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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 11-22-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02020

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The Nomads of VR-62 departed NAS Jacksonville Nov. 14 for their nor mal, single-plane rotation in U.S. Naval Forces Central Command/5th Fleet (NAVCENT). In just 26 days since the Nomads return from WESTPAC, they are headed out in one of their four C-130-T Hercules to report to CTF-53 for tasking. We love the operations tempo in Bahrain. Last time we were there we were very busy, and we expect nothing different this time. The Nomads always respond, said VR-62 Executive Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino. The Nomads detach with just 21 Sailors and will support a multitude of airlift requests for high-priority, rapidresponse logistics while in NAVCENT for the next 90 days. VR-62 is a Navy Reserve squadron based at NAS Jacksonville that operates four of the Navys 19 C-130T Hercules logistics aircraft. VR-62 detachment heads out on deployment Sailors attending the NAS Jax Auxiliary Security Force (ASF) Academy last week participated in a new training evolution to prepare them for differ ent scenarios they may encounter while standing ASF duty. This is the first time this particular ASF group of students were involved in a realistic setting encountering active shooters and to work on tactical team movement, said NAS Jax Police Training Officer Maj. Jerry Syrek. We incorporated this training into the course to simulate live fire situa tions to expose the students to events that can occur any place and any time. We train them to be aware of their sur roundings at all times and to know what procedures to take to protect them selves and the public. As the students donned their protec tive gear and were issued their weapons (paintball guns) they lined the hallways of Gateway Inns and Suites Building 11 (which is no longer being used to house guests) in search of the bad guy who was hiding somewhere within the rooms. Several paper targets were also hung in the rooms portraying suspects with weapons and regular workers to test the students abilities to distinguish who they were trying to apprehend. The students worked in teams safe ly clearing the rooms and hallways to locate their suspect. Once found, sev eral scenarios involved simulated live Auxiliary Security Force Academy students train for worst-case scenarios The VP-16 War Eagles ord nance shop wrapped up its first P-8A Poseidon Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI) and cer tification involving two load teams Nov. 14-15 at NAS Jax Hangar 511. The inspection evaluated the squadrons ability to use appli cable publications to accu rately wire-check, upload and download conventional ord nance. VP-16 awarded outstanding on weapons proficiency

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS In September, when Senator-elect Angus King (then still a candidate) was the 41st guest to fill my deployed hus bands empty chair at the dinner table, as part of our yearlong project Dinner with the Smileys, he was greeted in the front yard by my three boys chasing each other with foam swords. King, a two-term former Maine gover nor, had a long bakery bag tucked under his arm. He pulled a French baguette from it, and wielding the food like sword, joined the boys battle. When Sen. Susan Collins was a guest in January, she came with homemade brownies that had nuts in them. The boys devoured the dessert, but picked out the nuts and left them in a pile on the table. Lindell, 5, climbed over and across the senators lap like she was his aunt. When lunch was late getting to the table during our Dinner with the Smileys with Congressman Mike Michaud, the representative flipped over a napkin and challenged Owen, 9, to a game of tic-tac-toe. At our 21st dinner, former gover nor John Baldacci played catch in the muddy backyard with Ford, 11. He let our 40-pound dog, Sparky sit in his lap. Basically, its hard to be a politician around three young boys, or maybe, in particular, my three boys. An unexpected outcome of Dinner with the Smileys is that the boys, with all their naivet, strip our guests of their VIP status and titles. Around the dinner table, everyone politicians, authors, artists, and, yes, even the teacher who supposedly lives at school becomes more human. How can they not? When youre passing butter to a U.S. Senator or showing him where to find the bathroom after dinner, its hard to treat him as anything less or more than simply human. It was no different earlier this month, when we were invited to dinner with Gov. and Mrs. LePage at the Blaine House in Augusta, Maine, for our 49th dinner. Being invited to the governors man sion is an amazing opportunity. The house alone is historical. So I was sur prised later that week when photogra pher Andrea Hand uploaded pictures of our dinner to the projects Facebook page and our likes plummeted. It seemed as if the bottom had dropped out on our more than 6,000 fans. And then former followers of the page wrote to tell me how shallow and ignorant I was to dine with a politician they hate. For the record, throughout the past 51 weeks, we have had dinner with people from varied political backgrounds, even if they are not currently serving in a public office. I havent agreed politically with all of our guests, but that has never been the purpose of the dinners. Rather, the purpose has been to fill up, rather than wish away, our time until my husband returns next month. And besides, if I have to agree politi cally with everyone I share a meal with, I would never see 75-percent of my friends. What I have tried to teach the boys is this: Judge politicians views in a politi cal setting or in the voting booth. But at dinner, treat them as you would any other human being. And Gov. LePage is nothing if not human with his incredible childhood story of perseverance. When he was 11 years old, his abusive father paid him a 50-cent piece to lie to a doctor and say his bruises were from a fall down the stairs. LePage took the 50 cents and ran away. For two years, he lived alone on the streets and slept in horse stables at night. He continued to go to school, worked three jobs, and later finished college and got his masters degree. His personal motto is, If it is to be . it is up to me. My boys were speechless as they heard this. Later, they were grateful when Gov. LePage gave them brace lets with the 10 two-letter-words motto printed on them. My oldest son con tinues to repeat the motto nearly two weeks later. How could any of this regardless of your opinion of the governors politics have been a negative thing for my children? We live in a highly polarized political world. Leaders are demonized for what people know about them only through media accounts. But at the dinner table, my boys have benefited from a fuller picture. They have gotten to know the human being. And, yes, its true that not everyone has this privilege. Not everyone can eat with a senator. But shouldnt we give them the benefit of the doubt regard less? Shouldnt we be able to separate the person from the politics? I dont necessarily agree political ly with everything President Obama does either. But I suspect his support ers would ask me to set that aside and appreciate the man for what he has accomplished and overcome in his life. In fact, I do. If the president had come to dinner, he would have been greeted by the same loud, rowdy boys and picky eaters. Lindell would have climbed in his lap. Sparky might have gotten fur on his pants. But mostly, President Obama would have been greeted with an open mind and an eagerness to know more about him as a person. Nov. 22 1914 Title Director of Naval Aeronautics estab lished. Capt. Mark Bristol, already serving in that capacity, was ordered to report to the Secretary of the Navy under the new title. Nov. 23 1918 Use of titles Navigation Officer and Aerographic Officer in naval air station organization was authorized by the Chief of Naval Operations to identify officers trained to perform the special duties involved. 1940 President Franklin D. Roosevelt appoints Adm. William Leahy as U.S. Ambassador to Vichy France to try to prevent the French fleet and naval bases from falling into German hands. Nov. 24 1852 Commodore Matthew Perry sails from Norfolk, Va. to negotiate a treaty with Japan for friend ship and commerce. 1964 USS Princeton (LPH-5) completes seven days of humanitarian relief to South Vietnam that suffered damage from typhoon and floods. 1969 HS-4 from USS Hornet (CVS-12) recovers allNavy crew of astronauts from Apollo 12: Commanders Richard Gordon, Charles Conrad and Alan Bean, after moon landing by Conrad and Bean. Nov. 25 1775 Continental Congress authorizes privateering. 1943 In Battle of Cape St. George, five destroyers of Destroyer Squadron 23 (Capt. Arleigh Burke) intercept five Japanese destroyers and sink three and damage one without suffering any damage. 1961 Commissioning of USS Enterprise (CVAN-65), the first nuclear powered aircraft carrier, at Newport News, Va. Nov. 26 1847 Lt. William Lynch in Supply sails from New York to Haifa for an expedition to the River Jordan and the Dead Sea. His group charted the Jordan River from the Sea of Galilee to the Dead Sea and compiled reports of the flora and fauna of the area. 1940 Sixth and last group of ships involved in Destroyers-for-Bases Agreement transferred to British at Nova Scotia. Nov. 27 1918 The Navy hydroplane NC-1 took off from Rockaway Beach, N.Y., with 51 persons aboard, estab lishing a new world record for persons carried in flight. 1941 Chief of Naval Operations sends war warn ing to commanders of Pacific and Asiatic Fleets. 1961 Navy reports first use of its cyclotron at Harvard University to treat a human brain tumor. After three treatments, the tumor of the 2-year old patient shrank by eighty percent. Nov. 28 1775 Congress adopts first rules for regulation of the Navy of the United Colonies. 1941 USS Enterprise (CV-6) sails from Pearl Harbor for Wake Island to ferry Marine aircraft to the island. 1942 Ensigns George Carlson and Mac Cason, USNR organize rescue parties to help save people from the fire at the Cocoanut Grove nightclub in Boston, Mass They are credited the cause of saving more lives than any other single agency.Dinner with Gov. LePage sparks debate Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 a.m. Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at Chapel Complex Building 749 and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the barracksNAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051

