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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 11-01-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02017

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jacksonville officials traveled to Washington, D.C. Oct. 18 where they received the 2012 Federal Energy and Water Management Award recognizing their outstand ing contributions in the areas of energy efficiency, water conserva tion, and the use of advanced and renewable energy technologies at federal facilities. NAS Jacksonville completed the largest utility energy service con tract project to date in the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast Region reducing its energy intensity by four percent and water consumption by 24 per cent from the prior year during only four months of operation in FY 2011. This is equal to savings of 34 billion Btu of energy and 79 million gallons of water, respectively. The $17.3 million project audited more than 30 facilities and incorpo rated numerous upgrades including air handler unit ultraviolet lights, More than 18 months after the commencement of pre-deployment workups, the HSL-42 Detachment 10 Night Furies returned home Oct. 31. The dual-aircraft detachment was embarked on board the Norfolk-based destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG 95), in support of the USS Enterprise Carrier Strike Group during the aircraft carriers final deployment in its storied 51-year history. The detachment, led by Lt. Cmdr. Christopher Conlon and AEC Michael Smith, successfully executed more than 1,400 mishap-free flight hours since standing up in March 2011. Lt. Hector Ferrell, Lt. Benjamin ONeill, and AWR2 Amado Vazquez, each earned the coveted 1,000 Sikorsky H-60 flight-hour benchmark during the Energy, water management award goes to NAS Jax HSL-42 Detachment 10 returns from deployment On March 10, all seven HS-11 Dragonslayer helicop ters departed Jacksonville and began the flight north to NS Norfolk, Va. to join USS Enterprise (CVN 65) for her final deployment. The next day, the carrier departed NS Norfolk to begin operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). The squadron began their deployment on a high note by rescuing an Enterprise Sailor who had fallen over board. During the transit through the Strait of Gibraltar, HS-11 provided anti-terrorism force protection (ATFP) and surface surveillance control (SSC) for the carrier. The Dragonslayers also supported the first of many successful photo exercises during this historic final deployment. At the end of March the squadron was in Athens, Greece for its first port visit. After departing Athens, the squadron provided an ATFP alert for the strike groups Suez Canal transit. Following the transit, the squadron began flying plane guard and SSC for the strike group while the air wing flew in support of OEF. Coupled with supporting OEF, HS-11 also performed many vertical replenish ment (VERTREP) operations where they delivered over 353 tons of cargo to keep the USS Enterprise (CVN 65) fully supplied. The carrier conducted 10 Strait of Hormuz tran sits throughout deployment during which the Dragonslayers provided armed ATFP and SSC. HS-11 HS-11 Dragonslayers home from historic deployment NAS Jax best in Southeast RegionWill now compete at CNIC levelFor the second consecutive year, Commander, Navy Region Southeast selected NAS Jacksonville as the nominee for the Commander, Naval Installation Command (CNIC) Installation Excellence Award. The station was also the recipient of last years CNIC Installation Excellence Award and Presidential Installation Excellence Award. It will now go on to compete with 76 other instal lations for the CNIC Installation Excellence Award. I am very pleased to announce that NAS Jacksonville and NSA Panama City have been selected as our nominees for large and small installations respectively for the FY-12 CNIC Installation Excellence Award, said Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. Our cross-functional panel of experts consid ered excellent packages from all of our installa tions. NAS Jacksonville and NSA Panama City submitted the best packages in their respective categories, demonstrating how they exceeded the criteria set forth by the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense to support the Fleet, Fighter and Family. NAS Jacksonville sustained excellence in a wide range of operational and warfighter readi ness support functions, better mission perfor mance and superb quality of life for military men and women and their families, and commu nity outreach program set it apart from 17 other Southeast installations. The nomination exemplified the total commit ment to excellence by its military and civilian personnel and sets the air installation as one of the contenders for the CNIC Award. In a message to base personnel, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders said, Congratulations! You have been named the best large installation in the Southeast Region. You truly are the best at what you do and I want to personally thank you. I cannot tell you how proud I am to be a part of this outstanding orga nization! When asked to explain the reason for their success, Sanders remarked, The contributions of every person military, DoD civilian and con tractor is valued. We are truly one team, one fight in pursuit of excellence and support to the Fleet, Fighter and Family. With the mission of supporting the fleet, fight er and family, NAS Jax is the premier installation for delivering effective, sustained and improved shore readiness for Sailors, their families and civilian employees. Base personnel worked around the clock pro viding services to 14 home-based squadrons, numerous detachments, joint commands, gov ernment agencies and carrier strike group exer cises. Air Operations handled more than 52,600 flight operations and supported 30 detachments. The award-winning air installation continued its unprecedented and accident-free growth in fiscal year 2012 (FY12) by exceeding the Chief of Naval Operations mandated 75 percent mis hap reduction goal in addition to being almost 60 percent below the industry guidelines for days-away restricted time established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. In partnership with 110 tenant commands, sta tion personnel provided support and service to transition the P-3C Orion to the P-8A Poseidon; HS to HSM, logistic and reserve squadrons, joint services and allies. The station also completed or started con struction on nearly $100 million of construction in support of the P-8A as well as the Triton and Fire Scout helicopter unmanned aerial systems. Achieving the Secretary of the Navys gold level of achievement for energy savings, NAS Jax installed 1,140 square-feet of solar panels bringing the total to 5,500 saving approximately $300,000 annually. NAS Jacksonville looks forward to compet ing at the CNIC level. The winner of the CNIC Installation Excellence Award will be nominated for the Commander in Chiefs Annual Award for Installation Excellence. Established in 1984, the award recognizes the outstanding efforts of personnel in the opera tions and maintenance of U.S. military installa tions worldwide.

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Nov. 1 1841 Mosquito Fleet command ed by Lt. Cmdr. J. T. McLaughlin, carries 750 Sailors and Marines into the Everglades to fight the Seminole Indians. 1941 President Franklin D. Roosevelt places Coast Guard under jurisdiction of Department of the Navy for duration of national emergency. 1967 Operation Coronado IX began in Mekong Delta. 1979 Beginning of retirement of Polaris A-3 program begins with removal of missiles from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Last Polaris missile removed in February 1982. Nov. 2 1943 In Battle in Empress Augusta Bay, U.S. cruisers and destroyers turn back Japanese forces trying to attack transports off Bougainville, Solomons. 1968 Operation Search Turn begins in Mekong Delta. Nov. 3 1853 USS Constitution seizes sus pected slaver H. N. Gambrill. 1931 Dirigible USS Los Angeles makes 10-hour flight from NAS Lakehurst, N.J., carrying 207 passen gers, establishing a new record for the number of passengers carried by a sin gle lighter-than-air craft. 1943 Battleship Oklahoma (BB-37) sunk at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941 is refloated. 1956 USS Cambria (APA-36) removes 24 members of United Nations Truce Commission team from the Gaza Strip. 1956 USS Chilton (APA-38), USS Thuban (AKA-19), and USS Fort Snelling (LSD-30) evacuate more than 1,500 U.S. and foreign nationals from Egypt and Israel because of the fighting. 1961 After Hurricane Hattie, heli copters from USS Antietam (CV-36) begin relief operations at British Honduras providing medical personnel, medical supplies, general supplies and water. Nov. 4 1967 Landing craft from USS Navarro (APA-215) rescue 43 men from British SS Habib Marikar aground on a reef at Lincoln Island in the Tonkin Gulf. 1971 USS Nathaniel Greene (SSBN636) launches a Poseidon C-3 missile in first surface launch of Poseidon missile. Nov. 5 1775 Commodore Esek Hopkins appointed to Commander in Chief of the Continental Navy. 1915 In an AB-2 flying boat, Lt. Cmdr. Henry Mustin makes first under way catapult launch from a ship, USS North Carolina, at Pensacola Bay, Fla. 1917 German submarine torpe does the yacht USS Alcedo (SP-166) off French coast. She was the first American vessel lost in World War I. 1923 Tests designed to prove the feasibility of launching a small sea plane from a submarine take place at Hampton Roads Naval Base. A Martin MS-1, stored disassembled in a tank on board submarine USS S-1, was removed and assembled. Then the submarine submerged allowing the plane to float free and take off. 1944 TF 38, under Commanding Officer Vice Admiral John S. McCain begins two days of carrier strikes on Luzon, Philippines. 1945 Ensign Jake West (VF-41) makes first jet landing on board a car rier, USS Wake Island (CVE-65) Nov. 6 1851 U.S. Navy expedition under command of Lt. William Lewis Herndon, on a mission to explore the valley of the Amazon and its tributaries, reaches Iquitos in the jungle region of the upper Amazon after their departure from Lima, Peru. 1941 On Neutrality Patrol, USS Omaha (CL-4) and USS Somers (DD381) intercept the German blockade runner Odenwald disguised as U.S. freighter, board her after the German crew abandoned the ship, and brought the ship to San Juan, Puerto Rico, where the boarding party was awarded sal vage shares. 1942 First officer and enlisted women from training schools report for shore duty around the USA. For several mornings in a row recent ly, I woke to the same conversation coming from the landing outside my bedroom: Owen, get my back. Get my back! Got it. The enemys on my tail. Hard right! Hard right! I see him. Im locking in. Got em. Theres another one. Locking in. Hes on my tail. The boys were playing a Nintendo Wii game called World War II Aces. Using the handheld remote, they led historic aircraft through maneuvers on famed missions. Even Lindell, 5, was learning pilot talk. The first time I saw him use his hands to demonstrate how a plane banked left I knew it was time to show them Top Gun. (Well, not all of Top Gun Id fast-forward through the amorous scenes.) I put the DVD in the player, and when the title screen came on, the first notes of Kenny Loggins iconic Danger Zone playing against the whistle and wind of jet noise, the entire 1980s washed over me. I felt like I might even smell the old perm in my hair. The boys stared at the television, their mouths hanging open. This is when I knew they needed some background information. I paused the DVD. Okay, first, I said, you should know that this is what I grew up with. Pop, your grandfather, was an F-14 pilot. What youre about to see is what he did for work when I was a kid. He even went to the famous Top Gun school. Pop? Owen said, the corners of his mouth turning up in a smile. My Pop? Lindell asked. Yes. But theres more. I reminded the boys of the aircraft carriers I grewup on and around in Norfolk, Virginia. Youre going to see an aircraft carrier in this movie. Its the same one your dad was on during his first deployment. He and Pop were actually on it together at one point. The boys minds had just been blown. As I realized that I had even more to tell them, I wondered what took me so long to show them this movie. Can we watch now? Ford asked. I pushed play and said what I thought was an aside, Also, people say the main character, Maverick, looks a lot like your dad. Owen put his hand over his mouth. Does Maverick die? I dont want to watch if Maverick dies. Thats when I remembered that Goose dies. I was having second thoughts. But the other boys were already enthralled with the F-14 catapulting off the flight deck. I cant imagine Pop flying that, Ford said. Yeah, I cant imagine an old man fly ing that plane, Lindell said. I laughed. Well, he wasnt old back then, I said. After Maverick landed his plane and took off his helmet, the boys gasped. He does look like Dad, Ford said. I cant watch this if he dies, Owen said. The boys stood to get closer to the screen. His mouth, it looks just like Dad, Lindell said. And that expression, Ford yelled, pointing at the screen. That, right there, looks just like him. It became difficult to follow the sto ryline because the boys had so many questions: Was I born when Pop went to Top Gun? No. Has Dad (Dustin) ever rescued pilots out of the water in the helicopter? Yes. Did I ever ride in an F-14? No. But I did watch Pop break the sound barrier once. Then the scene came where Goose dies. The room grew quiet. On the screen, Maverick packed up Gooses belongings and took them to Meg Ryan, who played Gooses wife. I dont think I can watch this, Owen said. Owen, Ford sighed. The one who died doesnt look like dad. Still, Owen said. So many things in the Navy are dangerous. I mean, Goose was just practicing and he died. I had no good response for this. All I could do was nod and push the hair away from Owens forehead. Next, there were ewws and fake vomiting when Maverick and Charlie (Kelly McGillis) kissed on screen. This seemed to replace all the heavy thoughts from before. The boys went to bed and said very little more about Top Gun. The next day, however, all those sto ries I had told them, having percolated overnight, grew and become distorted. I overheard Owen telling a neighbor, My Pop went to Top Gun and was the best fighter pilot that ever lived. He breaks the sound barrier all the time. He was better than Tom Cruise. Hey, Old Man, youre welcome. The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now sell ing tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Nov. 4, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Detroit Lions (Tickets on sale Oct. 22) Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jags vs. Indianapolis Colts (Tickets on sale Oct. 29) Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eli gible to purchase/use these tickets. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, My boys first experience with Top Gun Jacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO

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The Tridents of VP-26 recently hosted members of the gold crew from USS Alaska (SSBN 732), a ballistic missile submarine home ported at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. Cmdr. Mark Sohaney, executive officer of VP-26, greet ed Alaska Commanding Officer Cmdr. Robert Wirth and Executive Officer Lt. Cmdr. Brian Earp, along with sev eral others from the submarines wardroom. After the submariners traded their coveralls for flight suits, the group departed on a crew training flight aboard a P-3C Orion. A crew training fight (CTF) is designed to stimulate scenarios for the crew to retain proficiency in real-world mission requirements. Throughout the flight, the sub mariners observed how a patrol plane crew operates on typical missions. The visitors were also able to take turns sitting in the pilot and copilot seats flying the aircraft. While the CTF was underway, others from the crew of the Alaska were taken to the P-3C simulator building where they received a tour of the spaces. The visitors were given a chance to experience flying the full-motion simulator under the guidance and supervision of Lt. Cmdr. John Wickham, VP-26s operations officer. The visiting crew had the opportunity to fly approaches to an airfield both in the clear skies and in poor weather conditions. After the Alaska crewmembers experienced flying under normal conditions, Wickham demonstrated com bat descents onto a hostile airfield and finally, the diffi culty of flying an approach under emergency conditions, such as an engine failure. The officers of the crew were then escorted to the tactical operational readiness trainer (TORT) to observe a combat aircrew conduct an anti-submarine warfare (ASW) mission. The officers got a glimpse of the crew coordination necessary to search, track and attack an enemy target. The trainer has stations for every member of the tactical team, including the acoustic operators, radar operator, in-flight technician, navigator and tacti cal coordinator. The unique TORT trainer allows the crew to train to complex scenarios that are impossible to simulate in the actual aircraft. The gold crew met with Capt. Eric Weise, commodore of Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11, who expressed his interest in continuing to host members of the sub marine community here at NAS Jacksonville. Wirth extended an offer to host a tour of the submarine Alaska for aviators to expand the knowledge of U.S. submarine capabilities. After lunch at the golf course, the crew was given a full tour of the P-3C Orion, followed by a brief on the capa bilities of the aircraft. The crew was also given a look at the future of the maritime patrol community, the P-8A Poseidon, which is scheduled to replace the P-3C over the coming years. Wirth called the tour excellent and informative as he and Sohaney exchanged autographed photos of their respective platforms before departing. The Alaska and VP-26 will continue to look for opportunities to exchange knowledge and strengthen ties among the Navys warfighting communities. The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 took part on a coor dinated anti-submarine warfare (ASW) exercise with the Warlords of HSL-51 while on detach ment to NAF Atsugi, Japan. The Warlords are the U.S. Navys only for ward deployed Sikorsky SH-60B/F Seahawk LAMPS Mk III helicop ter squadron. Home ported at NAF Atsugi, the Warlords provide combat-ready armed anti-surface and antisubmarine helicopter detachments to ships deploying in the Korea, Western Pacific and Arabian Gulf regions, as well as executive trans port for Commander, U.S. 7th Fleet home ported in Yokosuka, Japan. This exercise focused on improving multiplat form communication and coordination during ASW prosecutions while work ing in a dynamic envi ronment. Its always great to work with a different platform, especially one as versatile as the P3, said Lt. Andrew Lathrop, a helicopter aircraft com mander for HSL-51. It was a great experience. We definitely look to for ward to doing more of this in the future. At the conclusion of the exercise the squad rons arranged a reception at Atsugi Air Base where the crews interacted and shared the experiences gained from the mis sion. Cmdr. David Loo, HSL-51 commanding officer, showed his appre ciation by offering to take VP-8 crewmembers on a low level training flight around the city of Tokyo in a SH-60B Seahawk helicopter. The flight consisted of an hour-long trip and offered the crew members a unique way of experiencing the area of Japan surrounding Tokyo. I had never been to Tokyo and to see it like that was amazing, said Lt. Chris Powell of VP-8 after the flight. I want to thank Cmdr. Loo and all of HSL-51 for their out standing work during the exercise, and the once in a lifetime experience afforded to us today. The Fighting Tigers are on a six-month deploy ment in support of U.S. 7th Fleet.VP-8 conducts training exercise with HSL-51 VP-26 Tridents play host to submariners JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 It was an exciting day in the culinary arts for NAS Jacksonville, as Food Network Chef and Restaurant: Impossible star Chef Robert Irvine displayed his cooking prowess at the Flight Line Caf on Oct. 24. With a galley full of resourc es and a crew of culinary spe cialists (CS) at his disposal, Irvine set about bringing to life his version on one of the most basic, yet favorite meals of Americans: Pizza. The event, sponsored by the NAS Jax Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) and Lighthouse Foods (a company that distributes some of Irvines line of foods), was put together as a fun training event for the CSs at the Flight Line Caf. Its really great to have Chef Irvine here to provide creative training to our crew, com mented CWO4 Teresa Culliper, food service officer of the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf. Not only is he here to promote training, but he is making a full set of pizzas that will be served to base personnel for lunch. Irvine began by assigning members of his own cooking crew and other CSs to make homemade pizza dough and sauce. He also took the time to mentor Sailors with his inven tive cooking ideas. I thought it was a great experience for everyone. Its exciting to meet such an experienced culinary profes sional who is also has his own cooking show, said CS2 Ray Johnson of the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf. As both the dough and sauce neared completion, a different twist was applied to the event: a friendly pizza making com petition. Splitting up the CSs into four teams, Irvine briefed the Sailors on exactly how the rules would work. From the time you get your pizza dough, youll have 30

