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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 11-15-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
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Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
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Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02019

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com MCPON: Zeroing in on Excellence Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) (AW/NAC) Mike Stevens released his Zeroing in on Excellence initiative in the form of four letters to the Navy Chiefs Mess Nov. 6. The initiative consists of three focus areas: developing leaders, good order and discipline, and con trolling what we own. Zeroing in on Excellence is a universal theme we can all apply in our respective positions, said Stevens. It does not distract from or add to exist ing individual roles and responsibilities it provides a sturdy framework around which we can build sound, durable readiness. In his letters, MCPON clearly and concisely out lined his thoughts on the overarching theme of Zeroing in on Excellence and how each of the three focus areas help create an environment where the Navy gets stronger. I believe developing leaders, fostering good order and discipline and controlling what we own help us get precisely that type of environment, now and down the road, said Stevens. These are not single actions; they are deliberate mindsets that permeate our processes and procedures. MCPON stated that his focus points could be powerful engines of influence, but assured the Mess it is their commitment to this vision that would help the ideas within it become a heightened part of our consciousness. If we grab Zeroing in on Excellence and main tain a steady strain on the ideas it entails, we will have a positive impact on readiness and get after some of the issues tainting our Navy, including sexual assault, suicide, domestic violence and alcohol/ drug abuse, said Stevens. In MCPONs letter on Zeroing in on Excellence: Developing Leaders, he discussed the importance of developing leaders through a combination of men torship, practical experience and training. Without competent leadership, even the most routine tasks can become difficult, said Stevens. If our Navy is going to continue climbing, then we as chief petty officers must always seek to increase our and our Sailors ability to lead. MCPON talked about the solid inventory of quality leadership training available to the enlisted com munity and how that combined with routine, daily, personal interaction will foster the kind of leader ship that is necessary to ensure our Navys contin ued success. MCPONs letter, Zeroing in on Excellence: Good Order and Discipline, focused on the impact Good Order and Discipline has on warfighting, readiness and mission accomplishment. To me, it [good order and discipline] is about establishing, sustaining and enforcing professional standards that set the condition for individual and unit success, said Stevens. Anything that interferes with or detracts from those conditions is contrary to Good Order and Discipline. MCPON stated that by-and-large he believes we are doing well in this area, but there is always room for improvement. He emphasized chief petty officers own good order and discipline and every CPO, first NAS Jacksonville hosted U.S. Congressman Ander Crenshaw s 11th annual Special Veterans Recognition Ceremony Nov. 8 during which 97 Northeast Florida veterans were honored for their service during Operation Desert Shield/Storm. Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk was the keynote speak er. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders, also a veteran of Desert Shield/Desert Storm, welcomed those being recognized and their families. Today, we are here to honor our uniformed and civilian men and women and remember the devo tion and gallantry of these vet erans during these operations, said Sanders before introducing Crenshaw. Crenshaw then took the podium, thanking the veterans in atten dance. There is a special sig nificance in our recognizing the heroes assembled here today as brave Americans continue to meet threats, new in kind and degree, Desert Shield/ Storm vets honored HSM-70 supports CQ Det on USS TrumanOn the morning of Oct. 30, the Spartans of HSM70 loaded trucks full of equipment and buses full of maintenance personnel and aircrews bound for Norfolk, Va. HSM-70 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Christopher Herr was notified the day prior that USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) required helicopter support for a carrier landing qualification detachment. In true Spartan spirit, the squadron pulled together to pre pare for the detachment, sending 60 personnel on a 12-hour bus ride. I couldnt be more proud of our squadron. Within 18 hours of the phone call from our carrier air wing commander, we were packed up and on our way to Norfolk, said Herr. Two of the squadrons MH-60R helicopters, piloted by Herr and Lt. Cmdr. Shon Brown, HSM-70s maintenance officer, arrived on board the Truman shortly after she pulled out of port Nov.1. Due to other local air assets being otherwise engaged conducting disaster relief in the wake of Hurricane Sandy and preparing for upcoming deployments, HSM-70 answered the call on short notice. The ship required helicopters to conduct plane guard duties on the ship in support of fixed wing carrier landing qualifications for an F-18 Fleet Replacement Squadron and several fixed wing training squadrons. Qualifying to land on the aircraft NAS Jacksonville has again been recognized by Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) for their dedication to helping the community. In a recent message announcing the winners of the Regional Navy Community Service Program, NAS Jacksonville was selected the third place winner in the Personal Excellence Partnership Flagship category for Shore 500 or more; third place in the Health, Safety and Fitness Flagship category; second place in the Campaign Drug Free Flagship category; second place in the Project Good Neighbor Flagship category and third place in the Environmental Stewardship Flagship category. Bravo Zulu to the winners and honorable mentions. Southeast region commands are commended for having active and successful command-sponsored volunteer community service programs. Their award submissions have been forwarded to Commander, Navy Installation Command and other flagship sponsors for Navywide competition, stated CNRSE Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. in the message. My sincerest personal thanks to all commands and individuals who selflessly volunteered their time to improve the quality of life in their local community and for partici pation in this years competition. A total of over 277,976 volunteer service hours were contributed by commands in the Southeast region. You are an inspiration to us all. According to NAS Jax Community Service Coordinator BMC(SW/ AW) Maurice Mabry, it is truly a team effort to be recognized for these accomplishments. I really think this is wonder ful because it demonstrates the great work that NAS Jax Sailors are doing for the community. They participate in such events as Campaign Drug-Free in the local schools, conducting clean ups in the community, building homes with Habitat for Humanity, mentor NAS Jax wins community service awards

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Nov. 15 1882 Lt. Cmdr. French Chadwick reports to American Legation in London as first Naval Attache. 1942 Although U.S. lost several ships in Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, a naval force under Rear Adm. Willlis Lee, on board battleship USS Washington (BB56), turns back Japanese transports trying to reinforce Guadalcanal. The Japanese never again try to send large naval forces to Guadalcanal. 1960 First Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine, USS George Washington (SSBN-598), leaves Charleston, S.C., on initial fleet ballistic missile patrol. Nov. 16 1776 First salute to an American flag (Grand Union flag) flying from Continental Navy ship Andrew Doria, by Dutch fort at St. Eustatius, West Indies. 1856 Barrier Forts reduction began at Canton China. 1942 Navys first Night Fighter squadron (VMF(N)-531) established at Cherry Point, N.C. 1963 President John F. Kennedy on USS Observation Island witnesses launch of Polaris A-2 missile by USS Andrew Jackson (SSBN-619). 1968 Operation Tran Hung Dao begins in Mekong Delta. 1973 Launch of Skylab 4 under command of USMC Lt. Col. Gerald Carr. The mission lasted 84 days and included 1,214 Earth orbits. Recovery by USS New Orleans (LPH-11). Nov. 17 1917 USS Fanning (DD-37) and USS Nicholson (DD-52) sink first enemy submarine, U-58, off Milford Haven, Wales. 1924 USS Langley, first aircraft car rier, reports for duty. 1941 Congress amends Neutrality Act to allow U.S. merchant ships to be armed. Navys Bureau of Navigation directs Navy personnel with Armed Guard training to be assigned for further training before going to Armed Guard Centers for assignment to merchant ships. 1955 Navy sets up Special Projects Office under Rear Adm. William Raborn to develop a solid propellant ballistic missile for use in submarines. Nov. 18 1890 USS Maine, first American bat tleship, is launched. 1922 Cmdr. Kenneth Whiting in a PT seaplane, makes first catapult launch ing from aircraft carrier, USS Langley, at anchor in the York River. Nov. 19 1813Capt. David Porter claims Marquesas Islands for the United States. 1943 Carrier force attacks bases on Tarawa and Makin. 1943 USS Nautilus (SS-168) enters Tarawa lagoon in first submarine photo reconnaissance mission. 1961 At the request of President of Dominican Republic, U.S. Naval Task Force sails to Dominican Republic to bolster the countrys government and to prevent a coup. 1969 Navy astronauts Cmdr. Charles Conrad Jr. and Cmdr. Alan Bean are 3rd and 4th men to walk on the moon. They were part of Apollo 12 mission. Cmdr. Richard Gordon Jr., the Command Module Pilot, remained in lunar orbit. During the mission lasting 19 days, 4 hours, and 36 minutes, the astronauts recovered 243 pounds of lunar material. Recovery by HS-4 helicopters from USS Hornet (CVS-12). Nov. 20 1856 Cmdr. Andrew Foote lands at Canton, China, with 287 Sailors and Marines to stop attacks by Chinese on U.S. military and civilians. 1917 USS Kanawha, Noma and Wakiva sink German sub off France. 1933 Navy crew (Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Settle and USMC Maj. Chester Fordney) sets a world altitude record in balloon (62,237 ft.) flight into stratosphere. 1943 Operation Galvanic, under command of Vice Adm. Raymond Spruance, lands Navy, Marine and Army forces on Tarawa and Makin. 1962 President John F. Kennedy lifts the Blockade of Cuba. Nov. 21 1918 U.S. battleships witness surrender of German High Seas fleet at Rosyth, Firth of Forth, Scotland, to U.S. and British fleets. Ive learned many things from responses to last weeks column about my youngest sons silver tooth, or cap, as our dentist prefers: I shouldnt be afraid of fluoride. My kids cavities might be my fault. Then again, maybe not. My son drinks too much juice. And, most importantly, Im not alone. There are a lot of silver teeth out there, and even more fillings. I know because mothers wrote me to say, me too and Im glad Im not alone. Like a pregnant woman who suddenly thinks everyone else from celebrities on magazines to virtually every single person she passes at the store are also pregnant, I have noticed a great many silver teeth since my son got his. Everywhere I look Cavities! Decay! Silver! While talking to people, Ive reflexively inspected their teeth and noticed every flash of color coming from their molars. In any case, outside of mothers commiserating with me, I also received messages from seemingly every pediatric den tist in the world. Not, not really. But I did have a lengthy conversation with Dr. Jonathan Shenkin, in Augusta, Maine, who read my column. He put my mind and my guilt to rest. But, like my own dentist, still wont allow me the comfort of falsely believing there wasnt more I could have done. Shenkin believes parents often see the dentist too late after the age when they could have received basic information to ensure good oral health and avoid dental treatment down the road. Preferably, children should go to a dentist when they are 12 months old, or 6 months after their first tooth erupts. Did you know most children should start using fluoride toothpaste when they are two years old? Did you know that 44 percent of children dont brush their teeth twice a day and that more than 50 percent of them will have cavities by the time they are in second grade? Did you know that brushing your teeth isnt enough to prevent cavities? Shenkin is on a mission to educate parents, as well as the medical community gatekeepers of health information for most children about basic preventative dental care before cavities appear. He says that filling cavities without correcting behaviors is like cutting limbs off diabetic patients and then saying, Look at how good we are at treating diabetes. The keys to good oral health, he says, are brushing twice a day with fluoride toothpaste and limiting sugar intake. I complained that mornings are crazy and I cant always be sure my boys have brushed their teeth. Thats like put ting a bicycle helmet on your child 50 percent of the time and then being surprised when he has an accident, he said. And the twice-a-day routine should begin as early as pos sible, like when the first tooth appears. But baby breath smells so good, I said. I never thought their mouths could be dirty. Plus, I told Shenkin, in my 12 years as a parent I had begun to think fluoride was poison. There are so many warnings about not letting kids swallow it and only using a pea-sized amount. I let my children use training paste too long for fear they might die from the fluoride. Shenkin said that before a child can spit, using a pea-sized amount of toothpaste is enough and safe. Maybe my kids teeth are just soft, I said, trying to cheer myself up. Shenkin says theres no such thing. For most people, personal behaviors and hygiene are the sole causes of tooth decay. There is no evidence to support naturally occurring, cavity prone teeth. I sighed. So I messed up, I said. But you didnt know, he said again, It is the system that fails, not necessarily the parents. If no one told you to get our child vaccinated and then he got sick, would you say thats your fault? Childrens dental health, or the lack of it, is taboo in the culture of motherhood. Maybe thats because none of us really know what were doing, and also because were ashamed of the outcome (cavities). Shenkin hopes to change that by educating providers and the public. But that wont fix my sons silver tooth, which he will have now until hes 11 or 12. The damage to his teeth was already done, long before I first took him to the dentist too late, at 3-years-old. Now I live with the silver reminder coming from his back molar. Still, my son doesnt care. One day he smiled up at me, shrugged, and said, Well, at least its not a wooden tooth like George Washington. Yes. There is that.Response to silver tooth enlightening Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 a.m. Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at Chapel Complex Building 749 and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the barracksNAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051

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YN1(SW) John Felizpolanco and OS2(SW) Brandon Doctor were named Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Sailor of the Year 2012, respectively, Nov. 2. As CNRSE Administration Department leading petty officer, Felizpolanco directly supervises the daily efforts of three junior Sailors and serves as CNRSE flag duty petty officer. He provides oversight and guidance in the completion of a number of administrative func tions, utilizing Bureau of Personnel Online, Transaction Online Processing System, Navy Standard Integrated Personnel System, and the Contract Verification System. He is one of the high est-performing petty officers Ive ever worked with, said YNCS(SW/ AW) Yolanda Walls. He is instrumen tal in our efforts to cre ate an environment that allows junior personnel to grow, and he possesses perfect blend of admin istrative expertise and drive toward other areas of mission accomplish ment. I am honored to be chosen to represent this command, Felizpolanco said. This is an outstanding staff with an outstanding group of Sailors. To have the opportunity to repre sent CNRSE is something that I think comes with a lot of responsibility. In addition to his military accomplishments, Felizpolanco is an avid volunteer in the community. He frequently volun teers for command-sponsored volunteer events and even gives up his free time to coach youth football and participate in the Big Brothers Big Sisters Program. Volunteer work has always been important to me because, for one, its an opportunity to repre sent the Navy in a posi tive way, but more importantly, it just feels good to know that you have had a positive impact on others. Doctor serves as a watch specialist in the Regional Operations Center, where he collects and disseminates voice reports, e-mail reports and official message traffic for 16 major installa tions and more than 100 Navy activities through out the region. Petty Officer Doctor is a role model who exem plifies the Navys core values, said QMC(SW) Jeffrey Brebner, Doctors supervisor. He consistently pro duces top-quality work and I can rely on him to provide a complete report and maintain a meticu lous log with all essential points. Hes hands down my best watchstander. Doctor attributed his success at CNRSE to the support he receives from his chain of command, as well as his family. My supervisors have been a major factor in my success. Its really their support that made it possible for me to be selected for this award, he said. I also owe a lot of gratitude to my wife, because without her encourage ment and positive atti tude, I dont think any of this would be possible. While Doctors perfor mance in his work cen ter was a major contribution to his selection, he is also extremely active throughout the com mand. He is acting presi dent of the CNRSE Petty Officers Association and he constantly partici pates in command vol unteer opportunities. In addition, he is the CNRSE building manager and is an active member of the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Committee. I think extracurricular activities are important, he said. I think its important to step out of your com fort zone and continually take on new challenges. If you are constantly making an effort to bet ter yourself, you cant go wrong. Individual selection criteria for the awards was based upon exem plary performance of tasks, contributions that enhanced organization accomplishment of com mand objectives, mis sion, teamwork or public image, and ones profes sional attitude toward self and others. CNRSE announces Sailors of the Year for 2012 in schools and help the homeless in area shel ters, said Mabry. Mabry continued, When we started the process for the awards package, we solicited the help of many Sailors and civilians to assist us. It took a lot of fact finding to determine what cat egories we qualified for based on our community service. Im proud that our Sailors and civilians have been recognized for the hard work they do to make our community a better place. For more information on community projects, call 542-1610. AWARDS JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 Thousands of children and parents enjoyed the annual MWR Military Family Appreciation Carnival and the beau tiful, sunny weather Nov. 10 at the Allegheny Softball Fields across from the Navy Exchange/ Commissary complex. Young and old alike enjoyed the spinning rides, a giant slide, a bull ride, a Ferris wheel, bun gee jumping, swings and an airplane ride. Other activities included a water race and camel race where the children and their parents could try their luck by rolling balls up a ramp into holes and shooting squirt guns. The Fleet and Family Support Center also pro vided free face painting for the children. Its a great way to celebrate the Month of the Military Family. Many times we recognize our active duty Sailors, but sometimes the fami lies and the sacrifices they endure often go unnoticed. They are here at home and holding the fort down while their loved ones are deployed fighting for our freedom. So this is our way to say thank you to the families and let them spend some time together, said Youth Activities Center Director Aaron Long. We have some great carnival rides, games with prizes and lots of free car nival treats. We have been coordinat ing this event for months and its really proven to be a popular event. Id real ly like to thank our sponsors VyStar Credit Union, USAA, Navy Mutual Aid Association, Emby-Riddle Aeronautical University, First Command Financial Planning, University of Phoenix, Purchasing Power, Allied American University and USA Discounters for their contribution and the many volunteers and workers who are absolutely essential to putting on this successful event, he continued. We came out today for the free activities on base. It is a beautiful day and my kids are loving it! I am thankful that the base offers free events for families who are living on tight budgets. We really appreciate this, said Christina Weaver. The families also enjoyed the free sno-cones, popcorn, funnel cakes and cotton candy. The next MWR celebration for mili tary families will be in April to celebrate the Month of the Military Child. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government offi cially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 5

