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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 11-29-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02021

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Set new milestones for MQ-8B Fire ScoutA crowd of family and friends will line the pier at Naval Station Mayport Dec. 1 to welcome home HSL-42 Detachment Two embedded with USS Klakring (FFG 42) from a highly successful fivemonth deployment to the U.S. Africa Command area of responsibility. Following their departure in June, Detachment Two provided airborne intelligence, surveillance, and recon naissance (ISR) in support of military units operating throughout Africa. This deployment was a unique oppor tunity for the Detachment Two team and the Klakring team. Squadron members broke new ground in the field of rotary wing aviation by being the first to deploy aboard a U.S. Navy ship with four vertical take-off and landing unmanned aerial vehicles (VTUAVs). Rather than taking their time-tested SH-60Bs to sea, the pilots, payload oper ators, and maintainers deployed with the MQ-8B Fire Scout VTUAV, one of the Navys newest aviation platforms. Manufactured by Northrop Grumman, the Fire Scout is capable of autonomously taking-off and landing from a ship, flying pre-programmed or commanded flight routes with long on-station time, and providing multisensor intelligence information. Beginning in December 2011, the flight crews and maintainers of Detachment Two underwent intensive training to operate and sustain this cut ting-edge technology at sea. Their hard work and dedication paid off over the past five months as the detachment pushed the boundaries of sea-based ISR and achieved many new milestones in naval unmanned avia tion. Detachment Two aircrews were the first active duty military members to fly two Fire Scout air vehicles simultane ously from a single control station on the ship for dual air vehicle operations. Additionally, they fulfilled a Chief of Naval Operations requirement for the Navy to execute 12 continuous hours of ISR coverage from a sea-based asset this fiscal year. Squadron members pushed the enve lope even further in demonstrating a surge capability by executing 24 con tinuous hours of real world ISR coverage in late September. Commenting on his detachments achievements, Officer-in-Charge Lt. Cmdr. Jay Lambert said, This was a very challenging deployment for every one involved but looking back now, it will be one of the highlights of my career. The issues we faced from logis tics to dealing with a relatively new type of aircraft were far outside the norm of what the HSL community usually runs into, but my guys handled everything that came at us perfectly. I really cant say enough about how well our entire detachment performed. They were the best group I could have ever possibly had the privilege of leading. Luckily, it wasnt all hard work over the last five months for the Sailors of Detachment Two and Klakring. The crew relaxed and enjoyed some wellearned time away from the ship dur ing their multiple port visits. Klakring called on such exotic locations as Djibouti, the Seychelles Islands, and the Island of Mauritius. When asked as to what his favorite port visit was, AT2 Richard Knowles commented, I had a great time in the Seychelles, but I am very happy to be home. Im going to Disney World! No, really, I am going to Disney World. USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) and HSC-22)Detachment Five relieved USS Klakring in the Mediterranean Sea and are currently underway conducting Fire Scout operations. As a testament to the skill and profes sionalism of Detachment Twos mainte nance team, three of their four MQ-8B aircraft were transferred to HSC-22 Detachment Five in theater, keeping the cutting edge Fire Scout aircraft for ward deployed for nearly a year before returning home. With warfighting the central focus of the Navys mission, the Navy is best when it is out and about, Navy Adm. Jonathan Greenert, chief of naval opera tions, said Nov. 16 in Washington, D.C. Operating forward means using innovative ways to make sure the ships that we have are where we need them to be, the admiral said during a speech at a National Press Club luncheon. Readiness to conduct forward oper ations requires more than just parts, maintenance and fuel, he added. It also means that we have compe tent and proficient crews that are ready to do the job, he said. For about 10 years, around half of the Navys ships have been forward deployed in the Asia-Pacific region, Greenert said. Half of those ships are home-ported there, he added. That forward-leaning posture helps to build international relationships and reassure U.S. allies, he said. Partnerships between the United States and Asia-Pacific nations are maturing and growing, Greenert said. For example, in Japan and South Korea, U.S. Navy operations personnel are colocated with their host nation counter parts, he said. In addition, a longstanding series of talks with the Chinese navy have been expanded to include flag officers, not just captains, Greenert said. We in the Department of Defense have now a deliberate strategy for engagement of the Chinese military, he said. The Asia-Pacific region has been a longtime focus for the Navy, the admi ral said, so it makes sense that the U.S. defense strategy would include a rebal ance toward the region. Part of the rebalance includes Spains recent agreement to allow four Aegis missile-equipped Arleigh Burke-class ships to home-port in Rota, effectively freeing up six ships to deploy elsewhere, Greenert said. In addition, more ships will be based on the West Coast. By 2020, 60 percent of the Navys ships will be based on the West Coast or elsewhere in the Pacific, he said. To send one ship forward, Greenert said, requires four other ships: one in the region, one that has just returned, one that is preparing to deploy and one that is in maintenance. It makes better economic sense to keep ships home-ported in those regions, he said. About a third of the deployed ships are in the Middle East and the Arabian Gulf, and about 18 are in the Mediterranean Sea, the admiral said. That arrangement helps to ensure access to maritime crossroads such as the Suez Canal and the straits of Hormuz, Malacca and Gibraltar, he said. We have to have access to those places. Thats where the lifeblood of our world economy travels through, he said. It can take several days, sometimes two or three weeks, to reach these plac es from the United States, he noted, underscoring the importance of operat ing from forward locations. Greenert: Navy at its best when forward deployed HSL 42 Det Two coming home

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Nov. 29 1775 Capt. John Manley in schooner Lee captures British ordnance ship Nancy with large quantity of munitions. 1890 First Army-Navy foot ball game is won by Navy 24 0. 1929 Cmdr. Richard Byrd makes first flight over South Pole. 1944 USS Archerfish (SS-311) sinks Japanese carrier Shinano, the worlds largest warship sunk by any submarine during World War II. Nov. 30 1942 In Battle of Tassafaronga, the last major naval action in Solomons, the U.S. force prevents Japanese attempt to resupply the Japanese troops on Guadalcanal. Six U.S. ships are damaged in the action. Dec. 1 1842 Execution of three crewmembers of USS Somers for mutiny: Midshipman Philip Spencer, Boatswain Samuel Cromwell and Seaman Elisha Small. 1921 In first flight of an air ship filled with helium, Blimp C-7 piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Ralph Wood, flew from Norfolk, Va., to Washington, D.C. 1959 Bureau of Ordnance merges with Bureau of Aeronautics to form the Bureau of Naval Weapons. Dec. 2 1908 Rear Adm. William Cowles submits report to Secretary of the Navy, prepared by Lt. George Sweet, recom mending purchase of aircraft suitable for operating from naval ships on scouting and observa tion missions. 1941 First Naval Armed Guard detachment (seven men under a coxswain) of World War II reports to Liberty ship SS Dunboyne. 1944 Two-day destroyer Battle of Ormoc Bay begins. 1965 USS Enterprise (CVAN65) and USS Bainbridge (DLGN25) become first nuclear-pow ered task unit used in combat operations with launch of air strikes near Bien Hoa, Vietnam. Dec. 3 1775 LT John Paul Jones raises the Grand Union flag on Alfred. First American flag raised over American naval ves sel. 1940 President Franklin D. Roosevelt embarks on USS Tuscaloosa (CA-37) to inspect bases acquired from Great Britain under Destroyer-for Bases agreement. 1983 Two F-14s flying over Lebanon were fired upon. Dec. 4 1918 President Woodrow Wilson sails in USS George Washington for Paris Peace Conference. 1943 Aircraft from USS Lexington (CV-16) and USS Independence (CVL-22) attack Kwajalein Atoll, sinking four Japanese ships and damaging five others, while only three U.S. ships suffered damage. 1944 USS Flasher (SS249) sinks Japanese destroyer Kishinami in South China Sea. Flasher is only U.S. sub to sink more than 100,000 tons of enemy shipping in World War II. 1965 Launch of Gemini 7 piloted by Cmdr. James Lovell. The flight consisted of 206 orbits at an altitude of 327 km and lasted 13 days and 18 hours. Recovery by HS-11 helicopters from USS Wasp (CVS-18). 1983 Aircraft from USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and USS Independence (CV-62) launch strike against anti-aircraft posi tions in Lebanon that fired on U.S. aircraft. Two Navy planes were shot down. Dec. 5 1843 Launching of USS Michigan at Erie, Penn., Americas first iron-hull war ship, as well as first prefabricat ed ship. 1941 USS Lexington (CV2) sails with Task Force 12 to ferry Marine Corps aircraft to Midway Island, leaving no carri ers at Pearl Harbor. Twelve years ago, Dustin arrived at a new squadron, and at the Hail and Farewell (the Navys efficient two-birds, onestone approach to saying hello and goodbye to rotating person nel), a tall, attractive woman walked into the bar wearing a white tank top and fitted jeans. Whos that, I asked. Dustin whispered back, One of the pilots. One of the pilots where? Here, he said. In this squad ron. I wanted to raise my hand and request that my husband be transferred to a new duty station. As if that works. I imagined how much more beautiful the pilot would seem to the men when they were separated from their wives for months at a time. I hated that she would have more access to my husband than I would. She would eat with him, exercise with him, and probably hang out in the ready room with him, too. Welcome to the strange, con flicted, sexually-charged but policed atmosphere of the mili tary, where uniforms meant to stifle individual expression have inadvertently become sex sym bols, and where husbands leave their wives for months at a time to live with other women, many of whom are young, smart, fit and attractive. For all of these reasons, last week, when I heard the news about former CIA Director David Petraeus having an affair with his biographer, Paula Broadwell, my stomach knotted. Fair or not, military leaders set the tone for their subordinates. A command er who has a family at home like ly will make holiday parties and family-services briefings a prior ity. A commander who is a bach elor might invite all the guys to Hooters for dinner. (Yes, I saw this happen.) A leaders person al behavior gives families back home either confidence or rea son to worry. So in the wake of the scandal, I feel a little like a kid whos just discovered her parents are get ting a divorce. Nothing makes sense. The military is not what I thought it was. Shouldnt Petraeus and his wife, after 38 years of marriage, be the happy picture of what military life can be? Werent we striving for what they have? Civilians, of course, have always secretly suspected that being on deployment involves sneaking around on your spouse and shirking duties as husband and father. Military wives some times fear this, too, but, until now, weve looked to leaders with the brass you know, the ones who are unimpressed with the countrys latest reality-TV star and are more focused on the troops and defending freedom and found comfort in the tone they set. So what now? Four-Star gener als, unlike some celebrities and politicians, dont usually end up on the front page of The National Enquirer. What are we to make of this? What is our new standard of a good military marriage? Or, worse, had we been duped all along? Jake Trapper, speaking about the affair to CNNs Piers Morgan last week, shared a story about being with the troops overseas, where it was, as he recalled, a world virtually void of women and filled with men starved for them. He said the men routinely clamored to listen to a female helicopter pilots voice over the radio. The men, he said, were convinced she was the most beautiful woman ever. All across the nation, as CNN went to commercial, a thousand military wives hearts broke. Those men clamoring to hear the radio probably werent all single. We always suspected as much, of course, but no one talked about it, and military leaders, we had hoped, certainly frowned on it. Oh, but the damage from this divorce is far from done. Next up in the fallout is Jill Kelley, a rich socialite civilian who, despite having no business at McDill Air Force Base, had total access to it and all of its leaders. There, Kelley received favors like written letters of support from two powerful generals for her sisters custody battle. I had to read that news report twice. Ive been a military dependent for 36 years; favors and social ite are not usually in the same sentence with military and base. Despite being a Navy wife and BRAT, Ive sometimes been turned away from the front gate because I didnt have my I.D. card. There never were any favors. But, then, Im closer to look ing more like General Patreuss wife than I am the perfectly dressed and toned Kelley or Broadwell. I used to think those things didnt matter in the mili tary. Its like the rug has been pulled out from under military wives. And as each new picture surfaces of the general wearing what looks like Mardi Gras beads and beautiful women on either arm, we will think of his wife, and our bitterness will grow at being left at home to raise fami lies, where we age, grow plump around the edges and wrinkled in the face. All while another woman goes jogging with our husband and a socialite is waved onto base. That collective sigh you hear is an army of wives asking them selves, perhaps many decades too late, is this really any way to live a married life? But we arentall necessarily question ing our marriages. Ive loved and been devoted to both my hus band and the military. Today, I feel like one of them has cheated me. And its not Dustin. The three Pacific Fleet aircraft carriers were USS Enterprise (CV-6), USS Lexington (CV-2), and USS Saratoga (CV-3). Enterprise: On Nov. 28, 1941, Adm. Husband Kimmel sent Task Force-8, con sisting of Enterprise, the heavy cruisers Northampton (CA-26), Chester (CA-27) and Salt Lake City (CA-24) along with nine destroy ers under Vice Adm. William Halsey Jr., to ferry 12 Grumman F4F-3 Wildcats of Marine Fighter Squadron (VMF) 211 to Wake Island. Upon completion of the mission on Dec. 4, TF-8 set course to return to Pearl Harbor. Dawn on Dec. 7 found TF-8 about 215 miles west of Oahu. Lexington: On Dec. 5, Task Force-12, formed around Lexington, under the com mand of Rear Adm. John Newton, sailed from Pearl to ferry 18 Vought SB2U-3 Vindicators of Marine Scout Bombing Squadron 231 to Midway Island. Dawn on Dec. 7 found Lexington, heavy cruisers Chicago (CA-29), Portland (CA-33) and Astoria (CA-34) along with five destroyers about 500 miles southeast of Midway. The attack on Pearl cancelled the mission and VMSB-231 was retained on board (they would ultimately fly to Midway from Hickam Field on Dec. 21). Saratoga: Having recently completed an overhaul at the Puget Sound Navy Yard in Bremerton, Wash., she reached NAS San Diego (North Island) late on Dec. 7. She embarked her air group, as well as Marine Fighter Squadron (VMF) 221 and a cargo of miscella neous airplanes to ferry to Pearl Harbor. Yorktown (CV-5), Ranger (CV-4) and Wasp (CV-7), along with the aircraft escort vessel Long Island (AVG-1), were in the Atlantic Fleet; Hornet (CV-8), commissioned in late October 1941, had yet to carry out her shakedown. Yorktown would be the first Atlantic Fleet car rier to be transferred to the Pacific, sailing on Dec.16, 1941.U.S. aircraft carrier locations: December 7, 1941Petraeus scandal cheats military wives

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On Nov. 16, VP-30 Executive Officer Cmdr. David Gardella recognized recent graduates of the P-3C CAT I (initial training syllabus) Acoustic and Nonacoustic Operator Class 1205, Flight Engineer Class 1203, and In-flight Technician Class 1203. The Honor Graduates of the classes were: AWF3 Cord Bailey (Naval Aircrewman Mechanical Class 1203), AWV3 Joshua Wendel (Naval Aircrewman Avionics Class 1203), AWO3 Nicholas Urban (Naval Aircrewman Operator Class 1205-Non-Acoustic), and AWO3 Cody Miller (Naval Aircrewman Operator Class 1205-Acoustic). All graduating Sailors were advanced at the ceremony to their listed rank by Gardella. These naval aircrewmen will now report to their assigned operational squadrons to begin their initial sea tours. More than 26,000 active duty and nearly 600 Full Time Support (FTS) Sailors are on their way to advancement to E4, E5 and E6 with the release of the fall Petty Officer advancement list Nov. 20. Advancements are critical to our overall strategy for managing rat ing and pay grade levels to ensure healthy community management and manning the Fleet to the cor rect level with the right people, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director of Military Personnel Plans and Policy. Sailors advanced in cycle 216 for Active Duty and Full Time Support (FTS) E4-E6 will provide the Fleet with the right Sailor with the right skills and the right experience level to maximize Navys readiness. While the number of active duty Sailors advancing to E5 and E4 decreased this cycle, the opportu nity to advance increased because there were fewer Sailors in the advancement window. Enlisted advancements are based on vacancies in the Fleet. Although there were fewer vacancies to advance into this cycle, there were also fewer Sailors in the advance ment window so percent opportu nity stayed high. Advancement opportunity for active duty E6 Sailors this cycle increased to 19.59 from 16.18 per cent last cycle, while E5 Sailors saw opportunity rise to 32.42 percent this cycle compared to 30.94 per cent last spring. Sailors advancing to E4 had opportunity increase to 47.70 percent from 45.83 percent last cycle. FTS E6 Sailors opportunity this cycle increased to 11.60 percent from 10.78 from last cycle, while E5 Sailors opportunity dropped to 23.58 per cent from 28.57 last cycle. E4 Sailors also saw a drop in opportunity from 59.52 in the last cycle to 42.21 this cycle.VP-30 aircrewman classes graduate, many advanced Petty officers advancement announced JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 3

