<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



Jax air news
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 11-08-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02018

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012 I N S I D E Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The multipurpose amphibi ous assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) arrived at Naval Station Mayport Nov. 2 to support the Week of Valor sponsored by the City of Jacksonville. The weeklong event honors service members, both veterans and active duty, for their service to the nation. Sailors and Marines from through out Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia have the opportunity to attend a variety of functions, includ ing a free concert, an NFL football game, an NCAA basketball game on board Bataan, and the downtown Veterans Day parade on the last day of the event. I think this week will be a good morale booster for the crew, said Lt. Jennifer Bouchard, Bataans assis tant first lieutenant. Preparing to show off our ship to our guests builds camaraderie. During the port visit, Bataan will host a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) basketball game on the ships flight deck. Crew mem bers will have an opportunity to meet the University of Florida Gators and the Georgetown University Hoyas who are scheduled to play Nov. 9. In our military families, we see the best our country has to offer. They demon strate the virtues that have made America great for more than two centuries and the values that will preserve our greatness for centuries to come, President Barack Obama said in his proclamation issued Nov. 1 declar ing the month of November as Military Family Month. The proclamation reads: Since our nations earliest days, courageous men and women of all backgrounds and beliefs have banded together to fight for the freedoms we cherish. Behind each Northeast Florida celebrates Week of Valor President proclaims November Military Family Month NAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Council hosted their 10th biannual Individual Augmentee (IA) Appreciation luncheon Nov. 1 at the NAS Jax Officers Club. Fifty-eight IAs from the base and tenant commands and several spouses were recognized at the event. The event was sponsored by the Northeast Florida Navy League, Rotary Club of Orange Park and Rotary of Orange Park Sunrise. The luncheon kicked off with the singing of the national anthem by MU2 Laura Carey of Navy Band Southeast and the invocation by NAS Jax Chaplain Lt.. Hylanie ChanWilliams. Music was provided by Navy Band Southeast. As awardees and command representatives enjoyed their lunch, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders wel comed and thanked the IAs for their dedicated service before introducing U.S. Congressman Ander Crenshaw as the guest speaker. I want to thank you all not just your commitment to the Navy, but youve demon strated tremendous com mitment to our country. As a member of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations, I occasion ally travel to some of those places where you have served such as Afghanistan, Iraq and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba to ensure that we are taking care of our troops, said Crenshaw. Crenshaw continued, I remember my first trip to Iraq in the middle of August and it was about 110 degrees. I think I had the best ice tea Ive every had. My trip was nothing like what youve experienced on your IA tours. But I want you to know as you step up from your comfort zones and go there on your own, working in a differ ent job for a different service, we realize how difficult that is. So thank you! As I look around here, I see a lot of family members. And, I realize that just like Individual Augmentees deploying alone without the support of a squad ron or ship, many of your spouses might not have the support from other military spouses. So for those of you who stayed home and took care Individual Augmentees recognized at NAS Jax www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA

PAGE 2

JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Nov. 8 1861 Capt. Charles Wilkes seizes two Confederate diplomats from the British steamer Trent, causing an international controversy with Great Britain (known as the Trent Affair). 1942 Operation Torch (Allied landings in French Northwest Africa). American forces land at Casablanca. French naval forces attack U.S. Navy ships and 13 French ships are sunk without a loss to the U.S. 1956 Navy Stratolab balloon (Lt. Cmdrs. Malcolm Ross and M. Lee Lewis) better world height record soaring to 76,000 feet over Black Hills, S.D., on flight to gather meteorological, cosmic ray and other scientific data. Nov. 9 1921 USS Olympia arrives at the Washington Navy Yard from France carrying the body of the Unknown Soldier for internment at Arlington National Cemetery. 1950 Task Force 77 makes first attack on the Yalu River bridges. In first engagement between MIG-15 and F9F jets (USS Philippine Sea), Lt. Cmdr. William Amen (VF-111) shoots down a MIG and becomes first Navy pilot to down a jet aircraft. Nov. 10 1775 Congress votes to raise two battalions of Continental Marines, establishing the U.S. Marine Corps. 1941 U.S. escorted convoy WS 12, carrying 20,000 British troops to Singapore, sails from Halifax, Nova Scotia. Nov. 11 1870 Navy expedition to explore the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, southern Mexico, commanded by Capt. Robert Shufeldt, enters the Coatzacoalcos River to begin a survey for possible inter-oceanic canal. Support provided by USS Kansas and USS Mayflower. 1918 Armistice ends World War I. 1920 Lenah Higbee becomes the first woman to be awarded the Navy Cross. It was awarded for her World War I service. 1921 Washington Naval Conference begins. 1943 Two Carrier Task Forces strike Japanese shipping at Rabaul, sinking one carrier and damag ing other ships. Raid was first use of SB2C Curtiss Helldivers in combat. 1954 Nov. 11 designated as Veterans Day to honor veterans of all U.S. wars. 1966 Launch of Gemini 12, with Cmdr. James Lovell Jr., as command Pilot. Mission lasted three days, 22 hours and 34 minutes. Included 59 orbits at an altitude of 162.7 nautical miles. Recovery by HS-11 helicopter from USS Wasp (CVS-18). 1981 Commissioning of first Trident-class nuclear powered fleet ballistic missile submarine, USS Ohio (SSBN-726). Nov. 12 1912 Lt. Theodore Ellyson makes first success ful launching of an airplane (A-3) by catapult at the Washington Navy Yard. 1940 CNO Admiral Stark submits memorandum to Secretary of the Navy on four plans if U.S. enters war. He favors the fourth one, Plan Dog, calling for strong offensive in the Atlantic and defense in the Pacific. 1942 First day of the three days of fighting in the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal. 1943 President Franklin D. Roosevelt embarks on USS Iowa (BB-61) to travel to the Allied conferences at Teheran, Iran and Cairo, Egypt. Nov. 13 1776 Capt. John Paul Jones sailing Alfred, along with brig Providence, captures British transport Mellish, carrying winter uniforms that were later used by Washingtons troops. 1942 Loss of USS Juneau (CL-52) during Battle of Guadalcanal results in loss of Five Sullivan Brothers. 1943 Fifth Fleet carriers begin long range night bombing attacks on Japanese positions in Gilberts and Marshalls in preparation for landings. 1957 First firing of Regulus II bombardment mis sile. Nov. 14 1846 Naval forces capture Tampico, Mexico. 1910 Civilian Eugene Ely pilots first aircraft to takeoff from a ship, USS Birmingham (CL-2) at Hampton Roads, Va. He lands safely on Willoughby Spit, Norfolk, Va. 1941 Order to withdraw Marines from Shanghai, Peiping, and Tientsin, China. Today Im sharing with you some thing that Id rather not. If you thought I was a bad parent because my boys watch SpongeBob and ride their bikes in the street, wait until you read this: Two of my children have cavities. The third one probably does, too, but so far, he hasnt cooperated for x-rays. There, Ive said it. Mothers dont like to talk about cavi ties because we view them as evidence of what we perceive to be bad parenting. How could we let those precious little baby teeth decay? Even the sound of the word decay makes us shudder. Decay? Decay? My childs mouth has decay? Weve sheltered our children from so many things, made them wash their hands before dinner, and now they have decay in their mouths. Every time one of my boys gets a cav ity, I feel like Im the only mom whos let this happen. The dentist assures me Im wrong. Dental caries are the most common chronic infectious disease of childhood. Plus, he says, Cavities arent something moms talk about at school pick-up. Hes right. We dont ask about cavi ties (as in, Are your childrens mouths decaying?) because we are afraid of the answer: Cavities? What? No way! Not my kids. A mother who asks another mother about cavities might as well announce that she lets her kids eat pizza twice a week and frozen waffles for breakfast. (Done and done.) The truth is that no matter how many times you brush your childrens teeth, or floss them more than just when we remember, you still might see the D-word (decay) on your childs chart. Sometimes, genetics simply arent on our side. Except, neither my husband nor I have ever had cavities. So that pretty much eliminates genes from my arsenal of defenses. My husband had horribly misaligned teeth growing up. When we were in ele mentary school together, his front teeth stuck out parallel to the floor. They were huge like horse teeth. He couldnt get his lips around them. And he would spend the next seven years of his life in head gear and braces. But he didnt have cavities. I had braces, retainers and this deceptively small, exquisitely pain ful bar a palate expander in the top of my mouth. My teeth had to be filed down and my frenulum snipped. But I didnt have cavities. The most recent cavity appeared in our youngest sons molar. I sent him back to the dentist for what I thought would be an ordinary filling, just like all those other times. Instead, he returned to the waiting room an hour later with a silver cap on his molar. Apparently the cavity was so big, a filling would have cracked the baby tooth. What came out of my mouth when I saw him was, Oh, Honey, how do you feel? What went through my mind, however, cant be printed here. Theres no hiding a shiny, silver cap, even if it is in the back on a molar. While the doc tor had my son on the nitrous oxide, he should have gone ahead and tattooed Mom lets me drink juice on his fore head, too. The silver tooth is like a dag ger in my heart. But thats just me. My son loves his new tooth, especially because his older brothers are fraught with jealousy. I want one, they said. Why did I get a plain filling? This proves, once again, that my three sons will fight over anything. The dentist tells me I did the best I could. Sometimes, these things happen. My son isnt broken and his teeth will be fine. Cant you just pull the tooth out? I asked, eager to be rid of the silver blem ish on my parenting. No, the dentist said. Extracting the tooth, while eliminating my guilt, would create problems for my sons per manent teeth. The silver cap holds a place for the grownup tooth below. So I put on my big-girl Mommy pants and accepted it. Because parenting involves getting over ourselves and our guilt for the sake of our childs future. A silver cap today means healthy teeth for the rest of my sons life. In theory, at least. As I finished my conversation with the dentist, he smiled and said, Remember, when a silver tooth falls out, the tooth fairy brings $50. Thats when I realized: I feel guilty but not that guilty. Cavities are an unspeakable part of childhood, parenting 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 3

In support of the Navys Resident Energy Conservation Program (RECP), NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders hosted a resident utility meeting Oct. 31 at All Saints Chapel, where he dis cussed a new plan to reduce base housing energy con sumption. This is a top priority of our CNO, Adm. Jonathan Greenert, who supports building a culture of conser vation within privatized housing. The goal of RECP is to increase resident awareness of their energy usage and encourage conservation habits in the home, said Sanders. He added, By working with our privatized housing partner, Balfour Beatty Communities, residents will learn how to reduce electricity use without sacrificing comfort. This is important to the Defense Department, when you consider it spends more than $4 billion annually on energy costs. They also found that when base housing residents are responsible for the cost of energy they consume they quickly develop smarter energy habits. And with RECP, the money we save is reinvested our Navy housing communities to support improved lifestyles for our Sailors and their families. Sanders explained that RECP is just one part of the installation-wide initiative to reduce energy con sumption by 30 percent in 2015 (from its 2005 base line). Overall, the less we spend on energy, the more we can spend on other needed budget items. NAS Jax will be the third Navy region to implement RECP when it goes live in April 2013. Under RECAP, housing at NAS Jax will be grouped according to energy efficiency into like-type groups (LTG). The base criteria to determine LTG includes neighborhood location, the size of the housing unit (number of bedrooms and square footage), and the year the housing unit was built or renovated. Each month, the average utility usage for each LTG will be determined and a 10 percent buffer above and below the average will be added to create normal usage bands that account for severe weather changes. Mock bills will be issued to residents for three months beginning Jan. 1. The mock bill enables resi dents to compare their utility cost and usage report that help adjust their energy consumption habits so they place within the normal usage band for the LTG. When live billing begins in April, residents will be billed if their usage is higher than the normal usage band. Residents whose consumption falls within the normal usage band will not owe anything for that bill ing period. Residents whose consumption falls below the normal usage band will receive a refund. Separately, Balfour Beatty Communities recently won a grant from the Department of Energy for the Switch4Good Program that encourages conservation by educating and informing residents of habits that can affect their utility consumption and how to shift their habits to promote conservation. Residents can also request a home energy audit, as well as a free energy coach visit. Another resident utility meeting is scheduled Nov. 8, from 4-6 p.m., at All Saints Chapel. CO hosts RECP town hall, next meeting set for today JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 3

PAGE 4

While generally satis fied with the progress of the service, the Navys top offi cer used his latest position report to assess the effects of set and drift on the sta tus of the U.S. Navy. Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert spoke about his report during a roundtable with reporters in his Pentagon office Nov. 1. Set and drift at sea is cur rent, its wind, its things you didnt think about something that takes you a little bit off, he said. Then you deal with it, you adjust a bit, and you move ahead. Position Report: 2012 addresses what the Navy needs to work on, the admiral said. The report is based on the three tenets of the service: Warfighting first, operate for ward and be ready. Much of what the service planned when Greenert came into his position last year, he said, is on track. The Navy has reinforced aid to warfighters by deploying new mine hunting and neutral izing equipment to the Arabian Gulf, and also has fielded improved torpedoes, advanced electromagnetic sensors and up-gunned patrol craft in the region. And the USS Ponce is deployed to the region as a for ward staging base. The Navy and Marine Corps are working to reinvigorate amphibious warfare skills, Greenert said. In the past year, 25 ships and 14,000 sailors and Marines honed those skills in Exercise Bold Alligator, he noted. Operating forward has meant an increasing number of ships and sailors deploying, Greenert said. The Navy has made progress in rebalancing ships homeports to 60 percent in the Pacific and 40 percent in the Atlantic, rather than the 50-50 split that was the norm before a shift in strategic focus to the Asia-Pacific region. Being ready has meant filling billets on ships. The Navy has improved advancement and re-enlistment opportunities across the board by reducing overmanned ratings and revis ing re-enlistment processes to ensure fairness, the admiral said in his report. An enlisted retention board also affected the service. The impact of it, what we needed to do, the marketing of it, mak ing sure its transparent, mak ing sure we give our folks every opportunity to do a deliber ate transition for them are important and must be accom plished, the admiral said. The board was needed to get our fit right to get our peo ple in billets at sea where they need to be, [with] the right skill set, with the right seniority in the right rating, he explained. The admiral said the Navy will not conduct another enlist ed retention board during his watch. He expects the Navy will fill the personnel gaps and will have the right mix for the fleet. But set and drift did affect the service over the past year, Greenert acknowledged. The thing that we didnt foresee a year ago was the level of [operational tempo] that the Navy has, he said. Mainly, it is the request for forces that extended past their deployments. The need for two carriers in the Arabian Gulf, four extra minesweepers in the Arabian Gulf and more helicopters in the region was not anticipated to continue so long, he added. Looking ahead, Greenert said, he will reinstate tracking of individual operational tempo. This is important for the overall health of the force, he said. Another area that needs more attention, the admi ral said, is the crime of sexu al assault. The number of events being reported has not declined, and Im not satis fied, he said. There will be a renewed emphasis. I like the strategy we have in place. I am satisfied that the track laid out by the Navy is good, but I per sonally am going to put more attention on that. The number of suicides in the Navy is creeping up, and we dont know why, Greenert said. We need to work on that work on the resilience of our folks, make sure the programs we are putting in place are properly implanted and getting to the people who need them, he said. Greenert uses position report to check course of Navy 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 5

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 5

PAGE 6

of the families, you are heroes as well, Crenshaw stated. He also told the IAs that as they return home, he hopes they will share the experienc es of their deployment fight ing in wars for democracy for people who dont understand what democracy or freedom is. Military families understand this, but many in our country dont realize how lucky we are and are not exposed to these other cultures that dont have the freedoms we do, said Crenshaw. Capt. Louis LaVopa of Naval Hospital Jax also offered a brief perspective and slide show on that it was like working in a hospital in Afghanistan during his IA tour. Im here today to stress the importance of Navy Medicine in Afghanistan. Im an ER doc tor and was deployed for one year with the Multinational Medical Unit in Afghanistan. During my tour, we saw over 1,100 patients including U.S. service members, coalition partners, Afghan nationals and security forces and contractors, he said. There was an ever present threat from improvised explo sive devices so that was always on our minds especially when our teams had to leave our facility. We worked side-by-side with coalition forces provid ing medical care to the injured. Healing our nations heroes was our mission. We would get the call of inbound victims and our trau ma teams would jump into action because the Medevac transports would bring in the injured directly from the bat tlefields. The first responders would meet them on the flight line and wed quickly check for IEDs and rush them to the trauma bay, surgery, and get them the care needed to sta bilize them for transport to Bagram Hospital and then a stateside hospital. The average stay at our intensive care unit was less than 12 hours. We also provided ceremoni al honors for fallen heroes who paid the ultimate sacrifice as they were transported from our facility. This was always a very somber event. LaVopa concluded his pre sentation with a three-minute slideshow created by HM2 Kyle Murphy which portrays numerous photos of medical staff members saving lives in Afghanistan. To close out the luncheon, each IA was presented with a special plaque and coin from the Northeast Florida Navy League Council and thankyou letters from U.S. Senators Bill Nelson and Marco Rubio, and U.S. Congressman Ander Crenshaw. Each spouse was also presented with a rose courtesy of the Navy Exchange. The IA Recognition Luncheon was first held at NAS Jax in 2008 and initiated by the Northeast Florida Navy League Council. Its important to rec ognize them because these men and women are deployed from their commands as an individual and were not get ting any recognition when they returned home. So this event pays tribute to them for their sacrifices, said Navy League Florida Region Navy League President Bill Dudley. LUNCHEONof them stands a parent, a sibling, a child, a spouse proud family members who share the weight of deploy ment and make profound sacrifices on behalf of our country. During Military Family Month, we honor our military families and recommit to showing them the fullest care and respect of a grateful Nation. In our military families, we see the best our country has to offer. They demonstrate the virtues that have made America great for more than two centuries and the values that will preserve our greatness for centu ries to come. With loved ones serving far from home, military spouses take on the work of two. Their children show courage and resilience as they move from base to base, school to school, home to home. And even through the strain of deployment, military families strengthen the fabric of each community they touch and enrich our national life as shining examples of patriotism. We each have a solemn duty to serve our Armed Forces and their families as well as they serve us. Through First Lady Michelle Obamas and Dr. Jill Bidens Joining Forces initiative, we have worked to ful fill this obligation by mobilizing all Americans to give service members and their families the opportunities and support they have earned. Last year, we challenged American businesses to hire or train 100,000 veter ans and military spouses by the end of 2013. To date, they have already exceeded that challenge, hiring over 125,000 veterans and military spouses. From helping military children succeed in the classroom to increasing support for those who care for our wounded warriors, Joining Forces will keep fighting to ensure the well-being of our troops and their families. When a young woman signs up to defend our Nation, her parents are enlisted as well. When a father deploys to a combat zone, his children are called to serve on the home front. And when the men and women of our military serve far from home, their families feel the strain of their absence. In that absence, let us stand together as one American family. Let us honor the brave patriots who keep our country safe, and let us forever hold close the memories of those who have perished in the line of duty. This month, we reaffirm that we will always lift up our military families not just when their loved ones are away, but also long after the welcome home ceremonies are over. Now, Therefore, I, Barack Obama, president of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim November 2012 as Military Family Month. I call on all Americans to honor military families through private actions and public service for the tremendous contributions they make in support of our service members and our Nation. PROCLAMATION 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 7

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 7

PAGE 8

The Gators and Hoyas basketball game is a great way to entertain people, said CTC(SW/AW) Burton Stark, a native of Virginia Beach, Va. It will attract a large crowd, and when theyre not watching the game, people can see what Sailors do. When the ship moored Nov. 2, the Honorable Alvin Brown, mayor of Jacksonville, welcomed the crew and presented Capt. Erik Ross, com manding officer of Bataan, with the key to the city. I am proud and honored by the arrival of USS Bataan at Naval Station Mayport, said Brown in his welcoming remarks. We work every day to ensure a great rela tionship with our current and retired service mem bers, he said, explaining why the city was hosting the Week of Valor. This is an excellent opportunity to show case our ship, and the fine young Sailors who make things happen, said Ross about the ships visit. We hope everyone who comes on board will take a moment to ask our Sailors about their jobs. Guests will definitely see the pride and profession alism of their Navy. While preparations are made for the NavyMarine Corps Classic on board, Bataans crew will be also able to enjoy liberty and the hospi tality of the city. Along with Morale, Welfare, and Recreation tours arranged for the week, Sailors will also be able to participate in Veterans Day celebrations and other military appre ciation events. The city officials are planning to make the Week of Valor an annual event, in sup port of the large number of veterans and active duty personnel who have made Northeast Florida their home. VALOR 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 9

