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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 10-11-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02014

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jax rings in new yearSailors and civilians joined NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders at the headquarters flag pole Oct. 12 for the Navy Birthday Bell Ringing Ceremony. BMC(AW/ SW) Maurice Mabry served as the bell ringer. As a prelude to the bell ring ing ceremony, Sanders read the birthday message from Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert. As we celebrate our naval heritage, we proudly reflect on more than two centuries of warfighting excellence as the worlds preeminent maritime force. We had an extremely busy year answering our nations calls to operate forward and like those Sailors that served before us we assured allies, projected power, and defended our nations interests around the globe. This past year also signified a landmark year for our Navy, as we commemorated the War of 1812. Two hundred years ago on the Great Lakes, along the eastern seaboard, and the waters of New Orleans our leg acy was forged and traditions were created. We can never forget the Sailors who fought in 1812 and what we learned. They were brave and innovative Sailors with an amazing warfighting spirit. They made us what we are today, and their spirit and sacrifices live on today in our bold, proficient and confident Sailors. As we begin this new year, I ask you to remember our tenets: warfighting first; oper ate forward; and be ready. We must be prepared to fight and win today, while building the ability to win tomorrow. We must provide off shore options to deter, influence, and win in an era of uncertainty. Finally, we must harness the teamwork, talent and imagination of our diverse force to be ready to fight and responsibly employ our resources. The Conseil International du Sport Militaire (CISM) World Military Golf Championship has attracted teams from 11 nations that will compete at the NAS Jacksonville Golf Club for four rounds over the nine holes of the red and white courses that are each par 36. Countries represented in the CISM championship include Bahrain, Canada, Italy, Netherlands, Pakistan, Namibia, Germany, Spain, Uganda, Zambia and the United States. Each nations team is composed of six men and two women. At the opening ceremony Oct. 13, Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. said, Welcome to the NAS Jacksonville Golf Club. This is going to be a great competition, but more importantly, its a great opportunity for members of all teams to build lasting friendships through sport. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders said it was indeed an honor for NAS Jacksonville to host the CISM World Military Golf Championship. We look forward to four days of exciting golf and wish the best of luck to each player. Sanders said he had watched some of On Sept. 27, a Canadian film crew wrapped up the second of two seg ments filmed at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) highlighting depotlevel maintenance on a P-3 Orion maritime patrol aircraft, one of two owned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Discovery Channel Canada is pro ducing a series entitled Mighty Planes featuring six aircraft, with one program devoted to NOAAs two Hurricane Hunters, both Lockheed WP-3D Orion turboprop planes used for hurricane research and reconnais sance missions. The series is scheduled to air in the spring of 2013. Nadine Pequeneza, the Orion epi sode director, said coordination among the production studio, NOAA and other agencies was much like conducting a well-orchestrated symphony with its many working parts. We flew into Hurricane Leslie, a two-day mission with three shots, said Pequeneza of her flights on Sept. 7 and 8.I was on Kermit flown by a female pilot, Lt. Cmdr. Cathy Martin. There were also meteorologists, mechan ics and technicians onboard. I was intrigued by the planes capabilities to fly into the eye of a hurricane. David Celebrating 237 years of service NAS Jacksonville Golf Club hosts CISM World Military Golf Championship FRCSE aids Canadian filmmaker with Mighty Planes series