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The Fighting Tigers of VP 8 wit nessed the culmination of six months of hard work and dedication when they hoisted the Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist (EAWS) pennant, Nov. 16 at Naval Air Facility Misawa, Japan. The squadron had their two most junior EAWS recipients hoist the pen nant during a hauling up ceremony inside their hangar. I am very proud of all of the accom plishments that the Sailors of VP-8 reach, but this particular one has to be gained as a team, said VP-8 Command Master Chief Patrick Campbell. Our Sailors encouraged each other to get their EAWS qualifi cations started and completed. They were determined to raise the EAWS Pennant. In order for a unit to be authorized to hoist the EAWS pennant, the com mand must have 75 percent or more of its personnel qualified. The Fighting Tigers currently have 78 percent of its personnel qualified which is a 31 percent increase since they deployed from NAS Jacksonville in May. The EAWS personnel qualification standard (PQS) covers four phases: command orientation; departmental qualifications; aircraft systems; a writ ten test and oral board. I have never seen a level of dedi cation to this magnitude regarding Sailors engaged and focused on earn ing their warfare qualification, said AWOC Jerry Fullerton, VP-8 EAWS coordinator. Everywhere you turned you would see Sailors in study groups, mock boards, and doing PQS with qualified members both at work and in the barracks during their liberty time. EAWS managers set up training ses sions for Sailors during the night and day shifts. These sessions gave them the opportunity to discuss and clarify any questions they might have on any given topic. We held one-hour training sessions seven-days-a-week for both day and night shifts. We also encouraged all personnel to get involved and assist enrollees in studying and maintain ing a steady progress through the pro gram, said AE2 Juliana Drach, VP-8 EAWS manager. Also, we continually emphasized the significance and pride that comes with wearing a set of EAWS wings. Wearing them stands for being a specialist in what we do on a daily basis. My expectations are always very high for our Sailors and programs, but I fully expect that the Fighting Tigers will not let this pennant come down anytime soon, said Campbell. Fighting Tigers hoist EAWS pennant 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012

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Corner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road Working together for stronger, healthier babiesa CFC participant Provided as a public service marchofdimes.com Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Executive Officer Capt. Scott Hurst spoke at the Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) luncheon in Jacksonville on Nov. 20. The society is comprised of military members, area business and industry leaders. He provided a general overview of NAVFAC Southeast engineering chal lenges and U.S. Navy construction out look in the southeastern United States and overseas, specifically onboard Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Africa. Hurst reviewed with the audience who NAVFAC Southeast is, where it con ducts business, how to do business with NAVFAC and the fiscal outlook for 2013. He also shared personal experiences and thoughts on doing business from his most recent one-year deployment, returning in May, where he was the commanding officer, Camp Lemonnier, located in the Horn of Africa. We (NAVFAC Southeast) are very diverse. Our diversity in territory (coast al, inland, Caribbean islands such as Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and Haiti) and the services we support (Navy, Marines, Air Force, Coast Guard) insulate us from fiscal highs and lows, said Hurst. Hurst commented that energy is a growth sector for NAVFAC Southeast and the workload in this area has actu ally increased. He suggested that if the gathered pro fessionals were looking for business, energy is of growing importance. Hurst also stressed that NAVFAC does more than MILCON (military construc tion). NAVFAC is also involved in utility, conservation, environmental and real estate transactions, to name a few. Our workload continues to be true and steady in fiscal 2013, said Hurst. Hurst discussed the growing impor tance of his last tour in Africa. Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, formally an obscure 100-year-old French outpost, has become a vital air hub and naviga tional point for the U.S. Navy and U.S. government supporting regional and combatant commanders. Combined Joint Task Force Horn of Africa is headquartered there and sup ports 25 additional tenant commands. What began for the U.S. as a contin gency outpost after 9/11 is turning into a full scale permanent base for the U.S. Navy supporting a population of more than 4000 military, civilian and con tract personnel, said Hurst. Hurst shared with the group informa tion on where to find business oppor tunities with NAVFAC, throughout the world. For more information, visit www.nav fac.navy.mil. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast active duty volunteers visited local classrooms and a retirement center Nov. 5 through Nov. 12 to support Jacksonvilles Week of Valor and other Veterans Day commemora tions. Military members visited as individu als and in small groups to speak to stu dents and retirees about their military experiences and about science, tech nology, engineering and math (STEM) opportunities. Lt. Cmdr. Doug Herrin, NAVFAC Southeast energy team leader, spoke to 55 juniors from Englewood High School Nov. 5, during their science class. I spoke about the service and sac rifices of veterans and the significant role veterans had in shaping our great nation and providing us with freedom and opportunities, said Herrin. I talk ed about defending our freedom and democracy, about my travels around the world, and how I have seen children who live in poverty and do not have the same educational opportunities we enjoy. Herrin also spoke about the role of engineers in the U.S. Navy and the importance of science, technology, engi neering, and math in pursuing a future career in the military or in the private sector. SWCS Jose Torres, NAVFAC Southeast senior enlisted advisor, met several kin dergarten through fourth grade students at Englewood Elementary on the same day. He spoke to them about veterans contributions, past and present, and the sacrifices made by both the military members and their families. Torres noted the children were very excited to visit with military members. He thanked them for taking time to honor veterans and that it meant a great deal to him personally to know that chil dren were thinking of the military. Cmdr. Cameron Geertsema, Navy Region Southeast assistant regional engineer, spoke to more than 100 mid dleschool students at Jacksonvilles San Jose Catholic School during the Week of Valor. Geertsema discussed the importance of service and how he came to serve. He also highlighted the significance of education, community service and team work in everything we do. That is what makes this country great, said Geertsema. Its everyones personal responsibility to do something however small or large. Geertsema followed up his remarks with a questions and answer session. The students were well prepared and peppered him with more than 40 ques tions. Geertsema said he was able to answer about ten questions in the allot ted 45 minutes. Students were interested in veterans serving in harms way, said Geertsema. They asked about what it means to serve and they were concerned with the type of hardships service members face. Geertsema told the students that it is a privilege and honor to serve. Serving in a time of war is difficult and affects each service member dif ferently, said Geertsema. We leave our families to answer the call of this great nation to do a job in a foreign land. Sometimes during war and sometimes to support humanitarian efforts. Either way, the experiences and friendships we build, both in the military or with the nation we are supporting, are rewarding and well worth the effort. Lt. Cmdr. Kenneth Vargas, NAVFAC Southeast disaster preparedness offi cer, and Lt. Ruben Chonna, NAVFAC Southeast energy manager for Public Works Department, NAS Jacksonville, visited with residents and staff of the River Garden Hebrew Home in Mandarin, Nov. 12, during their Veterans Day commemoration. Approximately 25 to 30 residents, including veterans of World War II, the Korean conflict, and Vietnam, greeted Vargas and Chonna. The official pro gram consisted of four presentations two by resident veterans and two by the NAVFAC officers. The veterans shared war stories including one veteran who shared his experiences at Pearl Harbor on that day of infamy, Dec. 7, 1941. The second veteran gave a brief history on Veterans Day, how it used to be known as Armistice day, and how on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month of each year was to be commemo rated as the moment in time to com memorate the end of all wars. It was a great honor and privilege to be surrounded by so many of our nations heros to commemorate this special day in Florida, said Vargas. The city-sponsored Week of Valor coincided with Veterans Day and fea tured a military appreciation luncheon, a job fair, a Veterans Day parade, a col lege basketball game aboard the USS Bataan, and a salute to the military dur ing the NFL football game between the Jacksonville Jaguars and Indianapolis Colts. Saturday marks the 54th anniversary of USO Pal Day in St. Augustine, where the old citys attractions show their sup port and appreciation to members of the U.S. armed forces and their families by opening their doors free of charge. In addition, members of Elks Lodge 829 will serve a free lunch sponsored by the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. Over the years, tens of thousands of active duty military and their families have enjoyed USO Pal Day. The Greater Jacksonville Area USO has the sole of mission of supporting our brave men/women and their fami lies who defend our freedoms. We are greatly appreciative of our partnership with the City of St. Augustine, Elks Lodge 829 and the United Way of St. Johns County. USO Pal Day celebrates 53 yearsNAVFAC Southeast executive officer engages local businesses NAVFAC Southeast supports Jacksonville veterans events JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 Carrier-based pilots of fixed-wing air craft know all too well the importance of deck lighting and visual aids to assist in guiding their aircraft safely on board. In addition to the hundreds of hours of practice approaches that prepare a pilot for this challenge, they rely on the Improved Fresnel Lens Optical Landing System (IFLOLS) and the Manually Operated Visual Landing Aid System (MOVLAS) early in their careers to gain the expertise required to land on a post age stamp in the middle of the night. Anyone who has seen Top Gun can recall hearing the phrase, You are three quarter mile, call the ball as Maverick prepares to land his F-14 Tomcat on board a carrier flight deck. This phrase is in reference to the meatball that is projected by IFLOLS to indicate to a pilot that their aircraft is on the optimal glide slope. The IFLOLS is a system consisting of 12 vertical cells and 10 horizontal datum lights that a pilot can see from up to 1.5 nautical miles, giving them time to make the necessary final adjustments that will ensure their tail hook connects with the arresting gear on board carrier flight decks. Should the IFLOLS system fail due to maintenance issues or extremely rough sea states, the MOVLAS serves as a back up system that can be manually oper ated by an experienced landing signal officer (LSO) to display the same visual information. Pilots train for carrier landings almost non-stop, using land-based fields to per fect their techniques. Outlying Landing Field (OLF) Whitehouse, located 45 min utes west of NAS Jacksonville, serves as one of these frequently used fields. Equipped with a pair of IFLOLS and MOVLAS units at each end of the run way, OLF Whitehouse serves as host to numerous fleet squadrons that use these lighting systems for their training and qualifications. In recent years these multi-million dollar units had degraded in life-cycle sustainability and performance due to continuous weather exposure and deterioration. In order to restore these degrading units, Lt. Cmdr. Erick Smith, ground electronics maintenance officer for NAS Jax, and ETC(SS) Steven David, leading chief petty officer for ground electronics with NAS Jax, headed a refur bishment project designed to save time and money. Initially contacting con tractors to get an estimate of how much money would be needed to repair the IFLOLS and MOVLAS units, David con cluded that a skilled team of petty offi cers led by IC2(SW) Michael Bean could make the repairs in much less time and for a fraction of the costs quoted. Beans team, as it came to be called, included IC2 (SW/AW) Jayson Bankhead, IC2(SW) Amber Thayer, ET2(SW) Timothy Fay, ET3 Hope Hatfield, ET3 Derek Mitchem, ET3 Ryan McCracken and Tom Duvall, a civilian electronics technician with NAS Jax. The contractors had initially told us it would cost the Navy a few hundred thousand dollars each to refurbish these units, and would take about four months per unit, David commented. He praised IC2 Beans team, as they accomplished all the research, created formal work packages and wiring sheets, established quality assurance proce dures, and constructed a detailed parts procurement process. The team then disassembled and repainted each IFLOLS and MOVLAS unit, before meticulously reconstructing them. Their focused efforts and team work allowed them to complete the job in just eight weeks and saved the Navy about $386,000. In these fiscally constrained times, we have to be great stewards of the American tax dollar, stated Smith. According to Smith and David, over 2024 man-hours went into the refurbish ment project and extended the life of the IFLOLS and MOVLAS units by 15 to 20 years -with virtually no disruption to flight operations and pilot training. This group of Sailors went well above and beyond for this, working nights and weekends, and sometimes learning things as each obstacle presented itself, all to get these units in great working condition, David continued. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders visited OLF Whitehouse on Nov. 19 to inspect the completed work. Commending the sail ors on a job well done, he stated, Im extremely impressed with the amount of sheer work each and every one of you put into this project. Our military benefits greatly from peo ple with such fantastic commitment, and you all have contributed to making the Navy that much better over the past two months. Thousands of dollars saved on runway lighting at OLF Whitehouse

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8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 The Mad Foxes of VP-5 played host to the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) VP-5 Pegasus. The maritime patrol and recon naissance Sailors met at the Kadena Air Base Officers Club and enjoyed a night of friend ly conversation and cultural exchange. Both squadrons had devel oped a relationship of coop eration throughout the Mad Foxes 7th Fleet Deployment. They have joined for numerous professional events, including squadron visits, briefings, cul tural exchanges, aircraft tours and real-world training mis sions. This event was an opportu nity to gather in a purely social setting to allow all sailors to get to know each other on a more personal level. Both officers and enlisted Sailors from each command attended the social. The eve ning began with an exchange of gifts and opening remarks by the squadrons command ing officers. The JMSDF offi cers began the night by offer ing their support and condo lences for the recent impact of Hurricane Sandy on the U.S. East Coast. They recounted the aid that the U.S. Navy had pro vided for tsunami and typhoon relief as examples of the close relationship between the two nations. It was a wonderful opportu nity to get to know the JMSDF aviators, said pilot Lt. j.g. Kevin Cottingham. After exchanging squadron insignia, taking photos togeth er and sharing stories, both squadrons walked away from the event with a better under standing and appreciation for each organization. The Mad Foxes were very grateful for the opportunity to participate in the event and look forward to future gatherings. VP-5 is currently on a routine deployment to the 7th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime patrol operations. For the United States and its allies, ending the al-Qaida threat calls for a modified mili tary footprint, close work with partners and continued U.S. involvement in regions of the world where violent extrem ism has flourished, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said Nov. 20. Addressing a large audi ence at the Center for a New American Security, the sec retary discussed significant national security challenges and opportunities ahead. He also outlined priori ties that characterize the approaching end of the longest period of sustained armed con flict in the nations history. The priorities, Panetta said, are fighting the war against alQaida and its affiliates, end ing the war in Afghanistan, implementing the new defense strategy, meeting fiscal respon sibilities, countering nuclear proliferation, improving cyber security, achieving greater energy security, implementing the Asia-Pacific rebalance, and taking care of service mem bers, veterans and military families. But tonight I want to focus on the goal that still remains at the top of the priority list, as it must. That goal that the presi dent made very clear that we have a responsibility to dis rupt, degrade, dismantle and ultimately defeat those who attacked America on 9/11 alQaida, the secretary said. The essential first step is to finish the job that the United States and its coalition part ners began in Afghanistan, he said, and we are on track to do that. As the United States and its NATO partners agreed at the 2010 summit in Lisbon, Panetta said, Afghans must be respon sible for their own security by the end of 2014. This transition will require continued commitment by the international community and the United States to help Afghan forces achieve this goal, he added. We have come too far. We have invested too much blood and treasure not to finish the job, the secretary said. There are no shortcuts, nor can we afford to turn away from this effort when we are so close to achieving success and prevent ing al-Qaida from ever return ing to this historic epicenter for violent extremism. In Afghanistan and Pakistan, prolonged military and intel ligence operations have sig nificantly weakened al-Qaida, Panetta said. The terrorist groups most effective leaders are gone, its command and control has been degraded and its safe haven is shrinking, he added, but al-Qaida remains. We have slowed the primary cancer but we know that the cancer has also metastasized to other parts of the global body, the secretary said. Two examples of that spreading alQaida presence are Yemen and Somalia. In Yemen, for example, the capabilities of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, or AQAP, are growing. This group has targeted the United States for attack and sowed violence and chaos in Yemen itself, Panetta said. We have struck back in an effort to disrupt and dismantle this group through a very close partnership with the govern ment of Yemen, he added. In Somalia, against the mili tant group al-Shaabab, prog ress also has been made, the secretary said, in large part because of an effective part nership between the United States and the African Union Mission in Somalia. But the challenge is far from over, Panetta said. President [Barack] Obama has made clear, we will fight not just through military means but by harnessing every element of American power military, intelligence, diplomatic, law enforcement, financial, economic and above all the power of our values as Americans, the secretary said. The second step in achieving the end of al-Qaida, Panetta said, involves maintain ing pressure on al-Qaida in Pakistan, on AQAP in Yemen, and on al-Qaida-associated forces in Somalia. That means degrading the terrorists senior leadership, dismantling their organiza tional capabilities, remaining vigilant to ensure the threat does not reconstitute, and working to build the capac ity of U.S. partners, including Pakistan, to confront these shared threats, he added. A third step is to prevent the emergence of new safe havens for al-Qaida elsewhere in the world that the group could use to attack the United States or its interests, he said. The last decade of war has shown that coordinated efforts to share intelligence, to con duct operations with partners, are critical to making sure that al-Qaida has no place to hide, Panetta told the audience. We will expand these efforts, including through sup port and partnership with gov ernments in transition in the Middle East and North Africa, he added. This campaign against alQaida will largely take place outside declared combat zones, using a small-footprint approach that includes preci sion operations, partnered activities with foreign special operations forces, and capacity building so that partner coun tries can be more effective in combating terrorism on their own, the secretary said. In Mali for example, Panetta said, we are working with our partners in Western Africa who are committed to countering the emerging threat to regional stability posed by AQIM. A fourth step needed to bring an end to al-Qaida involves investing in the future, he added, in new military and intelligence capabilities and security partnerships. Our new defense strategy makes clear the military must retain and even build new counterterrorism capabilities for the future, Panetta said. As the size of the military shrinks, for example, special operations will continue to ramp up, growing from 37,000 members on 9/11 to 64,000 today and 72,000 by 2017, the secretary noted. We are expanding our fleet of Predator and Reaper [unmanned aerial vehicles] over what we have today. These enhanced capabilities will enable us to be more flex ible and agile against a threat that has grown more diffuse, Panetta said. A final point that too often takes a backseat to operations against al-Qaida, Panetta said, is how to prevent extremist ideologies from attracting new recruits. Over the past decade we have successfully directed our military and intelligence capa bilities at fighting terrorism, he added. And yet we are still struggling to develop an effec tive approach to address the factors that attract young men and women to extreme ideolo gies, and to ensure that govern ments and societies have the capacity and the will to counter and reject violent extremism. To truly end the threat from al-Qaida, the secretary said, military force aimed at kill ing our enemy alone will never be enough. The United States must stay involved and invest ed through diplomacy, through development, through educa tion, through trade in those regions of the world where vio lent extremism has flourished. But to truly protect America, we must sustain and in some areas deepen our engagement in the world our military, intelligence, diplomatic and development efforts are key to doing that, he added. Pursuing an isolation ist path, the secretary said, would make all of us less safe in the long-term. This is not a time for retrenchment. This is not a time for isolation. It is a time for renewed engagement and partnership in the world, Panetta said. Use of marijuana prohibited by federal employees In light of recent elec tion results that legal ized marijuana in the states of Washington and Colorado, the fol lowing is provided as clarification of policy on the use of marijuana by Department of Navy employees. At this time, marijuana use is illegal under feder al law which means fed eral employees are pro hibited from using this drug regardless of chang es to state laws. Unless or until there is further spe cific guidance issued at the federal level allowing marijuana use in some (or any) situations, fed eral employees remain accountable to comply with federal law. Those employees sub ject to random drug testing or other testing (applicant, reasonable suspicion, post-accident or follow-up), remain subject to the conse quences for illegal drug use. Panetta details steps to end al-Qaida threat VP-5 Mad Foxes host VP-5 Pegasus

