1941 Aircraft from USS Enterprise (CV-6) attack and sink Japanese Submarine I-70 north of Hawaiian Islands. A participant in the Pearl Harbor Attack, I-70 is the first Japanese combat ant ship sunk during World War II. 1941 PBY flying boat piloted by Lt. Utter of VP-101 shoots down Japanese ZERO in first Navy air-to-air kill during World War II. 1950 Evacuation operations at Wonson, North Korea, completed. 1979 First Poseidon submarine configured with Trident missiles, USS Francis Scott Key (SSBN-657), completes initial deterrent patrol. Dec. 11 1941 Wake Island Garrison under Cmdr. Winfield Cunningham repulses Japanese invasion force. 1954 First super carrier of 59,630 tons, USS Forrestal (CVA-59), launched at Newport News, Va. Dec. 12 1862 Confederate torpedo (mine) sinks USS Cairo in Yazoo River. 1937 Japanese aircraft sink USS Panay in Yangtze River near Nanking, China. 1941 Naval Air Transport Service is established. 1951 First flight of helicopter with gas-turbine engine at Windsor Locks, Conn., demonstrates adaptability of this engine to helicopters. 1972Capt. Eugene Cernan, com mander of Apollo 17, walks on the Moon. Cmdr. Ronald Evans was the Command Module Pilot. The mission lasted 12 days, 13 hours and 52 minutes. Recovery by HC-1 helicopters from USS Ticonderoga (CVS-14). Middle son wont need to share birthday Free airport shuttle availableThe MWR Liberty Program is coor dinating free airport shuttle runs for all E1-E6 single Sailors and Marines from Dec. 12 through Jan. 14. These shuttles will run every four hours and will be available for depar tures and arrivals. Shuttle riders must sign up in the Liberty Center at least 24 hours in advance and must provide a copy of their itinerary during registration. Shuttle registration is now ongoing. To register or form more informa tion, call 542-3491. Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 a.m. Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at Chapel Complex Building 749 and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the barracks NAS Jacksonville Chapel Center Corner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road 542-3051

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 3

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AC1(AW/SW) Sara Bailey of NAS Joint Reserve Base (JRB) New Orleans, was named Navy Region Southeast (NRSE) Sailor of the Year for 2012 dur ing a ceremony on board NAS Jacksonville Nov. 28. The ceremony was the cul mination of NRSE Sailor of the Year week, during which five finalists selected from the regions 16 installations were invited to Jacksonville to com pete for the honor of Sailor of the Year and to participate in a series of recreational activities. During the week, the Sailors toured EverBank Field, home of the NFL Jacksonville Jaguars, and visited St. Johns Town Center. All of our candidates for Sailor of the Year were out standing Sailors and role mod els, said NRSE Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Mack Ellis. What made AC1 stand out was her sustained performance of duties primary as well as collateral. She is always ready to take on more challenging assignments. According to Bailey, it was an honor to receive such a prestigious award. Its really incredible. It was a real shock to hear my name called because the rest of these Sailors here are all great exam ples of what a first class petty officer should be, she said. She also stressed that she could never have made it this far by herself. Im in the position Im in today because of my Sailors and everything theyve done. Honestly, theyre really the ones that deserve the recogni tion, she said. In addition to Bailey, the top five also included SH1(SW) Danielle Bradford of Transient Personnel Unit NAS Jacksonville; PS1(AW/ SW) Nathaniel Ndikum of NAS JRB Fort Worth; MA1(SW/AW) Jessica Brown of Naval Station Guantanamo Bay; and MA1 Adam Turner of NAS Whiting Field. Each Sailor was accompa nied by a sponsor, who was either his or her command master chief or command senior chief. According to Ndikum, the time spent with their senior leaders was one of the most rewarding experienc es of the competition. Its a really unique experi ence to have this many master chiefs in the same place at the same time. Theyve offered a lot of encouragement, he said. Its also great to be with all of these great Sailors, too. The entire experience has been good. It provides a lot of moti vation for us to take what we learned here back to our com mands and continue to make our Sailors better. According to Bailey, the can didates were extremely ner vous the day of the selection board, but the most success ful approach was to be candid when answering questions. I went in there and just spoke the truth. If I didnt know the answer to a question, I didnt try to hide it. I just spoke from the heart and hoped for the best, and that approach apparently worked for me in the end, she said. While the board could only select one Sailor of the Year, all of the candidates should be extremely proud to have made it as far as they did, according to Ellis. It is truly a great accom plishment, he said. To get from our deckplates to this competition, thats absolutely a great accomplishment. Bailey will go on to com pete against Sailors from other regions for the honor of Commander, Naval Installations Command Sailor of the Year. The selectee from that com petition will go on to compete for Chief of Naval Operations Sailor of the Year. Southeast Region announces 2012 Sailor of the Year 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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NAS Jax petty officers advancedMore than 30 NAS Jax Sailors were frocked to E4, E5 and E6 at an all hands quarters outside Building 1 on Nov. 30. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders told the audience of active duty and civilian personnel, This is a testament to all your hard work and dedication. Congratulations on your work ethic and achievement in our Navy. Sailors frocked included: AC3 Joseph Barry QM3 Tirzah Carroll AC3 Hannah Daniels MA3 Alycia Delgado AC3 Becca Hontz PR3 Petria Jackson YN3 Doneka Royster FC3 Christine Sapp GSM3 Alison Sudduth MA3 Drew Risley MA3 William Zar Jr. YN2 Zakeyia Alvarez RP2 Jannie Anaya ABE2 David Aponte Jr. MM2 Kevin Ayres AO2 Devanae Bradley AC2 Brittany Darnell AC2 Viktor Fisher MM2 Kenneth Johnson YN2 Jeffrie Key OS2 Jeffrey Muirhead MA2 Brittny Olsen MA2 Ashanta Ross ABH2 Jamespaul Viar ET2 Timothy Walker CS1 Marnika Ash CS1 Prince Benton EN1 Lee Holts ET1 Joshua Love OS1 Jason Spooner ET1 Lucas Coffey ET1 Travis Wood The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 hosted military mem bers of the El Salvadoran 2nd Air Brigade, Nov. 21 at Las Flores Air Base. During the visit, members from the El Salvadoran Air Force and Navy participated in ground briefings on safety, operations and maintenance practices; static aircraft display; and an aircraft mission famil iarization flight. In the air, VP-8 aircrew demonstrated the intelli gence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities of the P-3C at various altitudes, utilizing the numerous electro-optical sensors onboard to image and identify selected surface vessels. VP-8 Officer-in-Charge, Lt. Cmdr. John McGonagle, remarked, the importance of showing our El Salvadorian partners what the P-3C Orion is capable of cannot be stressed enough. What the P-3C brings to the Counter Transnational Organized Crime mis sion is vital to the U.S. Southern Commands efforts in the region. It is of utmost importance that partnering nations are familiar with the capabilities that the P-3C brings to the fight. VP-8 is currently returning to its home base of NAS Jacksonville, from which it was deployed to the 4th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility.VP-8 hosts El Salvadoran military JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 Everyone looks to their health care provider to help fix them when theyre sick or injured but most people also want to do what they can to stay well to feel good, stay actively engaged with life, prevent premature aging and (for service members) maintain medi cal readiness. At Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, our staff works collabora tively with patients to not only manage illness but to enhance wellness. People can play an active role not only with their own healthy choices eating well, exercising and not smoking but also by understanding the preven tive health guidelines for their age and gender. Screenings are important for maintaining health, getting medical advice and identifying any problems early for optimal treatment. medical and dental checkups and all recommended immunizations. dental checkups, as well as immuni zations including an annual flu shot. Older adults also need eye checks, pneumococcal vaccine (ages 65 and over), and colorectal screening such as colonoscopy (starting at age 50). checkups during pregnancy and start ing at age 40 mammograms. blood tests, urine tests, foot checks and WELLNESS TIPS FROM NAVAL HOSPITAL JACKSONVILLE

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 7 eye checks. to ensure they have a manage ment plan in place and take medications properly. More screening informa tion is available from U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (at www.ahrq.gov), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (at www.cdc. gov), and American Academy of Pediatrics (at http://brightfu tures.aap.org). various TRICARE medical and dental plans, contact TRICARE health benefits advisors at 542-9164/9165 or check the TRICARE website at www.tri care.mil. tage of wellness services by scheduling a check-up with their Primary Care Manager (PCM). For patients with a PCM at NH Jacksonville, call Central Appointments at 542-4677 (for Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville, call 5467094/7095). NH Jacksonville resources such as the Wellness Center (next to the base fitness cen ter) at 542-5292, Deployment Health Center at 546-7099, Mental Health at 542-3473, Immunizations at 542-7810, pregnancy and parenting classes at 542-BABY (2229), Breast Care Center (542-9360 or 542-7857), Diabetes Center at 542-9178, Nutrition at 5429786, and the weight loss sur gery program at 542-7524. Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal our nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of a hospital and five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. Of its patient population 215,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guards men and their families more than 57,000 are enrolled with a PCM. Each day, a dedicated team of 2,500 military and civilian personnel sees 1,800 outpatients and 315 dental patients, admits 15 inpatients, cares for 80 people in the ER, performs 14 same-day surger ies, fills 4,700 prescriptions, conducts 4,600 lab tests and delivers two to three babies. Additionally, up to eight per cent of NH Jacksonville active duty staff is deployed around the globe providing com bat and humanitarian care. Keep up with news by visiting the website (www.med.navy. mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax), liking the Facebook page (www.facebook/ NavalHospitalJacksonville) and following on Twitter (www. twitter.com/NHJax). HEALTH

