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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 10-18-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02015

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Returns to rootsCommander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, visited NAS Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport and Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay to meet with senior leaders during a series of leadership calls Oct. 16-18. During the visit, Adm. Bill Gortney presented his phi losophies on leadership and took questions from base lead ers. While the trip is similar to trips he will duplicate many times, for the fleets top admi ral, a trip to Northeast Florida is always special. Its always great, he said. I grew up on the St. Johns River water skiing on Doctors Inlet, and its always nice to come back to Northern Florida. Its home. Growing up as the son of a Navy captain, he moved to Jacksonville in 1970 when his father retired and took a job aboard NAS Cecil Field. That year was his sophomore year at Orange Park High School, where he would meet his future wife, Sherry. Gortney spent the next three years working summer jobs at NAS Jacksonville. He spent a summer as a lifeguard at the HSL-42 Detachment Seven, embarked on board USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), recently participated in Sea Breeze, the largest multinational mari time exercise in the Black Sea. Hosted by the Ukrainian Navy, the mission of Sea Breeze 2012 was to improve mari time safety and security in the region while enhancing the capabilities of Partnership for Peace and Black Sea Regional Maritime Security Forces. Participants included representatives from various branches of the armed forces of 17 nations. Participating fixedwing air assets included the U.S. Navys P-3C Orion and its Ukrainian counter part, the Be-12 Chayka (Russian for seagull due to its unique wing place ment). Rotary-wing assets included the U.S. Navys SH-60B Seahawk, the Ukrainian Mil-14 Haze, and Ka-27 Helix. During the exercise, members of HSL-42s Detachment Seven were given the opportunity to tour FFH Hetman Sahaydachniy, the Ukrainian Navy flag ship. Hosted by the ships aircrew, the visit focused on the embarked Ka-27 and flight deck facilities. Squadron per sonnel returned the favor by giving the Ukrainian crew the opportunity to visit USS Jason Dunhams flight deck facili ties and discuss the SH-60B Seahawk. Throughout the exercise, all assets focused on formation steaming, search and rescue, and naval flight opera tions which included Ka-27 landings on Dunham. These assets were able to overcome significant language differ ences to achieve a common goal and complete the mission. The task group of 17 nations inte grated to execute all facets of opera tions in the littoral environment, which included an extensive medical training exercise. Assets coordinated with and supported each other in all phases of medical evacuation from start to finish. The event included rotary wing, sur face, and land assets as the task group facilitated casualty and medical assis tance training using organic assets. These shared skills and training events provided all nations the confidence and capacity to execute operations in littoral environments. In todays maritime environment, the ability to operate with other nations to Red Lancers visit Scotland for Joint WarriorNATOs largest military exercise, the United Kingdom-led Joint Warrior, took place off the west coast of Scotland Oct. 1-11. Participating allied units including three P-3C Orions from VP-10 at NAS Jax conducted piracy, narcotics and insurgency opera tions, mine countermeasures and electronic warfare training, as well as tactical intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance missions. Fleet Forces commander visits North Florida HSL 42, Det 7 participates in International Exercise Sea Breeze

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Oct. 25 1812 USS United States, under Capt. Stephen Decatur, captures HMS Macedonian. 1924 Navy airship USS Shenandoah (ZR-1) completes round-trip transconti nental cruise that began Oct. 7. 1944 During Battle of Leyte Gulf, in the Surigao Straits, U.S. battle ships execute the maneuver of cross ing the tee of the Japanese forces. Off Samar, escort carriers, destroyers and destroyer escorts heroically resist attacks of Japanese Center Force. Off Cape Engano, 3rd Fleet carriers attack Japanese Northern Force sinking sev eral small carriers. 1950 Chinese Communist Forces launch first offensive in Korea. 1983 U.S. Marines and U.S. Army troops land on Grenada to evacuate U.S. citizens threatened by the islands unstable political situation. Oct. 26 1921 In first successful test, a com pressed air, turntable catapult, launch es an N-9 seaplane. 1922 Lt. Cmdr. Godfrey de Chevalier makes first landing aboard a carrier (USS Langley) while underway off Cape Henry, Va. 1942 Battle of Santa Cruz Island. USS Hornet (CV-8) was lost and USS Enterprise (CV-6) was badly damaged during the battle. 1944 Battle of Leyte Gulf ends with Navy carrier and USAAF aircraft attacks on the retreating Japanese ships. U.S. forces sink many Japanese ships includ ing four carriers, three battleships, 10 cruisers, and nine destroyers, for a total of 26 capital ships. Afterwards, Japanese fleet ceases to exist as an orga nized fighting fleet. 1944 Special Task Air Group One makes last attack in month-long dem onstration of TDR drone missile against Japanese shipping and islands in the Pacific. Of 46 missiles fired, 29 reached their target areas. 1950 U.S. Amphibious Force 7th Fleet lands 1st Marine Division at Wonsan, Korea. 1963 USS Andrew Jackson (SSBN619) launches first Polaris A-3 missile from a submerged submarine, off Cape Canaveral, Fla. Oct. 27 1864 Lt. William Cushing sinks Confederate ram Albemarle with a spar torpedo attached to the bow of his launch. 1922 Navy League of U.S. spon sors first annual celebration of Navy Day to focus public attention on the importance of the U.S. Navy. That date was selected because it was Theodore Roosevelts birthday. 1943 First women Marines report for duty at Camp Pendleton. 1944 Fast Carrier Task Forces attack Japanese shipping and installations in Visayas and northern Luzon. 1967 Operation Coronado VIII begins in Rung Sat Zone. Oct. 28 1864 Steamer General Thomas and gunboat Stone River destroy Confederate batteries on Tennessee River near Decatur, Alabama. Oct. 29 1814 Launching of Fulton I first American steam-powered warship, at New York City. The ship was designed by Robert Fulton. 1980 USS Parsons (DDG-33) res cues 110 Vietnamese refugees 330 miles south of Saigon. Oct. 30 1799 William Balch becomes Navys first commissioned Chaplain. Oct. 31 1941 German submarine U-552 sinks USS Reuben James (DD245), which was escorting Convoy HX 156, with loss of 115 lives. First U.S. ship lost to enemy action in World War II. 1943 Lt. Hugh ONeill of VF(N)-75 destroys a Japanese aircraft during night attack off Vella Lavella in first kill by a radar-equipped night fighter in the Pacific. 1956 Navy personnel land in R4D Skytrain on the ice at the South Pole. Rear Adm. George Dufek, Capt. Douglas Cordiner, Capt. William Hawkes, Lt. Cmdr. Conrad Shinn, Lt. John Swadener, AD2 J. P. Strider and AD2 William Cumbie are the first men to stand on the South Pole since Capt. Robert Scott in 1912. 1956 USS Burdo (APD-133) and USS Harlan R. Dickson (DD-708) evacuate 166 persons from Haifa, Israel, due to the fighting between Egypt and Israel. 1961 End of lighter-than-air craft in U.S. Navy with disestablishment of Fleet Airship Wing One and ZP-1 and ZP-3, the last operating units in Navy LTA branch at Lakehurst, N.J. My new extreme sport is exposing strangers, through Dinner with the Smileys, to the sometimes-charm, sometimes-wrath of my pre-adolescent son. Quite frankly, on most days, Id much rather eat a South American hissing cockroach or parachute out of a heli copter. My youngest son, 5-year-old Lindell, is considered adorable in all situations even when hes mooning a former gov ernor or pretending to vomit a plastic earthworm. Owen, by virtue of being the middle child, only dreams of mooning impor tant people or having any sort of wrath to call his own. Hes fortunate we dont accidentally leave the house without him, when hes quietly in his room or otherwise minding his own business. Ford is in a tough spot. Not only is he the oldest, and not only do I (rightly or wrongly) expect the most from him, but hes gone through this roller-coaster, pre-teen year alongside the 315 different people weve had to our weekly dinner. All because Fords dad his idol, his mentor, the man who can do no wrong has been deployed overseas for 12 months. Ford was left with me: the mom who cant throw a football, who pushes snooze 15 times, and who asks him to do annoying things like take dirty plates to the sink after dinner. So its been a rough year for me and Ford. Or maybe it just seems that way because weve had a weekly audience at the dinner table. Most boys and their parents suffer the pre-teen years with grace and dignity in the privacy of their homes. Sometimes Ive wondered if Dinner with the Smileys has been too much for Ford, who, like his dad, finds social situ ations difficult. Each week, Ive forced Ford out of his comfort zone, and many times, Ive paid the price. Weve had dinner with a wide range of people, from those who are extroverted and funny, to those who are quiet and serious, and even someone who suffers from Alzheimers Disease. Ive pushed my boys limits with din ners like No. 35, which included rock climbing a cliff at Acadia National Park. Often, the boys have welcomed the challenge. More often, however, Ford has resisted and rebelled. But for all Fords reservation and inhibition, he hasnt been shy about letting our guests know how hes feeling. Hes sighed, rolled his eyes, shut down and acted like Im the stupidest person who ever put on pants. I often make apologies for my boys after the dinners. Like a public affairs person cleaning up a politicians mess, I try to put the boys comments and behaviors into context. I ask our new friends to remember their own chil drens worst moments. But readers will say, Those poor chil dren, and Look at what shes made them go through. After 47 weekly din ners with our community, however, I completely disagree. What Ive given my boys is a year full of lessons, each with a steep learning curve and usu ally no study guide. The boys have had to learn to be tolerant, patient, flexible and accommodating. Theyve learned to read social cues, give and take, and, ultimately, to say sorry when appro priate. Yes, most people are spared the embarrassment of having a moment in front of strangers at the dinner table, but those people have also missed the opportunity to learn and grow with their community. At our latest dinner, after Ford left the table angry, I overheard our female guest whisper to her husband, Why dont you go check on Ford. The hus band did. And, like magic to a weary mother, 10 minutes later, Ford grudg ingly returned to the table. Its true that Ford might resent me now. Maybe Ive made him feel uncom fortable. But I have faith that when these rocky years have past, he will look back and recognize my gift to him: one year filled with a village that, in the absence of his father, helped to raise him.It takes a village to raise a pre-teen Due to a reporters error, a sponsor was omitted from the MWR Barracks Bash article in the Oct. 18 edition of Jax Air News The correct spon sor list is: Everest University, Jacksonville Jaguars, USAA, GEICO, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, VyStar Credit Union, University of Phoenix and Allied University. Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Catholic CCD 11 a.m. Protestant Worship Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study 6 p.m. in the Barracks Officer Christian Fellowship and Bible study Every Monday at 6 p.m. NAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051