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carrier is a critical part of training for new pilots. Helicopters assume search and rescue duties to mitigate the risk of pilot ejections during fixed-wing flight operations from aircraft carriers. Although capable of search and rescue, the primary mission of HSM-70 is anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and surface warfare. The MH-60R is the Navys most capable, combat-tested ASW air asset with a multitude of sensors. These sensors make the MH-60R heavier than her MH-60S counterpart, the typical plane guard plat form. To prepare HSM-70 for plane guard duties, Spartan maintainers worked tirelessly on two MH-60Rs, removing ASW equipment and conducting inspections to get the helicopters ready for deploy ment within hours of receiving tasking. Remarking on the flexibility of the mission change, Herr stated, The Spartans maintain a level of readiness that allows us to respond at a moments notice. We fight as we train. On Nov. 3, the Truman passed USS Enterprise (CVN 65) as she returned to Naval Station Norfolk, completing her final deployment after 51 years of service. Enterprise was the Navys first nuclear powered air craft carrier. Herr, Lt. j.g. Zachary Jackson, AWR2 Clayton Reed and AWR3 Matthew Ballard of HSM-70 were in the air when she passed by and were able to take photographs to commemorate the landmark occasion. It was an honor to fly and see one of the Navys most historic carriers on her final voyage, said Herr. For several of the newest Spartans, the detachment marked their first time underway on an aircraft car rier and for some, on a Navy ship, including AWR3 Bill Christensen. Its a totally different experience, he said. Its been cool seeing the jets take off. Some more seasoned members of the squadron were present for the maiden deployment of USS George H. W. Bush (CVN 77) with Carrier Air Wing Eight from May to December 2011. HSM-70 returned from the deployment with numerous awards including the Arnold J. Isbell Trophy and Adm. Thatch Award. Despite being a relatively new squadron, HSM-70 is quickly becoming well known throughout the fleet for upholding the highest Navy standards. HSM-70 in the same basic Middle East area where you made a stand, he said. The congressman contin ued, America has always been blessed to have men and women like you, who are will ing to put personal dreams on hold and serve our coun try. To the men and women of our armed forces, to our veter ans honored today and to your families and friends, I thank you for your patriotism. Your sacrifices are priceless; your dedication is appreciated; and through you, our countrys strength is resolute. Sanders then welcomed Van Buskirk who also thanked the veterans for their service. The Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen who served in Desert Shield and Desert Storm not only achieved a signifi cant military victory, but also renewed Americans belief in their military and its ability to fight and win a major military action. To all of the veterans of Desert Shield and Desert Storm in attendance today, I com mend you and thank you for your service and sacrifice and for the legacy you left behind for todays service members, said Van Buskirk. Each individual Desert Shield/Desert Storm vet eran was then recognized and presented with a certifi cate of Special Congressional Recognition in honor of their service to our country by Crenshaw and Van Buskirk. After every veteran was rec ognized, Sanders read Old Glory as NAS Jax Sailors per formed the passing of the flag. The flag was then presented to Crenshaw who in turn presented it to Desert Shield/Desert Storm veteran retired Adm. Stan Arthur, former commander, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command during Operation Desert Storm. This is a great event to honor veterans who took part in these operations. Our armed services were trained for these operations we were going into the unknown and had no idea of what we were fac ing. Fortunately, we preserved and won the battle and Im very proud of the young men and women who participated in Operation Desert Shield/ Storm, said Arthur. The ceremony concluded with a 21-gun salute, the play ing of Taps by members of Navy Band Southeast and the bene diction. I think this is just outstanding that the congressman rec ognized us today for our ded icated service to our country and the support we provided during these operations, said retired CWO2 David Harvey, who was deployed on board USS Juett and was in the Persian Gulf when Iraq invad ed Kuwait. I really appreciate this and it was an honor to be here today. This is one way to say thank you to men and women in the military who put their lives on the line to defend the freedom and democracy that we enjoy, said Crenshaw. This is prob ably one of the most reward ing things I do as a member of Congress. We have honored a lot of the veterans from prior wars and we thought with this most recent war that it was appropriate to honor these folks. CEREMONY 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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and foremost, must set the conditions through personal example and integrity in their own actions. In September, he approached his Leadership Mess, a group of fleet, force and command master chiefs, asking them to speak with their Messes and help pinpoint top areas where the CPO community could make positive and immediate impacts on good order and discipline. After reviewing hundreds of responses, it became overwhelmingly clear that four areas stand out above all others, said Stevens. Leadership through per sonal example; accountability commen surate with responsibility; clear, unam biguous and personal communication throughout the chain of command; and excellence in the things we have rather than continuously inventing new solu tions. Discussing distractions beyond our control, MCPON outlined the concept of control and influence within our own sphere in his letter, Zeroing in on Excellence: Controlling What We Own. There are many things that you and I do own and control, including good order and discipline, technical train ing, maintenance/administrative pro duction, and the execution of orders, said Stevens. We also have the ability to control much of our own lives by becoming and remaining physically, mentally, morally, and spiritually sound. MCPONs Zeroing in on Excellence letters lay the framework for individual Chiefs Messes and commands to work within, allowing them to take his guid ance and determine how to best employ the initiative to their specific commands and messes in order to functionally and effectively support CNOs Sailing Directions, build an environment where our entire Navy gets stronger, and fol low the fundamental standard to work hard, stay out of trouble and be good and decent people. MCPON The Navy Exchange (NEX) wants to help its customers finance their chil drens college education through its A-OK Student Reward Program. All qualified students will participate in a quarterly drawing for monetary awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500 for a total of $5,500 per quarter. The next drawing will be held at the end of November 2012. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point average equiva lent or better, as determined by their school system, may enter the drawing. Eligible students include dependent children of active duty military mem bers, reservists and military retirees enrolled in first through 12th grade. Dependent children without an indi vidual Dependent Identification Card must be accompanied by their sponsor to submit their entry. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter the drawing, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the mini mum grade average. Then fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX products and services. The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) has been offer ing students a chance to pay for col lege through its A-OK Student Reward Program since 1997. Since the program began, NEXCOM has awarded over $600,000 in Series EE U.S. savings bonds and monetary awards with the help of its generous vendor partners.NEX rewards students with its A-OK Student Reward Program JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 7

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8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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As the U.S. Marine Corps counted its 237th birthday in 2012, military officials gathered at the Pentagon Nov. 7 to enjoy a slice of both the services storied his tory and its ceremonial cake. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chair man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, were on hand, along with Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Amos. An excerpt of the annual birthday message written in 1921 by Gen. John Lejeune, the services 13th comman dant, reads, Generation after genera tion of Marines have grown grey in war in both hemispheres and in every cor ner of the seven seas so that our country and its citizens might enjoy peace and security. Amos explained the messages enduring relevance. One of the things we really never want to atrophy is our history in the minds and hearts and souls of every body that wears the eagle, globe and anchor, Amos said. In August, Amos said, he and his wife visited Guadalcanal, site of the 19421943 campaign that marked the first major offensive in the World War II Pacific theater. That was a spiritual experience for us, and we were mindful of all those 1,300 Marines that give their lives there, Amos said of wading into the waters there. He read the account of a young Marine from George Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, who said a noncommissioned officer at Guadalcanal did manage to read Lejeunes birthday message to some platoons, while cooks prepared a cake from rice flour for the birthday celebration. As each man went through the chow line, besides a thin slice of Spam with a hard biscuit, we all received a thin portion of cake, Amos quoted from the Marines account. The 28th Marine Corps comman dant, retired Gen. P.X. Kelley, described during the ceremony how his Vietnam experiences and the loss of his father in World War II still inspire his visits to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. He imparted advice to spectators. Go at night, he said. Thats where you see the real hard-core people with their hand on a name or a bended knee. Happy 237TH Birthday, United States Marine Corps JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 9

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Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast employ ees worked hard on the largest event ever produced by the U.S. Navy and the City of Jacksonville. The Navy-Marine Corps Classic NCAA basketball game was played Nov. 9 on board USS Bataan (LHD 5), at Naval Station (NS) Mayport. The Bataan, a multipurpose amphibious assault ship, would seem at first glance to be a strange place to hold a NCAA college basketball game, but thats exactly happened, along with a concert featuring the group Little Big Town. This is absolutely a first in my career, a really unique opportunity, said NS Mayport Public Works Officer Cmdr. Miguel Dieguez. To both see a production like this get put together, and to do it on a Navy warship of this size is extraordinary. Dieguez, NAVFAC Southeasts proj ect officer for the game, has been point man for the project since May. Set-up for the event included con struction of approximately 3,500 tem porary seats, an NCAA regulation bas ketball court, and infrastructure to support TV production (sound, video display boards, lighting) and broadcast (camera towers). Since, Nov. 2, a contractor workforce of nearly 60 people worked 10-12 hour days, in close coordination with Bataan and NS Mayport personnel, to put the site together. The game between the University of Florida Gators and the Georgetown University Hoyas is just part of the Week of Valor, a weeklong celebration hosted by the City of Jacksonville and the Florida Blue corporation, honoring veterans, reservists and active duty, for their service to the nation. Dieguez became involved in preparations early on when the idea was first presented to the Secretary of the Navy to hold a college basketball game on a U.S. Navy warship at NS Mayport. His team also worked the utilities and infrastructure support basically any thing that touches the physical plant of the base. His team also coordinated NAVFAC Southeast integral to Navy-Marine Corps Classic prep 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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with engineers from Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) to ensure the game-day complex (bleachers, basket ball court, sound system, etc.) were safe and built to specifications. It makes me feel proud, said Dieguez. This is such a huge oppor tunity for both the U.S. Navy and the City of Jacksonville to put their best foot forward. Last years Quicken Loans Carrier Classic was hosted on board the air craft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) in San Diego. In addition to the basketball game, the evening also featured a concert and fan fest with food and beverage venders, and military static displays in the parking lot adjacent to the Bataans mooring. Thirty-five hundred fans got a birdseye view of the basketball game from bleachers on Bataans flight deck, but another 12,000 or so spectators enjoyed the game on large video monitors set up at the concert and static display venue below. Danny Williams, NS Mayport Crane Program Manager and NAVFAC Southeast employee, directed the approximately 200 crane lifts required to get the equipment needed aboard Bataan. Williams said it took about 30 hours using two cranes to lift the dis assembled bleachers, basketball court and other items to the flight deck. He said that it was a unique task compared to normal port operations. We were happy to support this spectacular event Nov. 9, said PWD Mayport Production Officer Lt. Cheron Thornton. She was responsible for working the support issues between the Bataan and the base. Her team provided cranes, vehicles and utilities (power) to the ship. This is the first time the Navy has done something like this in coordi nation with a city government, said Dieguez. In this case, the City of Jacksonville is putting up the financial resources to make this happen. It really speaks well of our local citizens they really love having the military as part of their community. NAVFAC JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 11

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The VP-8 Fighting Tigers, on deployment in Misawa, Japan, once more showed their solidarity, com passion and generosity during a Nov. 7 fundraising event for those recent ly affected by Hurricane Sandy in the northeastern United States. The squadrons First Class Petty Officers Association (FCPOA) conduct ed a two-day bake sale an idea sug gested during one of the associations meetings by AE1 Joshua Eason. When a fundraiser to aid the Red Cross Hurricane Sandy relief efforts was suggested, everyone jumped on board with ideas and suggestions. As always, the FCPOA embraced the idea and made the fundraiser a reality, said NC1 Deborah Spinner. All the baked goods were donated by the squadrons first class petty officers, commonly known as the Aces, who also organized and executed the sale. The Tigers came out in full support, eager to help in any way they could, said AM1 Angela Berrios, the squad rons FCPOA secretary. Because VP-8 is deployed to Japans northern region which was heav ily damaged during the 2011 tsunami they have seen first hand the need for long-term support for those affected by natural disasters. The Aces will take the $881 raised from the bake sale and transmit the money electronically to the American Red Cross. Our thoughts and prayers are with the families that have been uprooted, and those that are currently dealing with the aftermath. As a military member, it is our job to protect our nation, and I feel powerless being so far away. This is our way of helping to support the cause and hope that it will make an impact in someones life, said Spinner. The FCPOA reminded their ship mates that they can still donate by vis iting www.redcross.org, calling 1-800RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or tex ting the word REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation. Any donation enables the Red Cross to provide shel ter, food, emotional support and other assistance to those affected. The NAS Jacksonville-based Fighting Tigers are on a six-month scheduled deployment in support of U.S. 7th Fleet. The commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet and the commander of U.S. Fleet Forces recently released a personal for (P4) message to leaders under their command to address how poor judgment and destructive behavior by Navy personnel is unacceptable and negatively impacts warfighting readi ness. In the message, Adm. Cecil Haney, commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, and Adm. William Gortney, commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command, directed commanders to get more actively involved in prevent ing destructive behavior by ensuring their Sailors are aware of, and abide by, the rules of conduct established by the Navy Ethos. The goal is that every Sailor, down to the deckplate level, makes a commit ment to recognize potential problems and have the courage to intervene before bad behavior occurs. It is the responsibility of every commander to make sure their Sailors are properly representing the U.S. Navy regardless of where they are or what they are doing, the message read. There were 496 sexual assaults reported in fiscal 2012, more than half involving alcohol. Because of these types of incidents, the Navy held a focused Sexual Assault Awareness campaign in April during National Sexual Assault Awareness month. The Navy has also implemented more training programs aimed at educating and encouraging Sailors to speak out against these crimes. Warfighting readiness is predicated on the relationships forged between Sailors and with partners. One instance of poor personal judgment in the workplace or on liberty can put these crucial relationships and readiness at risk. Our warfighting strategy relies in part on the willingness of host nations to provide our forces access to their ports, Haney and Gortney wrote in their message. To support this mis sion area, our Sailors must be exem plary ambassadors of our Navy and our nation. In conjunction with the release of the P4 message, U.S. Pacific Fleet Master Chief John Minyard addressed Sailors from Navy Region Hawaii. During two separate calls with junior and senior enlisted personnel, Minyard emphasized the opportunity for all Sailors to be leaders in preventing shipmates from making poor deci sions. We have to own good order and discipline within our commands, at every level of leadership, and I believe we can do that, Minyard said. You need to know your people, you need to lead your people, and you need to be involved in their decisions. Every Sailor, E-1 thru O-10, has a responsibility to look out for the safe ty of their shipmates and to always hold themselves to the highest levels of accountability for their actions at home and abroad, he said. If we have the moral courage to step in and stop destructive behavior before it occurs, we can eliminate these incidents. The admirals concluded that the U.S. Navy has been a global force for good and that our conduct shapes our ability to position forces forward, to be ready, and to fight and win when required. We must strive to eradicate sexual assaults and other destructive behav ior by identifying problems and inter vening early, they wrote. Respect for others is fundamental to our character and part of our Navy ethos. Aces raise funds for Hurricane Sandy victims Fleet commanders message on personal conduct 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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DEWEYSCall 542-3521 Deweys is located in Bldg. 608 between Gillis St. and Keily St. off of Enterprise Ave. Monday Friday 10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 4 10 p.m. CPO Lounge Monday, Tuesday & Friday 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Wednesday Thursday 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m. Deweys Specials Monday Pizza madness 29 p.m. one topping pizza for only $5 Free Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday social hours, 79 p.m., $.50 wings & $7.95 pizza your way NFL Ticket Sunday 12:30 9 p.m., $.50 wingsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Kennedy Space Center Adult $40, child $31 Entertainment Books $30 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam February 23, 2013 Preferred seating $41, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3 day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31, 2013 and must be redeemed by June 30, 2013. Ask about our special discounted tickets for family members. Gator Bowl tickets $35 Gator Bowl Patch $9 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day $29.50, 2 day $40, Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT! Daytona 500 Feb. 24, 2013 tickets on sale now! $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Islands of Adventure Weekend Trip Nov. 17 & 18 $40 per person Mall & Movie Trip Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater Nov. 23 at 6 p.m. Kennedy Space Center Trip Nov. 24 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Nov. 27 for active duty Nov. 15 & 29 for retirees & DoD personnel Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Turkey Trot Killer Scramble Nov. 21 at noon $50 entry fee, $60 for civilian guests Four person scramble Let us cook for you! Order turkey dinners at MulligansMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Dashing Through The Grove Saturday, Dec. 8 48 p.m. at Patriots Grove Free snow sledding, photos with Santa, tree lighting, musical entertainment and more! For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239, or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil A Driver Improvement Class designed specifi cally for dependent driv ers between 15 and 21 years of age will be held Nov. 19 from 8 a.m. -1 p.m. in Building 1. There will be no time behind the wheel of a vehicle it is a classroom session only. Those who pass the multiple-choice test will receive AAA Driver Improvement Class completion certifi cates. If you believe your teen can benefit from driv ing tips by professional driving instructors, sign them up for the Teen Driver Improvement Class. Contact Linda at 542-3082 or Cindy at 5422584. Teen driving class JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 13