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sance support; and mari time domain awareness flights. Simultaneously in the 4th Fleet AOR, the Fighting Tigers oper ated out of Comalapa International Airport, El Salvador, and completed counter transnational organized crime mis sions. Their efforts directly resulted in the interdic tion and seizure of 18,800 kilograms of cocaine val ued at $1.2 billion and 1,500 kilograms of mari juana valued at 8.7 mil lion dollars, as well as the detention of 61 suspects. These missions would not have been possible without the expertise and tireless work ethic of the squadrons maintenance department, said VP-8 Maintenance Master Chief AVCM Kier Walls. In all, maintenance personnel were responsi ble for the flawless execu tion of more than 16,000 maintenance actions on 12 aircraft across both theaters during the deployment. With deployment and service in the U.S. mili tary comes the respon sibility and privilege for Sailors to be U.S. ambas sadors. The Fighting Tigers took this task to heart, volunteering more than 1,600 hours in support of 30 community rela tions projects across both AORs, including tsunami disaster relief projects in Japan and support of local orphanages and homeless shelters in El Salvador. When asked to sum marize the squadrons performance, VP-8 Executive Officer Cmdr. Todd Libby remarked, Nothing short of phe nomenal it never ceases to amaze me what our Tigers can do when challenged, from engine changes in the El Salvadorian heat and humidity to helping assemble playgrounds for the local orphanage. After all its hard work, the squadron was happy to successfully turnover with the Red Lancers of VP-10, also based at NAS Jacksonville. Next up for the Fighting Tigers, is celebrat ing the holiday season with family and friends before starting the Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 Advanced Readiness Program in January as they begin preparations for their next overseas deployment. Marston stated, While we are thankful to be back in Jacksonville with our family and friends, our thoughts and prayers go out to all the mem bers of the Armed Forces that remain on duty away from their families this holiday season. VP-8 PARKStowards his recovery. Im really excited to be going to rehab in Tampa and get my prosthetic. The support Ive received from everyone is really overwhelming and hum bling, he continued. Parks is also thrilled that he and his wife, Susan are expecting their second child in early December. We have a 1-year-old son, Jason and now we are having a little girl. After receiving the proclamation, which was read by Guillory, Parks stated, This is very humbling and overwhelming. All I did was try to help some one. Thank you so much, said Parks. I just praise God for getting me through this. From what I hear, 99.6 percent of those with my injury dont make it and I did. Ive had incredible nurses and doctors. They saved my life and I am so grateful Im still here for my family, he added. Id also like to thank my co-workers for being by my side. I really appreciate them helping us with what ever weve needed. A member of VP-30 for almost two years, he is known as a dedicated Sailor and fitness enthusiast who works as a personal trainer in his free time. I enlisted in the Navy to be a rescue swimmer I wanted to help people. Unfortunately, I broke my foot and couldnt complete the course. Then I got married and my priorities changed. And with this happening, Im not sure where our future lies. I am thinking about doing some motivational speaking, said Parks. The incident also highlighted the importance of blood donation in the community. VP-30 held a blood drive Nov. 21, collecting 78 pints of blood. An account has also been set up at VyStar Credit Union for the family. Those looking to help can donate to Account #702965111, Routing #263079276. After the incident, the police arrested suspect Courtney Phillips on aggravated battery and other charges. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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rest of China. In 1940, the Japanese government allied their country with Nazi Germany in the Axis Alliance, and soon occu pied all of Indochina. The United States was alarmed by Japans moves so it increased military and financial aid to China, embarked on a program of strengthening its own military power in the Pacific, and cut off the shipment of oil and other raw materials to Japan. Because Japan was poor in natural resources, its government viewed these steps especially the embargo on oil as a threat to the nations survival. To neutralize the danger posed by the U.S. Pacific Fleet based at Pearl Harbor, Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, command er of the Japanese fleet, devised a plan to destroy the U.S. fleet at the outset of the war through a surprise attack. In October 1941 the naval general staff gave final approval to Yamamotos plan, which called for the forma tion of an attack force commanded by Vice Admiral Chuichi Nagumo. It cen tered around six heavy aircraft carri ers accompanied by 24 supporting ves sels. A separate group of submarines was to sink any American warships that escaped the Japanese carrier Force. Nagumos fleet departed in strictest secrecy for Hawaii on Nov. 26, 1941. The ships route crossed the North Pacific and avoided normal shipping lanes. At dawn on Dec. 7, the Japanese task force had approached undetected to a point slightly more than 200 miles north of Oahu. Fortunately, the U.S. aircraft carriers were not at Pearl Harbor at this time. On Nov. 28, Adm. Kimmel sent USS Enterprise under Rear Admiral William Halsey to deliver Marine Corps fight er planes to Wake Island. On Dec. 4, Enterprise delivered the aircraft and by Dec. 7, the task force was on its way back to Pearl Harbor. On Dec. 5, Kimmel sent the USS Lexington with a task force under Rear Adm. Newton to deliver 25 scout bomb ers to Midway Island. The third Pacific carrier, USS Saratoga, had departed Pearl Harbor for repairs on the west coast. At 6 a.m. on Dec. 7, six Japanese carri ers launched the first wave of 181 planes composed of torpedo bombers, dive bombers, horizontal bombers and fight ers. Just before dawn, U.S. Navy vessels spotted an unidentified submarine peri scope near the entrance to Pearl Harbor. It was attacked and reported sunk by the destroyer USS Ward (DD-139) and a patrol plane. At 7 a.m., an alert operator at an Army radar station at Opana spot ted the approaching first wave of the attack force. The officers to whom those reports were relayed did not consider them significant enough to take action. The report of the submarine sinking was handled routinely, and the radar sighting was passed off as an approach ing group of American planes due to arrive that morning. The Japanese aircrews achieved com plete surprise when they hit American ships and military installations on Oahu shortly before 8 a.m. They attacked military airfields at the same time they hit the fleet anchored in Pearl Harbor. The Navy air bases at Ford Island and Kaneohe Bay, the Marine Corps airfield at Ewa and the Army Air Corps fields at Bellows, Wheeler and Hickam fields were all bombed and strafed as other elements of the attacking force began their assaults on the ships moored in Pearl Harbor. The purpose of the simul taneous attacks was to destroy the American planes before they could rise to intercept the Japanese. Of the more than 90 ships at anchor in Pearl Harbor, the primary targets were the eight battleships. Seven were moored on Battleship Row along the southeast shore of Ford Island, while the USS Pennsylvania (BB-38) lay in dry dock across the channel. Within the first minutes of the attack all the battleships adjacent to Ford Island had taken bomb and or torpedo hits. The USS West Virginia (BB-48) sank quickly. The USS Oklahoma (BB-37) turned turtle and sank. At about 8:10 a.m., USS Arizona (BB39) was mortally wounded by an armorpiercing bomb that ignited the ships forward ammunition magazine. The resulting explosion and fire killed 1,177 crewmen, the greatest loss of life on any ship that day and about half the total number of Americans killed. USS California (BB-44), USS Maryland (BB-46), USS Tennessee (BB-43) and USS Nevada (BB-36) also suffered vary ing degrees of damage in the first half hour of the raid. There was a short lull in the fury of the attack at about 8:30 a.m. when USS Nevada, despite her wounds, managed to get underway and move down the channel toward the open sea. Before she could clear the harbor, a second wave of 170 Japanese planes, launched 30 minutes after the first, appeared over the harbor. They concentrated their attacks on the mov ing battleship, hoping to sink her in the channel and block the narrow entrance to Pearl Harbor. On orders from the har bor control tower, the USS Nevada was beached at Hospital Point and the chan nel remained clear. When the attack ended shortly before 10 a.m., less than two hours after it began, the American forces had paid a fearful price. Twenty-one ships of the U.S. Pacific Fleet were sunk or damaged: the battle ships Arizona, California, Maryland, Nevada, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West Virginia; cruisers USS Helena (CL-50), USS Honolulu (CL48) and USS Raleigh (CL-7); the destroy ers USS Cassin (DD-372), USS Downes (DD-375), USS Helm (DD-388) and USS Shaw (DD-373); seaplane tender USS Curtiss (AV-4); target ship (ex-battle ship) USS Utah (AG-16); repair ship USS Vestal (AR-4); minelayer USS Oglala (CM-4); tug USS Sotoyomo (YT-9); and Floating Drydock Number 2. Aircraft losses were 188 destroyed and 159 damaged, the majority hit before they had a chance to take off. American dead numbered 2,403. That figure included 68 civilians, most of them killed by improperly fused antiaircraft shells landing in Honolulu. There were 1,178 military and civilian wounded. Japanese losses were compar atively light. Twenty-nine planes, less than 10 percent of the attacking force, failed to return to their carriers. The Japanese success was over whelming but it was not complete. They failed to damage any American aircraft carriers which by a stroke of luck were absent from the harbor. They neglected to damage the shore facilities at the Pearl Harbor Naval Base, which played an important role in the Allied victory in World War II. American technological skill raised and repaired all but three of the ships sunk or damaged at Pearl Harbor (Arizona, considered too badly dam aged to be salvaged; Oklahoma, consid ered too old to be worth repairing, and the obsolete USS Utah (AG-16) consid ered not worth the effort). Most impor tantly, the shock and anger caused by the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor united a divided nation and was trans lated into a wholehearted commitment to victory in World War II. PEARL 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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NECE provides public health internship for UNF studentsThe University of Northern Florida (UNF), Brooks College of Health, Department of Public Health teamed up with the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) to provide an intern ship position for UNF students. The goal of the collaboration is to pro vide students with the education and skills needed for entry-level positions in community health and for gradu ate studies. Graduates of the program are typically employed in governmental and non-profit health agencies, health care facilities, work site wellness pro grams or school settings. While the student intern program at NECE focuses primarily on student development, it is beneficial to all involved, said Cmdr. Eric Hoffman, NECE officer in charge. The student gains experience and knowledge of military preventive med icine, entomology and public health, preparing them to pursue and achieve professional goals; meanwhile the NECE staff benefits from the enthusi asm brought to the command, know ing the next generation of public health professionals will be well prepared to meet the tremendous challenges of the future. The first candidate to participate in the internship is Kristina Harand, a senior at UNF. She is interested in epidemiology and wishes to pursue a masters degree in public health after she graduates this semester. Harand worked with entomologists and molec ular biologists at NECE to test insecti cide efficacy on the medically signifi cant Yellow Fever mosquito. Kristinas studies help us have a bet ter understanding of how insecticides affect larval mosquitoes which can translate to better control programs, said Katelyn Chalaire, NECE molecular biologist. According to Lt. Cmdr. Carl Doud, NECE technical director, Harand was able to bring more to the com mand than just a willingness to work. Kristina truly impressed all of us with her passion, work ethic and perfor mance, said Doud. Her enthusiasm was contagious and whoever fills the position next will certainly have big shoes to fill. The internship position is intended to be filled each semester with stu dents from the UNF Public Health Department. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 11