HS-11 Dragonslayers home from deploymentAs seven HS-11 Dragonslayer helicopters arrived in formation over NAS Jacksonville Oct. 31, fam ily members cheered as they anxiously awaited the reunion with their loved ones. When the helos landed, family mem bers happily greeted the HS-11 crew welcoming them home from an eight-month deploy ment on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65). The carrier is set to decommission later this year. AWR1 Brandon Lee summed up what his squadrons mis sions entailed. Ultimately, were out there to protect the carrier from enemy threats, said Lee. Its nice to be back in our country but our mission is to defend the freedoms of our people. During the deployment, HS-11 provided anti-terror ism force protection, surface surveillance control, medical evacuations, vertical replen ishment of supplies (353 tons of cargo) and supported photo missions. This was one of our lon gest deployments and being separated from our fami lies for eight months is defi nitely hard, said HS-11 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Ryan Keys. We were able to communicate through email to stay in touch with our loved ones back home but its great to be back at NAS Jax. For AD2(AW) Shawn Carmichael, the homecom ing was very emotional. This is really great to be home see ing my daughter and wife. I last saw my daughter when she was 10 days old and now shes seven months old. My wife, Erica sent lots of pictures but its wonder ful to be back and see them, he said. During the deployment, the Dragonslayers flew 1,012 flights for 2,575.8 hours completing 99.9 percent of their flights. Squadron personnel also vis ited several countries includ ing Greece, Italy, United Arab Emirates and Bahrain. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 9

PAGE 10

VP-45 recognized AWO1(NAC/AW/ SW/IUSS) Steven Oles as the VP-45 Senior Sailor of the Year during the VP-45 Association Reunion in Mobile, Ala. Oct. 20. I am proud to name Petty Officer Oles as the VP-45 Sailor of the Year, said VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mike Vitali. He embodies our Navys core values of honor, courage, and commitment and is an exception al example of Pelican pride for us all. Petty Officer Oles garnered the award based upon his superior per formance leading Sailors while on deployment in Sigonella, Sicily and during a compressed InterDeployment Readiness Cycle, said VP-45 CMDCM Tom Ayers. We look forward to supporting him as he represents VP-45 in competi tion for the Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 Sailor of the Year Award in early November. The Sailor of the Year program was instituted by Adm. Elmo Zumwalt in 1972 to recognize the top Sailor at each command. The award is given annually by every command in the Navy with subsequent competitions at higher levels to ultimately deter mine the Chief of Naval Operations Sailor of the Year in four categories (Sea, Shore, Reserve, and Recruiting). The four winners of the CNOs Sailor of the Year competition are meritori ously advanced to chief petty officer in a ceremony in Washington, D.C. Parents of youthful drivers can rest a little easier when they sign up their offspring for the Driver Improvement Class designed specifically for depen dent drivers between 15 and 21 years of age. The class will be held Nov. 19, from 8 a.m. -1 p.m., in Building 1. Kristen Montejo, of Cape Fox Professional Services, said that new drivers are more likely to be involved in an accident or receive a ticket within the first 12 months of getting their driv ers license. For parents of a new driver, that can cause some worry and sleep less nights. Class members are not required to have a drivers license to attend, said Montejo. This class will offer valuable safety tips, how to respond to driving emergencies, as well as raising aware ness of other risks such as distracted driving. There will be no time behind the wheel of a vehicle it is a classroom session only. Those who pass the multi ple-choice test will receive AAA Driver Improvement Class completion certifi cates. Beverage and snack machines will be available. If you believe your teen can ben efit from driving tips by professional driving instructors, sign them up for the Teen Driver Improvement Class. Contact Linda at 542-3082 or Cindy at 542-2584. Oles announced as VP-45 Sailor of the Year Teen driver improvement class Nov. 19 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 11

MC1(SW) Greg Johnson and IT3 Patrick Schroeder were named Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Sailor of the Fourth Quarter, respectively, Oct. 27. Phil Hageman and Sharon Warner were named Senior and Junior Civilian of the Third Quarter, respectively, Oct. 31. As a staff public affairs specialist, Johnson wrote 13 articles and shot more than 800 images during the past quarter. He was one of 25 military photojournal ists selected to attend the 20th Annual Department of Defense Worldwide Military Photography Workshop, where he placed third in the competition. In addition, he manages the commands official Navy Web site and is the CNRSE Navy Community Service Program (NCSP) coordinator. I cannot conceive of anyone more deserving of this recognition or of any one who gives more back to the commu nity, said Mike Andrews, Navy Region Southeast public affairs officer. Petty Officer Johnson does double-duty. Not only does he volunteer for community service projects, hes also the person who actually organizes these projects so others can participate. According to Johnson, command involvement is one of the most impor tant factors in the success of Sailors at every level in the chain of command. Its not enough to just come in and do your job, he said. As Sailors, we have a much wider range of responsibility. When you take the time to get involved with extracurricular activities, you cre ate opportunities to develop your junior Sailors, your peers and yourself. As the NCSP coordinator, Johnson developed community partnerships between CNRSE and multiple local community organizations, including First Coast High School and Habitat for Humanity. His efforts resulted in a total of 121 command volunteer service hours during the quarter. We have a lot of great Sailors here who are not only willing, but eager to go out and give up their time for a good cause, Johnson said. Its through their efforts that we have been able to have a positive impact on the local commu nity. Its amazing that, even with a small command, our Sailors have been able to make such a difference in our local neighborhoods. I couldnt appreciate their efforts more. Schroeder serves as a regional watch specialist in the Regional Operations Center (ROC). During Hurricane Isaac, he was the operations section knowl edge manager on the Crisis Action Team. During that time, he spent more than 30 hours in the ROC, ensuring his section chief had the information neces sary to assist installations affected by the disaster. Additionally, Schroeder is highly active in the command. He is the trea surer for the CNRSE Petty Officers Association and is an active member of the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Committee. He helped raise more than $5,000 in support of the commands annual picnic. He is extremely bright and an incred ibly fast learner, said QMC(SW) Jeffrey Brebner, Schroeders supervisor. Hes very proactive when it comes to prob lem solving, and he is sought out by his superiors to tackle time-sensitive, highvisibility projects. According to Schroeder, it is humbling to receive such a prestigious award. It really is an honor, especially as a third class, to get it my first time up. Schroeder cited hard work within his division and command involvement as keys to his success. I just try to do the best job I can and work hard in the division, but it helps to be involved with the command and participate in as many functions as possible, he said. Phil Hageman, CNRSEs SCOQ, is a management and program analyst. His direct involvement in the Contract Acquisition Management Office (CAMO) process has contributed to the suc cess of a region-wide implementation, and his development of detailed tutori als for training and process documenta tion are the benchmark nationwide, said Dennis ORear, Hagemans supervisor. Phil, day in and day out, approach es his job the same way. He is always extremely professional and provides superb service to those he supports, ORear said. Hageman said it was the efforts of his co-workers that were most instrumental to his selection. Receiving this award is an honor. Im humbled, grateful and especially thankful for my CNRSE colleagues. They made possible the opportunity to apply skills to improve business pro cesses leading to our success, he said. To everyone associated with my work, my deepest appreciation for your understand ing and patience as we developed and implemented new business processes. Process improvement is not always easy, but positive attitude, coupled with desire for improvement, overcame many obstacles. Warner is a human resource (HR) specialist assigned to the CNRSE HR Pensacola Satellite, where she plays a lead role in support of the CNRSE Summer Hire Program. She initiated a plan of action and coordinated with other HR satellite offices to help maxi mize workflow efficiency for more than 30 students. She also worked with vari ous satellite offices to expedite the pro cessing of new-hire paperwork and per formance evaluations for selected stu dents who were appointed for a short tenure. According to her supervisor, Genie Milhouse, Warner sets an exam ple for everyone who works around her. Sharon is dedicated to doing her own work and willingly takes on new challenges without fear to help support the CNRSE HR team, she said. Many times, she recognizes skill shortfalls of customer liaisons and volunteers herself to help them grasp the HR steps and procedures to execute the customer need, whether it involves recruitment or other types of personnel issues. Warner said her selection for the award is an honor she doesnt take light ly. I am not only grateful, but humbled to even be nominated for this award. This is an exciting and cherished achievement in my career that I will carry with me throughout my future endeavors, she said. According to Warner, hard work and dedication have contributed to her suc cess, but she also offered some addi tional advice to those who aspire to be in her position. As a focused and determined federal employee, I use the skills and knowl edge I have learned in my 14-year career to accomplish any and all tasks. I enjoy what I do and love coming to work every day to see what new challenge awaits me, she said. My advice for those who want to succeed is to be true to who you are, do your very best, no matter what you are tasked with, and seek out opportunities to expand and enrich your knowledge base.CNRSE announces Sailors, Civilians of the Quarter JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 11

PAGE 12

12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 With many commands across the Fleet and at NAS Jax preparing for the semi-annu al physical fitness assessment (PFA), the Navys physical read iness program director, talks about Sailor responsibilities for the physical readiness test (PRT). Its the Sailors responsibil ity to maintain physical fitness standards constantly and con sistently, not solely at the time of semi-annual testing, said William Moore, director, Navy Physical Readiness Program on Oct. 16. Its important for Sailors to maintain a minimum level of physical fitness necessary for worldwide deployment readi ness, whenever and wherever needed. According to Navys Physical Readiness Program instruction, Sailors should complete at least 150 minutes of moder ate physical activity each week. Examples of moderate-intensi ty activities include brisk walk ing (3 mph or faster), bicycling (slower than 10 mph) and water aerobics. High-intensity activi ties include jogging or running, lap swimming, jumping rope and circuit training. Sailors should also perform strength training exercises at least twice a week to work all major mus cle groups. The Navy assesses each Sailors physical readiness twice a year through the semiannual PFA. The PFA includes a medical screening, a body composition assessment (BCA), and a PRT. BCA is based upon a Sailors height and weight measure ments, and circumference (measuring tape) measure ments as required. Sailors are responsible to comply with medical screening requirements for Navy physical training. Medical screening includes a current annual periodic health assessment (PHA), a semi-annual PARFQ (Physical Activity Risk Factor Questionnaire) and pre-phys ical activity questions. Sailors may check the status of their PHA in PRIMS (Physical Readiness Information Management System), a Navywide program available in BUPERS Online, used to track Sailors physical readiness data. PHA data is located on the members page under the header Last PHA. Sailors should contact medical to schedule a PHA if their current PHA has expired or will expire before the next PRT. Failure to complete any of the medical screening can pre vent a Sailor from participating in the PRT. All unauthorized non-par ticipation in the PFA will be designated as UA in PRIMS and scored a PFA failure for the PFA cycle, said Moore. OPNAVINST 6110.1J pro vides guidance for the Navys Physical Readiness Program, lists program requirements, defines respon sibilities for compliance and establishes required mini mum standards of physical fit ness. All members are required to participate in the semi-annual PFA regardless of gender, age, rank, title, bil let or retirement request status, said Moore. Sailors prepare for physical fitness assessment

PAGE 13

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 13

PAGE 14

The holidays can bring as much stress as they do joy, especially when watch ing your nutrition, Navy leaders said Oct. 23. Command and family gatherings are approaching. The kids are getting excited in anticipation of being out of school, and you are preparing for a visit from your in-laws. You may have a lot to do to prepare for the holidays, but dont let yourself run on empty. With the stress from planning and prepa rations, and the easy access to candy and your favorite not-so-healthy holiday foods, its easy to get off course from your fitness and nutrition goals, said Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Wallinger, OPNAV N-135 Nutritionist. Eating well and staying active doesnt have to stand in the way of holi day celebrations and can actually add to your enjoyment, said Wallinger. Now is a great time to reaffirm your nutrition and fitness goals, increase awareness of the days ahead and pre pare a plan to manage stress that often accompanies the holidays. Navy Physical Readiness Program offers several nutrition resources that can help you stay energized during the holidays and curb the negative impact to your body and mind. Fact sheets on achieving your holiday goals and being food label savvy will soon be available online, offering guid ance on choosing quality foods and a fixing a great plate for the holidays. The Navy Operational Fueling Series also outlines how to choose the right foods and portions something we can all do a better job at during the holidays. Being mindful of your eating hab its and setting aside time for physical activity will help you keep stress, and your waistline, under control. Exercise contributes to positive behavioral health by building resilien cy when faced with daily stress, said Captain Kurt Scott, director, OPNAV N-135H, Navy Behavioral Health. Familiarize yourself with fitness and nutrition resources to stay ready and resilient this holiday season. For more information, visit Navy Physical Readiness Page at www.npc. navy.mil/support/physical.Fueling up for the holidays: Pay attention to nutrition 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 15

NAS Jacksonville celebrated Hispanic Heritage Month dur ing a special luncheon Oct. 30. The event was held at the NAS Jax Officers Club and was sponsored by the base Multi-Cultural Awareness Committee. This years theme is Diversity United, Building Americas Future Today. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders kicked off the event with some opening remarks. Each year, Americans observe National Hispanic Heritage Month from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, by celebrating the histories, cultures and contri butions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Center and South America, said Sanders. The Navys strength is a product of its diversity. Hispanics have served brave ly in the Navy through every war and conflict since the American Revolution. Today, more than 63,000 Hispanic and Latino Sailors and civilians serve in the Navy Total Force, continued Sanders. Sanders added, Today, con tributions of Hispanics to the mission of the Navy are woven into every segment of naval operations. Recognizing that Americas strength lies in its diversity is vital to mission accomplishment. We must leverage the strength of the diversity that our nation and our people have to offer. The guest speaker for this years event was Hector Sepulveda, program direc tor, Fleet and Family Support Programs, Commander, Navy Region Southeast. I was born in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico and at the age of 10, my mother and I moved to the lower west side of Manhattan. I had to learn English and American customs the hard way and I faced many misunderstandings, he told the audience. Today, the Hispanic popula tion in the United States num bers about 47 million or about 15 percent of the population in this nation of over 300 million. During the next 40 or so years the Hispanic population will grow to a significant one-third of the population. By the year 2050, Hispanics are projected to double in size to a whopping 30 percent of the United States population. Sepulveda went on to talk about some of the cultural dif ferences regarding Hispanics. Latin-Americans often dis play non-verbal cues to enrich the spoken word. Sometimes nothing is said, yet the implic it message is passed on nonverbally. There is also a differ ence of maintaining measure able distances between people as they interact; the bubble around us. When Americans interact with some people of other cultures, they feel their bubble or space has been invaded. In Hispanic culture, the relative distance between individuals tends to be small, he said. And, touch is an extremely important sense for humans. For Hispanics, and particu larly for the Puerto Rican cul ture, touching is a way of life. It Is a sign of respect, friend ship, or admiration, continued Sepulveda. In conclusion, Sepulveda stated, Hispanics have added new threads to the American fabric. These cultural values and behaviors will be inter woven in the American cul tural fabric. Although we are talking about Hispanic Heritage Month, Id like to say that the greatest asset of the American culture is it diversi fied culture. Americas great est strength is our ability to draw on the strength of all our cultural members of this great American society. The guests were then treat ed to a Latin-style buffet that included a variety of traditional dishes from various featured Hispanic nationalities and a short dance program. NAS Jax celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 15

PAGE 16

16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 17

Dashing Through The Groveat NAS Jax Patriots GroveSaturday December 8, 4 8 p.m. FREEsnow Sledding Photos with Santa Tree Lighting Musical Entertainment Refreshments And more! 778-9772 Blue Star Families brought the joy of reading to military children by donating 400 new books through the organi zations Books on Bases pro gram at the NAS Jacksonville Child Development Center Oct. 29. The books were donat ed following a book drive by Jacksonvilles Books A-Go Go and Retired Seniors Volunteer Programs for Blue Star Families. During the event, Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., his wife, Chris, along with NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders and his wife, Kathy, read A Handy Manny Halloween to pre schoolers before giving each of the children a book to take home. Blue Star Families is a nonprofit organization comprised of military families supporting and empowering other mili tary families. One of the ways we do this is partnering with the Department of Defense and other organizations to develop programs that help military families, explained Jacksonville Blue Star Families Chapter Director Sheila Stevens. One of those programs is Books on Bases where we bring books to base libraries, schools and child care cen ters. So today, we are deliver ing more than 400 Halloween books to the children here, along with several other books for the classrooms and a Nook for the teachers to use, she continued. We hold these events because there are a lot of children whose parents are deployed. Reading gives them a chance to escape inside a book and they can sit down and read with the parent at home or with siblings. This is a great event. They are promoting literacy and we want all of our children to enjoy reading and to be suc cessful when they get to kin dergarten so this helps give them a good start, said NAS Jax Child and Youth Program Manager Mary Grenier. Books on Bases plans to distribute more than 65,000 books nationally this year, to reach, military-impacted pub lic schools, and community libraries. Program promotes reading for military children JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 17

PAGE 18

A sheet metal mechanic at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) spends his days repairing missioncritical aircraft in support of Warfighters but in his off-duty hours he referees high school football, an avo cation for which he was recently recognized. Ray Reberio, assigned to the FRCSE P-3 Orion air craft production line, received this years Florida High School Athletic Association (FHSAA) Official of the Year award presented annually to recipients who exemplify the highest standards of ethical conduct and moral character. He was presented a plaque at the first North Florida Officials Association meeting in August. Reberio has been active for 15 years with the FHSAA and is cur rently responsible for officiating at 52 schools in four counties. Dan Hicken, the First Coast News (WTLV Channel 12) sports director and weeknight sports anchor, accompanied by videographer Chad Cushnir, inter viewed Reberio in the FRCSE P-3 production hangar Oct. 25. Hicken wanted to portray referees in a more positive light following the NFLs three-month referee labor dispute during which replacement referees reportedly blew two calls between Seattle and Green Bay and awarded the Seahawks the winning touchdown (1412) over the Packers. Reberio said every official has made mistakes in the game, but instant replay is not allowed in high school football. My regular job isnt officiating, said Reberio. I love doing it (refereeing), and all the coaches know me well. I mentor officials, and I run a tight ship. Its our responsibility to know all the rules with many changing from year to year. Sometimes a par ent thinks you made a bad call, but they dont always know as much as they think they do. He said his job is to make novice officials into veter ans, so they can move up in the organization to make room for new officials. We take tests through FHSAA, the official govern ing body for interscholastic athletics in Florida, he said. Hes been involved with youth athletics for more than 25 years, first working with the Pop Warner youth football league in Virginia. He does it for the love of the sport, and he wants to be a good role model for the players. Reberio said he is paid for officiating at two to three varsity and junior varsity games each week, but it scarcely covers his gas or time. You actually lose money, he said. I leave home at 4 p.m. and return some nights at 11. If youre doing this for the money, youre in the wrong business. FRCSE mechanic is mentor for game-day officials 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 19

Navy Legal Office changes name, services remain intact The Naval Legal Service Command realigned its offices Oct. 1, but its legal services to the fleet did not change. Legal assistance services were previously provid ed by Naval Legal Service Offices (NLSOs). As a result of the realignment, a service member seeking legal assistance with an issue such as a will, power of attorney, family law advice or any similar personal legal matter can now find assistance at the closest Region Legal Service Office (RLSO). The provision of legal assistance will continue at all prior NLSO locations, but will now be delivered by RLSO commands. There are legal assistance offices in fleet concen tration areas, and at or near most Navy bases around the world, with legal support providers prepared to assist service members, their families, retirees, and other eligible clients. All legal assistance services are provided free of charge to those eligible. RLSOs will continue to prosecute courts-martial and provide legal advice to commands around the globe. Command services include advice on military justice, ethics, JAG Manual investigations, admin istrative law, and other legal issues involving Navy commands. On Oct. 1, eight NLSOs headquartered in Pensacola; Norfolk; Bremerton; Jacksonville; San Diego; Washington, D.C.; Naples, Italy; and Yokosuka, Japan, realigned to become four Defense Service Offices (DSOs) headquartered in San Diego; Washington, D.C.; Norfolk; and Yokosuka, Japan. The DSOs mission is to defend service members in military justice proceedings, represent them at administrative boards, and provide other represen tational services, including advice on non-judicial punishment and adverse personnel actions. This realignment also changed the way service members receive defense services in 12 locations around the fleet where former NLSO detachments were closed. In those locations, service members will receive personal defense services in a manner similar to the way service members at sea are sup ported. Service members requesting defense services, such as representation for courts-martial or admin istrative boards, will make initial contact with a DSO attorney by telephone or other remote com munication technology, with subsequent in-per son consultation if necessary. The 12 locations are Everett, Whidbey Island, Port Hueneme, Lemoore, Corpus Christi, New Orleans, Millington, Kings Bay, Guantanamo Bay, Newport, Earle, and Sigonella. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 19