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Sunseekers hold Change of Command CeremonyCmdr. Chris MacMillan was relieved by Cmdr. Richard Shettler as commanding officer of VR-58 on Oct. 20 at NAS Jacksonville. The guest speaker for the ceremony was Vice Adm. Robin Braun who recently became the 13th Chief of Navy Reserve. Shettler, a native of Byron, Mich., enlisted in the United States Navy in July 1987. He graduated from Electronics A school in December 1988 and reported on board USS Raleigh (LPD-1). While assigned to USS Raleigh, Shettler deployed to the Persian Gulf region in support of Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm from August 1990 to April 1991. After returning to Norfolk, Va., Shettler applied and was selected as an officer candidate and attend ed both Old Dominion and Norfolk State Universities and com missioned an ensign in the spring of 1994. After complet ing flight training in December 1995, Shettler was designat ed a naval aviator and assigned to VQ-4 at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma City, Okla. There he served as both mission and aircraft com mander providing the president of the United States with a survivable and endurable means to command the nations strategic nuclear weapons arsenal. After his tour with the VQ-4, Shettler report ed back to the birthplace of naval aviation, flying as a Warbuck at Training Squadron Four at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-4, Shettler completed his Masters Degree from Embry Riddle Aeronautical University in 2001 and applied, was selected and redesignated as a full time support (FTS) officer in the United States Naval Reserve in July 2001. After becoming an FTS officer, Shettler completed operational VR tours with the VR-58 Sunseekers in Jacksonville and the VR-51 Windjammers in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. On shore duty he completed an individual aug mentee deployment in support of both Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom as the director of the Warrior Transition Program in Kuwait from April 2009 to November 2009. In 2011, Shettler completed a shore tour on the staff of Commander, Naval Air Force. Shettler has served in a variety of positions, includ ing operations officer, maintenance officer, aviation safety officer, administration officer, training officer, detachment officer in charge and requirements offi cer defending procurement plans for 12 different type model aircraft. In May 2011, he reported as the prospective execu tive officer of VR-58 andassumed the position of exec utive officer in September 2011. Shettler has accumulated more than 5,500 mishap free flight hours in six different Navy aircraft. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 Sixty-six military members from 11 countries par ticipated in the seventh Conseil International du Sport Militaire (CISM) World Military Golf Championship at NAS Jacksonville last week. Players from the U.S., Canada, Bahrain, Spain, Netherlands, Pakistan, Germany, Italy, Namibia, Zambia and Estonia came together to enjoy four days of tournament play and other events. The event kicked off with opening ceremonies Oct. 13 at the Navy Gateway Inns & Suites Pavilion. Team by team, the athletes paraded in, proudly carrying their national flags, as a group of dignitaries and spec tators looked on. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders welcomed the dignitaries and athletes to the base. Additional remarks were made by Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast, and USAF Brig. Gen. Eden Murrie, chair of the Armed Forces Sports Council and U.S. Chief of Delegation for CISM. After remarks regarding the games and the history of CISM, Lt. Col. Hakeem Al-Shino, the official CISM representative, declared the 7th CISM World Military Golf Championship officially open. Steven Dinote, Armed Forces Sports Secretary of the U.S. delegation added, We are excited to have the championship back at NAS Jacksonville in 2003, it hosted the inaugural CISM championship. This year we have the largest roster of players since it was brought into the CISM calendar. The tournaments first round began Sunday morning at the NAS Jacksonville Golf Club. The athletes were broken into 22 groups of three players each, with the men teeing off first. After several hours of play, one by one, the teams came in and scores were tallied. The U.S. mens team of Thomas Whitney, Addison Lambeth, Adam Dickey, Jason Perry, Brent Riley and Stephan Rude, led the field in round one with a score of 282. They were followed by Thomas Cameron, Tony Stuckless, Paul Ridyard, Cameron Lowdon, Wayne ODonnell and Richard Lim of Canada at 299. The Bahrain team of Mohammed Alnoaimi, Naser Yaqoob, Hamad Alafnan, Abdulla Alhakam, Nabeel Sabt and Sultan Alhakam were next with a score of 315. Individual scores put Stephan Rude on top of the leader board with a 69. Thomas Whitney and Adam Dickey tied for second at 70. Addison Lambeth fol lowed with a 73. In the womens competition, the U.S. team of Linda Jeffery and Nicole Johnson, placed first in round one with a score of 159, followed by Carla Escobar and Karyne Gelinas of Canada at 168. The German team of Karin Schmidt and Janina Kohler placed third with a 197. Individual scores put Nicole Johnson in first with a 79 and Linda Jeffrey second with 80. Carla Escobar of Canada placed third with an 82. On day two, under cloudy skies, the U.S. mens team increased their lead with an overall score of 284, fol lowed by Canada at 307 and Bahrain with 296. Thomas Whitney shot a sub-par second round earn ing him first place with a score of 136. Stephan Rude NAS Jacksonville hosts World Military Golf Championship

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 5 placed second with 142 and Jason Perry moved up to third with 145. Once again, the U.S. women retained the lead at 312 strokes. Canada remained in second at 335 and Germany in third with 378. Linda Jeffery and Nicole Johnson tied for first in the individual competition at 156 strokes. Karyne Gelinas of Canada placed third at of 167. In round three, under sunny skies, the U.S. womens team maintained their lead at 468 strokes, followed by Canada at 513 and Germany at 549. In the individual competition, Nicole Johnson and Linda Jeffery tied for first place at 234 strokes. The U.S. mens team continued their lead with a score of 853, as Bahrain moved up to second with 907 and Canada took third with 918. Thomas Whitney retained the top position at 203 strokes, Jason Perry moves up to second with 215 and Stephan Rude fell six strokes behind with 221. The final day of the tournament proved to be quite exciting, with play ers battling stroke by stroke for the gold medal. The womens division was tied going into the final round of compe tition between U.S. teammates Linda Jeffrey and Nicole Johnson. Jeffrey took the final round to win the gold with 312. Johnson finished five strokes behind at 317. The U.S. women won the team cham pionship with a low score of 629. Canada earned the sliver with 691 and Germany the bronze with 717. Jeffrey said, This is my fifth CISM championship. The NAS Jax Golf Course staff, including the maintenance team, really got this course in great shape for the tournament considering all the weather issues. It was a very challenging golf course that met my expectations. All the countries had a good time and got to experience a great offering from hospitality and staff. Im lucky enough to have won and this time around proved to be tougher. I had great com petition with my own teammate, Nicole Johnson. My favorite part was getting to meet people from other countries and that to me is the true meaning of this competition friendship through sport. It is not just about the medals. The U.S. men dominated the individ ual competition. Thomas Whitney won gold with an impressive score of 270 followed by Adam Dickey and Stephan Rude at 293 strokes. The U.S. mens team claimed a sub stantial win by 79 strokes with a score of 1,135. The battle for silver and bronze was extremely close between Bahrain and Canada. Bahrain finished at 1,214, followed by Canada at 1,219. Brig. Gen. Gijs van Keulen, Chief of Mission for the Netherlands stated, We had a very enjoyable time here, I just returned myself from a year tour in Afghanistan where we had 51 allies, who worked jointly to help other peo ple. Here, we also have a great team of nations working together and build ing friendships through sport. The overall performance of the U.S. team in Jacksonville was great. The course was enormous and in excellent shape. I would like to recognize all the volun teers who organized this event. It will be tough to match this next time. We had a great time, many thanks, many thanks. The overall atmosphere was great. In each days parings at least one per son was from a different country to promote the friendship through sport. New friendships were established this week. The camaraderie increased as the week went on. The CISM tradition of gift sharing and trading of jerseys went on throughout the week. You also saw the team spirit when players who fin ished early went back on the golf course to cheer on their fellow teammates and show good will to players of other nations, said NAS Jacksonville Director of Golf Joe Carreiro. On Thursday, the teams were treat ed to a special cultural day at World Golf Village in St. Augustine, Fla. They toured the Word Golf Hall of Fame museum, watched an IMAX 3D film, participated in an 18-hole putting chal lenge and enjoyed lunch. After four days of competition, an awards ceremony that evening officially brought the CISM tournament to a close. Photos by Shannon Leonard and Morgan Kehnert GOLF

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The VP-26 Tridents teamed up with the Royal Canadian Air Force for a weeklong dynam ic joint exercise in August. Operation Nanook is an annual exercise that consists of sup port from Joint Task Force North, Canadian Maritime Command, and the Canadian Coast Guard. VP-26 joined forces in continued support of our neighbors and to solid ify our relationship with the Canadian territories. In 2007, Operation Nanook was initiated in response to Russias territorial claim in the Arctic region. Since 2001, Russia has sought formal rec ognition that its territorial waters extend to the North Pole, which has sparked con troversy among Russias neighboring nations. Russias research has spawned a movement by Canada and its neighbors to exert stronger authority over Canadian ter ritorial waters and their asso ciated bodies of water known as Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs). EEZs extend a coun trys sovereignty up to 200 nau tical miles from the coastal baseline, provided the waters are adjacent to a territorial sea. Throughout the exercise, the Tridents assisted with mari time surveillance of several EEZs. The aircrew routine ly patrolled the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Labrador Sea, The Davis Strait and Baffin Bay for all vessels entering and exit ing the areas. Using radar, high-resolution cameras, and an Automatic Identification System (AIS), P-3 crews cor roborated a list of pre-approved merchant traffic and identified vessels of interest. AIS informa tion is coupled with a Global Positioning System (GPS) to supplement marine radar, which is the primary method used for maritime collision avoidance. The flexibility of the P-3C Orion allowed the crew to operate from many challenging locations to collect essential data on the vessels operating in the area. Taking off out of various unfamiliar airfields in Nova Scotia, Nunavut, and the North West Indies, the crew faced several operational challenges. In addition to primitive naviga tional equipment at these air fields, they also encountered poor weather conditions. Ice, snow, and whiteouts diminish visual references and are not native to typical Jacksonville weather. A whiteout is an obscuration caused by snow or sand that can reduce or even eliminate visibility, caus ing the horizon to disappear. Conditions like these put pilots at risk of severe spatial disori entation and merit additional The VP-5 Mad Foxes par ticipated in the fourth itera tion of Valiant Shield, a large simulated war game that took place in Guam, Sept. 11-21. The exercise strengthened joint U.S. forces abilities to detect, track, and engage units at sea, in the air, and on land. Missions ranged from antisubmarine warfare (ASW) to combat search and rescue, and tested the capabilities of and cooperation between the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force. VP-5 supported the 11-day exercise, flying more than 114 hours. The Mad Fox Detachment, led by Lt. Andy Mack, included Combat Aircrews One, Eight, and Nine, and a maintenance support team. The exercise combined the efforts of Maritime Patrol Reconnaissance Aircraft (MPRA) assets, USS George Washington Strike Group, 12th Reconnaissance Squadron, and Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 225. All entities worked together seamlessly to create an envi ronment suitable for training and sharing platform specific tactics. In the air, the Mad Foxes had the tremendous opportu nity to conduct coordinated operations with the newest addition to the MPRF team, the P-8A Poseidon. Working with the P-8 in a coordinated environment during our ASW missions was an awesome experience for the crew, said Lt. j.g. Casey Stuart. In addition, the aircrews conducted simulated anti-sur face warfare with other air and maritime assets. They also participated in several intelligence, surveil lance, and reconnaissance operations to integrate the MPRA capabilities into Carrier Strike Group operations. Mack stated, The whole exercise was a terrific flying experience that promoted safety and mission accom plishment; we had a great opportunity to provide train ing to our aircrews as well. On the ground, the mainte nance team flexed to a num ber of challenges in the busy environment. We worked as a multisquadron maintenance con trol team from the start of the exercise. It was great to solve problems with other squad rons to get the aircraft and systems ready to fly, said AT2 Marcello Cromer. Not only did the team immediately respond to Mad Fox P-3C maintenance needs, but they worked side by side with other VP squadron main tenance teams to ensure the planes were mission-capable for any mission during the exercise. With 100 percent mission completion, the Mad Foxes demonstrated the full range of MPRA capabilities during Valiant Shield 2012. The maintenance and air crew teams also received valu able joint operations training with other U.S. forces. AWO2 Kevin Stoelting com mented, Each flight, we refined our skills with coor dinated operations, which we will take with us into the real world environment. Mad Foxes support Exercise Valiant Shield 2012 Tridents lend a hand in Operation Nanook 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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considerations for safety. Flight equipment failures led to a loss of the GPS system as well as sever al other unreliable or non-functioning navigational aids in the aircraft. The crew was forced to navigate only on non-directional beacons to land at their destination Yellowknife in very poor visibility. A non-directional beacon (NDB) is a radio transmitter used for navigation and is usually found in remote areas. They can be maintained at a lower cost, but, provide no directional or distance information to the aircraft instruments. Many NDBs in Canada are privately owned and maintenance is dependent upon the owners capabilities, thus, can be much less reliable. Challenges such as these, highlight the importance of a strong fundamental background for pilots and a firm understanding of basic instrument procedures. Throughout Operation Nanook, the Tridents seized an opportunity to strengthen a critical relationship with the former British colony as well as garner increased experience and an expanded perspective on the P-3 Orions capabilities. VP-26 MTOC-3 deploys to 5th Fleet AORThe Sailors of Mobile Tactical Operations Center Three (MTOC-3) loaded their palletized gear onto a USAF C-17 transport aircraft Oct. 17 for airlift to its forward operating base in the 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR). MTOC-3 is one of four such units under Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 (CPRW-11) at NAS Jacksonville. An MTOC is a rap idly deployable mobile command and control, communications, computers and intelligence (C4I) supporting the Navys maritime patrol and reconnais sance force. MTOC Sailors are considered rapid deployers who can pack their tacti cal gear in a C-130 Hercules or C-17 Globemaster, depending on the scope of their mission, and promptly deploy across the globe according to the needs of theater commanders. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 7