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Darnell-Cookman Middle/ High School of the Medical Arts played host Nov. 16 to Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Science, Service, Medicine & Mentoring (S2M2) program. The S2M2 program is designed to encourage, nur ture and enhance high school students interest in pursuing careers in science and medi cine. Approximately 100 sopho mores attended the S2M2 kickoff event that brought together Darnell-Cookman Principal Mark Ertel and Medical Integration Coordinator Matt Walker with NH Jacksonvilles Cmdr. Jim Keck, MD, fam ily medicine residency pro gram director; Lt. Cmdr. Leslie Manohar, MD, ortho pedic surgeon; Capt. Paula Chamberlain, RN, associate director for public health; Lt. Cmdr. Patrick Fairley, PharmD, pharmacist; and Lt. Cmdr. Ken Meehan, PA-C, physician assis tant. Our S2M2 program offers Darnell-Cookman students the opportunity to get a glimpse to witness the clinical rota tions available in medicine, says Keck. And for Naval Hospital Jacksonville, its a way of giving back . a way of serving. Darnell-Cookman embrac es the S2M2 partnership (launched in 2010) as it com plements the schools focus on equipping high-perform ing students with the tools to support their future goals in pursuing advanced medical degrees. Walker, the school medical integration coordinator, works hand-in-hand with S2M2. Having the opportunity for our students to gain real-world experience with Naval Hospital through the S2M2 program is a wonderful and unique oppor tunity, said Walker. This partnership provides an outlet for our students to grow in their medical knowl edge and also sharpen leader ship skills. Were so excited to have yet another group of stu dents participate in S2M2 this year. During the event, NH Jacksonville clinicians shared inspirational stories of their careers in Navy Medicine and the paths they took to get there. Along with the formal event, smaller groups of students were able to spend quality time with Navy clinicians in an open forum, hearing first-hand about the roles each medical profession plays in healing our nations heroes. Many of the students took full advantage of this chance, including Meiling Torres. You actually get firsthand knowl edge based on the doctors experience, said Torres. The reason we are at Darnell-Cookman is we all have some interest in medi cine. I think its really interest ing and very helpful. Roy Peterson felt that having access to NH Jacksonville clini cians helped clarify things for him. When the Naval Med per sonnel are here, they really help you find your way, said Peterson. It gets you focused on want ing to get into the medical field and to choose a good career path. In addition to the kick-off event, NH Jacksonville will host two intensive, week-long S2M2 programs for approxi mately 20 students. These students will get realworld experience in patient care areas from the operat ing and emergency rooms to pharmacy and physical/ occu pational therapy. Along with the hands-on medical activities, students will participate in discussions, job-shadowing and mentor ing with physicians and other medical professionals. Additionally, the school and hospital are exploring ways to further align the S2M2 pro gram with the medical arts curriculum such as allowing students to participate in the hospitals graduate medical education training via video conferencing. NH Jax S2M2 clinicians spark interest at medical magnet school JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Located in Bldg. 608 between Gillis St. and Keily St. off of Enterprise Ave. Deweys offers a full service menu, bar and a friendly atmosphere for all ages. Monday Friday 10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 4 10 p.m. CPO Lounge Monday, Tuesday & Friday 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Wednesday Thursday 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m. Childrens Holiday Bingo Dec. 15 Doors open at 4 p.m., games begin at 5 p.m. $15 per child, ages 3 17 New Years Day Bingo Extravaganza Doors open at 10:30 a.m., games begin at 12:30 p.m. $125 per personFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New Years Eve Bowling Party Dec. 31, 7 p.m. 1 a.m. $15 per person Includes glow in the dark bowling, shoe rental, DJ with karaoke, party favors, t-shirts, souvenir cups, midnight toast & breakfast buffet! Beverages not included. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 40,000 Calories of Christmas See if you and your teammate can burn 40,000 calories Dec. 3 to Jan. 18. Top teams in each team category receive a trophy. Sign up in the fitness center by Nov. 28 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Contact Melissa Luehrs at 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Jingle Bell Jog 5K Dec. 13 at 11:30 a.m. Preregister by Dec. 7I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus Jan.1821, $13 per person Jacksonville Zoo Lights Dec. 1431, $8 $10 per person St. Augustine Old Town Trolley Night of Lights Adult $8.75, child $4 ShenYun at the Times Union Center Jan. 2930, $55 $163 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zip line Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Preferred seating $41, lower-level seat ing $22 Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 MOSH $7 $12 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31 and must be redeemed by June 30, 2013. Ask about our special discounted tick ets for family members. Gator Bowl tickets $35 Gator Bowl Patch $9 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1-day $29.50, 2-day $40, Gold pass $71 Daytona 500 Feb. 24 $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Kings Bay Comedy Show Featuring Jarrod Harris & Shawn Filipe Dec. 6 at 6 p.m. Reindeer Games Competition Dec. 8 at noon Win $500 Jaguars vs. Jets NFL game Dec. 9 at 11:30 a.m. Free admission and transportationNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Santa Sez Golf Tournament Dec. 21 at 10 a.m. 4-person scramble $40 $50 per person Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Dec. 18 for active duty Dec. 6 & 20 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1 p.m. every day. Monday & Tuesday Play 18 holes for $18 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Dashing Through The Grove Dec. 8, from 4 -8 p.m. at Patriots Grove Free snow sledding, photos with Santa, tree lighting, music & more. Movie Under the Stars Dec.14, 5:30 p.m. at Patriots Grove How the Grinch Stole Christmas Free popcorn and $.50 drinks Drop-in care and open recreation are available. Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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NAS Jax All Saints Chapel was filled Nov. 30 with proud families and ship mates who came to honor the lat est graduates of Southern Illinois University (SIU) at Carbondale. The university offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Electronic Systems Technologies, and a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Care Management, through the Navy College Office at NAS Jacksonville. In his invocation, NAS Jax Chaplain (Lt.) Hylanie Chan-Williams said that SIU Carbondale has been preparing leaders and scholars since 1869. Today, we must thank the families of these scholars the wives and hus bands and sons and daughters who encouraged them as they labored through the wee hours of the night and on weekends to complete their studies. That family support is what set the feet of these scholars on the path to greater greats and higher highs. In his congratulatory remarks, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders offered the graduates some pearls of wisdom about personal suc cess. First, knowledge is everything. Today is just the first step and tomor row you need to be paranoid about the currency of what you know. Ask yourself every day, Am I up to speed or am I stagnating intellectually or worse am I falling behind? Now you have a brain and a diploma. Put them both to work. SIU has taught you how to learn for a lifetime, said Sanders. Second, remember that life is a mar athon, not a sprint, and nobody wins all the time. To grow personally and pro fessionally, you must live without fear of failure. Dont be part of the crowd. If you fail learn from it and dont make the same mistake twice. Finally, make a commitment to excellence. Legendary football coach Vince Lombardi once said, when peo ple make a commitment to a way of life, they put the greatest strength in the world behind them its something we call heart power. Once a person has made this com mitment, nothing will stop them short of success. The fact that you graduates are here today, tells me you have a pret ty good idea of how to be successful, concluded Sanders. Dr. Charles Sidell, SIU coordina tor of workforce education, said, Commencement is not the end of something its the beginning of some thing. These new alumni have worked hard to reach their scholarship goals, as well as developing their leadership skills. This is a day they will always remember. Southern Illinois Universitys College of Applied Sciences and Arts offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Electronic Systems Technologies and a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Care Management at NAS Jacksonville. Classes meet on Saturday and Sunday of alternate weekends. Students enrolled full-time are able to complete the 48-semester-hour major in as little as 16 months. Both degree programs consist of 120 semester hours of credit. The 48 semester hours of major coursework is taught at NAS Jacksonville by SIU faculty, both campus-based and adjuncts who are accomplished professionals in the subject area. Transfer work from other regionally accredited colleges and universities, CLEP and DSST testing, military train ing, and work experience fulfill the 41 semester hours of core curriculum and 31 semester hours of approved career electives. To learn more, contact NAS Jax Navy College Director Vicki OToole at 5422477 or e-mail: nco.jacksonville@navy. mil. Southern Illinois University holds 37th commencement at NAS Jax 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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A safety stand down was held for Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) and NAS Jacksonville Sailors and civilian employees at Deweys All Hands Club Nov. 28 to remind them to make smart decisions to stay safe over the holiday season. This is a particularly dangerous time of year. We had 35 vehicular fatalities within the Navy last year, 20 of those were motorcycle accidents. Of that total, seven were within Navy Region Southeast. Any number above zero is too many, said CNRSE Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. Its about taking care of yourselves, your shipmates and your families. So look out for one another and be careful out there on the roads. CNRSE/NAS Jax Safety Officer Ron Williamson also offered some advice to the audience. There always seem to be more acci dents in the holiday season than dur ing the rest of the year. So this safety stand down is a good reminder for everyone to be more vigilant to safety measures, not only on the roads but at home, he said. The guest speaker for the event was Steve Verret, a master traffic safety instructor and professional stand-up comedian. Verret, who has taught driver safety for more than 25 years, used humor to relay important information regarding vehicle insurance, measures to take to avoid accidents, seatbelt use, open container laws, drinking and driving and using cell phones while driving. As the crowd laughed at his jokes and answered his questions, they took away a wealth of information regard ing traffic safety. Verret stressed the importance of not using cell phones while driving. Cell phones are the new DUI. I think they are more dangerous than drunk driving because those who drink and drive normally know they are doing something wrong but those drivers talking on cell phones or tex ting dont think they are doing any thing wrong, said Verret. It may or may not be against the law in certain states but when you are on the phone while driving, you are not focused on the road. And, cell phone usage can be used in liability cases if you have an accident so you may not get compensation or someone else may get more compensation. For Verret, conducting safety stand downs for military members is an important cause. I try to positively reinforce safe ty every time I conduct one of these events. No matter how many times you tell someone not to drink or drive and to wear their seatbelts, there are still those who either ignore this advice or just dont get it, said Verret. I try to reach military personnel through these presentations because they do so much for our country and I think its a shame that someone puts their life on the line overseas and then they come home and do one thing carelessly in their vehicle and they either lose their lives or are injured. Scorby concluded the stand down by stating, We have the finest Navy military and civilian forces and Im proud to serve with you. We need to have all of you back following the holi day season so be careful out there and remember the reason for the season. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil Visit the MWR website at www. cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com/nas jaxmwr. Comedian brings humor to safety stand down JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 17

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Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Realty Specialist Jason Ellerbee started writing a new chapter in his life Nov. 16 by raising his right hand during his commissioning ceremony. Ellerbee was sworn in to the U.S. Navy Reserves by NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus as Ellerbees wife, daughter, friends and co-workers looked on. What we do at NAVFAC and the support we provide has really generated a spark to serve, said Ellerbee. Ellerbee, who began his career with NAVFAC Southeast as a realty specialist in April 2008, nor mally spends his days working on acquisitions, leas es, licensing agreements and easement issues for Gulfcoast IPT. He said he pretty much works on anything that deals with the land aboard a U.S. Navy Base. Now he will have the opportunity to work on issues in the spiritual realm as he will provide counseling to Sailors and Marines. The inspiration to serve in the military began at a young age when he was a Sea Cadet at the age of 12. The inspiration to serve militarily turned into serious thought about two years ago. Ellerbee said working in a military culture at NAVFAC Southeast for the last four years has gener ated a real sense of pride for the Navy. Ellerbee holds a Bachelor of Arts in History from the College of Charleston, SC, and a masters degree in Historic Preservation from the University of Georgia and is currently working on his Master of Divinity through Luther Rice Universitys Seminary of Atlanta online program. As the process to come aboard as an officer with the Navy Reserves progressed, the chaplain candi date program seemed like a perfect fit for me since I already possessed so many of the prerequisites, said Ellerbee. Ellerbee already serves in the ministry as a volun teer at the church he attends in Jacksonville. He serves as an assistant director and team lead in the Media Department and serves as a fitness counselor. Its always been a desire to serve in the ministry in some fashion, said Ellerbee. He also said his family is very excited about this opportuni ty. His wife was the one who actually encouraged him to go and see the recruit ers in the first place. We are very excited for the opportunity and the doors this will open up for us, said Ellerbee. This is just a whole new aspect of our lives. We are really excited to see where God is going to take this and what He wants to do with it. Ellerbee wont know what unit he will serve with or where until he completes his Masters of Divinity degree along with Officer Development School (ODS) and Navy Chaplain training which could take two years. My overall aspiration is to care for the Sailors and Marines in whatever capacity is needed, said Ellerbee. To ensure that they get the proper treatment and counseling they need. A former pastor in Charleston, S.C., once told him to just jump into the ministry pond and serve in as many areas as you can until you find that one spot or purpose that God has for you. I feel strongly that this is my purpose in life, said Ellerbee. New Navy chaplain fulfilling his purpose in life 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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To ensure that the holiday sea son is safe and merry, there are a few things we can all do around the home. Deck the house Strings of holiday lights are put up both inside and outside to brighten up any dwelling. Unfortunately, these same lights cause a large number of fires each year. Before putting them up, check on the condition of the lights. Make sure the wiring is not frayed or damaged and that none of the bulbs are broken. A set of lights that is in bad shape can be very likely to short out and start a fire. When the wires are not in prime condition, its time to dispose of that set for another. Even a newer set of lights can be a hazard, so it is never a good idea to leave them unattended. When you go out for the night or go to sleep, make sure to turn them off. A tree can also be a major hazard. Every year hundreds of fires begin in festively decorated trees. There are a few things you can do to make the tree as safe as possible. First off, mount the tree securely so it can not tip over or be easily knocked down. A falling tree can land on some one or damage property. A dry tree can ignite far too easily. It is essential to keep the tree well watered the entire time you have it in your home. Place the tree far away from the fire place, and the same goes for wrap ping paper, gifts or any other holi day items that may be flammable. Make sure you have a charged extin guisher around the house. Let everyone who lives there know exactly where it is, and how to use it. Check the batteries in smoke alarms. Holiday decorations are often used all over the house, but they should never block exits. Holiday gatherings A dinner party is a great way to enter tain your guests, but dont neglect the food you have cooking. Another major household fire hazard is food that is placed on the stove and forgotten about. If table settings include can dles you may want to remove them when its time to eat, especially if there are young children involved. Keeping your home safe from fire is only part of the responsibilities home owners face during the holiday season. Protecting your house from criminals Picture this. Its late at night and you hear a noise at the back door or a win dow inside your home. You get up to investigate and find an intruder break ing into your home. What would you do? The first answer is to call the police, but in the time it takes for them to arrive, a criminal may harm you or your family. Chances are the home invader will be armed, so the job of defend er may be left entirely up to you. Owning a gun While its wise to do everything you can to safeguard your home from a break in, if a criminal is intent on get ting into your house, chances are they will. This frightening concept causes home owners to purchase firearms and keep them easily accessible. Simply having the gun can make people feel safer, but if you own one it is vital to learn how to properly han dle, maintain and fire the weapon. The seriousness of owning a gun must never be forgotten. Every year, people are killed by accidental gunfire. There are many classes in which new gun owners can learn to handle and fire it correctly. When children are involved Make no mistake, there are haz ards to keeping any lethal weapon in the home, and when children are pres ent the danger is multiplied. All chil dren are naturally curious, and a gun is something that can easily peak their interest. Adults who own a deadly weapon must take every precaution to keep it out of the hands of young kids. Storing a gun in a locked drawer or cab inet and keeping the key with you is an ideal solution. This will help to ensure that a child cannot get to it for any rea son. It is also advisable to keep the gun unloaded. Try to find places for the fire arm and the bullets that are secure but also easily accessible in case you need to get to them in a hurry. At some point you may feel your kids are old enough to learn about the gun you keep in the home. Express how important it is to be very cautious when handling a weapon and how danger ous they are. Have your kids take a gun safety course when you feel they are old enough to handle a firearm on their Tips for keeping your holidays safe JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 19