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Get started during Great American SmokeoutSmoking cessation is a two-part process: the first is stopping and the second is staying stopped. Because nicotine is one of the worlds most powerfully addictive drugs its also one of the toughest addictions to overcome. And thats not to mention the fact that tobacco use can shorten the average lifespan by 15 years, said Brook Keen, a health promotion spe cialist at the Naval Hospital Wellness Center. She is a former smoker who under stands both the challenges and rewards of smoking cessation. Our four-week tobacco cessation program is available for active duty, retirees and other TRICARE-eligible beneficiaries. No appointment is required, so walk-ins at building 867 on Enterprise Avenue are always wel come, said Keen. The program is run by two certi fied smoking cessation facilitators who work under direction of Naval Hospital Jacksonville Director of Public Health Capt. Joseph McQuade, M.D. Program participants may choose individual or group sessions. Participants attend one session per week for four weeks, with unlimited follow-up counseling for relapse pre vention available. Whether you smoke, chew or dip, you can improve your health through our tobacco cessation program. The educational component of our program helps quitters deal with challenges such as stress, weight gain and alcohol use, explained Keen. Participants may choose from a variety of nicotine replacement aids, including the transdermal patch, nicotine lozenges and nicotine gum. Other aids include prescription medications such as Zyban and Chantix. Active duty members of the aviation and submarine communities are not allowed to use the prescription medications, but may use any of the nicotine replacement aids. This is a comprehensive threemonth program where we maintain communications with participants on a weekly basis by telephone or email. As an added support component, partici pants may join in any of our group sessions that take place three times a week to reinforce positive behavior changes, said Keen. The weekly tobacco cessation sup port group sessions are: Monday at 9 a.m.; Tuesday at 2 a.m.; and Thursday at noon. Regardless of the amount of your nicotine usage or length of addiction you can overcome one of the most power ful drugs with help from the Naval Hospital Wellness Center. Call 542-5292 for more information. Ready to quit smoking, dipping or chewing? JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 15

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Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast hosted its quarterly energy partnership meeting aboard NAS Jacksonville, Nov. 8, at the Gateway Inn and Suites Conference Center, to learn about the latest in eco-friendly and energy saving technology. Its a great opportunity for us as the government to part ner with industry, the experts out there, to find ways togeth er to meet our energy goals, said Lt. Cmdr. Doug Herrin, NAVFAC Southeast energy team leader, in his opening remarks. Herrin said in fiscal year 2012 (FY12), NAVFAC Southeast awarded 34 ener gy projects. Navy Region Southeast is scheduled to award 53 energy projects in FY13. Herrin also noted the region is making strides in energy conservation stating electrical use was down 4.7 percent and natural gas use was down 15.2 percent in FY12 compared to FY11. Eight venders, including six presenters, were on hand to discuss a diverse collection of environmentally friendly and energy saving products and services available to help NAVFAC Southeast personnel better evaluate current energy consumption patterns to effect efficiency planning, as well as green technologies to effect savings of dollars, and the precious resources we currently expend. Some of the products and services presented included metering equipment used to evaluate energy consump tion and efficiencies, green solar powered lighting tech nologies and biomass gasification. Heating and air condi tioning energy saving devices, advanced metering and Navy SMART Grid and power man agement and voltage condi tioning were also discussed. NAVFAC Southeast takes great strides to remain current on technology advancement in energy conservation and sus tainment for capital improve ment and renovation projects. This event gives us the opportunity to learn from industry professionals what their latest technology and services offer to help the Navy reach its energy goals in the Southeast, said Leigh Adams, NAVFAC Southeast energy program engineer and the event organizer. Vendors interested in pre senting at future quarterly energy partnership events may contact the program coordina tor at (904) 542-6760. During his retirement ceremony at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Nov. 8, the production direc tor received the Navys third highest civilian award for his last seven years of distinguished service, ending a notable 33-year career. Capt. Robert Caldwell, the FRCSE commanding officer, presented Bobby Stroud, Jr. with a Meritorious Civilian Service Award for his contributions to the production of EA-6B Prowler, F/A-18 Hornet, H-60 Seahawk, P-3 Orion, T-34 and T-44 Trainer aircraft, four engines types and numerous components. Caldwell said when he arrived at FRCSE in September 2006 at the 21-year mark in his career, he had never served in a facility with a predominately civil ian workforce. He said he was fortunate to have Stroud as his mentor, friend and professional advisor to figure out how a depot works dealing with capital funds, private industry partners and the unions. During his lengthy career in feder al service at FRCSE, Stroud has held numerous positions and has seen many changes as a result of world events, such as the Cold War, Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, the 9/11 ter rorist attacks and Operation Enduring Freedom. His focus has always been on what is best for the taxpayer and the warfighter. The business decisions weve made over the years have not always been popular, but they have always been based on whats best for the Fleet, said Stroud during an earlier interview. Thats something to be proud of. We produce products; we produce hard ware. When you see an F/18 (Hornet strike fighter) on TV, I can actually say I had something to do with that. Stroud started his career in February 1978 stripping paint from aircraft, a temporary Wage Grade 06 position that lasted only 10 months. He was subse quently rehired for the same job and picked up for permanent service in September 1980. He was next selected for a career progression ladder, General Schedule (GS) 5/7/9, in the Methods and Standards Department where he worked his way up to section supervi sor. His success landed him a manage ment analyst job in a GS-11 position. In the early 1990s, he transferred to the Business Office where he was tasked with writing J52 engine proposals for public/private competition, answering Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) data calls and working on BRAC implementation. Under the commands reorganization, Stroud competed and was selected as the Business Department head. Stroud moved to production support when Capt. David Beck assumed com mand in 2003 of FRCSE, then called Naval Air Depot Jacksonville. In August 2005 when Capt. John Scanlan, II took the helm, Stroud landed the production director position where he has served since. Under Strouds direction, FRCSE Implemented Franklin Coveys 4 Disciplines of Execution methodology. This radically changed the leadership culture in the command by developing Wildly Important Goals and establish ing a system to ensure accountabili ty within FRCSE. This enabled FRCSE to reduce execution costs from Fiscal Year (FY) 08 through FY12, resulting in an average annual cost avoidance of $48 million, which directly improved Naval Aviation Enterprise readiness by increasing the fleets buying power. In addition, Stroud developed a reduced component unit price (CPU) initiative that was adopted by NAVFAC Southeast energy partnership meeting FRCSE production director retires with 33 years of distinguished service 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Navy-Marine Corps Classic played on Bataan flight deckWeather interferes with second halfSailors and civilians on board the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) attended the Navy-Marine Corps Classic NCAA basketball game between the University of Florida Gators and the University of Georgetown Hoyas, Nov. 9. The flight deck was transformed from launching and landing six different types of aircraft during flight quarters, to a basketball court with seats holding more than 1,000 people. The Navy-Marine Corps Classic was the highlight of the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor. Jacksonville and the surrounding communi ties have a long tradition of supporting Sailors and Marines. The Week of Valor honors veterans, active and reserve service members, as well as military families. Jacksonville has always been a great Navy town, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. We are mov ing an amphibious ready group, including a ship like this, to Jacksonville. It is one of the ways we connect the ship to the city and the U.S. Navy to the American people, because when we are doing our job we are usually a long way from home. During half time at the game, the audience got an inside look at Navy life when Mabus reenlisted seven Sailors. After the re-enlistment oath, players from both teams shook the hands of the enlistees. Fewer than one percent of America serves in uni form, yet they keep the other 99 percent of us safe, 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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said Mabus. These seven Sailors who reen listed are some of the best we have. Unfortunately, before the players could finish the game, condensa tion covered the court and officials stopped the game to ensure the players safety. The game came to a close after 20 minutes of playing time with the Florida Gators lead ing 27 to 23. Thank you everyone for mak ing this event possible, said John Thompson III, head coach, Georgetown University. Thank you for hosting us, and to all the Sailors who represent us out here. Its been an unbelievable experi ence for our guys just to be a part of this event and the fact that the game is ending doesnt take away from that. Several players said participat ing in the game was a small way to give back to the Sailors who defend America. Its an amazing experience just to have the opportunity to come out here on a ship, said Otto Porter, team member of the Georgetown Hoyas. Its just one of those things where we got to come out here and support the Navy and soldiers back home. Sailors also savored the expe rience of the Navy-Marine Corps Classic basketball game. I thought the game was won derful, said CTSN(SW) Brianna Williams, a Bataan Sailor. I was amazed that they turned our ship into a stadium so quickly. The Week of Valor presented Bataan Sailors with many lasting experiences, including watching the NFL Jacksonville Jaguars practice and play a game Nov. 8 against the Indianapolis Colts, as well as participating in a community relations project, and enjoying at a free concert by country band Little Big Town at NS Mayport prior to the game. BATAAN JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 19

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NAS Jacksonville has receive funding in the amount of $2.6 million from the Office of the Secretary of Defense to renovate the base gymnasium. The facil ity will be closed Dec. 17 through June 30, 2013. Cardio and weight training equipment, gear issue, and the gym and administration opera tions will be temporarily relo cated to Building 798 (old loca tion of The Zone) from Jan. 14 through June 30. Unfortunately, showers and locker storage will not be avail able during this temporary move, however, bathroom facili ties are available on site. Due to the lack of laundry facilities in Building 798, towels will not be available. ue at this location Monday and Wednesday at 11 a.m. expanded the hours of opera tions from 5 a.m. 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. cancel indoor winter basketball and badminton leagues. racquetball courts will also be closed until project completion. tion will be complete Jan. 1 and will support Surface Search and Rescue classes and command physical readiness testing until April 1. facilities and locker rooms, rec reation swimming at the indoor pool will remain closed until the gym renovation project is com pleted. open on April 1 for lap swim ming from 5:30-8 a.m.; 11 a.m.1 p.m.; 4:30-8 p.m., Monday through Friday. Additionally, the outdoor pool will be available for Reserve units on drill weekends for physical fitness training if requested. For more information, contact MWR Program Director John Bushick at 542-4768 or e-mail john.bushick@navy.mil. Gymnasium and indoor pool operations change for renovation 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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The world-famous Budweiser Clydesdales, the symbol of quality and tradition for Anheuser-Busch since 1933, are scheduled to make sever al appearances in the area Nov.14-18, including one at NAS Jacksonville to honor our serving military members and their families. The eight-horse hitch will be har nessed and hitched to the famous red beer wagon at the Navy Exchange Nov. 15 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Clydesdales appearance in Jacksonville is one of hundreds made annually by the traveling hitches. Canadians of Scottish descent brought the first Clydesdales to America in the mid-1800s. Today, the giant draft hors es are used primarily for breeding and show. Horses chosen for the Budweiser Clydesdale hitch must be at least three years of age, stand approximately 18 hands or six feet at the shoulder, weigh an average of 2,000 pounds, must be bay in color, have four white legs, and a blaze of white on the face and black mane and tail. A gentle temperament is very important as hitch horses meet millions of people each year. A single Clydesdale hitch horse will consume as much as 20-25 quarts of feed, 40-50 pounds of hay and 30 gal lons of water per day. Each hitch travels with a Dalmatian. In the early days of brewing, Dalmatians were bred and trained to protect the horses and guard the wagon when the driver went inside to make deliveries. The Budweiser Clydesdales can be viewed at the Anheuser-Busch brewer ies in St. Louis, Mo.; Merrimack, N.H.; and Ft. Collins, Colo. They also may be viewed at Grants Farm in St. Louis and at Warm Springs Ranch, the 300-plus acre Clydesdale breeding farm located near Boonville, Mo. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Sailors and Marines paid homage to two survivors of the World War II Bataan Death March during a ceremony held on board USS Bataan (LHD 5) as a part of the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor, Nov. 8. This ship was commissioned in 1997 to honor the sacrifices of those who have gone before us, said Capt. Erik Ross, the ships commanding officer. This ceremony honored Donato Abalos and Patricio Ganio, both of whom marched nearly 60 miles during a forc ible transfer of more than 70,000 Filipino and American prisoners of war by the Imperial Japanese Army. The march followed the three-month Battle of Bataan in the Philippines. These two individuals sacrificed, said Ross. Their dedication, their courage, their perseverance, and most remarkable in my opinion, their humility in a time where humility was rare. Both of you are true heroes. During the march, many prisoners died from abuse, murder or exhaustion, while others were not given food or water until they had reached Balanga, the capital of Bataan. These acts of heroism were not lost on the crew attending the cer emony. I felt very honored to see them because everything they went through was extremely dangerous, said ABAA Elizabeth Blanco. The reason we honor them today is not only because our ship is named after their struggle, but because there is a sense of pride and you have to be proud. Being in the Navy, I am proud to serve my country, proud to wear the uniform. Whether its speaking to others about serving in the military or working long hours during flight operations. I want to thank them for giving us an example to do the same. I am happy to be here. After the ceremony, service members were able shake hands with the survivors and many were moved by the experience. I was extremely humbled and hon ored to be in the presence of war heroes, said Lance Cpl. Ian Delacruz stationed in Camp Lejuene, N.C. To have the opportunity to hear what they have gone through and survived is very heartwarming. Im infantry, so our job is to be on the frontlines and put ourselves at risk. To hear what they did, Im just honored to be able to shake their hands and when I did, I dont know if this is the right way to say it, but it just felt right. I feel like we are in the same line of work and they are my predecessors. Im proud to be here today to pick up where they left off. The Battan is the second ship to be named in honor of the march. The first was USS Bataan (CVL-29/AVT-4), which was originally planned as USS Buffalo, but was renamed on June 2, 1942 after the tragedy occurred. A translator added that Ganio and Abalos were proud to be recognized after all of these years and were very thankful for the opportunity to attend. World-renowned Budweiser Clydesdales to visit NAS Jax USS Bataan marches on in honor of the fallen More than 800 people attended the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce kick off its 10th Military Appreciation Luncheon, Nov. 5, at Prime Osborn Convention Center in downtown Jacksonville, kicking off the Week of Valor to honor military members, veterans and their families. Today is the first day of ... a week long salute to the service and the sacrifice of our military members, our veterans and family who support them, said Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown. I believe that is very appro priate, that the first of what will be terrific events planned this week is led by JAX Chamber. During the luncheon, Brown pledged the citys continued dedi cation to the military, highlighting that the military is a large part of Jacksonvilles economy and way of life. The military delivers an economic impact of 12.2 billion dollars here in Jacksonville, said Brown. In the City of Jacksonville, the military helps define who we are and the high value we place on civic respon sibility, service and sacrifice. My administration is focused on making Jacksonville the most military friendly city in the nation. Keynote speaker Lt. Gen. William Faulkner, deputy commandant for Installations and Logistics United States Marines Corps, took the podi um and highlighted programs the city provides for service members and veterans. He thanked the Mayor and the city for their work on behalf of the military. Initiatives like your Jobs for Vets Web site designed to connect job seeking veterans to veteran-friendly employers in the city, is an impres sive template for other cities around the United States to emulate, said Faulkner. With the support of a grateful nation and proud and faith ful Americans, such as the citizens of Jacksonville who recognize the sacrifice of our brave warriors, were con fident that we will continue to be ever faithful in meeting the nations need for military crisis response. Chamber hosts 10th military appreciation luncheon JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 21