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VP-30 wings Navys newest naval flight officersExecutive Officer of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron One Executive Officer Capt. Wade Turvold and VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to the following 11 officers Nov. 9. The new NFOs include: Lt. j.g.. Bryce Christenses, Lt. j.g. Jennifer Schmidt, Lt. j.g. Lucas Strasser, 2nd Lt. Aleksander Dale, Ensign Victor Barnett, Ensign Jose Caloca, Ensign Jeremy Cooper, Ensign Francheska Gonzalez, Ensign Andrew Hinkley, Ensign Justin Otto and Ensign Troy Wood. Also in attendance were Col. Gerard Larsen, command ing officer Air Wing 133 of the Royal Norwegian Air Force and Lt. Col. Arne Heitzman, commanding officer 2nd Training Squadron of the German Navy. Schmidt of the German Navy and Dale of the Royal Norwegian Air Force are part of a Foreign Exchange program that exposes naval officers from allied nations to standard U.S. Naval Aviation Training. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer (UMFO) syllabus at VP-30, earning their cov eted wings of gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the FRS syllabus, they will report to operational Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance squadrons to begin their initial sea tours in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, Whidbey Island, Wash., or NAS Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, Fla. where all aviation officers undergo a classroom syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation which includes aerodynamics, meteorology and principles of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transition from a classroom learn ing environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3C or P-8A training pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft train ing. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012 The NAS Jacksonville Honor Support Team (HST) participates in numerous military funer als every week at Jacksonville National Cemetery, as well as other cemeteries in northeast Florida and southeast Georgia. They serve as casket bearers, riflemen and flag folders/pre senters. Commander, Navy Region Southeast is the regional coor dinator for the Casualty Assistance Calls program and Funeral Honors Support pro gram. Assisting the next-of-kin of Navy members who have died is an emotion-filled process that culminates with the arrange ment of funeral honors support for deceased active duty, retirees and veterans. Max Small, funeral hon ors trainer for Navy Region Southeast, stopped by Building 876 on Nov. 14 to see the NAS Jacksonville HST rehearse for an active duty funeral that after noon at Jacksonville National Cemetery. Since he has a number of new team members, Chief Tracy asked me to come by and observe this mornings training. I was very impressed with their preci sion and synchronization they looked good and should repre sent well, said Small. The military funeral service is designed to be slow, methodi cal and dignified with no fast movements. All hand salutes are three-count, except for the flag presentation to next-of-kin, which is a seven-count salute. AEC Kevin Tracy, of the NAS Jacksonville Security Department, supervises the funeral honor support team and ceremonial color guard. Our teams are made up of vol unteers who serve here on TAD (temporary assigned duty) orders from various tenant commands, said Tracy. After completing their initial training, they meet every morn ing, Monday through Friday, to drill as flag bearers, riflemen and flag folders. Each of the 16 team members six men and 10 women is cross-trained to per form every function. Funeral honor support consists of, but is not limited to: flag. Tracy explained that HST pro vides three levels of support for cemetery burials. For an active duty funeral, the HST consists of 16 personnel six pallbearers, seven riflemen for a 21-gun salute, two flag folders and a bugler. For a retiree, our HST consists of seven personnel a team leader, three riflemen, two flag folders and a bugler. For a veteran, we provide two flag folders and a bugler, said Tracy. NAS Jacksonville HST also provides two team members, Monday through Friday, for the combined services team at the Jacksonville National Cemetery. Our people team up with two Sailors from Naval Station Mayport and four U.S. Army personnel to provide honor sup port for the cemeterys growing schedule of veterans burials, said Tracy. AN Cydney Sandy of VP-30 performed with the HST from April to August. HST volunteers usually get TAD orders for six months. Im on the team today because Chief Tracy was a little short-handed, and also because the Sailor were honoring happened to be my first supervisor at VP-30. So Im proud to render honors for his family and other mourners, she said. Tracys team also supports Navy celebrations and ritu als with the NAS Jacksonville Ceremonial Color Guard. He urges young Sailors to con sider volunteering for this unique duty. We have 24 billets, but only 14 are filled at the moment. So were stretched thin on days like this, said Tracy. To learn more about serving with this special unit, call 5420969 ext. 149. Dignified, methodical, and precise: HST represents NAS Jax with class

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012 5 Photos by Kaylee LaRocque, Clark Pierce, and the U.S. Navy

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Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON)(AW/NAC) Mike Stevens visited Naval Station Mayport Nov. 8-10, to discuss his Zeroing in on Excellence initiative. MCPON met with area chiefs to discuss his initiative that was released in four letters to the Chiefs Mess Nov. 6, and used this trip as his first oppor tunity to assess communica tion success. If you have seen, read or heard of the initiative that I recently sent out called Zeroing in on Excellence raise your hand, said Stevens. Three quarters of the approximately 150 chief petty officers raised their hand. MCPON discussed the basics of the idea behind the initiative and the three focus areas of: what we own. What the Zeroing in on Excellence initiative provides you is the framework with in which you can work, said Stevens. Its my charge to every chief petty officer in the Navy to look at it, especially the leaders within the mess, and ask them selves, What is it we can do to support this and sustain it? Im not interested in a flash in the pan, here-now-gone-tomorrow effort. MCPON explained that if a leader is ineffective, then the command is ineffec tive. MCPON also visited com mands and Sailors through out the base including USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). While there, a Sailor asked MCPON for advice on becoming MCPON. I have been in the Navy for 30 years, said Stevens. After all that time, here is what I can tell you about being successful: work hard, stay out of trouble and be a good and decent per son. If you do those things, you will be a success in anything that you do. While visiting USS De Wert (FFG 45), MCPON met with the Chiefs Mess to discuss his ini tiative and and team cohesion. Im asking you, as chief petty officers, to be strategical ly smart, said Stevens. Recognize where the world is at, where our economy is at, to recognize where the Navy is at and where we are going. You have to be smart. Think about the things you personally own in your organization that will ultimately impact those strategic decisions when we come together collectively as a Chiefs Mess. The Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville announces their Sailors and Instructors of the Quarter selections for Third Quarter of 2012. AD1 (AW) Ryan Watts was selected as Senior Instructor of the Quarter, Third Quarter, CY-12. As T56-A-14 1st Degree Intermediate and 54H-60-77 Prop Intermediate Maintenance Training Unit Lead Power Plants instructor, Watts provided 525 hours of instruc tion to 18 students while achieving an impressive 100 percent graduation rate. AS1 (AW/SW) Daphne Guzman was selected as Sailor of the Quarter, Fourth Quarter, FY-12. As Support Equipment Electrical Phase leading petty officer, Guzman managed 12 courses and 13 instructors ensur ing a 100 percent graduation rate for over 60 students. Additionally, she completed three college courses through Southern Illinois University and represented the Navy as an ambassador by volunteering 48 off-duty hours to Jacksonville Airport USO, CCD teacher for St. Patricks Catholic Church, and San Mateo Elementary Big Sister program. AS2 (AW/SW) Anthony Wagner was selected as Junior Sailor of the Quarter, Fourth Quarter, FY-12. As MTU 3032 Support Equipment Afloat technician, he provided 500 hours of instruction to 12 students with a 100 per cent graduation rate and average GPA of 96.8 percent. Sgt. Adam Sulewski was selected as Junior Instructor of the Quarter, Third Quarter, CY-12. As MTU 3032 Ground Support Equipment technician, Sulewski is the course supervisor of the Environmental Control Unit Intermediate Maintenance Course, EPA Certification, and Mobile Facility Intermediate Maintenance Course. Sulewski has provided over 100 hours of instruction this quarter to 14 Navy/Marine students achieving a 100 per cent graduation rate and an average GPA of 96.7 percent. MCPON visits Mayport, Zeroes in on Excellence CNATTU Jax recognizes Sailors and Instructors of the Quarter 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012 7

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fire before the suspect was placed face down on the floor and handcuffed. NAS Jax Police Training Officer Lt. Olimpia Jackson and Patrolman Antoine Gary led the teams through each training scenario, evaluating their skills as they conducted the evolutions. Any situation you encounter could turn into a real world encounter. If shots are fired and you are trying to apprehend a suspect, one of your team members might not make it out. Communication is the key you are a team and need to work as a team. You have to watch out for each other and be ready for anything because these situations occur very quickly, Jackson told the students. After another scenario, Gary stressed the impor tance of taking every situation seriously. This could be reality. When you clear a room, you see the importance of everyone doing their job. Be aware of everything around you, be sure of your target and dont assume anything, he said. This was some really good training and definitely an adrenaline rush. I think we learned how to better work as a team. Our instructors have taught us to be prepared for any type of situation and I look forward to serving on the ASF, said AMAN John Holt. ASF 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012 9

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10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012