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Navy Region Southeast recently convened several Court-martials to hear the following cases: At a General Court-Martial con vened aboard NAS Jacksonville, a petty officer third class pled guilty to wrongful use of marijuana and he was found guilty of unau thorized absence terminated by apprehension. The court-martial sentenced the accused to seven months of confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, and a bad conduct discharge. At a General Court-Martial con vened aboard NAS Jacksonville, a petty officer second class was found not guilty of assault and willfully and wrongfully discharg ing a firearm. At a Special Court-Martial con vened on board NAS Pensacola, a petty officer third class pled guilty to assaulting a child under the age of 16 years. The military judge sen tenced the Accused to 12 months of confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, forfeiture of $994 pay per month for 12 months, and a bad conduct discharge. At a Special Court-Martial con vened aboard NAS Jacksonville, a petty officer second class pled guilty to fraternization, derelic tion of duty, failing to obey a lawful order, and wrongful appropriation of a government vehicle. The mili tary judge sentenced the accused to 100 days of confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, and a bad con duct discharge. At a General Court-Martial con vened aboard NAS Jacksonville, a lance corporal pled guilty to wrongful use of marijuana (3 specifications), having sexual intercourse with someone inca pable of declining participation, and engaging in a sexual act with someone incapable of declining participation. The military judge sentenced the accused to 12 years of confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, and a dishonorable dis charge. At a Special Court-Martial con vened aboard NAS Jacksonville, a petty officer second class was found guilty of attempting to steal military property. The court-mar tial sentenced the accused to be restricted to base for 60 days and to forfeit $1,244 pay per month for four months. Court-Martials in Navy Region Southeast are tried with few exceptions at NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, and NAS Pensacola. Therefore, the location of where a court-martial described above was convened does not neces sarily correlate to the command that convened the court-martials. Adjudged sentences may be modi fied by pre-trial agreement or clemency. Recently at the courthouse . 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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Dashing Through The Groveat NAS Jax Patriots GroveSaturday December 8, 4 8 p.m. FREEsnow Sledding Photos with Santa Tree Lighting Musical Entertainment Refreshments And more! 778-9772 2013 Scholarships for military childrenown. Before purchasing a gun Every state has laws that govern gun use and own ership. You will need to find out what they are, and make sure you have the proper permits to legally own a firearm. The laws can vary depending on whether you are attempting to buy a handgun, shotgun or other type of firearm. Most of these weapons have a mandatory waiting period before you may bring them home, and dur ing this time a background check will be conducted to make sure you do not have any felonies and can legally own a gun. Anyone can become a victim of crime, but there are some very basic things that you can do to deter criminals from choosing you. People generally think of their homes as safe havens where the outside world can not get to them, but statistics show that crime and home invasions are on the rise. Do what you can to make your home as safe as possible. It all starts by becoming more active with your neighborhood. Crime in your neighborhood One of the best ways to ensure a burglar does not target your house involves working with your neigh bors so that everyone watches out for each other. Meet the people who live nearby, learn their names, what cars they have and exchange phone numbers. Keep a list of this contact information near a phone. Consider starting an official Neighborhood Watch Group and working with local law enforce ment agencies to help watch over your neighborhood. Watch for strangers Once you get to know the people around you, you will be better prepared to notice strangers who seem to be hanging around. Seeing someone you dont know walk down your street once is not unusual, but if that same person is lingering, they may be cas ing the neighborhood and looking for a home to rob. And, if an unfamiliar car is spending a lot of time driving on your street, it could be an indication that criminals are looking for potential targets. Warn a neighbor if you see someone looking at their home, and dont be afraid to call the police to report suspi cious behavior. Deter criminals from choosing your home Even a well-watched neighborhood can be struck by crime. A burglar looks for the easiest target possible, so it is up to you to make your house difficult to break into. The first step is keeping exterior and interior lights on during the night. Criminals prefer a cover of dark ness, and will gravitate towards a home that has no lights on at all. When you go out for the night, keep a television on, or play a radio inside the house. This will give the appearance that someone is still home, which is a great deterrent to criminals. Experts often recommend choosing a talk station for the radio to give the impression that a conversation is taking place inside. A law-breaker may still attempt to break into your home if they become reasonably certain they can do so without being noticed. These are just a few tips to hopefully keep your holi day season safe. Applications for the 2013 Scholarships for Military Children Program are now avail able at commissar ies worldwide. You can also find them online at http://www.mili taryscholar.org Scholarship awards will be based on funds available, but the schol arship program awards at least $1,500 at each com missary. If there are no eligible applicants from a particular commissary, the funds designated for that commissary will be awarded at another store. The scholarship pro gram was created to rec ognize military families contributions to the read iness of U.S. armed forces and to celebrate the com missarys role in the mili tary community. DeCA is focused on supporting a good qual ity of life for our military and their families, said Defense Commissary Agency Director and CEO Joseph Jeu. To apply, students must be a dependent, unmar ried child, younger than 21 or 23, if enrolled as a full-time student at a college or university of a service member on active duty, reserv ist, guardsman, retiree or survivor of a military member who died while on active duty or survivor of a retiree. Eligibility is deter mined using the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System data base. Applicants should ensure that they and their sponsor, are enrolled in DEERS and have a current military ID card. The applicant must also be planning to attend or already attend ing an accredited college or university, full time, in the fall of 2013 or be enrolled in a program of studies designed to trans fer directly into a fouryear program. Applicants must sub mit an essay on a topic chosen by the Fisher House. Applications must be turned in to a com missary by close of busi ness Feb. 22, 2013. For more information, call 856-616-9311 or mili taryscholar@scholar shipmanagers.com TIPS JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 21

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The VP-8 Fighting Tigers start ed returning home Nov. 27 following a six-month deployment to the U.S. Pacific Command and U.S. Southern Command areas of responsibility (AOR). I am extremely proud of the work the Fighting Tigers did on this deployment. From executing missions in both 4th and 7th Fleets, to performing sched uled and unscheduled maintenance, to volunteering their time to help those in need VP-8 Sailors executed flaw lessly, said VP-8 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Michael Marston. While deployed, VP-8 flew 652 sorties totaling 3,065 mishap-free flight hours and achieved an exceptional 97 percent mission completion rate. These statistics are a true testament to the hard work and dedication put forth by the men and women of VP-8, said Operations Officer Lt. Cmdr. John Pianetta. Based out of Japans Naval Air Facility Misawa and Kadena Air Base, while in the 7th Fleet AOR, VP-8 performed anti-submarine warfare missions; intelligence, surveillance, and reconnais The road to war between Japan and the United States began in the 1930s when differences over China drove the two nations apart. In 1931 Japan conquered Manchuria, which until then had been part of China. In 1937 Japan began a long and ultimately unsuccessful campaign to conquer the VP-8 home from dual-site deployment AWFAN Brett Parks of VP-30 was recognized by the City of Jacksonville when he was presented a proclamation for heroic action from Victor Guillory, director of Military Affairs, Veterans and Disabled Services Department on behalf of Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown Nov. 30. The proclamation designates Dec. 5 as Brett Parks Day to pay tribute to Parks who was shot while coming to the assistance of a robbery suspect in October. Since then, Parks has been hospitalized at Shands Jacksonville Medical Center recovering from his life-threatening wounds that resulted in the loss of a kidney and part of his right leg. He hopes to be transferred to the Tampa VA Hospital this week to continue his rehabilitation process and receive his prosthetic device. While telling his story, Parks says he does not consider himself a hero. I didnt look at what I was doing as heroic its just something that you do. I just heard a man screaming for help and I ran over there. The man attacking him took off so I chased after him. I stopped him but didnt see a gun. A couple seconds later, he shot me and I fell, said Parks, a native of Miami, who joined the Navy in 2008. Emergency personnel quickly transported Parks to the hospital where he has since undergone numerous surger ies to save his life. The gun shot wound damaged a major artery incurring a great loss of blood. During his ordeal, Parks has required nearly 80 pints of blood. With his family, friends and co-workers rallying by his side, Parks is making strides City of Jacksonville recognizes VP-30 Sailor for heroic action Remembering Pearl Harbor ~ Dec. 7, 1941 ~