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The Jacksonville Jaguars hosted a military appreciation game at EverBank Field Nov. 9. While the action on the field was the main focus as the Jaguars took on the Indianapolis Colts for more than 60,000 screaming fans, a moment that had nothing to do with football may have pro duced the loudest cheers. The entire stadium was on its feet as CM1(SCW) William Cook ran out of the tunnel to meet his wife and daughters during halftime. Cook, who is assigned to Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CMBU) 202 at NAS Jacksonville, spent the last 10 months deployed to Afghanistan as an Individual Augmentee (IA). He had not seen his family since last Christmas, and his family was completely unaware that he was coming home. But thanks to the Jacksonville Jaguars and his chain of command, he was able to reunite with his fam ily earlier than expected. The event was even more special to Williams and his family because it just happened to be his daughters 21st birthday. Im still in shock. I really never expected to see my father tonight, said Kasey, Cooks daughter. Its definitely a really special thing to be able to get together tonight because I didnt expect to be able to cel ebrate this birthday together. But this is as good of a birthday present as I could ask for. The military appreciation game was sponsored by the City of Jacksonville and the Jaguars as part of the Week of Valor, a city-sponsored ini tiative designed to showcase Jacksonville as one of the most military-friendly cities in the country. Cook was informed by his senior enlisted advi sor about three weeks ago that he was selected to come home early and participate in the event. He was originally scheduled to return next week, but arrived in Jacksonville Wednesday, instead. The whole thing was over whelming . it really took me by surprise, he said. I wasnt really sure if my daughter was going to be able to make it because shes in the process of moving, but I think it was really cool for her to have me home for her birthday. According to Cook, it was a real challenge to keep his family from realizing that he was still overseas throughout the past two days, but thanks to social media, he was able to pull it off. They thought he was in Kuwait going through the Navys Warrior Transition Program, which is designed to ease the transition for Sailors returning from deployment. Social media came into play because the guys over there kept tagging me in their posts, saying, Hey, were in Kuwait hanging out watching movies with Lt. OConnell and Chief Berg, you know, so we were able to keep it a big secret until the game. The post-deployment fam ily reunion was the third of its kind since Cook enlisted in the Navy in 1995. He was deployed twice previously to Iraq and Afghanistan, including a tour in 2005 where he was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon. A native of Hopactong, N.J., Cook said he never really con sidered the Navy as a career when he first enlisted. I didnt have a great job and I wanted to do something bet ter with my life. I heard about the Seabees, thought that it was something I could do and Ive been doing it now for 17 years. Ive had some pretty good tours and I look at it as probably the best thing that ever happened to me, he said. Throughout his career, Cook has been stationed in Norfolk, Va., Charleston, S.C., Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and served multiple times in Port Hueneme, Calif., and Okinawa, Japan. He volunteered for his third IA assignment shortly after reporting to his current position at CMBU 202. I was the maintenance manager for the detachment here, and I dont like sitting for too long. I heard about these provincial reconstruc tion teams (PRT) that go out and do a lot of stuff with the Department of Agriculture and USAID (United States Agency for International Development), going out and trying to make Afghanistan a better place, he said. After completing PRT training, Cook reported to Afghanistan, where he spent most of the past year support ing reconstruction efforts. After a long 10 months, he finally flew into Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport on Wednesday for outprocessing and then on to NAS Jacksonville the following day. Im grateful for the oppor tunity to come home a week early, and Id like to thank the city of Jacksonville for making this happen, he said. I think the NFL Salutes the Military is a really great program. Its an honor to be selected. You dont get many of these opportuni ties and I thank them for their efforts to get me home. Now that he is home, Cook is looking to take some time off and relax, but life at home also comes with its own challenges, he said. Im planning on taking a lot of time off, but I do have a kitchen to remodel and my wife is waiting for me to get home and get on that. Ive got a back yard to finish up and some housework to do, but I thor oughly enjoy doing that stuff, so Im looking forward to get ting started. Sailor surprises family with homecoming during Jaguars game 22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Commander, Fleet Readiness Centers Governance Board as a pilot enterprise initiative to achieve strategic cost and readiness goals. The initiative was prototyped at FRCSE. As a result, Sailors were integrated into depot-level work centers to perform intermediate maintenance tasks with civilian artisans providing them with valuable training. FRCSE was able to lower the CPU price charged to its warfighting customers. Im proud that we operate in an environment of business, where we sup port the fleet. Im proud of how we have taken all the change over the years with external pressure to drive costs out the equation at a time when that is more important than ever. Stroud said he has accompanied many distinguished visitors during FRCSE tours over the years and always enjoys seeing the amazement register on their faces when they see the facil itys full capabilities. When they see an F/18 spread apart in three pieces, yeah, that is some thing, he said. We can build anything; we can do anything. Its a capability that only exists in one location, a mili tary depot. Private industry doesnt have what we have. Holly Martinez, the deputy produc tion director has been chosen to suc ceed Stroud as the FRCSE production director. FRCSE More than 50 active duty service members and veterans from NAS Jacksonville, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Naval Station Mayport and other area military commands visited 70 elementary, middle and high school classrooms Nov. 5-9 in support of the Week of Valor, a city-sponsored ini tiative designed to showcase Jacksonville as one of the most military-friendly cities in the country. Volunteers visited class rooms in small groups and spoke to students about what it means to serve in the military and stressed the importance of observing Veterans Day. According to Suzanne Speight, a public affairs spe cialist with Navy Region Southeast who coordinated the visits, the efforts of those who volunteered are invaluable to maintaining a good relation ship with the community. The Navy and the military are such a big part of the First Coast community and it is so important for people to know who we are and what we do, she said. Speight said she appreciated the efforts of service members from Blount Island Command and Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville, as well. This was a tremendous joint effort with Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen, along with veterans from the retired community, she said. Throughout the week, the groups spoke to students in dozens of schools, sharing personal experiences in the mili tary, views on Veterans Day and their own school-day experiences. They also answered hun dreds of questions about their careers and the military in general. We were treated to a won derful Veterans Day presenta tion during our communitys Week of Valor, said Khaki Hager, an eighth-grade history teacher at Mandarin Middle School. Lieutenant Wilhelm, Lieutenant Commander Lazenka and Lieutenant Verducci spoke to our team of students and gave a fantastic presentation filled with valu able information. Our students learned so much and we know they are better prepared today for their futures. Southeast Region Command Master Chief Mack Ellis said he takes great pride in knowing that his Sailors had a positive impact on the students. In my opinion, our Sailors and Marines wear the cloth of our nation. Were role models and mentors for our youth, he said. We need to realize the impact and the difference we can make by providing inspiration to the youth of our coun try. They are our future leaders and we need to be at the fore front of their development. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown spoke in a similar tone during his opening remarks at a military appreciation lun cheon Nov. 8. Our military and veterans community already has given so much to our nation. Its an inspiring sight to see these brave men and women continue to give back in our schools, Brown said. This outreach effort is about pairing the leaders of today with the leaders of tomorrow. He also expressed his grati tude to the 900-plus veterans, active duty military members and military leaders in atten dance. Its always a humbling thought to think about the sacrifices made by the men and women of our military, he said. Im honored to work with so many dedicated business leaders and community partners to say thank you for their service and dedication. This years Week of Valor was the first time Jacksonville has hosted such an event, but the city plans to make it an annual occasion. In addition to school speak ing engagements, the Week of Valor also featured a military appreciation luncheon, a job fair, a Veterans Day Parade, the Navy-Marine Corps Carrier Classic NCAA college basket ball game between Florida and Georgetown aboard USS Bataan (LHD 5), and a military appreciation football game between the NFL Jacksonville Jaguars and Indianapolis Colts. Last week, I saw a retiree who was about my age in Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles family medicine clinic. He grew up knowing how bad tobacco could be, and still, he told me he had a hard time quitting. He tried using medications to help, with some suc cess, but said that stress had led him to start smoking again. He was obese and had pre-diabetes and unhealthy cholesterol levels. What should a doctor or a friend or family member do for a person in this situation? We celebrate the Great American Smokeout on Nov. 15 and it gives everyone a chance to stop, even if just for a minute, to think about how to help tobacco users like this patient who need some help. In recent years, ideas about how to help tobacco users has matured somewhat to identify tobacco use as a chronic, relapsing medical condi tion and not just a bad habit. Tobacco use is a disease, an addiction to nic otine that is very difficult to break. Treatment needs to be approached in a systemic fashion, with patients being asked about tobacco use at every medical or dental visit, and being offering medications at every visit. It should be as easy to get started on a medication to quit as it is to buy a pack of ciga rettes. Clinical guidelines direct provid ers to consider tobacco users for a wide range of screenings. All smok ers should be immunized with a flu shot every year and a pneumonia vaccine once before age 65. All smok ers over age 40 should be referred for lung function measurement to help diagnose emphysema earlier. At age 65, smokers should be screened for aortic abdominal aneurysms using ultrasound. Skin exams should be more frequent and more extensive for smokers, as the risk of skin cancer is increased in people with a smoking history. Bone scans should be con sidered earlier to document calcium loss for patients who continue smok ing. Hip fracture rates are markedly increased among people who continue to smoke. Smokers should also be screened far more closely for other conditions, such as depression and anxiety. People with mental illnesses smoke at rates nearly twice as high (44 percent) as the general public (22.5 percent) in the U.S. and nearly half the cigarettes smoked in this country are consumed by people with psychiatric or addictive disorders. Life expectancy is dramatically improved among women who quit smoking compared to those who dont quit, according to a recent study in Great Britain. This sounds like something we already know, but its very important to be clear that contin ued smoking triples the risk of dying at age 50 in the more than one mil lion women studied. The study also showed that even light smokers (fewer than 10 cigarettes a day) were at sub stantially increased risk of death relative to never-smokers. So, as we celebrate the Great American Smokeout, I encourage and support my fellow providers and the public in treating the disease of smoking as a chronic, long-term condition that can take eight or nine attempts to quit for good. Tobacco use is hard. Tobacco users need consistent, firm and impartial commitment over time to help them quit for good. Every November, we should all take time to support our friends and family who continue to smoke, and help them choose to quit one more time, in the hope that its the final time. Were standing by to help you quit at NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center (next to the base fitness center) at 5425292, or at your next visit to any pro vider at NH Jacksonville, including Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville. We have tools to help you successfully quit once and for all, including prescrip tion medication, nicotine gum and classes. Additional resources include the Department of Defense Quit Tobacco Make Everyone Proud website at www.ucanquit2.org, TRICAREs Quitline at 877-414-9949, and Tobacco Free Florida at 877-U-CAN-NOW (877822-6669). Start making your quit plan today! Southeast Region Sailors, veterans support Week of Valor Another Great American Smokeout who smokes now? When entering into a residential lease, both landlords and tenants alike hope that everything runs smoothly. While this is usually the case, some times problems arise. The following are ways to protect yourself when entering into a residential lease. Read your lease before you sign Always read your lease in its entirety before signing. A lease may seem like a bunch of legal jargon, but remember, you will be bound by its terms. Do you have to upkeep the lawn? Do you have to give notice when you move out? If so, how much14, 30, 60 days? What is the procedure for notifying your landlord about repairs? Taking an hour to review the lease before signing could save you a lot of timeand moneyin the future. Get everything in writing Scenario: Lease says you must pay $40 a month for lawn service. You tell the landlord that you do not want this service. They tell you not to worry about it because they will not charge you and to just sign the lease. What should you do? Before signing anything, get the landlords promise in writing and make sure it is incorporated into the lease. All promises/agreements should be in writing. If an agreement is made in person or over the phone after you sign the lease, follow up with an e-mail confirming the details of the conversation. This is to avoid having to prove the existence of an oral agreement in court if a dis pute arises. Conduct a thorough inspection Upon moving in, make sure you inspect your new place thoroughly. Take pictures, make a list of defects, and provide a copy of the list to your land lord immediately. This will prove that you are not responsible for pre-existing conditions. Similarly, upon moving out, be present during the final inspection and take pictures of the condition in which you are leaving your place. If the inspector does not see any problems, make sure you get that in writing. Security deposits What does your lease say about security deposits? Is the pet deposit nonrefundable? Under what conditions could the landlord retain the depos it? Once you have moved, the land lord is most likely required to return the deposit or provide a list of deductions for damages within a certain period of time. This requirement varies state-bystate. In Florida, your landlord has 15 days to return your deposit, or 30 days to give you written notice by certified mail explaining the amount theyre keeping and why. If your landlord doesnt give the required notice, they must return all of your deposit. If they do give you notice, you then have 15 days to dispute the claim. Each state has different rules. Military clause The Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) is a federal law that allows a service member to terminate a lease before its expiration date, but only after providing written notice and a copy of PCS orders to the landlord. Even if there is not a military clause in your lease, you are still protected under the SCRA. Under the SCRA, the termination date of your lease will be 30 days after the next payment is due. For example, if you give written notice on 15 February and you pay rent on the first of each month, then your termination date is no earlier than 30 March. Some states have their own versions of the SCRA that give servicemembers additional protections; one of those states is Florida. In Florida, you can terminate a lease for a variety of reasons. The big ones are: you get PCS orders requiring you to move at least 35 miles away; you receive orders requiring you to move into gov ernment quarters; you become eligible to live in government quarters and opt to move into them; or you are released from active duty after having leased your place while on active duty and it is at least 35 miles from your home of record. To terminate your lease, give your landlord: written notice, including a termination date that is at least 30 days after the date you deliver the notice to your landlord, and a copy of your orders or a letter signed by your commanding officer. Once you do this, your landlord must prorate any rent you pay to the termination date. Visit the Region Legal Service Office Southeast Legal Assistance Office for more information.Renting: Protect yourself when signing a lease JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 23

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Humana Military is contracted with the federal government to manage the TRICARE contract for the South Region. The TRICARE office in Orange Park has moved from its Kingsley Avenue loca tion to 769-1 Blanding Boulevard. There are approximately 170,000 TRICARE beneficiaries in the Jacksonville area. TRICARE is the Department of Defenses worldwide health care pro gram available to eligible beneficiaries in any of the seven uniformed servic es the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service, and Commissioned Corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. TRICARE eligible beneficiaries may include active duty service members and their families, retired service members and their families, National Guard and reserve members and their fami lies, survivors, certain former spouses, and others. TRICARE brings together military and civilian health care professionals and resources to provide highquality health care services. For more information about TRICARE benefits, call 1-800-444-5445 or visit www.tricare.mil The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty mem bers including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and fam ily members are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for mili tary personnel, but under no circumstances are dependent children authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may purchase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No exceptions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. TRICARE office movesJacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO 24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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The worlds $110 billion-a-year cyber economy has never been more vulnerable to crime and other threats. Securing the Internet against attacks demands the expertise of government agencies, industry and allies, said the commander of U.S. Cyber Command on Nov. 8 in Washington D.C. Army Gen. Keith Alexander, Cybercom chief and director of the National Security Agency, spoke before a large audience at the Symantec 2012 Government Symposium. The symposium examines a funda mental question: how to protect sensi tive information while enabling col laboration across jurisdictions, nations, and the private sector? Government operations depend on the network. If we lose that network we cant communicate, and what happens when [adversaries] disrupt our network or the power grid or our banking institutions, Alexander asked, adding that the U.S. must work with its partners in industry and its allies to solve the problem. Many will ask about the roles of [the National Security Agency and Cybercom in this, and how can we ensure civil liberties and privacy [as well as] the security of cyberspace? We can do both, he said. One of the first things industry and government must decide is how to make sure all companies involved in U.S. critical infrastructure -including financial and information services and the defense industrial base -institute the highest possible levels of computer security. How many companies in the United States and among our allies are at this level? Alexander asked. We actually do inspections, he added. We inspect our government networks to see how many are at 100 percent cybersecurity. And the answer is, very few. Companies in some sectors, like banking and the high end of the defense industrial base, are right there at the top of computer security, the general said. Then you go out to some companies that are being [by adversaries in cyberspace] and they dont know what the threat looks like nor what they should do, and some of them are in critical infrastructure, he added. Nobody wants to make such an effort hard, costly or bureaucratic, Alexander said. The question is how do we help them? he said. Whats the right forum for government and industry to work together to help those companies get to the right level of security? Another imperative for governmentindustry collaboration involves gaps in computer security exploited by what are called zero-day attacks -those that exploit vulnerabilities in computer applications. Eventually, patches are created to plug the security holes, but not before adversaries have entered and damaged the network or stolen intellectual property. Alexander used an analogy to explain how Cybercom or the NSA could help industry identify what the gener al called bad packets, or those that carry destructive payloads out on the Internet. Internet service providers see pack ets out there. We want them to be able to see bad packets and do something about them. Well have [an examination process] for every packet. And well say, Did you see a bad packet in the network? Tell us where its coming from and going to, and stop it because [its carrying] a destructive payload, the general explained. When they see that bad packet, we dont need to know what was in the communications, he added. All we need to know is a dangerous packet went from point A to point B right now, and that we may need to act. The federal government is not look ing at the traffic, Alexander said. Industry is looking at the traffic and they have to do that to own and oper ate these networks. Were going to help them with signatures and other things, and they need to tell us when they need our help. But its got to be done in time for us to help, and thats part of the key issue. At Cybercom, the general said, experts are training the cyber work force of the future, determining roles and responsibilities of the federal agencies involved in cyber security and exploring a defensible architecture for the Defense Department. The DoD architecture, in my opin ion, is not defensible per se. Were doing our best to defend it, but weve made this really hard, Alexander said. The department has 15,000 enclaves, each run by separate system administra tors and each with its own firewalls, he added. Cybercom and other agencies are also working on issues related to their authority to respond to a problem, Alexander said. The key question, he added, is what can the Department of Homeland Security, the FBI, Cybercom and the NSA do to defend the country against a cyber attack, and when can they do it? Alexander said that he, DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano, and FBI Director Robert Mueller have laid out lanes in the highway for the government enti ties. The FBI is responsible for inves tigation, attribution and domestic problems. DHS is responsible, along with partners like NSA, the National Institute for Standards and Technology and the SANS Institute, for cyber secu rity standards. NSA and Cybercom have a couple of roles and responsibilities, Alexander said, including foreign intelligence. NSA has the best folks in the world, the general said. They have special skills and we want to leverage those skills to help secure cyberspace for our country and for our allies. Cybercoms role is not only to oper ate and defend DoD networks but to defend the country, he said, noting Cybercom would step in if America came under cyber attack. In the meantime, the general said, hes concerned that attacks like the destructive August attack on computers at Saudi Arabias government-owned oil company Aramco are happening and were spending a lot of time talking about what we should do and when we should do it. While there is still time, he said, while youre all in the room together with us we ought to argue it out just like we did in the election [on Tuesday], come to a solution and then get going. Cyber security involves allies, federal and industry partners JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 25