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A Lunch and Learn on Education meeting was held at the NAS Jax Youth Activities Center Nov. 14 to gather infor mation about issues military parents are struggling with regarding their childrens educational opportunities. The session was led by NAS Jax School Liaison Officer Dawn Mills who serves as a link between Navy families and schools in Duval, Clay, St. Johns, and Nassau Counties. One of the biggest concerns stated during meeting was transportation for children living aboard NAS Jax who attend magnet schools. Funding was recently cut for the Duval County School District and all free transporta tion to magnet schools was eliminated creating problems for parents to find ways for their children to get to and from those schools. Several parents at the meeting stated that they are paying hundreds of dollars using a school con tractor to transport their children, how ever the bus stop is off base and not con venient for working military parents. Others have chosen to drive their children to school, spending hundreds of dollars in fuel costs and having to try to work around their daily work sched ules. This is probably the biggest com plaint we are dealing with and we are trying to come up with solutions to help our military families. We will continue to work with the school districts to see what can be done, said Mills. Another issue discussed was the Military Interstate Childrens Compact which assists military children with their educational needs when relocat ing. This is a great program that helps students keep their credits earned in schools in different states when they move to a new school district, explained Mills. I had one case last year where a high school senior in one of our military families transferred here and they were not going to let him graduate because he was miss ing courses mandatory for a diploma from that school. His previous district in Maryland was contacted, and they determined he was eligible to graduate high school so he received his diplo ma during graduation ceremonies here from his school in Maryland. The Military Interstate Childrens Compact not only covers education records but absences relating to deploy ments, extracurricular activities such as tryouts for sports, course waivers and flexibility in exit exams and entrance age requirements. This is a new program and some schools might not be aware of some of the guidelines involved. Military fami lies transferring in or out of the state should check with me or the school liaison officer at their current or new duty station if they have any educa tional issues concerning their children, stressed Mills. For CSCS Glenda Atwood of Fleet Logistics Center Jax, the meeting was beneficial as she just transferred to NAS Jax. I have a son in elementary school and have not moved him here yet because Im looking at all the different areas of the city to decide what is the best school for him before I find hous ing, she said. Mills assured her she would help find the best school to suit her childs edu cational needs. There have been some significant improvements made in the schools in our local area since I started this job three years ago. And, we are striving to make sure they understand the needs of our military families, she said. I want our military families to know that I am here for them and will do whatever I can to ensure they get their educational questions answered and assist them. For more information or if you have concerns regarding your childs edu cational opportunities, contact Mills at dawn.m.mills@navy.mil NAS Jax hosts Lunch and Learn on Education JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012 11

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AO1(AW) Justin Skelton was a quality assurance and safety observer (QA/SO) for one of the five-person load teams. Each team consists of a QA/SO, a team leader, a weapons hoist driver, and two riggers who make the necessary weapons connections and attach ments. Inspectors from Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 (CPRW-11) Weapons School and Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Group (CPRG) evaluated the exercise. Each load team was required to handle an inert MK 54 training tor pedo from a weapons cart to the P-8A Poseidon internal weapons bay. We also loaded chaff buck ets in the nose of the Poseidon and conducted wire checks between the flight deck and the internal bomb bay, said Skelton. VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Molly Boron said the teams performance was no surprise. Our ordies have been training for CWTPI for about four months, with guidance from the P-8A trainers at VP-30. I also know that our people have volunteered to train on week ends in order to be ready for this inspection, said Boron. Bottom line theres no need for luck when youre prepared. Our ordnance teams can take justifi able pride in the professionalism of their work center and their CWTPI accomplishment. VP-16 The Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion-Womens Policy, OPNAV N134W, announced in NAVADMIN 338/12 that they are accepting nominations for the 2013 Capt. Joy Bright Hancock and Master Chief Anna Der-Vartanian Leadership Awards. Presented annually, the awards recognize and honor the inspirational and vision ary leadership of Navy service members whose ideals and ded ication foster a positive working environment, while reinforcing and furthering the integration of women into the Navy. Nominations are now being accepted for four award catego ries: senior, junior), (E-7 through E-9), member (E-5 through E-6). Nominees should embody inspirational, innovative and imaginative leadership dem onstrated by example both on and off duty. Additionally, appli cants should be mature lead ers who have shown exceptional leadership over time and have persevered to overcome chal lenges while serving. Nominations should also address the professional accom plishments, leadership style and community involvement of the service member. Candidates must be nominat ed by their commanding officer or officer in charge and receive an endorsement from the commands immediate superior in command (ISIC). Nominations are open to both active and Reserve service members. The award winners will be honored at the 2013 Sea Service Leadership Association (SSLA) Joint Womens Leadership Symposium in Washington, D.C. on March 11. Nominations are due to OPNAV N134W no later than Jan. 18. Packages shall be sub mitted electronically via the commands ISIC to OSC Jessica Myers, senior enlisted advisor to the Office of Womens Policy at jessica.myers@navy.mil. Previous award winners include Navy ACSC(AW/SW) JoAnn Ortloff, who was serv ing aboard the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) when she was selected as the 2000 Capt. Joy Bright Hancock Senior Enlisted Leadership Award winner. Soon after receiving her award, Ortloff was selected for promo tion to master chief, and then was chosen for the command master chief program in 2003. In May of 2012, Ortloff became Fleet Master Chief for Commander, Naval Forces Europe and Africa, and upon her selection, Ortloff became the highest-ranking enlisted woman in the Navy, and the second woman in naval histo ry to reach the position of fleet master chief. Navy pilot Lt. Megan Donnelly, the 2012 Captain Joy Bright Hancock junior officer leadership award recipient, was also recently selected for the highly competitive Career Intermission Pilot Program (CIPP). This program allows Donnelly to take time off from her current career path to pur sue personal and professional goals outside the Navy, optimiz ing life/work integration. Upon completion of the program, Donnelly will return to the Navy to resume her career path pipe line. CIPP is an element of the con tinuum of service area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effec tive force in the history of the Department of the Navy.Nominations sought for 2013 Joint Womens Leadership Symposium Leadership Awards 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012

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Thanking our troops, one flight at a time A C-40A Clipper logistics aircraft assigned to the VR-58 Sunseekers set out from NAS Jacksonville Nov. 2 for another routine detachment to the 5th Fleet area of responsibility in Al Manama, Bahrain. The cabin was filled with maintainers and staff from VR-58 and VR-54 (based at JRB New Orleans) as the air craft took off for its first sched uled stop at Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada. As the remnants of Hurricane Sandy affected the weather in Saint John, it created the need for alternate plans by the flight crew, who diverted their Clipper to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, at a converted civilian airfield that was for merly Pease Air Force Base. When the crew called the Pease fixed base operator to inform them of their reroute, the word went out to the Pease Greeters. Upon arrival at the airfield, the Navy crew and passengers were showered with hospitality. Just off the jet bridge awaited a room full of senior citizens and veterans who greeted them and offered a cornucopia of goodies. They had cookies, dough nuts, sodas, hand-knitted sock hats, T-shirts, pizza, puzzle books and enough chocolate to make Hershey, Pa., look like a convenience store, comment ed Lt. Cmdr. Chad Beaufort, the VR-58 detachment officer in charge. The Pease Greeters are a cadre of former Sailors, Airman, Soldiers and Marines who make it their mission to welcome troops home or send them off to areas of conflict around the world. According to Chuck Cove, chairman of the Pease Greeters, their mission is to not only welcome, but also to, create an environment that reflects the respect and high esteem in which we hold all veterans. They also educate the pub lic of the importance of hon oring troops through formal ceremonies. When notified, the Greeters will show up for the welcome whether it is 4 a.m. or 4 a.m. When it was time to reboard the airplane, the Pease Greeters formed ranks and sent off the crew by presenting colors, sing ing the national anthem, and rendering a salute from the offi cer of the day with the words, We, the old Warriors, salute you, the young Warriors. For more information on the Pease Greeters visit their web site at www.peasegreeters.org. Bonus Bucks are back at select Navy Exchanges (NEX) this holiday season. On Dec. 8 from 8 a.m. 1 p.m., custom ers will receive one $10 Bonus Bucks coupon for each $100 of merchandise/ service purchased, while coupon sup plies last. A maximum of five Bonus Bucks will be issued to customers per single transaction. NEX customers have responded very positively to this promotion since we started it three years ago, so were bringing it back again this year, said Mike Powers, Navy Exchange Service Command director of retail operations. We know there are many places our customers can shop during the holiday season. NEX Bonus Bucks are our way of thanking customers for shopping at their NEX and to encourage them to come back for extra savings. NEX Bonus Bucks will be redeemable in any NEX from Dec. 26Jan. 1, 2013, on all merchandise and services except uniforms, gasoline, tobacco, alcohol, NEX and third party Gift Cards and concession merchandise. Purchases made on the All Services Catalog or myNavyExchange.com do not apply. One coupon will be redeemable on a transaction of $50 or more. A maxi mum of five coupons can be used on a transaction of $250 or more. Pease Greeters set the example Navy Exchange bringing back Bonus Bucks JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012 13