PAGE 20

With winter weather right around the corner in northern Japan, the Fighting Tigers of VP-8 are preparing them selves to conduct cold-weather opera tions. To the Fighting Tigers, who are used to operating in the warm weather of their homeport of NAS Jacksonville, conducting de-icing training is an important necessity to ensure the safety of the aircrew flying the aircraft, and the maintainers who work on the flightline. VP-8 recently conducted a de-icing drill to train and prepare their main tenance personnel and flight crews for inclement winter weather. Maintenance personnel gained the skills necessary to operate deicing equipment ensuring they are capable of safely and effectively removing any ice buildup and snow on the aircrafts fuselage, wings, and con trol surfaces. Snow and ice can be very danger ous during flight, said VP-8 Safety/ NATOPS Officer Lt. Cmdr. Leroy Shoesmith. Too much ice on the wings will decrease the amount of lift need ed for the aircraft to safely fly. In the air we have systems that help us with ice removal, but on the ground these systems are ineffective. During preflight snow and ice buildup needs to be removed manually by aircrew and our maintenance team. Special equipment which applies a liquid anti-ice mixture to the aircraft is then used to prevent any additional buildup prior to takeoff. The drill consisted of a simulated pre flight performed by VP-8 aircrew who called for a maintenance deicing crew. With the GL-1800 Global Deicing truck on scene VP-8 Sailors conducted the necessary training to de-ice and ready an aircraft to go flying in winter condi tions. Aircrew got to experience the amount of time and manpower it takes to prop erly deice an aircraft. VP-8 aircrews have not routinely operated in cold, icy environment since late 2008. There are very few individuals in the squadron that have ever operated in and around snow. Training and prepa ration ensures we are ready to execute our duties in all conditions without sac rifice to safety or proper procedure, said Shoesmith. Everyone got a front row view of what should happen. Maintenance per sonnel who attended the training got the opportunity to participate in oper ating the equipment, and all aircrew got to see just how the process will work. I know that everyone is significantly more aware of the processes and safety concerns involved in this evolution. The Jacksonville-based Fighting Tigers are on a six-month scheduled deployment in support of U.S. 7th Fleet. Fighting Tigers prepare for winter in Northern Japan 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 21

Make gift-giving plans early to avoid stress, save budget Not interested in another desk fountain or lava lamp? Really dont want to participate in the office or club gift exchange? Its okay, but dont put off let ting others know your preferences. Plan ahead and avoid feeling obligated to join-in or ungrateful for that unappreciated gift. With the holidays just around the cor ner, this is a good time to think about how you want to celebrate and plan your gift giving, said Stacy Livingstone-Hoyte, per sonal financial management specialist at the Fleet and Family Support Center in Millington, Tenn. Generally there are two catego ries of shoppers the planners or the procrastinators, according to Livingstone-Hoyte. Regardless of such labeling, one thing is certain; you will not survive the holidays financially without a well-thought-out and realistic plan, she said. Everyone wants to have a great holiday season and include gifts, but to do that realistic planning and managing expectations goes with that. There are some simple steps Sailors and their families can take to prepare for the holidays. Decide what your priorities dur ing the holidays are, what is important to you and why. Dont spend money out of guilt or a sense of obligation, said Livingstone-Hoyte. Knowing what your priori ties are and shaping the expecta tions of your family, friends and coworkers early in the season can relieve stressors later. People will know what to expect. For more tips on managing hol iday spending along with a holi day budget worksheet, visit www. navynavstress.com. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 21

PAGE 22

Jacksonville University appreciates the Military and invites all Armed Forces personnel, their families and friends to see the JU Dolphins take on Campbell Universitys Fighting Camels. Come enjoy great food, an alcohol free family fun day, and the JU Dolphin championship Football team. Highlights Free admission for all Active Duty Military and children 5 and under! $5 tickets for all dependents and guests available at the game! Parking located in The Valley (South Campus), LOT I. Enter campus at the Main entrance, opposite Merrill Road Proceed straight through Campus, down the hill and park in the lot at the bottom (Lot I) next to the tennis courts. To reach the game from the parking lot, go up the stairs behind the baseball field and take a left at the top. Walk straight (north) to arrive at Milne Football Field (North Campus) Hosted by Jacksonville University NROTC Military Appreciation Football Game Jacksonville University SAT, November 10th @ 12pm Driving and Parking Directions Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 (CPRW11) was transformed from its work space into an amazing haunted house for a Halloween festival and trick or treating family extravagan za Oct. 26. The Sailors and civilians of CPRW-11 showed off their creative wit and ingenuity by building the scariest haunted hallway in all of Navy Region Southeast. Cmdr. Kelly Holmes stated, That was way too scary for my kids and almost too scary for me, as he walked through the creepy spaces once known as the CPRW11 operations hallway. Family activities during CPRW11s Halloween party included an autumn festival complete with car nival games and prizes. Pumpkin painting and trick or treating through the decorated hallways of Building 850 ensued as the Sailors of CPRW-11 cooked an incredible BBQ for all of the fami lies. AWVC Terry Trayer said, This is a great way to welcome the week end and kick off the holiday sea son. The unbelievable effort and attention to detail put forth by the CPRW-11 staff into this Halloween party is just one more demonstra tion to how this command tackles its demanding operational com mitments while keeping family a priority. 22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 23

A team of Jacksonville University biol ogy students is working with NAS Jax Natural Resources Manager Christine Bauer and NAS Jax Storm Water Manager John Young to trap and iden tify turtles residing in a retention pond slated for renovation. The storm water retention pond along Mustin Road near the NAS Jacksonville Golf Club is scheduled for dredging to remove excessive silt runoff that has accumulated over the years, said Bauer. Were fortunate that John Enz, assis tant professor of biology and marine science at Jacksonville University, vol unteered his students for this important task. It saves our base some money and lets the students earn a lab credit. Enz explained, Were spending about five weeks to survey the fauna pri marily turtles, in addition to snakes and alligators to make sure the tur tle population is not adversely affected when equipment is brought in to dredge the retention pond. As we capture the turtles in non-lethal basking or bottom traps, we note the species and size and mark the turtle so we only count a turtle once. Its good to see that the Navy is con cerned about maintaining the natu ral environment of NAS Jacksonville. Ive learned that the base is a depend able community partner on all types of environmental projects. This is a great educational opportunity for students in my herpetology class and it counts as a lab that gives them real-world research experience. And with my class col lecting the data, the Navy saves some money versus hiring a consultant, said Enz. Young added, At three weeks into the survey, Professor Enz and his students have identified six species of turtles and one small alligator. But there could be up to eight or more turtle species. Some of the more reclusive species include bottom dwellers such as mud, musk, softshell and snapping turtles. The Jacksonville University volun teers are also mapping the depth of the pond before and after dredging to provide a bottom profile. That will allow measurement of the rate of siltation to help understand what upstream mea sures can be taken to better manage future storm water runoff, said Young. According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Florida has more species of turtles than other states. Of the 26 types of turtle species found in Florida, the vast major ity (18) are freshwater turtle species. Besides freshwater turtles, Florida is home to the gopher tortoise, box turtles and five sea turtle species. While most freshwater turtles have hard boney shells, three species known as softshell turtles have fleshy shells adapted for swimming. Turtle shells provide protection from predators. Be careful of the Florida snapping turtle and the alligator snapping turtle, both of which can bite with great force. Turtle roundup near NAS Jax Golf Club JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 23

PAGE 24

Deweys All Hands ClubCall 542-3521 Deweys is located in Bldg. 608 between Gillis St. and Keily St. off of Enterprise Ave. Deweys offers a full service menu, bar and a friendly atmosphere that is great for all ages! Monday Friday 10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 4 10 p.m. CPO Pub Monday, Tuesday & Friday 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Wednesday Thursday 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party at Freedom Lanes Complete packages avail able including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, call 542-3518/4238. Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor pool Open for lap swimming Monday Friday 5:30 8 a.m. & 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Recreational swimming Monday Friday 4:30 8 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Kennedy Space Center Adult $40, child $31 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family mem bers at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zip line Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Preferred seating $41, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! Upcoming ITT Trips: Lakeridge Winery Nov. 10 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4 day hopper $153.25 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retir ees, free 3 day, park-topark ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31, 2013 and must be redeemed by June 30, 2013. Ask about our special dis counted tickets for family members. Gator Bowl tickets $35 Gator Bowl Patch $9 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70 Daytona 500 Feb. 24, tickets on sale now! $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50 The Vault Liberty Recreation Center Trips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unac companied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Free Jaguars vs. Colts game Nov. 8 at 6:30 p.m. Florida Gators Football Game Nov. 10 FREE admission and transportation Old City Music Festival Trip St. Augustine Nov. 11 at noonNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 5423249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees November 13 & 27 for active duty November 15 & 29 for retirees & DoD personnel Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not appli cable on holidays. Turkey Trot Killer Scramble Nov.21 at noon $50 entry fee, $60 for civilian guests Four-person scrambleMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel bal ancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you Call 778-9772 for more information. Military Family Appreciation Carnival Nov. 10, 11 a.m. 5 p.m. Allegheny Softball Field Dashing Through The Grove Dec. 8, 48 p.m. at Patriots Grove Free snow sledding, pho tos with Santa, tree light ing, musical entertain ment and more! The NAS Jacksonville Golf Club hosted the 2012 Mary Burnside Golf Tournament on Oct. 31. The Jacksonville Womens Golf Association (JWGA), the third-oldest golf association in the country at 85 years, organized the annual tourna ment. The tournament honors the late Lt. Cmdr. Mary Burnside, who joined JWGA in 1968 and served as president of the organization from 1983 to 1985. Her devotion to JWGA and love of golf catapulted the organization into the public eye and served as inspira tion to everyone involved, said Faye Shepherd, the current JWGA president. She was pleased with the turnout for the event with 79 participants, plus, an additional eight special guests in atten dance for the awards luncheon held at the NAS Jax Officers Club. The tournaments top golfers were Tama Caldabaugh (low gross overall winner) and Delores Adams (overall net winner) who shot a terrific round that included a natural eagle on Blue No. 6. Mary Hafeman, a JWGA mem ber since 1980, was guest speaker at the luncheon. She talked about Mary Burnsides influence on others saying, What you leave behind is not what is engraved onto a granite monument but is woven into the lives of others. Mary wove a lot of great memories, a lot of great moments into our lives. After serving the Navy for 20 years, Mary Burnside spent her last days of service to our country at NAS Jacksonville, making it the perfect place to host the 2012 Mary Burnside Golf Tournament. Women golfers tee off 24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 25

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 25 They bid farewell after 52 years of serviceTwo highly regarded VP-26 Tridents prepared for retirement from their dis tinguished naval careers Oct. 31. The morning marked the ceremonial final flight for Lt. Cmdr. John Wickham and AFCM Roger Reed. Together, they have served a combined 52 years in the U.S. Navy. Both Tridents devoted decades of service to the maritime patrol com munity and were selflessly committed to a number of naval commands from Brunswick, Maine to Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii and beyond during their multi tude of deployments across the globe. Their final flight aboard Trident num ber 916 took off into clear blue skies and gusty winds. The crew of five flew approximately two hours before ulti mately landing on runway 28. With Reed as a passenger, Wickham closed out his naval flight career just shy of 3,800 flight hours upon landing. Following the flight, the command arranged a formal retirement ceremony in Hangar 511 to pay homage to his con tributions to VP-26 over his 24 months on board. Guest speakers for the event included the Tridents Commanding Officer Cmdr. Erik Thors and former shipmate Capt. Vincent Segars. I love the story of Johns career, because it represents what is truly great about our nation and the U.S. Navy, said Segars. He has held the highest qualifications achievable at every step along the way. Wickhams naval career began with his enlistment on July 29, 1991. After Yeoman A school, he served the Commander of Submarine Forces for the Pacific Fleet, as well as completing a tour with USS Newport News (SSN 750) where he earned his Silver Dolphins. In May of 1999, Wickham received his commission and began his flight career. His tours included VP-4, Combined Task Force 54/74, Special Projects Unit Two, VP-30 and finally, VP-26. His department head tour with the Tridents placed him in various high profile roles, including training officer, safety/NATOPs officer and operations officer. Wickham also served as offi cer in charge of Task Group 57.2 for the duration of his final deployment in U.S. 5th Fleet from December 2011 to June 2012. Reed enlisted in the Navy in May of 1982. Following A school, he com pleted tours with VP-6, Executive Transportation Department, Special Projects Unit Two, VP-47, VP-8 and AIMD Brunswick. From there, he made the trek to his final assignment with VP-26 as the maintenance master chief petty officer (MMCPO) of the squadron. Reeds equally admirable tour with VP-26 as MMCPO resulted in a recordsetting deployment to U.S. 5th Fleet. He led the Tridents in overseeing the main tenance and upkeep of eight aircraft, resulting in an astounding 99.5 percent mission completion rate. He attributes his success to the collaboration of the entire Trident maintenance team. I am extremely proud of the Sailors here at VP-26, Reed said. We had a great deployment. It tells you the qual ity of this maintenance department. They have continued their high level of performance throughout the interdeployment readiness cycle as well. Reed will formally retire from service on Nov. 9. Mad Foxes help Special OlympicsThe Mad Foxes of VP-5 took time from their busy schedules to volunteer for a Gas and Glass event for the Kadena, Okinawa Special Olympics Oct. 27. Mad Fox volunteers joined forces with personnel from Commander, Fleet Activities Okinawa and the U.S. Naval Hospital to tackle the days events. The Sailors spent the afternoon pumping gas and clean ing windows at the Kadena gas station. They provided a full-service experience, even swiping credit cards for customers, so they would not have to leave the comfort of their vehicles. It was a fun event working with different Navy personnel from the area, said IT3 Nicole Souza. I enjoyed knowing I was working hard for a great cause, supporting the Special Olympics. The event continued VP-5s grow ing relationship with the Special Olympics, which began with par ticipation in the Torch Run through Okinawa on Sept. 22. The Mad Foxes will be present in full force Nov. 17, the official date of the Kadena Special Olympics. VP-5 is currently on a routine deployment to the 7th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime patrol operations.Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at the Chapel Complex, Bldg. 749 Weekly Bible Study Thursdays, 7 p.m. in the BarracksNAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051 Two VP-26 Tridents embark on final flight

PAGE 26

Question: I am seriously overweight. Does this mean I am at risk for developing diabe tes and other life-threatening conditions? Dr. Joe says: Yes, obesity is a prime indicator increasing the incidence of Type 2 diabe tes as well as cardiovascular disease, high levels of choles terol and triglycerides, hyper tension and stroke. It is estimated that for every one-kilogram (2.2 pounds) increase in weight, the preva lence of diabetes increases by nine percent, according to Patrick Sullivan, PhD, at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver. Question: Every time I lose weight I am unable to keep it off. What is the best way for me to achieve my goal of long-term weight loss? Dr. Joe says: By track ing the habits of people who lose weight and keep it off, researchers have found these common denominators in weight-loss success stories: ries per day of which less than 24 percent comes from fat. way you think about food and daily activities. exercise habits to maintain weight loss. hour a day. Walking is the most frequently reported exercise that seems to help. self as a dieter, think about a lifestyle change. but dont be upset by small changes on the dial. Dont panic about one or two pounds of weight gain. Deal with it through better nutrition and exercise adjustments. Question: I want to start a workout program, but I do not know where to begin. Any sug gestions? Dr. Joe says: First off, if you are way out of shape you should first consult with your primary care physician. When you are cleared for exercise, the American College of Sports Medicine as well as the American Heart Association recommends the following: dio exercise 30 minutes a day, five days a week, or dio exercise 20 minutes a day, three days a week, and training exercises, eight to 12 repetitions of each exercise two days a week. Moderate-intensity physical activity means working hard enough to raise your heart rate and break a sweat, yet still being able to carry on a conver sation. It should be noted that to actually lose weight or main tain weight loss, 60 to 90 min utes of physical activity may be necessary daily. The 30-minute recom mendation is for the average healthy adult to maintain health and reduce the risk for chronic disease. These guidelines have been suggested for healthy adults under the age of 65. The Career Management System Interactive Detailing (CMS/ID) applica tion phase is scheduled to begin Nov. 8, and remain open until 5 a.m. Nov. 20 for Sailors in their permanent change of station (PCS) orders negotiation win dow. CMS/ID is the web-based program enlisted Sailors use to review and apply for PCS orders when its time to transfer duty stations. Sailors may access the site at https://www.cmsid.navy.mil or from the CMS/ID link at www.npc.navy. mil. Sailors are in their orders negotia tion window when they are within nine through seven months from their pro jected rotation date (PRD). This is the first application phase for Sailors with an August 2013 PRD, the second appli cation phase for Sailors with a July 2013 PRD and the last application phase for Sailors with a June 2013 PRD. These Sailors may review advertised billets in CMS/ID during the appli cation phase and apply for up to five jobs, either directly using CMS/ID or through a command career counselor (CCC). The application phase is typi cally 10 days, allowing Sailors time to review available jobs, research billets and discuss options with their family and chain of command before mak ing applications before the application phase closes. Updated detailing business rules announced earlier this year in NAVADMIN 226/12 eliminated red zone and green zone job advertise ments in CMS/ID and now detailers fill all advertised active-duty billets each month using the available Sailors who are in their orders-negotiation window. Sailors can be more proactive in getting an assignment of their choice by maxi mizing their choices. Data shows that Sailors rarely apply for more than two advertised jobs. Officials recommend using all five choices when applying. CMS/ID features a Sailor Preference section under the Sailor Info Tab where Sailors may rank duty prefer ences by type, command, location, platform and community, as well as indicate which special programs and schools they would like and leave com ments for the detailer. Detailers will always attempt to fill billets using a Sailors desired selections first; howev er, Fleet readiness requirements are the guiding factor in filling billets. Detailers must also follow sea-shore flow guide lines outlined in NAVADMIN 201/11, so unless a Sailor requests Sea Duty Incentive Pay (SDIP) or the Voluntary Sea Duty Program (VSDP) to take con secutive sea duty orders, a Sailor up for shore duty should not be involuntarily assigned another sea tour. It may mean a Sailor hoping for shore duty in Florida or California may receive shore duty someplace else, where the need is great er. A single set of sea billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and a single set of shore billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command and Bureau of Naval Personnel are advertised each application cycle as the Navy seeks to fill gaps at sea and place Sailors with the right experience levels and skill sets into high-priority Fleet billets. Some factors a detailer must weigh when matching Sailors to jobs include the Sailors desires, qualifications, career progression and cost to the Navy. Detailers wont assign Sailors to advertised jobs until after the close of the application phase, during the detailer selection phase. Sailors may log into CMS/ID anytime after the detailer selection phase to see if they have been selected for orders. Overweight and looking for help!November application phase open for Sailors seeking PCS orders Humana Military is contracted with the federal government to manage the TRICARE contract for the South Region. The office in Orange Park has moved from its Kingsley location to 769-1 Blanding Boulevard, Orange Park, Fla. There are approximately 170,000 TRICARE beneficiaries in the Jacksonville area. TRICARE is the Department of Defenses worldwide health care pro gram available to eligible beneficiaries in any of the seven uniformed servic es the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service, and Commissioned Corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. TRICARE eligible beneficiaries may include active duty service members and their families, retired service mem bers and their families, National Guard and reserve members and their fami lies, survivors, certain former spouses, and others. TRICARE brings together military and civilian health care profes sionals and resources to provide highquality health care services. For more information about TRICARE benefits, call 1-800-444-5445 or visit www.tricare.mil.TRICARE office in Orange Park moves Who to notify when a credit card is stolenCredit card theft is a huge burden and can cause major problems for victims. The follow ing are numbers to call if cards are lost of stolen. These agencies should be contacted immediately. Equifax Credit Bureau: 800-5256285 Experian Credit Bureau: 888-3973742 TransUnion Credit Bureau: 800-6807289 SS Administration Fraud Line: 800772-1213 Federal Trade Administration Identity Theft Line: 877-438-4338 26 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 27