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 5 CHEFminutes to come up with an idea for an original pizza. Get creative, but keep it simple. You should be able to come up with something that is both tasty and healthy. I dont wanna see just red sauce, cheese and peppero ni, Irvine stated. As the Sailors went to work, the tension in the kitchen was high as they rushed to complete their pizza ideas within the allotted time. In the meantime, the Flight Line Caf assembled a team of four judges, including Irvine, his wife, Gail Kim, President of Lighthouse Foods Billy Hashey and FLC Executive Officer Cmdr. Tom Dailey. Thirty minutes seemed like 10, but each team finished their piz zas with flying colors and present ed them to the judges panel. As the judges munched on the platters served to them, they evaluated each team based on taste and creativ ity. Ultimately, the team from the NS Mayport Oasis Galley claimed first place, its members being CS2 Peter Torres, CS2 Jeremy Smith, and CSC Wayne Rickerson. Their pizza included a fantastic combination of spinach, onion, bacon, basil and scrambled eggs, lightly topped with cayenne pepper. After the awards were presented and Irvine took photos with all the CSs who competed. He closed by saying, I was a cook in the Royal Navy for 10 years, and I know how important what all of you do is to the morale and welfare of the military. Thank you for the effort and hard work, and for the service you provide everyday to the men and women who serve with you.Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 NAS Jax top Sailors recognizedNAS Jacksonville rec ognized 99 top Sailors from the base and tenant commands for the third quarter during the Sailor of the Quarter (SOQ) luncheon at the NAS Jax Officers Club Oct. 24. In the insanely hec tic operational tempo of todays Navy, we have over 321,000 Sailors serv ing through the world. We have 287 ships in ser vice which 113 including four aircraft carriers and five big deck amphibious ships are currently underway and deploying in every area of responsibility in the world. Our objective is to project power for deterrence while sustaining the American way of life. And in a couple weeks you have the privilege of voting which many countries do not, said NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/ SW) Brad Shepherd. Today we continue with battles in Afghanistan, the withdrawal from Iraq, detainee operations in Guantanamo Bay and pirate operations in 5th Fleet, to name a few. However, today this event is about you our Sailors of the Quarter. You are the future of our Navy and today we are recognizing your accomplish ments, he continued. MU2 Laura Carey of Navy Band Southeast per formed the national anthem and NAS Jacksonville Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore delivered the invocation. The events guest speaker was NAS Jax Senior Sailor of the Quarter AC1 Amarilys Torres. When I joined the Navy, I was looking for a family. And, I found it. I joined as an aviation support equip ment technician it really wasnt the job I wanted. My goal was to be in the medical field but I ended up converting to air traffic controller. Its been the best decision Ive ever made, said Torres. The Navy has taught me discipline and my job requires me to make decisions under pressure and its made me who I am today. This is honor to be here. And for all of you being recognized today, there is so much more. Reach for the stars. The Navy has so much to offer and if it wasnt for the Navy and all the wonderful people who have taught me so much I wouldnt be where I am today, she added. Following lunch, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders thanked the Sailors and their spouses. Ive been in the Navy for 26 years and I know that we cannot achieve anything without the support of our families. In the Navy, we continually face chal lenges and how we view those challenges is what defines us as people, leaders and Sailors. Do we see these challenges as stepping-stones to the future or as obstacles. If we see them as obstacles, they will soon become problems, said Sanders. You, as Sailors of the Quarter, are the leaders of tomorrow. You are the leaders who junior Sailors will look up to, to overcome these obstacles and solve the problems. Its very easy to not want to do this but that is the mindset of people who fail. And because you are here today, its obvious you dont have that mindset and thats what we need in todays Navy. Sanders then presented each SOQ an award enve lope containing a $25 Visa gift card from VyStar Credit Union and a Sailor of the Quarter coin from First Command Financial Services. The event was sponsored by VyStar Credit Union, USAA, First Coast Financial Services, University of Phoenix and Navy Mutual Aid Association. This is a pretty big deal going on here and some thing Ive never been a part of before. Im so very excit ed to be here and be recognized today. I really appre ciate all this, said AM3 Kendra Martinez of VP-30. I think this is a great honor. Ive strived pretty hard to make Sailor of the Quarter and its really cool that I get to come here with my wife and be recognized, added AD2 (AW) Billy Burton of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. VP-30 Sailor hospitalized after robbery attemptAWFAN Brett Parks remains hospitalized after suffering a gunshot wound when he came to the aid of someone calling for help. The Jacksonville Sheriffs Office has an on-going investigation into the incident. The suspect allegedly shot Parks while fleeing the scene of a robbery attempt. The inci dent occurred Oct. 17 at the Colony of Deerwood apartment complex near the St. Johns Town Center. Parks was immediately rushed to the intensive care unit at Shands Jacksonville Medical Center. According to Jacksonville Sheriffs Office, the sus pect is in custody. Originally from South Florida, Parks enlisted in the Navy in 2008. A member of VP-30 for approxi mately two years, he is known as a dedicated Sailor and fitness enthusiast who enjoys being a personal trainer in his free time. His Leading Chief Petty Officer, AWFC Mark Mason, was not surprised to hear that Parks rushed to the scene to help someone describing him as, a hardworking, selfless Sailor. The Navy immediately assigned a casualty assis tance calls officer to provide a direct link for his family to assist with their needs during Parks recovery. This incident also highlighted the importance of blood donation in the community. News of Parks shooting generated significant interest by VP-30 Sailors in donating blood. The squadron will spon sor a blood drive in November.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 7

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you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but under no circumstances are dependent children authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to pur chase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may purchase a maxi mum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No exceptions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/ CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justifi cation, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@ usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buy ing any more tickets for the entire season. TICKETS ENERGYmotor variable frequency drives, direct digital con trols, fuel conversions, chiller retrofits and replace ments, and boiler replacements. The venture also addressed heating, ventila tion and air conditioning mechanical opportuni ties such as chiller retrofits with magnetic bearing compressors. Exemplifying the contracts success, roof-mounted solar water heating systems were installed at several facilities, delivering an average of 3.8 million Btu per day. The first year of renew able cost savings exceeded $30,000. When fully implemented, the contract is expected to result in annual savings of more than 65 billion Btu and $3.3 million, with estimated avoided greenhouse gas emissions of about 9,840 metric tons of carbon dioxide. The Department of Energys Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) facilitates the fed eral governments implementation of sound, costeffective energy management and investment prac tices to enhance the nations energy security and environmental stewardship. FEMP awards recognize outstanding achieve ments across the following areas: buildings; aircraft identified and tracked potentially hostile small boats, patrol craft, and one midget class sub marine during the transit, and actively shielded the Enterprise from aggressive vessels by keeping them at bay. For these transits, HS-11 developed and used new tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) for the strike group, which were submitted to the small boat interaction weapon tactics conference at Al Udeid Air Base in Qatar in August. The Enterprise also performed flight operations in the Arabian Gulf. In addition to the normal duties of plane guard and SSC, HS-11 continuously assisted the helicopter detachments on board USS Nitze (DDG 94) and USS Vicksburg (CG 69) by flying additional SSC flights that granted those detachments a reprieve to perform critical maintenance on their aircraft. The Dragonslayers also took advantage of their close prox imity to Udairi Army Airfield. The squadron deployed three separate detachments of two aircraft that allowed 24 pilots and 37 aircrew men to regain terrain flight currency. HS-11 also conducted several distinguished visitor flights and executed a successful helicopter second pilot swap with HSL-46 Detachment Six on board USS Vicksburg (CG 69). Seven pilots and five aircrewmen were swapped between the two squadrons, providing valuable train ing and experience to crews from both platforms. Nearing their departure from the 5th Fleet area of responsibility, the Dragonslayers provided critical logistical support to the USS Iwo Jima Expeditionary Strike Group as they prepared for contingency opera tions following the attacks on U.S. Embassies through out the region. The ability of the Dragonslayers to quickly and effectively flex to and accomplish countless missions added to the flexibility of strike group operations in the compressed operating area of the Arabian Gulf. The Enterprise Carrier Strike Group transitioned to 6th Fleet in mid-October and the Dragonslayers picked up where they left off in 5th Fleet, provid ing critical logistics support to the strike group. The Sailors of HS-11 then enjoyed a well-deserved port call in Naples, Italy allowing for some rest and relaxation. Upon leaving the Mediterranean and cross ing the Atlantic, HS-11 off-loaded tons of weapons and stores to USNS Sakagawea in preparation for Enterprises homecoming and ultimate deactivation. Family and friends then welcomed home the vet eran Dragonslayers at both NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport at the completion of a truly historic and suc cessful combat deployment. By the end of deployment the Dragonslayers had flown 1012 flights for 2,575.8 hours completing 99.9 percent of their flights. Even with the Enterprises high operation tempo, the Dragonslayers had 33 Sailors earn their Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist qualifications and 14 earned their Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist qual ification. deployment. Detachment workups started with a trip to Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center for Helicopter Advanced Readiness Program training, followed by a myriad of exercises over the course of the next year. Most notably, Detachment 10 flew in support of two Submarine Commander Courses Exercise Bold Alligator 2012, and Exercise Frukus 2011, that includ ed forces from France, the United Kingdom, Russia and the United States. The detachment also showcased its anti-subma rine warfare (ASW) proficiency by participating in a CNO-mandated Mk-54 torpedo evaluation. The Night Furies successfully loaded and launched seven MK-54 block upgrade torpedoes, enabling urgent software upgrades to be introduced for fleet use. While operating in the Red Sea for several months, Detachment 10 flew over 30 hours in support of three international exercises, strengthening partner nation capabilities. During exercise Eagle Salute, a four-day exercise with Egyptian naval forces that involved ASW and maritime interdiction operations (MIO), the detach ment conducted dual ASW operations with an Egyptian SH-2. Exercise Indigo Serpent was a two-day exercise with Royal Saudi Naval Forces that involved more ASW and MIO. Finally, the detachment conduct ed a one-day passing exercise with Egyptian forces, focusing on basic anti-surface warfare tactics. The detachment spent the majority of deployment flying in support of counter terrorist/narcotic opera tions throughout the 5th Fleet area of responsibil ity. The Night Furies worked with various interna tional units to provide valuable intelligence and track ing information through the use of the legendary SH-60Bs myriad of active and passive sensors. The Night Furies worked hand-in-hand with an embarked U.S. Coast Guard Advanced Interdiction Team. The members of this 12-man detachment provided the ship with a highly qualified maritime boarding ele ment. Detachment 10 successfully integrated these individuals as members of the aircrew, providing an extremely specialized capability for the supported commander. This interaction not only increased the utility of the LAMPS Mk III airborne asset, but also provided the detachment with significant lessons learned that will shape future USCG/HSM partner ships in 5th Fleet. Ever flexible, Detachment 10 also supported the Enterprise Strike Group by conducting over 15 verti cal replenishments, 50 personnel transfers, and five medical evacuations. On one occasion, the Night Furies were able to assist in the rescue of 10 Iranian fishermen, whose dhow caught fire, forcing them to abandon ship on a dark, moonless night. While per forming the role of on-scene commander, the Night Furies monitored the safety of all adrift survivors with the use of its forward looking infrared camera, vec tored the ships RHIB to the survivors and coordinated the successful recovery of all mariners whose dhow eventually sank. A defining portion of the summer months was spent conducting armed escorts of national high-value units through the Strait of Hormuz, a high-risk choke point for ships that requires careful planning and con stant monitoring of the recognized maritime picture in order to avoid inadvertent collisions and pos sible threats. The Night Furies flew in support of 14 transits, escorting CVN, LHD, LPD, and T-AO class ships. Detachment 10s reputation for precise contact reporting while developing over-the-horizon surface pictures and application of required pre-planned responses earned praise from carrier strike group commanders, amphibious battle group commanders and fleet admirals alike. The success of the Night Furies would not have been possible without the best maintenance support in the fleet. Led by Smith, the detachments main tenance department shined. Throughout workups and the intense summer climate of the Middle East, over 12,000 man hours, including seven at-sea phase inspections, were logged in order to maintain a robust flight schedule. In addition to maintaining such high maintenance standards, nine members earned enlisted aviation warfare specialist qualifications and three earned their enlisted surface warfare specialist qualification. The high quality of the Sailors on Detachment Ten was also exemplified through the 100 percent reten tion rate and 12 advancements made since the detach ment was created. In mid-October, the Night Furies left 5th Fleet and traded the unflinching heat of the Arabian Gulf for the fair winds of the Mediterranean and one last port call. Detachment 10 enjoyed a myriad of port calls during their eight month deployment, including Italy, Seychelles, Jordon, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Israel and the United Arab Emirates. The Night Furies represent one of the last HSL detachments that HSL-42 will deploy as the sun sets on the legendary SH-60B aircraft. HSL-42 HS-11 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012

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The VR-62 Nomads received thank you messages written on 280 origami cranes from Japanese citizens during a ceremony held recently at Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan. The gifts were given in appreciation of the squadrons efforts during Operation Tomodachi, an operation that provided humanitarian aid and disaster relief assistance after an earth quake and tsunami struck Japan in March 2011. The event was organized by Helping Hands, a Yokosuka, Japan-based organization designed to help families displaced by the tragedy. Bobbi Bauer-Chen acted as the liaison between Helping Hands and VR-62. Bauer-Chen is a former VR-62 aviation mainte nance duty officer now residing in the Yokosuka area.Bauer-Chen told Helping Hands members of VR-62s role in Operation Tomodachi, and Masako Sullivan insisted that origami cranes be created for the squadron personnel. Sullivan, founder of Helping Hands, said the idea of sending gifts to the Sailors who assist ed with Tomodachi began with a woman in Fukushima, Japan who wanted to thank the Navy for everything they had done for her. I suggested that we send origami cranes with names and messages on the wings, Sullivan said. We collected cranes from all over Japan to donate them to the U.S. Navy units that took part in Tomodachi. Sullivan said it was important to her to thank the Sailors and the Navy for their assistance dur ing Operation Tomodachi. I knew that a lot of Sailors donated clothing, blankets, and personal items, said Sullivan. I knew it wasnt because the Navy told them to, but because they really wanted to help peo ple. It was beyond the Navys job. I wanted the people of Japan to continue remembering those things and give something back to the Navy. VR-62 was on station at NAF Atsugi when the earthquake and resulting tsunami struck. The squadron moved 127 tons of relief materi als during Operation Tomodachi. Japanese citizens thank VR-62 for assistance JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 9

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NAS Jax Security Department person nel had to deal with one of their own Oct. 23 when the stations Integrated Training Team implemented an exer cise involving an in-house shooter/hos tage simulation with injuries. Installation Training Officer Jim Butters described the exercise. An active duty Master at Arms attached to our base security department learns she will not be retained due to the severely over-manned rate. As a wife and a mother of three boys, she despairs for her familys future and expresses her outrage in an inappropri ate and ultimately violent way. Using her police identification, roleplayer MA1 Jennifer Hannan made her way to the armory ready-for-issue room where she requested entry to retrieve her cell phone. Upon gaining access, she shoots one armorer and takes the other hostage. The duress alarm was sounded and a security force arrived to isolate the armory and establish communications with both the hostage-taker and the NAS Jax Emergency Operations Center (EOC). As the Incident Command Post was established near building 876, a radio request was made for an NCIS (Navy Criminal Investigative Service) hostage negotiator. Sgt. Dion Alexander led the fourman security force at the armory and engaged the hostage-taker in conserva tion until the negotiator arrived. Now is the right time to drop your weap on and let us get you some help just dont harm anybody else, implored Alexander. She responded, Sgt. Dion, my patience is wearing thin I must have OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder, an anxiety disorder) because I cant sit tight too long. Im not upset with you or your team, Sgt. Dion my beef is with the Navy. The hostage-taker then used her cell phone to call the base public affairs offi cer, as well as to post her situation on Facebook and Twitter but NCIS agents had anticipated that action and shut down her social media accounts. Alexander tried to assure her that the negotiator would arrive soon. Were doing whatever it takes to achieve a peaceful outcome here. Im positive that Security drill at police department armory 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012