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Sailors should create a holiday spend ing plan now to avoid post-season financial hardship, said a Navy finan cial specialist, Nov. 15. Examine holiday priorities and fig ure out what is most important to you, said Stacy Livingstone-Hoyte, financial counselor, Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC). Instead of spending your hardearned money on something just sure its a tradition that is important to you and your family. Do not spend out of habit, obligation or guilt. Tracking expenses when paying for holiday purchases will help Sailors and families stay true to their priorities and objectives, said Livingstone-Hoyte. Determine your holiday spend ing limit by making a list of what you will spend on different categories or purchases. Be realistic and make sure that whatever you elect to spend will not exceed what you can afford, said Livingstone-Hoyte. A little research of market prices, retailer ads and deals around town can go a long way toward understanding how you can match your purchase dol lars with items for sale and dont forget to clip, cut and stack coupons for the best results. Livingstone-Hoyte said Sailors should also consider alternative gift-giving options like making homemade gifts or cooking food, volunteering as a family to help neighbors, friends and relatives or making a coupon to give as a present that is redeemable for babysitting, lawn care, etc. Financial matters that occur from overspending or bad budgeting, such as failure to pay bills, bad credit, bank ruptcy and foreclosures can negatively impact a Sailors career, and affect mis sion readiness and the Navys ability to transfer or retain Sailors. Command financial specialists (CFSs) provide financial education and training, counseling, and information referral at the command level at no cost to Sailors and their families. FFSCs located worldwide provide financial education and counseling for Sailors and families as well. Sailors experiencing financial chal lenges should notify their chain of com mand and work with their CFS to devel opment a budget and explore additional options such as military relief societies, eligibility for interest rate reductions and other relief. For more information about financial planning, budgeting or investing, con tact the CFS, local FFSC or call the Navy Personnel Command customer service center at 1-866-U-ASK-NPC or email CSCMailbox@navy.mil.Financial planning to survive the holidays 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012

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A five-plane, 10-student training detachment from the Greyhawks of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 120 began its 12-day field carrier land ing practice (FCLP) Nov. 10 at Outlying Landing Field (OLF) Whitehouse, located west of NAS Jacksonville. This shorebased training will be followed by shipboard training in early December on board an under way aircraft carrier in the Atlantic. VAW-120 is the Navys fleet replacement squadron (FRS) for VAW squadrons flying the E-2C and E-2D Hawkeyes. The Greyhawks are also the FRS for fleet logistics support squad rons (VRC) flying the C-2A Greyhound aircraft. Lt. Cmdr. Chris Swanson, officer-in-charge of the detachment from NS Norfolk Chambers Field, said, We detach to NAS Jacksonville four or five times a year so our CAT I student pilots can get their FCLP which represents the near completion of their FRS training syllabi. He explained that pilot ball flying using the Optical Landing System at OLF Whitehouse is the most impor tant part of our detachments mission because theres no greater challenge for a new pilot than landing an aircraft on a ship. The runway at OLF Whitehouse is the same width as an aircraft carrier flight deck. Our landing signal officers (LSOs) are focused strictly on accurate landings with out mishaps, said Swanson. Thats why grading each touch-and-go landing or bounce at Whitehouse is vital. Every bounce by every pilot is analyzed and graded and after flight ops, each pilot is debriefed by their LSO. During their detachment to NAS Jacksonville, pilots will average 170 to 190 passes at OLF Whitehouse. When they undergo carrier qualifications, each Hawkeye and Greyhound pilot must accomplish at least 10 daytime traps and six night traps. The FRS mission is to train pilots, naval flight officers and maintainers. Upon successful completion of their training syl labi, they depart VAW-120 for assignment to one of the Navys operational E-2 or C-2 squad rons based at Chambers Field, or Naval Base Ventura County at Point Mugu, Calif. The C-2A Greyhound, a derivative of the E-2 Hawkeye, shares wings and power plants with the E-2, but has a widened fuselage with a rear loading ramp. According to the Naval Air Systems Command fact sheet, the E-2C Hawkeye provides all-weather airborne early warning, airborne battle man agement and command and control functions for the car rier strike group and joint force commander. Additional mis sions include surface surveil lance coordination, air inter diction, offensive and defensive counter air control, close air support coordination, time crit ical strike coordination, search and rescue airborne coordi nation and communications relay. The C-2A Greyhound provides critical logistics sup port to carrier strike groups. Its primary mission is the trans port of high-priority cargo, mail and passengers between car riers and shore bases. Priority cargo such as jet engines can be transported from shore to ship in a matter of hours. A cargo cage system or transport stand provides restraint for loads dur ing launches and landings. VAW-120 bounces at OLF Whitehouse 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012

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A naval officer earned his Professional Aviation Maintenance Officer (PAMO) warfare designator that recog nizes his significant support of the Navys aviation mission, presented before a gathering of his peers at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Oct. 31. After successfully complet ing the extensive profession al qualification standards, Lt. Cmdr. Shawn Noga, the FRCSE engine production officer, received his PAMO warfare designation certificate and insignia presented by Capt. Robert Caldwell, the FRCSE commanding officer. Noga said he pursed the des ignation to improve his chanc es for advancement. I knew of two other offi cers in my year group whose records were pretty strong, he said. They had the designa tion, and I wanted to present my package in a better light in front of the promotion board. He had two years to complete all the PAMO qualifications, with the clock ticking from his first qualification signoff. You have to have at least one squadron tour to deploy on a carrier, he said. It took two years to com plete the quals, but I utilized my 17 years of experience with squadron tours and Level II tours for my signoffs. The PAMO community is comprised of aerospace main tenance duty officers, aviation maintenance limited duty offi cers, and aviation maintenance chief warrant officers. Due to billet constraints not all designator eligible officers will acquire the explicit career path experience necessary to participate. Noga asked Cmdr. Ken Jalali, the FRCSE corporate opera tions officer, to pin on his PAMO insignia during the cer emony. Noga, who was also checking out of the command the same day, attributed much of his suc cess to Jalalis encouragement and support, along with other maintenance officers assigned at the aviation maintenance, repair and overhaul facility. I loved it here, both on a pro fessional and personal level, said Noga of his tour of duty at FRCSE. I would recommend this assignment to my fellow avia tion maintenance officer. If its FRCSE, go for it, but youd bet ter come with your A game. Noga reports to Naval Air Technical Training Center at Pensacola in November, going from production to training working with technical review of aviation maintenance pro grams. The PAMO designation dis tinguishes the officer whose career path and training has prepared him or her to sup port air operations at sea in a combat environment, as well as contribute fully to the damage control and survival of the ship and embarked aircraft, accord ing to the PAMO manual. FRCSE aviation maintenance officer earns warfare designation JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012 17

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012 The cool, dismal day didnt deter the 120 runners who came out for the annual Turkey Trot 5K Nov. 17. The event was coordi nated by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department. Placing first overall and first in the mens 35-39 age category was Will Lutat of VR-62 with a time of 17:30. Naketa George of Naval Hospital (NH) Jax took first in the womens 30-34 cat egory and was the first female to cross the finish line with a time of 23:56. Other winners were: The event was sponsored by Allied American University and University of Phoenix. The next MWR run will be the annual Jingle Bell Jog Dec. 13 at 11:30 a.m. For more informa tion, call 542-3239/3518.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. DEWEYSCall 542-3521 Deweys is located in Bldg. 608 on Enterprise Ave. Deweys offers a full service menu, bar and a friendly atmosphere that is great for all ages! Monday Friday 10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 410 p.m. CPO Lounge Monday, Tuesday & Friday 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Wednesday Thursday 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. 40,000 Calories of Christmas See if you and your teammate can burn a total of 40,000 calories Dec. 3 to Jan. 18. The top teams in each team category will receive a trophy. Sign-up in the fitness center by Nov. 28.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. St. Augustine Old Town Trolley Night of Lights Adult $8.75, child $4 Orlando Magic Tickets $18 $268 ShenYun at the Times Union Center Jan. 29 30, $55 $163 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Kennedy Space Center Adult $40, child $31 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23, 2013 Preferred seating $41, lower level seat ing $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sec tions 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3 day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31, 2013 and must be redeemed by June 30, 2013. Ask about our special discounted tick ets for family members. Gator Bowl tickets $35 Gator Bowl Patch $9 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day $29.50, 2 day $40, Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT! Daytona 500 Feb. 24, 2013 tickets on sale now! $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Mall & Movie Trip Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater November 23 at 6 p.m. Kennedy Space Center Trip Nov. 24 at 9 a.m. Jaguars vs. Titans Nov. 25 at 11:30 a.m. Free admission and transportationNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Nov. 27 for active duty Nov. 29 for retirees & DoD personnel Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Turkey Trot Killer Scramble Nov. 21 at noon $50 entry fee, $60 for civilian guests Four person scramble Let us cook for you! Order turkey dinners at MulligansMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Dashing Through The Grove Dec. 8, 48 p.m. at Patriots Grove Free snow sledding, photos with Santa, tree lighting, musical entertainment and more!Flying Club Call 777-8549 Call for latest training schedule Annual Turkey Trot brings out runners