Sailors with the White Hat Association from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/ C4F) participated in a community relations project Nov. 2 at the Clara White Mission in down town Jacksonville. The Sailors assisted the mission with daily food service by provid ing breakfast to the less fortunate and needy of Jacksonville. The mission serves an average of 400 meals per day. For more than 100 years, the Clara White Mission has helped Jacksonvilles lowincome, at-risk individu als, through job training, educational programs and daily meals. Volunteers are essen tial to the Clara White Mission, said Shirley Edwards, volunteer coor dinator at the mission. Without them we would not be able to help the individuals that we do. We are grateful for the time these Sailors have given us today. The mission also has a veterans center that pro vides job training, along with access to computers and laundry facilities. The purpose of COMUSNAVO/C4F White Hat Association is to bring junior enlisted Sailors together, person ally and socially to pro mote friendship, mutual support and career devel opment among the mem bers. Volunteering at the Clara White Mission is a great way for our asso ciation to introduce our selves to the command and the community, said IT2 Faith Goodwin, presi dent of COMUSNAVO White Hat Association. I am very happy our Sailors are involved in the community, said Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet command er. Our Navy and local communities all ben efit from well-rounded Sailors who support both our mission at 4th Fleet, as well as the needs of our community. Our White Hat Associations involvement with the Clara White Mission is a fine example of that. The experience the Sailors had being able to help others was a great experience, but for one Sailor, in particular, the experience was much more personal. I wanted to volunteer for this project, because I, myself, was homeless before I joined the Navy, said ISSN Chad Reed. It was great to be able to help any way that I could now that I am in a posi tion to do so. Reed was homeless as a teenager and that experience had a large impact on his deci sion to join the Navy. For more information about COMUSNAVO/C4F White Hat Association, contact IT2 Goodwin at 270-5868. For more informa tion regarding volunteer opportunities at the Clara White Mission, contact Shirley Edwards at 3544162. COMUSNAVSO/C4F supports U.S. Southern Commands joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain; to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners; to fully exploit the sea as maneu ver space in order to enhance regional secu rity; and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. U.S. 4th Fleet Sailors help at local charity JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 27

PAGE 28

28 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 The U.S. Navy continued to provide disaster relief Nov. 4 in support of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), national and local authorities in the New York and New Jersey areas affected by Hurricane Sandy. USS Wasp (LHA 1), USS San Antonio (LPD 17), and USS Carter Hall (LSD 50) are in position off the coast of New York and New Jersey supplying military personnel and equip ment to disaster areas. Wasp is supplying aircraft to aid in the mission with a total of 18 helicopters aboard: Several of these helos have departed for Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst (JB MDL) for tasking. Wasp also sent a team of damage controlmen and hull technicians to help repair the damaged Hoboken Ferry Terminal. San Antonio has four MH-60S and a Landing Utility Craft (LCU) capable of trans porting cargo, vehicles and personnel from ship to shore. Carter Hall also has a land ing utility craft (LCU) capable of transporting cargo, vehicles and personnel from ship to shore. This LCU ferried sup plies and personnel ashore to Sandy Hook, N.J., Nov. 4. Both San Antonio and Carter Hall are capable of providing command and control; under water infrastructure repair capabilities; riverine search and damage assessment; and underwater port survey. Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202, embarked aboard San Antonio and Carter Hall, is providing two 15 kilowatt generators and three 250 gallons per minute (gpm) pumps. Additionally, they are providing small boat and command and con trol support to the U.S. Coast Guard. Navy Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 11 is provid ing a convoy of 23 vehicles and 90 Seabees prepared to assist. Their equipment includes five 60 kilowatt, five 30 kilowatt and three 15 kilowatt genera tors and six 725 gpm pumps along with one 1,000 gpm pump. NMCB 5 is providing 110 Seabees to Joint Base McGuireDix-Lakehurst (JBMDL) for tasking. FEMA issued a mission assignment (MA) to the Department of Defense (DoD) requesting high-volume water pumps (350 gpm and greater) with qualified teams to sup port the operation and mainte nance of the equipment. In support of FEMA, SECDEF has authorized the Navy to pro vide 30 high-volume pumps, 125 Sailors and 30 civilian technicians to support dewa tering efforts. So far, 18 Sailors from Mobile Diving and Salvage Units have arrived, with an additional 110 Sailors and 30 pumps from NMCB 5 to arrive Nov. 5. The retired USS Charles F. Adams (DDG-2) is closer to coming home as an interactive attraction and venue in downtown Jacksonville on the St. Johns River. The aim is to become the first Naval Ship Museum in Florida or Georgia and to honor our military heri tage and increase educational oppor tunities, tourism and business as a key element of downtown revitalization. Outwardly similar to the Shermanclass destroyer, USS Adams was the first U.S. Navy ship designed from the keel up to launch anti-aircraft missiles. USS Adams, the first guided missile destroyer in its class, was home ported for 21 years at Naval Station Mayport from 1969-90. The last existent ship in its class, USS Adams is currently moored in Philadelphias Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility. With the Jacksonville Historic Naval Ship Association leading the way, the latest discussions have focused on placing the USS Adams at the Shipyards location along the Northbank in down town, adjacent to the citys sports com plex and as part of a hub of new activity along Bay Street. With nearly 20 percent of the Jacksonville areas population made up of active and retired military and their families, the venue would have a natu ral attraction, in addition to tourism traffic and offering a site for business meetings, Scout campouts and other gatherings. For more information, go to www.adams2jax.org. Navy provides disaster relief in aftermath of Hurricane Sandy The Department of the Navy (DoN) recently announced a single system wounded warriors can use to apply for Department of Defense civilian jobs. Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) Juan Garcia, III debuted the Defense Outplace Referral System (DORS) at the third annual Wounded Warrior Hiring and Support Conference in San Diego. In an effort to help connect our Wounded Warriors with available job opportunities, our commands and all three services have developed indi vidual databases to capture the talent and skills of returning men and women that process often required our Wounded Warriors, who were searching for jobs, to register in multiple systems, said Garcia. Now we can direct them to one system. DORS is a cost-effective vehicle that is compatible across all services, provid ing opportunities for a wide-array of skills and locations across the country, ensuring wounded warriors receive pri ority placement for jobs. Registration is open to all services, however, in order to register in DORS, veterans must meet these qualifica tions: be ready to work within 30 days; be honorably discharged; and have a compensable service-connected dis ability of 30 percent or more. The dis ability must be a direct result of injury and/or disease received in the line of duty and a result of armed conflict or instrumentality of war. Wounded warriors have gained a myriad of skills and experience from their military service, said Garcia. There are hundreds of civilian occupa tions and careers that provide a fit for those skills from supply sergeant to logistics specialist, corpsman to medi cal technician, cyber security operation to information technology manager, and many more. Three wounded warriors are now working in civilian careers and are helping promote the program by telling their stories of transition from military to civilian service. Matthew Sullivan, formerly in the infantry with the U.S. Army 82nd Airborne Division, is now a records room supervisor and was the first wounded warrior hired through DORS. DORS offers wounded warriors a great network and advantage to getting their information out, said Matthew Sullivan. Sullivan says there are many resourc es available to wounded warriors, acknowledging the angst of preparing resumes on top of leaving the service. There is support available to help veterans relate their military experi ence and skills to civilian careers, said Sullivan. Gabe Ledesma and Laura Langdeau, both former Marines and Purple Heart recipients, have also successfully tran sitioned to civilian careers. There are different ways to serve your country, said Ledesma. Opportunities like DORS help make that possible. Ledesma now works at Naval Sea Systems Command helping wounded warriors and veterans transi tioning from the military. Even though we are not on the ground, we are part of the big picture and we are supporting our Sailors and Marines, said Langdeau, now a pro duction controller at Naval Air Systems Commands (NAVAIR) Lakehurst Division. More than 10,857 veterans were among the new hires for the DoN this past year, with 2,580 of the new hires being disabled veterans and 1,835 being wounded warriors with 30 percent or more disability. The Office of Civilian Human Resources is leading the execution of DORS for the DoN and in providing support to veterans interested in civil ian careers. To explore civilian careers with the DoN and learn more about DORS and other support for veterans, visit www.donhr.navy.mil.Campaign links wounded warrior seeking civilian careersNew ship museum seeks support

PAGE 29

In January, the JNJ Sports softball team began its run in the 2012 Military Varsity B Softball Program. Lead sponsor JNJ Sports is comprised of retired Chief Petty Officer Jody Smith and his wife, Jenne. Retired Senior Chief Petty Officer Robert Passen and his wife, Tonya, are also contributing sponsors of the squad. In March, the team participat ed in the first leg of the Southeastern Conference Championship Series at the 4th annual Kickoff Classic in Niceville, Fla. and finished in first place finish with a 4-0 record. April saw the team participate in the second leg of the conference series by playing in the Florida Military State Championships at Drew Park in Jacksonville where they were crowned the champions with a 4-1 record. In May, the team participated in the 4th annual Thunder Over Augusta/ Armed Forces NIT held in Augusta, Ga. The team finished in first place with a 6-1 record. The Southeast Regional Military State/Roger Hockey Invitational Tournament took place in June at Dallas, Ga. The team was crowned the Georgia Military State Champions with a 4-0 record. Next up was the DRASH Stars and Stripes Military NIT in Destin, Fla., where JNJ Sports took second place with a 4-2 record. The squad followed up the next day by playing in the North Florida Military States where they took another runner-up finish with a 3-2 record. In August, the team played in the Military Varsity B World Championships in Panama City Fla. The squad started their run in the Worlds with a spotless 3-0 record until tropical rains washed out the tourna ment. The JNJ Sports team was declared Co-World Champion and ended the year ranked number one out of 65 teams in the country. The teams All World Tournament selections were: LSCS Chuck Morrow, Master Sgt. Larry Shelvy, ABHC Charlie Campos, AWOC Ryan Crate, AZC Tony Johnson, AWO1 Tim Tyler, AWO1 Ryan Branco. Also receiving the All World Co-Offensive MVP was YNCS(Ret) Derrick Lovell and All World Co-Defensive MVP AOC Mike Muncy. JNJ Sports coaches are retired YNCS) Derrick Lovell and AE1 Shawn Bone. Players are LSCS Chuck Morrow, Master Sgt. Larry Shelvy, ABHC Charlie Campos, AWOC Ryan Crate, AOC Mike Muncy, AZC Tony Johnson, AWOC Dale Lewis, AWO1 Tim Tyler, AWO1 Ryan Branco, OS1 Zack Machnics, AWV2 Dustin Quakenbush, AM2 Daniel Dingman, AD3 Daniel Pinales, LS3 Alejandro Ramirez and contractor Brian Hinton. The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to pur chase/use these tickets. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for mili tary personnel, but under no circum stances are dependent children autho rized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger fami lies desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may pur chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No excep tions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the sea son.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@ usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tick ets for the entire season. Americas 398 national parks will offer the public free admission Nov. 10-12 during Veterans Day weekend in honor of those who serve and have served in the U.S. military. National parks preserve places that commemorate our countrys collec tive heritage our ideals, our majes tic lands, our sacred sites, our patriotic icons which our military has defend ed through the years, National Park Service Director Jonathan Jarvis said. We are grateful for the service and sacrifice of military members, and hon ored to tell their story at our national parks, Jarvis added. From frontier forts to World War II battlefields, more than 70 national parks have direct connections to the military, he said. National parks throughout the coun try will hold special events to commem orate Veterans Day, according to Jarvis. Highlights include: Vicksburg National Cemetery, Miss., where visitors will encounter historical personalities; 6,000 graves at Poplar Grove National Cemetery in Petersburg National Battlefield, Va.; at Independence National Historical Park, Pa.; War experience at Natchez National Historical Park, Miss.; and, Roosevelts in the World Wars at Sagamore Hill National Historic Site, N.Y. Additional benefits for veterans on Veterans Day include a free Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area cruise that will pass the USS Constitution on its way to Georges Island, home of Fort Warren, according to the release. The National Park Service is also, in partnership with the Gettysburg Foundation, offering veterans free entrance to the Gettysburg National Military Park museum in Pennsylvania, concluded Jarvis. NAS Jax-based softball team repeats as Military Varsity B Southeastern Conference ChampionsJacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USONational Parks free to all for Veterans Day weekend JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 29

PAGE 30

30 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Defense Secretary Leon Panetta praised the United Service Organizations for its steadfast support of troops and their families. USO is very special to me personally, Panetta said yes terday at the 2012 USO Gala. As a young boy in Monterey, California, during World War II, the USO was next to my Catholic grammar school that I went to. [Our nuns] grabbed us and took us over to the USO, he said. It was the greatest treat I ever had as a boy to greet the soldiers that were there who were destined for war at the time. The secretary also noted that when he was young lieuten ant in the U.S. Army, he made use of the USO at a number of stations and that his genera tion always regarded the USO and Bob Hope as one and the same. Panetta said the evenings event paid tribute to the great legacy of the USO, and its long history of helping those serving in uniform. But as we pause from our daily lives to honor the USO, our thoughts naturally turn to those men and women in uni form who are working for us and fighting for us every day, he said. The secretary made note of the National Guard troops serving in 13 states follow ing the damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. As we speak, something Ive been dealing with now for the last few days, there are more than 7,000 National Guardsmen who are help ing distressed fellow citizens dig out from the damage of Hurricane Sandy, Panetta said. Turning to U.S. service mem bers who are deployed over seas in harms way, Panetta saluted the 68,000 troops of Americas finest fighting force serving in the cold moun tains and windswept valleys of Afghanistan. And, there are thousands more brave men and women who are enduring tough con ditions at sea, or stationed at remote posts in the Middle East, and Africa, and elsewhere around the world, the secre tary added. America is the worlds stron gest nation with the best mili tary because of the dedica tion and sacrifice of its service members, Panetta said. We owe it to all of them no matter where duty calls to honor their service and to support them in every way pos sible, the secretary said. Panetta said he was part of the generation that came of age during the Vietnam War, and could always count on strong support from the USO. The politics of that war never changed the warm response and embrace of the USO, he said. Far too many troops returned home to a country that failed to give them the honor that they richly deserved. It has taken many years but finally our nation recognizes the sacrifices that were made [by U.S. service members dur ing the Vietnam War], Panetta said. Today, [after] more than a decade of war that weve endured, we can all be thank ful that the American people are united in support of those who put their lives on the line for this country. The defense secretary noted the USO has been a galvaniz ing force to turn that spirit of support for our military into benefits for our servicemen and women, and their fami lies. I am deeply grateful as sec retary of defense to the tens of thousands of USO staff and volunteers who work tirelessly to support our troops, Panetta said. The defense secretary cited USO-provided services rang ing from arranging world-class entertainment to just provid ing a quiet space for a service member to call home, as wel come reprieves from the rigors of deployment. On behalf of the Department of Defense, I want to thank all of those who vol unteer and work on USO tours and at USO centers here at home and around the world for all they do, Panetta said. Panetta also congratulated six service members for their service and remarkable acts of bravery and sacrifice lead ing to their selection as USO Service Members of the Year. Army Staff Sgt. Jacob Perkins, Marine Corps Sgt. Clifford Wooldridge, Navy Petty Officer Second Class Gregory Gaylor, Air Force Staff Sgt. Christopher Beversdorf, Coast Guard Petty Officer Second Class Nicholas Beane and Senior Airman Evan Stevens were honored during the gala. Panetta noted he often says the U.S. military has a great deal of powerful weapons the best ships, aircraft and advanced weapons systems in the world but they are worth less without American troops who serve. They are our militarys greatest strength, and that is why we must do everything we can to take care of them, he said. And the heart and the soul of caring for them is the USO. God bless the USO, and God bless our men and women in uniform, Panetta said. There are a lot of people who look at autumn as the beginning of winter. Like most people, chances are that you associate both autumn and winter with weight gain, depending on your location. Without the warm weather that is experienced in spring and sum mer, the idea of fun outdoor activities probably sounds pretty ridiculous to you. Luckily, there are a number of fun autumn activities to add to your fitness plan. Here, we will take a much closer look at just a few of the fun autumn activities that you can enjoy with your chil dren, your significant other, your friends or just about anyone! Go to a Fair When you go to the fair, you can spend hours walk ing looking at all the exhibits and rides. And many of the rides will give you a full cardio workout working every muscle just to hang on. Some fairs have contests such as sack races or egg tosses which will also work some muscles. Going to a fair is definitely an autumn activity to add to your fitness plan just stay away from the cotton candy and fried donuts! Go to a Corn Maze If you have never been to a corn maze before, they are loads of fun! Not only are they fun, but it is likely that it will take you quite a while to find your way out of the corn maze once you have gone to each check point. Many people spend hours trying to find their way out of a corn maze. By the end, you will probably have worked up a good sweat just trying to find your way out of the corn maze. Going to a corn maze is very fun autumn activity to add to your fitness plan! Go to the Zoo The idea of going to the zoo probably sounds absurd, but there are plenty of reasons to go during the autumn season. One of the reasons is because many zoos lower their rates during this time. The ulti mate reason to go to the zoo in autumn, however, is because you will be more likely to see animals! In the summer, animals are too hot to come out during the day and spend most of their time sleeping. During the autumn, it is cool enough for them to walk around and graze. You probably already know that the reason you should add this fun autumn activity to your fitness plan is because you will burn calories from all of the walking that you will do at the zoo! Rake Leaves With Your Family Raking leaves can be a lot of fun when you make it a family event. Children, especially, love to rake leaves. It is likely that you will enjoy watching your chil dren do something that they enjoy, which will make you happy. Besides, children and adults can both get pretty physical when they rake leaves which is all the more reason to add this fun autumn activity to your fitness plan. As you can see, there are many fun autumn activi ties to add to your fitness plan this season! This excludes all of the block parties, long days at the mall you will spend Christmas shopping and any other fun autumn activities you can think of to add to your fitness plan! It is definitely safe to say that there are many things you can do in order to stay in shape throughout the autumn season! Going to the zoo, to a corn maze, fair and raking leaves are just to name a few of the many fun things to do in autumn! You may not actually blow your top or see red, but there are some very real physical symptoms of anger. When you are angry, adrenaline and other chemicals pour into your blood stream, causing your pulse to rise and your blood pressure to go up. In severe cases, the adrenaline begins to shut down the frontal lobe of your brainthe part that allows you to reason. You may feel hot, turn red, or feel your hands or body shake. The response is as natural as hunger pangs or sweating. Your body senses a threat and prepares for action by increasing your energy level. The threat may be real or imagined. It can be a physical threat or a threat to your ego. The energy boost you get from this sudden dump of adrenaline can be harmful to your body and lead to health problems if you dont learn how to manage it. Unmanaged anger can also end in violence. Recognize your anger Some people learn to recognize their anger and deal with it from a very early age. Others do not. They have to make a conscious effort as adults to change the way they behave when faced with frustration, hurt, annoy ance, and other causes of anger. The trick is to recog nize that you are angry, figure out why you are angry, and make a rational decision about what to do. In other words, find a way to switch gears in your brain so that the thinking side is in control, rather than the feeling side. Switching gears may be easier said than done. You may need to get away from the situation to cool off. Physical exercise, deep breathing, or taking some time to enjoy a hobby or watch TV may help you get in your right mind. Once you are calm, you are ready to resolve the conflict. Anger management tips Use a calm voice. Shouting seldom leads to solu tions. Be assertive, but not aggressive. Make sure you say what you need to say, but take time to listen, as well. Name calling and accusations only escalate the fight. Chose your words carefully. Negotiate and compromise. Try to meet in the mid dle. Sulking in silence or ignoring a problem is no better than blowing up. Your body is still producing harm ful adrenaline and the problem will not magically go away. Unexpressed anger can lead to physical ail ments, such as ulcers and migraine headaches When its not you Maybe someone around you cannot manage his or her anger. When dealing with a hot head, be sure to keep your cool. Dont make the situation worse by answering anger with anger. Try being a good listener or using a little humor. Encourage a hot head to talk privately about the situation. A private setting may allow someone with a big ego more room to back down and save face. If someone is clearly out of control or approaching violence, get help. Dont take chances with your own safety. Anger is a natural human response. When we learn how to recognize and manage the energy it creates, we improve our lives and the lives of those around us. Panetta commends USO, congratulates outstanding troops Fun autumn activities to add to your fitness planAnger: Negative energy and its harmful effects