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS My middle son, Owen, doesnt get a lot of mention in this column. Or so he tells me. Of course, Owen also once told me never to write about him again. So Im in a bit of a predicament. If I read between the lines, what I hear from Owen is this: Write about me, but give me my own space. Therefore, in honor of his 10th birthday this week, I will attempt a feat that until now has seemed impossible: writing about Owen without mentioning (oldest sons name) and (youngest sons name). I went into labor with Owen while I was cleaning up from, ahem, someone elses second birthday party. He was nearly three weeks early, and I was glad, because my husband had volunteered me to roast five turkeys for the squad rons single-sailor Thanksgiving party. (Apparently Dustin had forgotten that I was nine months pregnant and that I didnt know how to cook one turkey.) Owen spent his first year of life sleeping in a crib with a netted tent above it because we were worried that another well-meaning toddler might acciden tally throw a blanket or a handful of Legos on top of him. Each morning, as I unzipped the tent to get him out, Owen smiled and cooed. He almost never cried. So thoughtful of him, I thought, because there was already enough noise in our house. Our dog, a Shetland Sheepdog named Tanner, took a liking to baby Owen. Sometimes, she enjoyed laying on his head. Still, Owen didnt cry. And I was lucky because this other, um, boy would say, Mom, Tanner is sitting on Owens head again. Otherwise, it could have been dangerous. One tuft of hair grew straight up from the top of Owens head, which led to his nickname Rooster. His dark brown eyes glistened and seemed to sparkle. Whenever this big kid who lived in our house drew pictures of Owen, he included sparkly eyes and sticking up hair. Owen didnt talk until well after his second birthday. He was a late walk er, too. He spent most of his time sit ting in my lap or on my hip. I worried that something was wrong. The doctors did all kinds of tests, and eventually, after the results came back normal, the pediatrician told us, Owen has just one problem, and his name begins with F. After that, a constant refrain became, Let Owen do it himself and Let Owen talk for himself. Owens favorite song was Nina Simones version of Here Comes the Sun. He called it the Little Darling song, and I can still recall the vision of him in the rearview mirror as it played: sunk in his car seat; hair sticking up; eyes twinkling; a little bit of drool falling down his chin as he smiled and grabbed at the toe of his shoe. When Owen was 4, he had oral sur gery and double pneumonia in the same winter. He had always been small and skinny, but by his fourth Christmas, he was fitting in old 2T clothing. I said he was like a kitten: long, bendy and skinny. He was still quiet, never complained and hardly ever cried, not even after surgery or when he was sick. Soon after, another little person joined our family. Owen seemed to grow faster after that. In another year, I referred to him as a sunflower. While some children consistently grow and change almost without detection year-to-year, Owen pushed through the soil and sprouted in a years time. Everything from his button nose to his pudgy knees took shape. Today, Owen is quiet but cheerful. It is impossible not to smile when he does. He doesnt get into trouble at school or home. He seldom needs help with any thing. He makes few demands. When other people want to be right, he lets them be. When other people want their way, he lets them have it. (Dear future daughter-in-law: youre welcome.) And . (sigh), I wanted to make this all about Owen. But I cant. You see, Owen is who he is in part because of his older and younger brothers. His place as the middle child is as much a part of his character as being the baby of the family is part of our other boys (you know, the one who is leaning over my shoulder right now squealing, What about me? Write about me? I dont see my name on the screen!) All three of my boys play off and to one another. They are shaping each other in ways they might not appreci ate until years from now. Except that, one son already gets a lot of attention for being the oldest, and another gets attention for being the youngest. And Owen, I fear, gets lost in the shuffle. Hed never ask for it to be different. He wants them to be happy, but mostly, he wants peace. He even told me to include the youngests name so hed stop cry ing. But I wont. Everyone needs his own day. Today is Owens. I just hope that, uh, the others can appreciate that. Dec. 6 1830 Naval Observatory, the first U.S. national observatory, established at Washington, D.C, under command of Lt. Louis Malesherbes. 1917 German submarine torpe does sink USS Jacob Jones (DD-61) off England. 1968 Operation Giant Slingshot begins in Mekong Delta. Dec. 7 1917 Four U.S. battleships (USS Delaware (BB-28), USS Florida (BB-30), USS New York (BB-34) and USS Wyoming (BB-32) arrive at Scapa Flow, England taking on the role of the British Grand Fleets 6th Battle Squadron. 1941 Japanese carrier aircraft attack U.S. Pacific Fleet based in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 1944 Seventh Fleet forces land Army troops at Ormoc Bay. Kamikazes attack Task Force, damaging several ships. Dec. 8 1933 Secretary of the Navy estab lishes Fleet Marine Force, integrating a ready-to-deploy Marine force with its own aircraft into Fleet organization. 1941 U.S. declares war on Japan. 1941 USS Wake (PR-3), a river gunboat moored at Shanghai, is only U.S. vessel to surrender during World War II. 1942 Eight PT boats (PT 36, PT 37, PT 40, PT 43, PT 44, PT 48, PT 59, and PT 109) turn back eight Japanese destroyers attempting to reinforce Japanese forces on Guadalcanal. Dec. 9 1938 Prototype shipboard radar, designed and built by the Naval Research Laboratory, is installed on USS New York (BB-34). 1941 USS Swordfish (SS-193) makes initial U.S. submarine attack on Japanese ship. 1952 Strike by aircraft from Task Force 77 destroys munitions factory and rail facilities near Rashin, North Korea. Dec. 10 1941 Guam surrenders to Japanese. 1941 Aircraft from USS Enterprise (CV-6) attack and sink Japanese Submarine I-70 north of Hawaiian Islands. A participant in the Pearl Harbor Attack, I-70 is the first Japanese combatant ship sunk during World War II. 1941 PBY flying boat piloted by Lt. Utter of VP-101 shoots down Japanese ZERO in first Navy air-to-air kill during World War II. 1950 Evacuation operations at Wonson, North Korea, completed. 1979 First Poseidon submarine configured with Trident missiles, USS Francis Scott Key (SSBN-657), completes initial deterrent patrol. Dec. 11 1941 Wake Island Garrison under Cmdr. Winfield Cunningham repulses Japanese invasion force. 1954 First super carrier of 59,630 tons, USS Forrestal (CVA-59), launched at Newport News, Va. Dec. 12 1862 Confederate torpedo (mine) sinks USS Cairo in Yazoo River. 1937 Japanese aircraft sink USS Panay in Yangtze River near Nanking, China. 1941 Naval Air Transport Service is established. 1951 First flight of helicopter with gas-turbine engine at Windsor Locks, Conn., demonstrates adaptability of this engine to helicopters. 1972Capt. Eugene Cernan, com mander of Apollo 17, walks on the Moon. Cmdr. Ronald Evans was the Command Module Pilot. The mission lasted 12 days, 13 hours and 52 minutes. Recovery by HC-1 helicopters from USS Ticonderoga (CVS-14). Middle son wont need to share birthday Free airport shuttle availableThe MWR Liberty Program is coor dinating free airport shuttle runs for all E1-E6 single Sailors and Marines from Dec. 12 through Jan. 14. These shuttles will run every four hours and will be available for departures and arrivals. Shuttle riders must sign up in the Liberty Center at least 24 hours in advance and must provide a copy of their itinerary during registration. Shuttle registration is now ongoing. To register or form more informa tion, call 542-3491. Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 a.m. Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at Chapel Complex Building 749 and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the barracks NAS Jacksonville Chapel Center Corner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road 542-3051

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AC1(AW/SW) Sara Bailey of NAS Joint Reserve Base (JRB) New Orleans, was named Navy Region Southeast (NRSE) Sailor of the Year for 2012 dur ing a ceremony on board NAS Jacksonville Nov. 28. The ceremony was the cul mination of NRSE Sailor of the Year week, during which five finalists selected from the regions 16 installations were invited to Jacksonville to compete for the honor of Sailor of the Year and to participate in a series of recreational activities. During the week, the Sailors toured EverBank Field, home of the NFL Jacksonville Jaguars, and visited St. Johns Town Center. All of our candidates for Sailor of the Year were out standing Sailors and role models, said NRSE Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Mack Ellis. What made AC1 stand out was her sustained performance of duties primary as well as collateral. She is always ready to take on more challenging assignments. According to Bailey, it was an honor to receive such a prestigious award. Its really incredible. It was a real shock to hear my name called because the rest of these Sailors here are all great examples of what a first class petty officer should be, she said. She also stressed that she could never have made it this far by herself. Im in the position Im in today because of my Sailors and everything theyve done. Honestly, theyre really the ones that deserve the recogni tion, she said. In addition to Bailey, the top five also included SH1(SW) Danielle Bradford of Transient Personnel Unit NAS Jacksonville; PS1(AW/ SW) Nathaniel Ndikum of NAS JRB Fort Worth; MA1(SW/AW) Jessica Brown of Naval Station Guantanamo Bay; and MA1 Adam Turner of NAS Whiting Field. Each Sailor was accompa nied by a sponsor, who was either his or her command master chief or command senior chief. According to Ndikum, the time spent with their senior leaders was one of the most rewarding experienc es of the competition. Its a really unique experi ence to have this many master chiefs in the same place at the same time. Theyve offered a lot of encouragement, he said. Its also great to be with all of these great Sailors, too. The entire experience has been good. It provides a lot of motivation for us to take what we learned here back to our com mands and continue to make our Sailors better. According to Bailey, the candidates were extremely ner vous the day of the selection board, but the most success ful approach was to be candid when answering questions. I went in there and just spoke the truth. If I didnt know the answer to a question, I didnt try to hide it. I just spoke from the heart and hoped for the best, and that approach apparently worked for me in the end, she said. While the board could only select one Sailor of the Year, all of the candidates should be extremely proud to have made it as far as they did, according to Ellis. It is truly a great accom plishment, he said. To get from our deckplates to this competition, thats absolutely a great accomplishment. Bailey will go on to com pete against Sailors from other regions for the honor of Commander, Naval Installations Command Sailor of the Year. The selectee from that com petition will go on to compete for Chief of Naval Operations Sailor of the Year. Southeast Region announces 2012 Sailor of the Year 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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NAS Jax petty officers advancedMore than 30 NAS Jax Sailors were frocked to E4, E5 and E6 at an all hands quarters outside Building 1 on Nov. 30. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders told the audience of active duty and civilian personnel, This is a testament to all your hard work and dedication. Congratulations on your work ethic and achievement in our Navy. Sailors frocked included: AC3 Joseph Barry QM3 Tirzah Carroll AC3 Hannah Daniels MA3 Alycia Delgado AC3 Becca Hontz PR3 Petria Jackson YN3 Doneka Royster FC3 Christine Sapp GSM3 Alison Sudduth MA3 Drew Risley MA3 William Zar Jr. YN2 Zakeyia Alvarez RP2 Jannie Anaya ABE2 David Aponte Jr. MM2 Kevin Ayres AO2 Devanae Bradley AC2 Brittany Darnell AC2 Viktor Fisher MM2 Kenneth Johnson YN2 Jeffrie Key OS2 Jeffrey Muirhead MA2 Brittny Olsen MA2 Ashanta Ross ABH2 Jamespaul Viar ET2 Timothy Walker CS1 Marnika Ash CS1 Prince Benton EN1 Lee Holts ET1 Joshua Love OS1 Jason Spooner ET1 Lucas Coffey ET1 Travis Wood The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 hosted military members of the El Salvadoran 2nd Air Brigade, Nov. 21 at Las Flores Air Base. During the visit, members from the El Salvadoran Air Force and Navy participated in ground briefings on safety, operations and maintenance practices; static aircraft display; and an aircraft mission familiarization flight. In the air, VP-8 aircrew demonstrated the intelli gence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities of the P-3C at various altitudes, utilizing the numerous electro-optical sensors onboard to image and identify selected surface vessels. VP-8 Officer-in-Charge, Lt. Cmdr. John McGonagle, remarked, the importance of showing our El Salvadorian partners what the P-3C Orion is capable of cannot be stressed enough. What the P-3C brings to the Counter Transnational Organized Crime mis sion is vital to the U.S. Southern Commands efforts in the region. It is of utmost importance that partnering nations are familiar with the capabilities that the P-3C brings to the fight. VP-8 is currently returning to its home base of NAS Jacksonville, from which it was deployed to the 4th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility.VP-8 hosts El Salvadoran military JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 Everyone looks to their health care provider to help fix them when theyre sick or injured but most people also want to do what they can to stay well to feel good, stay actively engaged with life, prevent premature aging and (for service members) maintain medi cal readiness. At Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, our staff works collaboratively with patients to not only manage illness but to enhance wellness. People can play an active role not only with their own healthy choices eating well, exercising and not smoking but also by understanding the preventive health guidelines for their age and gender. Screenings are important for maintaining health, getting medical advice and identifying any problems early for optimal treatment. medical and dental checkups and all recommended immunizations. dental checkups, as well as immuni zations including an annual flu shot. Older adults also need eye checks, pneumococcal vaccine (ages 65 and over), and colorectal screening such as colonoscopy (starting at age 50). checkups during pregnancy and starting at age 40 mammograms. blood tests, urine tests, foot checks and WELLNESS TIPS FROM NAVAL HOSPITAL JACKSONVILLE