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base swimming pool. He spent another summer working as a carpenters assistant, helping build the Patriots Point base housing area behind the hos pital. This exchange and this commissary are not the same ones that I used to go to when I was growing up, but this is home for me, Gortney said. Even though he grew up in a Navy family and spent so much time on base, Gortney said he could never see himself as a Sailor when he was younger. I wanted no part of the Navy, he said. I felt that way because I moved around all my life as a Navy brat, but when I was about half way through college, I decided I didnt want to be a lawyer. I was a history major, and I didnt know what I would do with a history degree if I wasnt going to law school. At that point, Gortney said, something changed within him. In our business, we have a lot of father-son or fatherdaughter relationships where you follow the path of your par ents, he said. At a very early age, I wanted to fly, and I would wear my fathers flight gear like any other kid did, and I think that spark came back to me when I was in college. Twenty-seven years later, Gortney would find himself back at NAS Jacksonville, not as a summer hire, but as a fourstar admiral. While he said the landscape has changed dra matically since his high-school years, so has the Navys war fighting capabilities. Gortney specifically mentioned the arrival of the P-8A Poseidon aircraft and the opening of the new P-8A Integrated Training Center. The good news is that were replacing the P-3s that were here when I was in high school with P-8s. I just had a chance to tour a P-8 and it was great, and I got to fly the simulator and it was a lot of fun, he said. The helicopters at NAS Jax are also more advanced. Weve gone from H-3s to H-60s, so we have much more capable helos out there on the seaboard. According to Gortney, Jacksonville is the perfect loca tion to base Poseidon aircraft, not just geographically, but also because of the strong com munity support for the mili tary. Jacksonville is just a super Navy town. North Florida is very supportive of the Navy and has been for years, he said. Its a great place to operate from, and its a great place to train from. The air station is a historical one, and its a real jewel. It has, for decades, pro vided terrific support forward. I wouldnt want to fly P-8s any where else. Despite all the things that have changed on and around NAS Jacksonville since Gortneys life-guarding days at the base pool, there is at least one thing that remains the same. The one constant is the quality of the people our Sailors, chief petty officers, officers and civilians that help make this place run. Theyre just phenomenal, and they are the greatest strength that we have. Although Gortney is now stationed in Norfolk, his father still has a place in Orange Park, where he spends the winter and Gortney still visits when he can. He said spending time in the Jacksonville area is some thing he will always look for ward to. FLEET FORCESFlying more than 24 sorties during the 10-day exercise, the VP-10 Red Lancers provided direct support to multinational forces from Royal Air Force (RAF) Leuchars, Scotland. The station is primarily a quick-reaction interceptor command that maintains crews and aircraft at full 24/7 readiness to protect United Kingdom airspace from unidentified aircraft. Lt. Cmdr. Neill was officer in charge of the three Red Lancers maritime patrol aircraft that were flown by six combat aircrew (CAC). We brought CACs 2, 4, 6, 7, 10 and 12, plus maintainers, for a total force of more than 120 Sailors, said Neil. These CACs were able to complete half of their Operational Readiness Evaluation events at Joint Warrior for a real-time multinational experience. The biannual Joint Warrior exer cise improves interoperability of sea, ground and air assets from allied and NATO forces and aims to foster team work between participating nations, including the United Kingdom, France, Canada, the Netherlands, Belgium, Estonia, Norway, United States and Sweden. It is great training for the whole crew to get the chance to interact with foreign countries, said CWO3 Travis Bourne. We are all better at communications because of this exercise. It was reas suring to see all the countries working together to accomplish one goal. During their days off from flying, some Red Lancers were able to play the world famous old St. Andrews golf course that was a short ride from RAF Leuchars. About 40 fixed-wing aircraft operated from RAF Leuchars during the exer cise, including a detachment of Swedish Saab JAS-39 Gripen jets, RAF Hawks, Tornado GR4s, a Eurofighter Typhoon aircraft, as well as eight maritime patrol aircraft from the U.S., Canada and France. VP-10 is training for its December deployment to the 4th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibilities. VP-10 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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accomplish international and nation al objectives is invaluable and extends well beyond the Black Sea. One of the most important areas of cooperation emphasized during Sea Breeze was the ability to conduct mari time interdiction operations. During the final stages of the exercise, surface and aviation assets worked closely to interdict a suspected smuggling vessel in an open ocean environment. HSL-42 Detachment Sevens SH-60B provided coverage during the search and boarding, while the Ukrainian Ka-27 Helix launched to directly sup port the UPN Sahaydachniys boarding team. The result was an effective and effi cient boarding operation that could be transplanted to any area of operation in the world. To conclude the exercise, the SH-60B and Ka-27 conducted a formation flight within a multinational ship formation. In order to complete this feat, the air crew held an extensive pre-flight brief to standardize radio communication and cover all possible contingencies. Once launched, the rotary formation executed basic formation tactics over the course of an hour above the multi national surface formation centered on Dunham. The final events provided a fitting finale for Sea Breeze 2012, symboliz ing the resolve of the United States and Ukraine as partners in maritime secu rity. The aircrews of HSL-42 Detachment Seven Warrior Legacy enjoyed the unique opportunities provided by oper ating in the Black Sea with fellow avia tors and the overall impact to theater security cooperation was greatly appre ciated. Over the course of two weeks, 17 nations came together to execute both maritime and amphibious operations. Through in-depth planning and patience, everyone was able to over come language and procedural barriers to provide mutual support and foster a cooperative operating environment. SEA BREEZE JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 9

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The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the military-to-civilian recruitment firm RecruitMilitary will collaborate on a hiring event for military veterans at EverBank Field, home of the NFL Jacksonville Jaguars, Nov. 1 from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. RecruitMilitary is inviting veterans who already have civilian work experi ence, men and women who are tran sitioning from active duty to civilian life, members of the National Guard and reserves, military spouses, and other military family members. This event, a Hiring Our Heroes/ RecruitMilitary Veteran Opportunity Expo, is part of a nationwide initiative to increase the hiring of veterans and military spouses by producing special career fair hiring events. RecruitMilitary and the Chamber expect more than 40 employers, fran chisors, educational institutions, and government agencies to reserve exhib itor booths at the Expo in Jacksonville.Veterans job expo set for Nov. 1 Brazilian aviation specialists tour Air OpsMore than 40 students and instructors from the Brazilian Air Force School of Aviation Specialists were briefed on northeast Florida air space Oct. 16 by the NAS Jax Air Operations team led by Cmdr. Mike Chan. Centro de Instruo e Adaptao da Aeronutica is the Brazilian Air Force Center for Instruction and Adaptation of Aeronautics (CIAAR). It provides technical training and career develop ment education for enlisted personnel who are commissioned as 2nd lieuten ants upon completion of their two-year course of study. Brazilian Air Force CIAAR Commander Brig. Gen. Antonio Coutinho thanked NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders for his warm hos pitality and for sharing information about base commands and operations. Chan arranged command briefings on NAS Jax air space, Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jax, Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Jax, as well as Navy meteorologi cal and oceanographic operations. In the NAS Jax control tower, groups of Brazilians observed Facility Watch Supervisor AC1 Floyd Nichols, local controller Ed Hall, Ground Controller AC2 Nathaniel Freeman and Ground Controller AC2 Roderick McPeak as they handled a steady flow of landings and takeoffs. Col. Jose Gouveia, commander of the CIAAR student corps, said, We teach three aviation specialties: air traffic control; meteorology and atmospheric research; and communications and data management. Each is a two-year course of study and the students were touring with today will graduate in December. Coutinho remarked that meteorology is always important to aviators because weather in both the atmosphere and the ocean can affect any military operation. He added that the student corps enjoyed seeing how U.S. Navy aviation proce dures compared with operations in the Brazilian Air Force. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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The VR-62 Nomads recently returned home from a Western Pacific deployment. Operating out of NAF Atsugi, Japan, the squadron supported Commander, Fleet Air Forward (CFAF), andprovided lift for the USS George Washington Battle Group and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5. During their deployment, the Nomads flew to 23 airfields in and around the Western Pacific Region, while maintaining a 100 percent missioncompletion rate with their C-130T Hercules transport aircraft. I am really proud of the Nomads work in the Western Pacific. Squadron person nel produced a fantastic outcome to sup port CFAF, the USS George Washington Battle Group and its customers. I am especially proud of ourmaintainers and aircrews for making this happen, said VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Alexander Ellermann. During the deployment, one aircraft provided support to 24 missions,fly ing 419.4 flight hours in 85 days while deployed recently in the Western Pacific. The Nomadsflew 303,975 pounds of cargo and transported 514 passengers. To use a tactical analogy, if the Nomads were an FA-18 squadron our mission would look like this: Utilizing a single FA-18 flying 9,700 miles to the area of responsibility, and dropping 608 500-pound bombs on 24 targets over a 85 day period logging 419.4 flight hours with a100 percent mission completion rate. Each of those bombs was delivered within 16 inches of the target, and we did it with 23 detached squadron personnel, then flying home 9,700 miles. That sounds pretty incredible, but we do these things on a 24/7 basis. The C-130T is the invis ible warrior of the U.S. Navy, said AWFCS Mike Wendelin, a VR-62 loadmaster. Following a three-week break home at NAS Jacksonville, the Nomads will detach to Bahrain in November. They will support Commander Task Force 53 withshort-notice, high-priority air logis tics throughout the Central Command theater.VR-62, a Navy Reserve squad ron, operates four of the Navys 19 C-130T Hercules aircraft.VR-62 Nomads return home from WESTPAC JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 11