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Eight retired Navy and Marine Corps aviators renewed their bonds of mili tary fellowship at NAS Jacksonville Oct. 24-25 at a mini-reunion of the Early and Pioneer Naval Aviators Association, better known as The Golden Eagles. Theyre considered the best of the best with some members whose combat missions began in World War II and with many of the rest logging flight hours over Vietnam, Bosnia and Iraq. Our organization perpetuates the spirit of excellence and achievement among notable naval aviators, said USMC Col. Gary VanGysel (250 combat missions, Navy Commendation Medal (V) and 23 Air Medals). After 28 years with the Marine Corps and 18 years with Boeing, aviation will always be in my blood. Talking with these JOs and young Sailors is very energizing for our group thats why youll some 82-year-old pilots still climbing around airplanes and helicop ters today. VanGysel was pleased to tour two of the Navys newest aircraft the P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft and the MH-60R Seahawk anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare helicopter. It reminds me of the Navys transi tion to the F/A-18 Hornet, when digi tal instrumentation and controls were first developed. The way in which train ing tracks have evolved since we were young officers is also very interesting especially the computer based training and high fidelity flight simulators, said VanGysel. Jacksonville resident Rear Adm. Mike Johnson (180 combat missions, two Distinguished Flying Crosses and 15 air medals) was recently inducted as a member of The Golden Eagles. Needless to say, its a huge honor to be associated with such a distinguished group of aviators. For my 33-year career to be recognized by this group of mostdecorated naval aviators is really spe cial. And the hospitality weve been shown by commands at NAS Jax is out standing. What really impressed us is the leading role that this installation is playing in transitions to new naval avia tion platforms, said Johnson. The P-8A Poseidon, MH-60R Seahawk, MQ-8B Fire Scout and MQ-4C Triton show how truly integrated Navy warfighters have become. Our eye in the sky unmanned aerial vehicles will extend the sensor and intelligence range of manned aircraft, in order to increase our capabilities despite reduced manpower. It makes sense to have the training and operations for both the Poseidon and Triton (Broad Area Maritime Surveillance vehicle) platforms here at NAS Jax. We also toured the P-8A Integrated Training Center and saw how VP-16 was approaching the end of their training cycle and will soon be the Navys first operational Poseidon squadron, said Johnson. Retired Navy Captain and for mer astronaut Bob Crippen (Congressional Space Medal of Honor and Distinguished Flying Cross) flew on four Space Shuttle missions aboard Columbia and Challenger, including three as commander. As a naval avia tor, I flew the A-4 Skyhawk, a very capa ble ground-attack aircraft, until join ing NASA in 1969. I spent a lot of my time with the space program working on computer systems and simulators, said Crippen. The computer-based training sys tems that we checked out today at the P-8A Integrated Training Center show how quickly technology advances. The simulator visual displays for the Poseidon and the Seahawk are state-ofthe-art and well advanced from any thing we used in NASA. Im glad to see that our naval aviators are training on the best equipment available. Other distinguished participants at The Golden Eagles mini-reunion included: Former Vice CNO Adm. Stan Arthur (500 combat missions, 11 Distinguished Flying Crosses and 51 air medals); Vice Adm. John Lockard (300 combat mis sions, Distinguished Flying Cross and 32 air medals); Rear Adm. Tom Watson (75 combat missions, two Distinguished Flying Crosses, Bronze Star and seven air medals); Capt. Roger Sheets (280 combat missions, nine Distinguished Flying Crosses, three Bronze Stars and 26 air medals); and Col. Bill Huffcut (1,000 combat missions, Navy Cross, three Distinguished Flying Crosses, three Purple Hearts and 50 air medals Founded in 1956, The Golden Eagles function as a living memorial to those early naval aviators who pioneered the development of this unique military aviation force. Membership is limited to 200 regular members. Qualifications remain highly restrictive. In order to perpetuate the spirit of the earliest members, selection for membership is made from those are pioneers in some new aspect of naval aviation or who are respected by their peers for their outstanding skills as a pilot, their wide experience, good judgment, personal character and dedication to flying. Golden Eagles land at NAS Jax JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 11

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While on detachment, Combat Aircrew (CAC) 3 from VP-8 Fighting Tigers took part in a bilateral exercise with the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) VP-3 Sea Eagles, Oct. 16-18. The exercise focused on improving tactical com munication and coor dination between the squadrons and consisted of a static aircraft display where both squadrons were invited onboard to tour the aircraft followed by a coordinated anti-sub marine warfare flight. Ive been fortunate to have worked with VP-2 Odin during an exer cise in Misawa and now the Sea Eagles in Atsugi. Both experiences have been great. The squad rons have tremendous knowledge and skill, and provide valuable train ing experiences for our aircrew, said Lt. Daniel Kuriluk, VP-8 plane com mander, who had worked with the JMSDF before and was again impressed with their skill and profes sionalism. The Sea Eagles hosted a number of social events during CAC 3s detach ment including a soccer match and cookout. The soccer match was held on Oct.17 and due to the large turnout, four teams were formed and a tour nament ensued. Teams were divided evenly and consisted of both Japanese and U.S. mem bers. Afterwards the Sea Eagles presented the win ning team with a certifi cate and sticker from their Atsugi Soccer Club. The soccer matches were a lot of fun, said AWO2 Amanda Sullivan. The Japanese are such good hosts and a lot of fun to be around. Following the conclu sion of the soccer match es the Sea Eagles invited the Fighting Tigers to a cookout. Hot dogs and hamburgers were served, while members of both squadrons exchanged patches, hats, and other gifts while having the chance to interact prior to the exercise. It was great being able to interact with the Sea Eagles on both a per sonal and then a profes sional level, said AWV2 Daniel DOrsi. You could tell friendships had been formed over just a few days which made working together during the exer cise a lot more enjoyable. On the last day of the detachment prior to the final flight both squad rons had one last oppor tunity to send crewmem bers to tour the other squadrons aircraft. Crewmembers enjoyed learning about the simi larities and differences between the two aircraft. I would like to thank VP-8 for their participa tion in these exercise, said Lt. Sato, JMSDF plane commander. It is great to have the opportunity to work together and accom plish a common goal. VP-8 conducts exercise with Japanese squadron 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012

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DEWEYSCall 542-3521 Deweys is now open! Deweys is located in Bldg. 608 between Gillis St. and Keily St. off of Enterprise Ave. Deweys offers a full service menu, bar and a friendly atmo sphere that is great for all ages! Monday Friday 10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 10 p.m. Monday, Tuesday & Friday 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Wednesday Thursday 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m. Monday Pizza madness 2 9 p.m. One-topping pizza for only $5 Free Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Thurs. at 7 p.m. Friday social hour, 7 9 p.m., $.50 wings & $7.95 pizza your way -chicken and extra cheese additional charge NFL Ticket Sunday 12:30 9 p.m., $.50 wingsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling, shoe rental included.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, con tact Melissa Luehrs at 5423518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor pool Open for lap swimming Monday Friday 5:30 8 a.m. & 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Recreational swimming Monday Friday 4:30 8 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Kennedy Space Center Adult $40, child $35.50 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $31 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 MOSH $7 $12 Blue Man Group in Orlando Special until March 31, adult $44, child $29, military $29 Upcoming ITT Trips: Lakeridge Winery Nov. 10 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4day hopper $153.25 Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31, 2013 and must be redeemed by June 30, 2013. Ask about our special discount ed tickets for family members. Gator Bowl tickets $35 Gator Bowl Patch $9 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1-day $29.50, 2-day $40, Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off prop erty hotels near attractions at ITT. Daytona 500 Feb. 24, 2013 tick ets on sale now! $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Paintball Trip GTF in Yulee Nov. 3 at 9 a.m. Free Jaguars vs. Lions game Nov. 4 at 11:30 a.m. Free Jaguars vs. Colts game Nov. 8 at 6:30 p.m. Florida Gators Football Game Nov. 10Free admission and transportation NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Nov. 13 & 27 for active duty Nov. 15 & 29 for retirees & DoD personnel Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holi days. Turkey Trot Killer Scramble Nov. 21 at noon $50 entry fee, $60 for civilian guests Four-person scrambleMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recre ation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more infor mation.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Oct. 29 Dec. 10 $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239, or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 13

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Past and present VP-16 War Eagles met Oct. 12 to learn about the future of the mari time patrol and reconnaissance force (MPRF) during the annual VP-16 reunion. About 120 for mer War Eagles made their way to NAS Jacksonville to reunite with old friends and share memories with former ship mates and current War Eagles. The group started their weekend being greeted by the entire squadron in formation at Hangar 511. Seeing the whole squadron in formation like that meant a lot to us. It was very impres sive, said Dan Adcock, a for mer member of VP-16. Following introductions, War Eagles of the past were given tours of a P-3C Orion and a P-8A Poseidon by the War Eagles of today. VP-16 is cur rently training to be the Navys first operational squadron to transition to the new P-8A air craft. This was the 15th annual reunion of former War Eagles, some from as far away as California. The reunion is held in a different city each year, but the members were very excited to return to Jacksonville this time to learn about the future of the MPRF community. They also took part in a trip to St. Augustine over the weekend. Veteran War Eagles also host ed a dinner that included cur rent members of the command. The guest speaker was Cmdr. Molly Boron, commanding offi cer of VP-16. She focused on the similarities and differences between the transition from the P-2V Neptune to the P-3A in 1964 and the current transi tion to the P-8A. Many of the attending veterans were part of VP-16 during the earlier transi tion to the P-3A. During dinner, the group also presented an award to Bill Creel, who was a VP-16 plank owner when the squadron was first established in 1953. Having this type of event left an emotional mark on all involved from the tears shed during the initial formation to the sense of family and tradi tion felt by all who attended the dinner. I really learned a ton about our history and heritage, reflected Lt. Brad Zalud. I particularly enjoyed the sto ries they brought home from deployments. All in all, the message seemed to be, Once a War Eagle, always a War Eagle, no matter what plane we are flying. The VP-45 Pelicans sent a P-3C detachment to Mobile, Ala. to participate in the three-day VP-45 Association Reunion Oct. 20. The VP-45 Association is an organization dedicated to former and current members of VP-45 by providing an avenue for shipmates to re-establish friend ships and preserve squadron history. The association holds a reunion every two years at various locations through out the United States. Getting together at these reunions promotes camaraderie and provides a great way to reconnect and stay in touch with old friends and shipmates, said retired Lt. Cmdr. Doug Mitchel, president of the VP-45 Association. Many of us voice the opinion that these squadron reunions are much more fun and rewarding than high school or college reunions we have attended. The VP-45 commanding officer, executive officer and command master chief all joined a full combat air crew for the VP-45 Reunion Banquet Dinner. It was a great experience for our members to participate in the banquet dinner, said VP-45 CMDCM Tom Ayers. It allowed them to learn about our squadron history first hand from people who lived it. We now all have a greater sense of honor knowing we will represent all former and current members of the World Famous Pelicans on our upcoming 7th Fleet deployment. The VP-45 Association is already planning for their 2014 reunion. Check the association website at http://www.vp45association.org for more information. War Eagles of the past return for glimpse of MPRF future VP-45 Pelicans hold reunion 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012

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Ribbon cutting events were held Oct. 15 for the inau guration of the newly con structed schools at Mandarin and Ecole Pont Gaudin, both located within the Artibonite Department of Haiti in or near the City of Gonaives as part of U.S. Southern Commands Humanitarian Assistance Program (HAP) in Haiti. This was great timing to ensure that the facilities were ready for the new school year, said Cmdr. Dewayne Roby, the U.S. Navys officer in charge of the construction projects. The children were very excited to see their new schools. The schools are located with in larger community cluster projects that include commu nity centers, medical clinics, wells, latrines and hand wash stations, in addition to the sixclassroom school at Ecole Pont Gaudin and the five-classroom school at Mandarin. Speaking at the ceremonies were representatives of the International Development Bank and Fond DAssistance Economique et Sociale (FAES), who provided the furniture for outfitting the schools; Cmdr. Richter Tipton, who represent ed the United States Embassy and U.S. Southern Command; along with Haitian govern ment representatives from the Ministry of Education, the Artibonite Department and the City of Gonaives. Also in attendance were representatives from USAID; Palgag Building Technologies (the Israeli contractor who provided the design and con struction of the project); Cmdr. Dewayne Roby, the Resident Officer in Charge of Construction Haiti with Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast; Sgt. 1st Class Roland Laforest, the U.S. Southern Command HAP Program Manager, who was also the interpreter for the ceremonies. The children sang a wel coming song and presented flowers and a personal thank you to Tipton as well as to the International Development Bank and the Minister of Education representative at each ceremony. The ceremonies drew a large showing of support from both the schools and local commu nities, stated Roby. These contracts, along with the remaining Humanitarian Assistance Program contracts throughout Haiti, were awarded by Naval Facilities Engineering Command in Jacksonville, Fla. and administered by Roby with acquisition and engineer ing support provided from NAVFACs Jacksonville office. U.S. Southern Commands HAP will provide a total of nine emergency operations centers and disaster relief warehouses, eight community clusters and fourteen fire stations in loca tions throughout Haiti. The program is designed to assist the people of Haiti in building and sustaining their capacity to prepare for and respond to disasters, while pro viding basic facilities which can help provide education, medi cal care and other services to the Haitian people. Ribbon cutting event opens new schools in Haiti It was the perfect day for the NAS Jax Monster Dash Oct. 26 as 203 runners turned out to participate in the 5K run. The event was coordinated by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department (MWR). Placing first overall and first in the mens 30-34 category was Jeremy Judernatz with a time of 18:13. Naketa George took first in the womens 30-34 cat egory and was the first female to cross the finish line with a time of 24:40. Due to techni cal difficulties with the timing equipment, many of the times were not recorded. Other winners were: The event was sponsored by American Allied University and the University of Phoenix. The next run will be the annu al Turkey Trot Nov. 16 at 11:30 a.m. For more information, call 542-3239/3518. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, spon sor or its products or services. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 Can you imagine life without the Internet? For most of us, the Internet is essential to almost every aspect of our life. We use email to communicate at work. We attend virtual meetings and trainings. We keep in touch with loved ones across the world. The Internet allows us to look up the answer to any question in the blink of an eye and download that song we just cant get out of our head. But for many people, living the cyber dream can quickly turn into a nightmare that could cost thousands of dollars. Recently, the legal assistance offic es at NAS Jacksonville and NAVSTA Mayport have seen several clients who were notified by their Internet pro vider that their Internet Protocol (IP) address has been identified as a copy right infringer. The letter from the internet provider explains that some entity has filed a lawsuit alleging that a list of IP address es have infringed on the plaintiffs copyright by uploading or downloading a movie or program without permis sion. In most of these cases, the plain tiff sends a long list of IP addresses to various Internet providers and requests that those Internet providers release the personal identifying information asso ciated with each IP Address. For some people, this is the first time they realize that they may have downloaded some thing illegally. For other people, they realize that they should have secured their wireless router or uninstalled a file sharing program. Additionally, the IP address may be wrong and the cus tomer associated with that IP address may have never even downloaded any copyrighted material. Whichever the case, if you receive one of these letters, it is essential that you see an attorney as soon as possible. Whether you downloaded something without thinking, used a file sharing software (e.g. bit torrent, pirate bay, gnutella), or think your neighbor may have been mooching off of your router, you could be held liable for copyright infringement as a result of a download and ordered to pay the plaintiff dam ages. This means that, depending on the outcome of your case, you could be ordered to pay anywhere between $200 and $150,00. In addition, you could be ordered to pay the plaintiffs attorney fees and court costs. Even if you (or your mooching neigh bor) never actually downloaded the copyrighted material, release of your information by your Internet provider could lead to threats from the plaintiffs attorney(s) trying to get you to settle the case out of court for thousands of dol lars. However, you likely have several options in avoiding such a costly out come but your options will be severe ly limited if you delay in seeking legal advice once you receive the letter from your Internet provider. The letter from the Internet company usually informs you that the Internet company will release your name, address, and other information con nected with your IP address if you do not take action by a certain date. This is why it is essential to seek legal advice right away. You may be able to prevent your personal information from being released, which would prevent the plaintiff from linking the IP address to your name, phone number, and address. If the plaintiff does not have your name and address, the plaintiffs attor neys will not be able to scare you into settling the case (i.e. paying to have the plaintiff drop you as named defen dant in their lawsuit). The plaintiff will not be able to sue you for copyright infringement if they cannot name you as a defendant. Even if your informa tion does get released to the plain tiff, an attorney may be able to get the case dismissed. Finally, if you actually get served and summoned to appear in court, an attorney can help prove that you should not be held liable for infringement. Ultimately, you should not bury your head in the sand and hope the problem will go away. At the very least, you should seek the free legal advice of an attorney at your nearest Legal Assistance office. Although you should seek legal advice as soon as you receive such a letter from your Internet company, you can do much to avoid the cyber nightmare by thinking before you download. File sharing programs may seem like a great way to build your music collection or catch up on that sitcom episode you missed but much of this free enter tainment is copyrighted. This means that your free movie, song, or sitcom can end up costing you thousands of dollars if you are found guilty of copy right infringement. One rule of thumb is that, if it seems too good to be true, it probably is, so dont click download. Even if you are a cautious Internet user, you could be at risk if you dont secure your wireless network. If your network is unsecured, not only can your neighbors slow down your Internet, but they could download something ille gally. Most illegal actions committed online are first traced through the IP address. So, if you cant prove that your neighbor downloaded something ille gally and not you, you may be on the hook for your neighbors actions. For whatever reason, many people think that their actions online are private. If there is one thing you take away from this article, remember that noth ing done online is private. Just as you would not steal a CD from a music store, you shouldnt download some thing without permission. If you secure your wireless router and think before you click, you can live the cyber dream without exposing yourself to a cyber nightmare. If you have any other questions, please contact your local legal assistance office as follows: NAS Jacksonville at 542-2565, Ext. 3006; NAVSTA Mayport at 270-5445, Ext. 3017 or NSB Kings Bay, Georgia at (912) 5733935. This article is not intended to substi tute for the personal advice of a licensed attorney. The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) has revised its Price Match Policy for its Navy Exchanges (NEX) around the world. The NEX Price Match Policy guaran tees that NEXs will match any brick and mortar retailers advertised price within the local market area on any identical in-stock item. We want the NEX to be our custom ers choice for shopping, said Richard Dow, NEXCOM senior vice president, store operations. Revamping our NEX Price Match Policy gives our NEX cashiers more authority to match prices which will give an even greater customer service experience to our customers. NEX sales associates have the author ity to match an advertised price reduc tion up to $100. An NEX supervisor must authorize a price match over $100. Customers may ask for a price adjust ment at any cash register in the store. The advertised priced may be pre sented in the form of a printed ad or a mobile marketing device, such as a cell phone or smart phone, from a local competitor. Photographs of an item taken with a cell phone or smart phone will not be accepted. A NEX cashier will also accept a cus tomers verbal price challenge for an item with a price difference of $10 or less. Customers need not bring a copy of a competitors advertisement for items under $10. For items on the NEX web store, myNavyExchange.com, the NEX will visually verify the price of the item prior to matching the price. In addition, overseas NEXs will match the pricing of current mail order cata logs as well as web stores from Sears, J.C. Penney, Walmart and any other comparable commercial retailers with web stores. Freight charges, if applicable, are added to the competitors price. The NEX Price Match Policy does not apply to fine jewelry, automotive parts, automotive labor and service, gasoline and special orders. Double and triple coupons, clearance, percent and dollar off items, flea market sales, going out of business sales and commissary prices are also excluded from the NEX Price Match Policy. For more information on the NEX Price Match Policy, see your local NEX manager or https://www.mynavy exchange.com/command/customer_ service/p_policy.html. Beware of what you downloadThink before you clickNEXCOM changes its NEX price match policy