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Defense Secretary Leon Panetta commended the last ing accomplishments of the former commander of U.S. Southern Command Nov. 19 and welcomed a new, but familiar, officer to lead the combatant command in Miami, Fla. Panetta presided over the Southcom ceremony as Air Force Gen. Douglas Fraser retired, relinquished his com mand to Marine Corps Gen. John Kelly. This afternoon, we pay trib ute to two very extraordinary officers, to their families, and to the service members and civilians that they have led, Panetta said. We celebrate General Frasers nearly four decades of selfless service to our country, his strong leader ship in a number of key posi tions, and his many lasting accomplishments as Southcom commander. The secretary highlighted some of Frasers early years as he came full circle from high school where he, fittingly, grad uated in Bogota, Colombia, to his rise to Southcom com mander as the last active duty member of his Air Force Academy class of 1975. Thanks to his extraordinary record of accomplishment, Doug was an excellent pick to be the first-ever U.S. Air Force officer to lead this command, Panetta said. Shortly after taking com mand, General Fraser was faced with one of the most sig nificant operational challenges that Southcom has ever faced when it had to face the devas tating earthquake in Haiti, he said. The secretary described Frasers immediate actions leading Southcoms disaster relief efforts during Operation Unified Response, the larg est humanitarian assistance and disaster relief mission this command has ever undertak en. In total, Southcom deliv ered 2.3 million meals, 17 mil lion pounds of bulk food, 2.6 million bottles of water, [and] 150,000 pounds of medical sup plies, among many, many other services, Panetta said. The defense secretary noted the devastation caused by Haitis earthquake under scores the fact that the key security challenges in this hemisphere are transnation al. Natural disasters, some times horrendous, in their impact on people and their countries, illicit trafficking, organized crime, narco-terror ism, the threats to security in the Americas are not contained by political boundaries, he said. One of General Frasers most significant and enduring con tributions, Panetta said, has been rallying support across the U.S. government in order to focus more attention on Central America as it confronts illicit drug trafficking. [This command] has helped galvanize U.S. and Western Hemisphere support for enhanced engagement in this region, he said. Weve made significant progress in partnering with the militaries of Central American nations, and they are now taking great er responsibility for their own security. Panetta also noted that Frasers efforts with Southcoms Joint Interagency Task Force South brought interagency and international cooperation to new levels, with Operation Martillo taking 152 metric tons of cocaine worth almost $3 billion off the market in 2012. All of these accomplish ments are the direct result of Dougs steady, but sure, lead ership, he said. I want to [personally] thank everyone at Southcom for all you do to keep America safe. Panetta also welcomed another dedicated leader to assume Frasers position lead ing Southcom Kelly, Panettas own former Pentagon staff member. Hes been my senior mili tary assistant since I came to the Pentagon last year, he said. Hes always been at my side as a trusted confidant and a trust ed friend. More than anyone, he has ensured that the daily reality of those serving on the front lines informs and guides every deci sion that Ive made, Panetta said. I could not have done my job without his judgment and blunt, honest counsel. The defense secretary called Kelly the true embodiment of a warrior and said he felt hon ored to promote the officer to four-star general prior to the change of command ceremony. I will be eternally grate ful to him, and to be honest, while I will miss him, he will be a great commander here at Southcom, Panetta said. I, very much, look forward to relying on his perspective and forthright advice as he leads our military efforts in this region. Panetta used an old Air Force metaphor as he expressed his confidence in Kelly as Southcoms new com mander. Fraser has this command to a higher altitude and, with todays change of command, Im confident that, in the extraordinarily capable hands of John Kelly, it will soar even higher in the future, he said. The Naval Air Training Command (NATRACOM) in Corpus Christi, Texas, held a change of command ceremony aboard USS Lexington muse um Nov. 15. Rear Adm. Mark Leavitt relieved Rear Adm. William Sizemore II, as the Chief of Naval Air Training (CNATRA). Sizemore is retiring after 32 years of service as a commis sioned naval officer. NATRACOM conducts and oversees all pilot and naval flight officer training for the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard throughout five train ing air wings located in three states. It also oversees the Naval Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels. Sizemore, a 1980 gradu ate of the United States Naval Academy, is a third-generation Sailor and second-generation naval aviator. He served as CNATRA since September of 2009. If I could have picked a place for the last tour of duty, it would have been here. Training Command is where I started; its where all Naval Aviators start and its just been won derful, said Sizemore. He was quick to credit the success of the NATRACOMs mission to the personnel assigned to the command and its subordinate commands. Its been a total team effort by everybody in this command the staff here, each of the five Training Air Wings and each of the squadrons under those Training Air Wings and ulti mately down to the instructor pilots, instructor NFOs, the stu dent Aviators and the student Naval Flight Officers theyve all gotten it done. Im very proud of our record of accom plishment, but again its been a total team effort on every bodys part. It always is in the Navy. The guest speaker, Vice Adm. Allen Myers, who served as Commander, Naval Air Forces (CNAF) from 2010 to October 2012, and is assigned as the next Deputy Chief of Naval Operations, Integration of Capabilities and Resources (N8), commended Sizemore and the NATRACOM. For the past three years, Naval Air Training Command has performed superbly under the guiding hand of Bill Sizemore, said Myers. I couldnt be prouder of what Size and his team has accomplished. Leavitt is a graduate of Florida State University in Tallahassee, Fla., and was designated a naval aviator in 1986. Leavitt is already famil iar with NATRACOM, pre viously serving as the com mander of both the Training Air Wing 2 Reserve Component and CNATRA Reserve Component. Before report ing as CNATRA, he served as Commander, Naval Air Forces Reserve. There are many challenges ahead, said Leavitt. Yet I know the CNATRA team: officer, enlisted, govern ment civilians and contrac tors, will continue to overcome these challenges and safely train the best naval aviators and naval flight officers in the world.Panetta praises outgoing, incoming Southcom commandersNaval Air Training Command welcomes new commander 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012

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Satellite Pharmacy changes to holiday hoursNaval Hospital Jacksonvilles Satellite Pharmacy, located at the Navy Exchange (Building 950), will transition to holiday hours from Dec. 14 through Jan. 11. The refill drive-up window will be open weekdays from 8 a.m. 4 p.m., and on Saturdays from 8 a.m. 3 p.m. The main lobby will operate from 9 a.m. 4 p.m. On Dec. 24 and Dec. 31, the refill drive-up will be open for pickup only and close at 3 p.m. The main lobby will be closed on these days. For more information call (904) 542-7405 or keep up with current news on Facebook (www.facebook.com/ NavalHospitalJacksonville). Uniform shiftNAS Jacksonville will shift to the winter uni form of the day Dec. 3. The uniform of the day will be: service dress blues or service khaki for all officers and chief petty officers and service dress blues or service uniforms for E-1 to E-6. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 11

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NAS Jacksonville held their first allfemale Motorcycle Basic Rider Course Nov. 18-19 with five participants learn ing the ins and outs of how to ride a motorcycle safely. The course was com prised of classroom work and range exercises to test their knowledge both mentally and physically. We are teaching them the basics of learning to ride a motorcycle includ ing gear shifting, braking, maneuvering skills, how to avoid hazards and how to have confidence on a bike. Most of participants out here have been riding on the back of a motorcycle and have decided they want to try it on their own, said Cape Fox Professional Services Motorcycle Instructor Kristen Montejo, as she taught a series of range exercises to the participants. We decided to teach this all-female class because sometimes women just arent as comfortable learning in our other classes. This gives them a more comfortable atmosphere to learn to ride and to develop safe riding habits, added Montejo. Although none of the participants actually owned their own motorcycles, they were excited about the prospect of buying one in the future and were glad for the opportunity to use one of the loaner motorcycles available for the class. Ive been riding on the back of motor cycles and was always too scared to try it myself. But this class has really helped build my confidence. But I will prac tice a whole lot more until Im comfort able enough to get on the road, said AOAN(AW) Kandice Harrison of HS-11. I really like this class because its all women and its not so intimidating. The instructors have been awesome. They are very patient and knowledgeable, added ET3 Nina Jarrett of the NAS Jax Legal Department. After earning their certificates of com pletion, the instructors will input the information to the Department of Motor Vehicles, allowing them to get a motor cycle endorsement on their drivers licenses. This endorsement is required by some states for operating a motor cycle. For a schedule of upcoming motorcy cle safety classes and to register, call the base safety office at 542-2584. NAS Jax holds first all-female motorcycle course JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 13

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DEWEYSCall 542-3521 Deweys is now open! Deweys is located in Bldg. 608 between Gillis St. and Keily St. off of Enterprise Ave. Deweys offers a full service menu, bar and a friendly atmosphere that is great for all ages! Monday Friday 10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 4 10 p.m. CPO Lounge Monday, Tuesday & Friday 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Wednesday Thursday 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m. Deweys Specials Monday Pizza madness 2 9 p.m. one topping pizza for only $5 Free Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday social hours, 7 9 p.m., $.50 wings & $7.95 pizza your way *chicken and extra cheese additional charge NFL Ticket Sunday 12:30 9 p.m., $.50 wingsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. 40,000 Calories of Christmas See if you and your teammate can burn a total of 40,000 calories December 3 to January 18. The top teams in each team category will receive a trophy. Sign-up in the fitness center by November 28I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. St. Augustine Old Town Trolley Night of Lights Adult $8.75, child $4 Orlando Magic Tickets $18 $268 ShenYun at the Times Union Center Jan. 29 30, $55 $163 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Kennedy Space Center Adult $40, child $31 Entertainment Books $30 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam February 23, 2013 Preferred seating $41, lower level seat ing $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sec tions 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Tampa Zoo $19 (Adult) $17.50 (Child) Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Blue Man Group in Orlando Special until March 31, adult $44, child $29, military $29 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4 day hopper $153.25 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3 day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31, 2013 and must be redeemed by June 30, 2013. Ask about our special discounted tick ets for family members. Gator Bowl tickets $35 Gator Bowl Patch $9 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day $29.50, 2 day $40, Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT! Daytona 500 Feb. 24, 2013 tickets on sale now! $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. St. Augustine PAL Day December 1 Free transportation Gift Wrap Wednesdays Wrap your gifts for FREE Kings Bay Comedy Show December 6 at 6 p.m. Reindeer Games Competition December 8 at noon Jaguars vs. Jets game December 9 at 11:30 a.m. Free admission and transportationNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees December 4 & 18 for active duty December 6 & 20 for retirees, DoD per sonnel and their guests Twilight Special Monday through Friday Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $18 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DOD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Turkey Trot Killer Scramble delete Santa Sez Golf Tournament December 21 at 10 a.m. 4 person scramble $40 $50 per person Let us cook for you! Order turkey dinners at MulligansMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Dashing Through The Grove Saturday, Dec. 8 4 8 p.m. at Patriots Grove Free snow sledding, photos with Santa, tree lighting, musical entertainment and more!Flying Club Call 777-8549 Call for latest training schedule For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239, or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 15

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More than 100 U.S. Navy medi cal professionals from Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville completed a course designed to prepare them for assembling, operating and disassembling an expedi tionary medical facility Nov. 7 at Camp Pendleton, Calif. NH Jacksonville hospital corpsmen, Medical Corps officers, other medi cal professionals and support person nel completed the Naval Expeditionary Medical Training Institute (NEMTI) Expeditionary Medical Facility (EMF) Tiered Readiness Training an effort focusing on the role medical profession als play in the construction of a medical facility in a contingency area. MA1(EXW) John Carpenter, NH Jacksonville Security Dept. leading petty officer and NEMTI camp commandant, said the 10-day course provided not only fundamentals of expeditionary medicine, but fostered the sense of togetherness necessary when working together in a challenging environment. This helps the corpsmen and other medical professionals get in the mindset that what they learn here at NEMTI will ultimately save lives, he said. Having the skill sets to successfully set up an EMF is invaluable and working together only serves to further our mission. The NEMTI EMF Tiered Readiness Training Phase Two Course, is annual sustainment training that includes the assembly and disassembly of an EMF, as well as medical, administrative and tactical topics that satisfy EMF program requirements. It has proven a mainstay in Navy expeditionary medicine as the shifting role of U.S. Navy medical pro fessionals have changed in contingency operations over the past 10 years. Capt. Thomas Sawyer, NEMTI officerin-charge, said the course continues to improve and evolve, as students adapt to new situations and work together to ensure successful missions. The team from NH JAX has done a magnificent job in the classroom and in the field, he said. Their training includ ed the Collective Protection System that enables the medical team to work in a contaminated environment and contin ue to provide medical care. In addition to the EMF build, NH Jacksonville com pleted training with the 9 millimeter pis tol and NBC (nuclear, biological, chemi cal) confidence chamber. This training increases the readiness posture of the NH Jacksonville team and improved their ability/capability to provide care in the field. Among numerous other classes, top ics covered during the EMF Tiered Readiness Training Phase Two Course included an orientation to the facility, its mission and capabilities, field compound sanitation, security operations, combat medical operations, medical evacuation functions and an understanding of the law of armed conflict. Carpenter said the course is beneficial to all attending even non-medical per sonnel in support roles and will have positive ramifications throughout the fleet. He added that the expeditionary style training at NEMTI requires stu dents of all ranks to live in the NEMTI sea huts (20-man, field-style facilities designed to replicate actual expedition ary conditions) provides junior Sailors and officers the chance to ensure readi ness by living and working together a concept he feels is invaluable in a deployed setting. These corpsmen and the entire team from NH Jacksonville bring diversity, professionalism and expertise to the Sailors and Marines both deployed and back at home, he said. This course has shown us how to work one aspect of expeditionary medicine, but also brought us together as a team, ensuring the camaraderie between the EMF personnel from NH Jacksonville and Seabees par ticipating in the course, said Carpenter. NEMTI is a component of Navy Medicine Operational Training Center (NMOTC), the global leader in operation al medical and aviation survival train ing. NMOTC reports to Navy Medicine Education and Training Command (NMETC). NMETC, NMOTC and NEMTI are part of the Navy Medicine team, a global health care network of Navy medical pro fessionals around the world who provide high-quality health care to more than one million eligible beneficiaries. To reduce the risk of fire during the holiday season, the following require ments are in effect and in accordance with standards set forth in the NAS Jacksonville Instruction 11320.1S, Fire Prevention and Fire Protection Measures. for all occupancies (except housing) shall be inspected and approved by the fire department. are not permitted in assembly (clubs), correctional, BEQ/BOQ, Navy Lodge, dormitories or educational facilities. pancies shall be labeled or otherwise identified or certified by the manufac turer as being fire retardant. Inc. (UL) listed electric lights and wir ing decorations shall be permitted or used on Christmas trees and other similar decorations. lar devices is strictly prohibited. Exception to this rule is during reli gious ceremonies held at places of worship such as the base chapel. To schedule an inspection, please call 542-0379/2783/3928/3995. Naval Hospital corpsmen, officers complete EMF training Christmas tree and decoration inspections 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 The Navy has directed the temporary return of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) from her current overseas deployment, allowing the ship to return home for two months before sending it back to the Middle East region. The unusual move is being made to accommodate delays due to repair work on USS Nimitz (CVN 68). The Bremerton-based carrier was expected to deploy to the region to relieve Eisenhower early next year. Nimitz is now expected to deploy once repair work is complete. Bringing Eisenhower back home to its homeport of Norfolk, Va. in December will permit the Navy to resurface the ships flight deck and make it available to return and remain in the Middle East region for several more months. This decision also provides the ships crew a welcome holiday respite from what will become nearly 10 months on station. The USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) Carrier Strike Group, currently deployed to the region, will continue providing carrier presence in the CENTCOM area of responsibility. Stennis departed its homeport of Bremerton in August. FACSFACJAX teams up with K9s for WarriorsMembers of Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville (FACSFACJAX) ) joined forces with the K9s for Warriors team Oct. 12 to help them prepare a new housing facility that veterans will use during a three-week course to meet and train with their service canine. This topic hits close to home with those of us in the military. It was an amazing opportunity to make a difference and help our brothers and sisters, said ET2 Arvydas Montvilas, one of the volun teer coordinators who organized the event. According to the Center for Military Health Policy, the rate of post-traumatic stress disorder among previously deployed service members dur ing Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom (Afghanistan and Iraq) was estimat ed to be at 13.8 percent. In an effort to help these veterans, the non-profit group K9s for Warriors provides service canines to assist in the recovery of men and women suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of 9/11 and the wars that have followed. K9s for Warriors certified dog trainers and for mer police K9 trainers help veterans and service canines grow accustomed to each other and teach the skills veterans will need to train their own dogs. By volunteering their time for this program, FACSFACJAX Sailors helped complete 98 percent of a work list that was projected to take multiple vol unteer events to accomplish, directly resulting in K9s for Warriors reaching more disabled veterans sooner than expected. FACSFACJAX Executive Officer Cmdr. Shannon Parker said, The Navy has a very long and proud tradition of volunteer service and I am very proud of our Sailors commitment to helping others. It is this commitment that brings our service members together as neighbors and as a community. They truly have a positive effect on our command, our Navy and our community. Bravo Zulu! For the first time since she entered Newport News Shipbuilding in early 2009, USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) conducted an overnight habitability fast cruise Nov. 5 reaching the complete crew move aboard milestone, which brings the Nimitz-class carrier closer to rejoining the fleet as an operational asset. There is a key event called complete crew move aboard during the refueling complex overhaul (RCOH) period, said TR Executive Officer Cmdr. Mark Colombo. It shows that we have the ability to sleep, house, berth, feed and accom modate the entire crew. Its an important indicator of where the ship is in its RCOH period. The fast cruise proves just that that we can sleep the crew onboard safely and securely. More than 2,000 Sailors crossed the brow Monday morning with backpacks and seabags, prepared to spend a night aboard the ship as a crew for the first time in three years. This is the culmination of the hard work of our crew, the shipyard, and the contrac tors over a three year period of time, said Colombo. The mess decks, the ward room, the chiefs mess, thats all up and running the TV studio we used for captains call that is part of the crew being able to exhibit that it can use all of the spaces that are normal, operational functions for an aircraft carrier at sea. During the course of the day, special training was given to help prepare Sailors for when the ship becomes fully opera tional at sea, including a gen eral quarters (GQ) drill. When the GQ alarm sounded, TRs 10 repair lockers responded with their damage control teams to simulated casualties through out the ship. Additionally, the medical training team and propulsion plant training team were integrated into the exer cise. The GQ drills get Sailors in the mindset that were going to be operational very soon, said LSC (SW/EXW/AW) William Bunton, a member of the ships damage control training team. Sailors learn what GQ con sists of and how to combat the ship in case of any casualties. Its very important to conduct training like this, because it gets us out of the mindset of being in the shipyards and into the mindset of being opera tional and doing what is going to be required of us as a carrier in the Navy. After dinner, the crew was invited to attend a mentorship fair on the mess decks to learn how to better themselves per sonally and professionally. Everyone has been working hard during RCOH, and work ing hard today on our first fast cruise. This just gives them all a chance to concentrate on their career and finance and other important things. The Navy isnt just about your job its about your life, said ITCS(SW/IDW) Nicole Fulton, the ships mentorship coordi nator. Additionally, the oppor tunity was given to Sailors to take advantage of an Enlisted Surface and Air Warfare Rodeo, which aimed to streamline the warfare qualifi cation process. It was a great idea. It gives everyone an opportunity to get help with signatures and walk throughs at a single loca tion, said ET1 (SW/AW) James Thornton, a reactor walkthrough coordinator. It helps put junior Sailors in an operational mindset, since it gives them an idea of what the ship will be like during combat scenarios. It also helps give them a better idea of how to save the ship if required. More than 400 Sailors partic ipated in the event, including ABE3(AW) Michael Shannon who is working on his ESWS qualification. It was a great help to get info on surface warfare, and to start making progress on my pin, said Shannon. Getting pins is important to Sailors careers. Without a pin, your advance ment suffers. With the successful comple tion of complete crew move aboard, TR is nearing the end of RCOH at Newport News Shipbuilding, and is closer to returning to the fleet. The only key milestone that we have left is the finish line, said Colombo. What we have left is the end. Its time to focus on all the things we need to do to get to the finish line as expeditiously as possible so we can get back to the fleet, back to the opera tional Navy and do what our country has asked us to do. Roosevelt completes first fast cruise in three years Ike to return home early, redeploy in 2013