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The 2012 Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) is under way at NAS Jacksonville, its tenant commands and departments. The drive kicked off with a CFC Fair outside Building 1 and Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast Oct. 18. The annual event runs from Sept. 1 through Dec. 15 and provides qualifying agen cies the opportunity to receive monetary contributions from government employees. Listed within the CFC program guide are short descriptions of each, including the percentage of donated funds that go to cover administration costs. This enables contributors to discern between charities based on their personal preferences and priorities. We are here today to let everyone know that the Combined Federal Campaign season is in full swing. We brought out 30 charities today so people can talk to them and get some information about what they represent and how they help those in need, said John Smith, regional direc tor for the Combined Federal Campaign. Without dona tions, charities cant achieve their missions. And, the easiest way to do this is through pay roll deductions. According to Smith, this years goal for the northeast region is 2.1 million. Federal workers have exceeded raising 2 million for the past 13 years so I am confident we will have another successful year, he added. NAS Jax Executive Office Capt. Roy Undersander wel comed the guests to the kickoff event. We have a wide range of charities and services rep resented from the Northeast Florida and Southern Georgia area. Last year, of the 2 million raised, about $700,000 went directly to the local charities in this area, he said. The rest went to other national and international charities. The money donated is definitely making a difference in our local communities. The goal for NAS Jacksonville this year is $500,000. NAS Jax personnel have always been the biggest sup porters within our region. Were very proud to be associ ated with them, said Smith. Tanya Hickey and AWVC(NAC/AW) John Markee of the NAS Jax Executive Department are leading the CFC for the station this year. All the agencies we support through the CFC must meet strict criteria so you know the majority of your money goes directly to that charity. Last year, base employees raised more than $600,000 for CFC. Think how much of that can be used for cancer research or to benefit children. So Id like to encourage you to choose an organization that you believe in and contribute what you can, said Hickey. Individuals can donate to CFC with a cash contribution or by pledging a specific amount to be withheld from their pay. Many commands also hold spe cial fundraising events to ben efit the CFC drive. Command involvement and leadership are essential ingredients to making the campaign successful. For more information on the CFC drive, contact your com mand loaned executive or call 542-5270. To further enhance customer shop ping experience at myNavyExchange. com, the Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) will be adding a number of new products to its Navy Exchange (NEX) web store over the next several months. We are constantly looking to add new products to our Web store, said Tess Paquette, NEXCOM senior vice president, chief merchandising officer. We know that some of our authorized customers dont have access to shop a NEX, so the web store is the only way they can use this benefit they have earned. We want to make sure we have the products our customers need and want at a savings, no matter where they live around the world. In honor of its decommissioning, USS Enterprise (CVN 65) apparel and gifts will be added to the NEX web store in mid-October. Customers will find a variety of Enterprise merchandise available to purchase including ball caps, shirts, coffee mugs and coins. Commissioned in 1961, the Enterprise is the worlds first nuclear-powered car rier and is both the largest and oldest active combat vessel in the Navy. Launching Oct. 31, customers will find a wider variety of toys on myNa vyExchange.com to coincide with the start of Toyland. Customers will be able to purchase action figures, building sets and blocks, dolls, kids electron ics, learning toys, riding toys and much more from their favorite brands. Toys were one of the top requests from customers and until now, we only offered early learning toys, said Paquette. We will now be offering toys for boys and girls for all age ranges, just in time for the holidays. MyNavyExchange.com currently has over 15,000 items in its Web store. This holiday season, mynavyex change.com is offering several free shipping deals for its customers. From Oct. 31 Nov. 21, customers will receive free standard shipping on any toy purchase of $150 or more. Customers will get free standard ship ping on any purchase of $150 or more from Nov. 22-26. Finally, from Nov. 30 Dec. 21, in addition to free standard shipping on any $150 or more purchase, customers will receive discounted priority delivery for $9.95 or discounted express delivery for $17.95.NEX Web store expands selection, adds merchandise Combined Federal Campaign kicks off at NAS Jax 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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DEWEYS All Hands ClubCall 542-3521 Located in Bldg. 608 between Gillis St. and Keily St. off of Enterprise Ave. Enjoy a full-service menu, beverages and a friendly atmo sphere that is great for all ages. Mon. Fri. 10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. Sat. & Sun. 4 10 p.m. CPO Pub Mon., Tues. & Fri. 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Wed. Thurs. 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Fall Bowling Leagues now forming! Mixed league Mon. @ 7 p.m. After-work league Wed. @ 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thurs. @ 9 a.m. Mixed league Thurs. @ 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Fri. @ 11:45 a.m. Friday night league @ 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Sat.@ 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Mon. Fri. 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wed. at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor pool Lap swimming Mon. Fri. 5:30 8 a.m. & 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Recreational swimming Mon. Fri. 4:30 8 p.m. Sat. & Sun. 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Kennedy Space Center Military member is free (pickup voucher at ITT) Family member tickets avail able at ITT Adult $44.50, child $35.50 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise at Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9 MOSH $7 $12 Upcoming ITT Trips: Lakeridge Winery Nov. 10 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4-day hopper $135.50 Universal Studios Special 2-day 1 park each day w/ 3rd day free $101.50 2-day park to park w/ 3rd day free $120.50 Tickets valid through Dec. 14, 2012 Universal Studios Halloween Horror Nights $41.25 $71 Order Gator Bowl tickets now $35 Gator Bowl Patch $9 Florida Classic $37.50 & $52.50 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Ghosts & Gravestones Tour St. Augustine, Oct. 27 at 5 p.m. Pumpkin Carving Contest Oct. 30, 7 p.m. at Liberty Dinner and a Movie at Liberty Oct. 31 at 6 p.m. The Campaign rated RNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Nov. 13 & 27 for active duty Nov. 15 & 29 for retirees & DoD personnel Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holi days. CFC Charity Golf Tournament Oct. 25, 12:30 p.m. shotgun start $60 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thurs. for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thurs., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding. ASE certified mechanic on site.Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recre ation available Family Fitness Center hours are Mon. Fri., 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you.Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Ground School Oct. 29 Dec. 10 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 13

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239, or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil The 10th annual NAS Freedom Lanes Professional Bowlers Association (PBA) South Region Tournament was held at NAS Jacksonville Oct. 12-14. Professional Kyle Troup from Taylorsville, N.C. placed first winning $2,100 followed by profession al Tom Daugherty from Wesley Chapel, Fla., taking home $1,100. NAS Freedom Lanes was awarded a certificate of appreciation from the PBA, for being a valued PBA tournament host center for 10 years. The center saw a record number of partici pation with 140 entries in Pro-Am and more than 200 spectators. The PBA, founded in 1958, is the major sanctioning body for the sport of professional 10-pin bowling in the United States. For more information on the bowling center call NAS Freedom Lanes at (904) 542-3493. Special thanks to VyStar Credit Union, Allied American University and The University of Phoenix for sponsoring the event.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.NAS Jax hosts Professional Bowlers Association tournament 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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The aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), operating off the Atlantic coast, recently completed phase two of its Tailored Ships Training Availability (TSTA), a stan dard used to evaluate a ships readiness for deployment. Airborne Tactical Advantage Company (ATAC), a civilian tactical airborne training organization, provided two F-21 Kfir fight ers and two Mk-58 Hawker Hunter attack aircraft flying from NAS Jacksonville to provide strike opposition to Trumans air wing. The three-phase TSTA leads up to a Final Evaluation Problem, in which the entire ships performance over a two-day event will be graded by Afloat Training Group and Naval Air Forces Atlantic before the ship can be certified by Carrier Strike Group 9. Trumans embarked Carrier Air Wing Three (CVW-3) practiced strike missions against ATAC opposition, utilizing Florida live-impact target ranges such as the Pinecastle Range Complex east of Ocala. Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is pleased to offer a new way for patients and their care teams to con nect. Patients with a Primary Care Manager (PCM) at the hospital or any of the branch health clinics can use a secure e-mail service called Medical Homeport Online. Patients can use this system to e-mail their care team for non-urgent issues, request lab results and medication refills, and access doctor-reviewed health information. Because its for non-urgent issues, it can take up to three business days for the team to reply. And the system is secure and confidential, with no cost. To sign up for Medical Homeport Online, go to www.relayhealth.com, select r egister in the upper right corner, and select register as a patient. Patients need to know the name of their PCM to sign up, and it can take up to three business days for the team to finalize the registration. For technical help, call RelayHealth at 866-RELAY-ME (866-735-2963). Patients can also fill out a registration form with staff at their Medical Homeport teams front desk. And, as always, NH Jacksonville Medical Homeport teams are available by telephone during clinic hours, and the Nurse Advice Line is available after-hours. To connect by telephone anytime, call Central Appointments and After-Hours Nurse Advice Line at 542-4677 or 800-JAX-HOSP (800-529-4677). For tele phone access to Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville during clinic hours, call 542-3500. These communication options are just one aspect of Medical Homeportthe Navys approach to the nationwide medical home model of care, which emphasizes quality, coordinated care led by a primary care provider. Medical Homeport places the patient at the center of a collaborative team of caregiversfrom doctors to nurses to case managersled by the PCM. The patient and the team work together for a coordi nated, whole person approach to health. To learn more about all services available at NH Jacksonville, check out the 2012 Patient Guide on the web at www.med.navy.mil/sites/navalhospitaljax and like the command on Facebook at www.facebook. com/navalhospitaljacksonville to keep up with cur rent news. ATAC helps Truman train warfighters E-mail access to hospital primary care teams: Medical Homeport Online WHAT TOOK YOU A LIFETIME TO LEARN CAN BE LOST IN MINUTES.Learn the warning signs atStrokeAssociation.orgor1-888-4-STROKE. WITH A STROKE, TIME LOST IS BRAIN LOST. American Heart Association Made possible in part by a generous grant from The Bugher Foundation. NOTE TO PUB:DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW,FOR ID ONLY. NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAs. American Stroke Association Newspaper (3 3/4 x 3 1/2) B&W ASNYR2-N-01065-H Lifetime85 line screen digital files at Schawk:(212) 689-8585 Ref#:211116 211116A01 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 15

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Legal assistance clients often ask when they can start dating before their divorce is completed. There is a lot at stake with such a question, especially those whose divorce will involve chil dren. Such extramarital relationships can affect your military career and can affect your divorce case. The bottom line is that dating before a final divorce is not recommended for several reasons. First and foremost, mil itary personnel could be subject to a prosecution for adultery, which is an offense under the UCMJ. No matter how hard you may try to hide your new relationship, social media such as Facebook, may compro mise the secret of your new relationship and provide evidence of your crime. Such relationships are not worth the possibility of losing your career (wheth er by court-martial, Article 15/Nonjudicial punishment, or administration separation). The new relationship may also cause an ugly fallout with your spouse and give your spouse ammunition to gain an advantage against you in the divorce proceeding. For military and civilians, if you have any children and/or proper ty with your spouse, a pending divorce could get very ugly quickly if the other party finds out that you have a new rela tionship when the divorce is not even final yet. The spouse may then be motivated to fight over issues that you thought were resolved as your spouse tries to find a way to lash out in any way that he or she can. All of a sudden, your soon-to-be-ex may try to prevent visitation with your children because of your new boyfriend or girlfriend and disagreements over whether it is in the best interests of the children for them to be exposed to your extra-marital affair. Such a relationship before the marriage is concluded could alter the complexion of the divorce pro ceedings and cause problems. All branches of the military provide that a service member has a duty to provide financial support to his or her spouse and family until an agreement is constructed and/or until a court finally issues a support order of some kind. A spouse who may be looking at getting less support than anticipated or no sup port may have a bigger incentive cause problems and reinvigorate the spouses support claims if your spouse becomes spiteful over your new relationship. Finally, rushing into a new relation ship while your old relationship is still not resolved may not be the best idea from a psychological standpoint. It may be advisable to give yourself time to heal from the broken relation ship before engaging in a new relation ship. A new relationship has a better chance of success if you arent still involved in a bitter divorce proceeding. An individual should take the time to get the necessary counseling required to improve the chances of a more suc cessful relationship in the future. The Naval Legal Service Office Southeast has legal assistance offices at NAS Jacksonville (542-2565, Ext. 3006), NS Mayport (270-5445, Ext. 3017) and NSB Kings Bay (912-573-3935). This article is not a substitute for individual legal advice and readers are advised that they should consult a law yer to obtain proper advice for any legal issue. The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Nov. 4, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Detroit Lions (Tickets now on sale) Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jags vs. Indianapolis Colts (Tickets on sale Oct. 29) Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to pur chase/use these tickets. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for mil itary personnel, but under no circum stances are dependent children autho rized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to pur chase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may pur chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No excep tions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or return ing during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tick ets for the entire season.Legal issues surrounding separation, divorce and datingJacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 17