PAGE 31

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 31

PAGE 32

32 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012



PAGE 1

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012 I N S I D E Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The multipurpose amphibi ous assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) arrived at Naval Station Mayport Nov. 2 to support the Week of Valor sponsored by the City of Jacksonville. The weeklong event honors service members, both veterans and active duty, for their service to the nation. Sailors and Marines from throughout Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia have the opportunity to attend a variety of functions, includ ing a free concert, an NFL football game, an NCAA basketball game on board Bataan, and the downtown Veterans Day parade on the last day of the event. I think this week will be a good morale booster for the crew, said Lt. Jennifer Bouchard, Bataans assis tant first lieutenant. Preparing to show off our ship to our guests builds camaraderie. During the port visit, Bataan will host a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) basketball game on the ships flight deck. Crew members will have an opportunity to meet the University of Florida Gators and the Georgetown University Hoyas who are scheduled to play Nov. 9. In our military families, we see the best our country has to offer. They demonstrate the virtues that have made America great for more than two centuries and the values that will preserve our greatness for centuries to come, President Barack Obama said in his proclamation issued Nov. 1 declar ing the month of November as Military Family Month. The proclamation reads: Since our nations earliest days, courageous men and women of all backgrounds and beliefs have banded together to fight for the freedoms we cherish. Behind each Northeast Florida celebrates Week of Valor President proclaims November Military Family Month NAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Council hosted their 10th biannual Individual Augmentee (IA) Appreciation luncheon Nov. 1 at the NAS Jax Officers Club. Fifty-eight IAs from the base and tenant commands and several spouses were recognized at the event. The event was sponsored by the Northeast Florida Navy League, Rotary Club of Orange Park and Rotary of Orange Park Sunrise. The luncheon kicked off with the singing of the national anthem by MU2 Laura Carey of Navy Band Southeast and the invocation by NAS Jax Chaplain Lt.. Hylanie ChanWilliams. Music was provided by Navy Band Southeast. As awardees and command representatives enjoyed their lunch, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders welcomed and thanked the IAs for their dedicated service before introducing U.S. Congressman Ander Crenshaw as the guest speaker. I want to thank you all not just your commitment to the Navy, but youve demon strated tremendous com mitment to our country. As a member of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations, I occasion ally travel to some of those places where you have served such as Afghanistan, Iraq and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba to ensure that we are taking care of our troops, said Crenshaw. Crenshaw continued, I remember my first trip to Iraq in the middle of August and it was about 110 degrees. I think I had the best ice tea Ive every had. My trip was nothing like what youve experienced on your IA tours. But I want you to know as you step up from your comfort zones and go there on your own, working in a differ ent job for a different service, we realize how difficult that is. So thank you! As I look around here, I see a lot of family members. And, I realize that just like Individual Augmentees deploying alone without the support of a squadron or ship, many of your spouses might not have the support from other military spouses. So for those of you who stayed home and took care Individual Augmentees recognized at NAS Jax www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA

PAGE 2

JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Nov. 8 1861 Capt. Charles Wilkes seizes two Confederate diplomats from the British steamer Trent, causing an international controversy with Great Britain (known as the Trent Affair). 1942 Operation Torch (Allied landings in French Northwest Africa). American forces land at Casablanca. French naval forces attack U.S. Navy ships and 13 French ships are sunk without a loss to the U.S. 1956 Navy Stratolab balloon (Lt. Cmdrs. Malcolm Ross and M. Lee Lewis) better world height record soaring to 76,000 feet over Black Hills, S.D., on flight to gather meteorological, cosmic ray and other scientific data. Nov. 9 1921 USS Olympia arrives at the Washington Navy Yard from France carrying the body of the Unknown Soldier for internment at Arlington National Cemetery. 1950 Task Force 77 makes first attack on the Yalu River bridges. In first engagement between MIG-15 and F9F jets (USS Philippine Sea), Lt. Cmdr. William Amen (VF-111) shoots down a MIG and becomes first Navy pilot to down a jet aircraft. Nov. 10 1775 Congress votes to raise two battalions of Continental Marines, establishing the U.S. Marine Corps. 1941 U.S. escorted convoy WS 12, carrying 20,000 British troops to Singapore, sails from Halifax, Nova Scotia. Nov. 11 1870 Navy expedition to explore the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, southern Mexico, commanded by Capt. Robert Shufeldt, enters the Coatzacoalcos River to begin a survey for possible inter-oceanic canal. Support provided by USS Kansas and USS Mayflower. 1918 Armistice ends World War I. 1920 Lenah Higbee becomes the first woman to be awarded the Navy Cross. It was awarded for her World War I service. 1921 Washington Naval Conference begins. 1943 Two Carrier Task Forces strike Japanese shipping at Rabaul, sinking one carrier and damag ing other ships. Raid was first use of SB2C Curtiss Helldivers in combat. 1954 Nov. 11 designated as Veterans Day to honor veterans of all U.S. wars. 1966 Launch of Gemini 12, with Cmdr. James Lovell Jr., as command Pilot. Mission lasted three days, 22 hours and 34 minutes. Included 59 orbits at an altitude of 162.7 nautical miles. Recovery by HS-11 helicopter from USS Wasp (CVS-18). 1981 Commissioning of first Trident-class nuclear powered fleet ballistic missile submarine, USS Ohio (SSBN-726). Nov. 12 1912 Lt. Theodore Ellyson makes first success ful launching of an airplane (A-3) by catapult at the Washington Navy Yard. 1940 CNO Admiral Stark submits memorandum to Secretary of the Navy on four plans if U.S. enters war. He favors the fourth one, Plan Dog, calling for strong offensive in the Atlantic and defense in the Pacific. 1942 First day of the three days of fighting in the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal. 1943 President Franklin D. Roosevelt embarks on USS Iowa (BB-61) to travel to the Allied conferences at Teheran, Iran and Cairo, Egypt. Nov. 13 1776 Capt. John Paul Jones sailing Alfred, along with brig Providence, captures British transport Mellish, carrying winter uniforms that were later used by Washingtons troops. 1942 Loss of USS Juneau (CL-52) during Battle of Guadalcanal results in loss of Five Sullivan Brothers. 1943 Fifth Fleet carriers begin long range night bombing attacks on Japanese positions in Gilberts and Marshalls in preparation for landings. 1957 First firing of Regulus II bombardment mis sile. Nov. 14 1846 Naval forces capture Tampico, Mexico. 1910 Civilian Eugene Ely pilots first aircraft to takeoff from a ship, USS Birmingham (CL-2) at Hampton Roads, Va. He lands safely on Willoughby Spit, Norfolk, Va. 1941 Order to withdraw Marines from Shanghai, Peiping, and Tientsin, China. Today Im sharing with you some thing that Id rather not. If you thought I was a bad parent because my boys watch SpongeBob and ride their bikes in the street, wait until you read this: Two of my children have cavities. The third one probably does, too, but so far, he hasnt cooperated for x-rays. There, Ive said it. Mothers dont like to talk about cavi ties because we view them as evidence of what we perceive to be bad parenting. How could we let those precious little baby teeth decay? Even the sound of the word decay makes us shudder. Decay? Decay? My childs mouth has decay? Weve sheltered our children from so many things, made them wash their hands before dinner, and now they have decay in their mouths. Every time one of my boys gets a cavity, I feel like Im the only mom whos let this happen. The dentist assures me Im wrong. Dental caries are the most common chronic infectious disease of childhood. Plus, he says, Cavities arent something moms talk about at school pick-up. Hes right. We dont ask about cavi ties (as in, Are your childrens mouths decaying?) because we are afraid of the answer: Cavities? What? No way! Not my kids. A mother who asks another mother about cavities might as well announce that she lets her kids eat pizza twice a week and frozen waffles for breakfast. (Done and done.) The truth is that no matter how many times you brush your childrens teeth, or floss them more than just when we remember, you still might see the D-word (decay) on your childs chart. Sometimes, genetics simply arent on our side. Except, neither my husband nor I have ever had cavities. So that pretty much eliminates genes from my arsenal of defenses. My husband had horribly misaligned teeth growing up. When we were in elementary school together, his front teeth stuck out parallel to the floor. They were huge like horse teeth. He couldnt get his lips around them. And he would spend the next seven years of his life in head gear and braces. But he didnt have cavities. I had braces, retainers and this deceptively small, exquisitely pain ful bar a palate expander in the top of my mouth. My teeth had to be filed down and my frenulum snipped. But I didnt have cavities. The most recent cavity appeared in our youngest sons molar. I sent him back to the dentist for what I thought would be an ordinary filling, just like all those other times. Instead, he returned to the waiting room an hour later with a silver cap on his molar. Apparently the cavity was so big, a filling would have cracked the baby tooth. What came out of my mouth when I saw him was, Oh, Honey, how do you feel? What went through my mind, however, cant be printed here. Theres no hiding a shiny, silver cap, even if it is in the back on a molar. While the doctor had my son on the nitrous oxide, he should have gone ahead and tattooed Mom lets me drink juice on his forehead, too. The silver tooth is like a dagger in my heart. But thats just me. My son loves his new tooth, especially because his older brothers are fraught with jealousy. I want one, they said. Why did I get a plain filling? This proves, once again, that my three sons will fight over anything. The dentist tells me I did the best I could. Sometimes, these things happen. My son isnt broken and his teeth will be fine. Cant you just pull the tooth out? I asked, eager to be rid of the silver blemish on my parenting. No, the dentist said. Extracting the tooth, while eliminating my guilt, would create problems for my sons permanent teeth. The silver cap holds a place for the grownup tooth below. So I put on my big-girl Mommy pants and accepted it. Because parenting involves getting over ourselves and our guilt for the sake of our childs future. A silver cap today means healthy teeth for the rest of my sons life. In theory, at least. As I finished my conversation with the dentist, he smiled and said, Remember, when a silver tooth falls out, the tooth fairy brings $50. Thats when I realized: I feel guilty but not that guilty. Cavities are an unspeakable part of childhood, parenting 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 3

In support of the Navys Resident Energy Conservation Program (RECP), NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders hosted a resident utility meeting Oct. 31 at All Saints Chapel, where he dis cussed a new plan to reduce base housing energy consumption. This is a top priority of our CNO, Adm. Jonathan Greenert, who supports building a culture of conser vation within privatized housing. The goal of RECP is to increase resident awareness of their energy usage and encourage conservation habits in the home, said Sanders. He added, By working with our privatized housing partner, Balfour Beatty Communities, residents will learn how to reduce electricity use without sacrificing comfort. This is important to the Defense Department, when you consider it spends more than $4 billion annually on energy costs. They also found that when base housing residents are responsible for the cost of energy they consume they quickly develop smarter energy habits. And with RECP, the money we save is reinvested our Navy housing communities to support improved lifestyles for our Sailors and their families. Sanders explained that RECP is just one part of the installation-wide initiative to reduce energy con sumption by 30 percent in 2015 (from its 2005 base line). Overall, the less we spend on energy, the more we can spend on other needed budget items. NAS Jax will be the third Navy region to implement RECP when it goes live in April 2013. Under RECAP, housing at NAS Jax will be grouped according to energy efficiency into like-type groups (LTG). The base criteria to determine LTG includes neighborhood location, the size of the housing unit (number of bedrooms and square footage), and the year the housing unit was built or renovated. Each month, the average utility usage for each LTG will be determined and a 10 percent buffer above and below the average will be added to create normal usage bands that account for severe weather changes. Mock bills will be issued to residents for three months beginning Jan. 1. The mock bill enables resi dents to compare their utility cost and usage report that help adjust their energy consumption habits so they place within the normal usage band for the LTG. When live billing begins in April, residents will be billed if their usage is higher than the normal usage band. Residents whose consumption falls within the normal usage band will not owe anything for that billing period. Residents whose consumption falls below the normal usage band will receive a refund. Separately, Balfour Beatty Communities recently won a grant from the Department of Energy for the Switch4Good Program that encourages conservation by educating and informing residents of habits that can affect their utility consumption and how to shift their habits to promote conservation. Residents can also request a home energy audit, as well as a free energy coach visit. Another resident utility meeting is scheduled Nov. 8, from 4-6 p.m., at All Saints Chapel. CO hosts RECP town hall, next meeting set for today JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 3

PAGE 4

While generally satis fied with the progress of the service, the Navys top offi cer used his latest position report to assess the effects of set and drift on the sta tus of the U.S. Navy. Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert spoke about his report during a roundtable with reporters in his Pentagon office Nov. 1. Set and drift at sea is cur rent, its wind, its things you didnt think about something that takes you a little bit off, he said. Then you deal with it, you adjust a bit, and you move ahead. Position Report: 2012 addresses what the Navy needs to work on, the admiral said. The report is based on the three tenets of the service: Warfighting first, operate for ward and be ready. Much of what the service planned when Greenert came into his position last year, he said, is on track. The Navy has reinforced aid to warfighters by deploying new mine hunting and neutralizing equipment to the Arabian Gulf, and also has fielded improved torpedoes, advanced electromagnetic sensors and up-gunned patrol craft in the region. And the USS Ponce is deployed to the region as a forward staging base. The Navy and Marine Corps are working to reinvigorate amphibious warfare skills, Greenert said. In the past year, 25 ships and 14,000 sailors and Marines honed those skills in Exercise Bold Alligator, he noted. Operating forward has meant an increasing number of ships and sailors deploying, Greenert said. The Navy has made progress in rebalancing ships homeports to 60 percent in the Pacific and 40 percent in the Atlantic, rather than the 50-50 split that was the norm before a shift in strategic focus to the Asia-Pacific region. Being ready has meant filling billets on ships. The Navy has improved advancement and re-enlistment opportunities across the board by reducing overmanned ratings and revising re-enlistment processes to ensure fairness, the admiral said in his report. An enlisted retention board also affected the service. The impact of it, what we needed to do, the marketing of it, making sure its transparent, mak ing sure we give our folks every opportunity to do a deliber ate transition for them are important and must be accomplished, the admiral said. The board was needed to get our fit right to get our peo ple in billets at sea where they need to be, [with] the right skill set, with the right seniority in the right rating, he explained. The admiral said the Navy will not conduct another enlisted retention board during his watch. He expects the Navy will fill the personnel gaps and will have the right mix for the fleet. But set and drift did affect the service over the past year, Greenert acknowledged. The thing that we didnt foresee a year ago was the level of [operational tempo] that the Navy has, he said. Mainly, it is the request for forces that extended past their deployments. The need for two carriers in the Arabian Gulf, four extra minesweepers in the Arabian Gulf and more helicopters in the region was not anticipated to continue so long, he added. Looking ahead, Greenert said, he will reinstate tracking of individual operational tempo. This is important for the overall health of the force, he said. Another area that needs more attention, the admi ral said, is the crime of sexu al assault. The number of events being reported has not declined, and Im not satis fied, he said. There will be a renewed emphasis. I like the strategy we have in place. I am satisfied that the track laid out by the Navy is good, but I per sonally am going to put more attention on that. The number of suicides in the Navy is creeping up, and we dont know why, Greenert said. We need to work on that work on the resilience of our folks, make sure the programs we are putting in place are properly implanted and getting to the people who need them, he said. Greenert uses position report to check course of Navy 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 5

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 5

PAGE 6

of the families, you are heroes as well, Crenshaw stated. He also told the IAs that as they return home, he hopes they will share the experienc es of their deployment fight ing in wars for democracy for people who dont understand what democracy or freedom is. Military families understand this, but many in our country dont realize how lucky we are and are not exposed to these other cultures that dont have the freedoms we do, said Crenshaw. Capt. Louis LaVopa of Naval Hospital Jax also offered a brief perspective and slide show on that it was like working in a hospital in Afghanistan during his IA tour. Im here today to stress the importance of Navy Medicine in Afghanistan. Im an ER doctor and was deployed for one year with the Multinational Medical Unit in Afghanistan. During my tour, we saw over 1,100 patients including U.S. service members, coalition partners, Afghan nationals and security forces and contractors, he said. There was an ever present threat from improvised explo sive devices so that was always on our minds especially when our teams had to leave our facility. We worked side-by-side with coalition forces provid ing medical care to the injured. Healing our nations heroes was our mission. We would get the call of inbound victims and our trauma teams would jump into action because the Medevac transports would bring in the injured directly from the bat tlefields. The first responders would meet them on the flightline and wed quickly check for IEDs and rush them to the trauma bay, surgery, and get them the care needed to sta bilize them for transport to Bagram Hospital and then a stateside hospital. The average stay at our intensive care unit was less than 12 hours. We also provided ceremonial honors for fallen heroes who paid the ultimate sacrifice as they were transported from our facility. This was always a very somber event. LaVopa concluded his pre sentation with a three-minute slideshow created by HM2 Kyle Murphy which portrays numerous photos of medical staff members saving lives in Afghanistan. To close out the luncheon, each IA was presented with a special plaque and coin from the Northeast Florida Navy League Council and thankyou letters from U.S. Senators Bill Nelson and Marco Rubio, and U.S. Congressman Ander Crenshaw. Each spouse was also presented with a rose courtesy of the Navy Exchange. The IA Recognition Luncheon was first held at NAS Jax in 2008 and initiated by the Northeast Florida Navy League Council. Its important to rec ognize them because these men and women are deployed from their commands as an individual and were not get ting any recognition when they returned home. So this event pays tribute to them for their sacrifices, said Navy League Florida Region Navy League President Bill Dudley. LUNCHEONof them stands a parent, a sibling, a child, a spouse proud family members who share the weight of deployment and make profound sacrifices on behalf of our country. During Military Family Month, we honor our military families and recommit to showing them the fullest care and respect of a grateful Nation. In our military families, we see the best our country has to offer. They demonstrate the virtues that have made America great for more than two centuries and the values that will preserve our greatness for centu ries to come. With loved ones serving far from home, military spouses take on the work of two. Their children show courage and resilience as they move from base to base, school to school, home to home. And even through the strain of deployment, military families strengthen the fabric of each community they touch and enrich our national life as shining examples of patriotism. We each have a solemn duty to serve our Armed Forces and their families as well as they serve us. Through First Lady Michelle Obamas and Dr. Jill Bidens Joining Forces initiative, we have worked to fulfill this obligation by mobilizing all Americans to give service members and their families the opportunities and support they have earned. Last year, we challenged American businesses to hire or train 100,000 veter ans and military spouses by the end of 2013. To date, they have already exceeded that challenge, hiring over 125,000 veterans and military spouses. From helping military children succeed in the classroom to increasing support for those who care for our wounded warriors, Joining Forces will keep fighting to ensure the well-being of our troops and their families. When a young woman signs up to defend our Nation, her parents are enlisted as well. When a father deploys to a combat zone, his children are called to serve on the home front. And when the men and women of our military serve far from home, their families feel the strain of their absence. In that absence, let us stand together as one American family. Let us honor the brave patriots who keep our country safe, and let us forever hold close the memories of those who have perished in the line of duty. This month, we reaffirm that we will always lift up our military families not just when their loved ones are away, but also long after the welcome home ceremonies are over. Now, Therefore, I, Barack Obama, president of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim November 2012 as Military Family Month. I call on all Americans to honor military families through private actions and public service for the tremendous contributions they make in support of our service members and our Nation. PROCLAMATION 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 7

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 7

PAGE 8

The Gators and Hoyas basketball game is a great way to entertain people, said CTC(SW/AW) Burton Stark, a native of Virginia Beach, Va. It will attract a large crowd, and when theyre not watching the game, people can see what Sailors do. When the ship moored Nov. 2, the Honorable Alvin Brown, mayor of Jacksonville, welcomed the crew and presented Capt. Erik Ross, com manding officer of Bataan, with the key to the city. I am proud and honored by the arrival of USS Bataan at Naval Station Mayport, said Brown in his welcoming remarks. We work every day to ensure a great relationship with our current and retired service members, he said, explaining why the city was hosting the Week of Valor. This is an excellent opportunity to show case our ship, and the fine young Sailors who make things happen, said Ross about the ships visit. We hope everyone who comes on board will take a moment to ask our Sailors about their jobs. Guests will definitely see the pride and profession alism of their Navy. While preparations are made for the NavyMarine Corps Classic on board, Bataans crew will be also able to enjoy liberty and the hospi tality of the city. Along with Morale, Welfare, and Recreation tours arranged for the week, Sailors will also be able to participate in Veterans Day celebrations and other military appre ciation events. The city officials are planning to make the Week of Valor an annual event, in sup port of the large number of veterans and active duty personnel who have made Northeast Florida their home. VALOR 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 9