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A Notice of Intent (NOI) will be published in the Federal Register Nov. 15 announcing the Navys intent to prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the introduction of the P-8A MultiMission Maritime Aircraft (MMA) to the U.S. Navy Fleet. The Supplemental EIS will address the potential environ mental impacts of new home basing alternatives and updat ed P-8A MMA program infor mation. In September 2008, the Navy completed the Final EIS for the Introduction of the P-8A into the U.S. Navy Fleet, which evaluated the environ mental impacts of home bas ing 12 P-8A MMA fleet squad rons (72 aircraft) and one Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) (12 aircraft) at established mar itime patrol home bases. On Jan. 2, 2009, a Record of Decision (ROD) was issued that called for basing five fleet squadrons and the FRS at Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville, four fleet squad rons at NAS Whidbey Island, and three fleet squadrons at Marine Corps Base (MCB) Hawaii Kaneohe Bay, with periodic squadron detach ments at NAS North Island (Alternative 5). To meet the Navys current and future requirements and maximize the efficiency of sup port facilities, simulation train ing equipment, and on-site support personnel, the Navy now proposes to analyze addi tional alternatives for P-8A air craft home basing. The Navy has determined that a dual-siting alternative, rather than home basing the aircraft at three locations, may best meet current require ments. The two potential home base locations for the P-8A MMA are NAS Jacksonville and NAS Whidbey Island. Home basing at two locations would result in an increase in aircraft and personnel at NAS Jacksonville and NAS Whidbey Island compared to the 2008 ROD. There is no new facility requirement for additional air craft at NAS Jacksonville. Additional aircraft at NAS Whidbey Island would result in an expanded facility footprint. Under a dual-siting alter native, a presence in Hawaii would be maintained with a continuous presence of two aircraft filled by rotating detachments at MCB Hawaii Kaneohe Bay. The two-aircraft detachment would result in fewer person nel and a reduced facility foot print at MCB Hawaii Kaneohe Bay when compared to the 2008 ROD. There would be no change to the periodic squad ron detachment operations at NAS North Island, as described in the 2008 ROD. No decision has been made to change the 2008 Record of decision. When the Supplemental EIS is com plete, the SECNAV can decide to home base at two locations, or to continue implementing home basing at three locations in light of the updated informa tion. During the 45-day public comment and agency review period following release of the Draft Supplemental EIS, antici pated in the summer of 2013, the Navy will schedule public meetings to discuss the find ings of the Draft Supplemental EIS and to receive public com ments. The public meetings will be held near each of the home basing locations. Dates, loca tions, and times for the public meetings will be announced in the Federal Register and local media at the appropriate time. A group of air traffic controllers from the Jacksonville area visited the Florida Air National Guard (FANG) 125th Fighter Squadron Nov. 7 to gain insight on how they can better work together during training missions. As part of the visit, the controllers received a brief which included details about the FANGs mission, an up close look into the F-15 Eagle, and a question and answer session to improve the rela tionship between the organizations. AC2(AW/SW) Jessica Hernandez from Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville (FACSFACJAX) was one of three lucky Sailors selected to participate in a familiarization ride in an F-15 the following day. I visited the Florida Air National Guard prior to the flight to receive egress training. We were taught how to quickly get out of the aircraft if there was an emergency on the ground, as well as how to properly eject and safe ly descend to the ground. The train ing was extremely informative, but did nothing to soothe my nerves, said Hernandez. When Hernandez met her pilot, Capt. Brannon Ferguson on the day of the flight, he explained the days mission. His confidence and knowledge helped to calm my nerves, Hernandez stated. After a quick pre-flight check and start-up, the aircraft taxied to the run way. I barely remember hearing the clearance to depart before we took off. We were cleared for an unre stricted climb to 15,000 and it took less than a min ute to make our assigned altitude. We headed out over the water for some maneuvers before ren dezvous ing with a KC-135 for in-flight refueling. On the way, we broke the sound barrier and during the intercept pulled around four g-forces or Gs. It was scary but exhilarating, explained Hernandez. She continued, After refueling we completed a few more maneuvers including the Immelman turn, a barrel roll, and an Aileron roll. Capt. Ferguson then asked if I was ready for more Gs. The next thing I knew the aircraft rolled onto its side and began to turn. My G-suit began to inflate and I began doing the breathing techniques they had taught me. Before I knew it every thing started going black, so I informed the pilot and he backed off. At this point we began conducting dog-fighting scenarios. I tried to see our opponent but all I saw were clouds. As we were diving down towards the water, I began to feel sick. I thought about leaving this part out of the story, but it was a part of the experience and besides, how many people can say they got sick in the back of an F-15, she said. Capt. Ferguson understood so we leveled off and he gave me the oppor tunity to fly! It was not as easy as he made it look. I began by attempting to just fly straight and level. I thought I was doing fine, but in the few seconds I had been in control, we descended more than 1,000 feet. I tried making some turns which was also harder than it looked. It didnt last long but for those few moments, I had succeeded in fulfilling my dream of being a pilot, Hernandez added. After breaking the sound bar rier again, we were at the appropri ate weight for landing so we headed back to the beach. We came in for a low approach, executed another quick climb and then came around to land. It was actually smoother than most commercial airliners I have flown in. If this had just been a tour of FANGs facilities and an opportunity to get up close and personal with their aircraft, it still would have been a great experi ence. But the chance to fly in the mighty F-15 was something I will never forget. I learned two things that day; my stom ach isnt what it used to be and I am not cut out to be a fighter pilot, concluded Hernandez. Navy to publish supplemental EIS for P-8 basingAir traffic controllers visit 125th Fighter Squadron JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 19

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Pet adoption event needs volunteersFirst Coast No More Homeless Pets, along with shelter and rescue groups from across Northeast Florida, are holding a Home for the Holidays pet adoption event Nov. 30 through Dec. 2 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Jacksonville Fairgrounds. Volunteers are needed to support this event and to help find homes for more than 1,000 animals during the threeday event. Volunteers will participate in set-up, acting as greeters, assist with dog and cat handling tasks, provide overnight safety for the animals, and help tear-down. For more information, or to volun teer, email mtekin@fcnmhp.org or vol unteer@fcnmhp.org or call 674-0665. Like any other retailer, Navy Exchangess (NEX) must pay a fee every time a customer uses a credit or debit card to pay for merchandise. On average, banks charge nearly two percent of the transaction total when a credit or debit card is used. During 2011, 81 percent of all NEX sales were paid for by commercial credit cards or debit card amounting to over $32 million in card transac tion fees. When our customers use a bank-issued credit or debit card, there is a cost to our bottom line, said Tom McDonald, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) vice president, trea surer. We give 70 percent of our profits to Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) for quality of life programs which amounted to over $43 million in 2011. We want to do all we can to minimize any impact to our profits since it has a direct impact on our contri bution to MWR. To help minimize credit card fees, customers can use their M S Card in place of a commercial credit or debit cards at military exchanges. In addi tion, customers can take advan tage of the many benefits of the M S Card including 10 percent off the first days pur chases (up to the customers cred it limit), no annual fee, low inter est rate and 24-hour customer service including online access. Several times throughout the year, the NEX will have special promotions on select merchan dise, such as electronics, jewelry, furniture and major appliances for customers using their NEX M S Card. These spe cials offer zero percent financing, no down payment and no inter est for a predetermined amount of days for specific merchandise with a specific dollar amount. M S Card applica tions are available at any NEX and can be processed the same day at the NEX customer service desk. Navy Exchange bringing back Bonus BucksBonus Bucks are back at select Navy Exchanges (NEX) this holiday season. On Dec. 8 from 8 a.m.-1 p.m., customers will receive one $10 Bonus Bucks coupon for each $100 of merchandise/service purchased, while coupon supplies last. A maximum of five Bonus Bucks will be issued to customers per single transaction. NEX customers have responded very pos itively to this promotion since we started it three years ago, so were bringing it back again this year, said Mike Powers, Navy Exchange Service Command director of retail operations. We know there are many places our custom ers can shop during the holiday season. NEX Bonus Bucks are our way of thanking custom ers for shopping at their NEX and to encourage them to come back for extra savings. NEX Bonus Bucks will be redeemable in any NEX from Dec. 26-Jan. 1, 2013, on all merchan dise and services except uniforms, gasoline, tobacco, alcohol, NEX and third party Gift Cards and concession merchandise. Purchases made on the All Services Catalog or myNavyExchange.com do not apply. One coupon will be redeemable on a transac tion of $50 or more. A maximum of five cou pons can be used on a transaction of $250 or more. The prevention and detection of theft at Navy Exchange (NEX) loca tions throughout the world is seri ous business. During 2011, NEX Loss Prevention/Safety associates investigat ed and resolved 1,320 shoplifting cases with a total dollar amount of $258,032. Of those 1,320 cases, 31 percent were juveniles and 19 percent were active duty military. The 2011 National Retail Security Survey, conducted by the University of Florida in conjunction with Americas top retail chains indicates for a second year in a row, stealing by shoppers cost American retailers a staggering $10.94 billion. Our customers and associates con tinue to play a vital role in preventing theft from our stores, said Tom Ruane, NEXCOMs corporate loss prevention/ safety manager. We encourage any one to report suspicions of theft activity to NEX management, loss prevention/ safety personnel or for our associates, through the anonymous Alertline pro gram. The top five departments for shoplift ing at the NEX in 2011 were costume jewelry, mass cosmetics, prestige cos metics, video games and fashion acces sories. While the NEX continues to be proactive in apprehending shoplifters, NEX Loss Prevention/Safety associates work hard at preventing theft before it hap pens. NEXs worldwide use electronic article surveillance (EAS) systems for electronic and high value merchan dise as well as extensive closed circuit surveillance systems (CCTV) to try and deter as well as catch shoplifters. The CCTV systems, coupled with digi tal video recorders and remote viewing technology, gives the NEX the ability to see everything within the store and identify incidents of theft. If shoplifting is suspected, NEX Loss Prevention/Safety associates turn all incidents over to base police and /or local law enforcement. In addition to possible disciplinary action and crim inal prosecution, the Federal Claims Collection Act allows NEXCOM to enact a flat administrative cost or Civil Recovery of $200 for each incident of theft. Shoplifting can account for about one-third of the total inventory shrink. Shrink is the retail industry term for the difference between the recorded book inventory and the actual physi cal inventory counted at the end of the year. Shrink is generally attributed to shoplifting, associate theft, administra tive errors or vendor fraud. Over the past nine years, NEXCOM has seen its inventory shrink below one percent to sales compared to the national average of approximately 1.42 percent to sales. Shoplifting from the NEX hurts everyone, said Ruane. People involved in shoplifting get caught, prosecuted and possibly banned from the NEX or end a military career. But the NEX and base lose out as well because 70 percent of our profits are given to Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) to sup port quality of life programs. In 2011, that contribution totaled over $43 mil lion. If our profits decline, so do our contributions to MWR.Navy Exchange takes shoplifting seriouslyCredit card fees add up at the NEX, use M S Card instead 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 21 The retired USS Charles F. Adams (DDG-2) is closer to coming home as an interactive attraction and venue in down town Jacksonville on the St. Johns River. The aim is to become the first Naval Ship Museum in Florida or Georgia and to honor our military heritage and increase educational oppor tunities, tourism and business as a key element of downtown revitalization. Outwardly similar to the Sherman-class destroyer, USS Adams was the first U.S. Navy ship designed from the keel up to launch anti-aircraft missiles. USS Adams, the first guided missile destroyer in its class, was home ported for 21 years at Naval Station Mayport from 1969-90. The last existent ship in its class, USS Adams is cur rently moored in Philadelphias Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility. With the Jacksonville Historic Naval Ship Association leading the way, the latest discussions have focused on placing the USS Adams at the Shipyards location along the Northbank in downtown, adja cent to the citys sports com plex and as part of a hub of new activity along Bay Street. With nearly 20 percent of the Jacksonville areas population made up of active and retired military and their families, the venue would have a natural attraction, in addition to tour ism traffic and offering a site for business meetings, Scout campouts and other gather ings. For more information, go to www.adams2jax.org The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale NOW) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above sched ule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $10 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maxi mum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but under no circumstances are dependent children authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may purchase a maximum of two tick ets, one for their use and one for a guest.No exceptions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director.These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justifica tion, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tick ets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. The Warrior Transition Program (WTP) is moving its operations from Camp Arifjan in Kuwait, to Sembach Kaserne in Kaiserslautern, Germany and is sched uled to host its first class of returning Sailors in mid-December. This change is being made to better serve Sailors who are completing their individual augmentee (IA) assignments in Afghanistan, Kuwait and Iraq. WTP is a five-day program where Sailors attend redeployment workshops, decompress, turn in gear and weapons, and meet with staff chaplains and nurses to discuss their down-range experience and redeploy ment following their IA assignment. Shifting WTP from Kuwait to Germany will provide a clear break from the opera tional mission, helping Sailors reintegrate back with the Navy and their families, said Capt. Ron Greiff, officer-in-charge of WTP in Kuwait. Contractors are in the final stages of refurbishing the Navys WTP facilities at Sembach, signaling an end to the dusty tents and trailers in Kuwait. The new facil ities include barracks with shared bath room facilities, a computer lab, gaming and exercise rooms, and a media room that also serves as a movie theater. With the completion of operational missions in Iraq, the Navy considered options on how to best support the reintegration of IAs returning from assignments through out the region. The transportation hub at Ramstein Air Force Base and the available resources in the Kaiserslautern Military Community in Germany provided a logical place to transfer the WTP mission, due to its loca tion and available infrastructure, said Rear Adm. Kevin Scott, commander of Task Force IA. We look forward to working with our sister services in the future to continue to meet the needs and requirements of our returning warriors. Additional services on base include a refurbished gym, bowling alley and sev eral food vendors. Sailors will also have access to a din ing facility that overlooks the picturesque German countryside. The overwhelming care and concern the Navy has for the health and welfare of its Sailors coming off extended and ardu ous IA duty is evident in the attention and top-notch facilities they are provided via this Warrior Transition Program move, said Cmdr. Larry Henke, director of WTP. New Jacksonville ship museum seeks support Warrior Transition Program moves to support IA Sailors$10 Jaguars tickets available at USO