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 7 eye checks. to ensure they have a management plan in place and take medications properly. More screening informa tion is available from U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (at www.ahrq.gov), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (at www.cdc. gov), and American Academy of Pediatrics (at http://brightfutures.aap.org). various TRICARE medical and dental plans, contact TRICARE health benefits advisors at 542-9164/9165 or check the TRICARE website at www.tri care.mil. tage of wellness services by scheduling a check-up with their Primary Care Manager (PCM). For patients with a PCM at NH Jacksonville, call Central Appointments at 542-4677 (for Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville, call 5467094/7095). NH Jacksonville resources such as the Wellness Center (next to the base fitness cen ter) at 542-5292, Deployment Health Center at 546-7099, Mental Health at 542-3473, Immunizations at 542-7810, pregnancy and parenting classes at 542-BABY (2229), Breast Care Center (542-9360 or 542-7857), Diabetes Center at 542-9178, Nutrition at 5429786, and the weight loss sur gery program at 542-7524. Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal our nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of a hospital and five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. Of its patient population 215,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guards men and their families more than 57,000 are enrolled with a PCM. Each day, a dedicated team of 2,500 military and civilian personnel sees 1,800 outpatients and 315 dental patients, admits 15 inpatients, cares for 80 people in the ER, performs 14 same-day surger ies, fills 4,700 prescriptions, conducts 4,600 lab tests and delivers two to three babies. Additionally, up to eight per cent of NH Jacksonville active duty staff is deployed around the globe providing com bat and humanitarian care. Keep up with news by visiting the website (www.med.navy. mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax), liking the Facebook page (www.facebook/ NavalHospitalJacksonville) and following on Twitter (www. twitter.com/NHJax). HEALTH

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sance support; and maritime domain awareness flights. Simultaneously in the 4th Fleet AOR, the Fighting Tigers oper ated out of Comalapa International Airport, El Salvador, and completed counter transnational organized crime mis sions. Their efforts directly resulted in the interdic tion and seizure of 18,800 kilograms of cocaine valued at $1.2 billion and 1,500 kilograms of mari juana valued at 8.7 mil lion dollars, as well as the detention of 61 suspects. These missions would not have been possible without the expertise and tireless work ethic of the squadrons maintenance department, said VP-8 Maintenance Master Chief AVCM Kier Walls. In all, maintenance personnel were responsi ble for the flawless execution of more than 16,000 maintenance actions on 12 aircraft across both theaters during the deployment. With deployment and service in the U.S. mili tary comes the respon sibility and privilege for Sailors to be U.S. ambas sadors. The Fighting Tigers took this task to heart, volunteering more than 1,600 hours in support of 30 community rela tions projects across both AORs, including tsunami disaster relief projects in Japan and support of local orphanages and homeless shelters in El Salvador. When asked to sum marize the squadrons performance, VP-8 Executive Officer Cmdr. Todd Libby remarked, Nothing short of phe nomenal it never ceases to amaze me what our Tigers can do when challenged, from engine changes in the El Salvadorian heat and humidity to helping assemble playgrounds for the local orphanage. After all its hard work, the squadron was happy to successfully turnover with the Red Lancers of VP-10, also based at NAS Jacksonville. Next up for the Fighting Tigers, is celebrat ing the holiday season with family and friends before starting the Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 Advanced Readiness Program in January as they begin preparations for their next overseas deployment. Marston stated, While we are thankful to be back in Jacksonville with our family and friends, our thoughts and prayers go out to all the mem bers of the Armed Forces that remain on duty away from their families this holiday season. VP-8 PARKStowards his recovery. Im really excited to be going to rehab in Tampa and get my prosthetic. The support Ive received from everyone is really overwhelming and hum bling, he continued. Parks is also thrilled that he and his wife, Susan are expecting their second child in early December. We have a 1-year-old son, Jason and now we are having a little girl. After receiving the proclamation, which was read by Guillory, Parks stated, This is very humbling and overwhelming. All I did was try to help some one. Thank you so much, said Parks. I just praise God for getting me through this. From what I hear, 99.6 percent of those with my injury dont make it and I did. Ive had incredible nurses and doctors. They saved my life and I am so grateful Im still here for my family, he added. Id also like to thank my co-workers for being by my side. I really appreciate them helping us with whatever weve needed. A member of VP-30 for almost two years, he is known as a dedicated Sailor and fitness enthusiast who works as a personal trainer in his free time. I enlisted in the Navy to be a rescue swimmer I wanted to help people. Unfortunately, I broke my foot and couldnt complete the course. Then I got married and my priorities changed. And with this happening, Im not sure where our future lies. I am thinking about doing some motivational speaking, said Parks. The incident also highlighted the importance of blood donation in the community. VP-30 held a blood drive Nov. 21, collecting 78 pints of blood. An account has also been set up at VyStar Credit Union for the family. Those looking to help can donate to Account #702965111, Routing #263079276. After the incident, the police arrested suspect Courtney Phillips on aggravated battery and other charges. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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rest of China. In 1940, the Japanese government allied their country with Nazi Germany in the Axis Alliance, and soon occu pied all of Indochina. The United States was alarmed by Japans moves so it increased military and financial aid to China, embarked on a program of strengthening its own military power in the Pacific, and cut off the shipment of oil and other raw materials to Japan. Because Japan was poor in natural resources, its government viewed these steps especially the embargo on oil as a threat to the nations survival. To neutralize the danger posed by the U.S. Pacific Fleet based at Pearl Harbor, Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, command er of the Japanese fleet, devised a plan to destroy the U.S. fleet at the outset of the war through a surprise attack. In October 1941 the naval general staff gave final approval to Yamamotos plan, which called for the forma tion of an attack force commanded by Vice Admiral Chuichi Nagumo. It cen tered around six heavy aircraft carri ers accompanied by 24 supporting ves sels. A separate group of submarines was to sink any American warships that escaped the Japanese carrier Force. Nagumos fleet departed in strictest secrecy for Hawaii on Nov. 26, 1941. The ships route crossed the North Pacific and avoided normal shipping lanes. At dawn on Dec. 7, the Japanese task force had approached undetected to a point slightly more than 200 miles north of Oahu. Fortunately, the U.S. aircraft carriers were not at Pearl Harbor at this time. On Nov. 28, Adm. Kimmel sent USS Enterprise under Rear Admiral William Halsey to deliver Marine Corps fight er planes to Wake Island. On Dec. 4, Enterprise delivered the aircraft and by Dec. 7, the task force was on its way back to Pearl Harbor. On Dec. 5, Kimmel sent the USS Lexington with a task force under Rear Adm. Newton to deliver 25 scout bombers to Midway Island. The third Pacific carrier, USS Saratoga, had departed Pearl Harbor for repairs on the west coast. At 6 a.m. on Dec. 7, six Japanese carriers launched the first wave of 181 planes composed of torpedo bombers, dive bombers, horizontal bombers and fight ers. Just before dawn, U.S. Navy vessels spotted an unidentified submarine periscope near the entrance to Pearl Harbor. It was attacked and reported sunk by the destroyer USS Ward (DD-139) and a patrol plane. At 7 a.m., an alert operator at an Army radar station at Opana spotted the approaching first wave of the attack force. The officers to whom those reports were relayed did not consider them significant enough to take action. The report of the submarine sinking was handled routinely, and the radar sighting was passed off as an approaching group of American planes due to arrive that morning. The Japanese aircrews achieved complete surprise when they hit American ships and military installations on Oahu shortly before 8 a.m. They attacked military airfields at the same time they hit the fleet anchored in Pearl Harbor. The Navy air bases at Ford Island and Kaneohe Bay, the Marine Corps airfield at Ewa and the Army Air Corps fields at Bellows, Wheeler and Hickam fields were all bombed and strafed as other elements of the attacking force began their assaults on the ships moored in Pearl Harbor. The purpose of the simultaneous attacks was to destroy the American planes before they could rise to intercept the Japanese. Of the more than 90 ships at anchor in Pearl Harbor, the primary targets were the eight battleships. Seven were moored on Battleship Row along the southeast shore of Ford Island, while the USS Pennsylvania (BB-38) lay in dry dock across the channel. Within the first minutes of the attack all the battleships adjacent to Ford Island had taken bomb and or torpedo hits. The USS West Virginia (BB-48) sank quickly. The USS Oklahoma (BB-37) turned turtle and sank. At about 8:10 a.m., USS Arizona (BB39) was mortally wounded by an armorpiercing bomb that ignited the ships forward ammunition magazine. The resulting explosion and fire killed 1,177 crewmen, the greatest loss of life on any ship that day and about half the total number of Americans killed. USS California (BB-44), USS Maryland (BB-46), USS Tennessee (BB-43) and USS Nevada (BB-36) also suffered vary ing degrees of damage in the first half hour of the raid. There was a short lull in the fury of the attack at about 8:30 a.m. when USS Nevada, despite her wounds, managed to get underway and move down the channel toward the open sea. Before she could clear the harbor, a second wave of 170 Japanese planes, launched 30 minutes after the first, appeared over the harbor. They concentrated their attacks on the mov ing battleship, hoping to sink her in the channel and block the narrow entrance to Pearl Harbor. On orders from the harbor control tower, the USS Nevada was beached at Hospital Point and the channel remained clear. When the attack ended shortly before 10 a.m., less than two hours after it began, the American forces had paid a fearful price. Twenty-one ships of the U.S. Pacific Fleet were sunk or damaged: the battleships Arizona, California, Maryland, Nevada, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West Virginia; cruisers USS Helena (CL-50), USS Honolulu (CL48) and USS Raleigh (CL-7); the destroyers USS Cassin (DD-372), USS Downes (DD-375), USS Helm (DD-388) and USS Shaw (DD-373); seaplane tender USS Curtiss (AV-4); target ship (ex-battle ship) USS Utah (AG-16); repair ship USS Vestal (AR-4); minelayer USS Oglala (CM-4); tug USS Sotoyomo (YT-9); and Floating Drydock Number 2. Aircraft losses were 188 destroyed and 159 damaged, the majority hit before they had a chance to take off. American dead numbered 2,403. That figure included 68 civilians, most of them killed by improperly fused antiaircraft shells landing in Honolulu. There were 1,178 military and civilian wounded. Japanese losses were compar atively light. Twenty-nine planes, less than 10 percent of the attacking force, failed to return to their carriers. The Japanese success was over whelming but it was not complete. They failed to damage any American aircraft carriers which by a stroke of luck were absent from the harbor. They neglected to damage the shore facilities at the Pearl Harbor Naval Base, which played an important role in the Allied victory in World War II. American technological skill raised and repaired all but three of the ships sunk or damaged at Pearl Harbor (Arizona, considered too badly dam aged to be salvaged; Oklahoma, considered too old to be worth repairing, and the obsolete USS Utah (AG-16) consid ered not worth the effort). Most impor tantly, the shock and anger caused by the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor united a divided nation and was translated into a wholehearted commitment to victory in World War II. PEARL 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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NECE provides public health internship for UNF studentsThe University of Northern Florida (UNF), Brooks College of Health, Department of Public Health teamed up with the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) to provide an internship position for UNF students. The goal of the collaboration is to provide students with the education and skills needed for entry-level positions in community health and for gradu ate studies. Graduates of the program are typically employed in governmental and non-profit health agencies, health care facilities, work site wellness pro grams or school settings. While the student intern program at NECE focuses primarily on student development, it is beneficial to all involved, said Cmdr. Eric Hoffman, NECE officer in charge. The student gains experience and knowledge of military preventive med icine, entomology and public health, preparing them to pursue and achieve professional goals; meanwhile the NECE staff benefits from the enthusi asm brought to the command, know ing the next generation of public health professionals will be well prepared to meet the tremendous challenges of the future. The first candidate to participate in the internship is Kristina Harand, a senior at UNF. She is interested in epidemiology and wishes to pursue a masters degree in public health after she graduates this semester. Harand worked with entomologists and molecular biologists at NECE to test insecti cide efficacy on the medically signifi cant Yellow Fever mosquito. Kristinas studies help us have a better understanding of how insecticides affect larval mosquitoes which can translate to better control programs, said Katelyn Chalaire, NECE molecular biologist. According to Lt. Cmdr. Carl Doud, NECE technical director, Harand was able to bring more to the com mand than just a willingness to work. Kristina truly impressed all of us with her passion, work ethic and perfor mance, said Doud. Her enthusiasm was contagious and whoever fills the position next will certainly have big shoes to fill. The internship position is intended to be filled each semester with stu dents from the UNF Public Health Department. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 11