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More than 20 Sailors from VP-8 and Naval Air Facility Misawa took an overnight trip to Miyagi Prefecture, Oct. 19-20, to help the victims of the March 2011 tsunami that struck north eastern Japan. On a chilly 40-degree morning, Sailors gathered and loaded their bus for a six-hour ride down south to Minamisanrikucho. Upon arriving to their destination, they immediately disembarked their bus and headed out to work. The community relations project consisted of cleaning up a local farm roughly 5,000 square yards in size. We are helping them help them selves recover from the devastation the tsunami caused in the area, said ADC Roy Cedeo. I think the local population depends on the farms to subsist, and we are honored to have the opportuni ty to come out here and help our host nation in whatever way they need us. After a long day of work, Sailors spent the night in a local common house, and woke up early to continue the work they started. By mid-afternoon, the job was done and the fields were ready for planting. It was a lot of work, but we were happy to make a difference in this hard-hit area, said IT1 Lydale Hyde. I think its important that our Japanese brothers and sisters know they can count on us to lend a helping hand whenever its needed. Navy cancels Service Dress Khaki, announces Service Dress Blue lightweight fabric options NAVADMIN 314/12, released Oct. 19, announced the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) decision to termi nate the Service Dress Khaki (SDK) ini tiative. The NAVADMIN also reempha sized the optional wear of the Service Dress Blue (SDB) uniform as an accept able alternative during summer uni form wear periods when participating in events, ceremonies and meetings where wearing a coat and tie is appro priate and when other uniforms are not prescribed. The Navy continuously monitors Sailors uniform concerns and develops uniforms and design changes based on feedback received and research con ducted, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director, Military Personnel Plans and Policy. After May 2012 when the con temporary design for SDK was approved for optional wear, the Navy continued to conduct research with product ven dors and with the information gained and reviewed, the decision was made to cancel Service Dress Khaki. The Navy decided to terminate the SDK uniform as an optional uniform due to factors identified during a com prehensive uniform assessment. These factors included the evaluation of quan tities of SDK sets ordered/sold, wear test of several models evaluating qual ity, durability, appearance and fit, and estimated cost per uniform set to the individual. The NAVADMIN 314/12 also reaf firmed E-7 to O-10 personnel may wear the SDB as a suitable alternative for wear in lieu of summer white and ser vice dress white uniforms when a coat and tie is appropriate. SDB uniforms may be prescribed for wear year-round to all official functions (when formal dress, dinner dress, or full dress uniforms are not prescribed) and civilian equivalent dress is coat and tie. This uniform is available for purchase in a quality lightweight fabric. The Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department hosted Barktoberfest at the NAS Jacksonville Vet Treatment Facility Oct. 20. The beautiful fall day encour aged more than 50 participants and their dogs to attend the festivities. Patrons participated in a two-mile fun run, a pet costume contest and a family-themed costume contest. We do this for our patrons, espe cially the ones who live on the base since there are not a lot of events that occur over the weekends. We want to encourage our military families to par ticipate in fitness activities and to enjoy it! I would like to thank the commis sary Purina representative for donat ing all the great goodie bags and prizes for the event, said NAS Jax Fitness Coordinator Melissa Luhers. AT1 Jacin Kopitke added, This was a great family event. We really enjoyed the day as a family with our dog. The event concluded with an impres sive military working dog demonstra tion. For more information on upcoming fit ness events, call 542-4238. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government offi cially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or ser vices. Navy Misawa and VP-8 team up to help Japanese community Barktoberfest brings out the canines JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 17

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 The USO and partners will recognize Veterans Day with Grant a Wish for Our Heroes, an initiative that will give Americans opportunities to thank those who serve in the Armed Forces by granting wishes for our troops and their families by supporting them in a variety of ways. Grant a Wish for Our Heroes is a call to action for anyone who wants to take a moment and give back to our troops and military families in the ways theyve told us helps the most. USO offers concrete ways, big and small, to show our troops that Americans appreciate their service and sacrifice, said Sloan Gibson, president and CEO of the USO. For years, troops and fami lies have been telling the USO what programs and services they need the most through a comprehensive annual survey, Tell USO, and the USO has responded. Our programs help ease the stress of deployment for both troops and their loved ones. This Veterans Day, the USO asks Americans to help support these USO programs and initiatives that our troops have requested most: Holiday Boxes for Deployed TroopsMany deployed troops spend holidays away from their families. The USO helps bring a touch of home to troops with boxes containing decorations games, snacks, movies and themed items. Connecting Troops to Families Back HomeMissing the birth of your child may seem hard to imagine, but its a reality for many of our troops overseas. TheUSO has made it possible for some ofour mili tary dadsto witness the birth of their child, via Skype. This November, well also be help ing those dads send some spe cial itemshome to their new born and momso they can be a part of those first precious weeks of their childs life. Support Child HeroesHelp the USO provide the book Little CHAMPS (Child Heroes Attached to Military Personnel) to military fami lies in order to ease their chal lenges and fears of deployment, relocation and injury of a loved one. Education, Employment and Community Reintegration for our Wounded WarriorsUSO Warrior and Family Care provides Hire Heroes USA/ USO Workshops and Careers Opportunity Days for wound ed, ill and injured service men and women, their spouses and caregivers. Career Opportunity Days are in collaboration with Hire Heroes USA and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and offer our healing heroes, spouses and caregivers a nontraditional career fair where employers connect on a per sonal level based on interest and background. Employers conduct mock interviews and provide feedback, providing an additional level of support for transitioning troops to meet with employers offeringjobs. Corporations, media part ners and a variety of commu nity organizations have signed on to the USOs Grant a Wish for Our Heroes this Veterans Day include: American Airlines: American Airlines is proud to be the official airline of the USO, Honoring those who serve, Veterans Day 2012. aa.com/ military American Crew: American Crew has teamed up with the USO to honor our troops with the 2012 Military Limited Edition product line. ameri cancrew.com/militaryedition/ AOL: The USO will be fea tured as the Cause of the Day this Veterans Day on aol.com and will take over AOLs mail sign-in page for one day in November. Bass Pro Shops: Stop by a Bass Pro Shop and check out how Reelin It In For the Troops is supporting Operation USO Care Package. basspro.com/ Cheerios: For every code entered from specially marked Cheerios, Honey Nut Cheerios or MultiGrain Cheerios at Walmart, General Mills will donate $1 to the USO (up to $50,000). Additionally, con sumers can send messages of support to troops and their families through the digital USO Thanks from Everywhere platform. cheerios.com/uso CVS: CVS/pharmacy will once again hold a USO dona tion campaign as part of its flu shot program during the week of Veterans Day. cvs.com ESPN: This Veterans Day, ESPN partners with the USO to help lift the spirits of Americas troops and their families. Using its broad portfolio of multimedia assets, ESPN is driving awareness and action from November 4-11 by invit ing its viewers and consum ers to give a gift to our heroes through USO Wishbook an alternative giving catalog ben efiting troops and their fami lies. You can visit uso.org/espn beginning Nov. 4 to select a gift and learn more. Lockheed Martin: Lockheed Martin will donate $1 to the USO for every new Like of their facebook page, up to $25,000. facebook.com/lock heedmartin My Coke Rewards: Let our troops know they are not for gotten. Donate your My Coke Rewards points to the USO and help support Americas troops and their families. mycokere wards.com NFL: The NFL will support the USO with its annual Salute to Service campaign during the month of November through a fundraiser during games in Weeks 9 11 of the season. Fans can also help support this campaign through an online auction at nfl.com/salute start ing Nov. 1, 2012. Old Navy: Old Navy salutes military families this Veterans Day and is proud to partner with the USO on Operation Donation. To support our troops and their families, we are collecting donations in all U.S. Old Navy stores Nov. 8-12. (this language was approved and provided by Old Navy) old navy.com Wells Fargo: From Nov. 1 through Dec. 13, Wells Fargo customers will have the oppor tunity to make a donation of up to $249.99 when using their Wells Fargo card at their local ATMs. US states except Arkansas, Missouri, and the District of Columbia. wellsfar go.com. To learn more about Grant a Wish for Our Heroes, visit uso. org/grant-a-wish. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. we can negotiate a way out of this for you. She responded, Up until today, Ive been a good Sailor. I know Ill have a mark on my record after this, however, I can do the return to duty program. Its only fair that I do my time, then the Navy can go ahead and rehabilitate me. I want to continue my service honorably, just like I have for 11 years. When the NCIS crisis negotiator arrived, he reaffirmed, We want to get you back in the arms of your kids. The only response he received was the sharp retort of a pis tol. After 11 years of service, the hostage-taker was dead from her own firearm. NAS Jax Security Department Training Division Officer Maj. Jerry Syrek noted that police arriving at a hostage scene before a negotiator may be trained to use the ICER concept: Isolate Isolate the hostage zone, create an outer perimeter and keep onlookers beyond the police safety line. Contain Limit the mobility of the hostage-taker to the smallest area possible (the inner perimeter) and prevent him/ her from observing police activity. Evaluate Without causing any escalation, gather informa tion, including the number of hostage-takers and hostages, their appearance, weapons and so on. Report Report all available information gathered to inform other officers and the chain of command. DRILL The aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) received and refueled an MV-22 Osprey for the first time Oct. 6. Assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 165 a potential replacement for the C-2A Greyhound, the Osprey was the first from VMM165 to make a carrier landing. It was part of an on-going initiative from the Joint Program Manager Air (PMA) 275 office to increase the number of avail able platforms. This was a first for our squadron, said Capt. Patrick Johnson, of VMM165. We recently made the switch from helicopters to the Osprey, so it was a new experience for most of us. Johnson embarked Nimitz as a liaison between the pilots of the MV-22 and Nimitz primary flight control. As the subject matter expert, Johnson was able to provide the Nimitz crew with infor mation about the MV-22 to aid in the recovery of this aircraft. Since this was the first time the Osprey landed on Nimitz, though simi lar to standard Navy aircraft, there were some things the flight deck crew had to be mindful of. With the Osprey you have to be care ful because the down-wash [the air that comes from the aircrafts rotors] is a lot more than a helicopter, explained ABH2 Andre Taylor, a flight deck direc tor on board Nimitz. This aircraft has a larger landing area so we have to make sure anything around the landing area is secure and make sure everything is out of the way. Nimitz sent some of its flight deck crew to Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., for training on how to handle the Osprey. We were taught how to properly chock and chain the aircraft along with how to turn, taxi (move an aircraft without having to use a tractor or a tow bar), and stow it on the flight deck, said Taylor. Basically, we learned the insand-outs of the aircraft. We got inside all of the batteries and oxygen tanks and learned what to look for in case the aircraft crashes and how to pull the emergency door in case a fire broke out. This training played a key part in allowing the Osprey to make its first carrier-based landing on Nimitz and turned out to be a unique experience for the crew. We all took turns landing the air craft because it was something new that we had never seen, said ABH1 Ricardo Camposflores, a flight deck lead ing petty officer on board Nimitz who assisted with the Osprey landing. We all got a chance to learn something new from this landing. Landing the Osprey will be another memory Nimitz crew will be able to add to the long history of the ship. I will remember this experience for a long time, Taylor smiled. I was more excited than I was nervous. Its a dif ferent feeling. Most people dont get a chance to be a part of these experienc es. Early one morning in October 2007, BM1 Jim Castaneda suffered a stroke during muster aboard USS Tortuga (LSD 46). The stroke was entirely unexpected and, in a matter of moments, Castanedas life was forever changed. Shortly after arriving at Naval Medical Center San Diego for treatment, Castaneda was referred to Navy Wounded Warrior (NWW) Safe Harbor. His NWW non-medical care manager helped his fam ily navigate the various nonmedical issues from securing various payments and entitle ments, to providing advice on a home application, to access ing Veterans Affairs benefits that threatened to distract from Castanedas recovery. [NWW] is one of those pro grams that commands may have heard about but dont know too much about, said Castaneda. But once they know what it does and how it helps families and severely injured Sailors they will appre ciate it. Indeed, only one-quarter of enlisted Sailors and less than one-half of naval officers are aware of Commander Navy Installations Commands Navy Wounded Warrior Safe Harbor program and the ser vices it provides. Yet, it is among the most important resources available to Navy families. Illness or injury can strike at any time. When they do, NWW can clear away the clutter and allow service members to focus on whats most important get ting well. NWW tailors support to each wounded warriors recovery, rehabilitation and reintegra tion needs. Its team of experts addresses pay and personnel issues, child and youth care, transportation and housing needs, education and train ing benefits, and much more. The programs goal is to return wounded warriors to duty, but when thats not possible, it works collaboratively with federal agencies and partner organizations to ensure their successful reintegration back into their communities. NWW will address virtually any problem that surfaces dur ing a wounded warriors recov ery process, said NWW direc tor Capt. Steve Hall. NWW non-medical care managers provides enrollees a shoulder to lean on, a help ing hand, an ear to listen and encouraging words. They act as advocates when service mem bers need one most. NWW enrollment is not lim ited to service members who have been wounded in combat operations or shipboard and training accidents. It also is available to those affected by serious illness like Castaneda or liberty accidents. November marks Warrior Care Month, a time to recog nize wounded warriors, as well as their caregivers, for their service, sacrifices, and achievements. This years theme, Success through Transition, high lights the many ways wound ed warriors and their families thrive after illness and injury on active duty, on the playing field, in the classroom, or on the job. This month, Adm. Cecil Haney, commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, will host the first-ever Wounded Warrior Pacific Trials at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam and the University of Hawaii Nov. 1217. More than 50 serious ly wounded, ill and injured Sailors and Coast Guardsmen from across the country including Castaneda will compete for a place on the 2013 Warrior Games Navy-Coast Guard team. NWW encouraged Castaneda to get involved in adaptive athletics several years ago, and it has had a tremen dously positive impact on his life. He says, Everyone [com peting in adaptive athletics] seems seven feet tall larger than life. I feel like superman. I can do anything now. Sailors and their families are urged to take time during Warrior Care Month to honor and support our wounded war riors. They can refer a service member to the program who has experienced serious illness or injury by calling 855-NAVY WWP (628-9997). MV-22 Osprey flight ops tested on board USS Nimitz Navy Wounded Warrior: A critical resource for SailorsUSO and partners invite Americans to Grant a Wish for Our Heroes