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012



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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The Nomads of VR-62 departed NAS Jacksonville Nov. 14 for their nor mal, single-plane rotation in U.S. Naval Forces Central Command/5th Fleet (NAVCENT). In just 26 days since the Nomads return from WESTPAC, they are headed out in one of their four C-130-T Hercules to report to CTF-53 for tasking. We love the operations tempo in Bahrain. Last time we were there we were very busy, and we expect nothing different this time. The Nomads always respond, said VR-62 Executive Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino. The Nomads detach with just 21 Sailors and will support a multitude of airlift requests for high-priority, rapidresponse logistics while in NAVCENT for the next 90 days. VR-62 is a Navy Reserve squadron based at NAS Jacksonville that operates four of the Navys 19 C-130T Hercules logistics aircraft. VR-62 detachment heads out on deployment Sailors attending the NAS Jax Auxiliary Security Force (ASF) Academy last week participated in a new training evolution to prepare them for differ ent scenarios they may encounter while standing ASF duty. This is the first time this particular ASF group of students were involved in a realistic setting encountering active shooters and to work on tactical team movement, said NAS Jax Police Training Officer Maj. Jerry Syrek. We incorporated this training into the course to simulate live fire situa tions to expose the students to events that can occur any place and any time. We train them to be aware of their surroundings at all times and to know what procedures to take to protect them selves and the public. As the students donned their protective gear and were issued their weapons (paintball guns) they lined the hallways of Gateway Inns and Suites Building 11 (which is no longer being used to house guests) in search of the bad guy who was hiding somewhere within the rooms. Several paper targets were also hung in the rooms portraying suspects with weapons and regular workers to test the students abilities to distinguish who they were trying to apprehend. The students worked in teams safe ly clearing the rooms and hallways to locate their suspect. Once found, sev eral scenarios involved simulated live Auxiliary Security Force Academy students train for worst-case scenarios The VP-16 War Eagles ordnance shop wrapped up its first P-8A Poseidon Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI) and cer tification involving two load teams Nov. 14-15 at NAS Jax Hangar 511. The inspection evaluated the squadrons ability to use appli cable publications to accu rately wire-check, upload and download conventional ord nance. VP-16 awarded outstanding on weapons proficiency

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS In September, when Senator-elect Angus King (then still a candidate) was the 41st guest to fill my deployed hus bands empty chair at the dinner table, as part of our yearlong project Dinner with the Smileys, he was greeted in the front yard by my three boys chasing each other with foam swords. King, a two-term former Maine governor, had a long bakery bag tucked under his arm. He pulled a French baguette from it, and wielding the food like sword, joined the boys battle. When Sen. Susan Collins was a guest in January, she came with homemade brownies that had nuts in them. The boys devoured the dessert, but picked out the nuts and left them in a pile on the table. Lindell, 5, climbed over and across the senators lap like she was his aunt. When lunch was late getting to the table during our Dinner with the Smileys with Congressman Mike Michaud, the representative flipped over a napkin and challenged Owen, 9, to a game of tic-tac-toe. At our 21st dinner, former gover nor John Baldacci played catch in the muddy backyard with Ford, 11. He let our 40-pound dog, Sparky sit in his lap. Basically, its hard to be a politician around three young boys, or maybe, in particular, my three boys. An unexpected outcome of Dinner with the Smileys is that the boys, with all their naivet, strip our guests of their VIP status and titles. Around the dinner table, everyone politicians, authors, artists, and, yes, even the teacher who supposedly lives at school becomes more human. How can they not? When youre passing butter to a U.S. Senator or showing him where to find the bathroom after dinner, its hard to treat him as anything less or more than simply human. It was no different earlier this month, when we were invited to dinner with Gov. and Mrs. LePage at the Blaine House in Augusta, Maine, for our 49th dinner. Being invited to the governors man sion is an amazing opportunity. The house alone is historical. So I was sur prised later that week when photogra pher Andrea Hand uploaded pictures of our dinner to the projects Facebook page and our likes plummeted. It seemed as if the bottom had dropped out on our more than 6,000 fans. And then former followers of the page wrote to tell me how shallow and ignorant I was to dine with a politician they hate. For the record, throughout the past 51 weeks, we have had dinner with people from varied political backgrounds, even if they are not currently serving in a public office. I havent agreed politically with all of our guests, but that has never been the purpose of the dinners. Rather, the purpose has been to fill up, rather than wish away, our time until my husband returns next month. And besides, if I have to agree politi cally with everyone I share a meal with, I would never see 75-percent of my friends. What I have tried to teach the boys is this: Judge politicians views in a political setting or in the voting booth. But at dinner, treat them as you would any other human being. And Gov. LePage is nothing if not human with his incredible childhood story of perseverance. When he was 11 years old, his abusive father paid him a 50-cent piece to lie to a doctor and say his bruises were from a fall down the stairs. LePage took the 50 cents and ran away. For two years, he lived alone on the streets and slept in horse stables at night. He continued to go to school, worked three jobs, and later finished college and got his masters degree. His personal motto is, If it is to be . it is up to me. My boys were speechless as they heard this. Later, they were grateful when Gov. LePage gave them brace lets with the 10 two-letter-words motto printed on them. My oldest son con tinues to repeat the motto nearly two weeks later. How could any of this regardless of your opinion of the governors politics have been a negative thing for my children? We live in a highly polarized political world. Leaders are demonized for what people know about them only through media accounts. But at the dinner table, my boys have benefited from a fuller picture. They have gotten to know the human being. And, yes, its true that not everyone has this privilege. Not everyone can eat with a senator. But shouldnt we give them the benefit of the doubt regard less? Shouldnt we be able to separate the person from the politics? I dont necessarily agree political ly with everything President Obama does either. But I suspect his support ers would ask me to set that aside and appreciate the man for what he has accomplished and overcome in his life. In fact, I do. If the president had come to dinner, he would have been greeted by the same loud, rowdy boys and picky eaters. Lindell would have climbed in his lap. Sparky might have gotten fur on his pants. But mostly, President Obama would have been greeted with an open mind and an eagerness to know more about him as a person. Nov. 22 1914 Title Director of Naval Aeronautics estab lished. Capt. Mark Bristol, already serving in that capacity, was ordered to report to the Secretary of the Navy under the new title. Nov. 23 1918 Use of titles Navigation Officer and Aerographic Officer in naval air station organization was authorized by the Chief of Naval Operations to identify officers trained to perform the special duties involved. 1940 President Franklin D. Roosevelt appoints Adm. William Leahy as U.S. Ambassador to Vichy France to try to prevent the French fleet and naval bases from falling into German hands. Nov. 24 1852 Commodore Matthew Perry sails from Norfolk, Va. to negotiate a treaty with Japan for friendship and commerce. 1964 USS Princeton (LPH-5) completes seven days of humanitarian relief to South Vietnam that suffered damage from typhoon and floods. 1969 HS-4 from USS Hornet (CVS-12) recovers allNavy crew of astronauts from Apollo 12: Commanders Richard Gordon, Charles Conrad and Alan Bean, after moon landing by Conrad and Bean. Nov. 25 1775 Continental Congress authorizes privateering. 1943 In Battle of Cape St. George, five destroyers of Destroyer Squadron 23 (Capt. Arleigh Burke) intercept five Japanese destroyers and sink three and damage one without suffering any damage. 1961 Commissioning of USS Enterprise (CVAN-65), the first nuclear powered aircraft carrier, at Newport News, Va. Nov. 26 1847 Lt. William Lynch in Supply sails from New York to Haifa for an expedition to the River Jordan and the Dead Sea. His group charted the Jordan River from the Sea of Galilee to the Dead Sea and compiled reports of the flora and fauna of the area. 1940 Sixth and last group of ships involved in Destroyers-for-Bases Agreement transferred to British at Nova Scotia. Nov. 27 1918 The Navy hydroplane NC-1 took off from Rockaway Beach, N.Y., with 51 persons aboard, establishing a new world record for persons carried in flight. 1941 Chief of Naval Operations sends war warn ing to commanders of Pacific and Asiatic Fleets. 1961 Navy reports first use of its cyclotron at Harvard University to treat a human brain tumor. After three treatments, the tumor of the 2-year old patient shrank by eighty percent. Nov. 28 1775 Congress adopts first rules for regulation of the Navy of the United Colonies. 1941 USS Enterprise (CV-6) sails from Pearl Harbor for Wake Island to ferry Marine aircraft to the island. 1942 Ensigns George Carlson and Mac Cason, USNR organize rescue parties to help save people from the fire at the Cocoanut Grove nightclub in Boston, Mass They are credited the cause of saving more lives than any other single agency.Dinner with Gov. LePage sparks debate Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 a.m. Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at Chapel Complex Building 749 and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the barracksNAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051