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Set new milestones for MQ-8B Fire ScoutA crowd of family and friends will line the pier at Naval Station Mayport Dec. 1 to welcome home HSL-42 Detachment Two embedded with USS Klakring (FFG 42) from a highly successful fivemonth deployment to the U.S. Africa Command area of responsibility. Following their departure in June, Detachment Two provided airborne intelligence, surveillance, and recon naissance (ISR) in support of military units operating throughout Africa. This deployment was a unique opportunity for the Detachment Two team and the Klakring team. Squadron members broke new ground in the field of rotary wing aviation by being the first to deploy aboard a U.S. Navy ship with four vertical take-off and landing unmanned aerial vehicles (VTUAVs). Rather than taking their time-tested SH-60Bs to sea, the pilots, payload operators, and maintainers deployed with the MQ-8B Fire Scout VTUAV, one of the Navys newest aviation platforms. Manufactured by Northrop Grumman, the Fire Scout is capable of autonomously taking-off and landing from a ship, flying pre-programmed or commanded flight routes with long on-station time, and providing multisensor intelligence information. Beginning in December 2011, the flight crews and maintainers of Detachment Two underwent intensive training to operate and sustain this cutting-edge technology at sea. Their hard work and dedication paid off over the past five months as the detachment pushed the boundaries of sea-based ISR and achieved many new milestones in naval unmanned avia tion. Detachment Two aircrews were the first active duty military members to fly two Fire Scout air vehicles simultane ously from a single control station on the ship for dual air vehicle operations. Additionally, they fulfilled a Chief of Naval Operations requirement for the Navy to execute 12 continuous hours of ISR coverage from a sea-based asset this fiscal year. Squadron members pushed the envelope even further in demonstrating a surge capability by executing 24 continuous hours of real world ISR coverage in late September. Commenting on his detachments achievements, Officer-in-Charge Lt. Cmdr. Jay Lambert said, This was a very challenging deployment for everyone involved but looking back now, it will be one of the highlights of my career. The issues we faced from logistics to dealing with a relatively new type of aircraft were far outside the norm of what the HSL community usually runs into, but my guys handled everything that came at us perfectly. I really cant say enough about how well our entire detachment performed. They were the best group I could have ever possibly had the privilege of leading. Luckily, it wasnt all hard work over the last five months for the Sailors of Detachment Two and Klakring. The crew relaxed and enjoyed some wellearned time away from the ship dur ing their multiple port visits. Klakring called on such exotic locations as Djibouti, the Seychelles Islands, and the Island of Mauritius. When asked as to what his favorite port visit was, AT2 Richard Knowles commented, I had a great time in the Seychelles, but I am very happy to be home. Im going to Disney World! No, really, I am going to Disney World. USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) and HSC-22)Detachment Five relieved USS Klakring in the Mediterranean Sea and are currently underway conducting Fire Scout operations. As a testament to the skill and professionalism of Detachment Twos maintenance team, three of their four MQ-8B aircraft were transferred to HSC-22 Detachment Five in theater, keeping the cutting edge Fire Scout aircraft forward deployed for nearly a year before returning home. With warfighting the central focus of the Navys mission, the Navy is best when it is out and about, Navy Adm. Jonathan Greenert, chief of naval operations, said Nov. 16 in Washington, D.C. Operating forward means using innovative ways to make sure the ships that we have are where we need them to be, the admiral said during a speech at a National Press Club luncheon. Readiness to conduct forward oper ations requires more than just parts, maintenance and fuel, he added. It also means that we have compe tent and proficient crews that are ready to do the job, he said. For about 10 years, around half of the Navys ships have been forward deployed in the Asia-Pacific region, Greenert said. Half of those ships are home-ported there, he added. That forward-leaning posture helps to build international relationships and reassure U.S. allies, he said. Partnerships between the United States and Asia-Pacific nations are maturing and growing, Greenert said. For example, in Japan and South Korea, U.S. Navy operations personnel are colocated with their host nation counterparts, he said. In addition, a longstanding series of talks with the Chinese navy have been expanded to include flag officers, not just captains, Greenert said. We in the Department of Defense have now a deliberate strategy for engagement of the Chinese military, he said. The Asia-Pacific region has been a longtime focus for the Navy, the admiral said, so it makes sense that the U.S. defense strategy would include a rebalance toward the region. Part of the rebalance includes Spains recent agreement to allow four Aegis missile-equipped Arleigh Burke-class ships to home-port in Rota, effectively freeing up six ships to deploy elsewhere, Greenert said. In addition, more ships will be based on the West Coast. By 2020, 60 percent of the Navys ships will be based on the West Coast or elsewhere in the Pacific, he said. To send one ship forward, Greenert said, requires four other ships: one in the region, one that has just returned, one that is preparing to deploy and one that is in maintenance. It makes better economic sense to keep ships home-ported in those regions, he said. About a third of the deployed ships are in the Middle East and the Arabian Gulf, and about 18 are in the Mediterranean Sea, the admiral said. That arrangement helps to ensure access to maritime crossroads such as the Suez Canal and the straits of Hormuz, Malacca and Gibraltar, he said. We have to have access to those places. Thats where the lifeblood of our world economy travels through, he said. It can take several days, sometimes two or three weeks, to reach these places from the United States, he noted, underscoring the importance of operat ing from forward locations. Greenert: Navy at its best when forward deployed HSL 42 Det Two coming home

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Nov. 29 1775 Capt. John Manley in schooner Lee captures British ordnance ship Nancy with large quantity of munitions. 1890 First Army-Navy foot ball game is won by Navy 24 0. 1929 Cmdr. Richard Byrd makes first flight over South Pole. 1944 USS Archerfish (SS-311) sinks Japanese carrier Shinano, the worlds largest warship sunk by any submarine during World War II. Nov. 30 1942 In Battle of Tassafaronga, the last major naval action in Solomons, the U.S. force prevents Japanese attempt to resupply the Japanese troops on Guadalcanal. Six U.S. ships are damaged in the action. Dec. 1 1842 Execution of three crewmembers of USS Somers for mutiny: Midshipman Philip Spencer, Boatswain Samuel Cromwell and Seaman Elisha Small. 1921 In first flight of an air ship filled with helium, Blimp C-7 piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Ralph Wood, flew from Norfolk, Va., to Washington, D.C. 1959 Bureau of Ordnance merges with Bureau of Aeronautics to form the Bureau of Naval Weapons. Dec. 2 1908 Rear Adm. William Cowles submits report to Secretary of the Navy, prepared by Lt. George Sweet, recom mending purchase of aircraft suitable for operating from naval ships on scouting and observa tion missions. 1941 First Naval Armed Guard detachment (seven men under a coxswain) of World War II reports to Liberty ship SS Dunboyne. 1944 Two-day destroyer Battle of Ormoc Bay begins. 1965 USS Enterprise (CVAN65) and USS Bainbridge (DLGN25) become first nuclear-pow ered task unit used in combat operations with launch of air strikes near Bien Hoa, Vietnam. Dec. 3 1775 LT John Paul Jones raises the Grand Union flag on Alfred. First American flag raised over American naval vessel. 1940 President Franklin D. Roosevelt embarks on USS Tuscaloosa (CA-37) to inspect bases acquired from Great Britain under Destroyer-for Bases agreement. 1983 Two F-14s flying over Lebanon were fired upon. Dec. 4 1918 President Woodrow Wilson sails in USS George Washington for Paris Peace Conference. 1943 Aircraft from USS Lexington (CV-16) and USS Independence (CVL-22) attack Kwajalein Atoll, sinking four Japanese ships and damaging five others, while only three U.S. ships suffered damage. 1944 USS Flasher (SS249) sinks Japanese destroyer Kishinami in South China Sea. Flasher is only U.S. sub to sink more than 100,000 tons of enemy shipping in World War II. 1965 Launch of Gemini 7 piloted by Cmdr. James Lovell. The flight consisted of 206 orbits at an altitude of 327 km and lasted 13 days and 18 hours. Recovery by HS-11 helicopters from USS Wasp (CVS-18). 1983 Aircraft from USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and USS Independence (CV-62) launch strike against anti-aircraft posi tions in Lebanon that fired on U.S. aircraft. Two Navy planes were shot down. Dec. 5 1843 Launching of USS Michigan at Erie, Penn., Americas first iron-hull war ship, as well as first prefabricat ed ship. 1941 USS Lexington (CV2) sails with Task Force 12 to ferry Marine Corps aircraft to Midway Island, leaving no carriers at Pearl Harbor. Twelve years ago, Dustin arrived at a new squadron, and at the Hail and Farewell (the Navys efficient two-birds, onestone approach to saying hello and goodbye to rotating person nel), a tall, attractive woman walked into the bar wearing a white tank top and fitted jeans. Whos that, I asked. Dustin whispered back, One of the pilots. One of the pilots where? Here, he said. In this squadron. I wanted to raise my hand and request that my husband be transferred to a new duty station. As if that works. I imagined how much more beautiful the pilot would seem to the men when they were separated from their wives for months at a time. I hated that she would have more access to my husband than I would. She would eat with him, exercise with him, and probably hang out in the ready room with him, too. Welcome to the strange, con flicted, sexually-charged but policed atmosphere of the mili tary, where uniforms meant to stifle individual expression have inadvertently become sex sym bols, and where husbands leave their wives for months at a time to live with other women, many of whom are young, smart, fit and attractive. For all of these reasons, last week, when I heard the news about former CIA Director David Petraeus having an affair with his biographer, Paula Broadwell, my stomach knotted. Fair or not, military leaders set the tone for their subordinates. A commander who has a family at home likely will make holiday parties and family-services briefings a priority. A commander who is a bachelor might invite all the guys to Hooters for dinner. (Yes, I saw this happen.) A leaders person al behavior gives families back home either confidence or rea son to worry. So in the wake of the scandal, I feel a little like a kid whos just discovered her parents are get ting a divorce. Nothing makes sense. The military is not what I thought it was. Shouldnt Petraeus and his wife, after 38 years of marriage, be the happy picture of what military life can be? Werent we striving for what they have? Civilians, of course, have always secretly suspected that being on deployment involves sneaking around on your spouse and shirking duties as husband and father. Military wives sometimes fear this, too, but, until now, weve looked to leaders with the brass you know, the ones who are unimpressed with the countrys latest reality-TV star and are more focused on the troops and defending freedom and found comfort in the tone they set. So what now? Four-Star generals, unlike some celebrities and politicians, dont usually end up on the front page of The National Enquirer. What are we to make of this? What is our new standard of a good military marriage? Or, worse, had we been duped all along? Jake Trapper, speaking about the affair to CNNs Piers Morgan last week, shared a story about being with the troops overseas, where it was, as he recalled, a world virtually void of women and filled with men starved for them. He said the men routinely clamored to listen to a female helicopter pilots voice over the radio. The men, he said, were convinced she was the most beautiful woman ever. All across the nation, as CNN went to commercial, a thousand military wives hearts broke. Those men clamoring to hear the radio probably werent all single. We always suspected as much, of course, but no one talked about it, and military leaders, we had hoped, certainly frowned on it. Oh, but the damage from this divorce is far from done. Next up in the fallout is Jill Kelley, a rich socialite civilian who, despite having no business at McDill Air Force Base, had total access to it and all of its leaders. There, Kelley received favors like written letters of support from two powerful generals for her sisters custody battle. I had to read that news report twice. Ive been a military dependent for 36 years; favors and socialite are not usually in the same sentence with military and base. Despite being a Navy wife and BRAT, Ive sometimes been turned away from the front gate because I didnt have my I.D. card. There never were any favors. But, then, Im closer to look ing more like General Patreuss wife than I am the perfectly dressed and toned Kelley or Broadwell. I used to think those things didnt matter in the mili tary. Its like the rug has been pulled out from under military wives. And as each new picture surfaces of the general wearing what looks like Mardi Gras beads and beautiful women on either arm, we will think of his wife, and our bitterness will grow at being left at home to raise fami lies, where we age, grow plump around the edges and wrinkled in the face. All while another woman goes jogging with our husband and a socialite is waved onto base. That collective sigh you hear is an army of wives asking themselves, perhaps many decades too late, is this really any way to live a married life? But we arentall necessarily question ing our marriages. Ive loved and been devoted to both my hus band and the military. Today, I feel like one of them has cheated me. And its not Dustin. The three Pacific Fleet aircraft carriers were USS Enterprise (CV-6), USS Lexington (CV-2), and USS Saratoga (CV-3). Enterprise: On Nov. 28, 1941, Adm. Husband Kimmel sent Task Force-8, con sisting of Enterprise, the heavy cruisers Northampton (CA-26), Chester (CA-27) and Salt Lake City (CA-24) along with nine destroyers under Vice Adm. William Halsey Jr., to ferry 12 Grumman F4F-3 Wildcats of Marine Fighter Squadron (VMF) 211 to Wake Island. Upon completion of the mission on Dec. 4, TF-8 set course to return to Pearl Harbor. Dawn on Dec. 7 found TF-8 about 215 miles west of Oahu. Lexington: On Dec. 5, Task Force-12, formed around Lexington, under the com mand of Rear Adm. John Newton, sailed from Pearl to ferry 18 Vought SB2U-3 Vindicators of Marine Scout Bombing Squadron 231 to Midway Island. Dawn on Dec. 7 found Lexington, heavy cruisers Chicago (CA-29), Portland (CA-33) and Astoria (CA-34) along with five destroyers about 500 miles southeast of Midway. The attack on Pearl cancelled the mission and VMSB-231 was retained on board (they would ultimately fly to Midway from Hickam Field on Dec. 21). Saratoga: Having recently completed an overhaul at the Puget Sound Navy Yard in Bremerton, Wash., she reached NAS San Diego (North Island) late on Dec. 7. She embarked her air group, as well as Marine Fighter Squadron (VMF) 221 and a cargo of miscellaneous airplanes to ferry to Pearl Harbor. Yorktown (CV-5), Ranger (CV-4) and Wasp (CV-7), along with the aircraft escort vessel Long Island (AVG-1), were in the Atlantic Fleet; Hornet (CV-8), commissioned in late October 1941, had yet to carry out her shakedown. Yorktown would be the first Atlantic Fleet carrier to be transferred to the Pacific, sailing on Dec.16, 1941.U.S. aircraft carrier locations: December 7, 1941Petraeus scandal cheats military wives

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On Nov. 16, VP-30 Executive Officer Cmdr. David Gardella recognized recent graduates of the P-3C CAT I (initial training syllabus) Acoustic and Nonacoustic Operator Class 1205, Flight Engineer Class 1203, and In-flight Technician Class 1203. The Honor Graduates of the classes were: AWF3 Cord Bailey (Naval Aircrewman Mechanical Class 1203), AWV3 Joshua Wendel (Naval Aircrewman Avionics Class 1203), AWO3 Nicholas Urban (Naval Aircrewman Operator Class 1205-Non-Acoustic), and AWO3 Cody Miller (Naval Aircrewman Operator Class 1205-Acoustic). All graduating Sailors were advanced at the ceremony to their listed rank by Gardella. These naval aircrewmen will now report to their assigned operational squadrons to begin their initial sea tours. More than 26,000 active duty and nearly 600 Full Time Support (FTS) Sailors are on their way to advancement to E4, E5 and E6 with the release of the fall Petty Officer advancement list Nov. 20. Advancements are critical to our overall strategy for managing rat ing and pay grade levels to ensure healthy community management and manning the Fleet to the cor rect level with the right people, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director of Military Personnel Plans and Policy. Sailors advanced in cycle 216 for Active Duty and Full Time Support (FTS) E4-E6 will provide the Fleet with the right Sailor with the right skills and the right experience level to maximize Navys readiness. While the number of active duty Sailors advancing to E5 and E4 decreased this cycle, the opportu nity to advance increased because there were fewer Sailors in the advancement window. Enlisted advancements are based on vacancies in the Fleet. Although there were fewer vacancies to advance into this cycle, there were also fewer Sailors in the advance ment window so percent opportunity stayed high. Advancement opportunity for active duty E6 Sailors this cycle increased to 19.59 from 16.18 per cent last cycle, while E5 Sailors saw opportunity rise to 32.42 percent this cycle compared to 30.94 per cent last spring. Sailors advancing to E4 had opportunity increase to 47.70 percent from 45.83 percent last cycle. FTS E6 Sailors opportunity this cycle increased to 11.60 percent from 10.78 from last cycle, while E5 Sailors opportunity dropped to 23.58 per cent from 28.57 last cycle. E4 Sailors also saw a drop in opportunity from 59.52 in the last cycle to 42.21 this cycle.VP-30 aircrewman classes graduate, many advanced Petty officers advancement announced JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 3