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jacksonville officials traveled to Washington, D.C. Oct. 18 where they received the 2012 Federal Energy and Water Management Award recognizing their outstand ing contributions in the areas of energy efficiency, water conserva tion, and the use of advanced and renewable energy technologies at federal facilities. NAS Jacksonville completed the largest utility energy service con tract project to date in the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast Region reducing its energy intensity by four percent and water consumption by 24 per cent from the prior year during only four months of operation in FY 2011. This is equal to savings of 34 billion Btu of energy and 79 million gallons of water, respectively. The $17.3 million project audited more than 30 facilities and incorporated numerous upgrades including air handler unit ultraviolet lights, More than 18 months after the commencement of pre-deployment workups, the HSL-42 Detachment 10 Night Furies returned home Oct. 31. The dual-aircraft detachment was embarked on board the Norfolk-based destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG 95), in support of the USS Enterprise Carrier Strike Group during the aircraft carriers final deployment in its storied 51-year history. The detachment, led by Lt. Cmdr. Christopher Conlon and AEC Michael Smith, successfully executed more than 1,400 mishap-free flight hours since standing up in March 2011. Lt. Hector Ferrell, Lt. Benjamin ONeill, and AWR2 Amado Vazquez, each earned the coveted 1,000 Sikorsky H-60 flight-hour benchmark during the Energy, water management award goes to NAS Jax HSL-42 Detachment 10 returns from deployment On March 10, all seven HS-11 Dragonslayer helicopters departed Jacksonville and began the flight north to NS Norfolk, Va. to join USS Enterprise (CVN 65) for her final deployment. The next day, the carrier departed NS Norfolk to begin operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). The squadron began their deployment on a high note by rescuing an Enterprise Sailor who had fallen over board. During the transit through the Strait of Gibraltar, HS-11 provided anti-terrorism force protection (ATFP) and surface surveillance control (SSC) for the carrier. The Dragonslayers also supported the first of many successful photo exercises during this historic final deployment. At the end of March the squadron was in Athens, Greece for its first port visit. After departing Athens, the squadron provided an ATFP alert for the strike groups Suez Canal transit. Following the transit, the squadron began flying plane guard and SSC for the strike group while the air wing flew in support of OEF. Coupled with supporting OEF, HS-11 also performed many vertical replenish ment (VERTREP) operations where they delivered over 353 tons of cargo to keep the USS Enterprise (CVN 65) fully supplied. The carrier conducted 10 Strait of Hormuz tran sits throughout deployment during which the Dragonslayers provided armed ATFP and SSC. HS-11 HS-11 Dragonslayers home from historic deployment NAS Jax best in Southeast RegionWill now compete at CNIC levelFor the second consecutive year, Commander, Navy Region Southeast selected NAS Jacksonville as the nominee for the Commander, Naval Installation Command (CNIC) Installation Excellence Award. The station was also the recipient of last years CNIC Installation Excellence Award and Presidential Installation Excellence Award. It will now go on to compete with 76 other instal lations for the CNIC Installation Excellence Award. I am very pleased to announce that NAS Jacksonville and NSA Panama City have been selected as our nominees for large and small installations respectively for the FY-12 CNIC Installation Excellence Award, said Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. Our cross-functional panel of experts consid ered excellent packages from all of our installa tions. NAS Jacksonville and NSA Panama City submitted the best packages in their respective categories, demonstrating how they exceeded the criteria set forth by the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense to support the Fleet, Fighter and Family. NAS Jacksonville sustained excellence in a wide range of operational and warfighter readiness support functions, better mission perfor mance and superb quality of life for military men and women and their families, and community outreach program set it apart from 17 other Southeast installations. The nomination exemplified the total commitment to excellence by its military and civilian personnel and sets the air installation as one of the contenders for the CNIC Award. In a message to base personnel, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders said, Congratulations! You have been named the best large installation in the Southeast Region. You truly are the best at what you do and I want to personally thank you. I cannot tell you how proud I am to be a part of this outstanding organization! When asked to explain the reason for their success, Sanders remarked, The contributions of every person military, DoD civilian and contractor is valued. We are truly one team, one fight in pursuit of excellence and support to the Fleet, Fighter and Family. With the mission of supporting the fleet, fighter and family, NAS Jax is the premier installation for delivering effective, sustained and improved shore readiness for Sailors, their families and civilian employees. Base personnel worked around the clock providing services to 14 home-based squadrons, numerous detachments, joint commands, gov ernment agencies and carrier strike group exer cises. Air Operations handled more than 52,600 flight operations and supported 30 detachments. The award-winning air installation continued its unprecedented and accident-free growth in fiscal year 2012 (FY12) by exceeding the Chief of Naval Operations mandated 75 percent mishap reduction goal in addition to being almost 60 percent below the industry guidelines for days-away restricted time established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. In partnership with 110 tenant commands, station personnel provided support and service to transition the P-3C Orion to the P-8A Poseidon; HS to HSM, logistic and reserve squadrons, joint services and allies. The station also completed or started con struction on nearly $100 million of construction in support of the P-8A as well as the Triton and Fire Scout helicopter unmanned aerial systems. Achieving the Secretary of the Navys gold level of achievement for energy savings, NAS Jax installed 1,140 square-feet of solar panels bringing the total to 5,500 saving approximately $300,000 annually. NAS Jacksonville looks forward to compet ing at the CNIC level. The winner of the CNIC Installation Excellence Award will be nominated for the Commander in Chiefs Annual Award for Installation Excellence. Established in 1984, the award recognizes the outstanding efforts of personnel in the opera tions and maintenance of U.S. military installations worldwide.

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Nov. 1 1841 Mosquito Fleet command ed by Lt. Cmdr. J. T. McLaughlin, carries 750 Sailors and Marines into the Everglades to fight the Seminole Indians. 1941 President Franklin D. Roosevelt places Coast Guard under jurisdiction of Department of the Navy for duration of national emergency. 1967 Operation Coronado IX began in Mekong Delta. 1979 Beginning of retirement of Polaris A-3 program begins with removal of missiles from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Last Polaris missile removed in February 1982. Nov. 2 1943 In Battle in Empress Augusta Bay, U.S. cruisers and destroyers turn back Japanese forces trying to attack transports off Bougainville, Solomons. 1968 Operation Search Turn begins in Mekong Delta. Nov. 3 1853 USS Constitution seizes suspected slaver H. N. Gambrill. 1931 Dirigible USS Los Angeles makes 10-hour flight from NAS Lakehurst, N.J., carrying 207 passen gers, establishing a new record for the number of passengers carried by a sin gle lighter-than-air craft. 1943 Battleship Oklahoma (BB-37) sunk at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941 is refloated. 1956 USS Cambria (APA-36) removes 24 members of United Nations Truce Commission team from the Gaza Strip. 1956 USS Chilton (APA-38), USS Thuban (AKA-19), and USS Fort Snelling (LSD-30) evacuate more than 1,500 U.S. and foreign nationals from Egypt and Israel because of the fighting. 1961 After Hurricane Hattie, heli copters from USS Antietam (CV-36) begin relief operations at British Honduras providing medical personnel, medical supplies, general supplies and water. Nov. 4 1967 Landing craft from USS Navarro (APA-215) rescue 43 men from British SS Habib Marikar aground on a reef at Lincoln Island in the Tonkin Gulf. 1971 USS Nathaniel Greene (SSBN636) launches a Poseidon C-3 missile in first surface launch of Poseidon missile. Nov. 5 1775 Commodore Esek Hopkins appointed to Commander in Chief of the Continental Navy. 1915 In an AB-2 flying boat, Lt. Cmdr. Henry Mustin makes first underway catapult launch from a ship, USS North Carolina, at Pensacola Bay, Fla. 1917 German submarine torpe does the yacht USS Alcedo (SP-166) off French coast. She was the first American vessel lost in World War I. 1923 Tests designed to prove the feasibility of launching a small sea plane from a submarine take place at Hampton Roads Naval Base. A Martin MS-1, stored disassembled in a tank on board submarine USS S-1, was removed and assembled. Then the submarine submerged allowing the plane to float free and take off. 1944 TF 38, under Commanding Officer Vice Admiral John S. McCain begins two days of carrier strikes on Luzon, Philippines. 1945 Ensign Jake West (VF-41) makes first jet landing on board a car rier, USS Wake Island (CVE-65) Nov. 6 1851 U.S. Navy expedition under command of Lt. William Lewis Herndon, on a mission to explore the valley of the Amazon and its tributaries, reaches Iquitos in the jungle region of the upper Amazon after their departure from Lima, Peru. 1941 On Neutrality Patrol, USS Omaha (CL-4) and USS Somers (DD381) intercept the German blockade runner Odenwald disguised as U.S. freighter, board her after the German crew abandoned the ship, and brought the ship to San Juan, Puerto Rico, where the boarding party was awarded sal vage shares. 1942 First officer and enlisted women from training schools report for shore duty around the USA. For several mornings in a row recently, I woke to the same conversation coming from the landing outside my bedroom: Owen, get my back. Get my back! Got it. The enemys on my tail. Hard right! Hard right! I see him. Im locking in. Got em. Theres another one. Locking in. Hes on my tail. The boys were playing a Nintendo Wii game called World War II Aces. Using the handheld remote, they led historic aircraft through maneuvers on famed missions. Even Lindell, 5, was learning pilot talk. The first time I saw him use his hands to demonstrate how a plane banked left I knew it was time to show them Top Gun. (Well, not all of Top Gun Id fast-forward through the amorous scenes.) I put the DVD in the player, and when the title screen came on, the first notes of Kenny Loggins iconic Danger Zone playing against the whistle and wind of jet noise, the entire 1980s washed over me. I felt like I might even smell the old perm in my hair. The boys stared at the television, their mouths hanging open. This is when I knew they needed some background information. I paused the DVD. Okay, first, I said, you should know that this is what I grew up with. Pop, your grandfather, was an F-14 pilot. What youre about to see is what he did for work when I was a kid. He even went to the famous Top Gun school. Pop? Owen said, the corners of his mouth turning up in a smile. My Pop? Lindell asked. Yes. But theres more. I reminded the boys of the aircraft carriers I grewup on and around in Norfolk, Virginia. Youre going to see an aircraft carrier in this movie. Its the same one your dad was on during his first deployment. He and Pop were actually on it together at one point. The boys minds had just been blown. As I realized that I had even more to tell them, I wondered what took me so long to show them this movie. Can we watch now? Ford asked. I pushed play and said what I thought was an aside, Also, people say the main character, Maverick, looks a lot like your dad. Owen put his hand over his mouth. Does Maverick die? I dont want to watch if Maverick dies. Thats when I remembered that Goose dies. I was having second thoughts. But the other boys were already enthralled with the F-14 catapulting off the flight deck. I cant imagine Pop flying that, Ford said. Yeah, I cant imagine an old man flying that plane, Lindell said. I laughed. Well, he wasnt old back then, I said. After Maverick landed his plane and took off his helmet, the boys gasped. He does look like Dad, Ford said. I cant watch this if he dies, Owen said. The boys stood to get closer to the screen. His mouth, it looks just like Dad, Lindell said. And that expression, Ford yelled, pointing at the screen. That, right there, looks just like him. It became difficult to follow the storyline because the boys had so many questions: Was I born when Pop went to Top Gun? No. Has Dad (Dustin) ever rescued pilots out of the water in the helicopter? Yes. Did I ever ride in an F-14? No. But I did watch Pop break the sound barrier once. Then the scene came where Goose dies. The room grew quiet. On the screen, Maverick packed up Gooses belongings and took them to Meg Ryan, who played Gooses wife. I dont think I can watch this, Owen said. Owen, Ford sighed. The one who died doesnt look like dad. Still, Owen said. So many things in the Navy are dangerous. I mean, Goose was just practicing and he died. I had no good response for this. All I could do was nod and push the hair away from Owens forehead. Next, there were ewws and fake vomiting when Maverick and Charlie (Kelly McGillis) kissed on screen. This seemed to replace all the heavy thoughts from before. The boys went to bed and said very little more about Top Gun. The next day, however, all those sto ries I had told them, having percolated overnight, grew and become distorted. I overheard Owen telling a neighbor, My Pop went to Top Gun and was the best fighter pilot that ever lived. He breaks the sound barrier all the time. He was better than Tom Cruise. Hey, Old Man, youre welcome. The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now sell ing tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Nov. 4, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Detroit Lions (Tickets on sale Oct. 22) Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jags vs. Indianapolis Colts (Tickets on sale Oct. 29) Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eli gible to purchase/use these tickets. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, My boys first experience with Top Gun Jacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO

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The Tridents of VP-26 recently hosted members of the gold crew from USS Alaska (SSBN 732), a ballistic missile submarine home ported at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. Cmdr. Mark Sohaney, executive officer of VP-26, greet ed Alaska Commanding Officer Cmdr. Robert Wirth and Executive Officer Lt. Cmdr. Brian Earp, along with sev eral others from the submarines wardroom. After the submariners traded their coveralls for flight suits, the group departed on a crew training flight aboard a P-3C Orion. A crew training fight (CTF) is designed to stimulate scenarios for the crew to retain proficiency in real-world mission requirements. Throughout the flight, the sub mariners observed how a patrol plane crew operates on typical missions. The visitors were also able to take turns sitting in the pilot and copilot seats flying the aircraft. While the CTF was underway, others from the crew of the Alaska were taken to the P-3C simulator building where they received a tour of the spaces. The visitors were given a chance to experience flying the full-motion simulator under the guidance and supervision of Lt. Cmdr. John Wickham, VP-26s operations officer. The visiting crew had the opportunity to fly approaches to an airfield both in the clear skies and in poor weather conditions. After the Alaska crewmembers experienced flying under normal conditions, Wickham demonstrated com bat descents onto a hostile airfield and finally, the difficulty of flying an approach under emergency conditions, such as an engine failure. The officers of the crew were then escorted to the tactical operational readiness trainer (TORT) to observe a combat aircrew conduct an anti-submarine warfare (ASW) mission. The officers got a glimpse of the crew coordination necessary to search, track and attack an enemy target. The trainer has stations for every member of the tactical team, including the acoustic operators, radar operator, in-flight technician, navigator and tactical coordinator. The unique TORT trainer allows the crew to train to complex scenarios that are impossible to simulate in the actual aircraft. The gold crew met with Capt. Eric Weise, commodore of Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11, who expressed his interest in continuing to host members of the sub marine community here at NAS Jacksonville. Wirth extended an offer to host a tour of the submarine Alaska for aviators to expand the knowledge of U.S. submarine capabilities. After lunch at the golf course, the crew was given a full tour of the P-3C Orion, followed by a brief on the capa bilities of the aircraft. The crew was also given a look at the future of the maritime patrol community, the P-8A Poseidon, which is scheduled to replace the P-3C over the coming years. Wirth called the tour excellent and informative as he and Sohaney exchanged autographed photos of their respective platforms before departing. The Alaska and VP-26 will continue to look for opportunities to exchange knowledge and strengthen ties among the Navys warfighting communities. The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 took part on a coordinated anti-submarine warfare (ASW) exercise with the Warlords of HSL-51 while on detach ment to NAF Atsugi, Japan. The Warlords are the U.S. Navys only for ward deployed Sikorsky SH-60B/F Seahawk LAMPS Mk III helicop ter squadron. Home ported at NAF Atsugi, the Warlords provide combat-ready armed anti-surface and antisubmarine helicopter detachments to ships deploying in the Korea, Western Pacific and Arabian Gulf regions, as well as executive trans port for Commander, U.S. 7th Fleet home ported in Yokosuka, Japan. This exercise focused on improving multiplat form communication and coordination during ASW prosecutions while work ing in a dynamic envi ronment. Its always great to work with a different platform, especially one as versatile as the P3, said Lt. Andrew Lathrop, a helicopter aircraft commander for HSL-51. It was a great experience. We definitely look to for ward to doing more of this in the future. At the conclusion of the exercise the squad rons arranged a reception at Atsugi Air Base where the crews interacted and shared the experiences gained from the mis sion. Cmdr. David Loo, HSL-51 commanding officer, showed his appreciation by offering to take VP-8 crewmembers on a low level training flight around the city of Tokyo in a SH-60B Seahawk helicopter. The flight consisted of an hour-long trip and offered the crewmembers a unique way of experiencing the area of Japan surrounding Tokyo. I had never been to Tokyo and to see it like that was amazing, said Lt. Chris Powell of VP-8 after the flight. I want to thank Cmdr. Loo and all of HSL-51 for their out standing work during the exercise, and the once in a lifetime experience afforded to us today. The Fighting Tigers are on a six-month deploy ment in support of U.S. 7th Fleet.VP-8 conducts training exercise with HSL-51 VP-26 Tridents play host to submariners JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 It was an exciting day in the culinary arts for NAS Jacksonville, as Food Network Chef and Restaurant: Impossible star Chef Robert Irvine displayed his cooking prowess at the Flight Line Caf on Oct. 24. With a galley full of resources and a crew of culinary spe cialists (CS) at his disposal, Irvine set about bringing to life his version on one of the most basic, yet favorite meals of Americans: Pizza. The event, sponsored by the NAS Jax Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) and Lighthouse Foods (a company that distributes some of Irvines line of foods), was put together as a fun training event for the CSs at the Flight Line Caf. Its really great to have Chef Irvine here to provide creative training to our crew, com mented CWO4 Teresa Culliper, food service officer of the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf. Not only is he here to promote training, but he is making a full set of pizzas that will be served to base personnel for lunch. Irvine began by assigning members of his own cooking crew and other CSs to make homemade pizza dough and sauce. He also took the time to mentor Sailors with his inven tive cooking ideas. I thought it was a great experience for everyone. Its exciting to meet such an experienced culinary profes sional who is also has his own cooking show, said CS2 Ray Johnson of the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf. As both the dough and sauce neared completion, a different twist was applied to the event: a friendly pizza making com petition. Splitting up the CSs into four teams, Irvine briefed the Sailors on exactly how the rules would work. From the time you get your pizza dough, youll have 30