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com MCPON: Zeroing in on Excellence Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) (AW/NAC) Mike Stevens released his Zeroing in on Excellence initiative in the form of four letters to the Navy Chiefs Mess Nov. 6. The initiative consists of three focus areas: devel oping leaders, good order and discipline, and con trolling what we own. Zeroing in on Excellence is a universal theme we can all apply in our respective positions, said Stevens. It does not distract from or add to exist ing individual roles and responsibilities it provides a sturdy framework around which we can build sound, durable readiness. In his letters, MCPON clearly and concisely out lined his thoughts on the overarching theme of Zeroing in on Excellence and how each of the three focus areas help create an environment where the Navy gets stronger. I believe developing leaders, fostering good order and discipline and controlling what we own help us get precisely that type of environment, now and down the road, said Stevens. These are not single actions; they are deliberate mindsets that permeate our processes and procedures. MCPON stated that his focus points could be pow erful engines of influence, but assured the Mess it is their commitment to this vision that would help the ideas within it become a heightened part of our consciousness. If we grab Zeroing in on Excellence and main tain a steady strain on the ideas it entails, we will have a positive impact on readiness and get after some of the issues tainting our Navy, including sex ual assault, suicide, domestic violence and alcohol/ drug abuse, said Stevens. In MCPONs letter on Zeroing in on Excellence: Developing Leaders, he discussed the importance of developing leaders through a combination of men torship, practical experience and training. Without competent leadership, even the most routine tasks can become difficult, said Stevens. If our Navy is going to continue climbing, then we as chief petty officers must always seek to increase our and our Sailors ability to lead. MCPON talked about the solid inventory of quality leadership training available to the enlisted com munity and how that combined with routine, daily, personal interaction will foster the kind of leader ship that is necessary to ensure our Navys contin ued success. MCPONs letter, Zeroing in on Excellence: Good Order and Discipline, focused on the impact Good Order and Discipline has on warfighting, readiness and mission accomplishment. To me, it [good order and discipline] is about establishing, sustaining and enforcing professional standards that set the condition for individual and unit success, said Stevens. Anything that interferes with or detracts from those conditions is contrary to Good Order and Discipline. MCPON stated that by-and-large he believes we are doing well in this area, but there is always room for improvement. He emphasized chief petty officers own good order and discipline and every CPO, first NAS Jacksonville hosted U.S. Congressman Ander Crenshaw s 11th annual Special Veterans Recognition Ceremony Nov. 8 dur ing which 97 Northeast Florida veterans were honored for their service during Operation Desert Shield/Storm. Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk was the keynote speak er. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders, also a veteran of Desert Shield/Desert Storm, wel comed those being recognized and their families. Today, we are here to honor our uniformed and civilian men and women and remember the devo tion and gallantry of these vet erans during these operations, said Sanders before introducing Crenshaw. Crenshaw then took the podium, thanking the veterans in atten dance. There is a special sig nificance in our recognizing the heroes assembled here today as brave Americans continue to meet threats, new in kind and degree, Desert Shield/ Storm vets honored HSM-70 supports CQ Det on USS TrumanOn the morning of Oct. 30, the Spartans of HSM70 loaded trucks full of equipment and buses full of maintenance personnel and aircrews bound for Norfolk, Va. HSM-70 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Christopher Herr was notified the day prior that USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) required helicopter support for a carrier landing qualification detachment. In true Spartan spirit, the squadron pulled together to pre pare for the detachment, sending 60 personnel on a 12-hour bus ride. I couldnt be more proud of our squadron. Within 18 hours of the phone call from our carrier air wing commander, we were packed up and on our way to Norfolk, said Herr. Two of the squadrons MH-60R helicopters, piloted by Herr and Lt. Cmdr. Shon Brown, HSM-70s main tenance officer, arrived on board the Truman shortly after she pulled out of port Nov.1. Due to other local air assets being otherwise engaged conducting disaster relief in the wake of Hurricane Sandy and preparing for upcoming deploy ments, HSM-70 answered the call on short notice. The ship required helicopters to conduct plane guard duties on the ship in support of fixed wing carrier landing qualifications for an F-18 Fleet Replacement Squadron and several fixed wing train ing squadrons. Qualifying to land on the aircraft NAS Jacksonville has again been recognized by Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) for their dedication to helping the commu nity. In a recent message announcing the winners of the Regional Navy Community Service Program, NAS Jacksonville was selected the third place winner in the Personal Excellence Partnership Flagship category for Shore 500 or more; third place in the Health, Safety and Fitness Flagship category; sec ond place in the Campaign Drug Free Flagship category; second place in the Project Good Neighbor Flagship category and third place in the Environmental Stewardship Flagship category. Bravo Zulu to the winners and honorable mentions. Southeast region commands are commended for having active and successful command-sponsored volunteer community service programs. Their award submissions have been forwarded to Commander, Navy Installation Command and other flagship sponsors for Navywide competition, stated CNRSE Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. in the message. My sincerest personal thanks to all commands and individuals who selflessly volunteered their time to improve the quality of life in their local community and for partici pation in this years competition. A total of over 277,976 volunteer service hours were contributed by commands in the Southeast region. You are an inspiration to us all. According to NAS Jax Community Service Coordinator BMC(SW/ AW) Maurice Mabry, it is truly a team effort to be recognized for these accomplishments. I really think this is wonder ful because it demonstrates the great work that NAS Jax Sailors are doing for the community. They participate in such events as Campaign Drug-Free in the local schools, conducting clean ups in the community, building homes with Habitat for Humanity, mentor NAS Jax wins community service awards

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Nov. 15 1882 Lt. Cmdr. French Chadwick reports to American Legation in London as first Naval Attache. 1942 Although U.S. lost several ships in Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, a naval force under Rear Adm. Willlis Lee, on board battleship USS Washington (BB56), turns back Japanese transports trying to reinforce Guadalcanal. The Japanese never again try to send large naval forces to Guadalcanal. 1960 First Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine, USS George Washington (SSBN-598), leaves Charleston, S.C., on initial fleet ballistic missile patrol. Nov. 16 1776 First salute to an American flag (Grand Union flag) flying from Continental Navy ship Andrew Doria, by Dutch fort at St. Eustatius, West Indies. 1856 Barrier Forts reduction began at Canton China. 1942 Navys first Night Fighter squad ron (VMF(N)-531) established at Cherry Point, N.C. 1963 President John F. Kennedy on USS Observation Island witnesses launch of Polaris A-2 missile by USS Andrew Jackson (SSBN-619). 1968 Operation Tran Hung Dao begins in Mekong Delta. 1973 Launch of Skylab 4 under com mand of USMC Lt. Col. Gerald Carr. The mission lasted 84 days and included 1,214 Earth orbits. Recovery by USS New Orleans (LPH-11). Nov. 17 1917 USS Fanning (DD-37) and USS Nicholson (DD-52) sink first enemy sub marine, U-58, off Milford Haven, Wales. 1924 USS Langley, first aircraft car rier, reports for duty. 1941 Congress amends Neutrality Act to allow U.S. merchant ships to be armed. Navys Bureau of Navigation directs Navy personnel with Armed Guard training to be assigned for further training before going to Armed Guard Centers for assignment to merchant ships. 1955 Navy sets up Special Projects Office under Rear Adm. William Raborn to develop a solid propellant ballistic missile for use in submarines. Nov. 18 1890 USS Maine, first American bat tleship, is launched. 1922 Cmdr. Kenneth Whiting in a PT seaplane, makes first catapult launch ing from aircraft carrier, USS Langley, at anchor in the York River. Nov. 19 1813Capt. David Porter claims Marquesas Islands for the United States. 1943 Carrier force attacks bases on Tarawa and Makin. 1943 USS Nautilus (SS-168) enters Tarawa lagoon in first submarine photo reconnaissance mission. 1961 At the request of President of Dominican Republic, U.S. Naval Task Force sails to Dominican Republic to bolster the countrys government and to prevent a coup. 1969 Navy astronauts Cmdr. Charles Conrad Jr. and Cmdr. Alan Bean are 3rd and 4th men to walk on the moon. They were part of Apollo 12 mission. Cmdr. Richard Gordon Jr., the Command Module Pilot, remained in lunar orbit. During the mission lasting 19 days, 4 hours, and 36 minutes, the astronauts recovered 243 pounds of lunar material. Recovery by HS-4 helicopters from USS Hornet (CVS-12). Nov. 20 1856 Cmdr. Andrew Foote lands at Canton, China, with 287 Sailors and Marines to stop attacks by Chinese on U.S. military and civilians. 1917 USS Kanawha, Noma and Wakiva sink German sub off France. 1933 Navy crew (Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Settle and USMC Maj. Chester Fordney) sets a world altitude record in balloon (62,237 ft.) flight into stratosphere. 1943 Operation Galvanic, under command of Vice Adm. Raymond Spruance, lands Navy, Marine and Army forces on Tarawa and Makin. 1962 President John F. Kennedy lifts the Blockade of Cuba. Nov. 21 1918 U.S. battleships witness surren der of German High Seas fleet at Rosyth, Firth of Forth, Scotland, to U.S. and British fleets. Ive learned many things from responses to last weeks column about my youngest sons silver tooth, or cap, as our dentist prefers: I shouldnt be afraid of fluoride. My kids cavities might be my fault. Then again, maybe not. My son drinks too much juice. And, most importantly, Im not alone. There are a lot of silver teeth out there, and even more fill ings. I know because mothers wrote me to say, me too and Im glad Im not alone. Like a pregnant woman who suddenly thinks everyone else from celebrities on magazines to virtually every single person she passes at the store are also pregnant, I have noticed a great many silver teeth since my son got his. Everywhere I look Cavities! Decay! Silver! While talking to people, Ive reflexively inspected their teeth and noticed every flash of color coming from their molars. In any case, outside of mothers commiserating with me, I also received messages from seemingly every pediatric den tist in the world. Not, not really. But I did have a lengthy conversation with Dr. Jonathan Shenkin, in Augusta, Maine, who read my col umn. He put my mind and my guilt to rest. But, like my own dentist, still wont allow me the comfort of falsely believing there wasnt more I could have done. Shenkin believes parents often see the dentist too late after the age when they could have received basic informa tion to ensure good oral health and avoid dental treatment down the road. Preferably, children should go to a dentist when they are 12 months old, or 6 months after their first tooth erupts. Did you know most children should start using fluoride toothpaste when they are two years old? Did you know that 44 percent of children dont brush their teeth twice a day and that more than 50 percent of them will have cavities by the time they are in second grade? Did you know that brushing your teeth isnt enough to prevent cavities? Shenkin is on a mission to educate parents, as well as the medical community gatekeepers of health information for most children about basic preventative dental care before cavities appear. He says that filling cavities without correcting behaviors is like cutting limbs off diabetic patients and then saying, Look at how good we are at treating diabetes. The keys to good oral health, he says, are brushing twice a day with fluoride toothpaste and limiting sugar intake. I complained that mornings are crazy and I cant always be sure my boys have brushed their teeth. Thats like put ting a bicycle helmet on your child 50 percent of the time and then being surprised when he has an accident, he said. And the twice-a-day routine should begin as early as pos sible, like when the first tooth appears. But baby breath smells so good, I said. I never thought their mouths could be dirty. Plus, I told Shenkin, in my 12 years as a parent I had begun to think fluoride was poison. There are so many warnings about not letting kids swallow it and only using a pea-sized amount. I let my children use training paste too long for fear they might die from the fluoride. Shenkin said that before a child can spit, using a pea-sized amount of toothpaste is enough and safe. Maybe my kids teeth are just soft, I said, trying to cheer myself up. Shenkin says theres no such thing. For most people, per sonal behaviors and hygiene are the sole causes of tooth decay. There is no evidence to support naturally occurring, cavity prone teeth. I sighed. So I messed up, I said. But you didnt know, he said again, It is the system that fails, not necessarily the parents. If no one told you to get our child vaccinated and then he got sick, would you say thats your fault? Childrens dental health, or the lack of it, is taboo in the culture of motherhood. Maybe thats because none of us really know what were doing, and also because were ashamed of the outcome (cavities). Shenkin hopes to change that by educating providers and the public. But that wont fix my sons silver tooth, which he will have now until hes 11 or 12. The damage to his teeth was already done, long before I first took him to the dentist too late, at 3-years-old. Now I live with the silver reminder coming from his back molar. Still, my son doesnt care. One day he smiled up at me, shrugged, and said, Well, at least its not a wooden tooth like George Washington. Yes. There is that.Response to silver tooth enlightening Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 a.m. Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at Chapel Complex Building 749 and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the barracksNAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051

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YN1(SW) John Felizpolanco and OS2(SW) Brandon Doctor were named Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Sailor of the Year 2012, respectively, Nov. 2. As CNRSE Administration Department leading petty officer, Felizpolanco directly supervises the daily efforts of three junior Sailors and serves as CNRSE flag duty petty officer. He provides oversight and guidance in the completion of a number of administrative func tions, utilizing Bureau of Personnel Online, Transaction Online Processing System, Navy Standard Integrated Personnel System, and the Contract Verification System. He is one of the high est-performing petty officers Ive ever worked with, said YNCS(SW/ AW) Yolanda Walls. He is instrumen tal in our efforts to cre ate an environment that allows junior personnel to grow, and he possesses perfect blend of admin istrative expertise and drive toward other areas of mission accomplish ment. I am honored to be chosen to represent this command, Felizpolanco said. This is an outstanding staff with an outstanding group of Sailors. To have the opportunity to repre sent CNRSE is something that I think comes with a lot of responsibility. In addition to his mili tary accomplishments, Felizpolanco is an avid volunteer in the commu nity. He frequently volun teers for command-spon sored volunteer events and even gives up his free time to coach youth football and participate in the Big Brothers Big Sisters Program. Volunteer work has always been important to me because, for one, its an opportunity to repre sent the Navy in a posi tive way, but more impor tantly, it just feels good to know that you have had a positive impact on oth ers. Doctor serves as a watch specialist in the Regional Operations Center, where he collects and disseminates voice reports, e-mail reports and official message traf fic for 16 major installa tions and more than 100 Navy activities through out the region. Petty Officer Doctor is a role model who exem plifies the Navys core values, said QMC(SW) Jeffrey Brebner, Doctors supervisor. He consistently pro duces top-quality work and I can rely on him to provide a complete report and maintain a meticu lous log with all essential points. Hes hands down my best watchstander. Doctor attributed his success at CNRSE to the support he receives from his chain of command, as well as his family. My supervisors have been a major factor in my success. Its really their support that made it pos sible for me to be selected for this award, he said. I also owe a lot of grat itude to my wife, because without her encourage ment and positive atti tude, I dont think any of this would be possible. While Doctors perfor mance in his work cen ter was a major contribu tion to his selection, he is also extremely active throughout the com mand. He is acting presi dent of the CNRSE Petty Officers Association and he constantly partici pates in command vol unteer opportunities. In addition, he is the CNRSE building manager and is an active member of the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Committee. I think extracurricular activities are important, he said. I think its important to step out of your com fort zone and continually take on new challenges. If you are constantly making an effort to bet ter yourself, you cant go wrong. Individual selection criteria for the awards was based upon exem plary performance of tasks, contributions that enhanced organization accomplishment of com mand objectives, mis sion, teamwork or public image, and ones profes sional attitude toward self and others. CNRSE announces Sailors of the Year for 2012 in schools and help the homeless in area shel ters, said Mabry. Mabry continued, When we started the process for the awards package, we solicited the help of many Sailors and civilians to assist us. It took a lot of fact finding to determine what cat egories we qualified for based on our community service. Im proud that our Sailors and civilians have been recognized for the hard work they do to make our community a better place. For more information on community projects, call 542-1610. AWARDS JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 Thousands of children and parents enjoyed the annual MWR Military Family Appreciation Carnival and the beau tiful, sunny weather Nov. 10 at the Allegheny Softball Fields across from the Navy Exchange/ Commissary complex. Young and old alike enjoyed the spinning rides, a giant slide, a bull ride, a Ferris wheel, bun gee jumping, swings and an airplane ride. Other activities includ ed a water race and camel race where the children and their parents could try their luck by rolling balls up a ramp into holes and shooting squirt guns. The Fleet and Family Support Center also pro vided free face painting for the children. Its a great way to celebrate the Month of the Military Family. Many times we recognize our active duty Sailors, but sometimes the fami lies and the sacrifices they endure often go unnoticed. They are here at home and holding the fort down while their loved ones are deployed fighting for our freedom. So this is our way to say thank you to the families and let them spend some time together, said Youth Activities Center Director Aaron Long. We have some great carnival rides, games with prizes and lots of free car nival treats. We have been coordinat ing this event for months and its really proven to be a popular event. Id real ly like to thank our sponsors VyStar Credit Union, USAA, Navy Mutual Aid Association, Emby-Riddle Aeronautical University, First Command Financial Planning, University of Phoenix, Purchasing Power, Allied American University and USA Discounters for their contribution and the many volun teers and workers who are absolutely essential to putting on this successful event, he continued. We came out today for the free activ ities on base. It is a beautiful day and my kids are loving it! I am thankful that the base offers free events for families who are living on tight budgets. We really appreciate this, said Christina Weaver. The families also enjoyed the free sno-cones, popcorn, funnel cakes and cotton candy. The next MWR celebration for mili tary families will be in April to celebrate the Month of the Military Child. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government offi cially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.