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VP-30 wings Navys newest naval flight officersExecutive Officer of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron One Executive Officer Capt. Wade Turvold and VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to the following 11 officers Nov. 9. The new NFOs include: Lt. j.g.. Bryce Christenses, Lt. j.g. Jennifer Schmidt, Lt. j.g. Lucas Strasser, 2nd Lt. Aleksander Dale, Ensign Victor Barnett, Ensign Jose Caloca, Ensign Jeremy Cooper, Ensign Francheska Gonzalez, Ensign Andrew Hinkley, Ensign Justin Otto and Ensign Troy Wood. Also in attendance were Col. Gerard Larsen, commanding officer Air Wing 133 of the Royal Norwegian Air Force and Lt. Col. Arne Heitzman, commanding officer 2nd Training Squadron of the German Navy. Schmidt of the German Navy and Dale of the Royal Norwegian Air Force are part of a Foreign Exchange program that exposes naval officers from allied nations to standard U.S. Naval Aviation Training. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer (UMFO) syllabus at VP-30, earning their coveted wings of gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the FRS syllabus, they will report to operational Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance squadrons to begin their initial sea tours in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, Whidbey Island, Wash., or NAS Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, Fla. where all aviation officers undergo a classroom syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation which includes aerodynamics, meteorology and principles of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transition from a classroom learn ing environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3C or P-8A training pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012 The NAS Jacksonville Honor Support Team (HST) participates in numerous military funer als every week at Jacksonville National Cemetery, as well as other cemeteries in northeast Florida and southeast Georgia. They serve as casket bearers, riflemen and flag folders/pre senters. Commander, Navy Region Southeast is the regional coor dinator for the Casualty Assistance Calls program and Funeral Honors Support pro gram. Assisting the next-of-kin of Navy members who have died is an emotion-filled process that culminates with the arrange ment of funeral honors support for deceased active duty, retirees and veterans. Max Small, funeral hon ors trainer for Navy Region Southeast, stopped by Building 876 on Nov. 14 to see the NAS Jacksonville HST rehearse for an active duty funeral that after noon at Jacksonville National Cemetery. Since he has a number of new team members, Chief Tracy asked me to come by and observe this mornings training. I was very impressed with their preci sion and synchronization they looked good and should repre sent well, said Small. The military funeral service is designed to be slow, methodi cal and dignified with no fast movements. All hand salutes are three-count, except for the flag presentation to next-of-kin, which is a seven-count salute. AEC Kevin Tracy, of the NAS Jacksonville Security Department, supervises the funeral honor support team and ceremonial color guard. Our teams are made up of volunteers who serve here on TAD (temporary assigned duty) orders from various tenant commands, said Tracy. After completing their initial training, they meet every morn ing, Monday through Friday, to drill as flag bearers, riflemen and flag folders. Each of the 16 team members six men and 10 women is cross-trained to per form every function. Funeral honor support consists of, but is not limited to: flag. Tracy explained that HST pro vides three levels of support for cemetery burials. For an active duty funeral, the HST consists of 16 personnel six pallbearers, seven riflemen for a 21-gun salute, two flag folders and a bugler. For a retiree, our HST consists of seven personnel a team leader, three riflemen, two flag folders and a bugler. For a veteran, we provide two flag folders and a bugler, said Tracy. NAS Jacksonville HST also provides two team members, Monday through Friday, for the combined services team at the Jacksonville National Cemetery. Our people team up with two Sailors from Naval Station Mayport and four U.S. Army personnel to provide honor sup port for the cemeterys growing schedule of veterans burials, said Tracy. AN Cydney Sandy of VP-30 performed with the HST from April to August. HST volunteers usually get TAD orders for six months. Im on the team today because Chief Tracy was a little short-handed, and also because the Sailor were honoring happened to be my first supervisor at VP-30. So Im proud to render honors for his family and other mourners, she said. Tracys team also supports Navy celebrations and ritu als with the NAS Jacksonville Ceremonial Color Guard. He urges young Sailors to consider volunteering for this unique duty. We have 24 billets, but only 14 are filled at the moment. So were stretched thin on days like this, said Tracy. To learn more about serving with this special unit, call 5420969 ext. 149. Dignified, methodical, and precise: HST represents NAS Jax with class

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012 5 Photos by Kaylee LaRocque, Clark Pierce, and the U.S. Navy

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Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON)(AW/NAC) Mike Stevens visited Naval Station Mayport Nov. 8-10, to discuss his Zeroing in on Excellence initiative. MCPON met with area chiefs to discuss his initiative that was released in four letters to the Chiefs Mess Nov. 6, and used this trip as his first opportunity to assess communica tion success. If you have seen, read or heard of the initiative that I recently sent out called Zeroing in on Excellence raise your hand, said Stevens. Three quarters of the approximately 150 chief petty officers raised their hand. MCPON discussed the basics of the idea behind the initiative and the three focus areas of: what we own. What the Zeroing in on Excellence initiative provides you is the framework with in which you can work, said Stevens. Its my charge to every chief petty officer in the Navy to look at it, especially the leaders within the mess, and ask themselves, What is it we can do to support this and sustain it? Im not interested in a flash in the pan, here-now-gone-tomorrow effort. MCPON explained that if a leader is ineffective, then the command is ineffec tive. MCPON also visited com mands and Sailors through out the base including USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). While there, a Sailor asked MCPON for advice on becoming MCPON. I have been in the Navy for 30 years, said Stevens. After all that time, here is what I can tell you about being successful: work hard, stay out of trouble and be a good and decent person. If you do those things, you will be a success in anything that you do. While visiting USS De Wert (FFG 45), MCPON met with the Chiefs Mess to discuss his initiative and and team cohesion. Im asking you, as chief petty officers, to be strategically smart, said Stevens. Recognize where the world is at, where our economy is at, to recognize where the Navy is at and where we are going. You have to be smart. Think about the things you personally own in your organization that will ultimately impact those strategic decisions when we come together collectively as a Chiefs Mess. The Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville announces their Sailors and Instructors of the Quarter selections for Third Quarter of 2012. AD1 (AW) Ryan Watts was selected as Senior Instructor of the Quarter, Third Quarter, CY-12. As T56-A-14 1st Degree Intermediate and 54H-60-77 Prop Intermediate Maintenance Training Unit Lead Power Plants instructor, Watts provided 525 hours of instruc tion to 18 students while achieving an impressive 100 percent graduation rate. AS1 (AW/SW) Daphne Guzman was selected as Sailor of the Quarter, Fourth Quarter, FY-12. As Support Equipment Electrical Phase leading petty officer, Guzman managed 12 courses and 13 instructors ensuring a 100 percent graduation rate for over 60 students. Additionally, she completed three college courses through Southern Illinois University and represented the Navy as an ambassador by volunteering 48 off-duty hours to Jacksonville Airport USO, CCD teacher for St. Patricks Catholic Church, and San Mateo Elementary Big Sister program. AS2 (AW/SW) Anthony Wagner was selected as Junior Sailor of the Quarter, Fourth Quarter, FY-12. As MTU 3032 Support Equipment Afloat technician, he provided 500 hours of instruction to 12 students with a 100 per cent graduation rate and average GPA of 96.8 percent. Sgt. Adam Sulewski was selected as Junior Instructor of the Quarter, Third Quarter, CY-12. As MTU 3032 Ground Support Equipment technician, Sulewski is the course supervisor of the Environmental Control Unit Intermediate Maintenance Course, EPA Certification, and Mobile Facility Intermediate Maintenance Course. Sulewski has provided over 100 hours of instruction this quarter to 14 Navy/Marine students achieving a 100 percent graduation rate and an average GPA of 96.7 percent. MCPON visits Mayport, Zeroes in on Excellence CNATTU Jax recognizes Sailors and Instructors of the Quarter 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012

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fire before the suspect was placed face down on the floor and handcuffed. NAS Jax Police Training Officer Lt. Olimpia Jackson and Patrolman Antoine Gary led the teams through each training scenario, evaluating their skills as they conducted the evolutions. Any situation you encounter could turn into a real world encounter. If shots are fired and you are trying to apprehend a suspect, one of your team members might not make it out. Communication is the key you are a team and need to work as a team. You have to watch out for each other and be ready for anything because these situations occur very quickly, Jackson told the students. After another scenario, Gary stressed the impor tance of taking every situation seriously. This could be reality. When you clear a room, you see the importance of everyone doing their job. Be aware of everything around you, be sure of your target and dont assume anything, he said. This was some really good training and definitely an adrenaline rush. I think we learned how to better work as a team. Our instructors have taught us to be prepared for any type of situation and I look forward to serving on the ASF, said AMAN John Holt. ASF 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012

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10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012