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 5 CHEFminutes to come up with an idea for an original pizza. Get creative, but keep it simple. You should be able to come up with something that is both tasty and healthy. I dont wanna see just red sauce, cheese and peppero ni, Irvine stated. As the Sailors went to work, the tension in the kitchen was high as they rushed to complete their pizza ideas within the allotted time. In the meantime, the Flight Line Caf assembled a team of four judges, including Irvine, his wife, Gail Kim, President of Lighthouse Foods Billy Hashey and FLC Executive Officer Cmdr. Tom Dailey. Thirty minutes seemed like 10, but each team finished their piz zas with flying colors and present ed them to the judges panel. As the judges munched on the platters served to them, they evaluated each team based on taste and creativ ity. Ultimately, the team from the NS Mayport Oasis Galley claimed first place, its members being CS2 Peter Torres, CS2 Jeremy Smith, and CSC Wayne Rickerson. Their pizza included a fantastic combination of spinach, onion, bacon, basil and scrambled eggs, lightly topped with cayenne pepper. After the awards were presented and Irvine took photos with all the CSs who competed. He closed by saying, I was a cook in the Royal Navy for 10 years, and I know how important what all of you do is to the morale and welfare of the military. Thank you for the effort and hard work, and for the service you provide everyday to the men and women who serve with you.Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 NAS Jax top Sailors recognizedNAS Jacksonville rec ognized 99 top Sailors from the base and tenant commands for the third quarter during the Sailor of the Quarter (SOQ) luncheon at the NAS Jax Officers Club Oct. 24. In the insanely hec tic operational tempo of todays Navy, we have over 321,000 Sailors serv ing through the world. We have 287 ships in service which 113 including four aircraft carriers and five big deck amphibious ships are currently underway and deploying in every area of responsibility in the world. Our objective is to project power for deterrence while sustaining the American way of life. And in a couple weeks you have the privilege of voting which many countries do not, said NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/ SW) Brad Shepherd. Today we continue with battles in Afghanistan, the withdrawal from Iraq, detainee operations in Guantanamo Bay and pirate operations in 5th Fleet, to name a few. However, today this event is about you our Sailors of the Quarter. You are the future of our Navy and today we are recognizing your accomplishments, he continued. MU2 Laura Carey of Navy Band Southeast per formed the national anthem and NAS Jacksonville Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore delivered the invocation. The events guest speaker was NAS Jax Senior Sailor of the Quarter AC1 Amarilys Torres. When I joined the Navy, I was looking for a family. And, I found it. I joined as an aviation support equipment technician it really wasnt the job I wanted. My goal was to be in the medical field but I ended up converting to air traffic controller. Its been the best decision Ive ever made, said Torres. The Navy has taught me discipline and my job requires me to make decisions under pressure and its made me who I am today. This is honor to be here. And for all of you being recognized today, there is so much more. Reach for the stars. The Navy has so much to offer and if it wasnt for the Navy and all the wonderful people who have taught me so much I wouldnt be where I am today, she added. Following lunch, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders thanked the Sailors and their spouses. Ive been in the Navy for 26 years and I know that we cannot achieve anything without the support of our families. In the Navy, we continually face chal lenges and how we view those challenges is what defines us as people, leaders and Sailors. Do we see these challenges as stepping-stones to the future or as obstacles. If we see them as obstacles, they will soon become problems, said Sanders. You, as Sailors of the Quarter, are the leaders of tomorrow. You are the leaders who junior Sailors will look up to, to overcome these obstacles and solve the problems. Its very easy to not want to do this but that is the mindset of people who fail. And because you are here today, its obvious you dont have that mindset and thats what we need in todays Navy. Sanders then presented each SOQ an award enve lope containing a $25 Visa gift card from VyStar Credit Union and a Sailor of the Quarter coin from First Command Financial Services. The event was sponsored by VyStar Credit Union, USAA, First Coast Financial Services, University of Phoenix and Navy Mutual Aid Association. This is a pretty big deal going on here and some thing Ive never been a part of before. Im so very excited to be here and be recognized today. I really appreciate all this, said AM3 Kendra Martinez of VP-30. I think this is a great honor. Ive strived pretty hard to make Sailor of the Quarter and its really cool that I get to come here with my wife and be recognized, added AD2 (AW) Billy Burton of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. VP-30 Sailor hospitalized after robbery attemptAWFAN Brett Parks remains hospitalized after suffering a gunshot wound when he came to the aid of someone calling for help. The Jacksonville Sheriffs Office has an on-going investigation into the incident. The suspect allegedly shot Parks while fleeing the scene of a robbery attempt. The inci dent occurred Oct. 17 at the Colony of Deerwood apartment complex near the St. Johns Town Center. Parks was immediately rushed to the intensive care unit at Shands Jacksonville Medical Center. According to Jacksonville Sheriffs Office, the suspect is in custody. Originally from South Florida, Parks enlisted in the Navy in 2008. A member of VP-30 for approximately two years, he is known as a dedicated Sailor and fitness enthusiast who enjoys being a personal trainer in his free time. His Leading Chief Petty Officer, AWFC Mark Mason, was not surprised to hear that Parks rushed to the scene to help someone describing him as, a hardworking, selfless Sailor. The Navy immediately assigned a casualty assistance calls officer to provide a direct link for his family to assist with their needs during Parks recovery. This incident also highlighted the importance of blood donation in the community. News of Parks shooting generated significant interest by VP-30 Sailors in donating blood. The squadron will sponsor a blood drive in November.

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you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but under no circumstances are dependent children authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may purchase a maxi mum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No exceptions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/ CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@ usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. TICKETS ENERGYmotor variable frequency drives, direct digital controls, fuel conversions, chiller retrofits and replacements, and boiler replacements. The venture also addressed heating, ventila tion and air conditioning mechanical opportuni ties such as chiller retrofits with magnetic bearing compressors. Exemplifying the contracts success, roof-mounted solar water heating systems were installed at several facilities, delivering an average of 3.8 million Btu per day. The first year of renew able cost savings exceeded $30,000. When fully implemented, the contract is expected to result in annual savings of more than 65 billion Btu and $3.3 million, with estimated avoided greenhouse gas emissions of about 9,840 metric tons of carbon dioxide. The Department of Energys Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) facilitates the fed eral governments implementation of sound, costeffective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nations energy security and environmental stewardship. FEMP awards recognize outstanding achieve ments across the following areas: buildings; aircraft identified and tracked potentially hostile small boats, patrol craft, and one midget class sub marine during the transit, and actively shielded the Enterprise from aggressive vessels by keeping them at bay. For these transits, HS-11 developed and used new tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) for the strike group, which were submitted to the small boat interaction weapon tactics conference at Al Udeid Air Base in Qatar in August. The Enterprise also performed flight operations in the Arabian Gulf. In addition to the normal duties of plane guard and SSC, HS-11 continuously assisted the helicopter detachments on board USS Nitze (DDG 94) and USS Vicksburg (CG 69) by flying additional SSC flights that granted those detachments a reprieve to perform critical maintenance on their aircraft. The Dragonslayers also took advantage of their close proximity to Udairi Army Airfield. The squadron deployed three separate detachments of two aircraft that allowed 24 pilots and 37 aircrewmen to regain terrain flight currency. HS-11 also conducted several distinguished visitor flights and executed a successful helicopter second pilot swap with HSL-46 Detachment Six on board USS Vicksburg (CG 69). Seven pilots and five aircrewmen were swapped between the two squadrons, providing valuable training and experience to crews from both platforms. Nearing their departure from the 5th Fleet area of responsibility, the Dragonslayers provided critical logistical support to the USS Iwo Jima Expeditionary Strike Group as they prepared for contingency operations following the attacks on U.S. Embassies throughout the region. The ability of the Dragonslayers to quickly and effectively flex to and accomplish countless missions added to the flexibility of strike group operations in the compressed operating area of the Arabian Gulf. The Enterprise Carrier Strike Group transitioned to 6th Fleet in mid-October and the Dragonslayers picked up where they left off in 5th Fleet, provid ing critical logistics support to the strike group. The Sailors of HS-11 then enjoyed a well-deserved port call in Naples, Italy allowing for some rest and relaxation. Upon leaving the Mediterranean and cross ing the Atlantic, HS-11 off-loaded tons of weapons and stores to USNS Sakagawea in preparation for Enterprises homecoming and ultimate deactivation. Family and friends then welcomed home the vet eran Dragonslayers at both NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport at the completion of a truly historic and successful combat deployment. By the end of deployment the Dragonslayers had flown 1012 flights for 2,575.8 hours completing 99.9 percent of their flights. Even with the Enterprises high operation tempo, the Dragonslayers had 33 Sailors earn their Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist qualifications and 14 earned their Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist qualification. deployment. Detachment workups started with a trip to Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center for Helicopter Advanced Readiness Program training, followed by a myriad of exercises over the course of the next year. Most notably, Detachment 10 flew in support of two Submarine Commander Courses Exercise Bold Alligator 2012, and Exercise Frukus 2011, that included forces from France, the United Kingdom, Russia and the United States. The detachment also showcased its anti-subma rine warfare (ASW) proficiency by participating in a CNO-mandated Mk-54 torpedo evaluation. The Night Furies successfully loaded and launched seven MK-54 block upgrade torpedoes, enabling urgent software upgrades to be introduced for fleet use. While operating in the Red Sea for several months, Detachment 10 flew over 30 hours in support of three international exercises, strengthening partner nation capabilities. During exercise Eagle Salute, a four-day exercise with Egyptian naval forces that involved ASW and maritime interdiction operations (MIO), the detachment conducted dual ASW operations with an Egyptian SH-2. Exercise Indigo Serpent was a two-day exercise with Royal Saudi Naval Forces that involved more ASW and MIO. Finally, the detachment conducted a one-day passing exercise with Egyptian forces, focusing on basic anti-surface warfare tactics. The detachment spent the majority of deployment flying in support of counter terrorist/narcotic operations throughout the 5th Fleet area of responsibil ity. The Night Furies worked with various interna tional units to provide valuable intelligence and tracking information through the use of the legendary SH-60Bs myriad of active and passive sensors. The Night Furies worked hand-in-hand with an embarked U.S. Coast Guard Advanced Interdiction Team. The members of this 12-man detachment provided the ship with a highly qualified maritime boarding ele ment. Detachment 10 successfully integrated these individuals as members of the aircrew, providing an extremely specialized capability for the supported commander. This interaction not only increased the utility of the LAMPS Mk III airborne asset, but also provided the detachment with significant lessons learned that will shape future USCG/HSM partner ships in 5th Fleet. Ever flexible, Detachment 10 also supported the Enterprise Strike Group by conducting over 15 verti cal replenishments, 50 personnel transfers, and five medical evacuations. On one occasion, the Night Furies were able to assist in the rescue of 10 Iranian fishermen, whose dhow caught fire, forcing them to abandon ship on a dark, moonless night. While per forming the role of on-scene commander, the Night Furies monitored the safety of all adrift survivors with the use of its forward looking infrared camera, vec tored the ships RHIB to the survivors and coordinated the successful recovery of all mariners whose dhow eventually sank. A defining portion of the summer months was spent conducting armed escorts of national high-value units through the Strait of Hormuz, a high-risk choke point for ships that requires careful planning and con stant monitoring of the recognized maritime picture in order to avoid inadvertent collisions and pos sible threats. The Night Furies flew in support of 14 transits, escorting CVN, LHD, LPD, and T-AO class ships. Detachment 10s reputation for precise contact reporting while developing over-the-horizon surface pictures and application of required pre-planned responses earned praise from carrier strike group commanders, amphibious battle group commanders and fleet admirals alike. The success of the Night Furies would not have been possible without the best maintenance support in the fleet. Led by Smith, the detachments main tenance department shined. Throughout workups and the intense summer climate of the Middle East, over 12,000 man hours, including seven at-sea phase inspections, were logged in order to maintain a robust flight schedule. In addition to maintaining such high maintenance standards, nine members earned enlisted aviation warfare specialist qualifications and three earned their enlisted surface warfare specialist qualification. The high quality of the Sailors on Detachment Ten was also exemplified through the 100 percent reten tion rate and 12 advancements made since the detachment was created. In mid-October, the Night Furies left 5th Fleet and traded the unflinching heat of the Arabian Gulf for the fair winds of the Mediterranean and one last port call. Detachment 10 enjoyed a myriad of port calls during their eight month deployment, including Italy, Seychelles, Jordon, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Israel and the United Arab Emirates. The Night Furies represent one of the last HSL detachments that HSL-42 will deploy as the sun sets on the legendary SH-60B aircraft. HSL-42 HS-11 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012

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The VR-62 Nomads received thank you messages written on 280 origami cranes from Japanese citizens during a ceremony held recently at Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan. The gifts were given in appreciation of the squadrons efforts during Operation Tomodachi, an operation that provided humanitarian aid and disaster relief assistance after an earth quake and tsunami struck Japan in March 2011. The event was organized by Helping Hands, a Yokosuka, Japan-based organization designed to help families displaced by the tragedy. Bobbi Bauer-Chen acted as the liaison between Helping Hands and VR-62. Bauer-Chen is a former VR-62 aviation maintenance duty officer now residing in the Yokosuka area.Bauer-Chen told Helping Hands members of VR-62s role in Operation Tomodachi, and Masako Sullivan insisted that origami cranes be created for the squadron personnel. Sullivan, founder of Helping Hands, said the idea of sending gifts to the Sailors who assist ed with Tomodachi began with a woman in Fukushima, Japan who wanted to thank the Navy for everything they had done for her. I suggested that we send origami cranes with names and messages on the wings, Sullivan said. We collected cranes from all over Japan to donate them to the U.S. Navy units that took part in Tomodachi. Sullivan said it was important to her to thank the Sailors and the Navy for their assistance during Operation Tomodachi. I knew that a lot of Sailors donated clothing, blankets, and personal items, said Sullivan. I knew it wasnt because the Navy told them to, but because they really wanted to help peo ple. It was beyond the Navys job. I wanted the people of Japan to continue remembering those things and give something back to the Navy. VR-62 was on station at NAF Atsugi when the earthquake and resulting tsunami struck. The squadron moved 127 tons of relief materials during Operation Tomodachi. Japanese citizens thank VR-62 for assistance JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 9

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NAS Jax Security Department personnel had to deal with one of their own Oct. 23 when the stations Integrated Training Team implemented an exer cise involving an in-house shooter/hostage simulation with injuries. Installation Training Officer Jim Butters described the exercise. An active duty Master at Arms attached to our base security department learns she will not be retained due to the severely over-manned rate. As a wife and a mother of three boys, she despairs for her familys future and expresses her outrage in an inappropriate and ultimately violent way. Using her police identification, roleplayer MA1 Jennifer Hannan made her way to the armory ready-for-issue room where she requested entry to retrieve her cell phone. Upon gaining access, she shoots one armorer and takes the other hostage. The duress alarm was sounded and a security force arrived to isolate the armory and establish communications with both the hostage-taker and the NAS Jax Emergency Operations Center (EOC). As the Incident Command Post was established near building 876, a radio request was made for an NCIS (Navy Criminal Investigative Service) hostage negotiator. Sgt. Dion Alexander led the fourman security force at the armory and engaged the hostage-taker in conservation until the negotiator arrived. Now is the right time to drop your weap on and let us get you some help just dont harm anybody else, implored Alexander. She responded, Sgt. Dion, my patience is wearing thin I must have OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder, an anxiety disorder) because I cant sit tight too long. Im not upset with you or your team, Sgt. Dion my beef is with the Navy. The hostage-taker then used her cell phone to call the base public affairs officer, as well as to post her situation on Facebook and Twitter but NCIS agents had anticipated that action and shut down her social media accounts. Alexander tried to assure her that the negotiator would arrive soon. Were doing whatever it takes to achieve a peaceful outcome here. Im positive that Security drill at police department armory 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012