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Darnell-Cookman Middle/ High School of the Medical Arts played host Nov. 16 to Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Science, Service, Medicine & Mentoring (S2M2) program. The S2M2 program is designed to encourage, nur ture and enhance high school students interest in pursuing careers in science and medi cine. Approximately 100 sopho mores attended the S2M2 kickoff event that brought together Darnell-Cookman Principal Mark Ertel and Medical Integration Coordinator Matt Walker with NH Jacksonvilles Cmdr. Jim Keck, MD, fam ily medicine residency pro gram director; Lt. Cmdr. Leslie Manohar, MD, ortho pedic surgeon; Capt. Paula Chamberlain, RN, associate director for public health; Lt. Cmdr. Patrick Fairley, PharmD, pharmacist; and Lt. Cmdr. Ken Meehan, PA-C, physician assistant. Our S2M2 program offers Darnell-Cookman students the opportunity to get a glimpse to witness the clinical rotations available in medicine, says Keck. And for Naval Hospital Jacksonville, its a way of giving back . a way of serving. Darnell-Cookman embrac es the S2M2 partnership (launched in 2010) as it com plements the schools focus on equipping high-perform ing students with the tools to support their future goals in pursuing advanced medical degrees. Walker, the school medical integration coordinator, works hand-in-hand with S2M2. Having the opportunity for our students to gain real-world experience with Naval Hospital through the S2M2 program is a wonderful and unique oppor tunity, said Walker. This partnership provides an outlet for our students to grow in their medical knowl edge and also sharpen leader ship skills. Were so excited to have yet another group of stu dents participate in S2M2 this year. During the event, NH Jacksonville clinicians shared inspirational stories of their careers in Navy Medicine and the paths they took to get there. Along with the formal event, smaller groups of students were able to spend quality time with Navy clinicians in an open forum, hearing first-hand about the roles each medical profession plays in healing our nations heroes. Many of the students took full advantage of this chance, including Meiling Torres. You actually get firsthand knowl edge based on the doctors experience, said Torres. The reason we are at Darnell-Cookman is we all have some interest in medi cine. I think its really interesting and very helpful. Roy Peterson felt that having access to NH Jacksonville clinicians helped clarify things for him. When the Naval Med per sonnel are here, they really help you find your way, said Peterson. It gets you focused on wanting to get into the medical field and to choose a good career path. In addition to the kick-off event, NH Jacksonville will host two intensive, week-long S2M2 programs for approxi mately 20 students. These students will get realworld experience in patient care areas from the operat ing and emergency rooms to pharmacy and physical/ occu pational therapy. Along with the hands-on medical activities, students will participate in discussions, job-shadowing and mentor ing with physicians and other medical professionals. Additionally, the school and hospital are exploring ways to further align the S2M2 pro gram with the medical arts curriculum such as allowing students to participate in the hospitals graduate medical education training via video conferencing. NH Jax S2M2 clinicians spark interest at medical magnet school JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Located in Bldg. 608 between Gillis St. and Keily St. off of Enterprise Ave. Deweys offers a full service menu, bar and a friendly atmosphere for all ages. Monday Friday 10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 4 10 p.m. CPO Lounge Monday, Tuesday & Friday 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Wednesday Thursday 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m. Childrens Holiday Bingo Dec. 15 Doors open at 4 p.m., games begin at 5 p.m. $15 per child, ages 3 17 New Years Day Bingo Extravaganza Doors open at 10:30 a.m., games begin at 12:30 p.m. $125 per personFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New Years Eve Bowling Party Dec. 31, 7 p.m. 1 a.m. $15 per person Includes glow in the dark bowling, shoe rental, DJ with karaoke, party favors, t-shirts, souvenir cups, midnight toast & breakfast buffet! Beverages not included. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 40,000 Calories of Christmas See if you and your teammate can burn 40,000 calories Dec. 3 to Jan. 18. Top teams in each team category receive a trophy. Sign up in the fitness center by Nov. 28 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Contact Melissa Luehrs at 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Jingle Bell Jog 5K Dec. 13 at 11:30 a.m. Preregister by Dec. 7I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus Jan.1821, $13 per person Jacksonville Zoo Lights Dec. 1431, $8 $10 per person St. Augustine Old Town Trolley Night of Lights Adult $8.75, child $4 ShenYun at the Times Union Center Jan. 2930, $55 $163 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zip line Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Preferred seating $41, lower-level seating $22 Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 MOSH $7 $12 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31 and must be redeemed by June 30, 2013. Ask about our special discounted tickets for family members. Gator Bowl tickets $35 Gator Bowl Patch $9 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1-day $29.50, 2-day $40, Gold pass $71 Daytona 500 Feb. 24 $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Kings Bay Comedy Show Featuring Jarrod Harris & Shawn Filipe Dec. 6 at 6 p.m. Reindeer Games Competition Dec. 8 at noon Win $500 Jaguars vs. Jets NFL game Dec. 9 at 11:30 a.m. Free admission and transportationNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Santa Sez Golf Tournament Dec. 21 at 10 a.m. 4-person scramble $40 $50 per person Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Dec. 18 for active duty Dec. 6 & 20 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1 p.m. every day. Monday & Tuesday Play 18 holes for $18 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Dashing Through The Grove Dec. 8, from 4 -8 p.m. at Patriots Grove Free snow sledding, photos with Santa, tree lighting, music & more. Movie Under the Stars Dec.14, 5:30 p.m. at Patriots Grove How the Grinch Stole Christmas Free popcorn and $.50 drinks Drop-in care and open recreation are available. Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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NAS Jax All Saints Chapel was filled Nov. 30 with proud families and ship mates who came to honor the lat est graduates of Southern Illinois University (SIU) at Carbondale. The university offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Electronic Systems Technologies, and a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Care Management, through the Navy College Office at NAS Jacksonville. In his invocation, NAS Jax Chaplain (Lt.) Hylanie Chan-Williams said that SIU Carbondale has been preparing leaders and scholars since 1869. Today, we must thank the families of these scholars the wives and hus bands and sons and daughters who encouraged them as they labored through the wee hours of the night and on weekends to complete their studies. That family support is what set the feet of these scholars on the path to greater greats and higher highs. In his congratulatory remarks, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders offered the graduates some pearls of wisdom about personal suc cess. First, knowledge is everything. Today is just the first step and tomor row you need to be paranoid about the currency of what you know. Ask yourself every day, Am I up to speed or am I stagnating intellectually or worse am I falling behind? Now you have a brain and a diploma. Put them both to work. SIU has taught you how to learn for a lifetime, said Sanders. Second, remember that life is a marathon, not a sprint, and nobody wins all the time. To grow personally and pro fessionally, you must live without fear of failure. Dont be part of the crowd. If you fail learn from it and dont make the same mistake twice. Finally, make a commitment to excellence. Legendary football coach Vince Lombardi once said, when peo ple make a commitment to a way of life, they put the greatest strength in the world behind them its something we call heart power. Once a person has made this com mitment, nothing will stop them short of success. The fact that you graduates are here today, tells me you have a pretty good idea of how to be successful, concluded Sanders. Dr. Charles Sidell, SIU coordina tor of workforce education, said, Commencement is not the end of something its the beginning of something. These new alumni have worked hard to reach their scholarship goals, as well as developing their leadership skills. This is a day they will always remember. Southern Illinois Universitys College of Applied Sciences and Arts offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Electronic Systems Technologies and a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Care Management at NAS Jacksonville. Classes meet on Saturday and Sunday of alternate weekends. Students enrolled full-time are able to complete the 48-semester-hour major in as little as 16 months. Both degree programs consist of 120 semester hours of credit. The 48 semester hours of major coursework is taught at NAS Jacksonville by SIU faculty, both campus-based and adjuncts who are accomplished professionals in the subject area. Transfer work from other regionally accredited colleges and universities, CLEP and DSST testing, military training, and work experience fulfill the 41 semester hours of core curriculum and 31 semester hours of approved career electives. To learn more, contact NAS Jax Navy College Director Vicki OToole at 5422477 or e-mail: nco.jacksonville@navy. mil. Southern Illinois University holds 37th commencement at NAS Jax 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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A safety stand down was held for Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) and NAS Jacksonville Sailors and civilian employees at Deweys All Hands Club Nov. 28 to remind them to make smart decisions to stay safe over the holiday season. This is a particularly dangerous time of year. We had 35 vehicular fatalities within the Navy last year, 20 of those were motorcycle accidents. Of that total, seven were within Navy Region Southeast. Any number above zero is too many, said CNRSE Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. Its about taking care of yourselves, your shipmates and your families. So look out for one another and be careful out there on the roads. CNRSE/NAS Jax Safety Officer Ron Williamson also offered some advice to the audience. There always seem to be more accidents in the holiday season than dur ing the rest of the year. So this safety stand down is a good reminder for everyone to be more vigilant to safety measures, not only on the roads but at home, he said. The guest speaker for the event was Steve Verret, a master traffic safety instructor and professional stand-up comedian. Verret, who has taught driver safety for more than 25 years, used humor to relay important information regarding vehicle insurance, measures to take to avoid accidents, seatbelt use, open container laws, drinking and driving and using cell phones while driving. As the crowd laughed at his jokes and answered his questions, they took away a wealth of information regard ing traffic safety. Verret stressed the importance of not using cell phones while driving. Cell phones are the new DUI. I think they are more dangerous than drunk driving because those who drink and drive normally know they are doing something wrong but those drivers talking on cell phones or tex ting dont think they are doing any thing wrong, said Verret. It may or may not be against the law in certain states but when you are on the phone while driving, you are not focused on the road. And, cell phone usage can be used in liability cases if you have an accident so you may not get compensation or someone else may get more compensation. For Verret, conducting safety stand downs for military members is an important cause. I try to positively reinforce safe ty every time I conduct one of these events. No matter how many times you tell someone not to drink or drive and to wear their seatbelts, there are still those who either ignore this advice or just dont get it, said Verret. I try to reach military personnel through these presentations because they do so much for our country and I think its a shame that someone puts their life on the line overseas and then they come home and do one thing carelessly in their vehicle and they either lose their lives or are injured. Scorby concluded the stand down by stating, We have the finest Navy military and civilian forces and Im proud to serve with you. We need to have all of you back following the holiday season so be careful out there and remember the reason for the season. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil Visit the MWR website at www. cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com/nas jaxmwr. Comedian brings humor to safety stand down JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 17