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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Returns to rootsCommander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, visited NAS Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport and Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay to meet with senior leaders during a series of leadership calls Oct. 16-18. During the visit, Adm. Bill Gortney presented his phi losophies on leadership and took questions from base leaders. While the trip is similar to trips he will duplicate many times, for the fleets top admi ral, a trip to Northeast Florida is always special. Its always great, he said. I grew up on the St. Johns River water skiing on Doctors Inlet, and its always nice to come back to Northern Florida. Its home. Growing up as the son of a Navy captain, he moved to Jacksonville in 1970 when his father retired and took a job aboard NAS Cecil Field. That year was his sophomore year at Orange Park High School, where he would meet his future wife, Sherry. Gortney spent the next three years working summer jobs at NAS Jacksonville. He spent a summer as a lifeguard at the HSL-42 Detachment Seven, embarked on board USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), recently participated in Sea Breeze, the largest multinational maritime exercise in the Black Sea. Hosted by the Ukrainian Navy, the mission of Sea Breeze 2012 was to improve mari time safety and security in the region while enhancing the capabilities of Partnership for Peace and Black Sea Regional Maritime Security Forces. Participants included representatives from various branches of the armed forces of 17 nations. Participating fixedwing air assets included the U.S. Navys P-3C Orion and its Ukrainian counter part, the Be-12 Chayka (Russian for seagull due to its unique wing place ment). Rotary-wing assets included the U.S. Navys SH-60B Seahawk, the Ukrainian Mil-14 Haze, and Ka-27 Helix. During the exercise, members of HSL-42s Detachment Seven were given the opportunity to tour FFH Hetman Sahaydachniy, the Ukrainian Navy flagship. Hosted by the ships aircrew, the visit focused on the embarked Ka-27 and flight deck facilities. Squadron personnel returned the favor by giving the Ukrainian crew the opportunity to visit USS Jason Dunhams flight deck facili ties and discuss the SH-60B Seahawk. Throughout the exercise, all assets focused on formation steaming, search and rescue, and naval flight opera tions which included Ka-27 landings on Dunham. These assets were able to overcome significant language differ ences to achieve a common goal and complete the mission. The task group of 17 nations inte grated to execute all facets of opera tions in the littoral environment, which included an extensive medical training exercise. Assets coordinated with and supported each other in all phases of medical evacuation from start to finish. The event included rotary wing, sur face, and land assets as the task group facilitated casualty and medical assis tance training using organic assets. These shared skills and training events provided all nations the confidence and capacity to execute operations in littoral environments. In todays maritime environment, the ability to operate with other nations to Red Lancers visit Scotland for Joint WarriorNATOs largest military exercise, the United Kingdom-led Joint Warrior, took place off the west coast of Scotland Oct. 1-11. Participating allied units including three P-3C Orions from VP-10 at NAS Jax conducted piracy, narcotics and insurgency operations, mine countermeasures and electronic warfare training, as well as tactical intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance missions. Fleet Forces commander visits North Florida HSL 42, Det 7 participates in International Exercise Sea Breeze

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Oct. 25 1812 USS United States, under Capt. Stephen Decatur, captures HMS Macedonian. 1924 Navy airship USS Shenandoah (ZR-1) completes round-trip transcontinental cruise that began Oct. 7. 1944 During Battle of Leyte Gulf, in the Surigao Straits, U.S. battle ships execute the maneuver of cross ing the tee of the Japanese forces. Off Samar, escort carriers, destroyers and destroyer escorts heroically resist attacks of Japanese Center Force. Off Cape Engano, 3rd Fleet carriers attack Japanese Northern Force sinking sev eral small carriers. 1950 Chinese Communist Forces launch first offensive in Korea. 1983 U.S. Marines and U.S. Army troops land on Grenada to evacuate U.S. citizens threatened by the islands unstable political situation. Oct. 26 1921 In first successful test, a com pressed air, turntable catapult, launches an N-9 seaplane. 1922 Lt. Cmdr. Godfrey de Chevalier makes first landing aboard a carrier (USS Langley) while underway off Cape Henry, Va. 1942 Battle of Santa Cruz Island. USS Hornet (CV-8) was lost and USS Enterprise (CV-6) was badly damaged during the battle. 1944 Battle of Leyte Gulf ends with Navy carrier and USAAF aircraft attacks on the retreating Japanese ships. U.S. forces sink many Japanese ships including four carriers, three battleships, 10 cruisers, and nine destroyers, for a total of 26 capital ships. Afterwards, Japanese fleet ceases to exist as an organized fighting fleet. 1944 Special Task Air Group One makes last attack in month-long dem onstration of TDR drone missile against Japanese shipping and islands in the Pacific. Of 46 missiles fired, 29 reached their target areas. 1950 U.S. Amphibious Force 7th Fleet lands 1st Marine Division at Wonsan, Korea. 1963 USS Andrew Jackson (SSBN619) launches first Polaris A-3 missile from a submerged submarine, off Cape Canaveral, Fla. Oct. 27 1864 Lt. William Cushing sinks Confederate ram Albemarle with a spar torpedo attached to the bow of his launch. 1922 Navy League of U.S. spon sors first annual celebration of Navy Day to focus public attention on the importance of the U.S. Navy. That date was selected because it was Theodore Roosevelts birthday. 1943 First women Marines report for duty at Camp Pendleton. 1944 Fast Carrier Task Forces attack Japanese shipping and installations in Visayas and northern Luzon. 1967 Operation Coronado VIII begins in Rung Sat Zone. Oct. 28 1864 Steamer General Thomas and gunboat Stone River destroy Confederate batteries on Tennessee River near Decatur, Alabama. Oct. 29 1814 Launching of Fulton I first American steam-powered warship, at New York City. The ship was designed by Robert Fulton. 1980 USS Parsons (DDG-33) res cues 110 Vietnamese refugees 330 miles south of Saigon. Oct. 30 1799 William Balch becomes Navys first commissioned Chaplain. Oct. 31 1941 German submarine U-552 sinks USS Reuben James (DD245), which was escorting Convoy HX 156, with loss of 115 lives. First U.S. ship lost to enemy action in World War II. 1943 Lt. Hugh ONeill of VF(N)-75 destroys a Japanese aircraft during night attack off Vella Lavella in first kill by a radar-equipped night fighter in the Pacific. 1956 Navy personnel land in R4D Skytrain on the ice at the South Pole. Rear Adm. George Dufek, Capt. Douglas Cordiner, Capt. William Hawkes, Lt. Cmdr. Conrad Shinn, Lt. John Swadener, AD2 J. P. Strider and AD2 William Cumbie are the first men to stand on the South Pole since Capt. Robert Scott in 1912. 1956 USS Burdo (APD-133) and USS Harlan R. Dickson (DD-708) evacuate 166 persons from Haifa, Israel, due to the fighting between Egypt and Israel. 1961 End of lighter-than-air craft in U.S. Navy with disestablishment of Fleet Airship Wing One and ZP-1 and ZP-3, the last operating units in Navy LTA branch at Lakehurst, N.J. My new extreme sport is exposing strangers, through Dinner with the Smileys, to the sometimes-charm, sometimes-wrath of my pre-adolescent son. Quite frankly, on most days, Id much rather eat a South American hissing cockroach or parachute out of a heli copter. My youngest son, 5-year-old Lindell, is considered adorable in all situations even when hes mooning a former governor or pretending to vomit a plastic earthworm. Owen, by virtue of being the middle child, only dreams of mooning impor tant people or having any sort of wrath to call his own. Hes fortunate we dont accidentally leave the house without him, when hes quietly in his room or otherwise minding his own business. Ford is in a tough spot. Not only is he the oldest, and not only do I (rightly or wrongly) expect the most from him, but hes gone through this roller-coaster, pre-teen year alongside the 315 different people weve had to our weekly dinner. All because Fords dad his idol, his mentor, the man who can do no wrong has been deployed overseas for 12 months. Ford was left with me: the mom who cant throw a football, who pushes snooze 15 times, and who asks him to do annoying things like take dirty plates to the sink after dinner. So its been a rough year for me and Ford. Or maybe it just seems that way because weve had a weekly audience at the dinner table. Most boys and their parents suffer the pre-teen years with grace and dignity in the privacy of their homes. Sometimes Ive wondered if Dinner with the Smileys has been too much for Ford, who, like his dad, finds social situations difficult. Each week, Ive forced Ford out of his comfort zone, and many times, Ive paid the price. Weve had dinner with a wide range of people, from those who are extroverted and funny, to those who are quiet and serious, and even someone who suffers from Alzheimers Disease. Ive pushed my boys limits with din ners like No. 35, which included rock climbing a cliff at Acadia National Park. Often, the boys have welcomed the challenge. More often, however, Ford has resisted and rebelled. But for all Fords reservation and inhibition, he hasnt been shy about letting our guests know how hes feeling. Hes sighed, rolled his eyes, shut down and acted like Im the stupidest person who ever put on pants. I often make apologies for my boys after the dinners. Like a public affairs person cleaning up a politicians mess, I try to put the boys comments and behaviors into context. I ask our new friends to remember their own chil drens worst moments. But readers will say, Those poor children, and Look at what shes made them go through. After 47 weekly dinners with our community, however, I completely disagree. What Ive given my boys is a year full of lessons, each with a steep learning curve and usu ally no study guide. The boys have had to learn to be tolerant, patient, flexible and accommodating. Theyve learned to read social cues, give and take, and, ultimately, to say sorry when appro priate. Yes, most people are spared the embarrassment of having a moment in front of strangers at the dinner table, but those people have also missed the opportunity to learn and grow with their community. At our latest dinner, after Ford left the table angry, I overheard our female guest whisper to her husband, Why dont you go check on Ford. The hus band did. And, like magic to a weary mother, 10 minutes later, Ford grudg ingly returned to the table. Its true that Ford might resent me now. Maybe Ive made him feel uncomfortable. But I have faith that when these rocky years have past, he will look back and recognize my gift to him: one year filled with a village that, in the absence of his father, helped to raise him.It takes a village to raise a pre-teen Due to a reporters error, a sponsor was omitted from the MWR Barracks Bash article in the Oct. 18 edition of Jax Air News The correct spon sor list is: Everest University, Jacksonville Jaguars, USAA, GEICO, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, VyStar Credit Union, University of Phoenix and Allied University. Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Catholic CCD 11 a.m. Protestant Worship Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study 6 p.m. in the Barracks Officer Christian Fellowship and Bible study Every Monday at 6 p.m. NAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051