HS-11 Dragonslayers home from deploymentAs seven HS-11 Dragonslayer helicopters arrived in formation over NAS Jacksonville Oct. 31, fam ily members cheered as they anxiously awaited the reunion with their loved ones. When the helos landed, family members happily greeted the HS-11 crew welcoming them home from an eight-month deployment on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65). The carrier is set to decommission later this year. AWR1 Brandon Lee summed up what his squadrons mis sions entailed. Ultimately, were out there to protect the carrier from enemy threats, said Lee. Its nice to be back in our country but our mission is to defend the freedoms of our people. During the deployment, HS-11 provided anti-terror ism force protection, surface surveillance control, medical evacuations, vertical replen ishment of supplies (353 tons of cargo) and supported photo missions. This was one of our lon gest deployments and being separated from our fami lies for eight months is defi nitely hard, said HS-11 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Ryan Keys. We were able to communicate through email to stay in touch with our loved ones back home but its great to be back at NAS Jax. For AD2(AW) Shawn Carmichael, the homecom ing was very emotional. This is really great to be home see ing my daughter and wife. I last saw my daughter when she was 10 days old and now shes seven months old. My wife, Erica sent lots of pictures but its wonderful to be back and see them, he said. During the deployment, the Dragonslayers flew 1,012 flights for 2,575.8 hours completing 99.9 percent of their flights. Squadron personnel also vis ited several countries includ ing Greece, Italy, United Arab Emirates and Bahrain. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 9

PAGE 10

VP-45 recognized AWO1(NAC/AW/ SW/IUSS) Steven Oles as the VP-45 Senior Sailor of the Year during the VP-45 Association Reunion in Mobile, Ala. Oct. 20. I am proud to name Petty Officer Oles as the VP-45 Sailor of the Year, said VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mike Vitali. He embodies our Navys core values of honor, courage, and commitment and is an exceptional example of Pelican pride for us all. Petty Officer Oles garnered the award based upon his superior per formance leading Sailors while on deployment in Sigonella, Sicily and during a compressed InterDeployment Readiness Cycle, said VP-45 CMDCM Tom Ayers. We look forward to supporting him as he represents VP-45 in competi tion for the Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 Sailor of the Year Award in early November. The Sailor of the Year program was instituted by Adm. Elmo Zumwalt in 1972 to recognize the top Sailor at each command. The award is given annually by every command in the Navy with subsequent competitions at higher levels to ultimately deter mine the Chief of Naval Operations Sailor of the Year in four categories (Sea, Shore, Reserve, and Recruiting). The four winners of the CNOs Sailor of the Year competition are meritori ously advanced to chief petty officer in a ceremony in Washington, D.C. Parents of youthful drivers can rest a little easier when they sign up their offspring for the Driver Improvement Class designed specifically for depen dent drivers between 15 and 21 years of age. The class will be held Nov. 19, from 8 a.m. -1 p.m., in Building 1. Kristen Montejo, of Cape Fox Professional Services, said that new drivers are more likely to be involved in an accident or receive a ticket within the first 12 months of getting their drivers license. For parents of a new driver, that can cause some worry and sleep less nights. Class members are not required to have a drivers license to attend, said Montejo. This class will offer valuable safety tips, how to respond to driving emergencies, as well as raising aware ness of other risks such as distracted driving. There will be no time behind the wheel of a vehicle it is a classroom session only. Those who pass the multiple-choice test will receive AAA Driver Improvement Class completion certifi cates. Beverage and snack machines will be available. If you believe your teen can ben efit from driving tips by professional driving instructors, sign them up for the Teen Driver Improvement Class. Contact Linda at 542-3082 or Cindy at 542-2584. Oles announced as VP-45 Sailor of the Year Teen driver improvement class Nov. 19 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 11

MC1(SW) Greg Johnson and IT3 Patrick Schroeder were named Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Sailor of the Fourth Quarter, respectively, Oct. 27. Phil Hageman and Sharon Warner were named Senior and Junior Civilian of the Third Quarter, respectively, Oct. 31. As a staff public affairs specialist, Johnson wrote 13 articles and shot more than 800 images during the past quarter. He was one of 25 military photojournalists selected to attend the 20th Annual Department of Defense Worldwide Military Photography Workshop, where he placed third in the competition. In addition, he manages the commands official Navy Web site and is the CNRSE Navy Community Service Program (NCSP) coordinator. I cannot conceive of anyone more deserving of this recognition or of any one who gives more back to the community, said Mike Andrews, Navy Region Southeast public affairs officer. Petty Officer Johnson does double-duty. Not only does he volunteer for community service projects, hes also the person who actually organizes these projects so others can participate. According to Johnson, command involvement is one of the most impor tant factors in the success of Sailors at every level in the chain of command. Its not enough to just come in and do your job, he said. As Sailors, we have a much wider range of responsibility. When you take the time to get involved with extracurricular activities, you cre ate opportunities to develop your junior Sailors, your peers and yourself. As the NCSP coordinator, Johnson developed community partnerships between CNRSE and multiple local community organizations, including First Coast High School and Habitat for Humanity. His efforts resulted in a total of 121 command volunteer service hours during the quarter. We have a lot of great Sailors here who are not only willing, but eager to go out and give up their time for a good cause, Johnson said. Its through their efforts that we have been able to have a positive impact on the local commu nity. Its amazing that, even with a small command, our Sailors have been able to make such a difference in our local neighborhoods. I couldnt appreciate their efforts more. Schroeder serves as a regional watch specialist in the Regional Operations Center (ROC). During Hurricane Isaac, he was the operations section knowl edge manager on the Crisis Action Team. During that time, he spent more than 30 hours in the ROC, ensuring his section chief had the information necessary to assist installations affected by the disaster. Additionally, Schroeder is highly active in the command. He is the trea surer for the CNRSE Petty Officers Association and is an active member of the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Committee. He helped raise more than $5,000 in support of the commands annual picnic. He is extremely bright and an incredibly fast learner, said QMC(SW) Jeffrey Brebner, Schroeders supervisor. Hes very proactive when it comes to prob lem solving, and he is sought out by his superiors to tackle time-sensitive, highvisibility projects. According to Schroeder, it is humbling to receive such a prestigious award. It really is an honor, especially as a third class, to get it my first time up. Schroeder cited hard work within his division and command involvement as keys to his success. I just try to do the best job I can and work hard in the division, but it helps to be involved with the command and participate in as many functions as possible, he said. Phil Hageman, CNRSEs SCOQ, is a management and program analyst. His direct involvement in the Contract Acquisition Management Office (CAMO) process has contributed to the suc cess of a region-wide implementation, and his development of detailed tutori als for training and process documentation are the benchmark nationwide, said Dennis ORear, Hagemans supervisor. Phil, day in and day out, approach es his job the same way. He is always extremely professional and provides superb service to those he supports, ORear said. Hageman said it was the efforts of his co-workers that were most instrumental to his selection. Receiving this award is an honor. Im humbled, grateful and especially thankful for my CNRSE colleagues. They made possible the opportunity to apply skills to improve business pro cesses leading to our success, he said. To everyone associated with my work, my deepest appreciation for your understand ing and patience as we developed and implemented new business processes. Process improvement is not always easy, but positive attitude, coupled with desire for improvement, overcame many obstacles. Warner is a human resource (HR) specialist assigned to the CNRSE HR Pensacola Satellite, where she plays a lead role in support of the CNRSE Summer Hire Program. She initiated a plan of action and coordinated with other HR satellite offices to help maxi mize workflow efficiency for more than 30 students. She also worked with vari ous satellite offices to expedite the pro cessing of new-hire paperwork and performance evaluations for selected stu dents who were appointed for a short tenure. According to her supervisor, Genie Milhouse, Warner sets an exam ple for everyone who works around her. Sharon is dedicated to doing her own work and willingly takes on new challenges without fear to help support the CNRSE HR team, she said. Many times, she recognizes skill shortfalls of customer liaisons and volunteers herself to help them grasp the HR steps and procedures to execute the customer need, whether it involves recruitment or other types of personnel issues. Warner said her selection for the award is an honor she doesnt take light ly. I am not only grateful, but humbled to even be nominated for this award. This is an exciting and cherished achievement in my career that I will carry with me throughout my future endeavors, she said. According to Warner, hard work and dedication have contributed to her suc cess, but she also offered some addi tional advice to those who aspire to be in her position. As a focused and determined federal employee, I use the skills and knowl edge I have learned in my 14-year career to accomplish any and all tasks. I enjoy what I do and love coming to work every day to see what new challenge awaits me, she said. My advice for those who want to succeed is to be true to who you are, do your very best, no matter what you are tasked with, and seek out opportunities to expand and enrich your knowledge base.CNRSE announces Sailors, Civilians of the Quarter JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 11

PAGE 12

12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 With many commands across the Fleet and at NAS Jax preparing for the semi-annu al physical fitness assessment (PFA), the Navys physical readiness program director, talks about Sailor responsibilities for the physical readiness test (PRT). Its the Sailors responsibil ity to maintain physical fitness standards constantly and con sistently, not solely at the time of semi-annual testing, said William Moore, director, Navy Physical Readiness Program on Oct. 16. Its important for Sailors to maintain a minimum level of physical fitness necessary for worldwide deployment readi ness, whenever and wherever needed. According to Navys Physical Readiness Program instruction, Sailors should complete at least 150 minutes of moder ate physical activity each week. Examples of moderate-intensi ty activities include brisk walking (3 mph or faster), bicycling (slower than 10 mph) and water aerobics. High-intensity activities include jogging or running, lap swimming, jumping rope and circuit training. Sailors should also perform strength training exercises at least twice a week to work all major mus cle groups. The Navy assesses each Sailors physical readiness twice a year through the semiannual PFA. The PFA includes a medical screening, a body composition assessment (BCA), and a PRT. BCA is based upon a Sailors height and weight measure ments, and circumference (measuring tape) measure ments as required. Sailors are responsible to comply with medical screening requirements for Navy physical training. Medical screening includes a current annual periodic health assessment (PHA), a semi-annual PARFQ (Physical Activity Risk Factor Questionnaire) and pre-phys ical activity questions. Sailors may check the status of their PHA in PRIMS (Physical Readiness Information Management System), a Navywide program available in BUPERS Online, used to track Sailors physical readiness data. PHA data is located on the members page under the header Last PHA. Sailors should contact medical to schedule a PHA if their current PHA has expired or will expire before the next PRT. Failure to complete any of the medical screening can prevent a Sailor from participating in the PRT. All unauthorized non-par ticipation in the PFA will be designated as UA in PRIMS and scored a PFA failure for the PFA cycle, said Moore. OPNAVINST 6110.1J pro vides guidance for the Navys Physical Readiness Program, lists program requirements, defines respon sibilities for compliance and establishes required mini mum standards of physical fit ness. All members are required to participate in the semi-annual PFA regardless of gender, age, rank, title, bil let or retirement request status, said Moore. Sailors prepare for physical fitness assessment

PAGE 13

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 13

PAGE 14

The holidays can bring as much stress as they do joy, especially when watch ing your nutrition, Navy leaders said Oct. 23. Command and family gatherings are approaching. The kids are getting excited in anticipation of being out of school, and you are preparing for a visit from your in-laws. You may have a lot to do to prepare for the holidays, but dont let yourself run on empty. With the stress from planning and prepa rations, and the easy access to candy and your favorite not-so-healthy holiday foods, its easy to get off course from your fitness and nutrition goals, said Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Wallinger, OPNAV N-135 Nutritionist. Eating well and staying active doesnt have to stand in the way of holiday celebrations and can actually add to your enjoyment, said Wallinger. Now is a great time to reaffirm your nutrition and fitness goals, increase awareness of the days ahead and pre pare a plan to manage stress that often accompanies the holidays. Navy Physical Readiness Program offers several nutrition resources that can help you stay energized during the holidays and curb the negative impact to your body and mind. Fact sheets on achieving your holiday goals and being food label savvy will soon be available online, offering guidance on choosing quality foods and a fixing a great plate for the holidays. The Navy Operational Fueling Series also outlines how to choose the right foods and portions something we can all do a better job at during the holidays. Being mindful of your eating hab its and setting aside time for physical activity will help you keep stress, and your waistline, under control. Exercise contributes to positive behavioral health by building resilien cy when faced with daily stress, said Captain Kurt Scott, director, OPNAV N-135H, Navy Behavioral Health. Familiarize yourself with fitness and nutrition resources to stay ready and resilient this holiday season. For more information, visit Navy Physical Readiness Page at www.npc. navy.mil/support/physical.Fueling up for the holidays: Pay attention to nutrition 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 15

NAS Jacksonville celebrated Hispanic Heritage Month during a special luncheon Oct. 30. The event was held at the NAS Jax Officers Club and was sponsored by the base Multi-Cultural Awareness Committee. This years theme is Diversity United, Building Americas Future Today. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders kicked off the event with some opening remarks. Each year, Americans observe National Hispanic Heritage Month from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, by celebrating the histories, cultures and contri butions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Center and South America, said Sanders. The Navys strength is a product of its diversity. Hispanics have served brave ly in the Navy through every war and conflict since the American Revolution. Today, more than 63,000 Hispanic and Latino Sailors and civilians serve in the Navy Total Force, continued Sanders. Sanders added, Today, con tributions of Hispanics to the mission of the Navy are woven into every segment of naval operations. Recognizing that Americas strength lies in its diversity is vital to mission accomplishment. We must leverage the strength of the diversity that our nation and our people have to offer. The guest speaker for this years event was Hector Sepulveda, program direc tor, Fleet and Family Support Programs, Commander, Navy Region Southeast. I was born in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico and at the age of 10, my mother and I moved to the lower west side of Manhattan. I had to learn English and American customs the hard way and I faced many misunderstandings, he told the audience. Today, the Hispanic population in the United States num bers about 47 million or about 15 percent of the population in this nation of over 300 million. During the next 40 or so years the Hispanic population will grow to a significant one-third of the population. By the year 2050, Hispanics are projected to double in size to a whopping 30 percent of the United States population. Sepulveda went on to talk about some of the cultural dif ferences regarding Hispanics. Latin-Americans often dis play non-verbal cues to enrich the spoken word. Sometimes nothing is said, yet the implicit message is passed on nonverbally. There is also a differ ence of maintaining measure able distances between people as they interact; the bubble around us. When Americans interact with some people of other cultures, they feel their bubble or space has been invaded. In Hispanic culture, the relative distance between individuals tends to be small, he said. And, touch is an extremely important sense for humans. For Hispanics, and particu larly for the Puerto Rican cul ture, touching is a way of life. It Is a sign of respect, friend ship, or admiration, continued Sepulveda. In conclusion, Sepulveda stated, Hispanics have added new threads to the American fabric. These cultural values and behaviors will be inter woven in the American cul tural fabric. Although we are talking about Hispanic Heritage Month, Id like to say that the greatest asset of the American culture is it diversi fied culture. Americas great est strength is our ability to draw on the strength of all our cultural members of this great American society. The guests were then treat ed to a Latin-style buffet that included a variety of traditional dishes from various featured Hispanic nationalities and a short dance program. NAS Jax celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 15

PAGE 16

16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 17

Dashing Through The Groveat NAS Jax Patriots GroveSaturday December 8, 4 8 p.m. FREEsnow Sledding Photos with Santa Tree Lighting Musical Entertainment Refreshments And more! 778-9772 Blue Star Families brought the joy of reading to military children by donating 400 new books through the organi zations Books on Bases pro gram at the NAS Jacksonville Child Development Center Oct. 29. The books were donated following a book drive by Jacksonvilles Books A-Go Go and Retired Seniors Volunteer Programs for Blue Star Families. During the event, Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., his wife, Chris, along with NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders and his wife, Kathy, read A Handy Manny Halloween to pre schoolers before giving each of the children a book to take home. Blue Star Families is a nonprofit organization comprised of military families supporting and empowering other mili tary families. One of the ways we do this is partnering with the Department of Defense and other organizations to develop programs that help military families, explained Jacksonville Blue Star Families Chapter Director Sheila Stevens. One of those programs is Books on Bases where we bring books to base libraries, schools and child care cen ters. So today, we are deliver ing more than 400 Halloween books to the children here, along with several other books for the classrooms and a Nook for the teachers to use, she continued. We hold these events because there are a lot of children whose parents are deployed. Reading gives them a chance to escape inside a book and they can sit down and read with the parent at home or with siblings. This is a great event. They are promoting literacy and we want all of our children to enjoy reading and to be suc cessful when they get to kin dergarten so this helps give them a good start, said NAS Jax Child and Youth Program Manager Mary Grenier. Books on Bases plans to distribute more than 65,000 books nationally this year, to reach, military-impacted pub lic schools, and community libraries. Program promotes reading for military children JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 17

PAGE 18

A sheet metal mechanic at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) spends his days repairing missioncritical aircraft in support of Warfighters but in his off-duty hours he referees high school football, an avocation for which he was recently recognized. Ray Reberio, assigned to the FRCSE P-3 Orion air craft production line, received this years Florida High School Athletic Association (FHSAA) Official of the Year award presented annually to recipients who exemplify the highest standards of ethical conduct and moral character. He was presented a plaque at the first North Florida Officials Association meeting in August. Reberio has been active for 15 years with the FHSAA and is cur rently responsible for officiating at 52 schools in four counties. Dan Hicken, the First Coast News (WTLV Channel 12) sports director and weeknight sports anchor, accompanied by videographer Chad Cushnir, inter viewed Reberio in the FRCSE P-3 production hangar Oct. 25. Hicken wanted to portray referees in a more positive light following the NFLs three-month referee labor dispute during which replacement referees reportedly blew two calls between Seattle and Green Bay and awarded the Seahawks the winning touchdown (1412) over the Packers. Reberio said every official has made mistakes in the game, but instant replay is not allowed in high school football. My regular job isnt officiating, said Reberio. I love doing it (refereeing), and all the coaches know me well. I mentor officials, and I run a tight ship. Its our responsibility to know all the rules with many changing from year to year. Sometimes a par ent thinks you made a bad call, but they dont always know as much as they think they do. He said his job is to make novice officials into veterans, so they can move up in the organization to make room for new officials. We take tests through FHSAA, the official govern ing body for interscholastic athletics in Florida, he said. Hes been involved with youth athletics for more than 25 years, first working with the Pop Warner youth football league in Virginia. He does it for the love of the sport, and he wants to be a good role model for the players. Reberio said he is paid for officiating at two to three varsity and junior varsity games each week, but it scarcely covers his gas or time. You actually lose money, he said. I leave home at 4 p.m. and return some nights at 11. If youre doing this for the money, youre in the wrong business. FRCSE mechanic is mentor for game-day officials 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 19

Navy Legal Office changes name, services remain intact The Naval Legal Service Command realigned its offices Oct. 1, but its legal services to the fleet did not change. Legal assistance services were previously provid ed by Naval Legal Service Offices (NLSOs). As a result of the realignment, a service member seeking legal assistance with an issue such as a will, power of attorney, family law advice or any similar personal legal matter can now find assistance at the closest Region Legal Service Office (RLSO). The provision of legal assistance will continue at all prior NLSO locations, but will now be delivered by RLSO commands. There are legal assistance offices in fleet concen tration areas, and at or near most Navy bases around the world, with legal support providers prepared to assist service members, their families, retirees, and other eligible clients. All legal assistance services are provided free of charge to those eligible. RLSOs will continue to prosecute courts-martial and provide legal advice to commands around the globe. Command services include advice on military justice, ethics, JAG Manual investigations, admin istrative law, and other legal issues involving Navy commands. On Oct. 1, eight NLSOs headquartered in Pensacola; Norfolk; Bremerton; Jacksonville; San Diego; Washington, D.C.; Naples, Italy; and Yokosuka, Japan, realigned to become four Defense Service Offices (DSOs) headquartered in San Diego; Washington, D.C.; Norfolk; and Yokosuka, Japan. The DSOs mission is to defend service members in military justice proceedings, represent them at administrative boards, and provide other represen tational services, including advice on non-judicial punishment and adverse personnel actions. This realignment also changed the way service members receive defense services in 12 locations around the fleet where former NLSO detachments were closed. In those locations, service members will receive personal defense services in a manner similar to the way service members at sea are sup ported. Service members requesting defense services, such as representation for courts-martial or administrative boards, will make initial contact with a DSO attorney by telephone or other remote com munication technology, with subsequent in-per son consultation if necessary. The 12 locations are Everett, Whidbey Island, Port Hueneme, Lemoore, Corpus Christi, New Orleans, Millington, Kings Bay, Guantanamo Bay, Newport, Earle, and Sigonella. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 19