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Eight retired Navy and Marine Corps aviators renewed their bonds of mili tary fellowship at NAS Jacksonville Oct. 24-25 at a mini-reunion of the Early and Pioneer Naval Aviators Association, better known as The Golden Eagles. Theyre considered the best of the best with some members whose combat missions began in World War II and with many of the rest logging flight hours over Vietnam, Bosnia and Iraq. Our organization perpetuates the spirit of excellence and achievement among notable naval aviators, said USMC Col. Gary VanGysel (250 combat missions, Navy Commendation Medal (V) and 23 Air Medals). After 28 years with the Marine Corps and 18 years with Boeing, aviation will always be in my blood. Talking with these JOs and young Sailors is very energizing for our group thats why youll some 82-year-old pilots still climbing around airplanes and helicopters today. VanGysel was pleased to tour two of the Navys newest aircraft the P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft and the MH-60R Seahawk anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare helicopter. It reminds me of the Navys transi tion to the F/A-18 Hornet, when digi tal instrumentation and controls were first developed. The way in which training tracks have evolved since we were young officers is also very interesting especially the computer based training and high fidelity flight simulators, said VanGysel. Jacksonville resident Rear Adm. Mike Johnson (180 combat missions, two Distinguished Flying Crosses and 15 air medals) was recently inducted as a member of The Golden Eagles. Needless to say, its a huge honor to be associated with such a distinguished group of aviators. For my 33-year career to be recognized by this group of mostdecorated naval aviators is really spe cial. And the hospitality weve been shown by commands at NAS Jax is outstanding. What really impressed us is the leading role that this installation is playing in transitions to new naval aviation platforms, said Johnson. The P-8A Poseidon, MH-60R Seahawk, MQ-8B Fire Scout and MQ-4C Triton show how truly integrated Navy warfighters have become. Our eye in the sky unmanned aerial vehicles will extend the sensor and intelligence range of manned aircraft, in order to increase our capabilities despite reduced manpower. It makes sense to have the training and operations for both the Poseidon and Triton (Broad Area Maritime Surveillance vehicle) platforms here at NAS Jax. We also toured the P-8A Integrated Training Center and saw how VP-16 was approaching the end of their training cycle and will soon be the Navys first operational Poseidon squadron, said Johnson. Retired Navy Captain and for mer astronaut Bob Crippen (Congressional Space Medal of Honor and Distinguished Flying Cross) flew on four Space Shuttle missions aboard Columbia and Challenger, including three as commander. As a naval avia tor, I flew the A-4 Skyhawk, a very capable ground-attack aircraft, until join ing NASA in 1969. I spent a lot of my time with the space program working on computer systems and simulators, said Crippen. The computer-based training sys tems that we checked out today at the P-8A Integrated Training Center show how quickly technology advances. The simulator visual displays for the Poseidon and the Seahawk are state-ofthe-art and well advanced from any thing we used in NASA. Im glad to see that our naval aviators are training on the best equipment available. Other distinguished participants at The Golden Eagles mini-reunion included: Former Vice CNO Adm. Stan Arthur (500 combat missions, 11 Distinguished Flying Crosses and 51 air medals); Vice Adm. John Lockard (300 combat mis sions, Distinguished Flying Cross and 32 air medals); Rear Adm. Tom Watson (75 combat missions, two Distinguished Flying Crosses, Bronze Star and seven air medals); Capt. Roger Sheets (280 combat missions, nine Distinguished Flying Crosses, three Bronze Stars and 26 air medals); and Col. Bill Huffcut (1,000 combat missions, Navy Cross, three Distinguished Flying Crosses, three Purple Hearts and 50 air medals Founded in 1956, The Golden Eagles function as a living memorial to those early naval aviators who pioneered the development of this unique military aviation force. Membership is limited to 200 regular members. Qualifications remain highly restrictive. In order to perpetuate the spirit of the earliest members, selection for membership is made from those are pioneers in some new aspect of naval aviation or who are respected by their peers for their outstanding skills as a pilot, their wide experience, good judgment, personal character and dedication to flying. Golden Eagles land at NAS Jax JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 11

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While on detachment, Combat Aircrew (CAC) 3 from VP-8 Fighting Tigers took part in a bilateral exercise with the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) VP-3 Sea Eagles, Oct. 16-18. The exercise focused on improving tactical com munication and coor dination between the squadrons and consisted of a static aircraft display where both squadrons were invited onboard to tour the aircraft followed by a coordinated anti-submarine warfare flight. Ive been fortunate to have worked with VP-2 Odin during an exer cise in Misawa and now the Sea Eagles in Atsugi. Both experiences have been great. The squad rons have tremendous knowledge and skill, and provide valuable train ing experiences for our aircrew, said Lt. Daniel Kuriluk, VP-8 plane com mander, who had worked with the JMSDF before and was again impressed with their skill and professionalism. The Sea Eagles hosted a number of social events during CAC 3s detach ment including a soccer match and cookout. The soccer match was held on Oct.17 and due to the large turnout, four teams were formed and a tour nament ensued. Teams were divided evenly and consisted of both Japanese and U.S. mem bers. Afterwards the Sea Eagles presented the win ning team with a certifi cate and sticker from their Atsugi Soccer Club. The soccer matches were a lot of fun, said AWO2 Amanda Sullivan. The Japanese are such good hosts and a lot of fun to be around. Following the conclu sion of the soccer match es the Sea Eagles invited the Fighting Tigers to a cookout. Hot dogs and hamburgers were served, while members of both squadrons exchanged patches, hats, and other gifts while having the chance to interact prior to the exercise. It was great being able to interact with the Sea Eagles on both a per sonal and then a profes sional level, said AWV2 Daniel DOrsi. You could tell friendships had been formed over just a few days which made working together during the exer cise a lot more enjoyable. On the last day of the detachment prior to the final flight both squad rons had one last oppor tunity to send crewmem bers to tour the other squadrons aircraft. Crewmembers enjoyed learning about the simi larities and differences between the two aircraft. I would like to thank VP-8 for their participa tion in these exercise, said Lt. Sato, JMSDF plane commander. It is great to have the opportunity to work together and accomplish a common goal. VP-8 conducts exercise with Japanese squadron 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012

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DEWEYSCall 542-3521 Deweys is now open! Deweys is located in Bldg. 608 between Gillis St. and Keily St. off of Enterprise Ave. Deweys offers a full service menu, bar and a friendly atmosphere that is great for all ages! Monday Friday 10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 10 p.m. Monday, Tuesday & Friday 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Wednesday Thursday 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m. Monday Pizza madness 2 9 p.m. One-topping pizza for only $5 Free Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Thurs. at 7 p.m. Friday social hour, 7 9 p.m., $.50 wings & $7.95 pizza your way -chicken and extra cheese additional charge NFL Ticket Sunday 12:30 9 p.m., $.50 wingsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling, shoe rental included.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa Luehrs at 5423518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor pool Open for lap swimming Monday Friday 5:30 8 a.m. & 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Recreational swimming Monday Friday 4:30 8 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Kennedy Space Center Adult $40, child $35.50 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $31 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 MOSH $7 $12 Blue Man Group in Orlando Special until March 31, adult $44, child $29, military $29 Upcoming ITT Trips: Lakeridge Winery Nov. 10 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4day hopper $153.25 Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31, 2013 and must be redeemed by June 30, 2013. Ask about our special discounted tickets for family members. Gator Bowl tickets $35 Gator Bowl Patch $9 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1-day $29.50, 2-day $40, Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT. Daytona 500 Feb. 24, 2013 tickets on sale now! $62 $209 Spring Fan Zone $53.50The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Paintball Trip GTF in Yulee Nov. 3 at 9 a.m. Free Jaguars vs. Lions game Nov. 4 at 11:30 a.m. Free Jaguars vs. Colts game Nov. 8 at 6:30 p.m. Florida Gators Football Game Nov. 10Free admission and transportation NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Nov. 13 & 27 for active duty Nov. 15 & 29 for retirees & DoD personnel Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Turkey Trot Killer Scramble Nov. 21 at noon $50 entry fee, $60 for civilian guests Four-person scrambleMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Oct. 29 Dec. 10 $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239, or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 13

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Past and present VP-16 War Eagles met Oct. 12 to learn about the future of the mari time patrol and reconnaissance force (MPRF) during the annual VP-16 reunion. About 120 for mer War Eagles made their way to NAS Jacksonville to reunite with old friends and share memories with former ship mates and current War Eagles. The group started their weekend being greeted by the entire squadron in formation at Hangar 511. Seeing the whole squadron in formation like that meant a lot to us. It was very impres sive, said Dan Adcock, a for mer member of VP-16. Following introductions, War Eagles of the past were given tours of a P-3C Orion and a P-8A Poseidon by the War Eagles of today. VP-16 is cur rently training to be the Navys first operational squadron to transition to the new P-8A air craft. This was the 15th annual reunion of former War Eagles, some from as far away as California. The reunion is held in a different city each year, but the members were very excited to return to Jacksonville this time to learn about the future of the MPRF community. They also took part in a trip to St. Augustine over the weekend. Veteran War Eagles also hosted a dinner that included cur rent members of the command. The guest speaker was Cmdr. Molly Boron, commanding offi cer of VP-16. She focused on the similarities and differences between the transition from the P-2V Neptune to the P-3A in 1964 and the current transi tion to the P-8A. Many of the attending veterans were part of VP-16 during the earlier transition to the P-3A. During dinner, the group also presented an award to Bill Creel, who was a VP-16 plank owner when the squadron was first established in 1953. Having this type of event left an emotional mark on all involved from the tears shed during the initial formation to the sense of family and tradi tion felt by all who attended the dinner. I really learned a ton about our history and heritage, reflected Lt. Brad Zalud. I particularly enjoyed the sto ries they brought home from deployments. All in all, the message seemed to be, Once a War Eagle, always a War Eagle, no matter what plane we are flying. The VP-45 Pelicans sent a P-3C detachment to Mobile, Ala. to participate in the three-day VP-45 Association Reunion Oct. 20. The VP-45 Association is an organization dedicated to former and current members of VP-45 by providing an avenue for shipmates to re-establish friendships and preserve squadron history. The association holds a reunion every two years at various locations throughout the United States. Getting together at these reunions promotes camaraderie and provides a great way to reconnect and stay in touch with old friends and shipmates, said retired Lt. Cmdr. Doug Mitchel, president of the VP-45 Association. Many of us voice the opinion that these squadron reunions are much more fun and rewarding than high school or college reunions we have attended. The VP-45 commanding officer, executive officer and command master chief all joined a full combat air crew for the VP-45 Reunion Banquet Dinner. It was a great experience for our members to participate in the banquet dinner, said VP-45 CMDCM Tom Ayers. It allowed them to learn about our squadron history first hand from people who lived it. We now all have a greater sense of honor knowing we will represent all former and current members of the World Famous Pelicans on our upcoming 7th Fleet deployment. The VP-45 Association is already planning for their 2014 reunion. Check the association website at http://www.vp45association.org for more information. War Eagles of the past return for glimpse of MPRF future VP-45 Pelicans hold reunion 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012

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Ribbon cutting events were held Oct. 15 for the inau guration of the newly con structed schools at Mandarin and Ecole Pont Gaudin, both located within the Artibonite Department of Haiti in or near the City of Gonaives as part of U.S. Southern Commands Humanitarian Assistance Program (HAP) in Haiti. This was great timing to ensure that the facilities were ready for the new school year, said Cmdr. Dewayne Roby, the U.S. Navys officer in charge of the construction projects. The children were very excited to see their new schools. The schools are located within larger community cluster projects that include commu nity centers, medical clinics, wells, latrines and hand wash stations, in addition to the sixclassroom school at Ecole Pont Gaudin and the five-classroom school at Mandarin. Speaking at the ceremonies were representatives of the International Development Bank and Fond DAssistance Economique et Sociale (FAES), who provided the furniture for outfitting the schools; Cmdr. Richter Tipton, who represent ed the United States Embassy and U.S. Southern Command; along with Haitian govern ment representatives from the Ministry of Education, the Artibonite Department and the City of Gonaives. Also in attendance were representatives from USAID; Palgag Building Technologies (the Israeli contractor who provided the design and con struction of the project); Cmdr. Dewayne Roby, the Resident Officer in Charge of Construction Haiti with Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast; Sgt. 1st Class Roland Laforest, the U.S. Southern Command HAP Program Manager, who was also the interpreter for the ceremonies. The children sang a wel coming song and presented flowers and a personal thank you to Tipton as well as to the International Development Bank and the Minister of Education representative at each ceremony. The ceremonies drew a large showing of support from both the schools and local commu nities, stated Roby. These contracts, along with the remaining Humanitarian Assistance Program contracts throughout Haiti, were awarded by Naval Facilities Engineering Command in Jacksonville, Fla. and administered by Roby with acquisition and engineer ing support provided from NAVFACs Jacksonville office. U.S. Southern Commands HAP will provide a total of nine emergency operations centers and disaster relief warehouses, eight community clusters and fourteen fire stations in loca tions throughout Haiti. The program is designed to assist the people of Haiti in building and sustaining their capacity to prepare for and respond to disasters, while providing basic facilities which can help provide education, medi cal care and other services to the Haitian people. Ribbon cutting event opens new schools in Haiti It was the perfect day for the NAS Jax Monster Dash Oct. 26 as 203 runners turned out to participate in the 5K run. The event was coordinated by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department (MWR). Placing first overall and first in the mens 30-34 category was Jeremy Judernatz with a time of 18:13. Naketa George took first in the womens 30-34 cat egory and was the first female to cross the finish line with a time of 24:40. Due to techni cal difficulties with the timing equipment, many of the times were not recorded. Other winners were: The event was sponsored by American Allied University and the University of Phoenix. The next run will be the annual Turkey Trot Nov. 16 at 11:30 a.m. For more information, call 542-3239/3518. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, spon sor or its products or services. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 Can you imagine life without the Internet? For most of us, the Internet is essential to almost every aspect of our life. We use email to communicate at work. We attend virtual meetings and trainings. We keep in touch with loved ones across the world. The Internet allows us to look up the answer to any question in the blink of an eye and download that song we just cant get out of our head. But for many people, living the cyber dream can quickly turn into a nightmare that could cost thousands of dollars. Recently, the legal assistance offic es at NAS Jacksonville and NAVSTA Mayport have seen several clients who were notified by their Internet pro vider that their Internet Protocol (IP) address has been identified as a copy right infringer. The letter from the internet provider explains that some entity has filed a lawsuit alleging that a list of IP addresses have infringed on the plaintiffs copyright by uploading or downloading a movie or program without permis sion. In most of these cases, the plain tiff sends a long list of IP addresses to various Internet providers and requests that those Internet providers release the personal identifying information asso ciated with each IP Address. For some people, this is the first time they realize that they may have downloaded something illegally. For other people, they realize that they should have secured their wireless router or uninstalled a file sharing program. Additionally, the IP address may be wrong and the cus tomer associated with that IP address may have never even downloaded any copyrighted material. Whichever the case, if you receive one of these letters, it is essential that you see an attorney as soon as possible. Whether you downloaded something without thinking, used a file sharing software (e.g. bit torrent, pirate bay, gnutella), or think your neighbor may have been mooching off of your router, you could be held liable for copyright infringement as a result of a download and ordered to pay the plaintiff dam ages. This means that, depending on the outcome of your case, you could be ordered to pay anywhere between $200 and $150,00. In addition, you could be ordered to pay the plaintiffs attorney fees and court costs. Even if you (or your mooching neighbor) never actually downloaded the copyrighted material, release of your information by your Internet provider could lead to threats from the plaintiffs attorney(s) trying to get you to settle the case out of court for thousands of dol lars. However, you likely have several options in avoiding such a costly out come but your options will be severe ly limited if you delay in seeking legal advice once you receive the letter from your Internet provider. The letter from the Internet company usually informs you that the Internet company will release your name, address, and other information con nected with your IP address if you do not take action by a certain date. This is why it is essential to seek legal advice right away. You may be able to prevent your personal information from being released, which would prevent the plaintiff from linking the IP address to your name, phone number, and address. If the plaintiff does not have your name and address, the plaintiffs attorneys will not be able to scare you into settling the case (i.e. paying to have the plaintiff drop you as named defendant in their lawsuit). The plaintiff will not be able to sue you for copyright infringement if they cannot name you as a defendant. Even if your informa tion does get released to the plain tiff, an attorney may be able to get the case dismissed. Finally, if you actually get served and summoned to appear in court, an attorney can help prove that you should not be held liable for infringement. Ultimately, you should not bury your head in the sand and hope the problem will go away. At the very least, you should seek the free legal advice of an attorney at your nearest Legal Assistance office. Although you should seek legal advice as soon as you receive such a letter from your Internet company, you can do much to avoid the cyber nightmare by thinking before you download. File sharing programs may seem like a great way to build your music collection or catch up on that sitcom episode you missed but much of this free enter tainment is copyrighted. This means that your free movie, song, or sitcom can end up costing you thousands of dollars if you are found guilty of copy right infringement. One rule of thumb is that, if it seems too good to be true, it probably is, so dont click download. Even if you are a cautious Internet user, you could be at risk if you dont secure your wireless network. If your network is unsecured, not only can your neighbors slow down your Internet, but they could download something ille gally. Most illegal actions committed online are first traced through the IP address. So, if you cant prove that your neighbor downloaded something ille gally and not you, you may be on the hook for your neighbors actions. For whatever reason, many people think that their actions online are private. If there is one thing you take away from this article, remember that noth ing done online is private. Just as you would not steal a CD from a music store, you shouldnt download some thing without permission. If you secure your wireless router and think before you click, you can live the cyber dream without exposing yourself to a cyber nightmare. If you have any other questions, please contact your local legal assistance office as follows: NAS Jacksonville at 542-2565, Ext. 3006; NAVSTA Mayport at 270-5445, Ext. 3017 or NSB Kings Bay, Georgia at (912) 5733935. This article is not intended to substi tute for the personal advice of a licensed attorney. The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) has revised its Price Match Policy for its Navy Exchanges (NEX) around the world. The NEX Price Match Policy guaran tees that NEXs will match any brick and mortar retailers advertised price within the local market area on any identical in-stock item. We want the NEX to be our customers choice for shopping, said Richard Dow, NEXCOM senior vice president, store operations. Revamping our NEX Price Match Policy gives our NEX cashiers more authority to match prices which will give an even greater customer service experience to our customers. NEX sales associates have the authority to match an advertised price reduction up to $100. An NEX supervisor must authorize a price match over $100. Customers may ask for a price adjust ment at any cash register in the store. The advertised priced may be pre sented in the form of a printed ad or a mobile marketing device, such as a cell phone or smart phone, from a local competitor. Photographs of an item taken with a cell phone or smart phone will not be accepted. A NEX cashier will also accept a customers verbal price challenge for an item with a price difference of $10 or less. Customers need not bring a copy of a competitors advertisement for items under $10. For items on the NEX web store, myNavyExchange.com, the NEX will visually verify the price of the item prior to matching the price. In addition, overseas NEXs will match the pricing of current mail order cata logs as well as web stores from Sears, J.C. Penney, Walmart and any other comparable commercial retailers with web stores. Freight charges, if applicable, are added to the competitors price. The NEX Price Match Policy does not apply to fine jewelry, automotive parts, automotive labor and service, gasoline and special orders. Double and triple coupons, clearance, percent and dollar off items, flea market sales, going out of business sales and commissary prices are also excluded from the NEX Price Match Policy. For more information on the NEX Price Match Policy, see your local NEX manager or https://www.mynavy exchange.com/command/customer_ service/p_policy.html. Beware of what you downloadThink before you clickNEXCOM changes its NEX price match policy