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The Fighting Tigers of VP 8 wit nessed the culmination of six months of hard work and dedication when they hoisted the Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist (EAWS) pennant, Nov. 16 at Naval Air Facility Misawa, Japan. The squadron had their two most junior EAWS recipients hoist the pennant during a hauling up ceremony inside their hangar. I am very proud of all of the accomplishments that the Sailors of VP-8 reach, but this particular one has to be gained as a team, said VP-8 Command Master Chief Patrick Campbell. Our Sailors encouraged each other to get their EAWS qualifi cations started and completed. They were determined to raise the EAWS Pennant. In order for a unit to be authorized to hoist the EAWS pennant, the com mand must have 75 percent or more of its personnel qualified. The Fighting Tigers currently have 78 percent of its personnel qualified which is a 31 percent increase since they deployed from NAS Jacksonville in May. The EAWS personnel qualification standard (PQS) covers four phases: command orientation; departmental qualifications; aircraft systems; a written test and oral board. I have never seen a level of dedi cation to this magnitude regarding Sailors engaged and focused on earn ing their warfare qualification, said AWOC Jerry Fullerton, VP-8 EAWS coordinator. Everywhere you turned you would see Sailors in study groups, mock boards, and doing PQS with qualified members both at work and in the barracks during their liberty time. EAWS managers set up training sessions for Sailors during the night and day shifts. These sessions gave them the opportunity to discuss and clarify any questions they might have on any given topic. We held one-hour training sessions seven-days-a-week for both day and night shifts. We also encouraged all personnel to get involved and assist enrollees in studying and maintain ing a steady progress through the program, said AE2 Juliana Drach, VP-8 EAWS manager. Also, we continually emphasized the significance and pride that comes with wearing a set of EAWS wings. Wearing them stands for being a specialist in what we do on a daily basis. My expectations are always very high for our Sailors and programs, but I fully expect that the Fighting Tigers will not let this pennant come down anytime soon, said Campbell. Fighting Tigers hoist EAWS pennant 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012

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Corner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road Working together for stronger, healthier babiesa CFC participant Provided as a public service marchofdimes.com Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Executive Officer Capt. Scott Hurst spoke at the Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) luncheon in Jacksonville on Nov. 20. The society is comprised of military members, area business and industry leaders. He provided a general overview of NAVFAC Southeast engineering chal lenges and U.S. Navy construction outlook in the southeastern United States and overseas, specifically onboard Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Africa. Hurst reviewed with the audience who NAVFAC Southeast is, where it conducts business, how to do business with NAVFAC and the fiscal outlook for 2013. He also shared personal experiences and thoughts on doing business from his most recent one-year deployment, returning in May, where he was the commanding officer, Camp Lemonnier, located in the Horn of Africa. We (NAVFAC Southeast) are very diverse. Our diversity in territory (coastal, inland, Caribbean islands such as Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and Haiti) and the services we support (Navy, Marines, Air Force, Coast Guard) insulate us from fiscal highs and lows, said Hurst. Hurst commented that energy is a growth sector for NAVFAC Southeast and the workload in this area has actually increased. He suggested that if the gathered professionals were looking for business, energy is of growing importance. Hurst also stressed that NAVFAC does more than MILCON (military construction). NAVFAC is also involved in utility, conservation, environmental and real estate transactions, to name a few. Our workload continues to be true and steady in fiscal 2013, said Hurst. Hurst discussed the growing impor tance of his last tour in Africa. Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, formally an obscure 100-year-old French outpost, has become a vital air hub and navigational point for the U.S. Navy and U.S. government supporting regional and combatant commanders. Combined Joint Task Force Horn of Africa is headquartered there and sup ports 25 additional tenant commands. What began for the U.S. as a contin gency outpost after 9/11 is turning into a full scale permanent base for the U.S. Navy supporting a population of more than 4000 military, civilian and con tract personnel, said Hurst. Hurst shared with the group information on where to find business oppor tunities with NAVFAC, throughout the world. For more information, visit www.navfac.navy.mil. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast active duty volunteers visited local classrooms and a retirement center Nov. 5 through Nov. 12 to support Jacksonvilles Week of Valor and other Veterans Day commemora tions. Military members visited as individu als and in small groups to speak to stu dents and retirees about their military experiences and about science, tech nology, engineering and math (STEM) opportunities. Lt. Cmdr. Doug Herrin, NAVFAC Southeast energy team leader, spoke to 55 juniors from Englewood High School Nov. 5, during their science class. I spoke about the service and sac rifices of veterans and the significant role veterans had in shaping our great nation and providing us with freedom and opportunities, said Herrin. I talk ed about defending our freedom and democracy, about my travels around the world, and how I have seen children who live in poverty and do not have the same educational opportunities we enjoy. Herrin also spoke about the role of engineers in the U.S. Navy and the importance of science, technology, engi neering, and math in pursuing a future career in the military or in the private sector. SWCS Jose Torres, NAVFAC Southeast senior enlisted advisor, met several kindergarten through fourth grade students at Englewood Elementary on the same day. He spoke to them about veterans contributions, past and present, and the sacrifices made by both the military members and their families. Torres noted the children were very excited to visit with military members. He thanked them for taking time to honor veterans and that it meant a great deal to him personally to know that children were thinking of the military. Cmdr. Cameron Geertsema, Navy Region Southeast assistant regional engineer, spoke to more than 100 mid dleschool students at Jacksonvilles San Jose Catholic School during the Week of Valor. Geertsema discussed the importance of service and how he came to serve. He also highlighted the significance of education, community service and team work in everything we do. That is what makes this country great, said Geertsema. Its everyones personal responsibility to do something however small or large. Geertsema followed up his remarks with a questions and answer session. The students were well prepared and peppered him with more than 40 ques tions. Geertsema said he was able to answer about ten questions in the allot ted 45 minutes. Students were interested in veterans serving in harms way, said Geertsema. They asked about what it means to serve and they were concerned with the type of hardships service members face. Geertsema told the students that it is a privilege and honor to serve. Serving in a time of war is difficult and affects each service member dif ferently, said Geertsema. We leave our families to answer the call of this great nation to do a job in a foreign land. Sometimes during war and sometimes to support humanitarian efforts. Either way, the experiences and friendships we build, both in the military or with the nation we are supporting, are rewarding and well worth the effort. Lt. Cmdr. Kenneth Vargas, NAVFAC Southeast disaster preparedness offi cer, and Lt. Ruben Chonna, NAVFAC Southeast energy manager for Public Works Department, NAS Jacksonville, visited with residents and staff of the River Garden Hebrew Home in Mandarin, Nov. 12, during their Veterans Day commemoration. Approximately 25 to 30 residents, including veterans of World War II, the Korean conflict, and Vietnam, greeted Vargas and Chonna. The official pro gram consisted of four presentations two by resident veterans and two by the NAVFAC officers. The veterans shared war stories including one veteran who shared his experiences at Pearl Harbor on that day of infamy, Dec. 7, 1941. The second veteran gave a brief history on Veterans Day, how it used to be known as Armistice day, and how on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month of each year was to be commemorated as the moment in time to com memorate the end of all wars. It was a great honor and privilege to be surrounded by so many of our nations heros to commemorate this special day in Florida, said Vargas. The city-sponsored Week of Valor coincided with Veterans Day and fea tured a military appreciation luncheon, a job fair, a Veterans Day parade, a col lege basketball game aboard the USS Bataan, and a salute to the military during the NFL football game between the Jacksonville Jaguars and Indianapolis Colts. Saturday marks the 54th anniversary of USO Pal Day in St. Augustine, where the old citys attractions show their support and appreciation to members of the U.S. armed forces and their families by opening their doors free of charge. In addition, members of Elks Lodge 829 will serve a free lunch sponsored by the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. Over the years, tens of thousands of active duty military and their families have enjoyed USO Pal Day. The Greater Jacksonville Area USO has the sole of mission of supporting our brave men/women and their families who defend our freedoms. We are greatly appreciative of our partnership with the City of St. Augustine, Elks Lodge 829 and the United Way of St. Johns County. USO Pal Day celebrates 53 yearsNAVFAC Southeast executive officer engages local businesses NAVFAC Southeast supports Jacksonville veterans events JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 Carrier-based pilots of fixed-wing air craft know all too well the importance of deck lighting and visual aids to assist in guiding their aircraft safely on board. In addition to the hundreds of hours of practice approaches that prepare a pilot for this challenge, they rely on the Improved Fresnel Lens Optical Landing System (IFLOLS) and the Manually Operated Visual Landing Aid System (MOVLAS) early in their careers to gain the expertise required to land on a postage stamp in the middle of the night. Anyone who has seen Top Gun can recall hearing the phrase, You are three quarter mile, call the ball as Maverick prepares to land his F-14 Tomcat on board a carrier flight deck. This phrase is in reference to the meatball that is projected by IFLOLS to indicate to a pilot that their aircraft is on the optimal glide slope. The IFLOLS is a system consisting of 12 vertical cells and 10 horizontal datum lights that a pilot can see from up to 1.5 nautical miles, giving them time to make the necessary final adjustments that will ensure their tail hook connects with the arresting gear on board carrier flight decks. Should the IFLOLS system fail due to maintenance issues or extremely rough sea states, the MOVLAS serves as a backup system that can be manually oper ated by an experienced landing signal officer (LSO) to display the same visual information. Pilots train for carrier landings almost non-stop, using land-based fields to perfect their techniques. Outlying Landing Field (OLF) Whitehouse, located 45 minutes west of NAS Jacksonville, serves as one of these frequently used fields. Equipped with a pair of IFLOLS and MOVLAS units at each end of the run way, OLF Whitehouse serves as host to numerous fleet squadrons that use these lighting systems for their training and qualifications. In recent years these multi-million dollar units had degraded in life-cycle sustainability and performance due to continuous weather exposure and deterioration. In order to restore these degrading units, Lt. Cmdr. Erick Smith, ground electronics maintenance officer for NAS Jax, and ETC(SS) Steven David, leading chief petty officer for ground electronics with NAS Jax, headed a refurbishment project designed to save time and money. Initially contacting con tractors to get an estimate of how much money would be needed to repair the IFLOLS and MOVLAS units, David con cluded that a skilled team of petty offi cers led by IC2(SW) Michael Bean could make the repairs in much less time and for a fraction of the costs quoted. Beans team, as it came to be called, included IC2 (SW/AW) Jayson Bankhead, IC2(SW) Amber Thayer, ET2(SW) Timothy Fay, ET3 Hope Hatfield, ET3 Derek Mitchem, ET3 Ryan McCracken and Tom Duvall, a civilian electronics technician with NAS Jax. The contractors had initially told us it would cost the Navy a few hundred thousand dollars each to refurbish these units, and would take about four months per unit, David commented. He praised IC2 Beans team, as they accomplished all the research, created formal work packages and wiring sheets, established quality assurance proce dures, and constructed a detailed parts procurement process. The team then disassembled and repainted each IFLOLS and MOVLAS unit, before meticulously reconstructing them. Their focused efforts and team work allowed them to complete the job in just eight weeks and saved the Navy about $386,000. In these fiscally constrained times, we have to be great stewards of the American tax dollar, stated Smith. According to Smith and David, over 2024 man-hours went into the refurbishment project and extended the life of the IFLOLS and MOVLAS units by 15 to 20 years -with virtually no disruption to flight operations and pilot training. This group of Sailors went well above and beyond for this, working nights and weekends, and sometimes learning things as each obstacle presented itself, all to get these units in great working condition, David continued. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders visited OLF Whitehouse on Nov. 19 to inspect the completed work. Commending the sail ors on a job well done, he stated, Im extremely impressed with the amount of sheer work each and every one of you put into this project. Our military benefits greatly from peo ple with such fantastic commitment, and you all have contributed to making the Navy that much better over the past two months. Thousands of dollars saved on runway lighting at OLF Whitehouse

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8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 The Mad Foxes of VP-5 played host to the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) VP-5 Pegasus. The maritime patrol and recon naissance Sailors met at the Kadena Air Base Officers Club and enjoyed a night of friend ly conversation and cultural exchange. Both squadrons had devel oped a relationship of coop eration throughout the Mad Foxes 7th Fleet Deployment. They have joined for numerous professional events, including squadron visits, briefings, cul tural exchanges, aircraft tours and real-world training mis sions. This event was an opportu nity to gather in a purely social setting to allow all sailors to get to know each other on a more personal level. Both officers and enlisted Sailors from each command attended the social. The eve ning began with an exchange of gifts and opening remarks by the squadrons command ing officers. The JMSDF offi cers began the night by offer ing their support and condo lences for the recent impact of Hurricane Sandy on the U.S. East Coast. They recounted the aid that the U.S. Navy had provided for tsunami and typhoon relief as examples of the close relationship between the two nations. It was a wonderful opportu nity to get to know the JMSDF aviators, said pilot Lt. j.g. Kevin Cottingham. After exchanging squadron insignia, taking photos togeth er and sharing stories, both squadrons walked away from the event with a better under standing and appreciation for each organization. The Mad Foxes were very grateful for the opportunity to participate in the event and look forward to future gatherings. VP-5 is currently on a routine deployment to the 7th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime patrol operations. For the United States and its allies, ending the al-Qaida threat calls for a modified military footprint, close work with partners and continued U.S. involvement in regions of the world where violent extrem ism has flourished, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said Nov. 20. Addressing a large audi ence at the Center for a New American Security, the sec retary discussed significant national security challenges and opportunities ahead. He also outlined priori ties that characterize the approaching end of the longest period of sustained armed conflict in the nations history. The priorities, Panetta said, are fighting the war against alQaida and its affiliates, end ing the war in Afghanistan, implementing the new defense strategy, meeting fiscal responsibilities, countering nuclear proliferation, improving cyber security, achieving greater energy security, implementing the Asia-Pacific rebalance, and taking care of service mem bers, veterans and military families. But tonight I want to focus on the goal that still remains at the top of the priority list, as it must. That goal that the presi dent made very clear that we have a responsibility to dis rupt, degrade, dismantle and ultimately defeat those who attacked America on 9/11 alQaida, the secretary said. The essential first step is to finish the job that the United States and its coalition part ners began in Afghanistan, he said, and we are on track to do that. As the United States and its NATO partners agreed at the 2010 summit in Lisbon, Panetta said, Afghans must be respon sible for their own security by the end of 2014. This transition will require continued commitment by the international community and the United States to help Afghan forces achieve this goal, he added. We have come too far. We have invested too much blood and treasure not to finish the job, the secretary said. There are no shortcuts, nor can we afford to turn away from this effort when we are so close to achieving success and preventing al-Qaida from ever returning to this historic epicenter for violent extremism. In Afghanistan and Pakistan, prolonged military and intel ligence operations have sig nificantly weakened al-Qaida, Panetta said. The terrorist groups most effective leaders are gone, its command and control has been degraded and its safe haven is shrinking, he added, but al-Qaida remains. We have slowed the primary cancer but we know that the cancer has also metastasized to other parts of the global body, the secretary said. Two examples of that spreading alQaida presence are Yemen and Somalia. In Yemen, for example, the capabilities of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, or AQAP, are growing. This group has targeted the United States for attack and sowed violence and chaos in Yemen itself, Panetta said. We have struck back in an effort to disrupt and dismantle this group through a very close partnership with the govern ment of Yemen, he added. In Somalia, against the mili tant group al-Shaabab, prog ress also has been made, the secretary said, in large part because of an effective part nership between the United States and the African Union Mission in Somalia. But the challenge is far from over, Panetta said. President [Barack] Obama has made clear, we will fight not just through military means but by harnessing every element of American power military, intelligence, diplomatic, law enforcement, financial, economic and above all the power of our values as Americans, the secretary said. The second step in achieving the end of al-Qaida, Panetta said, involves maintain ing pressure on al-Qaida in Pakistan, on AQAP in Yemen, and on al-Qaida-associated forces in Somalia. That means degrading the terrorists senior leadership, dismantling their organiza tional capabilities, remaining vigilant to ensure the threat does not reconstitute, and working to build the capac ity of U.S. partners, including Pakistan, to confront these shared threats, he added. A third step is to prevent the emergence of new safe havens for al-Qaida elsewhere in the world that the group could use to attack the United States or its interests, he said. The last decade of war has shown that coordinated efforts to share intelligence, to con duct operations with partners, are critical to making sure that al-Qaida has no place to hide, Panetta told the audience. We will expand these efforts, including through sup port and partnership with governments in transition in the Middle East and North Africa, he added. This campaign against alQaida will largely take place outside declared combat zones, using a small-footprint approach that includes preci sion operations, partnered activities with foreign special operations forces, and capacity building so that partner coun tries can be more effective in combating terrorism on their own, the secretary said. In Mali for example, Panetta said, we are working with our partners in Western Africa who are committed to countering the emerging threat to regional stability posed by AQIM. A fourth step needed to bring an end to al-Qaida involves investing in the future, he added, in new military and intelligence capabilities and security partnerships. Our new defense strategy makes clear the military must retain and even build new counterterrorism capabilities for the future, Panetta said. As the size of the military shrinks, for example, special operations will continue to ramp up, growing from 37,000 members on 9/11 to 64,000 today and 72,000 by 2017, the secretary noted. We are expanding our fleet of Predator and Reaper [unmanned aerial vehicles] over what we have today. These enhanced capabilities will enable us to be more flexible and agile against a threat that has grown more diffuse, Panetta said. A final point that too often takes a backseat to operations against al-Qaida, Panetta said, is how to prevent extremist ideologies from attracting new recruits. Over the past decade we have successfully directed our military and intelligence capa bilities at fighting terrorism, he added. And yet we are still struggling to develop an effec tive approach to address the factors that attract young men and women to extreme ideologies, and to ensure that governments and societies have the capacity and the will to counter and reject violent extremism. To truly end the threat from al-Qaida, the secretary said, military force aimed at kill ing our enemy alone will never be enough. The United States must stay involved and invest ed through diplomacy, through development, through educa tion, through trade in those regions of the world where violent extremism has flourished. But to truly protect America, we must sustain and in some areas deepen our engagement in the world our military, intelligence, diplomatic and development efforts are key to doing that, he added. Pursuing an isolation ist path, the secretary said, would make all of us less safe in the long-term. This is not a time for retrenchment. This is not a time for isolation. It is a time for renewed engagement and partnership in the world, Panetta said. Use of marijuana prohibited by federal employees In light of recent elec tion results that legal ized marijuana in the states of Washington and Colorado, the fol lowing is provided as clarification of policy on the use of marijuana by Department of Navy employees. At this time, marijuana use is illegal under federal law which means fed eral employees are pro hibited from using this drug regardless of changes to state laws. Unless or until there is further specific guidance issued at the federal level allowing marijuana use in some (or any) situations, fed eral employees remain accountable to comply with federal law. Those employees sub ject to random drug testing or other testing (applicant, reasonable suspicion, post-accident or follow-up), remain subject to the conse quences for illegal drug use. Panetta details steps to end al-Qaida threat VP-5 Mad Foxes host VP-5 Pegasus