PAGE 20

With winter weather right around the corner in northern Japan, the Fighting Tigers of VP-8 are preparing them selves to conduct cold-weather opera tions. To the Fighting Tigers, who are used to operating in the warm weather of their homeport of NAS Jacksonville, conducting de-icing training is an important necessity to ensure the safety of the aircrew flying the aircraft, and the maintainers who work on the flightline. VP-8 recently conducted a de-icing drill to train and prepare their main tenance personnel and flight crews for inclement winter weather. Maintenance personnel gained the skills necessary to operate deicing equipment ensuring they are capable of safely and effectively removing any ice buildup and snow on the aircrafts fuselage, wings, and con trol surfaces. Snow and ice can be very danger ous during flight, said VP-8 Safety/ NATOPS Officer Lt. Cmdr. Leroy Shoesmith. Too much ice on the wings will decrease the amount of lift need ed for the aircraft to safely fly. In the air we have systems that help us with ice removal, but on the ground these systems are ineffective. During preflight snow and ice buildup needs to be removed manually by aircrew and our maintenance team. Special equipment which applies a liquid anti-ice mixture to the aircraft is then used to prevent any additional buildup prior to takeoff. The drill consisted of a simulated preflight performed by VP-8 aircrew who called for a maintenance deicing crew. With the GL-1800 Global Deicing truck on scene VP-8 Sailors conducted the necessary training to de-ice and ready an aircraft to go flying in winter conditions. Aircrew got to experience the amount of time and manpower it takes to properly deice an aircraft. VP-8 aircrews have not routinely operated in cold, icy environment since late 2008. There are very few individuals in the squadron that have ever operated in and around snow. Training and preparation ensures we are ready to execute our duties in all conditions without sacrifice to safety or proper procedure, said Shoesmith. Everyone got a front row view of what should happen. Maintenance personnel who attended the training got the opportunity to participate in oper ating the equipment, and all aircrew got to see just how the process will work. I know that everyone is significantly more aware of the processes and safety concerns involved in this evolution. The Jacksonville-based Fighting Tigers are on a six-month scheduled deployment in support of U.S. 7th Fleet. Fighting Tigers prepare for winter in Northern Japan 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 21

Make gift-giving plans early to avoid stress, save budget Not interested in another desk fountain or lava lamp? Really dont want to participate in the office or club gift exchange? Its okay, but dont put off let ting others know your preferences. Plan ahead and avoid feeling obligated to join-in or ungrateful for that unappreciated gift. With the holidays just around the corner, this is a good time to think about how you want to celebrate and plan your gift giving, said Stacy Livingstone-Hoyte, per sonal financial management specialist at the Fleet and Family Support Center in Millington, Tenn. Generally there are two categories of shoppers the planners or the procrastinators, according to Livingstone-Hoyte. Regardless of such labeling, one thing is certain; you will not survive the holidays financially without a well-thought-out and realistic plan, she said. Everyone wants to have a great holiday season and include gifts, but to do that realistic planning and managing expectations goes with that. There are some simple steps Sailors and their families can take to prepare for the holidays. Decide what your priorities dur ing the holidays are, what is important to you and why. Dont spend money out of guilt or a sense of obligation, said Livingstone-Hoyte. Knowing what your priori ties are and shaping the expectations of your family, friends and coworkers early in the season can relieve stressors later. People will know what to expect. For more tips on managing holiday spending along with a holi day budget worksheet, visit www. navynavstress.com. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 21

PAGE 22

Jacksonville University appreciates the Military and invites all Armed Forces personnel, their families and friends to see the JU Dolphins take on Campbell Universitys Fighting Camels. Come enjoy great food, an alcohol free family fun day, and the JU Dolphin championship Football team. Highlights Free admission for all Active Duty Military and children 5 and under! $5 tickets for all dependents and guests available at the game! Parking located in The Valley (South Campus), LOT I. -Enter campus at the Main entrance, opposite Merrill Road -Proceed straight through Campus, down the hill and park in the lot at the bottom (Lot I) next to the tennis courts. -To reach the game from the parking lot, go up the stairs behind the baseball field and take a left at the top. -Walk straight (north) to arrive at Milne Football Field (North Campus) Hosted by Jacksonville University NROTC Military Appreciation Football Game Jacksonville University SAT, November 10th @ 12pm Driving and Parking Directions Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 (CPRW11) was transformed from its workspace into an amazing haunted house for a Halloween festival and trick or treating family extravaganza Oct. 26. The Sailors and civilians of CPRW-11 showed off their creative wit and ingenuity by building the scariest haunted hallway in all of Navy Region Southeast. Cmdr. Kelly Holmes stated, That was way too scary for my kids and almost too scary for me, as he walked through the creepy spaces once known as the CPRW11 operations hallway. Family activities during CPRW11s Halloween party included an autumn festival complete with carnival games and prizes. Pumpkin painting and trick or treating through the decorated hallways of Building 850 ensued as the Sailors of CPRW-11 cooked an incredible BBQ for all of the families. AWVC Terry Trayer said, This is a great way to welcome the week end and kick off the holiday sea son. The unbelievable effort and attention to detail put forth by the CPRW-11 staff into this Halloween party is just one more demonstra tion to how this command tackles its demanding operational com mitments while keeping family a priority. 22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 23

A team of Jacksonville University biology students is working with NAS Jax Natural Resources Manager Christine Bauer and NAS Jax Storm Water Manager John Young to trap and iden tify turtles residing in a retention pond slated for renovation. The storm water retention pond along Mustin Road near the NAS Jacksonville Golf Club is scheduled for dredging to remove excessive silt runoff that has accumulated over the years, said Bauer. Were fortunate that John Enz, assistant professor of biology and marine science at Jacksonville University, vol unteered his students for this important task. It saves our base some money and lets the students earn a lab credit. Enz explained, Were spending about five weeks to survey the fauna pri marily turtles, in addition to snakes and alligators to make sure the tur tle population is not adversely affected when equipment is brought in to dredge the retention pond. As we capture the turtles in non-lethal basking or bottom traps, we note the species and size and mark the turtle so we only count a turtle once. Its good to see that the Navy is concerned about maintaining the natu ral environment of NAS Jacksonville. Ive learned that the base is a depend able community partner on all types of environmental projects. This is a great educational opportunity for students in my herpetology class and it counts as a lab that gives them real-world research experience. And with my class col lecting the data, the Navy saves some money versus hiring a consultant, said Enz. Young added, At three weeks into the survey, Professor Enz and his students have identified six species of turtles and one small alligator. But there could be up to eight or more turtle species. Some of the more reclusive species include bottom dwellers such as mud, musk, softshell and snapping turtles. The Jacksonville University volun teers are also mapping the depth of the pond before and after dredging to provide a bottom profile. That will allow measurement of the rate of siltation to help understand what upstream mea sures can be taken to better manage future storm water runoff, said Young. According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Florida has more species of turtles than other states. Of the 26 types of turtle species found in Florida, the vast majority (18) are freshwater turtle species. Besides freshwater turtles, Florida is home to the gopher tortoise, box turtles and five sea turtle species. While most freshwater turtles have hard boney shells, three species known as softshell turtles have fleshy shells adapted for swimming. Turtle shells provide protection from predators. Be careful of the Florida snapping turtle and the alligator snapping turtle, both of which can bite with great force. Turtle roundup near NAS Jax Golf Club JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 23

PAGE 24

Deweys All Hands ClubCall 542-3521 Deweys is located in Bldg. 608 between Gillis St. and Keily St. off of Enterprise Ave. Deweys offers a full service menu, bar and a friendly atmosphere that is great for all ages! Monday Friday 10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 4 10 p.m. CPO Pub Monday, Tuesday & Friday 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Wednesday Thursday 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party at Freedom Lanes Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, call 542-3518/4238. Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor pool Open for lap swimming Monday Friday 5:30 8 a.m. & 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Recreational swimming Monday Friday 4:30 8 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Kennedy Space Center Adult $40, child $31 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zip line Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Preferred seating $41, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! Upcoming ITT Trips: Lakeridge Winery Nov. 10 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4 day hopper $153.25 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3 day, park-topark ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31, 2013 and must be redeemed by June 30, 2013. Ask about our special discounted tickets for family members. Gator Bowl tickets $35 Gator Bowl Patch $9 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70 Daytona 500 Feb. 24, tickets on sale now! $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50 The Vault Liberty Recreation Center Trips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Free Jaguars vs. Colts game Nov. 8 at 6:30 p.m. Florida Gators Football Game Nov. 10 FREE admission and transportation Old City Music Festival Trip St. Augustine Nov. 11 at noonNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 5423249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees November 13 & 27 for active duty November 15 & 29 for retirees & DoD personnel Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Turkey Trot Killer Scramble Nov.21 at noon $50 entry fee, $60 for civilian guests Four-person scrambleMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you Call 778-9772 for more information. Military Family Appreciation Carnival Nov. 10, 11 a.m. 5 p.m. Allegheny Softball Field Dashing Through The Grove Dec. 8, 48 p.m. at Patriots Grove Free snow sledding, photos with Santa, tree lighting, musical entertainment and more! The NAS Jacksonville Golf Club hosted the 2012 Mary Burnside Golf Tournament on Oct. 31. The Jacksonville Womens Golf Association (JWGA), the third-oldest golf association in the country at 85 years, organized the annual tourna ment. The tournament honors the late Lt. Cmdr. Mary Burnside, who joined JWGA in 1968 and served as president of the organization from 1983 to 1985. Her devotion to JWGA and love of golf catapulted the organization into the public eye and served as inspira tion to everyone involved, said Faye Shepherd, the current JWGA president. She was pleased with the turnout for the event with 79 participants, plus, an additional eight special guests in attendance for the awards luncheon held at the NAS Jax Officers Club. The tournaments top golfers were Tama Caldabaugh (low gross overall winner) and Delores Adams (overall net winner) who shot a terrific round that included a natural eagle on Blue No. 6. Mary Hafeman, a JWGA mem ber since 1980, was guest speaker at the luncheon. She talked about Mary Burnsides influence on others saying, What you leave behind is not what is engraved onto a granite monument but is woven into the lives of others. Mary wove a lot of great memories, a lot of great moments into our lives. After serving the Navy for 20 years, Mary Burnside spent her last days of service to our country at NAS Jacksonville, making it the perfect place to host the 2012 Mary Burnside Golf Tournament. Women golfers tee off 24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 25

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 25 They bid farewell after 52 years of serviceTwo highly regarded VP-26 Tridents prepared for retirement from their distinguished naval careers Oct. 31. The morning marked the ceremonial final flight for Lt. Cmdr. John Wickham and AFCM Roger Reed. Together, they have served a combined 52 years in the U.S. Navy. Both Tridents devoted decades of service to the maritime patrol com munity and were selflessly committed to a number of naval commands from Brunswick, Maine to Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii and beyond during their multitude of deployments across the globe. Their final flight aboard Trident number 916 took off into clear blue skies and gusty winds. The crew of five flew approximately two hours before ulti mately landing on runway 28. With Reed as a passenger, Wickham closed out his naval flight career just shy of 3,800 flight hours upon landing. Following the flight, the command arranged a formal retirement ceremony in Hangar 511 to pay homage to his contributions to VP-26 over his 24 months on board. Guest speakers for the event included the Tridents Commanding Officer Cmdr. Erik Thors and former shipmate Capt. Vincent Segars. I love the story of Johns career, because it represents what is truly great about our nation and the U.S. Navy, said Segars. He has held the highest qualifications achievable at every step along the way. Wickhams naval career began with his enlistment on July 29, 1991. After Yeoman A school, he served the Commander of Submarine Forces for the Pacific Fleet, as well as completing a tour with USS Newport News (SSN 750) where he earned his Silver Dolphins. In May of 1999, Wickham received his commission and began his flight career. His tours included VP-4, Combined Task Force 54/74, Special Projects Unit Two, VP-30 and finally, VP-26. His department head tour with the Tridents placed him in various high profile roles, including training officer, safety/NATOPs officer and operations officer. Wickham also served as offi cer in charge of Task Group 57.2 for the duration of his final deployment in U.S. 5th Fleet from December 2011 to June 2012. Reed enlisted in the Navy in May of 1982. Following A school, he com pleted tours with VP-6, Executive Transportation Department, Special Projects Unit Two, VP-47, VP-8 and AIMD Brunswick. From there, he made the trek to his final assignment with VP-26 as the maintenance master chief petty officer (MMCPO) of the squadron. Reeds equally admirable tour with VP-26 as MMCPO resulted in a recordsetting deployment to U.S. 5th Fleet. He led the Tridents in overseeing the maintenance and upkeep of eight aircraft, resulting in an astounding 99.5 percent mission completion rate. He attributes his success to the collaboration of the entire Trident maintenance team. I am extremely proud of the Sailors here at VP-26, Reed said. We had a great deployment. It tells you the quality of this maintenance department. They have continued their high level of performance throughout the interdeployment readiness cycle as well. Reed will formally retire from service on Nov. 9. Mad Foxes help Special OlympicsThe Mad Foxes of VP-5 took time from their busy schedules to volunteer for a Gas and Glass event for the Kadena, Okinawa Special Olympics Oct. 27. Mad Fox volunteers joined forces with personnel from Commander, Fleet Activities Okinawa and the U.S. Naval Hospital to tackle the days events. The Sailors spent the afternoon pumping gas and clean ing windows at the Kadena gas station. They provided a full-service experience, even swiping credit cards for customers, so they would not have to leave the comfort of their vehicles. It was a fun event working with different Navy personnel from the area, said IT3 Nicole Souza. I enjoyed knowing I was working hard for a great cause, supporting the Special Olympics. The event continued VP-5s growing relationship with the Special Olympics, which began with par ticipation in the Torch Run through Okinawa on Sept. 22. The Mad Foxes will be present in full force Nov. 17, the official date of the Kadena Special Olympics. VP-5 is currently on a routine deployment to the 7th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime patrol operations.Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at the Chapel Complex, Bldg. 749 Weekly Bible Study Thursdays, 7 p.m. in the BarracksNAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051 Two VP-26 Tridents embark on final flight

PAGE 26

Question: I am seriously overweight. Does this mean I am at risk for developing diabetes and other life-threatening conditions? Dr. Joe says: Yes, obesity is a prime indicator increasing the incidence of Type 2 diabe tes as well as cardiovascular disease, high levels of choles terol and triglycerides, hyper tension and stroke. It is estimated that for every one-kilogram (2.2 pounds) increase in weight, the preva lence of diabetes increases by nine percent, according to Patrick Sullivan, PhD, at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver. Question: Every time I lose weight I am unable to keep it off. What is the best way for me to achieve my goal of long-term weight loss? Dr. Joe says: By track ing the habits of people who lose weight and keep it off, researchers have found these common denominators in weight-loss success stories: ries per day of which less than 24 percent comes from fat. way you think about food and daily activities. exercise habits to maintain weight loss. hour a day. Walking is the most frequently reported exercise that seems to help. self as a dieter, think about a lifestyle change. but dont be upset by small changes on the dial. Dont panic about one or two pounds of weight gain. Deal with it through better nutrition and exercise adjustments. Question: I want to start a workout program, but I do not know where to begin. Any suggestions? Dr. Joe says: First off, if you are way out of shape you should first consult with your primary care physician. When you are cleared for exercise, the American College of Sports Medicine as well as the American Heart Association recommends the following: dio exercise 30 minutes a day, five days a week, or dio exercise 20 minutes a day, three days a week, and training exercises, eight to 12 repetitions of each exercise two days a week. Moderate-intensity physical activity means working hard enough to raise your heart rate and break a sweat, yet still being able to carry on a conversation. It should be noted that to actually lose weight or main tain weight loss, 60 to 90 min utes of physical activity may be necessary daily. The 30-minute recom mendation is for the average healthy adult to maintain health and reduce the risk for chronic disease. These guidelines have been suggested for healthy adults under the age of 65. The Career Management System Interactive Detailing (CMS/ID) application phase is scheduled to begin Nov. 8, and remain open until 5 a.m. Nov. 20 for Sailors in their permanent change of station (PCS) orders negotiation window. CMS/ID is the web-based program enlisted Sailors use to review and apply for PCS orders when its time to transfer duty stations. Sailors may access the site at https://www.cmsid.navy.mil or from the CMS/ID link at www.npc.navy. mil. Sailors are in their orders negotia tion window when they are within nine through seven months from their pro jected rotation date (PRD). This is the first application phase for Sailors with an August 2013 PRD, the second application phase for Sailors with a July 2013 PRD and the last application phase for Sailors with a June 2013 PRD. These Sailors may review advertised billets in CMS/ID during the appli cation phase and apply for up to five jobs, either directly using CMS/ID or through a command career counselor (CCC). The application phase is typi cally 10 days, allowing Sailors time to review available jobs, research billets and discuss options with their family and chain of command before mak ing applications before the application phase closes. Updated detailing business rules announced earlier this year in NAVADMIN 226/12 eliminated red zone and green zone job advertise ments in CMS/ID and now detailers fill all advertised active-duty billets each month using the available Sailors who are in their orders-negotiation window. Sailors can be more proactive in getting an assignment of their choice by maxi mizing their choices. Data shows that Sailors rarely apply for more than two advertised jobs. Officials recommend using all five choices when applying. CMS/ID features a Sailor Preference section under the Sailor Info Tab where Sailors may rank duty prefer ences by type, command, location, platform and community, as well as indicate which special programs and schools they would like and leave comments for the detailer. Detailers will always attempt to fill billets using a Sailors desired selections first; however, Fleet readiness requirements are the guiding factor in filling billets. Detailers must also follow sea-shore flow guide lines outlined in NAVADMIN 201/11, so unless a Sailor requests Sea Duty Incentive Pay (SDIP) or the Voluntary Sea Duty Program (VSDP) to take con secutive sea duty orders, a Sailor up for shore duty should not be involuntarily assigned another sea tour. It may mean a Sailor hoping for shore duty in Florida or California may receive shore duty someplace else, where the need is greater. A single set of sea billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and a single set of shore billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command and Bureau of Naval Personnel are advertised each application cycle as the Navy seeks to fill gaps at sea and place Sailors with the right experience levels and skill sets into high-priority Fleet billets. Some factors a detailer must weigh when matching Sailors to jobs include the Sailors desires, qualifications, career progression and cost to the Navy. Detailers wont assign Sailors to advertised jobs until after the close of the application phase, during the detailer selection phase. Sailors may log into CMS/ID anytime after the detailer selection phase to see if they have been selected for orders. Overweight and looking for help!November application phase open for Sailors seeking PCS orders Humana Military is contracted with the federal government to manage the TRICARE contract for the South Region. The office in Orange Park has moved from its Kingsley location to 769-1 Blanding Boulevard, Orange Park, Fla. There are approximately 170,000 TRICARE beneficiaries in the Jacksonville area. TRICARE is the Department of Defenses worldwide health care pro gram available to eligible beneficiaries in any of the seven uniformed servic es the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service, and Commissioned Corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. TRICARE eligible beneficiaries may include active duty service members and their families, retired service members and their families, National Guard and reserve members and their fami lies, survivors, certain former spouses, and others. TRICARE brings together military and civilian health care professionals and resources to provide highquality health care services. For more information about TRICARE benefits, call 1-800-444-5445 or visit www.tricare.mil.TRICARE office in Orange Park moves Who to notify when a credit card is stolenCredit card theft is a huge burden and can cause major problems for victims. The follow ing are numbers to call if cards are lost of stolen. These agencies should be contacted immediately. Equifax Credit Bureau: 800-5256285 Experian Credit Bureau: 888-3973742 TransUnion Credit Bureau: 800-6807289 SS Administration Fraud Line: 800772-1213 Federal Trade Administration Identity Theft Line: 877-438-4338 26 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012