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A Lunch and Learn on Education meeting was held at the NAS Jax Youth Activities Center Nov. 14 to gather infor mation about issues military parents are struggling with regarding their childrens educational opportunities. The session was led by NAS Jax School Liaison Officer Dawn Mills who serves as a link between Navy families and schools in Duval, Clay, St. Johns, and Nassau Counties. One of the biggest concerns stated during meeting was transportation for children living aboard NAS Jax who attend magnet schools. Funding was recently cut for the Duval County School District and all free transporta tion to magnet schools was eliminated creating problems for parents to find ways for their children to get to and from those schools. Several parents at the meeting stated that they are paying hundreds of dollars using a school con tractor to transport their children, however the bus stop is off base and not con venient for working military parents. Others have chosen to drive their children to school, spending hundreds of dollars in fuel costs and having to try to work around their daily work sched ules. This is probably the biggest com plaint we are dealing with and we are trying to come up with solutions to help our military families. We will continue to work with the school districts to see what can be done, said Mills. Another issue discussed was the Military Interstate Childrens Compact which assists military children with their educational needs when relocat ing. This is a great program that helps students keep their credits earned in schools in different states when they move to a new school district, explained Mills. I had one case last year where a high school senior in one of our military families transferred here and they were not going to let him graduate because he was miss ing courses mandatory for a diploma from that school. His previous district in Maryland was contacted, and they determined he was eligible to graduate high school so he received his diplo ma during graduation ceremonies here from his school in Maryland. The Military Interstate Childrens Compact not only covers education records but absences relating to deployments, extracurricular activities such as tryouts for sports, course waivers and flexibility in exit exams and entrance age requirements. This is a new program and some schools might not be aware of some of the guidelines involved. Military fami lies transferring in or out of the state should check with me or the school liaison officer at their current or new duty station if they have any educa tional issues concerning their children, stressed Mills. For CSCS Glenda Atwood of Fleet Logistics Center Jax, the meeting was beneficial as she just transferred to NAS Jax. I have a son in elementary school and have not moved him here yet because Im looking at all the different areas of the city to decide what is the best school for him before I find hous ing, she said. Mills assured her she would help find the best school to suit her childs edu cational needs. There have been some significant improvements made in the schools in our local area since I started this job three years ago. And, we are striving to make sure they understand the needs of our military families, she said. I want our military families to know that I am here for them and will do whatever I can to ensure they get their educational questions answered and assist them. For more information or if you have concerns regarding your childs edu cational opportunities, contact Mills at dawn.m.mills@navy.mil NAS Jax hosts Lunch and Learn on Education JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012 11

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AO1(AW) Justin Skelton was a quality assurance and safety observer (QA/SO) for one of the five-person load teams. Each team consists of a QA/SO, a team leader, a weapons hoist driver, and two riggers who make the necessary weapons connections and attach ments. Inspectors from Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 (CPRW-11) Weapons School and Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Group (CPRG) evaluated the exercise. Each load team was required to handle an inert MK 54 training torpedo from a weapons cart to the P-8A Poseidon internal weapons bay. We also loaded chaff buck ets in the nose of the Poseidon and conducted wire checks between the flight deck and the internal bomb bay, said Skelton. VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Molly Boron said the teams performance was no surprise. Our ordies have been training for CWTPI for about four months, with guidance from the P-8A trainers at VP-30. I also know that our people have volunteered to train on weekends in order to be ready for this inspection, said Boron. Bottom line theres no need for luck when youre prepared. Our ordnance teams can take justifi able pride in the professionalism of their work center and their CWTPI accomplishment. VP-16 The Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion-Womens Policy, OPNAV N134W, announced in NAVADMIN 338/12 that they are accepting nominations for the 2013 Capt. Joy Bright Hancock and Master Chief Anna Der-Vartanian Leadership Awards. Presented annually, the awards recognize and honor the inspirational and vision ary leadership of Navy service members whose ideals and dedication foster a positive working environment, while reinforcing and furthering the integration of women into the Navy. Nominations are now being accepted for four award categories: senior, junior), (E-7 through E-9), member (E-5 through E-6). Nominees should embody inspirational, innovative and imaginative leadership dem onstrated by example both on and off duty. Additionally, applicants should be mature lead ers who have shown exceptional leadership over time and have persevered to overcome chal lenges while serving. Nominations should also address the professional accomplishments, leadership style and community involvement of the service member. Candidates must be nominat ed by their commanding officer or officer in charge and receive an endorsement from the commands immediate superior in command (ISIC). Nominations are open to both active and Reserve service members. The award winners will be honored at the 2013 Sea Service Leadership Association (SSLA) Joint Womens Leadership Symposium in Washington, D.C. on March 11. Nominations are due to OPNAV N134W no later than Jan. 18. Packages shall be sub mitted electronically via the commands ISIC to OSC Jessica Myers, senior enlisted advisor to the Office of Womens Policy at jessica.myers@navy.mil. Previous award winners include Navy ACSC(AW/SW) JoAnn Ortloff, who was serv ing aboard the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) when she was selected as the 2000 Capt. Joy Bright Hancock Senior Enlisted Leadership Award winner. Soon after receiving her award, Ortloff was selected for promo tion to master chief, and then was chosen for the command master chief program in 2003. In May of 2012, Ortloff became Fleet Master Chief for Commander, Naval Forces Europe and Africa, and upon her selection, Ortloff became the highest-ranking enlisted woman in the Navy, and the second woman in naval histo ry to reach the position of fleet master chief. Navy pilot Lt. Megan Donnelly, the 2012 Captain Joy Bright Hancock junior officer leadership award recipient, was also recently selected for the highly competitive Career Intermission Pilot Program (CIPP). This program allows Donnelly to take time off from her current career path to pur sue personal and professional goals outside the Navy, optimizing life/work integration. Upon completion of the program, Donnelly will return to the Navy to resume her career path pipeline. CIPP is an element of the con tinuum of service area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effec tive force in the history of the Department of the Navy.Nominations sought for 2013 Joint Womens Leadership Symposium Leadership Awards 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012

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Thanking our troops, one flight at a time A C-40A Clipper logistics aircraft assigned to the VR-58 Sunseekers set out from NAS Jacksonville Nov. 2 for another routine detachment to the 5th Fleet area of responsibility in Al Manama, Bahrain. The cabin was filled with maintainers and staff from VR-58 and VR-54 (based at JRB New Orleans) as the air craft took off for its first scheduled stop at Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada. As the remnants of Hurricane Sandy affected the weather in Saint John, it created the need for alternate plans by the flight crew, who diverted their Clipper to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, at a converted civilian airfield that was for merly Pease Air Force Base. When the crew called the Pease fixed base operator to inform them of their reroute, the word went out to the Pease Greeters. Upon arrival at the airfield, the Navy crew and passengers were showered with hospitality. Just off the jet bridge awaited a room full of senior citizens and veterans who greeted them and offered a cornucopia of goodies. They had cookies, dough nuts, sodas, hand-knitted sock hats, T-shirts, pizza, puzzle books and enough chocolate to make Hershey, Pa., look like a convenience store, comment ed Lt. Cmdr. Chad Beaufort, the VR-58 detachment officer in charge. The Pease Greeters are a cadre of former Sailors, Airman, Soldiers and Marines who make it their mission to welcome troops home or send them off to areas of conflict around the world. According to Chuck Cove, chairman of the Pease Greeters, their mission is to not only welcome, but also to, create an environment that reflects the respect and high esteem in which we hold all veterans. They also educate the pub lic of the importance of hon oring troops through formal ceremonies. When notified, the Greeters will show up for the welcome whether it is 4 a.m. or 4 a.m. When it was time to reboard the airplane, the Pease Greeters formed ranks and sent off the crew by presenting colors, singing the national anthem, and rendering a salute from the officer of the day with the words, We, the old Warriors, salute you, the young Warriors. For more information on the Pease Greeters visit their web site at www.peasegreeters.org. Bonus Bucks are back at select Navy Exchanges (NEX) this holiday season. On Dec. 8 from 8 a.m. 1 p.m., customers will receive one $10 Bonus Bucks coupon for each $100 of merchandise/ service purchased, while coupon sup plies last. A maximum of five Bonus Bucks will be issued to customers per single transaction. NEX customers have responded very positively to this promotion since we started it three years ago, so were bringing it back again this year, said Mike Powers, Navy Exchange Service Command director of retail operations. We know there are many places our customers can shop during the holiday season. NEX Bonus Bucks are our way of thanking customers for shopping at their NEX and to encourage them to come back for extra savings. NEX Bonus Bucks will be redeemable in any NEX from Dec. 26Jan. 1, 2013, on all merchandise and services except uniforms, gasoline, tobacco, alcohol, NEX and third party Gift Cards and concession merchandise. Purchases made on the All Services Catalog or myNavyExchange.com do not apply. One coupon will be redeemable on a transaction of $50 or more. A maxi mum of five coupons can be used on a transaction of $250 or more. Pease Greeters set the example Navy Exchange bringing back Bonus Bucks JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012 13