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carrier is a critical part of training for new pilots. Helicopters assume search and rescue duties to miti gate the risk of pilot ejections during fixed-wing flight operations from aircraft carriers. Although capable of search and rescue, the primary mission of HSM-70 is anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and surface warfare. The MH-60R is the Navys most capable, combat-tested ASW air asset with a multitude of sensors. These sensors make the MH-60R heavier than her MH-60S counterpart, the typical plane guard plat form. To prepare HSM-70 for plane guard duties, Spartan maintainers worked tirelessly on two MH-60Rs, removing ASW equipment and conducting inspections to get the helicopters ready for deploy ment within hours of receiving tasking. Remarking on the flexibility of the mission change, Herr stated, The Spartans maintain a level of readi ness that allows us to respond at a moments notice. We fight as we train. On Nov. 3, the Truman passed USS Enterprise (CVN 65) as she returned to Naval Station Norfolk, complet ing her final deployment after 51 years of service. Enterprise was the Navys first nuclear powered air craft carrier. Herr, Lt. j.g. Zachary Jackson, AWR2 Clayton Reed and AWR3 Matthew Ballard of HSM-70 were in the air when she passed by and were able to take photographs to commemorate the landmark occasion. It was an honor to fly and see one of the Navys most historic carriers on her final voyage, said Herr. For several of the newest Spartans, the detachment marked their first time underway on an aircraft car rier and for some, on a Navy ship, including AWR3 Bill Christensen. Its a totally different experience, he said. Its been cool seeing the jets take off. Some more seasoned members of the squadron were present for the maiden deployment of USS George H. W. Bush (CVN 77) with Carrier Air Wing Eight from May to December 2011. HSM-70 returned from the deployment with numerous awards including the Arnold J. Isbell Trophy and Adm. Thatch Award. Despite being a relatively new squadron, HSM-70 is quickly becoming well known throughout the fleet for upholding the highest Navy standards. HSM-70 in the same basic Middle East area where you made a stand, he said. The congressman contin ued, America has always been blessed to have men and women like you, who are will ing to put personal dreams on hold and serve our coun try. To the men and women of our armed forces, to our veter ans honored today and to your families and friends, I thank you for your patriotism. Your sacrifices are priceless; your dedication is appreciated; and through you, our countrys strength is resolute. Sanders then welcomed Van Buskirk who also thanked the veterans for their service. The Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen who served in Desert Shield and Desert Storm not only achieved a signifi cant military victory, but also renewed Americans belief in their military and its ability to fight and win a major military action. To all of the veterans of Desert Shield and Desert Storm in attendance today, I com mend you and thank you for your service and sacrifice and for the legacy you left behind for todays service members, said Van Buskirk. Each individual Desert Shield/Desert Storm vet eran was then recognized and presented with a certifi cate of Special Congressional Recognition in honor of their service to our country by Crenshaw and Van Buskirk. After every veteran was rec ognized, Sanders read Old Glory as NAS Jax Sailors per formed the passing of the flag. The flag was then presented to Crenshaw who in turn present ed it to Desert Shield/Desert Storm veteran retired Adm. Stan Arthur, former command er, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command during Operation Desert Storm. This is a great event to honor veterans who took part in these operations. Our armed services were trained for these operations we were going into the unknown and had no idea of what we were fac ing. Fortunately, we preserved and won the battle and Im very proud of the young men and women who participated in Operation Desert Shield/ Storm, said Arthur. The ceremony concluded with a 21-gun salute, the play ing of Taps by members of Navy Band Southeast and the bene diction. I think this is just outstand ing that the congressman rec ognized us today for our ded icated service to our country and the support we provided during these operations, said retired CWO2 David Harvey, who was deployed on board USS Juett and was in the Persian Gulf when Iraq invad ed Kuwait. I really appreciate this and it was an honor to be here today. This is one way to say thank you to men and women in the military who put their lives on the line to defend the freedom and democracy that we enjoy, said Crenshaw. This is prob ably one of the most reward ing things I do as a member of Congress. We have honored a lot of the veterans from prior wars and we thought with this most recent war that it was appropriate to honor these folks. CEREMONY 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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and foremost, must set the conditions through personal example and integrity in their own actions. In September, he approached his Leadership Mess, a group of fleet, force and command master chiefs, asking them to speak with their Messes and help pinpoint top areas where the CPO community could make positive and immediate impacts on good order and discipline. After reviewing hundreds of respons es, it became overwhelmingly clear that four areas stand out above all others, said Stevens. Leadership through per sonal example; accountability commen surate with responsibility; clear, unam biguous and personal communication throughout the chain of command; and excellence in the things we have rather than continuously inventing new solu tions. Discussing distractions beyond our control, MCPON outlined the concept of control and influence within our own sphere in his letter, Zeroing in on Excellence: Controlling What We Own. There are many things that you and I do own and control, including good order and discipline, technical train ing, maintenance/administrative pro duction, and the execution of orders, said Stevens. We also have the ability to control much of our own lives by becom ing and remaining physically, mentally, morally, and spiritually sound. MCPONs Zeroing in on Excellence letters lay the framework for individual Chiefs Messes and commands to work within, allowing them to take his guid ance and determine how to best employ the initiative to their specific commands and messes in order to functionally and effectively support CNOs Sailing Directions, build an environment where our entire Navy gets stronger, and fol low the fundamental standard to work hard, stay out of trouble and be good and decent people. MCPON The Navy Exchange (NEX) wants to help its customers finance their chil drens college education through its A-OK Student Reward Program. All qualified students will participate in a quarterly drawing for monetary awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500 for a total of $5,500 per quarter. The next drawing will be held at the end of November 2012. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point average equiva lent or better, as determined by their school system, may enter the drawing. Eligible students include dependent children of active duty military mem bers, reservists and military retirees enrolled in first through 12th grade. Dependent children without an indi vidual Dependent Identification Card must be accompanied by their sponsor to submit their entry. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter the drawing, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the mini mum grade average. Then fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX products and services. The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) has been offer ing students a chance to pay for col lege through its A-OK Student Reward Program since 1997. Since the program began, NEXCOM has awarded over $600,000 in Series EE U.S. savings bonds and monetary awards with the help of its generous vendor partners.NEX rewards students with its A-OK Student Reward Program JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 7

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As the U.S. Marine Corps counted its 237th birthday in 2012, military officials gathered at the Pentagon Nov. 7 to enjoy a slice of both the services storied his tory and its ceremonial cake. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chair man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, were on hand, along with Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Amos. An excerpt of the annual birthday message written in 1921 by Gen. John Lejeune, the services 13th comman dant, reads, Generation after genera tion of Marines have grown grey in war in both hemispheres and in every cor ner of the seven seas so that our country and its citizens might enjoy peace and security. Amos explained the messages endur ing relevance. One of the things we really never want to atrophy is our history in the minds and hearts and souls of every body that wears the eagle, globe and anchor, Amos said. In August, Amos said, he and his wife visited Guadalcanal, site of the 19421943 campaign that marked the first major offensive in the World War II Pacific theater. That was a spiritual experience for us, and we were mindful of all those 1,300 Marines that give their lives there, Amos said of wading into the waters there. He read the account of a young Marine from George Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, who said a non commissioned officer at Guadalcanal did manage to read Lejeunes birthday message to some platoons, while cooks prepared a cake from rice flour for the birthday celebration. As each man went through the chow line, besides a thin slice of Spam with a hard biscuit, we all received a thin portion of cake, Amos quoted from the Marines account. The 28th Marine Corps comman dant, retired Gen. P.X. Kelley, described during the ceremony how his Vietnam experiences and the loss of his father in World War II still inspire his visits to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. He imparted advice to spectators. Go at night, he said. Thats where you see the real hard-core people with their hand on a name or a bended knee. Happy 237TH Birthday, United States Marine Corps JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 9

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Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast employ ees worked hard on the largest event ever produced by the U.S. Navy and the City of Jacksonville. The Navy-Marine Corps Classic NCAA basketball game was played Nov. 9 on board USS Bataan (LHD 5), at Naval Station (NS) Mayport. The Bataan, a multipurpose amphibi ous assault ship, would seem at first glance to be a strange place to hold a NCAA college basketball game, but thats exactly happened, along with a concert featuring the group Little Big Town. This is absolutely a first in my career, a really unique opportunity, said NS Mayport Public Works Officer Cmdr. Miguel Dieguez. To both see a produc tion like this get put together, and to do it on a Navy warship of this size is extraordinary. Dieguez, NAVFAC Southeasts proj ect officer for the game, has been point man for the project since May. Set-up for the event included con struction of approximately 3,500 tem porary seats, an NCAA regulation bas ketball court, and infrastructure to support TV production (sound, video display boards, lighting) and broadcast (camera towers). Since, Nov. 2, a contractor workforce of nearly 60 people worked 10-12 hour days, in close coordination with Bataan and NS Mayport personnel, to put the site together. The game between the University of Florida Gators and the Georgetown University Hoyas is just part of the Week of Valor, a weeklong celebration hosted by the City of Jacksonville and the Florida Blue corporation, honoring veterans, reservists and active duty, for their service to the nation. Dieguez became involved in prepara tions early on when the idea was first presented to the Secretary of the Navy to hold a college basketball game on a U.S. Navy warship at NS Mayport. His team also worked the utilities and infrastructure support basically any thing that touches the physical plant of the base. His team also coordinated NAVFAC Southeast integral to Navy-Marine Corps Classic prep 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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with engineers from Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) to ensure the game-day complex (bleachers, basket ball court, sound system, etc.) were safe and built to specifications. It makes me feel proud, said Dieguez. This is such a huge oppor tunity for both the U.S. Navy and the City of Jacksonville to put their best foot forward. Last years Quicken Loans Carrier Classic was hosted on board the air craft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) in San Diego. In addition to the basketball game, the evening also featured a concert and fan fest with food and beverage venders, and military static displays in the park ing lot adjacent to the Bataans mooring. Thirty-five hundred fans got a birdseye view of the basketball game from bleachers on Bataans flight deck, but another 12,000 or so spectators enjoyed the game on large video monitors set up at the concert and static display venue below. Danny Williams, NS Mayport Crane Program Manager and NAVFAC Southeast employee, directed the approximately 200 crane lifts required to get the equipment needed aboard Bataan. Williams said it took about 30 hours using two cranes to lift the dis assembled bleachers, basketball court and other items to the flight deck. He said that it was a unique task compared to normal port operations. We were happy to support this spectacular event Nov. 9, said PWD Mayport Production Officer Lt. Cheron Thornton. She was responsible for working the support issues between the Bataan and the base. Her team provided cranes, vehicles and utilities (power) to the ship. This is the first time the Navy has done something like this in coordi nation with a city government, said Dieguez. In this case, the City of Jacksonville is putting up the financial resources to make this happen. It really speaks well of our local citizens they really love having the military as part of their community. NAVFAC JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 11

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The VP-8 Fighting Tigers, on deployment in Misawa, Japan, once more showed their solidarity, com passion and generosity during a Nov. 7 fundraising event for those recent ly affected by Hurricane Sandy in the northeastern United States. The squadrons First Class Petty Officers Association (FCPOA) conduct ed a two-day bake sale an idea sug gested during one of the associations meetings by AE1 Joshua Eason. When a fundraiser to aid the Red Cross Hurricane Sandy relief efforts was suggested, everyone jumped on board with ideas and suggestions. As always, the FCPOA embraced the idea and made the fundraiser a reality, said NC1 Deborah Spinner. All the baked goods were donated by the squadrons first class petty officers, commonly known as the Aces, who also organized and executed the sale. The Tigers came out in full support, eager to help in any way they could, said AM1 Angela Berrios, the squad rons FCPOA secretary. Because VP-8 is deployed to Japans northern region which was heav ily damaged during the 2011 tsunami they have seen first hand the need for long-term support for those affected by natural disasters. The Aces will take the $881 raised from the bake sale and transmit the money electronically to the American Red Cross. Our thoughts and prayers are with the families that have been uprooted, and those that are currently dealing with the aftermath. As a military mem ber, it is our job to protect our nation, and I feel powerless being so far away. This is our way of helping to support the cause and hope that it will make an impact in someones life, said Spinner. The FCPOA reminded their ship mates that they can still donate by vis iting www.redcross.org, calling 1-800RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or tex ting the word REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation. Any donation enables the Red Cross to provide shel ter, food, emotional support and other assistance to those affected. The NAS Jacksonville-based Fighting Tigers are on a six-month scheduled deployment in support of U.S. 7th Fleet. The commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet and the commander of U.S. Fleet Forces recently released a personal for (P4) message to leaders under their command to address how poor judgment and destructive behavior by Navy personnel is unacceptable and negatively impacts warfighting readi ness. In the message, Adm. Cecil Haney, commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, and Adm. William Gortney, commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command, directed commanders to get more actively involved in prevent ing destructive behavior by ensuring their Sailors are aware of, and abide by, the rules of conduct established by the Navy Ethos. The goal is that every Sailor, down to the deckplate level, makes a commit ment to recognize potential problems and have the courage to intervene before bad behavior occurs. It is the responsibility of every com mander to make sure their Sailors are properly representing the U.S. Navy regardless of where they are or what they are doing, the message read. There were 496 sexual assaults reported in fiscal 2012, more than half involving alcohol. Because of these types of incidents, the Navy held a focused Sexual Assault Awareness campaign in April during National Sexual Assault Awareness month. The Navy has also implemented more training programs aimed at educating and encouraging Sailors to speak out against these crimes. Warfighting readiness is predicated on the relationships forged between Sailors and with partners. One instance of poor personal judgment in the workplace or on liberty can put these crucial relationships and readi ness at risk. Our warfighting strategy relies in part on the willingness of host nations to provide our forces access to their ports, Haney and Gortney wrote in their message. To support this mis sion area, our Sailors must be exem plary ambassadors of our Navy and our nation. In conjunction with the release of the P4 message, U.S. Pacific Fleet Master Chief John Minyard addressed Sailors from Navy Region Hawaii. During two separate calls with junior and senior enlisted personnel, Minyard emphasized the opportunity for all Sailors to be leaders in prevent ing shipmates from making poor deci sions. We have to own good order and discipline within our commands, at every level of leadership, and I believe we can do that, Minyard said. You need to know your people, you need to lead your people, and you need to be involved in their decisions. Every Sailor, E-1 thru O-10, has a responsibility to look out for the safe ty of their shipmates and to always hold themselves to the highest levels of accountability for their actions at home and abroad, he said. If we have the moral courage to step in and stop destructive behavior before it occurs, we can eliminate these incidents. The admirals concluded that the U.S. Navy has been a global force for good and that our conduct shapes our ability to position forces forward, to be ready, and to fight and win when required. We must strive to eradicate sexual assaults and other destructive behav ior by identifying problems and inter vening early, they wrote. Respect for others is fundamental to our character and part of our Navy ethos. Aces raise funds for Hurricane Sandy victims Fleet commanders message on personal conduct 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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DEWEYSCall 542-3521 Deweys is located in Bldg. 608 between Gillis St. and Keily St. off of Enterprise Ave. Monday Friday 10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 4 10 p.m. CPO Lounge Monday, Tuesday & Friday 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Wednesday Thursday 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m. Deweys Specials Monday Pizza madness 29 p.m. one topping pizza for only $5 Free Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday social hours, 79 p.m., $.50 wings & $7.95 pizza your way NFL Ticket Sunday 12:30 9 p.m., $.50 wingsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Kennedy Space Center Adult $40, child $31 Entertainment Books $30 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam February 23, 2013 Preferred seating $41, lower level seat ing $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sec tions 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3 day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31, 2013 and must be redeemed by June 30, 2013. Ask about our special discounted tick ets for family members. Gator Bowl tickets $35 Gator Bowl Patch $9 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day $29.50, 2 day $40, Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT! Daytona 500 Feb. 24, 2013 tickets on sale now! $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Islands of Adventure Weekend Trip Nov. 17 & 18 $40 per person Mall & Movie Trip Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater Nov. 23 at 6 p.m. Kennedy Space Center Trip Nov. 24 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Nov. 27 for active duty Nov. 15 & 29 for retirees & DoD person nel Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Turkey Trot Killer Scramble Nov. 21 at noon $50 entry fee, $60 for civilian guests Four person scramble Let us cook for you! Order turkey dinners at MulligansMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Dashing Through The Grove Saturday, Dec. 8 48 p.m. at Patriots Grove Free snow sledding, photos with Santa, tree lighting, musical entertainment and more! For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239, or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil A Driver Improvement Class designed specifi cally for dependent driv ers between 15 and 21 years of age will be held Nov. 19 from 8 a.m. -1 p.m. in Building 1. There will be no time behind the wheel of a vehicle it is a classroom session only. Those who pass the multiple-choice test will receive AAA Driver Improvement Class completion certifi cates. If you believe your teen can benefit from driv ing tips by professional driving instructors, sign them up for the Teen Driver Improvement Class. Contact Linda at 542-3082 or Cindy at 5422584. Teen driving class JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 13