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Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Realty Specialist Jason Ellerbee started writing a new chapter in his life Nov. 16 by raising his right hand during his commissioning ceremony. Ellerbee was sworn in to the U.S. Navy Reserves by NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus as Ellerbees wife, daughter, friends and co-workers looked on. What we do at NAVFAC and the support we provide has really generated a spark to serve, said Ellerbee. Ellerbee, who began his career with NAVFAC Southeast as a realty specialist in April 2008, nor mally spends his days working on acquisitions, leases, licensing agreements and easement issues for Gulfcoast IPT. He said he pretty much works on anything that deals with the land aboard a U.S. Navy Base. Now he will have the opportunity to work on issues in the spiritual realm as he will provide counseling to Sailors and Marines. The inspiration to serve in the military began at a young age when he was a Sea Cadet at the age of 12. The inspiration to serve militarily turned into serious thought about two years ago. Ellerbee said working in a military culture at NAVFAC Southeast for the last four years has gener ated a real sense of pride for the Navy. Ellerbee holds a Bachelor of Arts in History from the College of Charleston, SC, and a masters degree in Historic Preservation from the University of Georgia and is currently working on his Master of Divinity through Luther Rice Universitys Seminary of Atlanta online program. As the process to come aboard as an officer with the Navy Reserves progressed, the chaplain candi date program seemed like a perfect fit for me since I already possessed so many of the prerequisites, said Ellerbee. Ellerbee already serves in the ministry as a volun teer at the church he attends in Jacksonville. He serves as an assistant director and team lead in the Media Department and serves as a fitness counselor. Its always been a desire to serve in the ministry in some fashion, said Ellerbee. He also said his family is very excited about this opportuni ty. His wife was the one who actually encouraged him to go and see the recruit ers in the first place. We are very excited for the opportunity and the doors this will open up for us, said Ellerbee. This is just a whole new aspect of our lives. We are really excited to see where God is going to take this and what He wants to do with it. Ellerbee wont know what unit he will serve with or where until he completes his Masters of Divinity degree along with Officer Development School (ODS) and Navy Chaplain training which could take two years. My overall aspiration is to care for the Sailors and Marines in whatever capacity is needed, said Ellerbee. To ensure that they get the proper treatment and counseling they need. A former pastor in Charleston, S.C., once told him to just jump into the ministry pond and serve in as many areas as you can until you find that one spot or purpose that God has for you. I feel strongly that this is my purpose in life, said Ellerbee. New Navy chaplain fulfilling his purpose in life 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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To ensure that the holiday sea son is safe and merry, there are a few things we can all do around the home. Deck the house Strings of holiday lights are put up both inside and outside to brighten up any dwelling. Unfortunately, these same lights cause a large number of fires each year. Before putting them up, check on the condition of the lights. Make sure the wiring is not frayed or damaged and that none of the bulbs are broken. A set of lights that is in bad shape can be very likely to short out and start a fire. When the wires are not in prime condition, its time to dispose of that set for another. Even a newer set of lights can be a hazard, so it is never a good idea to leave them unattended. When you go out for the night or go to sleep, make sure to turn them off. A tree can also be a major hazard. Every year hundreds of fires begin in festively decorated trees. There are a few things you can do to make the tree as safe as possible. First off, mount the tree securely so it can not tip over or be easily knocked down. A falling tree can land on someone or damage property. A dry tree can ignite far too easily. It is essential to keep the tree well watered the entire time you have it in your home. Place the tree far away from the fire place, and the same goes for wrap ping paper, gifts or any other holi day items that may be flammable. Make sure you have a charged extin guisher around the house. Let everyone who lives there know exactly where it is, and how to use it. Check the batteries in smoke alarms. Holiday decorations are often used all over the house, but they should never block exits. Holiday gatherings A dinner party is a great way to entertain your guests, but dont neglect the food you have cooking. Another major household fire hazard is food that is placed on the stove and forgotten about. If table settings include can dles you may want to remove them when its time to eat, especially if there are young children involved. Keeping your home safe from fire is only part of the responsibilities home owners face during the holiday season. Protecting your house from criminals Picture this. Its late at night and you hear a noise at the back door or a win dow inside your home. You get up to investigate and find an intruder breaking into your home. What would you do? The first answer is to call the police, but in the time it takes for them to arrive, a criminal may harm you or your family. Chances are the home invader will be armed, so the job of defend er may be left entirely up to you. Owning a gun While its wise to do everything you can to safeguard your home from a break in, if a criminal is intent on get ting into your house, chances are they will. This frightening concept causes home owners to purchase firearms and keep them easily accessible. Simply having the gun can make people feel safer, but if you own one it is vital to learn how to properly han dle, maintain and fire the weapon. The seriousness of owning a gun must never be forgotten. Every year, people are killed by accidental gunfire. There are many classes in which new gun owners can learn to handle and fire it correctly. When children are involved Make no mistake, there are haz ards to keeping any lethal weapon in the home, and when children are pres ent the danger is multiplied. All chil dren are naturally curious, and a gun is something that can easily peak their interest. Adults who own a deadly weapon must take every precaution to keep it out of the hands of young kids. Storing a gun in a locked drawer or cabinet and keeping the key with you is an ideal solution. This will help to ensure that a child cannot get to it for any reason. It is also advisable to keep the gun unloaded. Try to find places for the fire arm and the bullets that are secure but also easily accessible in case you need to get to them in a hurry. At some point you may feel your kids are old enough to learn about the gun you keep in the home. Express how important it is to be very cautious when handling a weapon and how danger ous they are. Have your kids take a gun safety course when you feel they are old enough to handle a firearm on their Tips for keeping your holidays safe JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 19

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Navy Region Southeast recently convened several Court-martials to hear the following cases: At a General Court-Martial convened aboard NAS Jacksonville, a petty officer third class pled guilty to wrongful use of marijuana and he was found guilty of unau thorized absence terminated by apprehension. The court-martial sentenced the accused to seven months of confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, and a bad conduct discharge. At a General Court-Martial convened aboard NAS Jacksonville, a petty officer second class was found not guilty of assault and willfully and wrongfully discharging a firearm. At a Special Court-Martial con vened on board NAS Pensacola, a petty officer third class pled guilty to assaulting a child under the age of 16 years. The military judge sentenced the Accused to 12 months of confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, forfeiture of $994 pay per month for 12 months, and a bad conduct discharge. At a Special Court-Martial con vened aboard NAS Jacksonville, a petty officer second class pled guilty to fraternization, derelic tion of duty, failing to obey a lawful order, and wrongful appropriation of a government vehicle. The military judge sentenced the accused to 100 days of confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, and a bad con duct discharge. At a General Court-Martial convened aboard NAS Jacksonville, a lance corporal pled guilty to wrongful use of marijuana (3 specifications), having sexual intercourse with someone inca pable of declining participation, and engaging in a sexual act with someone incapable of declining participation. The military judge sentenced the accused to 12 years of confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, and a dishonorable dis charge. At a Special Court-Martial con vened aboard NAS Jacksonville, a petty officer second class was found guilty of attempting to steal military property. The court-martial sentenced the accused to be restricted to base for 60 days and to forfeit $1,244 pay per month for four months. Court-Martials in Navy Region Southeast are tried with few exceptions at NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, and NAS Pensacola. Therefore, the location of where a court-martial described above was convened does not neces sarily correlate to the command that convened the court-martials. Adjudged sentences may be modi fied by pre-trial agreement or clemency. Recently at the courthouse . 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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Dashing Through The Groveat NAS Jax Patriots GroveSaturday December 8, 4 8 p.m. FREEsnow Sledding Photos with Santa Tree Lighting Musical Entertainment Refreshments And more! 778-9772 2013 Scholarships for military childrenown. Before purchasing a gun Every state has laws that govern gun use and own ership. You will need to find out what they are, and make sure you have the proper permits to legally own a firearm. The laws can vary depending on whether you are attempting to buy a handgun, shotgun or other type of firearm. Most of these weapons have a mandatory waiting period before you may bring them home, and dur ing this time a background check will be conducted to make sure you do not have any felonies and can legally own a gun. Anyone can become a victim of crime, but there are some very basic things that you can do to deter criminals from choosing you. People generally think of their homes as safe havens where the outside world can not get to them, but statistics show that crime and home invasions are on the rise. Do what you can to make your home as safe as possible. It all starts by becoming more active with your neighborhood. Crime in your neighborhood One of the best ways to ensure a burglar does not target your house involves working with your neigh bors so that everyone watches out for each other. Meet the people who live nearby, learn their names, what cars they have and exchange phone numbers. Keep a list of this contact information near a phone. Consider starting an official Neighborhood Watch Group and working with local law enforce ment agencies to help watch over your neighborhood. Watch for strangers Once you get to know the people around you, you will be better prepared to notice strangers who seem to be hanging around. Seeing someone you dont know walk down your street once is not unusual, but if that same person is lingering, they may be casing the neighborhood and looking for a home to rob. And, if an unfamiliar car is spending a lot of time driving on your street, it could be an indication that criminals are looking for potential targets. Warn a neighbor if you see someone looking at their home, and dont be afraid to call the police to report suspicious behavior. Deter criminals from choosing your home Even a well-watched neighborhood can be struck by crime. A burglar looks for the easiest target possible, so it is up to you to make your house difficult to break into. The first step is keeping exterior and interior lights on during the night. Criminals prefer a cover of darkness, and will gravitate towards a home that has no lights on at all. When you go out for the night, keep a television on, or play a radio inside the house. This will give the appearance that someone is still home, which is a great deterrent to criminals. Experts often recommend choosing a talk station for the radio to give the impression that a conversation is taking place inside. A law-breaker may still attempt to break into your home if they become reasonably certain they can do so without being noticed. These are just a few tips to hopefully keep your holiday season safe. Applications for the 2013 Scholarships for Military Children Program are now avail able at commissar ies worldwide. You can also find them online at http://www.mili taryscholar.org Scholarship awards will be based on funds available, but the schol arship program awards at least $1,500 at each com missary. If there are no eligible applicants from a particular commissary, the funds designated for that commissary will be awarded at another store. The scholarship pro gram was created to rec ognize military families contributions to the readiness of U.S. armed forces and to celebrate the commissarys role in the military community. DeCA is focused on supporting a good qual ity of life for our military and their families, said Defense Commissary Agency Director and CEO Joseph Jeu. To apply, students must be a dependent, unmar ried child, younger than 21 or 23, if enrolled as a full-time student at a college or university of a service member on active duty, reserv ist, guardsman, retiree or survivor of a military member who died while on active duty or survivor of a retiree. Eligibility is deter mined using the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System data base. Applicants should ensure that they and their sponsor, are enrolled in DEERS and have a current military ID card. The applicant must also be planning to attend or already attend ing an accredited college or university, full time, in the fall of 2013 or be enrolled in a program of studies designed to transfer directly into a fouryear program. Applicants must sub mit an essay on a topic chosen by the Fisher House. Applications must be turned in to a com missary by close of busi ness Feb. 22, 2013. For more information, call 856-616-9311 or mili taryscholar@scholar shipmanagers.com TIPS JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 6, 2012 21

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