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Sailors should create a holiday spending plan now to avoid post-season financial hardship, said a Navy finan cial specialist, Nov. 15. Examine holiday priorities and fig ure out what is most important to you, said Stacy Livingstone-Hoyte, financial counselor, Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC). Instead of spending your hardearned money on something just sure its a tradition that is important to you and your family. Do not spend out of habit, obligation or guilt. Tracking expenses when paying for holiday purchases will help Sailors and families stay true to their priorities and objectives, said Livingstone-Hoyte. Determine your holiday spend ing limit by making a list of what you will spend on different categories or purchases. Be realistic and make sure that whatever you elect to spend will not exceed what you can afford, said Livingstone-Hoyte. A little research of market prices, retailer ads and deals around town can go a long way toward understanding how you can match your purchase dollars with items for sale and dont forget to clip, cut and stack coupons for the best results. Livingstone-Hoyte said Sailors should also consider alternative gift-giving options like making homemade gifts or cooking food, volunteering as a family to help neighbors, friends and relatives or making a coupon to give as a present that is redeemable for babysitting, lawn care, etc. Financial matters that occur from overspending or bad budgeting, such as failure to pay bills, bad credit, bankruptcy and foreclosures can negatively impact a Sailors career, and affect mission readiness and the Navys ability to transfer or retain Sailors. Command financial specialists (CFSs) provide financial education and training, counseling, and information referral at the command level at no cost to Sailors and their families. FFSCs located worldwide provide financial education and counseling for Sailors and families as well. Sailors experiencing financial chal lenges should notify their chain of command and work with their CFS to development a budget and explore additional options such as military relief societies, eligibility for interest rate reductions and other relief. For more information about financial planning, budgeting or investing, con tact the CFS, local FFSC or call the Navy Personnel Command customer service center at 1-866-U-ASK-NPC or email CSCMailbox@navy.mil.Financial planning to survive the holidays 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012

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A five-plane, 10-student training detachment from the Greyhawks of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 120 began its 12-day field carrier land ing practice (FCLP) Nov. 10 at Outlying Landing Field (OLF) Whitehouse, located west of NAS Jacksonville. This shorebased training will be followed by shipboard training in early December on board an under way aircraft carrier in the Atlantic. VAW-120 is the Navys fleet replacement squadron (FRS) for VAW squadrons flying the E-2C and E-2D Hawkeyes. The Greyhawks are also the FRS for fleet logistics support squad rons (VRC) flying the C-2A Greyhound aircraft. Lt. Cmdr. Chris Swanson, officer-in-charge of the detachment from NS Norfolk Chambers Field, said, We detach to NAS Jacksonville four or five times a year so our CAT I student pilots can get their FCLP which represents the near completion of their FRS training syllabi. He explained that pilot ball flying using the Optical Landing System at OLF Whitehouse is the most impor tant part of our detachments mission because theres no greater challenge for a new pilot than landing an aircraft on a ship. The runway at OLF Whitehouse is the same width as an aircraft carrier flight deck. Our landing signal officers (LSOs) are focused strictly on accurate landings with out mishaps, said Swanson. Thats why grading each touch-and-go landing or bounce at Whitehouse is vital. Every bounce by every pilot is analyzed and graded and after flight ops, each pilot is debriefed by their LSO. During their detachment to NAS Jacksonville, pilots will average 170 to 190 passes at OLF Whitehouse. When they undergo carrier qualifications, each Hawkeye and Greyhound pilot must accomplish at least 10 daytime traps and six night traps. The FRS mission is to train pilots, naval flight officers and maintainers. Upon successful completion of their training syllabi, they depart VAW-120 for assignment to one of the Navys operational E-2 or C-2 squad rons based at Chambers Field, or Naval Base Ventura County at Point Mugu, Calif. The C-2A Greyhound, a derivative of the E-2 Hawkeye, shares wings and power plants with the E-2, but has a widened fuselage with a rear loading ramp. According to the Naval Air Systems Command fact sheet, the E-2C Hawkeye provides all-weather airborne early warning, airborne battle man agement and command and control functions for the car rier strike group and joint force commander. Additional mis sions include surface surveil lance coordination, air inter diction, offensive and defensive counter air control, close air support coordination, time critical strike coordination, search and rescue airborne coordi nation and communications relay. The C-2A Greyhound provides critical logistics sup port to carrier strike groups. Its primary mission is the trans port of high-priority cargo, mail and passengers between car riers and shore bases. Priority cargo such as jet engines can be transported from shore to ship in a matter of hours. A cargo cage system or transport stand provides restraint for loads during launches and landings. VAW-120 bounces at OLF Whitehouse 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012

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A naval officer earned his Professional Aviation Maintenance Officer (PAMO) warfare designator that recog nizes his significant support of the Navys aviation mission, presented before a gathering of his peers at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Oct. 31. After successfully complet ing the extensive profession al qualification standards, Lt. Cmdr. Shawn Noga, the FRCSE engine production officer, received his PAMO warfare designation certificate and insignia presented by Capt. Robert Caldwell, the FRCSE commanding officer. Noga said he pursed the designation to improve his chanc es for advancement. I knew of two other offi cers in my year group whose records were pretty strong, he said. They had the designa tion, and I wanted to present my package in a better light in front of the promotion board. He had two years to complete all the PAMO qualifications, with the clock ticking from his first qualification signoff. You have to have at least one squadron tour to deploy on a carrier, he said. It took two years to com plete the quals, but I utilized my 17 years of experience with squadron tours and Level II tours for my signoffs. The PAMO community is comprised of aerospace main tenance duty officers, aviation maintenance limited duty officers, and aviation maintenance chief warrant officers. Due to billet constraints not all designator eligible officers will acquire the explicit career path experience necessary to participate. Noga asked Cmdr. Ken Jalali, the FRCSE corporate opera tions officer, to pin on his PAMO insignia during the ceremony. Noga, who was also checking out of the command the same day, attributed much of his success to Jalalis encouragement and support, along with other maintenance officers assigned at the aviation maintenance, repair and overhaul facility. I loved it here, both on a professional and personal level, said Noga of his tour of duty at FRCSE. I would recommend this assignment to my fellow avia tion maintenance officer. If its FRCSE, go for it, but youd bet ter come with your A game. Noga reports to Naval Air Technical Training Center at Pensacola in November, going from production to training working with technical review of aviation maintenance pro grams. The PAMO designation dis tinguishes the officer whose career path and training has prepared him or her to sup port air operations at sea in a combat environment, as well as contribute fully to the damage control and survival of the ship and embarked aircraft, according to the PAMO manual. FRCSE aviation maintenance officer earns warfare designation JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012 17

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012 The cool, dismal day didnt deter the 120 runners who came out for the annual Turkey Trot 5K Nov. 17. The event was coordi nated by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department. Placing first overall and first in the mens 35-39 age category was Will Lutat of VR-62 with a time of 17:30. Naketa George of Naval Hospital (NH) Jax took first in the womens 30-34 cat egory and was the first female to cross the finish line with a time of 23:56. Other winners were: The event was sponsored by Allied American University and University of Phoenix. The next MWR run will be the annual Jingle Bell Jog Dec. 13 at 11:30 a.m. For more information, call 542-3239/3518.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. DEWEYSCall 542-3521 Deweys is located in Bldg. 608 on Enterprise Ave. Deweys offers a full service menu, bar and a friendly atmosphere that is great for all ages! Monday Friday 10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 410 p.m. CPO Lounge Monday, Tuesday & Friday 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Wednesday Thursday 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. 40,000 Calories of Christmas See if you and your teammate can burn a total of 40,000 calories Dec. 3 to Jan. 18. The top teams in each team category will receive a trophy. Sign-up in the fitness center by Nov. 28.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. St. Augustine Old Town Trolley Night of Lights Adult $8.75, child $4 Orlando Magic Tickets $18 $268 ShenYun at the Times Union Center Jan. 29 30, $55 $163 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Kennedy Space Center Adult $40, child $31 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23, 2013 Preferred seating $41, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3 day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31, 2013 and must be redeemed by June 30, 2013. Ask about our special discounted tickets for family members. Gator Bowl tickets $35 Gator Bowl Patch $9 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day $29.50, 2 day $40, Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT! Daytona 500 Feb. 24, 2013 tickets on sale now! $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Mall & Movie Trip Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater November 23 at 6 p.m. Kennedy Space Center Trip Nov. 24 at 9 a.m. Jaguars vs. Titans Nov. 25 at 11:30 a.m. Free admission and transportationNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Nov. 27 for active duty Nov. 29 for retirees & DoD personnel Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Turkey Trot Killer Scramble Nov. 21 at noon $50 entry fee, $60 for civilian guests Four person scramble Let us cook for you! Order turkey dinners at MulligansMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Dashing Through The Grove Dec. 8, 48 p.m. at Patriots Grove Free snow sledding, photos with Santa, tree lighting, musical entertainment and more!Flying Club Call 777-8549 Call for latest training schedule Annual Turkey Trot brings out runners

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 22, 2012