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Oct. 18 1812 U.S. sloop of war Wasp captures HM brig Frolic. 1859 U.S. Marines reach Harpers Ferry, Va. and assault the arsenal seized by John Brown and his fol lowers. 1867 USS Ossippee and USS Resaca participate in formal transfer of Alaska to U.S. authority at Sitka and remain to enforce law and order in new territory. 1944 3rd Fleet carrier aircraft attack Japanese ships in harbor, as well as land forces around Manila. 1968 In Operation Sea Lords, the Navys three major operating forces in Vietnam (TF 115, 116, and 117) are brought together for the first time to stop Vietcong infiltration deep into South Vietnams Mekong Delta. Oct. 19 1843 Capt. Robert Stockton in USS Princeton, the first screw-propelled naval steamer, challenges British merchant ship Great Western to a race near New York, which Princeton won easily. 1915 Establishment of submarine base at New London, Conn. 1944 Secretary of Navy orders African American women accepted into Naval Reserve. 1987 Destruction of an Iranian oil-drilling plat form used for military purposes. Oct. 20 1824 U.S. schooner Porpoise captures four pirate ships off Cuba. 1944 Seventh Fleet lands more than 60,000 Army troops on Leyte, Philippines while Japanese aircraft attack. 1952 Task Force 77 establishes ECM Hunter/Killer Teams of two ECM-equipped aircraft and an armed escort of four Skyraiders and four Corsairs. 1967 Operation Coronado VII began in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. 1983 Due to political strife, USS Independence (CV-59 ) ordered to Grenada. Oct. 21 1797 Launching of USS Constitution at the Harts Boston shipyard, Boston, Mass. The ship is now the oldest commissioned ship in the U.S. Navy. 1942 British submarine lands Capt. Jerauld Wright and four Army officers at Cherchel, French North Africa, to meet with a French military delegation to learn the French attitude toward future Allied landings. Oct. 22 1846 Lavinia Fanning Watson of Philadelphia christens the sloop-of-war Germantown, the first U.S. Navy ship sponsored by a woman. 1951 First of seven detonations, Operation BusterJangle nuclear test. 1962 President John F. Kennedy orders surface blockade (quarantine) of Cuba to prevent Soviet offen sive weapons from reaching Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Oct. 23 1944 Battle of Leyte Gulf, a series of separate bat tles, begins with attacks on Japanese ships. 1983 A suicide truck bomber attacks the Marine barracks at Beirut airport, Lebanon killing 241 (220 Marines, 18 Sailors, and 3 soldiers) 1983 Operation Urgent Fury (Grenada, West Indies) begins. Oct. 24 1944 In air-sea battle in the Sibuyan Sea, carrier aircraft attack Japanese Center Force. 1958 USS Kleinsmith (APD-134) evacuates U.S. nationals from Nicaro, Cuba. 1962 Atlantic Fleet begins quarantine operations to force Soviet Union to agree to remove ballistic mis siles and long range bombers from Cuba. Many people were shocked when Dustin and I surprised the boys last Halloween with a puppy, just three weeks before Dustin left for his deployment. Are you sure you want to take on the extra responsibility? they said. Do you know what youre getting into? What most people didnt know was that we had a 4-year-old who believed he was a dog, to the point of eating off the floor and carrying a tennis ball in his mouth. Before Sparky, the last dog we lived with was a border collie named Annie, who, I suspect, could manage pre-Algebra. She was one of the smartest dogs Ive ever known, except for that time she ate an SOS pad. But Annie also liked to eat wood specifically our back porch so she left us to work on a 13-acre farm in Florida. Lindell never knew Annie. We had a long, pet-free period (unless you count fish), until one year ago when the boys ran from the schoolyard to greet the new puppy waiting for them on the sidewalk. So long as Sparky wasnt on a mission, like Annie, to destroy stuff, I knew he would be a welcome addition. As it turns out, Sparky, a Brittany Spaniel, is a great distrac tion, especially for Lindell. Sparky has been cried on, hugged (perhaps too tightly) and fought over (Hes sleeping in my room. No, my room!). Sparky was even an accomplice to the great runaway epi sode several months ago. I cant say which one, but a son ran away to the end of the street with no suitcase or change of clothes, but with a willing dog by his side. Sparky has also done wonders for Lindells confusion about being a dog. At first, Sparky and Lindell had some getting used to (Lindells words). Sparky often sighed, and sometimes ran away, when Lindell approached him. This might have had something to do with the Scooby Doo costume Lindell wore and the fact that he took naps in Sparkys bed usually on top of Sparky. Eventually, however, Lindell learned Sparkys lessons (again, Lindells words), and besides that time Sparky ran out the backdoor with Lindells underwear, the two seldom make each other cry. They have settled into a nice, passive-aggressive rela tionship of sibling rivalry. Sparky has brought out many aspects of all my boys person alities. Lindell is the needler, the instigator. He is not opposed to blaming his mess on Sparky. Ford is the dutiful helper, always willing to take Sparky for a walk or feed him breakfast. Owen is the empathizer. When Sparky had to wear the dreaded cone of shame (a post-surgery e-collar) last week, Owen hand-fed his meals to him. Just as a husband and wife unite in their children, the older boys and I have bonded over our shared love of Sparky. When we pick up Sparky after a bath or time spent playing with another dog, Ford and Owen smile uncontrollably. Look at him just sitting there with those other dogs, they say. Or, Look at how smart he is! This reminds me of human parents behavior when they pick up their children at school. Also, it reminds me of the way Ford and Owen act when they see Lindell playing at the park with friends. Lindell doesnt participate in these loving observations of Sparky, because he doesnt view Sparky as a child. He sees him as a brother. While Lindell has moved past believing he himself is 100 percent dog (its been a long time since he carried a tennis ball in his mouth), he and Sparky are still growing up together. They are in parallel states of innocence and wonder. I wish I could suspend them there. Soon, Lindell will move past Sparky (ageand experiencewise), even though I know he will never outgrow him. Which brings me back to Lindells species identity. When my mother-in-law, Robin, was visiting last month, she told the boys about a new way to study genealogy. Using a testtube provided by a scientific company, Robin sends a sample of her saliva to be analyzed for DNA. The results tell her what per centage of her DNA is European, Middle Eastern, etc. Fords and Owens eyes lit up at the thought. Later, they asked me, Can we do this with Lindell and add a little bit of Sparkys spit before sending it off, so that the results come back with You are 10 percent dog? I laughed. And then I felt sad. If that could actually workif it would keep my two youngest boys, Lindell and Sparky, in a sus pended state of blissful innocenceI just might try it. IA Luncheon set for Nov. 1 NAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Councils will host the semi-annu al Individual Augmentee (IA) Luncheon Nov. 1 at 11 a.m. at the NAS Jax Officers Club. During this event, all NAS Jax Sailors who have returned from an IA assignment (within the last six months) will be recognized. There is no cost for IAs and their spouses. The cost for other military and civilian guests is $10. Tickets may be purchased at the Fleet and Family Support Center, MondayThursday from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The deadline to purchase tickets is Oct. 25. Childcare will be provided at the Child Development Center (CDC) for children of all IAs and spouses in attendance. Call the CDC at 542-9075 to reserve child care. Pre-registration is required. Base commands and depart ments are asked to provide a list of attendees to Shannon Klein of the Fleet and Family Support Center at shannon.klein.ctr@navy.mil by Oct. 18. Please include rate/rank (warfare pin if applicable), com mand and full name of IAs and their spouse for plaque and certifi cate information. Commands with IAs attending are also asked to submit photos of IAs on deployment to Miriam. gallet@navy.mil for inclusion in a multimedia show that will be shown during this event. Photos are needed by Oct. 25.Family dog trains boy to be human