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Sunseekers hold Change of Command CeremonyCmdr. Chris MacMillan was relieved by Cmdr. Richard Shettler as commanding officer of VR-58 on Oct. 20 at NAS Jacksonville. The guest speaker for the ceremony was Vice Adm. Robin Braun who recently became the 13th Chief of Navy Reserve. Shettler, a native of Byron, Mich., enlisted in the United States Navy in July 1987. He graduated from Electronics A school in December 1988 and reported on board USS Raleigh (LPD-1). While assigned to USS Raleigh, Shettler deployed to the Persian Gulf region in support of Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm from August 1990 to April 1991. After returning to Norfolk, Va., Shettler applied and was selected as an officer candidate and attend ed both Old Dominion and Norfolk State Universities and com missioned an ensign in the spring of 1994. After complet ing flight training in December 1995, Shettler was designat ed a naval aviator and assigned to VQ-4 at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma City, Okla. There he served as both mission and aircraft commander providing the president of the United States with a survivable and endurable means to command the nations strategic nuclear weapons arsenal. After his tour with the VQ-4, Shettler report ed back to the birthplace of naval aviation, flying as a Warbuck at Training Squadron Four at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-4, Shettler completed his Masters Degree from Embry Riddle Aeronautical University in 2001 and applied, was selected and redesignated as a full time support (FTS) officer in the United States Naval Reserve in July 2001. After becoming an FTS officer, Shettler completed operational VR tours with the VR-58 Sunseekers in Jacksonville and the VR-51 Windjammers in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. On shore duty he completed an individual aug mentee deployment in support of both Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom as the director of the Warrior Transition Program in Kuwait from April 2009 to November 2009. In 2011, Shettler completed a shore tour on the staff of Commander, Naval Air Force. Shettler has served in a variety of positions, including operations officer, maintenance officer, aviation safety officer, administration officer, training officer, detachment officer in charge and requirements offi cer defending procurement plans for 12 different type model aircraft. In May 2011, he reported as the prospective execu tive officer of VR-58 andassumed the position of executive officer in September 2011. Shettler has accumulated more than 5,500 mishap free flight hours in six different Navy aircraft. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 Sixty-six military members from 11 countries par ticipated in the seventh Conseil International du Sport Militaire (CISM) World Military Golf Championship at NAS Jacksonville last week. Players from the U.S., Canada, Bahrain, Spain, Netherlands, Pakistan, Germany, Italy, Namibia, Zambia and Estonia came together to enjoy four days of tournament play and other events. The event kicked off with opening ceremonies Oct. 13 at the Navy Gateway Inns & Suites Pavilion. Team by team, the athletes paraded in, proudly carrying their national flags, as a group of dignitaries and spectators looked on. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders welcomed the dignitaries and athletes to the base. Additional remarks were made by Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast, and USAF Brig. Gen. Eden Murrie, chair of the Armed Forces Sports Council and U.S. Chief of Delegation for CISM. After remarks regarding the games and the history of CISM, Lt. Col. Hakeem Al-Shino, the official CISM representative, declared the 7th CISM World Military Golf Championship officially open. Steven Dinote, Armed Forces Sports Secretary of the U.S. delegation added, We are excited to have the championship back at NAS Jacksonville in 2003, it hosted the inaugural CISM championship. This year we have the largest roster of players since it was brought into the CISM calendar. The tournaments first round began Sunday morning at the NAS Jacksonville Golf Club. The athletes were broken into 22 groups of three players each, with the men teeing off first. After several hours of play, one by one, the teams came in and scores were tallied. The U.S. mens team of Thomas Whitney, Addison Lambeth, Adam Dickey, Jason Perry, Brent Riley and Stephan Rude, led the field in round one with a score of 282. They were followed by Thomas Cameron, Tony Stuckless, Paul Ridyard, Cameron Lowdon, Wayne ODonnell and Richard Lim of Canada at 299. The Bahrain team of Mohammed Alnoaimi, Naser Yaqoob, Hamad Alafnan, Abdulla Alhakam, Nabeel Sabt and Sultan Alhakam were next with a score of 315. Individual scores put Stephan Rude on top of the leader board with a 69. Thomas Whitney and Adam Dickey tied for second at 70. Addison Lambeth fol lowed with a 73. In the womens competition, the U.S. team of Linda Jeffery and Nicole Johnson, placed first in round one with a score of 159, followed by Carla Escobar and Karyne Gelinas of Canada at 168. The German team of Karin Schmidt and Janina Kohler placed third with a 197. Individual scores put Nicole Johnson in first with a 79 and Linda Jeffrey second with 80. Carla Escobar of Canada placed third with an 82. On day two, under cloudy skies, the U.S. mens team increased their lead with an overall score of 284, fol lowed by Canada at 307 and Bahrain with 296. Thomas Whitney shot a sub-par second round earning him first place with a score of 136. Stephan Rude NAS Jacksonville hosts World Military Golf Championship

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 5 placed second with 142 and Jason Perry moved up to third with 145. Once again, the U.S. women retained the lead at 312 strokes. Canada remained in second at 335 and Germany in third with 378. Linda Jeffery and Nicole Johnson tied for first in the individual competition at 156 strokes. Karyne Gelinas of Canada placed third at of 167. In round three, under sunny skies, the U.S. womens team maintained their lead at 468 strokes, followed by Canada at 513 and Germany at 549. In the individual competition, Nicole Johnson and Linda Jeffery tied for first place at 234 strokes. The U.S. mens team continued their lead with a score of 853, as Bahrain moved up to second with 907 and Canada took third with 918. Thomas Whitney retained the top position at 203 strokes, Jason Perry moves up to second with 215 and Stephan Rude fell six strokes behind with 221. The final day of the tournament proved to be quite exciting, with play ers battling stroke by stroke for the gold medal. The womens division was tied going into the final round of compe tition between U.S. teammates Linda Jeffrey and Nicole Johnson. Jeffrey took the final round to win the gold with 312. Johnson finished five strokes behind at 317. The U.S. women won the team championship with a low score of 629. Canada earned the sliver with 691 and Germany the bronze with 717. Jeffrey said, This is my fifth CISM championship. The NAS Jax Golf Course staff, including the maintenance team, really got this course in great shape for the tournament considering all the weather issues. It was a very challenging golf course that met my expectations. All the countries had a good time and got to experience a great offering from hospitality and staff. Im lucky enough to have won and this time around proved to be tougher. I had great com petition with my own teammate, Nicole Johnson. My favorite part was getting to meet people from other countries and that to me is the true meaning of this competition friendship through sport. It is not just about the medals. The U.S. men dominated the individ ual competition. Thomas Whitney won gold with an impressive score of 270 followed by Adam Dickey and Stephan Rude at 293 strokes. The U.S. mens team claimed a sub stantial win by 79 strokes with a score of 1,135. The battle for silver and bronze was extremely close between Bahrain and Canada. Bahrain finished at 1,214, followed by Canada at 1,219. Brig. Gen. Gijs van Keulen, Chief of Mission for the Netherlands stated, We had a very enjoyable time here, I just returned myself from a year tour in Afghanistan where we had 51 allies, who worked jointly to help other peo ple. Here, we also have a great team of nations working together and build ing friendships through sport. The overall performance of the U.S. team in Jacksonville was great. The course was enormous and in excellent shape. I would like to recognize all the volun teers who organized this event. It will be tough to match this next time. We had a great time, many thanks, many thanks. The overall atmosphere was great. In each days parings at least one per son was from a different country to promote the friendship through sport. New friendships were established this week. The camaraderie increased as the week went on. The CISM tradition of gift sharing and trading of jerseys went on throughout the week. You also saw the team spirit when players who fin ished early went back on the golf course to cheer on their fellow teammates and show good will to players of other nations, said NAS Jacksonville Director of Golf Joe Carreiro. On Thursday, the teams were treat ed to a special cultural day at World Golf Village in St. Augustine, Fla. They toured the Word Golf Hall of Fame museum, watched an IMAX 3D film, participated in an 18-hole putting chal lenge and enjoyed lunch. After four days of competition, an awards ceremony that evening officially brought the CISM tournament to a close. Photos by Shannon Leonard and Morgan Kehnert GOLF

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The VP-26 Tridents teamed up with the Royal Canadian Air Force for a weeklong dynam ic joint exercise in August. Operation Nanook is an annual exercise that consists of sup port from Joint Task Force North, Canadian Maritime Command, and the Canadian Coast Guard. VP-26 joined forces in continued support of our neighbors and to solid ify our relationship with the Canadian territories. In 2007, Operation Nanook was initiated in response to Russias territorial claim in the Arctic region. Since 2001, Russia has sought formal rec ognition that its territorial waters extend to the North Pole, which has sparked con troversy among Russias neighboring nations. Russias research has spawned a movement by Canada and its neighbors to exert stronger authority over Canadian ter ritorial waters and their asso ciated bodies of water known as Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs). EEZs extend a coun trys sovereignty up to 200 nautical miles from the coastal baseline, provided the waters are adjacent to a territorial sea. Throughout the exercise, the Tridents assisted with mari time surveillance of several EEZs. The aircrew routine ly patrolled the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Labrador Sea, The Davis Strait and Baffin Bay for all vessels entering and exit ing the areas. Using radar, high-resolution cameras, and an Automatic Identification System (AIS), P-3 crews cor roborated a list of pre-approved merchant traffic and identified vessels of interest. AIS information is coupled with a Global Positioning System (GPS) to supplement marine radar, which is the primary method used for maritime collision avoidance. The flexibility of the P-3C Orion allowed the crew to operate from many challenging locations to collect essential data on the vessels operating in the area. Taking off out of various unfamiliar airfields in Nova Scotia, Nunavut, and the North West Indies, the crew faced several operational challenges. In addition to primitive navigational equipment at these air fields, they also encountered poor weather conditions. Ice, snow, and whiteouts diminish visual references and are not native to typical Jacksonville weather. A whiteout is an obscuration caused by snow or sand that can reduce or even eliminate visibility, caus ing the horizon to disappear. Conditions like these put pilots at risk of severe spatial disori entation and merit additional The VP-5 Mad Foxes par ticipated in the fourth itera tion of Valiant Shield, a large simulated war game that took place in Guam, Sept. 11-21. The exercise strengthened joint U.S. forces abilities to detect, track, and engage units at sea, in the air, and on land. Missions ranged from antisubmarine warfare (ASW) to combat search and rescue, and tested the capabilities of and cooperation between the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force. VP-5 supported the 11-day exercise, flying more than 114 hours. The Mad Fox Detachment, led by Lt. Andy Mack, included Combat Aircrews One, Eight, and Nine, and a maintenance support team. The exercise combined the efforts of Maritime Patrol Reconnaissance Aircraft (MPRA) assets, USS George Washington Strike Group, 12th Reconnaissance Squadron, and Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 225. All entities worked together seamlessly to create an envi ronment suitable for training and sharing platform specific tactics. In the air, the Mad Foxes had the tremendous opportu nity to conduct coordinated operations with the newest addition to the MPRF team, the P-8A Poseidon. Working with the P-8 in a coordinated environment during our ASW missions was an awesome experience for the crew, said Lt. j.g. Casey Stuart. In addition, the aircrews conducted simulated anti-surface warfare with other air and maritime assets. They also participated in several intelligence, surveil lance, and reconnaissance operations to integrate the MPRA capabilities into Carrier Strike Group operations. Mack stated, The whole exercise was a terrific flying experience that promoted safety and mission accom plishment; we had a great opportunity to provide train ing to our aircrews as well. On the ground, the mainte nance team flexed to a num ber of challenges in the busy environment. We worked as a multisquadron maintenance con trol team from the start of the exercise. It was great to solve problems with other squad rons to get the aircraft and systems ready to fly, said AT2 Marcello Cromer. Not only did the team immediately respond to Mad Fox P-3C maintenance needs, but they worked side by side with other VP squadron maintenance teams to ensure the planes were mission-capable for any mission during the exercise. With 100 percent mission completion, the Mad Foxes demonstrated the full range of MPRA capabilities during Valiant Shield 2012. The maintenance and air crew teams also received valuable joint operations training with other U.S. forces. AWO2 Kevin Stoelting com mented, Each flight, we refined our skills with coor dinated operations, which we will take with us into the real world environment. Mad Foxes support Exercise Valiant Shield 2012 Tridents lend a hand in Operation Nanook 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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considerations for safety. Flight equipment failures led to a loss of the GPS system as well as several other unreliable or non-functioning navigational aids in the aircraft. The crew was forced to navigate only on non-directional beacons to land at their destination Yellowknife in very poor visibility. A non-directional beacon (NDB) is a radio transmitter used for navigation and is usually found in remote areas. They can be maintained at a lower cost, but, provide no directional or distance information to the aircraft instruments. Many NDBs in Canada are privately owned and maintenance is dependent upon the owners capabilities, thus, can be much less reliable. Challenges such as these, highlight the importance of a strong fundamental background for pilots and a firm understanding of basic instrument procedures. Throughout Operation Nanook, the Tridents seized an opportunity to strengthen a critical relationship with the former British colony as well as garner increased experience and an expanded perspective on the P-3 Orions capabilities. VP-26 MTOC-3 deploys to 5th Fleet AORThe Sailors of Mobile Tactical Operations Center Three (MTOC-3) loaded their palletized gear onto a USAF C-17 transport aircraft Oct. 17 for airlift to its forward operating base in the 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR). MTOC-3 is one of four such units under Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 (CPRW-11) at NAS Jacksonville. An MTOC is a rap idly deployable mobile command and control, communications, computers and intelligence (C4I) supporting the Navys maritime patrol and reconnaissance force. MTOC Sailors are considered rapid deployers who can pack their tacti cal gear in a C-130 Hercules or C-17 Globemaster, depending on the scope of their mission, and promptly deploy across the globe according to the needs of theater commanders. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 7