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Get started during Great American SmokeoutSmoking cessation is a two-part pro cess: the first is stopping and the second is staying stopped. Because nicotine is one of the worlds most powerfully addictive drugs its also one of the toughest addictions to overcome. And thats not to mention the fact that tobacco use can shorten the average lifespan by 15 years, said Brook Keen, a health promotion spe cialist at the Naval Hospital Wellness Center. She is a former smoker who under stands both the challenges and rewards of smoking cessation. Our four-week tobacco cessation program is available for active duty, retirees and other TRICARE-eligible beneficiaries. No appointment is required, so walk-ins at building 867 on Enterprise Avenue are always wel come, said Keen. The program is run by two certi fied smoking cessation facilitators who work under direction of Naval Hospital Jacksonville Director of Public Health Capt. Joseph McQuade, M.D. Program participants may choose individual or group sessions. Participants attend one session per week for four weeks, with unlimited follow-up counseling for relapse pre vention available. Whether you smoke, chew or dip, you can improve your health through our tobacco cessation program. The educational component of our program helps quitters deal with challenges such as stress, weight gain and alcohol use, explained Keen. Participants may choose from a variety of nicotine replacement aids, including the transdermal patch, nico tine lozenges and nicotine gum. Other aids include prescription medications such as Zyban and Chantix. Active duty members of the aviation and submarine communities are not allowed to use the prescription medica tions, but may use any of the nicotine replacement aids. This is a comprehensive threemonth program where we maintain communications with participants on a weekly basis by telephone or email. As an added support component, partici pants may join in any of our group ses sions that take place three times a week to reinforce positive behavior changes, said Keen. The weekly tobacco cessation sup port group sessions are: Monday at 9 a.m.; Tuesday at 2 a.m.; and Thursday at noon. Regardless of the amount of your nic otine usage or length of addiction you can overcome one of the most power ful drugs with help from the Naval Hospital Wellness Center. Call 542-5292 for more information. Ready to quit smoking, dipping or chewing? JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 15

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Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast hosted its quarterly energy partnership meeting aboard NAS Jacksonville, Nov. 8, at the Gateway Inn and Suites Conference Center, to learn about the latest in eco-friendly and energy saving technology. Its a great opportunity for us as the government to part ner with industry, the experts out there, to find ways togeth er to meet our energy goals, said Lt. Cmdr. Doug Herrin, NAVFAC Southeast energy team leader, in his opening remarks. Herrin said in fiscal year 2012 (FY12), NAVFAC Southeast awarded 34 ener gy projects. Navy Region Southeast is scheduled to award 53 energy projects in FY13. Herrin also noted the region is making strides in energy conservation stating electrical use was down 4.7 percent and natural gas use was down 15.2 percent in FY12 compared to FY11. Eight venders, including six presenters, were on hand to discuss a diverse collection of environmentally friendly and energy saving products and services available to help NAVFAC Southeast personnel better evaluate current energy consumption patterns to effect efficiency planning, as well as green technologies to effect savings of dollars, and the pre cious resources we currently expend. Some of the products and services presented included metering equipment used to evaluate energy consump tion and efficiencies, green solar powered lighting tech nologies and biomass gasifica tion. Heating and air condi tioning energy saving devices, advanced metering and Navy SMART Grid and power man agement and voltage condi tioning were also discussed. NAVFAC Southeast takes great strides to remain current on technology advancement in energy conservation and sus tainment for capital improve ment and renovation projects. This event gives us the opportunity to learn from industry professionals what their latest technology and services offer to help the Navy reach its energy goals in the Southeast, said Leigh Adams, NAVFAC Southeast energy pro gram engineer and the event organizer. Vendors interested in pre senting at future quarterly energy partnership events may contact the program coordina tor at (904) 542-6760. During his retirement ceremony at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Nov. 8, the production direc tor received the Navys third highest civilian award for his last seven years of distinguished service, ending a notable 33-year career. Capt. Robert Caldwell, the FRCSE commanding officer, presented Bobby Stroud, Jr. with a Meritorious Civilian Service Award for his contributions to the production of EA-6B Prowler, F/A-18 Hornet, H-60 Seahawk, P-3 Orion, T-34 and T-44 Trainer aircraft, four engines types and numerous components. Caldwell said when he arrived at FRCSE in September 2006 at the 21-year mark in his career, he had never served in a facility with a predominately civil ian workforce. He said he was fortunate to have Stroud as his mentor, friend and professional advisor to figure out how a depot works dealing with capital funds, private industry partners and the unions. During his lengthy career in feder al service at FRCSE, Stroud has held numerous positions and has seen many changes as a result of world events, such as the Cold War, Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, the 9/11 ter rorist attacks and Operation Enduring Freedom. His focus has always been on what is best for the taxpayer and the warfighter. The business decisions weve made over the years have not always been popular, but they have always been based on whats best for the Fleet, said Stroud during an earlier interview. Thats something to be proud of. We produce products; we produce hard ware. When you see an F/18 (Hornet strike fighter) on TV, I can actually say I had something to do with that. Stroud started his career in February 1978 stripping paint from aircraft, a temporary Wage Grade 06 position that lasted only 10 months. He was subse quently rehired for the same job and picked up for permanent service in September 1980. He was next selected for a career progression ladder, General Schedule (GS) 5/7/9, in the Methods and Standards Department where he worked his way up to section supervi sor. His success landed him a manage ment analyst job in a GS-11 position. In the early 1990s, he transferred to the Business Office where he was tasked with writing J52 engine proposals for public/private competition, answering Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) data calls and working on BRAC imple mentation. Under the commands reor ganization, Stroud competed and was selected as the Business Department head. Stroud moved to production support when Capt. David Beck assumed com mand in 2003 of FRCSE, then called Naval Air Depot Jacksonville. In August 2005 when Capt. John Scanlan, II took the helm, Stroud landed the production director position where he has served since. Under Strouds direction, FRCSE Implemented Franklin Coveys 4 Disciplines of Execution methodology. This radically changed the leadership culture in the command by developing Wildly Important Goals and establish ing a system to ensure accountabili ty within FRCSE. This enabled FRCSE to reduce execution costs from Fiscal Year (FY) 08 through FY12, resulting in an average annual cost avoidance of $48 million, which directly improved Naval Aviation Enterprise readiness by increasing the fleets buying power. In addition, Stroud developed a reduced component unit price (CPU) initiative that was adopted by NAVFAC Southeast energy partnership meeting FRCSE production director retires with 33 years of distinguished service 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Navy-Marine Corps Classic played on Bataan flight deckWeather interferes with second halfSailors and civilians on board the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) attend ed the Navy-Marine Corps Classic NCAA basketball game between the University of Florida Gators and the University of Georgetown Hoyas, Nov. 9. The flight deck was transformed from launching and landing six different types of aircraft during flight quarters, to a basketball court with seats holding more than 1,000 people. The Navy-Marine Corps Classic was the highlight of the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor. Jacksonville and the surrounding communi ties have a long tradition of supporting Sailors and Marines. The Week of Valor honors veterans, active and reserve service members, as well as military fami lies. Jacksonville has always been a great Navy town, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. We are mov ing an amphibious ready group, including a ship like this, to Jacksonville. It is one of the ways we connect the ship to the city and the U.S. Navy to the American people, because when we are doing our job we are usually a long way from home. During half time at the game, the audience got an inside look at Navy life when Mabus reenlisted seven Sailors. After the re-enlistment oath, players from both teams shook the hands of the enlistees. Fewer than one percent of America serves in uni form, yet they keep the other 99 percent of us safe, 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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said Mabus. These seven Sailors who reen listed are some of the best we have. Unfortunately, before the players could finish the game, condensa tion covered the court and officials stopped the game to ensure the players safety. The game came to a close after 20 minutes of playing time with the Florida Gators lead ing 27 to 23. Thank you everyone for mak ing this event possible, said John Thompson III, head coach, Georgetown University. Thank you for hosting us, and to all the Sailors who represent us out here. Its been an unbelievable experi ence for our guys just to be a part of this event and the fact that the game is ending doesnt take away from that. Several players said participat ing in the game was a small way to give back to the Sailors who defend America. Its an amazing experience just to have the opportunity to come out here on a ship, said Otto Porter, team member of the Georgetown Hoyas. Its just one of those things where we got to come out here and support the Navy and soldiers back home. Sailors also savored the expe rience of the Navy-Marine Corps Classic basketball game. I thought the game was won derful, said CTSN(SW) Brianna Williams, a Bataan Sailor. I was amazed that they turned our ship into a stadium so quickly. The Week of Valor presented Bataan Sailors with many lasting experiences, including watching the NFL Jacksonville Jaguars prac tice and play a game Nov. 8 against the Indianapolis Colts, as well as participating in a community rela tions project, and enjoying at a free concert by country band Little Big Town at NS Mayport prior to the game. BATAAN JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 19

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NAS Jacksonville has receive funding in the amount of $2.6 million from the Office of the Secretary of Defense to renovate the base gymnasium. The facil ity will be closed Dec. 17 through June 30, 2013. Cardio and weight training equipment, gear issue, and the gym and administration opera tions will be temporarily relo cated to Building 798 (old loca tion of The Zone) from Jan. 14 through June 30. Unfortunately, showers and locker storage will not be avail able during this temporary move, however, bathroom facili ties are available on site. Due to the lack of laundry facilities in Building 798, towels will not be available. ue at this location Monday and Wednesday at 11 a.m. expanded the hours of opera tions from 5 a.m. 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. cancel indoor winter basketball and badminton leagues. racquetball courts will also be closed until project completion. tion will be complete Jan. 1 and will support Surface Search and Rescue classes and command physical readiness testing until April 1. facilities and locker rooms, rec reation swimming at the indoor pool will remain closed until the gym renovation project is com pleted. open on April 1 for lap swim ming from 5:30-8 a.m.; 11 a.m.1 p.m.; 4:30-8 p.m., Monday through Friday. Additionally, the outdoor pool will be available for Reserve units on drill weekends for physical fitness training if requested. For more information, contact MWR Program Director John Bushick at 542-4768 or e-mail john.bushick@navy.mil. Gymnasium and indoor pool operations change for renovation 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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The world-famous Budweiser Clydesdales, the symbol of quality and tradition for Anheuser-Busch since 1933, are scheduled to make sever al appearances in the area Nov.14-18, including one at NAS Jacksonville to honor our serving military members and their families. The eight-horse hitch will be har nessed and hitched to the famous red beer wagon at the Navy Exchange Nov. 15 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Clydesdales appearance in Jacksonville is one of hundreds made annually by the traveling hitches. Canadians of Scottish descent brought the first Clydesdales to America in the mid-1800s. Today, the giant draft hors es are used primarily for breeding and show. Horses chosen for the Budweiser Clydesdale hitch must be at least three years of age, stand approximately 18 hands or six feet at the shoulder, weigh an average of 2,000 pounds, must be bay in color, have four white legs, and a blaze of white on the face and black mane and tail. A gentle tempera ment is very important as hitch horses meet millions of people each year. A single Clydesdale hitch horse will consume as much as 20-25 quarts of feed, 40-50 pounds of hay and 30 gal lons of water per day. Each hitch travels with a Dalmatian. In the early days of brewing, Dalmatians were bred and trained to protect the horses and guard the wagon when the driver went inside to make deliveries. The Budweiser Clydesdales can be viewed at the Anheuser-Busch brewer ies in St. Louis, Mo.; Merrimack, N.H.; and Ft. Collins, Colo. They also may be viewed at Grants Farm in St. Louis and at Warm Springs Ranch, the 300-plus acre Clydesdale breeding farm located near Boonville, Mo. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Sailors and Marines paid homage to two survivors of the World War II Bataan Death March during a ceremony held on board USS Bataan (LHD 5) as a part of the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor, Nov. 8. This ship was commissioned in 1997 to honor the sacrifices of those who have gone before us, said Capt. Erik Ross, the ships commanding officer. This ceremony honored Donato Abalos and Patricio Ganio, both of whom marched nearly 60 miles during a forc ible transfer of more than 70,000 Filipino and American prisoners of war by the Imperial Japanese Army. The march fol lowed the three-month Battle of Bataan in the Philippines. These two individuals sacrificed, said Ross. Their dedication, their courage, their perseverance, and most remarkable in my opinion, their humility in a time where humility was rare. Both of you are true heroes. During the march, many prisoners died from abuse, murder or exhaustion, while others were not given food or water until they had reached Balanga, the capi tal of Bataan. These acts of heroism were not lost on the crew attending the cer emony. I felt very honored to see them because everything they went through was extremely dangerous, said ABAA Elizabeth Blanco. The reason we honor them today is not only because our ship is named after their struggle, but because there is a sense of pride and you have to be proud. Being in the Navy, I am proud to serve my country, proud to wear the uniform. Whether its speaking to others about serving in the military or working long hours during flight operations. I want to thank them for giving us an example to do the same. I am happy to be here. After the ceremony, service members were able shake hands with the survivors and many were moved by the experience. I was extremely humbled and hon ored to be in the presence of war heroes, said Lance Cpl. Ian Delacruz stationed in Camp Lejuene, N.C. To have the opportunity to hear what they have gone through and survived is very heartwarming. Im infantry, so our job is to be on the frontlines and put ourselves at risk. To hear what they did, Im just honored to be able to shake their hands and when I did, I dont know if this is the right way to say it, but it just felt right. I feel like we are in the same line of work and they are my predecessors. Im proud to be here today to pick up where they left off. The Battan is the second ship to be named in honor of the march. The first was USS Bataan (CVL-29/AVT-4), which was originally planned as USS Buffalo, but was renamed on June 2, 1942 after the tragedy occurred. A translator added that Ganio and Abalos were proud to be recognized after all of these years and were very thankful for the opportunity to attend. World-renowned Budweiser Clydesdales to visit NAS Jax USS Bataan marches on in honor of the fallen More than 800 people attended the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce kick off its 10th Military Appreciation Luncheon, Nov. 5, at Prime Osborn Convention Center in downtown Jacksonville, kicking off the Week of Valor to honor military members, veterans and their families. Today is the first day of ... a week long salute to the service and the sac rifice of our military members, our veterans and family who support them, said Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown. I believe that is very appro priate, that the first of what will be ter rific events planned this week is led by JAX Chamber. During the luncheon, Brown pledged the citys continued dedi cation to the military, highlighting that the military is a large part of Jacksonvilles economy and way of life. The military delivers an economic impact of 12.2 billion dollars here in Jacksonville, said Brown. In the City of Jacksonville, the mili tary helps define who we are and the high value we place on civic respon sibility, service and sacrifice. My administration is focused on making Jacksonville the most military friendly city in the nation. Keynote speaker Lt. Gen. William Faulkner, deputy commandant for Installations and Logistics United States Marines Corps, took the podi um and highlighted programs the city provides for service members and veterans. He thanked the Mayor and the city for their work on behalf of the military. Initiatives like your Jobs for Vets Web site designed to connect job seeking veterans to veteran-friendly employers in the city, is an impres sive template for other cities around the United States to emulate, said Faulkner. With the support of a grateful nation and proud and faith ful Americans, such as the citizens of Jacksonville who recognize the sacri fice of our brave warriors, were con fident that we will continue to be ever faithful in meeting the nations need for military crisis response. Chamber hosts 10th military appreciation luncheon JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 21