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012 A cool evening provided the perfect setting for the fall NAS Jax Barracks Bash on Oct. 11, with Sailors in high attendance for the festivities. With free food and prizes, plus, music provided by a DJ and a dance stage, there was something for every one including a myriad of events such as rock climbing, sumo-suit wrestling, paintball, volleyball and other competi tive events. Over the years, our Barracks Bash has proven to be an all around suc cess for the NAS Jacksonville Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Liberty Program, said MWR Marketing Manager Shannon Leonard. We organize and hold the Barracks Bash bi-annually. This time around, our focus was not only improving morale, but also to encourage physical activities, commented MWR Liberty Assistant Manager Brittany Brown. We have over $2,000 worth of prizes to give away, that are meant to promote healthy living. For example, we are giv ing away gift cards to the golf course and other MWR facilities around base. Not only were Sailors attracted by free food and activities live appear ances by the Jacksonville Jaguars Roarcheerleaders and the Jacksonville Bullies Belles Dancers seemed to top the night off. Both groups of cheerleaders gracious ly signed autographs, took pictures and performed their routines on stage, all the while grateful for the opportunity to entertain Sailors at the event. We are always excited to put this event together for our Sailors, Brown said. It gives them a chance to get out of the barracks and have fun, and allows us a chance to show our appreciation to them. MWR thanks everyone who support ed or volunteered for this event includ ing, sponsors Jacksonville Jaguars, Jacksonville Bullies, USAA, GEICO, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, VyStar Credit Union, University of Phoenix and Allied University.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government offi cially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Barracks Bash provides challenging entertainment for Sailors

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012 5 Photos by Lt. j.g. Kevin Wendt and Shannon Leonard