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Defense Secretary Leon Panetta commended the last ing accomplishments of the former commander of U.S. Southern Command Nov. 19 and welcomed a new, but familiar, officer to lead the combatant command in Miami, Fla. Panetta presided over the Southcom ceremony as Air Force Gen. Douglas Fraser retired, relinquished his com mand to Marine Corps Gen. John Kelly. This afternoon, we pay tribute to two very extraordinary officers, to their families, and to the service members and civilians that they have led, Panetta said. We celebrate General Frasers nearly four decades of selfless service to our country, his strong leadership in a number of key posi tions, and his many lasting accomplishments as Southcom commander. The secretary highlighted some of Frasers early years as he came full circle from high school where he, fittingly, graduated in Bogota, Colombia, to his rise to Southcom com mander as the last active duty member of his Air Force Academy class of 1975. Thanks to his extraordinary record of accomplishment, Doug was an excellent pick to be the first-ever U.S. Air Force officer to lead this command, Panetta said. Shortly after taking com mand, General Fraser was faced with one of the most significant operational challenges that Southcom has ever faced when it had to face the devas tating earthquake in Haiti, he said. The secretary described Frasers immediate actions leading Southcoms disaster relief efforts during Operation Unified Response, the larg est humanitarian assistance and disaster relief mission this command has ever undertak en. In total, Southcom deliv ered 2.3 million meals, 17 mil lion pounds of bulk food, 2.6 million bottles of water, [and] 150,000 pounds of medical supplies, among many, many other services, Panetta said. The defense secretary noted the devastation caused by Haitis earthquake under scores the fact that the key security challenges in this hemisphere are transnational. Natural disasters, some times horrendous, in their impact on people and their countries, illicit trafficking, organized crime, narco-terrorism, the threats to security in the Americas are not contained by political boundaries, he said. One of General Frasers most significant and enduring con tributions, Panetta said, has been rallying support across the U.S. government in order to focus more attention on Central America as it confronts illicit drug trafficking. [This command] has helped galvanize U.S. and Western Hemisphere support for enhanced engagement in this region, he said. Weve made significant progress in partnering with the militaries of Central American nations, and they are now taking greater responsibility for their own security. Panetta also noted that Frasers efforts with Southcoms Joint Interagency Task Force South brought interagency and international cooperation to new levels, with Operation Martillo taking 152 metric tons of cocaine worth almost $3 billion off the market in 2012. All of these accomplish ments are the direct result of Dougs steady, but sure, lead ership, he said. I want to [personally] thank everyone at Southcom for all you do to keep America safe. Panetta also welcomed another dedicated leader to assume Frasers position lead ing Southcom Kelly, Panettas own former Pentagon staff member. Hes been my senior mili tary assistant since I came to the Pentagon last year, he said. Hes always been at my side as a trusted confidant and a trusted friend. More than anyone, he has ensured that the daily reality of those serving on the front lines informs and guides every decision that Ive made, Panetta said. I could not have done my job without his judgment and blunt, honest counsel. The defense secretary called Kelly the true embodiment of a warrior and said he felt honored to promote the officer to four-star general prior to the change of command ceremony. I will be eternally grate ful to him, and to be honest, while I will miss him, he will be a great commander here at Southcom, Panetta said. I, very much, look forward to relying on his perspective and forthright advice as he leads our military efforts in this region. Panetta used an old Air Force metaphor as he expressed his confidence in Kelly as Southcoms new com mander. Fraser has this command to a higher altitude and, with todays change of command, Im confident that, in the extraordinarily capable hands of John Kelly, it will soar even higher in the future, he said. The Naval Air Training Command (NATRACOM) in Corpus Christi, Texas, held a change of command ceremony aboard USS Lexington muse um Nov. 15. Rear Adm. Mark Leavitt relieved Rear Adm. William Sizemore II, as the Chief of Naval Air Training (CNATRA). Sizemore is retiring after 32 years of service as a commis sioned naval officer. NATRACOM conducts and oversees all pilot and naval flight officer training for the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard throughout five train ing air wings located in three states. It also oversees the Naval Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels. Sizemore, a 1980 gradu ate of the United States Naval Academy, is a third-generation Sailor and second-generation naval aviator. He served as CNATRA since September of 2009. If I could have picked a place for the last tour of duty, it would have been here. Training Command is where I started; its where all Naval Aviators start and its just been won derful, said Sizemore. He was quick to credit the success of the NATRACOMs mission to the personnel assigned to the command and its subordinate commands. Its been a total team effort by everybody in this command the staff here, each of the five Training Air Wings and each of the squadrons under those Training Air Wings and ulti mately down to the instructor pilots, instructor NFOs, the student Aviators and the student Naval Flight Officers theyve all gotten it done. Im very proud of our record of accom plishment, but again its been a total team effort on every bodys part. It always is in the Navy. The guest speaker, Vice Adm. Allen Myers, who served as Commander, Naval Air Forces (CNAF) from 2010 to October 2012, and is assigned as the next Deputy Chief of Naval Operations, Integration of Capabilities and Resources (N8), commended Sizemore and the NATRACOM. For the past three years, Naval Air Training Command has performed superbly under the guiding hand of Bill Sizemore, said Myers. I couldnt be prouder of what Size and his team has accomplished. Leavitt is a graduate of Florida State University in Tallahassee, Fla., and was designated a naval aviator in 1986. Leavitt is already famil iar with NATRACOM, pre viously serving as the com mander of both the Training Air Wing 2 Reserve Component and CNATRA Reserve Component. Before report ing as CNATRA, he served as Commander, Naval Air Forces Reserve. There are many challenges ahead, said Leavitt. Yet I know the CNATRA team: officer, enlisted, govern ment civilians and contrac tors, will continue to overcome these challenges and safely train the best naval aviators and naval flight officers in the world.Panetta praises outgoing, incoming Southcom commandersNaval Air Training Command welcomes new commander 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012

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Satellite Pharmacy changes to holiday hoursNaval Hospital Jacksonvilles Satellite Pharmacy, located at the Navy Exchange (Building 950), will transition to holiday hours from Dec. 14 through Jan. 11. The refill drive-up window will be open weekdays from 8 a.m. 4 p.m., and on Saturdays from 8 a.m. 3 p.m. The main lobby will operate from 9 a.m. 4 p.m. On Dec. 24 and Dec. 31, the refill drive-up will be open for pickup only and close at 3 p.m. The main lobby will be closed on these days. For more information call (904) 542-7405 or keep up with current news on Facebook (www.facebook.com/ NavalHospitalJacksonville). Uniform shiftNAS Jacksonville will shift to the winter uniform of the day Dec. 3. The uniform of the day will be: service dress blues or service khaki for all officers and chief petty officers and service dress blues or service uniforms for E-1 to E-6. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 11

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NAS Jacksonville held their first allfemale Motorcycle Basic Rider Course Nov. 18-19 with five participants learn ing the ins and outs of how to ride a motorcycle safely. The course was com prised of classroom work and range exercises to test their knowledge both mentally and physically. We are teaching them the basics of learning to ride a motorcycle includ ing gear shifting, braking, maneuvering skills, how to avoid hazards and how to have confidence on a bike. Most of participants out here have been riding on the back of a motorcycle and have decided they want to try it on their own, said Cape Fox Professional Services Motorcycle Instructor Kristen Montejo, as she taught a series of range exercises to the participants. We decided to teach this all-female class because sometimes women just arent as comfortable learning in our other classes. This gives them a more comfortable atmosphere to learn to ride and to develop safe riding habits, added Montejo. Although none of the participants actually owned their own motorcycles, they were excited about the prospect of buying one in the future and were glad for the opportunity to use one of the loaner motorcycles available for the class. Ive been riding on the back of motorcycles and was always too scared to try it myself. But this class has really helped build my confidence. But I will prac tice a whole lot more until Im comfort able enough to get on the road, said AOAN(AW) Kandice Harrison of HS-11. I really like this class because its all women and its not so intimidating. The instructors have been awesome. They are very patient and knowledgeable, added ET3 Nina Jarrett of the NAS Jax Legal Department. After earning their certificates of completion, the instructors will input the information to the Department of Motor Vehicles, allowing them to get a motor cycle endorsement on their drivers licenses. This endorsement is required by some states for operating a motor cycle. For a schedule of upcoming motorcy cle safety classes and to register, call the base safety office at 542-2584. NAS Jax holds first all-female motorcycle course JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 13

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DEWEYSCall 542-3521 Deweys is now open! Deweys is located in Bldg. 608 between Gillis St. and Keily St. off of Enterprise Ave. Deweys offers a full service menu, bar and a friendly atmosphere that is great for all ages! Monday Friday 10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 4 10 p.m. CPO Lounge Monday, Tuesday & Friday 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Wednesday Thursday 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m. Deweys Specials Monday Pizza madness 2 9 p.m. one topping pizza for only $5 Free Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday social hours, 7 9 p.m., $.50 wings & $7.95 pizza your way *chicken and extra cheese additional charge NFL Ticket Sunday 12:30 9 p.m., $.50 wingsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. 40,000 Calories of Christmas See if you and your teammate can burn a total of 40,000 calories December 3 to January 18. The top teams in each team category will receive a trophy. Sign-up in the fitness center by November 28I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. St. Augustine Old Town Trolley Night of Lights Adult $8.75, child $4 Orlando Magic Tickets $18 $268 ShenYun at the Times Union Center Jan. 29 30, $55 $163 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Kennedy Space Center Adult $40, child $31 Entertainment Books $30 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam February 23, 2013 Preferred seating $41, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Tampa Zoo $19 (Adult) $17.50 (Child) Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Blue Man Group in Orlando Special until March 31, adult $44, child $29, military $29 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4 day hopper $153.25 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3 day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31, 2013 and must be redeemed by June 30, 2013. Ask about our special discounted tickets for family members. Gator Bowl tickets $35 Gator Bowl Patch $9 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day $29.50, 2 day $40, Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT! Daytona 500 Feb. 24, 2013 tickets on sale now! $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. St. Augustine PAL Day December 1 Free transportation Gift Wrap Wednesdays Wrap your gifts for FREE Kings Bay Comedy Show December 6 at 6 p.m. Reindeer Games Competition December 8 at noon Jaguars vs. Jets game December 9 at 11:30 a.m. Free admission and transportationNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees December 4 & 18 for active duty December 6 & 20 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Monday through Friday Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $18 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DOD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Turkey Trot Killer Scramble delete Santa Sez Golf Tournament December 21 at 10 a.m. 4 person scramble $40 $50 per person Let us cook for you! Order turkey dinners at MulligansMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Dashing Through The Grove Saturday, Dec. 8 4 8 p.m. at Patriots Grove Free snow sledding, photos with Santa, tree lighting, musical entertainment and more!Flying Club Call 777-8549 Call for latest training schedule For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239, or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 15

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More than 100 U.S. Navy medi cal professionals from Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville completed a course designed to prepare them for assembling, operating and disassembling an expedi tionary medical facility Nov. 7 at Camp Pendleton, Calif. NH Jacksonville hospital corpsmen, Medical Corps officers, other medi cal professionals and support person nel completed the Naval Expeditionary Medical Training Institute (NEMTI) Expeditionary Medical Facility (EMF) Tiered Readiness Training an effort focusing on the role medical profession als play in the construction of a medical facility in a contingency area. MA1(EXW) John Carpenter, NH Jacksonville Security Dept. leading petty officer and NEMTI camp commandant, said the 10-day course provided not only fundamentals of expeditionary medicine, but fostered the sense of togetherness necessary when working together in a challenging environment. This helps the corpsmen and other medical professionals get in the mindset that what they learn here at NEMTI will ultimately save lives, he said. Having the skill sets to successfully set up an EMF is invaluable and working together only serves to further our mission. The NEMTI EMF Tiered Readiness Training Phase Two Course, is annual sustainment training that includes the assembly and disassembly of an EMF, as well as medical, administrative and tactical topics that satisfy EMF program requirements. It has proven a mainstay in Navy expeditionary medicine as the shifting role of U.S. Navy medical pro fessionals have changed in contingency operations over the past 10 years. Capt. Thomas Sawyer, NEMTI officerin-charge, said the course continues to improve and evolve, as students adapt to new situations and work together to ensure successful missions. The team from NH JAX has done a magnificent job in the classroom and in the field, he said. Their training includ ed the Collective Protection System that enables the medical team to work in a contaminated environment and contin ue to provide medical care. In addition to the EMF build, NH Jacksonville com pleted training with the 9 millimeter pistol and NBC (nuclear, biological, chemi cal) confidence chamber. This training increases the readiness posture of the NH Jacksonville team and improved their ability/capability to provide care in the field. Among numerous other classes, top ics covered during the EMF Tiered Readiness Training Phase Two Course included an orientation to the facility, its mission and capabilities, field compound sanitation, security operations, combat medical operations, medical evacuation functions and an understanding of the law of armed conflict. Carpenter said the course is beneficial to all attending even non-medical per sonnel in support roles and will have positive ramifications throughout the fleet. He added that the expeditionary style training at NEMTI requires stu dents of all ranks to live in the NEMTI sea huts (20-man, field-style facilities designed to replicate actual expedition ary conditions) provides junior Sailors and officers the chance to ensure readi ness by living and working together a concept he feels is invaluable in a deployed setting. These corpsmen and the entire team from NH Jacksonville bring diversity, professionalism and expertise to the Sailors and Marines both deployed and back at home, he said. This course has shown us how to work one aspect of expeditionary medicine, but also brought us together as a team, ensuring the camaraderie between the EMF personnel from NH Jacksonville and Seabees par ticipating in the course, said Carpenter. NEMTI is a component of Navy Medicine Operational Training Center (NMOTC), the global leader in operational medical and aviation survival train ing. NMOTC reports to Navy Medicine Education and Training Command (NMETC). NMETC, NMOTC and NEMTI are part of the Navy Medicine team, a global health care network of Navy medical pro fessionals around the world who provide high-quality health care to more than one million eligible beneficiaries. To reduce the risk of fire during the holiday season, the following requirements are in effect and in accordance with standards set forth in the NAS Jacksonville Instruction 11320.1S, Fire Prevention and Fire Protection Measures. for all occupancies (except housing) shall be inspected and approved by the fire department. are not permitted in assembly (clubs), correctional, BEQ/BOQ, Navy Lodge, dormitories or educational facilities. pancies shall be labeled or otherwise identified or certified by the manufacturer as being fire retardant. Inc. (UL) listed electric lights and wiring decorations shall be permitted or used on Christmas trees and other similar decorations. lar devices is strictly prohibited. Exception to this rule is during reli gious ceremonies held at places of worship such as the base chapel. To schedule an inspection, please call 542-0379/2783/3928/3995. Naval Hospital corpsmen, officers complete EMF training Christmas tree and decoration inspections 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 The Navy has directed the temporary return of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) from her current overseas deployment, allowing the ship to return home for two months before sending it back to the Middle East region. The unusual move is being made to accommodate delays due to repair work on USS Nimitz (CVN 68). The Bremerton-based carrier was expected to deploy to the region to relieve Eisenhower early next year. Nimitz is now expected to deploy once repair work is complete. Bringing Eisenhower back home to its homeport of Norfolk, Va. in December will permit the Navy to resurface the ships flight deck and make it available to return and remain in the Middle East region for several more months. This decision also provides the ships crew a welcome holiday respite from what will become nearly 10 months on station. The USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) Carrier Strike Group, currently deployed to the region, will continue providing carrier presence in the CENTCOM area of responsibility. Stennis departed its homeport of Bremerton in August. FACSFACJAX teams up with K9s for WarriorsMembers of Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville (FACSFACJAX) ) joined forces with the K9s for Warriors team Oct. 12 to help them prepare a new housing facility that veterans will use during a three-week course to meet and train with their service canine. This topic hits close to home with those of us in the military. It was an amazing opportunity to make a difference and help our brothers and sisters, said ET2 Arvydas Montvilas, one of the volunteer coordinators who organized the event. According to the Center for Military Health Policy, the rate of post-traumatic stress disorder among previously deployed service members during Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom (Afghanistan and Iraq) was estimated to be at 13.8 percent. In an effort to help these veterans, the non-profit group K9s for Warriors provides service canines to assist in the recovery of men and women suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of 9/11 and the wars that have followed. K9s for Warriors certified dog trainers and for mer police K9 trainers help veterans and service canines grow accustomed to each other and teach the skills veterans will need to train their own dogs. By volunteering their time for this program, FACSFACJAX Sailors helped complete 98 percent of a work list that was projected to take multiple vol unteer events to accomplish, directly resulting in K9s for Warriors reaching more disabled veterans sooner than expected. FACSFACJAX Executive Officer Cmdr. Shannon Parker said, The Navy has a very long and proud tradition of volunteer service and I am very proud of our Sailors commitment to helping others. It is this commitment that brings our service members together as neighbors and as a community. They truly have a positive effect on our command, our Navy and our community. Bravo Zulu! For the first time since she entered Newport News Shipbuilding in early 2009, USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) conducted an overnight habitability fast cruise Nov. 5 reaching the complete crew move aboard milestone, which brings the Nimitz-class carrier closer to rejoining the fleet as an operational asset. There is a key event called complete crew move aboard during the refueling complex overhaul (RCOH) period, said TR Executive Officer Cmdr. Mark Colombo. It shows that we have the ability to sleep, house, berth, feed and accom modate the entire crew. Its an important indicator of where the ship is in its RCOH period. The fast cruise proves just that that we can sleep the crew onboard safely and securely. More than 2,000 Sailors crossed the brow Monday morning with backpacks and seabags, prepared to spend a night aboard the ship as a crew for the first time in three years. This is the culmination of the hard work of our crew, the shipyard, and the contrac tors over a three year period of time, said Colombo. The mess decks, the ward room, the chiefs mess, thats all up and running the TV studio we used for captains call that is part of the crew being able to exhibit that it can use all of the spaces that are normal, operational functions for an aircraft carrier at sea. During the course of the day, special training was given to help prepare Sailors for when the ship becomes fully opera tional at sea, including a gen eral quarters (GQ) drill. When the GQ alarm sounded, TRs 10 repair lockers responded with their damage control teams to simulated casualties through out the ship. Additionally, the medical training team and propulsion plant training team were integrated into the exer cise. The GQ drills get Sailors in the mindset that were going to be operational very soon, said LSC (SW/EXW/AW) William Bunton, a member of the ships damage control training team. Sailors learn what GQ con sists of and how to combat the ship in case of any casualties. Its very important to conduct training like this, because it gets us out of the mindset of being in the shipyards and into the mindset of being opera tional and doing what is going to be required of us as a carrier in the Navy. After dinner, the crew was invited to attend a mentorship fair on the mess decks to learn how to better themselves per sonally and professionally. Everyone has been working hard during RCOH, and work ing hard today on our first fast cruise. This just gives them all a chance to concentrate on their career and finance and other important things. The Navy isnt just about your job its about your life, said ITCS(SW/IDW) Nicole Fulton, the ships mentorship coordi nator. Additionally, the oppor tunity was given to Sailors to take advantage of an Enlisted Surface and Air Warfare Rodeo, which aimed to streamline the warfare qualifi cation process. It was a great idea. It gives everyone an opportunity to get help with signatures and walk throughs at a single loca tion, said ET1 (SW/AW) James Thornton, a reactor walkthrough coordinator. It helps put junior Sailors in an operational mindset, since it gives them an idea of what the ship will be like during combat scenarios. It also helps give them a better idea of how to save the ship if required. More than 400 Sailors participated in the event, including ABE3(AW) Michael Shannon who is working on his ESWS qualification. It was a great help to get info on surface warfare, and to start making progress on my pin, said Shannon. Getting pins is important to Sailors careers. Without a pin, your advance ment suffers. With the successful comple tion of complete crew move aboard, TR is nearing the end of RCOH at Newport News Shipbuilding, and is closer to returning to the fleet. The only key milestone that we have left is the finish line, said Colombo. What we have left is the end. Its time to focus on all the things we need to do to get to the finish line as expeditiously as possible so we can get back to the fleet, back to the opera tional Navy and do what our country has asked us to do. Roosevelt completes first fast cruise in three years Ike to return home early, redeploy in 2013