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The Jacksonville Jaguars hosted a military appreciation game at EverBank Field Nov. 9. While the action on the field was the main focus as the Jaguars took on the Indianapolis Colts for more than 60,000 screaming fans, a moment that had nothing to do with football may have pro duced the loudest cheers. The entire stadium was on its feet as CM1(SCW) William Cook ran out of the tunnel to meet his wife and daughters during halftime. Cook, who is assigned to Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CMBU) 202 at NAS Jacksonville, spent the last 10 months deployed to Afghanistan as an Individual Augmentee (IA). He had not seen his family since last Christmas, and his family was completely unaware that he was coming home. But thanks to the Jacksonville Jaguars and his chain of command, he was able to reunite with his fam ily earlier than expected. The event was even more special to Williams and his family because it just happened to be his daughters 21st birthday. Im still in shock. I really never expected to see my father tonight, said Kasey, Cooks daughter. Its definitely a real ly special thing to be able to get together tonight because I didnt expect to be able to cel ebrate this birthday together. But this is as good of a birthday present as I could ask for. The military appreciation game was sponsored by the City of Jacksonville and the Jaguars as part of the Week of Valor, a city-sponsored ini tiative designed to showcase Jacksonville as one of the most military-friendly cities in the country. Cook was informed by his senior enlisted advi sor about three weeks ago that he was selected to come home early and participate in the event. He was originally scheduled to return next week, but arrived in Jacksonville Wednesday, instead. The whole thing was over whelming . it really took me by surprise, he said. I wasnt really sure if my daughter was going to be able to make it because shes in the process of moving, but I think it was real ly cool for her to have me home for her birthday. According to Cook, it was a real challenge to keep his family from realizing that he was still overseas throughout the past two days, but thanks to social media, he was able to pull it off. They thought he was in Kuwait going through the Navys Warrior Transition Program, which is designed to ease the transition for Sailors returning from deployment. Social media came into play because the guys over there kept tagging me in their posts, saying, Hey, were in Kuwait hanging out watching movies with Lt. OConnell and Chief Berg, you know, so we were able to keep it a big secret until the game. The post-deployment fam ily reunion was the third of its kind since Cook enlisted in the Navy in 1995. He was deployed twice previously to Iraq and Afghanistan, including a tour in 2005 where he was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon. A native of Hopactong, N.J., Cook said he never really con sidered the Navy as a career when he first enlisted. I didnt have a great job and I wanted to do something bet ter with my life. I heard about the Seabees, thought that it was something I could do and Ive been doing it now for 17 years. Ive had some pretty good tours and I look at it as probably the best thing that ever happened to me, he said. Throughout his career, Cook has been stationed in Norfolk, Va., Charleston, S.C., Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and served multiple times in Port Hueneme, Calif., and Okinawa, Japan. He volunteered for his third IA assignment shortly after reporting to his current position at CMBU 202. I was the maintenance manager for the detachment here, and I dont like sitting for too long. I heard about these provincial reconstruc tion teams (PRT) that go out and do a lot of stuff with the Department of Agriculture and USAID (United States Agency for International Development), going out and trying to make Afghanistan a better place, he said. After completing PRT training, Cook reported to Afghanistan, where he spent most of the past year support ing reconstruction efforts. After a long 10 months, he finally flew into Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport on Wednesday for outprocessing and then on to NAS Jacksonville the following day. Im grateful for the oppor tunity to come home a week early, and Id like to thank the city of Jacksonville for making this happen, he said. I think the NFL Salutes the Military is a really great program. Its an honor to be selected. You dont get many of these opportuni ties and I thank them for their efforts to get me home. Now that he is home, Cook is looking to take some time off and relax, but life at home also comes with its own challenges, he said. Im planning on taking a lot of time off, but I do have a kitchen to remodel and my wife is waiting for me to get home and get on that. Ive got a back yard to finish up and some housework to do, but I thor oughly enjoy doing that stuff, so Im looking forward to get ting started. Sailor surprises family with homecoming during Jaguars game 22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Commander, Fleet Readiness Centers Governance Board as a pilot enterprise initiative to achieve strategic cost and readiness goals. The initiative was pro totyped at FRCSE. As a result, Sailors were integrated into depot-level work centers to perform intermediate maintenance tasks with civilian artisans providing them with valuable training. FRCSE was able to lower the CPU price charged to its warfighting custom ers. Im proud that we operate in an envi ronment of business, where we sup port the fleet. Im proud of how we have taken all the change over the years with external pressure to drive costs out the equation at a time when that is more important than ever. Stroud said he has accompanied many distinguished visitors during FRCSE tours over the years and always enjoys seeing the amazement register on their faces when they see the facil itys full capabilities. When they see an F/18 spread apart in three pieces, yeah, that is some thing, he said. We can build anything; we can do anything. Its a capability that only exists in one location, a mili tary depot. Private industry doesnt have what we have. Holly Martinez, the deputy produc tion director has been chosen to suc ceed Stroud as the FRCSE production director. FRCSE More than 50 active duty service members and veterans from NAS Jacksonville, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Naval Station Mayport and other area military commands visited 70 elementary, middle and high school classrooms Nov. 5-9 in support of the Week of Valor, a city-sponsored ini tiative designed to showcase Jacksonville as one of the most military-friendly cities in the country. Volunteers visited class rooms in small groups and spoke to students about what it means to serve in the military and stressed the importance of observing Veterans Day. According to Suzanne Speight, a public affairs spe cialist with Navy Region Southeast who coordinated the visits, the efforts of those who volunteered are invaluable to maintaining a good relation ship with the community. The Navy and the military are such a big part of the First Coast community and it is so important for people to know who we are and what we do, she said. Speight said she appreciated the efforts of service members from Blount Island Command and Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville, as well. This was a tremendous joint effort with Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen, along with veterans from the retired com munity, she said. Throughout the week, the groups spoke to students in dozens of schools, sharing per sonal experiences in the mili tary, views on Veterans Day and their own school-day expe riences. They also answered hun dreds of questions about their careers and the military in gen eral. We were treated to a won derful Veterans Day presenta tion during our communitys Week of Valor, said Khaki Hager, an eighth-grade history teacher at Mandarin Middle School. Lieutenant Wilhelm, Lieutenant Commander Lazenka and Lieutenant Verducci spoke to our team of students and gave a fantastic presentation filled with valu able information. Our students learned so much and we know they are better prepared today for their futures. Southeast Region Command Master Chief Mack Ellis said he takes great pride in knowing that his Sailors had a positive impact on the students. In my opinion, our Sailors and Marines wear the cloth of our nation. Were role models and mentors for our youth, he said. We need to realize the impact and the difference we can make by providing inspira tion to the youth of our coun try. They are our future leaders and we need to be at the fore front of their development. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown spoke in a similar tone during his opening remarks at a military appreciation lun cheon Nov. 8. Our military and veterans community already has given so much to our nation. Its an inspiring sight to see these brave men and women contin ue to give back in our schools, Brown said. This outreach effort is about pairing the leaders of today with the leaders of tomorrow. He also expressed his grati tude to the 900-plus veterans, active duty military members and military leaders in atten dance. Its always a humbling thought to think about the sac rifices made by the men and women of our military, he said. Im honored to work with so many dedicated business lead ers and community partners to say thank you for their service and dedication. This years Week of Valor was the first time Jacksonville has hosted such an event, but the city plans to make it an annual occasion. In addition to school speak ing engagements, the Week of Valor also featured a military appreciation luncheon, a job fair, a Veterans Day Parade, the Navy-Marine Corps Carrier Classic NCAA college basket ball game between Florida and Georgetown aboard USS Bataan (LHD 5), and a military appreciation football game between the NFL Jacksonville Jaguars and Indianapolis Colts. Last week, I saw a retiree who was about my age in Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles family medicine clinic. He grew up knowing how bad tobacco could be, and still, he told me he had a hard time quitting. He tried using medications to help, with some suc cess, but said that stress had led him to start smoking again. He was obese and had pre-diabetes and unhealthy cholesterol levels. What should a doctor or a friend or family member do for a person in this situation? We celebrate the Great American Smokeout on Nov. 15 and it gives everyone a chance to stop, even if just for a minute, to think about how to help tobacco users like this patient who need some help. In recent years, ideas about how to help tobacco users has matured somewhat to identify tobacco use as a chronic, relapsing medical condi tion and not just a bad habit. Tobacco use is a disease, an addiction to nic otine that is very difficult to break. Treatment needs to be approached in a systemic fashion, with patients being asked about tobacco use at every med ical or dental visit, and being offering medications at every visit. It should be as easy to get started on a medication to quit as it is to buy a pack of ciga rettes. Clinical guidelines direct provid ers to consider tobacco users for a wide range of screenings. All smok ers should be immunized with a flu shot every year and a pneumonia vaccine once before age 65. All smok ers over age 40 should be referred for lung function measurement to help diagnose emphysema earlier. At age 65, smokers should be screened for aortic abdominal aneurysms using ultrasound. Skin exams should be more frequent and more extensive for smokers, as the risk of skin cancer is increased in people with a smoking history. Bone scans should be con sidered earlier to document calcium loss for patients who continue smok ing. Hip fracture rates are markedly increased among people who continue to smoke. Smokers should also be screened far more closely for other conditions, such as depression and anxiety. People with mental illnesses smoke at rates nearly twice as high (44 percent) as the general public (22.5 percent) in the U.S. and nearly half the cigarettes smoked in this country are consumed by people with psychiatric or addictive disorders. Life expectancy is dramatically improved among women who quit smoking compared to those who dont quit, according to a recent study in Great Britain. This sounds like some thing we already know, but its very important to be clear that contin ued smoking triples the risk of dying at age 50 in the more than one mil lion women studied. The study also showed that even light smokers (fewer than 10 cigarettes a day) were at sub stantially increased risk of death rela tive to never-smokers. So, as we celebrate the Great American Smokeout, I encourage and support my fellow providers and the public in treating the disease of smoking as a chronic, long-term condition that can take eight or nine attempts to quit for good. Tobacco use is hard. Tobacco users need consistent, firm and impartial commitment over time to help them quit for good. Every November, we should all take time to support our friends and family who continue to smoke, and help them choose to quit one more time, in the hope that its the final time. Were standing by to help you quit at NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center (next to the base fitness center) at 5425292, or at your next visit to any pro vider at NH Jacksonville, including Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville. We have tools to help you successfully quit once and for all, including prescrip tion medication, nicotine gum and classes. Additional resources include the Department of Defense Quit Tobacco Make Everyone Proud website at www.ucanquit2.org, TRICAREs Quitline at 877-414-9949, and Tobacco Free Florida at 877-U-CAN-NOW (877822-6669). Start making your quit plan today! Southeast Region Sailors, veterans support Week of Valor Another Great American Smokeout who smokes now? When entering into a residential lease, both landlords and tenants alike hope that everything runs smoothly. While this is usually the case, some times problems arise. The following are ways to protect yourself when entering into a residential lease. Read your lease before you sign Always read your lease in its entirety before signing. A lease may seem like a bunch of legal jargon, but remember, you will be bound by its terms. Do you have to upkeep the lawn? Do you have to give notice when you move out? If so, how much14, 30, 60 days? What is the procedure for notifying your landlord about repairs? Taking an hour to review the lease before signing could save you a lot of timeand moneyin the future. Get everything in writing Scenario: Lease says you must pay $40 a month for lawn service. You tell the landlord that you do not want this service. They tell you not to worry about it because they will not charge you and to just sign the lease. What should you do? Before signing anything, get the landlords promise in writing and make sure it is incorporated into the lease. All promises/agreements should be in writing. If an agreement is made in per son or over the phone after you sign the lease, follow up with an e-mail confirm ing the details of the conversation. This is to avoid having to prove the existence of an oral agreement in court if a dis pute arises. Conduct a thorough inspection Upon moving in, make sure you inspect your new place thoroughly. Take pictures, make a list of defects, and provide a copy of the list to your land lord immediately. This will prove that you are not responsible for pre-existing conditions. Similarly, upon moving out, be present during the final inspection and take pictures of the condition in which you are leaving your place. If the inspector does not see any problems, make sure you get that in writing. Security deposits What does your lease say about secu rity deposits? Is the pet deposit nonrefundable? Under what conditions could the landlord retain the depos it? Once you have moved, the land lord is most likely required to return the deposit or provide a list of deductions for damages within a certain period of time. This requirement varies state-bystate. In Florida, your landlord has 15 days to return your deposit, or 30 days to give you written notice by certified mail explaining the amount theyre keeping and why. If your landlord doesnt give the required notice, they must return all of your deposit. If they do give you notice, you then have 15 days to dispute the claim. Each state has different rules. Military clause The Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) is a federal law that allows a service member to terminate a lease before its expiration date, but only after providing written notice and a copy of PCS orders to the landlord. Even if there is not a military clause in your lease, you are still protected under the SCRA. Under the SCRA, the termination date of your lease will be 30 days after the next payment is due. For example, if you give written notice on 15 February and you pay rent on the first of each month, then your termination date is no earlier than 30 March. Some states have their own versions of the SCRA that give ser vicemembers additional protections; one of those states is Florida. In Florida, you can terminate a lease for a variety of reasons. The big ones are: you get PCS orders requiring you to move at least 35 miles away; you receive orders requiring you to move into gov ernment quarters; you become eligible to live in government quarters and opt to move into them; or you are released from active duty after having leased your place while on active duty and it is at least 35 miles from your home of record. To terminate your lease, give your landlord: written notice, including a termination date that is at least 30 days after the date you deliver the notice to your landlord, and a copy of your orders or a letter signed by your commanding officer. Once you do this, your landlord must prorate any rent you pay to the ter mination date. Visit the Region Legal Service Office Southeast Legal Assistance Office for more information.Renting: Protect yourself when signing a lease JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 23

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Humana Military is contracted with the federal government to manage the TRICARE contract for the South Region. The TRICARE office in Orange Park has moved from its Kingsley Avenue loca tion to 769-1 Blanding Boulevard. There are approximately 170,000 TRICARE beneficiaries in the Jacksonville area. TRICARE is the Department of Defenses worldwide health care pro gram available to eligible beneficiaries in any of the seven uniformed servic es the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service, and Commissioned Corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. TRICARE eligible beneficiaries may include active duty service members and their families, retired service mem bers and their families, National Guard and reserve members and their fami lies, survivors, certain former spouses, and others. TRICARE brings together military and civilian health care profes sionals and resources to provide highquality health care services. For more information about TRICARE benefits, call 1-800-444-5445 or visit www.tricare.mil The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty mem bers including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and fam ily members are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for mili tary personnel, but under no circumstanc es are dependent children authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may purchase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No exceptions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. TRICARE office movesJacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO 24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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The worlds $110 billion-a-year cyber economy has never been more vulnera ble to crime and other threats. Securing the Internet against attacks demands the expertise of government agencies, industry and allies, said the command er of U.S. Cyber Command on Nov. 8 in Washington D.C. Army Gen. Keith Alexander, Cybercom chief and director of the National Security Agency, spoke before a large audience at the Symantec 2012 Government Symposium. The symposium examines a funda mental question: how to protect sensi tive information while enabling col laboration across jurisdictions, nations, and the private sector? Government operations depend on the network. If we lose that network we cant communicate, and what happens when [adversaries] disrupt our network or the power grid or our banking institutions, Alexander asked, adding that the U.S. must work with its partners in industry and its allies to solve the problem. Many will ask about the roles of [the National Security Agency and Cybercom in this, and how can we ensure civil liberties and privacy [as well as] the security of cyberspace? We can do both, he said. One of the first things industry and government must decide is how to make sure all companies involved in U.S. critical infrastructure -including financial and information services and the defense industrial base -institute the highest possible levels of computer security. How many companies in the United States and among our allies are at this level? Alexander asked. We actually do inspections, he added. We inspect our government networks to see how many are at 100 percent cybersecurity. And the answer is, very few. Companies in some sectors, like banking and the high end of the defense industrial base, are right there at the top of computer security, the general said. Then you go out to some companies that are being [by adversaries in cyber space] and they dont know what the threat looks like nor what they should do, and some of them are in critical infrastructure, he added. Nobody wants to make such an effort hard, costly or bureaucratic, Alexander said. The question is how do we help them? he said. Whats the right forum for government and industry to work together to help those companies get to the right level of security? Another imperative for governmentindustry collaboration involves gaps in computer security exploited by what are called zero-day attacks -those that exploit vulnerabilities in computer applications. Eventually, patches are created to plug the security holes, but not before adversaries have entered and damaged the network or stolen intellectual prop erty. Alexander used an analogy to explain how Cybercom or the NSA could help industry identify what the gener al called bad packets, or those that carry destructive payloads out on the Internet. Internet service providers see pack ets out there. We want them to be able to see bad packets and do something about them. Well have [an examina tion process] for every packet. And well say, Did you see a bad packet in the network? Tell us where its coming from and going to, and stop it because [its carrying] a destructive payload, the general explained. When they see that bad packet, we dont need to know what was in the communications, he added. All we need to know is a dangerous packet went from point A to point B right now, and that we may need to act. The federal government is not look ing at the traffic, Alexander said. Industry is looking at the traffic and they have to do that to own and oper ate these networks. Were going to help them with signatures and other things, and they need to tell us when they need our help. But its got to be done in time for us to help, and thats part of the key issue. At Cybercom, the general said, experts are training the cyber work force of the future, determining roles and responsibilities of the federal agen cies involved in cyber security and exploring a defensible architecture for the Defense Department. The DoD architecture, in my opin ion, is not defensible per se. Were doing our best to defend it, but weve made this really hard, Alexander said. The department has 15,000 enclaves, each run by separate system administra tors and each with its own firewalls, he added. Cybercom and other agencies are also working on issues related to their authority to respond to a problem, Alexander said. The key question, he added, is what can the Department of Homeland Security, the FBI, Cybercom and the NSA do to defend the country against a cyber attack, and when can they do it? Alexander said that he, DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano, and FBI Director Robert Mueller have laid out lanes in the highway for the government enti ties. The FBI is responsible for inves tigation, attribution and domestic problems. DHS is responsible, along with partners like NSA, the National Institute for Standards and Technology and the SANS Institute, for cyber secu rity standards. NSA and Cybercom have a couple of roles and responsibilities, Alexander said, including foreign intelligence. NSA has the best folks in the world, the general said. They have special skills and we want to leverage those skills to help secure cyberspace for our country and for our allies. Cybercoms role is not only to oper ate and defend DoD networks but to defend the country, he said, noting Cybercom would step in if America came under cyber attack. In the meantime, the general said, hes concerned that attacks like the destructive August attack on computers at Saudi Arabias government-owned oil company Aramco are happening and were spending a lot of time talking about what we should do and when we should do it. While there is still time, he said, while youre all in the room together with us we ought to argue it out just like we did in the election [on Tuesday], come to a solution and then get going. Cyber security involves allies, federal and industry partners JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 15, 2012 25

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