PAGE 27

Sailors with the White Hat Association from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/ C4F) participated in a community relations project Nov. 2 at the Clara White Mission in down town Jacksonville. The Sailors assisted the mission with daily food service by provid ing breakfast to the less fortunate and needy of Jacksonville. The mission serves an average of 400 meals per day. For more than 100 years, the Clara White Mission has helped Jacksonvilles lowincome, at-risk individu als, through job training, educational programs and daily meals. Volunteers are essen tial to the Clara White Mission, said Shirley Edwards, volunteer coor dinator at the mission. Without them we would not be able to help the individuals that we do. We are grateful for the time these Sailors have given us today. The mission also has a veterans center that pro vides job training, along with access to computers and laundry facilities. The purpose of COMUSNAVO/C4F White Hat Association is to bring junior enlisted Sailors together, person ally and socially to pro mote friendship, mutual support and career development among the members. Volunteering at the Clara White Mission is a great way for our asso ciation to introduce our selves to the command and the community, said IT2 Faith Goodwin, president of COMUSNAVO White Hat Association. I am very happy our Sailors are involved in the community, said Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet command er. Our Navy and local communities all ben efit from well-rounded Sailors who support both our mission at 4th Fleet, as well as the needs of our community. Our White Hat Associations involvement with the Clara White Mission is a fine example of that. The experience the Sailors had being able to help others was a great experience, but for one Sailor, in particular, the experience was much more personal. I wanted to volunteer for this project, because I, myself, was homeless before I joined the Navy, said ISSN Chad Reed. It was great to be able to help any way that I could now that I am in a posi tion to do so. Reed was homeless as a teenager and that experience had a large impact on his deci sion to join the Navy. For more information about COMUSNAVO/C4F White Hat Association, contact IT2 Goodwin at 270-5868. For more informa tion regarding volunteer opportunities at the Clara White Mission, contact Shirley Edwards at 3544162. COMUSNAVSO/C4F supports U.S. Southern Commands joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain; to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners; to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional secu rity; and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. U.S. 4th Fleet Sailors help at local charity JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 27

PAGE 28

28 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 The U.S. Navy continued to provide disaster relief Nov. 4 in support of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), national and local authorities in the New York and New Jersey areas affected by Hurricane Sandy. USS Wasp (LHA 1), USS San Antonio (LPD 17), and USS Carter Hall (LSD 50) are in position off the coast of New York and New Jersey supplying military personnel and equip ment to disaster areas. Wasp is supplying aircraft to aid in the mission with a total of 18 helicopters aboard: Several of these helos have departed for Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst (JB MDL) for tasking. Wasp also sent a team of damage controlmen and hull technicians to help repair the damaged Hoboken Ferry Terminal. San Antonio has four MH-60S and a Landing Utility Craft (LCU) capable of trans porting cargo, vehicles and personnel from ship to shore. Carter Hall also has a land ing utility craft (LCU) capable of transporting cargo, vehicles and personnel from ship to shore. This LCU ferried sup plies and personnel ashore to Sandy Hook, N.J., Nov. 4. Both San Antonio and Carter Hall are capable of providing command and control; under water infrastructure repair capabilities; riverine search and damage assessment; and underwater port survey. Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202, embarked aboard San Antonio and Carter Hall, is providing two 15 kilowatt generators and three 250 gallons per minute (gpm) pumps. Additionally, they are providing small boat and command and con trol support to the U.S. Coast Guard. Navy Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 11 is providing a convoy of 23 vehicles and 90 Seabees prepared to assist. Their equipment includes five 60 kilowatt, five 30 kilowatt and three 15 kilowatt genera tors and six 725 gpm pumps along with one 1,000 gpm pump. NMCB 5 is providing 110 Seabees to Joint Base McGuireDix-Lakehurst (JBMDL) for tasking. FEMA issued a mission assignment (MA) to the Department of Defense (DoD) requesting high-volume water pumps (350 gpm and greater) with qualified teams to sup port the operation and maintenance of the equipment. In support of FEMA, SECDEF has authorized the Navy to provide 30 high-volume pumps, 125 Sailors and 30 civilian technicians to support dewa tering efforts. So far, 18 Sailors from Mobile Diving and Salvage Units have arrived, with an additional 110 Sailors and 30 pumps from NMCB 5 to arrive Nov. 5. The retired USS Charles F. Adams (DDG-2) is closer to coming home as an interactive attraction and venue in downtown Jacksonville on the St. Johns River. The aim is to become the first Naval Ship Museum in Florida or Georgia and to honor our military heritage and increase educational oppor tunities, tourism and business as a key element of downtown revitalization. Outwardly similar to the Shermanclass destroyer, USS Adams was the first U.S. Navy ship designed from the keel up to launch anti-aircraft missiles. USS Adams, the first guided missile destroyer in its class, was home ported for 21 years at Naval Station Mayport from 1969-90. The last existent ship in its class, USS Adams is currently moored in Philadelphias Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility. With the Jacksonville Historic Naval Ship Association leading the way, the latest discussions have focused on placing the USS Adams at the Shipyards location along the Northbank in downtown, adjacent to the citys sports complex and as part of a hub of new activity along Bay Street. With nearly 20 percent of the Jacksonville areas population made up of active and retired military and their families, the venue would have a natural attraction, in addition to tourism traffic and offering a site for business meetings, Scout campouts and other gatherings. For more information, go to www.adams2jax.org. Navy provides disaster relief in aftermath of Hurricane Sandy The Department of the Navy (DoN) recently announced a single system wounded warriors can use to apply for Department of Defense civilian jobs. Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) Juan Garcia, III debuted the Defense Outplace Referral System (DORS) at the third annual Wounded Warrior Hiring and Support Conference in San Diego. In an effort to help connect our Wounded Warriors with available job opportunities, our commands and all three services have developed indi vidual databases to capture the talent and skills of returning men and women that process often required our Wounded Warriors, who were searching for jobs, to register in multiple systems, said Garcia. Now we can direct them to one system. DORS is a cost-effective vehicle that is compatible across all services, provid ing opportunities for a wide-array of skills and locations across the country, ensuring wounded warriors receive priority placement for jobs. Registration is open to all services, however, in order to register in DORS, veterans must meet these qualifica tions: be ready to work within 30 days; be honorably discharged; and have a compensable service-connected dis ability of 30 percent or more. The dis ability must be a direct result of injury and/or disease received in the line of duty and a result of armed conflict or instrumentality of war. Wounded warriors have gained a myriad of skills and experience from their military service, said Garcia. There are hundreds of civilian occupations and careers that provide a fit for those skills from supply sergeant to logistics specialist, corpsman to medi cal technician, cyber security operation to information technology manager, and many more. Three wounded warriors are now working in civilian careers and are helping promote the program by telling their stories of transition from military to civilian service. Matthew Sullivan, formerly in the infantry with the U.S. Army 82nd Airborne Division, is now a records room supervisor and was the first wounded warrior hired through DORS. DORS offers wounded warriors a great network and advantage to getting their information out, said Matthew Sullivan. Sullivan says there are many resources available to wounded warriors, acknowledging the angst of preparing resumes on top of leaving the service. There is support available to help veterans relate their military experi ence and skills to civilian careers, said Sullivan. Gabe Ledesma and Laura Langdeau, both former Marines and Purple Heart recipients, have also successfully tran sitioned to civilian careers. There are different ways to serve your country, said Ledesma. Opportunities like DORS help make that possible. Ledesma now works at Naval Sea Systems Command helping wounded warriors and veterans transitioning from the military. Even though we are not on the ground, we are part of the big picture and we are supporting our Sailors and Marines, said Langdeau, now a pro duction controller at Naval Air Systems Commands (NAVAIR) Lakehurst Division. More than 10,857 veterans were among the new hires for the DoN this past year, with 2,580 of the new hires being disabled veterans and 1,835 being wounded warriors with 30 percent or more disability. The Office of Civilian Human Resources is leading the execution of DORS for the DoN and in providing support to veterans interested in civil ian careers. To explore civilian careers with the DoN and learn more about DORS and other support for veterans, visit www.donhr.navy.mil.Campaign links wounded warrior seeking civilian careersNew ship museum seeks support

PAGE 29

In January, the JNJ Sports softball team began its run in the 2012 Military Varsity B Softball Program. Lead sponsor JNJ Sports is comprised of retired Chief Petty Officer Jody Smith and his wife, Jenne. Retired Senior Chief Petty Officer Robert Passen and his wife, Tonya, are also contributing sponsors of the squad. In March, the team participat ed in the first leg of the Southeastern Conference Championship Series at the 4th annual Kickoff Classic in Niceville, Fla. and finished in first place finish with a 4-0 record. April saw the team participate in the second leg of the conference series by playing in the Florida Military State Championships at Drew Park in Jacksonville where they were crowned the champions with a 4-1 record. In May, the team participated in the 4th annual Thunder Over Augusta/ Armed Forces NIT held in Augusta, Ga. The team finished in first place with a 6-1 record. The Southeast Regional Military State/Roger Hockey Invitational Tournament took place in June at Dallas, Ga. The team was crowned the Georgia Military State Champions with a 4-0 record. Next up was the DRASH Stars and Stripes Military NIT in Destin, Fla., where JNJ Sports took second place with a 4-2 record. The squad followed up the next day by playing in the North Florida Military States where they took another runner-up finish with a 3-2 record. In August, the team played in the Military Varsity B World Championships in Panama City Fla. The squad started their run in the Worlds with a spotless 3-0 record until tropical rains washed out the tourna ment. The JNJ Sports team was declared Co-World Champion and ended the year ranked number one out of 65 teams in the country. The teams All World Tournament selections were: LSCS Chuck Morrow, Master Sgt. Larry Shelvy, ABHC Charlie Campos, AWOC Ryan Crate, AZC Tony Johnson, AWO1 Tim Tyler, AWO1 Ryan Branco. Also receiving the All World Co-Offensive MVP was YNCS(Ret) Derrick Lovell and All World Co-Defensive MVP AOC Mike Muncy. JNJ Sports coaches are retired YNCS) Derrick Lovell and AE1 Shawn Bone. Players are LSCS Chuck Morrow, Master Sgt. Larry Shelvy, ABHC Charlie Campos, AWOC Ryan Crate, AOC Mike Muncy, AZC Tony Johnson, AWOC Dale Lewis, AWO1 Tim Tyler, AWO1 Ryan Branco, OS1 Zack Machnics, AWV2 Dustin Quakenbush, AM2 Daniel Dingman, AD3 Daniel Pinales, LS3 Alejandro Ramirez and contractor Brian Hinton. The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but under no circum stances are dependent children autho rized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may pur chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No exceptions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@ usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tick ets for the entire season. Americas 398 national parks will offer the public free admission Nov. 10-12 during Veterans Day weekend in honor of those who serve and have served in the U.S. military. National parks preserve places that commemorate our countrys collec tive heritage our ideals, our majes tic lands, our sacred sites, our patriotic icons which our military has defended through the years, National Park Service Director Jonathan Jarvis said. We are grateful for the service and sacrifice of military members, and honored to tell their story at our national parks, Jarvis added. From frontier forts to World War II battlefields, more than 70 national parks have direct connections to the military, he said. National parks throughout the country will hold special events to commemorate Veterans Day, according to Jarvis. Highlights include: Vicksburg National Cemetery, Miss., where visitors will encounter historical personalities; 6,000 graves at Poplar Grove National Cemetery in Petersburg National Battlefield, Va.; at Independence National Historical Park, Pa.; War experience at Natchez National Historical Park, Miss.; and, Roosevelts in the World Wars at Sagamore Hill National Historic Site, N.Y. Additional benefits for veterans on Veterans Day include a free Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area cruise that will pass the USS Constitution on its way to Georges Island, home of Fort Warren, according to the release. The National Park Service is also, in partnership with the Gettysburg Foundation, offering veterans free entrance to the Gettysburg National Military Park museum in Pennsylvania, concluded Jarvis. NAS Jax-based softball team repeats as Military Varsity B Southeastern Conference ChampionsJacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USONational Parks free to all for Veterans Day weekend JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 29

PAGE 30

30 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Defense Secretary Leon Panetta praised the United Service Organizations for its steadfast support of troops and their families. USO is very special to me personally, Panetta said yes terday at the 2012 USO Gala. As a young boy in Monterey, California, during World War II, the USO was next to my Catholic grammar school that I went to. [Our nuns] grabbed us and took us over to the USO, he said. It was the greatest treat I ever had as a boy to greet the soldiers that were there who were destined for war at the time. The secretary also noted that when he was young lieuten ant in the U.S. Army, he made use of the USO at a number of stations and that his genera tion always regarded the USO and Bob Hope as one and the same. Panetta said the evenings event paid tribute to the great legacy of the USO, and its long history of helping those serving in uniform. But as we pause from our daily lives to honor the USO, our thoughts naturally turn to those men and women in uni form who are working for us and fighting for us every day, he said. The secretary made note of the National Guard troops serving in 13 states follow ing the damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. As we speak, something Ive been dealing with now for the last few days, there are more than 7,000 National Guardsmen who are help ing distressed fellow citizens dig out from the damage of Hurricane Sandy, Panetta said. Turning to U.S. service members who are deployed over seas in harms way, Panetta saluted the 68,000 troops of Americas finest fighting force serving in the cold moun tains and windswept valleys of Afghanistan. And, there are thousands more brave men and women who are enduring tough con ditions at sea, or stationed at remote posts in the Middle East, and Africa, and elsewhere around the world, the secre tary added. America is the worlds stron gest nation with the best mili tary because of the dedica tion and sacrifice of its service members, Panetta said. We owe it to all of them no matter where duty calls to honor their service and to support them in every way possible, the secretary said. Panetta said he was part of the generation that came of age during the Vietnam War, and could always count on strong support from the USO. The politics of that war never changed the warm response and embrace of the USO, he said. Far too many troops returned home to a country that failed to give them the honor that they richly deserved. It has taken many years but finally our nation recognizes the sacrifices that were made [by U.S. service members dur ing the Vietnam War], Panetta said. Today, [after] more than a decade of war that weve endured, we can all be thank ful that the American people are united in support of those who put their lives on the line for this country. The defense secretary noted the USO has been a galvaniz ing force to turn that spirit of support for our military into benefits for our servicemen and women, and their fami lies. I am deeply grateful as sec retary of defense to the tens of thousands of USO staff and volunteers who work tirelessly to support our troops, Panetta said. The defense secretary cited USO-provided services rang ing from arranging world-class entertainment to just provid ing a quiet space for a service member to call home, as wel come reprieves from the rigors of deployment. On behalf of the Department of Defense, I want to thank all of those who vol unteer and work on USO tours and at USO centers here at home and around the world for all they do, Panetta said. Panetta also congratulated six service members for their service and remarkable acts of bravery and sacrifice lead ing to their selection as USO Service Members of the Year. Army Staff Sgt. Jacob Perkins, Marine Corps Sgt. Clifford Wooldridge, Navy Petty Officer Second Class Gregory Gaylor, Air Force Staff Sgt. Christopher Beversdorf, Coast Guard Petty Officer Second Class Nicholas Beane and Senior Airman Evan Stevens were honored during the gala. Panetta noted he often says the U.S. military has a great deal of powerful weapons the best ships, aircraft and advanced weapons systems in the world but they are worthless without American troops who serve. They are our militarys greatest strength, and that is why we must do everything we can to take care of them, he said. And the heart and the soul of caring for them is the USO. God bless the USO, and God bless our men and women in uniform, Panetta said. There are a lot of people who look at autumn as the beginning of winter. Like most people, chances are that you associate both autumn and winter with weight gain, depending on your location. Without the warm weather that is experienced in spring and summer, the idea of fun outdoor activities probably sounds pretty ridiculous to you. Luckily, there are a number of fun autumn activities to add to your fitness plan. Here, we will take a much closer look at just a few of the fun autumn activities that you can enjoy with your chil dren, your significant other, your friends or just about anyone! Go to a Fair When you go to the fair, you can spend hours walking looking at all the exhibits and rides. And many of the rides will give you a full cardio workout working every muscle just to hang on. Some fairs have contests such as sack races or egg tosses which will also work some muscles. Going to a fair is definitely an autumn activity to add to your fitness plan just stay away from the cotton candy and fried donuts! Go to a Corn Maze If you have never been to a corn maze before, they are loads of fun! Not only are they fun, but it is likely that it will take you quite a while to find your way out of the corn maze once you have gone to each check point. Many people spend hours trying to find their way out of a corn maze. By the end, you will probably have worked up a good sweat just trying to find your way out of the corn maze. Going to a corn maze is very fun autumn activity to add to your fitness plan! Go to the Zoo The idea of going to the zoo probably sounds absurd, but there are plenty of reasons to go during the autumn season. One of the reasons is because many zoos lower their rates during this time. The ultimate reason to go to the zoo in autumn, however, is because you will be more likely to see animals! In the summer, animals are too hot to come out during the day and spend most of their time sleeping. During the autumn, it is cool enough for them to walk around and graze. You probably already know that the reason you should add this fun autumn activity to your fitness plan is because you will burn calories from all of the walking that you will do at the zoo! Rake Leaves With Your Family Raking leaves can be a lot of fun when you make it a family event. Children, especially, love to rake leaves. It is likely that you will enjoy watching your chil dren do something that they enjoy, which will make you happy. Besides, children and adults can both get pretty physical when they rake leaves which is all the more reason to add this fun autumn activity to your fitness plan. As you can see, there are many fun autumn activities to add to your fitness plan this season! This excludes all of the block parties, long days at the mall you will spend Christmas shopping and any other fun autumn activities you can think of to add to your fitness plan! It is definitely safe to say that there are many things you can do in order to stay in shape throughout the autumn season! Going to the zoo, to a corn maze, fair and raking leaves are just to name a few of the many fun things to do in autumn! You may not actually blow your top or see red, but there are some very real physical symptoms of anger. When you are angry, adrenaline and other chemicals pour into your blood stream, causing your pulse to rise and your blood pressure to go up. In severe cases, the adrenaline begins to shut down the frontal lobe of your brainthe part that allows you to reason. You may feel hot, turn red, or feel your hands or body shake. The response is as natural as hunger pangs or sweating. Your body senses a threat and prepares for action by increasing your energy level. The threat may be real or imagined. It can be a physical threat or a threat to your ego. The energy boost you get from this sudden dump of adrenaline can be harmful to your body and lead to health problems if you dont learn how to manage it. Unmanaged anger can also end in violence. Recognize your anger Some people learn to recognize their anger and deal with it from a very early age. Others do not. They have to make a conscious effort as adults to change the way they behave when faced with frustration, hurt, annoyance, and other causes of anger. The trick is to recognize that you are angry, figure out why you are angry, and make a rational decision about what to do. In other words, find a way to switch gears in your brain so that the thinking side is in control, rather than the feeling side. Switching gears may be easier said than done. You may need to get away from the situation to cool off. Physical exercise, deep breathing, or taking some time to enjoy a hobby or watch TV may help you get in your right mind. Once you are calm, you are ready to resolve the conflict. Anger management tips Use a calm voice. Shouting seldom leads to solu tions. Be assertive, but not aggressive. Make sure you say what you need to say, but take time to listen, as well. Name calling and accusations only escalate the fight. Chose your words carefully. Negotiate and compromise. Try to meet in the middle. Sulking in silence or ignoring a problem is no better than blowing up. Your body is still producing harm ful adrenaline and the problem will not magically go away. Unexpressed anger can lead to physical ailments, such as ulcers and migraine headaches When its not you Maybe someone around you cannot manage his or her anger. When dealing with a hot head, be sure to keep your cool. Dont make the situation worse by answering anger with anger. Try being a good listener or using a little humor. Encourage a hot head to talk privately about the situation. A private setting may allow someone with a big ego more room to back down and save face. If someone is clearly out of control or approaching violence, get help. Dont take chances with your own safety. Anger is a natural human response. When we learn how to recognize and manage the energy it creates, we improve our lives and the lives of those around us. Panetta commends USO, congratulates outstanding troops Fun autumn activities to add to your fitness planAnger: Negative energy and its harmful effects

PAGE 31

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012 31

PAGE 32

32 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 8, 2012