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A Notice of Intent (NOI) will be published in the Federal Register Nov. 15 announcing the Navys intent to prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the introduction of the P-8A MultiMission Maritime Aircraft (MMA) to the U.S. Navy Fleet. The Supplemental EIS will address the potential environ mental impacts of new home basing alternatives and updat ed P-8A MMA program infor mation. In September 2008, the Navy completed the Final EIS for the Introduction of the P-8A into the U.S. Navy Fleet, which evaluated the environ mental impacts of home bas ing 12 P-8A MMA fleet squad rons (72 aircraft) and one Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) (12 aircraft) at established maritime patrol home bases. On Jan. 2, 2009, a Record of Decision (ROD) was issued that called for basing five fleet squadrons and the FRS at Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville, four fleet squad rons at NAS Whidbey Island, and three fleet squadrons at Marine Corps Base (MCB) Hawaii Kaneohe Bay, with periodic squadron detach ments at NAS North Island (Alternative 5). To meet the Navys current and future requirements and maximize the efficiency of support facilities, simulation training equipment, and on-site support personnel, the Navy now proposes to analyze additional alternatives for P-8A aircraft home basing. The Navy has determined that a dual-siting alternative, rather than home basing the aircraft at three locations, may best meet current require ments. The two potential home base locations for the P-8A MMA are NAS Jacksonville and NAS Whidbey Island. Home basing at two locations would result in an increase in aircraft and personnel at NAS Jacksonville and NAS Whidbey Island compared to the 2008 ROD. There is no new facility requirement for additional air craft at NAS Jacksonville. Additional aircraft at NAS Whidbey Island would result in an expanded facility footprint. Under a dual-siting alter native, a presence in Hawaii would be maintained with a continuous presence of two aircraft filled by rotating detachments at MCB Hawaii Kaneohe Bay. The two-aircraft detachment would result in fewer person nel and a reduced facility foot print at MCB Hawaii Kaneohe Bay when compared to the 2008 ROD. There would be no change to the periodic squad ron detachment operations at NAS North Island, as described in the 2008 ROD. No decision has been made to change the 2008 Record of decision. When the Supplemental EIS is com plete, the SECNAV can decide to home base at two locations, or to continue implementing home basing at three locations in light of the updated information. During the 45-day public comment and agency review period following release of the Draft Supplemental EIS, anticipated in the summer of 2013, the Navy will schedule public meetings to discuss the find ings of the Draft Supplemental EIS and to receive public comments. The public meetings will be held near each of the home basing locations. Dates, loca tions, and times for the public meetings will be announced in the Federal Register and local media at the appropriate time. A group of air traffic controllers from the Jacksonville area visited the Florida Air National Guard (FANG) 125th Fighter Squadron Nov. 7 to gain insight on how they can better work together during training missions. As part of the visit, the controllers received a brief which included details about the FANGs mission, an up close look into the F-15 Eagle, and a question and answer session to improve the relationship between the organizations. AC2(AW/SW) Jessica Hernandez from Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville (FACSFACJAX) was one of three lucky Sailors selected to participate in a familiarization ride in an F-15 the following day. I visited the Florida Air National Guard prior to the flight to receive egress training. We were taught how to quickly get out of the aircraft if there was an emergency on the ground, as well as how to properly eject and safe ly descend to the ground. The train ing was extremely informative, but did nothing to soothe my nerves, said Hernandez. When Hernandez met her pilot, Capt. Brannon Ferguson on the day of the flight, he explained the days mission. His confidence and knowledge helped to calm my nerves, Hernandez stated. After a quick pre-flight check and start-up, the aircraft taxied to the run way. I barely remember hearing the clearance to depart before we took off. We were cleared for an unre stricted climb to 15,000 and it took less than a min ute to make our assigned altitude. We headed out over the water for some maneuvers before ren dezvous ing with a KC-135 for in-flight refueling. On the way, we broke the sound barrier and during the intercept pulled around four g-forces or Gs. It was scary but exhilarating, explained Hernandez. She continued, After refueling we completed a few more maneuvers including the Immelman turn, a barrel roll, and an Aileron roll. Capt. Ferguson then asked if I was ready for more Gs. The next thing I knew the aircraft rolled onto its side and began to turn. My G-suit began to inflate and I began doing the breathing techniques they had taught me. Before I knew it every thing started going black, so I informed the pilot and he backed off. At this point we began conducting dog-fighting scenarios. I tried to see our opponent but all I saw were clouds. As we were diving down towards the water, I began to feel sick. I thought about leaving this part out of the story, but it was a part of the experience and besides, how many people can say they got sick in the back of an F-15, she said. Capt. Ferguson understood so we leveled off and he gave me the opportunity to fly! It was not as easy as he made it look. I began by attempting to just fly straight and level. I thought I was doing fine, but in the few seconds I had been in control, we descended more than 1,000 feet. I tried making some turns which was also harder than it looked. It didnt last long but for those few moments, I had succeeded in fulfilling my dream of being a pilot, Hernandez added. After breaking the sound bar rier again, we were at the appropri ate weight for landing so we headed back to the beach. We came in for a low approach, executed another quick climb and then came around to land. It was actually smoother than most commercial airliners I have flown in. If this had just been a tour of FANGs facilities and an opportunity to get up close and personal with their aircraft, it still would have been a great experi ence. But the chance to fly in the mighty F-15 was something I will never forget. I learned two things that day; my stom ach isnt what it used to be and I am not cut out to be a fighter pilot, concluded Hernandez. Navy to publish supplemental EIS for P-8 basingAir traffic controllers visit 125th Fighter Squadron JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 19

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Pet adoption event needs volunteersFirst Coast No More Homeless Pets, along with shelter and rescue groups from across Northeast Florida, are holding a Home for the Holidays pet adoption event Nov. 30 through Dec. 2 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Jacksonville Fairgrounds. Volunteers are needed to support this event and to help find homes for more than 1,000 animals during the threeday event. Volunteers will participate in set-up, acting as greeters, assist with dog and cat handling tasks, provide overnight safety for the animals, and help tear-down. For more information, or to volun teer, email mtekin@fcnmhp.org or vol unteer@fcnmhp.org or call 674-0665. Like any other retailer, Navy Exchangess (NEX) must pay a fee every time a customer uses a credit or debit card to pay for merchandise. On average, banks charge nearly two percent of the transaction total when a credit or debit card is used. During 2011, 81 percent of all NEX sales were paid for by commercial credit cards or debit card amounting to over $32 million in card transac tion fees. When our customers use a bank-issued credit or debit card, there is a cost to our bottom line, said Tom McDonald, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) vice president, trea surer. We give 70 percent of our profits to Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) for quality of life programs which amounted to over $43 million in 2011. We want to do all we can to minimize any impact to our profits since it has a direct impact on our contribution to MWR. To help minimize credit card fees, customers can use their M S Card in place of a commercial credit or debit cards at military exchanges. In addi tion, customers can take advan tage of the many benefits of the M S Card including 10 percent off the first days pur chases (up to the customers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24-hour customer service including online access. Several times throughout the year, the NEX will have special promotions on select merchan dise, such as electronics, jewelry, furniture and major appliances for customers using their NEX M S Card. These specials offer zero percent financing, no down payment and no inter est for a predetermined amount of days for specific merchandise with a specific dollar amount. M S Card applica tions are available at any NEX and can be processed the same day at the NEX customer service desk. Navy Exchange bringing back Bonus BucksBonus Bucks are back at select Navy Exchanges (NEX) this holiday season. On Dec. 8 from 8 a.m.-1 p.m., customers will receive one $10 Bonus Bucks coupon for each $100 of merchandise/service purchased, while coupon supplies last. A maximum of five Bonus Bucks will be issued to customers per single transaction. NEX customers have responded very pos itively to this promotion since we started it three years ago, so were bringing it back again this year, said Mike Powers, Navy Exchange Service Command director of retail operations. We know there are many places our customers can shop during the holiday season. NEX Bonus Bucks are our way of thanking custom ers for shopping at their NEX and to encourage them to come back for extra savings. NEX Bonus Bucks will be redeemable in any NEX from Dec. 26-Jan. 1, 2013, on all merchandise and services except uniforms, gasoline, tobacco, alcohol, NEX and third party Gift Cards and concession merchandise. Purchases made on the All Services Catalog or myNavyExchange.com do not apply. One coupon will be redeemable on a transaction of $50 or more. A maximum of five cou pons can be used on a transaction of $250 or more. The prevention and detection of theft at Navy Exchange (NEX) loca tions throughout the world is seri ous business. During 2011, NEX Loss Prevention/Safety associates investigat ed and resolved 1,320 shoplifting cases with a total dollar amount of $258,032. Of those 1,320 cases, 31 percent were juveniles and 19 percent were active duty military. The 2011 National Retail Security Survey, conducted by the University of Florida in conjunction with Americas top retail chains indicates for a second year in a row, stealing by shoppers cost American retailers a staggering $10.94 billion. Our customers and associates con tinue to play a vital role in preventing theft from our stores, said Tom Ruane, NEXCOMs corporate loss prevention/ safety manager. We encourage any one to report suspicions of theft activity to NEX management, loss prevention/ safety personnel or for our associates, through the anonymous Alertline pro gram. The top five departments for shoplifting at the NEX in 2011 were costume jewelry, mass cosmetics, prestige cos metics, video games and fashion acces sories. While the NEX continues to be proactive in apprehending shoplifters, NEX Loss Prevention/Safety associates work hard at preventing theft before it hap pens. NEXs worldwide use electronic article surveillance (EAS) systems for electronic and high value merchan dise as well as extensive closed circuit surveillance systems (CCTV) to try and deter as well as catch shoplifters. The CCTV systems, coupled with digi tal video recorders and remote viewing technology, gives the NEX the ability to see everything within the store and identify incidents of theft. If shoplifting is suspected, NEX Loss Prevention/Safety associates turn all incidents over to base police and /or local law enforcement. In addition to possible disciplinary action and crim inal prosecution, the Federal Claims Collection Act allows NEXCOM to enact a flat administrative cost or Civil Recovery of $200 for each incident of theft. Shoplifting can account for about one-third of the total inventory shrink. Shrink is the retail industry term for the difference between the recorded book inventory and the actual physi cal inventory counted at the end of the year. Shrink is generally attributed to shoplifting, associate theft, administra tive errors or vendor fraud. Over the past nine years, NEXCOM has seen its inventory shrink below one percent to sales compared to the national average of approximately 1.42 percent to sales. Shoplifting from the NEX hurts everyone, said Ruane. People involved in shoplifting get caught, prosecuted and possibly banned from the NEX or end a military career. But the NEX and base lose out as well because 70 percent of our profits are given to Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) to sup port quality of life programs. In 2011, that contribution totaled over $43 mil lion. If our profits decline, so do our contributions to MWR.Navy Exchange takes shoplifting seriouslyCredit card fees add up at the NEX, use M S Card instead 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 29, 2012 21 The retired USS Charles F. Adams (DDG-2) is closer to coming home as an interactive attraction and venue in downtown Jacksonville on the St. Johns River. The aim is to become the first Naval Ship Museum in Florida or Georgia and to honor our military heritage and increase educational oppor tunities, tourism and business as a key element of downtown revitalization. Outwardly similar to the Sherman-class destroyer, USS Adams was the first U.S. Navy ship designed from the keel up to launch anti-aircraft missiles. USS Adams, the first guided missile destroyer in its class, was home ported for 21 years at Naval Station Mayport from 1969-90. The last existent ship in its class, USS Adams is cur rently moored in Philadelphias Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility. With the Jacksonville Historic Naval Ship Association leading the way, the latest discussions have focused on placing the USS Adams at the Shipyards location along the Northbank in downtown, adjacent to the citys sports com plex and as part of a hub of new activity along Bay Street. With nearly 20 percent of the Jacksonville areas population made up of active and retired military and their families, the venue would have a natural attraction, in addition to tour ism traffic and offering a site for business meetings, Scout campouts and other gather ings. For more information, go to www.adams2jax.org The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale NOW) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above sched ule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $10 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but under no circumstances are dependent children authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may purchase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No exceptions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director.These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tick ets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. The Warrior Transition Program (WTP) is moving its operations from Camp Arifjan in Kuwait, to Sembach Kaserne in Kaiserslautern, Germany and is sched uled to host its first class of returning Sailors in mid-December. This change is being made to better serve Sailors who are completing their individual augmentee (IA) assignments in Afghanistan, Kuwait and Iraq. WTP is a five-day program where Sailors attend redeployment workshops, decompress, turn in gear and weapons, and meet with staff chaplains and nurses to discuss their down-range experience and redeploy ment following their IA assignment. Shifting WTP from Kuwait to Germany will provide a clear break from the operational mission, helping Sailors reintegrate back with the Navy and their families, said Capt. Ron Greiff, officer-in-charge of WTP in Kuwait. Contractors are in the final stages of refurbishing the Navys WTP facilities at Sembach, signaling an end to the dusty tents and trailers in Kuwait. The new facilities include barracks with shared bath room facilities, a computer lab, gaming and exercise rooms, and a media room that also serves as a movie theater. With the completion of operational missions in Iraq, the Navy considered options on how to best support the reintegration of IAs returning from assignments through out the region. The transportation hub at Ramstein Air Force Base and the available resources in the Kaiserslautern Military Community in Germany provided a logical place to transfer the WTP mission, due to its location and available infrastructure, said Rear Adm. Kevin Scott, commander of Task Force IA. We look forward to working with our sister services in the future to continue to meet the needs and requirements of our returning warriors. Additional services on base include a refurbished gym, bowling alley and sev eral food vendors. Sailors will also have access to a din ing facility that overlooks the picturesque German countryside. The overwhelming care and concern the Navy has for the health and welfare of its Sailors coming off extended and ardu ous IA duty is evident in the attention and top-notch facilities they are provided via this Warrior Transition Program move, said Cmdr. Larry Henke, director of WTP. New Jacksonville ship museum seeks support Warrior Transition Program moves to support IA Sailors$10 Jaguars tickets available at USO

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