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More than 20 Sailors from VP-8 and Naval Air Facility Misawa took an overnight trip to Miyagi Prefecture, Oct. 19-20, to help the victims of the March 2011 tsunami that struck northeastern Japan. On a chilly 40-degree morning, Sailors gathered and loaded their bus for a six-hour ride down south to Minamisanrikucho. Upon arriving to their destination, they immediately disembarked their bus and headed out to work. The community relations project consisted of cleaning up a local farm roughly 5,000 square yards in size. We are helping them help them selves recover from the devastation the tsunami caused in the area, said ADC Roy Cedeo. I think the local population depends on the farms to subsist, and we are honored to have the opportunity to come out here and help our host nation in whatever way they need us. After a long day of work, Sailors spent the night in a local common house, and woke up early to continue the work they started. By mid-afternoon, the job was done and the fields were ready for planting. It was a lot of work, but we were happy to make a difference in this hard-hit area, said IT1 Lydale Hyde. I think its important that our Japanese brothers and sisters know they can count on us to lend a helping hand whenever its needed. Navy cancels Service Dress Khaki, announces Service Dress Blue lightweight fabric options NAVADMIN 314/12, released Oct. 19, announced the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) decision to termi nate the Service Dress Khaki (SDK) initiative. The NAVADMIN also reempha sized the optional wear of the Service Dress Blue (SDB) uniform as an acceptable alternative during summer uni form wear periods when participating in events, ceremonies and meetings where wearing a coat and tie is appro priate and when other uniforms are not prescribed. The Navy continuously monitors Sailors uniform concerns and develops uniforms and design changes based on feedback received and research con ducted, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director, Military Personnel Plans and Policy. After May 2012 when the con temporary design for SDK was approved for optional wear, the Navy continued to conduct research with product ven dors and with the information gained and reviewed, the decision was made to cancel Service Dress Khaki. The Navy decided to terminate the SDK uniform as an optional uniform due to factors identified during a comprehensive uniform assessment. These factors included the evaluation of quantities of SDK sets ordered/sold, wear test of several models evaluating qual ity, durability, appearance and fit, and estimated cost per uniform set to the individual. The NAVADMIN 314/12 also reaf firmed E-7 to O-10 personnel may wear the SDB as a suitable alternative for wear in lieu of summer white and ser vice dress white uniforms when a coat and tie is appropriate. SDB uniforms may be prescribed for wear year-round to all official functions (when formal dress, dinner dress, or full dress uniforms are not prescribed) and civilian equivalent dress is coat and tie. This uniform is available for purchase in a quality lightweight fabric. The Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department hosted Barktoberfest at the NAS Jacksonville Vet Treatment Facility Oct. 20. The beautiful fall day encour aged more than 50 participants and their dogs to attend the festivities. Patrons participated in a two-mile fun run, a pet costume contest and a family-themed costume contest. We do this for our patrons, espe cially the ones who live on the base since there are not a lot of events that occur over the weekends. We want to encourage our military families to participate in fitness activities and to enjoy it! I would like to thank the commis sary Purina representative for donat ing all the great goodie bags and prizes for the event, said NAS Jax Fitness Coordinator Melissa Luhers. AT1 Jacin Kopitke added, This was a great family event. We really enjoyed the day as a family with our dog. The event concluded with an impressive military working dog demonstra tion. For more information on upcoming fit ness events, call 542-4238. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government offi cially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or ser vices. Navy Misawa and VP-8 team up to help Japanese community Barktoberfest brings out the canines JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 17

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 1, 2012 The USO and partners will recognize Veterans Day with Grant a Wish for Our Heroes, an initiative that will give Americans opportunities to thank those who serve in the Armed Forces by granting wishes for our troops and their families by supporting them in a variety of ways. Grant a Wish for Our Heroes is a call to action for anyone who wants to take a moment and give back to our troops and military families in the ways theyve told us helps the most. USO offers concrete ways, big and small, to show our troops that Americans appreciate their service and sacrifice, said Sloan Gibson, president and CEO of the USO. For years, troops and fami lies have been telling the USO what programs and services they need the most through a comprehensive annual survey, Tell USO, and the USO has responded. Our programs help ease the stress of deployment for both troops and their loved ones. This Veterans Day, the USO asks Americans to help support these USO programs and initiatives that our troops have requested most: Holiday Boxes for Deployed TroopsMany deployed troops spend holidays away from their families. The USO helps bring a touch of home to troops with boxes containing decorations games, snacks, movies and themed items. Connecting Troops to Families Back HomeMissing the birth of your child may seem hard to imagine, but its a reality for many of our troops overseas. TheUSO has made it possible for some ofour mili tary dadsto witness the birth of their child, via Skype. This November, well also be help ing those dads send some spe cial itemshome to their new born and momso they can be a part of those first precious weeks of their childs life. Support Child HeroesHelp the USO provide the book Little CHAMPS (Child Heroes Attached to Military Personnel) to military fami lies in order to ease their chal lenges and fears of deployment, relocation and injury of a loved one. Education, Employment and Community Reintegration for our Wounded WarriorsUSO Warrior and Family Care provides Hire Heroes USA/ USO Workshops and Careers Opportunity Days for wound ed, ill and injured service men and women, their spouses and caregivers. Career Opportunity Days are in collaboration with Hire Heroes USA and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and offer our healing heroes, spouses and caregivers a nontraditional career fair where employers connect on a per sonal level based on interest and background. Employers conduct mock interviews and provide feedback, providing an additional level of support for transitioning troops to meet with employers offeringjobs. Corporations, media part ners and a variety of commu nity organizations have signed on to the USOs Grant a Wish for Our Heroes this Veterans Day include: American Airlines: American Airlines is proud to be the official airline of the USO, Honoring those who serve, Veterans Day 2012. aa.com/ military American Crew: American Crew has teamed up with the USO to honor our troops with the 2012 Military Limited Edition product line. ameri cancrew.com/militaryedition/ AOL: The USO will be fea tured as the Cause of the Day this Veterans Day on aol.com and will take over AOLs mail sign-in page for one day in November. Bass Pro Shops: Stop by a Bass Pro Shop and check out how Reelin It In For the Troops is supporting Operation USO Care Package. basspro.com/ Cheerios: For every code entered from specially marked Cheerios, Honey Nut Cheerios or MultiGrain Cheerios at Walmart, General Mills will donate $1 to the USO (up to $50,000). Additionally, con sumers can send messages of support to troops and their families through the digital USO Thanks from Everywhere platform. cheerios.com/uso CVS: CVS/pharmacy will once again hold a USO dona tion campaign as part of its flu shot program during the week of Veterans Day. cvs.com ESPN: This Veterans Day, ESPN partners with the USO to help lift the spirits of Americas troops and their families. Using its broad portfolio of multimedia assets, ESPN is driving awareness and action from November 4-11 by invit ing its viewers and consum ers to give a gift to our heroes through USO Wishbook an alternative giving catalog benefiting troops and their fami lies. You can visit uso.org/espn beginning Nov. 4 to select a gift and learn more. Lockheed Martin: Lockheed Martin will donate $1 to the USO for every new Like of their facebook page, up to $25,000. facebook.com/lock heedmartin My Coke Rewards: Let our troops know they are not for gotten. Donate your My Coke Rewards points to the USO and help support Americas troops and their families. mycokere wards.com NFL: The NFL will support the USO with its annual Salute to Service campaign during the month of November through a fundraiser during games in Weeks 9 11 of the season. Fans can also help support this campaign through an online auction at nfl.com/salute starting Nov. 1, 2012. Old Navy: Old Navy salutes military families this Veterans Day and is proud to partner with the USO on Operation Donation. To support our troops and their families, we are collecting donations in all U.S. Old Navy stores Nov. 8-12. (this language was approved and provided by Old Navy) oldnavy.com Wells Fargo: From Nov. 1 through Dec. 13, Wells Fargo customers will have the opportunity to make a donation of up to $249.99 when using their Wells Fargo card at their local ATMs. US states except Arkansas, Missouri, and the District of Columbia. wellsfar go.com. To learn more about Grant a Wish for Our Heroes, visit uso. org/grant-a-wish. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. we can negotiate a way out of this for you. She responded, Up until today, Ive been a good Sailor. I know Ill have a mark on my record after this, however, I can do the return to duty program. Its only fair that I do my time, then the Navy can go ahead and rehabilitate me. I want to continue my service honorably, just like I have for 11 years. When the NCIS crisis negotiator arrived, he reaffirmed, We want to get you back in the arms of your kids. The only response he received was the sharp retort of a pistol. After 11 years of service, the hostage-taker was dead from her own firearm. NAS Jax Security Department Training Division Officer Maj. Jerry Syrek noted that police arriving at a hostage scene before a negotiator may be trained to use the ICER concept: Isolate Isolate the hostage zone, create an outer perimeter and keep onlookers beyond the police safety line. Contain Limit the mobility of the hostage-taker to the smallest area possible (the inner perimeter) and prevent him/ her from observing police activity. Evaluate Without causing any escalation, gather informa tion, including the number of hostage-takers and hostages, their appearance, weapons and so on. Report Report all available information gathered to inform other officers and the chain of command. DRILL The aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) received and refueled an MV-22 Osprey for the first time Oct. 6. Assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 165 a potential replacement for the C-2A Greyhound, the Osprey was the first from VMM165 to make a carrier landing. It was part of an on-going initiative from the Joint Program Manager Air (PMA) 275 office to increase the number of avail able platforms. This was a first for our squadron, said Capt. Patrick Johnson, of VMM165. We recently made the switch from helicopters to the Osprey, so it was a new experience for most of us. Johnson embarked Nimitz as a liaison between the pilots of the MV-22 and Nimitz primary flight control. As the subject matter expert, Johnson was able to provide the Nimitz crew with infor mation about the MV-22 to aid in the recovery of this aircraft. Since this was the first time the Osprey landed on Nimitz, though similar to standard Navy aircraft, there were some things the flight deck crew had to be mindful of. With the Osprey you have to be careful because the down-wash [the air that comes from the aircrafts rotors] is a lot more than a helicopter, explained ABH2 Andre Taylor, a flight deck director on board Nimitz. This aircraft has a larger landing area so we have to make sure anything around the landing area is secure and make sure everything is out of the way. Nimitz sent some of its flight deck crew to Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., for training on how to handle the Osprey. We were taught how to properly chock and chain the aircraft along with how to turn, taxi (move an aircraft without having to use a tractor or a tow bar), and stow it on the flight deck, said Taylor. Basically, we learned the insand-outs of the aircraft. We got inside all of the batteries and oxygen tanks and learned what to look for in case the aircraft crashes and how to pull the emergency door in case a fire broke out. This training played a key part in allowing the Osprey to make its first carrier-based landing on Nimitz and turned out to be a unique experience for the crew. We all took turns landing the air craft because it was something new that we had never seen, said ABH1 Ricardo Camposflores, a flight deck lead ing petty officer on board Nimitz who assisted with the Osprey landing. We all got a chance to learn something new from this landing. Landing the Osprey will be another memory Nimitz crew will be able to add to the long history of the ship. I will remember this experience for a long time, Taylor smiled. I was more excited than I was nervous. Its a dif ferent feeling. Most people dont get a chance to be a part of these experienc es. Early one morning in October 2007, BM1 Jim Castaneda suffered a stroke during muster aboard USS Tortuga (LSD 46). The stroke was entirely unexpected and, in a matter of moments, Castanedas life was forever changed. Shortly after arriving at Naval Medical Center San Diego for treatment, Castaneda was referred to Navy Wounded Warrior (NWW) Safe Harbor. His NWW non-medical care manager helped his fam ily navigate the various nonmedical issues from securing various payments and entitle ments, to providing advice on a home application, to access ing Veterans Affairs benefits that threatened to distract from Castanedas recovery. [NWW] is one of those pro grams that commands may have heard about but dont know too much about, said Castaneda. But once they know what it does and how it helps families and severely injured Sailors they will appreciate it. Indeed, only one-quarter of enlisted Sailors and less than one-half of naval officers are aware of Commander Navy Installations Commands Navy Wounded Warrior Safe Harbor program and the ser vices it provides. Yet, it is among the most important resources available to Navy families. Illness or injury can strike at any time. When they do, NWW can clear away the clutter and allow service members to focus on whats most important getting well. NWW tailors support to each wounded warriors recovery, rehabilitation and reintegra tion needs. Its team of experts addresses pay and personnel issues, child and youth care, transportation and housing needs, education and train ing benefits, and much more. The programs goal is to return wounded warriors to duty, but when thats not possible, it works collaboratively with federal agencies and partner organizations to ensure their successful reintegration back into their communities. NWW will address virtually any problem that surfaces during a wounded warriors recovery process, said NWW direc tor Capt. Steve Hall. NWW non-medical care managers provides enrollees a shoulder to lean on, a help ing hand, an ear to listen and encouraging words. They act as advocates when service mem bers need one most. NWW enrollment is not lim ited to service members who have been wounded in combat operations or shipboard and training accidents. It also is available to those affected by serious illness like Castaneda or liberty accidents. November marks Warrior Care Month, a time to recog nize wounded warriors, as well as their caregivers, for their service, sacrifices, and achievements. This years theme, Success through Transition, high lights the many ways wound ed warriors and their families thrive after illness and injury on active duty, on the playing field, in the classroom, or on the job. This month, Adm. Cecil Haney, commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, will host the first-ever Wounded Warrior Pacific Trials at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam and the University of Hawaii Nov. 1217. More than 50 serious ly wounded, ill and injured Sailors and Coast Guardsmen from across the country including Castaneda will compete for a place on the 2013 Warrior Games Navy-Coast Guard team. NWW encouraged Castaneda to get involved in adaptive athletics several years ago, and it has had a tremen dously positive impact on his life. He says, Everyone [com peting in adaptive athletics] seems seven feet tall larger than life. I feel like superman. I can do anything now. Sailors and their families are urged to take time during Warrior Care Month to honor and support our wounded warriors. They can refer a service member to the program who has experienced serious illness or injury by calling 855-NAVY WWP (628-9997). MV-22 Osprey flight ops tested on board USS Nimitz Navy Wounded Warrior: A critical resource for SailorsUSO and partners invite Americans to Grant a Wish for Our Heroes

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