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base swimming pool. He spent another summer working as a carpenters assistant, helping build the Patriots Point base housing area behind the hos pital. This exchange and this commissary are not the same ones that I used to go to when I was growing up, but this is home for me, Gortney said. Even though he grew up in a Navy family and spent so much time on base, Gortney said he could never see himself as a Sailor when he was younger. I wanted no part of the Navy, he said. I felt that way because I moved around all my life as a Navy brat, but when I was about half way through college, I decided I didnt want to be a lawyer. I was a history major, and I didnt know what I would do with a history degree if I wasnt going to law school. At that point, Gortney said, something changed within him. In our business, we have a lot of father-son or fatherdaughter relationships where you follow the path of your parents, he said. At a very early age, I wanted to fly, and I would wear my fathers flight gear like any other kid did, and I think that spark came back to me when I was in college. Twenty-seven years later, Gortney would find himself back at NAS Jacksonville, not as a summer hire, but as a fourstar admiral. While he said the landscape has changed dra matically since his high-school years, so has the Navys war fighting capabilities. Gortney specifically mentioned the arrival of the P-8A Poseidon aircraft and the opening of the new P-8A Integrated Training Center. The good news is that were replacing the P-3s that were here when I was in high school with P-8s. I just had a chance to tour a P-8 and it was great, and I got to fly the simulator and it was a lot of fun, he said. The helicopters at NAS Jax are also more advanced. Weve gone from H-3s to H-60s, so we have much more capable helos out there on the seaboard. According to Gortney, Jacksonville is the perfect location to base Poseidon aircraft, not just geographically, but also because of the strong community support for the mili tary. Jacksonville is just a super Navy town. North Florida is very supportive of the Navy and has been for years, he said. Its a great place to operate from, and its a great place to train from. The air station is a historical one, and its a real jewel. It has, for decades, pro vided terrific support forward. I wouldnt want to fly P-8s anywhere else. Despite all the things that have changed on and around NAS Jacksonville since Gortneys life-guarding days at the base pool, there is at least one thing that remains the same. The one constant is the quality of the people our Sailors, chief petty officers, officers and civilians that help make this place run. Theyre just phenomenal, and they are the greatest strength that we have. Although Gortney is now stationed in Norfolk, his father still has a place in Orange Park, where he spends the winter and Gortney still visits when he can. He said spending time in the Jacksonville area is some thing he will always look for ward to. FLEET FORCESFlying more than 24 sorties during the 10-day exercise, the VP-10 Red Lancers provided direct support to multinational forces from Royal Air Force (RAF) Leuchars, Scotland. The station is primarily a quick-reaction interceptor command that maintains crews and aircraft at full 24/7 readiness to protect United Kingdom airspace from unidentified aircraft. Lt. Cmdr. Neill was officer in charge of the three Red Lancers maritime patrol aircraft that were flown by six combat aircrew (CAC). We brought CACs 2, 4, 6, 7, 10 and 12, plus maintainers, for a total force of more than 120 Sailors, said Neil. These CACs were able to complete half of their Operational Readiness Evaluation events at Joint Warrior for a real-time multinational experience. The biannual Joint Warrior exer cise improves interoperability of sea, ground and air assets from allied and NATO forces and aims to foster teamwork between participating nations, including the United Kingdom, France, Canada, the Netherlands, Belgium, Estonia, Norway, United States and Sweden. It is great training for the whole crew to get the chance to interact with foreign countries, said CWO3 Travis Bourne. We are all better at communications because of this exercise. It was reas suring to see all the countries working together to accomplish one goal. During their days off from flying, some Red Lancers were able to play the world famous old St. Andrews golf course that was a short ride from RAF Leuchars. About 40 fixed-wing aircraft operated from RAF Leuchars during the exer cise, including a detachment of Swedish Saab JAS-39 Gripen jets, RAF Hawks, Tornado GR4s, a Eurofighter Typhoon aircraft, as well as eight maritime patrol aircraft from the U.S., Canada and France. VP-10 is training for its December deployment to the 4th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibilities. VP-10 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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accomplish international and nation al objectives is invaluable and extends well beyond the Black Sea. One of the most important areas of cooperation emphasized during Sea Breeze was the ability to conduct maritime interdiction operations. During the final stages of the exercise, surface and aviation assets worked closely to interdict a suspected smuggling vessel in an open ocean environment. HSL-42 Detachment Sevens SH-60B provided coverage during the search and boarding, while the Ukrainian Ka-27 Helix launched to directly sup port the UPN Sahaydachniys boarding team. The result was an effective and effi cient boarding operation that could be transplanted to any area of operation in the world. To conclude the exercise, the SH-60B and Ka-27 conducted a formation flight within a multinational ship formation. In order to complete this feat, the air crew held an extensive pre-flight brief to standardize radio communication and cover all possible contingencies. Once launched, the rotary formation executed basic formation tactics over the course of an hour above the multinational surface formation centered on Dunham. The final events provided a fitting finale for Sea Breeze 2012, symboliz ing the resolve of the United States and Ukraine as partners in maritime secu rity. The aircrews of HSL-42 Detachment Seven Warrior Legacy enjoyed the unique opportunities provided by operating in the Black Sea with fellow avia tors and the overall impact to theater security cooperation was greatly appreciated. Over the course of two weeks, 17 nations came together to execute both maritime and amphibious operations. Through in-depth planning and patience, everyone was able to over come language and procedural barriers to provide mutual support and foster a cooperative operating environment. SEA BREEZE JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 9

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The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the military-to-civilian recruitment firm RecruitMilitary will collaborate on a hiring event for military veterans at EverBank Field, home of the NFL Jacksonville Jaguars, Nov. 1 from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. RecruitMilitary is inviting veterans who already have civilian work experience, men and women who are tran sitioning from active duty to civilian life, members of the National Guard and reserves, military spouses, and other military family members. This event, a Hiring Our Heroes/ RecruitMilitary Veteran Opportunity Expo, is part of a nationwide initiative to increase the hiring of veterans and military spouses by producing special career fair hiring events. RecruitMilitary and the Chamber expect more than 40 employers, franchisors, educational institutions, and government agencies to reserve exhibitor booths at the Expo in Jacksonville.Veterans job expo set for Nov. 1 Brazilian aviation specialists tour Air OpsMore than 40 students and instructors from the Brazilian Air Force School of Aviation Specialists were briefed on northeast Florida air space Oct. 16 by the NAS Jax Air Operations team led by Cmdr. Mike Chan. Centro de Instruo e Adaptao da Aeronutica is the Brazilian Air Force Center for Instruction and Adaptation of Aeronautics (CIAAR). It provides technical training and career develop ment education for enlisted personnel who are commissioned as 2nd lieuten ants upon completion of their two-year course of study. Brazilian Air Force CIAAR Commander Brig. Gen. Antonio Coutinho thanked NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders for his warm hos pitality and for sharing information about base commands and operations. Chan arranged command briefings on NAS Jax air space, Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jax, Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Jax, as well as Navy meteorological and oceanographic operations. In the NAS Jax control tower, groups of Brazilians observed Facility Watch Supervisor AC1 Floyd Nichols, local controller Ed Hall, Ground Controller AC2 Nathaniel Freeman and Ground Controller AC2 Roderick McPeak as they handled a steady flow of landings and takeoffs. Col. Jose Gouveia, commander of the CIAAR student corps, said, We teach three aviation specialties: air traffic control; meteorology and atmospheric research; and communications and data management. Each is a two-year course of study and the students were touring with today will graduate in December. Coutinho remarked that meteorology is always important to aviators because weather in both the atmosphere and the ocean can affect any military operation. He added that the student corps enjoyed seeing how U.S. Navy aviation proce dures compared with operations in the Brazilian Air Force. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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The VR-62 Nomads recently returned home from a Western Pacific deployment. Operating out of NAF Atsugi, Japan, the squadron supported Commander, Fleet Air Forward (CFAF), andprovided lift for the USS George Washington Battle Group and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5. During their deployment, the Nomads flew to 23 airfields in and around the Western Pacific Region, while maintaining a 100 percent missioncompletion rate with their C-130T Hercules transport aircraft. I am really proud of the Nomads work in the Western Pacific. Squadron person nel produced a fantastic outcome to support CFAF, the USS George Washington Battle Group and its customers. I am especially proud of ourmaintainers and aircrews for making this happen, said VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Alexander Ellermann. During the deployment, one aircraft provided support to 24 missions,fly ing 419.4 flight hours in 85 days while deployed recently in the Western Pacific. The Nomadsflew 303,975 pounds of cargo and transported 514 passengers. To use a tactical analogy, if the Nomads were an FA-18 squadron our mission would look like this: Utilizing a single FA-18 flying 9,700 miles to the area of responsibility, and dropping 608 500-pound bombs on 24 targets over a 85 day period logging 419.4 flight hours with a100 percent mission completion rate. Each of those bombs was delivered within 16 inches of the target, and we did it with 23 detached squadron personnel, then flying home 9,700 miles. That sounds pretty incredible, but we do these things on a 24/7 basis. The C-130T is the invis ible warrior of the U.S. Navy, said AWFCS Mike Wendelin, a VR-62 loadmaster. Following a three-week break home at NAS Jacksonville, the Nomads will detach to Bahrain in November. They will support Commander Task Force 53 withshort-notice, high-priority air logis tics throughout the Central Command theater.VR-62, a Navy Reserve squad ron, operates four of the Navys 19 C-130T Hercules aircraft.VR-62 Nomads return home from WESTPAC JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 11

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The 2012 Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) is under way at NAS Jacksonville, its tenant commands and departments. The drive kicked off with a CFC Fair outside Building 1 and Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast Oct. 18. The annual event runs from Sept. 1 through Dec. 15 and provides qualifying agen cies the opportunity to receive monetary contributions from government employees. Listed within the CFC program guide are short descriptions of each, including the percentage of donated funds that go to cover administration costs. This enables contributors to discern between charities based on their personal preferences and priorities. We are here today to let everyone know that the Combined Federal Campaign season is in full swing. We brought out 30 charities today so people can talk to them and get some information about what they represent and how they help those in need, said John Smith, regional direc tor for the Combined Federal Campaign. Without dona tions, charities cant achieve their missions. And, the easiest way to do this is through pay roll deductions. According to Smith, this years goal for the northeast region is 2.1 million. Federal workers have exceeded raising 2 million for the past 13 years so I am confident we will have another successful year, he added. NAS Jax Executive Office Capt. Roy Undersander wel comed the guests to the kickoff event. We have a wide range of charities and services rep resented from the Northeast Florida and Southern Georgia area. Last year, of the 2 million raised, about $700,000 went directly to the local charities in this area, he said. The rest went to other national and international charities. The money donated is definitely making a difference in our local communities. The goal for NAS Jacksonville this year is $500,000. NAS Jax personnel have always been the biggest sup porters within our region. Were very proud to be associ ated with them, said Smith. Tanya Hickey and AWVC(NAC/AW) John Markee of the NAS Jax Executive Department are leading the CFC for the station this year. All the agencies we support through the CFC must meet strict criteria so you know the majority of your money goes directly to that charity. Last year, base employees raised more than $600,000 for CFC. Think how much of that can be used for cancer research or to benefit children. So Id like to encourage you to choose an organization that you believe in and contribute what you can, said Hickey. Individuals can donate to CFC with a cash contribution or by pledging a specific amount to be withheld from their pay. Many commands also hold spe cial fundraising events to ben efit the CFC drive. Command involvement and leadership are essential ingredients to making the campaign successful. For more information on the CFC drive, contact your com mand loaned executive or call 542-5270. To further enhance customer shop ping experience at myNavyExchange. com, the Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) will be adding a number of new products to its Navy Exchange (NEX) web store over the next several months. We are constantly looking to add new products to our Web store, said Tess Paquette, NEXCOM senior vice president, chief merchandising officer. We know that some of our authorized customers dont have access to shop a NEX, so the web store is the only way they can use this benefit they have earned. We want to make sure we have the products our customers need and want at a savings, no matter where they live around the world. In honor of its decommissioning, USS Enterprise (CVN 65) apparel and gifts will be added to the NEX web store in mid-October. Customers will find a variety of Enterprise merchandise available to purchase including ball caps, shirts, coffee mugs and coins. Commissioned in 1961, the Enterprise is the worlds first nuclear-powered carrier and is both the largest and oldest active combat vessel in the Navy. Launching Oct. 31, customers will find a wider variety of toys on myNa vyExchange.com to coincide with the start of Toyland. Customers will be able to purchase action figures, building sets and blocks, dolls, kids electron ics, learning toys, riding toys and much more from their favorite brands. Toys were one of the top requests from customers and until now, we only offered early learning toys, said Paquette. We will now be offering toys for boys and girls for all age ranges, just in time for the holidays. MyNavyExchange.com currently has over 15,000 items in its Web store. This holiday season, mynavyex change.com is offering several free shipping deals for its customers. From Oct. 31 Nov. 21, customers will receive free standard shipping on any toy purchase of $150 or more. Customers will get free standard shipping on any purchase of $150 or more from Nov. 22-26. Finally, from Nov. 30 Dec. 21, in addition to free standard shipping on any $150 or more purchase, customers will receive discounted priority delivery for $9.95 or discounted express delivery for $17.95.NEX Web store expands selection, adds merchandise Combined Federal Campaign kicks off at NAS Jax 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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DEWEYS All Hands ClubCall 542-3521 Located in Bldg. 608 between Gillis St. and Keily St. off of Enterprise Ave. Enjoy a full-service menu, beverages and a friendly atmosphere that is great for all ages. Mon. Fri. 10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. Sat. & Sun. 4 10 p.m. CPO Pub Mon., Tues. & Fri. 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Wed. Thurs. 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Fall Bowling Leagues now forming! Mixed league Mon. @ 7 p.m. After-work league Wed. @ 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thurs. @ 9 a.m. Mixed league Thurs. @ 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Fri. @ 11:45 a.m. Friday night league @ 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Sat.@ 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Mon. Fri. 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wed. at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor pool Lap swimming Mon. Fri. 5:30 8 a.m. & 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Recreational swimming Mon. Fri. 4:30 8 p.m. Sat. & Sun. 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Kennedy Space Center Military member is free (pickup voucher at ITT) Family member tickets available at ITT Adult $44.50, child $35.50 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise at Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9 MOSH $7 $12 Upcoming ITT Trips: Lakeridge Winery Nov. 10 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4-day hopper $135.50 Universal Studios Special 2-day 1 park each day w/ 3rd day free $101.50 2-day park to park w/ 3rd day free $120.50 Tickets valid through Dec. 14, 2012 Universal Studios Halloween Horror Nights $41.25 $71 Order Gator Bowl tickets now $35 Gator Bowl Patch $9 Florida Classic $37.50 & $52.50 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Ghosts & Gravestones Tour St. Augustine, Oct. 27 at 5 p.m. Pumpkin Carving Contest Oct. 30, 7 p.m. at Liberty Dinner and a Movie at Liberty Oct. 31 at 6 p.m. The Campaign rated RNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Nov. 13 & 27 for active duty Nov. 15 & 29 for retirees & DoD personnel Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. CFC Charity Golf Tournament Oct. 25, 12:30 p.m. shotgun start $60 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thurs. for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thurs., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding. ASE certified mechanic on site.Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation available Family Fitness Center hours are Mon. Fri., 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you.Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Ground School Oct. 29 Dec. 10 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 13

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239, or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil The 10th annual NAS Freedom Lanes Professional Bowlers Association (PBA) South Region Tournament was held at NAS Jacksonville Oct. 12-14. Professional Kyle Troup from Taylorsville, N.C. placed first winning $2,100 followed by profession al Tom Daugherty from Wesley Chapel, Fla., taking home $1,100. NAS Freedom Lanes was awarded a certificate of appreciation from the PBA, for being a valued PBA tournament host center for 10 years. The center saw a record number of partici pation with 140 entries in Pro-Am and more than 200 spectators. The PBA, founded in 1958, is the major sanctioning body for the sport of professional 10-pin bowling in the United States. For more information on the bowling center call NAS Freedom Lanes at (904) 542-3493. Special thanks to VyStar Credit Union, Allied American University and The University of Phoenix for sponsoring the event.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.NAS Jax hosts Professional Bowlers Association tournament 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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The aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), operating off the Atlantic coast, recently completed phase two of its Tailored Ships Training Availability (TSTA), a stan dard used to evaluate a ships readiness for deployment. Airborne Tactical Advantage Company (ATAC), a civilian tactical airborne training organization, provided two F-21 Kfir fighters and two Mk-58 Hawker Hunter attack aircraft flying from NAS Jacksonville to provide strike opposition to Trumans air wing. The three-phase TSTA leads up to a Final Evaluation Problem, in which the entire ships performance over a two-day event will be graded by Afloat Training Group and Naval Air Forces Atlantic before the ship can be certified by Carrier Strike Group 9. Trumans embarked Carrier Air Wing Three (CVW-3) practiced strike missions against ATAC opposition, utilizing Florida live-impact target ranges such as the Pinecastle Range Complex east of Ocala. Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is pleased to offer a new way for patients and their care teams to con nect. Patients with a Primary Care Manager (PCM) at the hospital or any of the branch health clinics can use a secure e-mail service called Medical Homeport Online. Patients can use this system to e-mail their care team for non-urgent issues, request lab results and medication refills, and access doctor-reviewed health information. Because its for non-urgent issues, it can take up to three business days for the team to reply. And the system is secure and confidential, with no cost. To sign up for Medical Homeport Online, go to www.relayhealth.com, select r egister in the upper right corner, and select register as a patient. Patients need to know the name of their PCM to sign up, and it can take up to three business days for the team to finalize the registration. For technical help, call RelayHealth at 866-RELAY-ME (866-735-2963). Patients can also fill out a registration form with staff at their Medical Homeport teams front desk. And, as always, NH Jacksonville Medical Homeport teams are available by telephone during clinic hours, and the Nurse Advice Line is available after-hours. To connect by telephone anytime, call Central Appointments and After-Hours Nurse Advice Line at 542-4677 or 800-JAX-HOSP (800-529-4677). For tele phone access to Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville during clinic hours, call 542-3500. These communication options are just one aspect of Medical Homeportthe Navys approach to the nationwide medical home model of care, which emphasizes quality, coordinated care led by a primary care provider. Medical Homeport places the patient at the center of a collaborative team of caregiversfrom doctors to nurses to case managersled by the PCM. The patient and the team work together for a coordi nated, whole person approach to health. To learn more about all services available at NH Jacksonville, check out the 2012 Patient Guide on the web at www.med.navy.mil/sites/navalhospitaljax and like the command on Facebook at www.facebook. com/navalhospitaljacksonville to keep up with cur rent news. ATAC helps Truman train warfighters E-mail access to hospital primary care teams: Medical Homeport Online WHAT TOOK YOU A LIFETIME TO LEARN CAN BE LOST IN MINUTES.Learn the warning signs atStrokeAssociation.orgor1-888-4-STROKE. WITH A STROKE, TIME LOST IS BRAIN LOST. American Heart Association Made possible in part by a generous grant from The Bugher Foundation. NOTE TO PUB:DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW,FOR ID ONLY. NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAs. American Stroke Association Newspaper (3 3/4 x 3 1/2) B&W ASNYR2-N-01065-H Lifetime85 line screen digital files at Schawk:(212) 689-8585 Ref#:211116 211116A01 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 15

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Legal assistance clients often ask when they can start dating before their divorce is completed. There is a lot at stake with such a question, especially those whose divorce will involve chil dren. Such extramarital relationships can affect your military career and can affect your divorce case. The bottom line is that dating before a final divorce is not recommended for several reasons. First and foremost, military personnel could be subject to a prosecution for adultery, which is an offense under the UCMJ. No matter how hard you may try to hide your new relationship, social media such as Facebook, may compromise the secret of your new relationship and provide evidence of your crime. Such relationships are not worth the possibility of losing your career (whether by court-martial, Article 15/Nonjudicial punishment, or administration separation). The new relationship may also cause an ugly fallout with your spouse and give your spouse ammunition to gain an advantage against you in the divorce proceeding. For military and civilians, if you have any children and/or property with your spouse, a pending divorce could get very ugly quickly if the other party finds out that you have a new relationship when the divorce is not even final yet. The spouse may then be motivated to fight over issues that you thought were resolved as your spouse tries to find a way to lash out in any way that he or she can. All of a sudden, your soon-to-be-ex may try to prevent visitation with your children because of your new boyfriend or girlfriend and disagreements over whether it is in the best interests of the children for them to be exposed to your extra-marital affair. Such a relationship before the marriage is concluded could alter the complexion of the divorce proceedings and cause problems. All branches of the military provide that a service member has a duty to provide financial support to his or her spouse and family until an agreement is constructed and/or until a court finally issues a support order of some kind. A spouse who may be looking at getting less support than anticipated or no support may have a bigger incentive cause problems and reinvigorate the spouses support claims if your spouse becomes spiteful over your new relationship. Finally, rushing into a new relation ship while your old relationship is still not resolved may not be the best idea from a psychological standpoint. It may be advisable to give yourself time to heal from the broken relation ship before engaging in a new relationship. A new relationship has a better chance of success if you arent still involved in a bitter divorce proceeding. An individual should take the time to get the necessary counseling required to improve the chances of a more suc cessful relationship in the future. The Naval Legal Service Office Southeast has legal assistance offices at NAS Jacksonville (542-2565, Ext. 3006), NS Mayport (270-5445, Ext. 3017) and NSB Kings Bay (912-573-3935). This article is not a substitute for individual legal advice and readers are advised that they should consult a lawyer to obtain proper advice for any legal issue. The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Nov. 4, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Detroit Lions (Tickets now on sale) Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jags vs. Indianapolis Colts (Tickets on sale Oct. 29) Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but under no circum stances are dependent children autho rized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to pur chase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may pur chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No exceptions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or return ing during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tick ets for the entire season.Legal issues surrounding separation, divorce and datingJacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 25, 2012 17