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Police Athletic League tours VP-45The Pelicans of VP-45 recently hosted a field trip at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 511 for 45 middle school chil dren from the Police Athletic League (PAL). The children toured the mighty P-3C Orion, learned about its mission and tried on aircrew survival gear. On the aircraft, we had an operator at every crew station to explain their responsibilities to the students said Lt. Jordan Schneider. Outside the aircraft, our paraloft personnel set up a survival equipment display. The kids really enjoyed trying on parachutes and life vests. We take our responsibility for community outreach in the city of Jacksonville very seriously. It was a privilege to provide an opportunity for the youth of the First Coast to learn first hand about the venerable P-3C Orion and its mission set, remarked Lt. Cmdr. Mike Saylor, VP-45 com mand services officer. The children of the Police Athletic League brought a lot of energy to Hangar 511 and I think they really enjoyed their time here. PAL is a nationwide, non-profit orga nization that exists to prevent juvenile crime and violence by providing civic, athletic, recreational and education al opportunities to youth. The Police Athletic League of Jacksonville has six locations throughout Duval County. PAL offers year-round and sea sonal sports programs, after-school education programs, and summer camps.PAL programs and facilities are available to all youth, regardless of their race, religion or financial situ ation. 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012 7

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Happy 237th birthday, shipmates. I could not be more proud of our Sailors, civilian work force and families. Im grateful to be your shipmate and a part of the greatest Navy the world has ever known. Mabry then took his station at the ceremonial bell and Sanders asked the attendees to rise and remain standing for the bell ringing ceremony. At 0900, the bell will strike eight times signifying the end of the watch and representing the end of the current birth day year. Then a single bell, traditionally used to signal the start of a new watch, represents the start of the new year the Navys 238th, explained Sanders. Sanders then introduced Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., who administered the oath of enlistment to three NAS Jacksonville Sailors. Afterward, he pre sented each with his command coin and said, On this historic day, you represent the Navys best. Thank you for renewing your oath to support our Navy ideals and our country. The first Navy Day was initiated Oct. 27 1922 by the New York Navy League in honor of the birthday of President Theodore Roosevelt, the sponsor of the modern peace keeping navy, who was noted for his big stick diplomacy and the Great White Fleet. In 1972, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo Zumwalt (on the advice of Vice Adm. Edwin Hooper, director of Naval History) designated Oct. 13 as the Navys birthday recognizing the date in 1775 when the Continental Congress passed legislation authorizing the con struction of Americas first naval ships. Today the Navy birthday celebration honors the United States emergence as a great naval power, as well as being an internal Sailor-focused commemoration. BIRTHDAYthe United States teams practice rounds. I must warn you that weve got some excellent golf ers who are ready to compete. So all I can say is, watch out, world, the friendly Americans are going for the gold. The weather forecast is good, so I expect to see some low scores, said Chair of the Armed Forces Sports Council and U.S. Chief of Delegation USAF Brig. Gen. Eden Murrie. Be sure to remember the CISM motto and take the time to cultivate friend ships with your competitors. CISM President for Asia Lt. Col. Hakeem Al-Shino is also head of Bahrain s military sports teams, which keeps him traveling throughout the year. Im very pleased to visit Jacksonville with my wife. We find the people here most welcoming, and after the golf championship, we look forward to visiting St. Augustine and other attractions in Florida. The official CISM motto is: SPORT means peace. SPORT is the opposite of war. SPORT is a cure for war. SPORT is international. SPORT brings nations closer. Friendship through sport. CISM 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012

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(Johns), the director of photography, filmed on the G-4 (Gulfstream IV-SP jet). NOAAs two P-3 aircraft are named Kermit and Miss Piggy after two of Jim Hensons famous Muppet characters. NOAA pilots also fly the G-IV, a high altitude, high speed, twin turbofan jet aircraft that augments the Orions low altitude data with upper atmospher ic soundings and meteorological data according to the NOAA website. The crew also filmed in Miami at the National Hurricane Center, the NOAA National Research Center, and at NOAAs Aircraft Operations Center at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Fla., where the P-3s and G-IV are home based. While shooting at FRCSE Sept. 26 and 27, Pequeneza said she was highly impressed with the artisans knowledge and skill level. Ive never seen a plane taken apart like that, she said. Its very intricate. The mechanics were showing us all the rivet holes and how each one has to line up. They showed us lightning strikes they were repairing on Miss Piggy. There were four or five, and you could see them very clearly. Its quite incred ible. Pequeneza also shot footage at FRCSE with Navy Cmdr. Dervin Brakob, the NOAA maintenance officer, Wes Couch, the crew chief responsible for Kermits maintenance, and Clinton Batten, a business management specialist and P-3 program manager from July 2010 to August 2012, who escorted the crew while filming at the military depot. Batten said the aircraft is at the facil ity for 6-year maintenance, a plan that includes scheduled depot-level mainte nance and repairs, Zone 5 wing plank inspection and repairs, as well as wing center section removal and replace ment. Earlier in September an advance film crew arrived at FRCSE to begin taping footage for the maintenance segment of the episode. Canadian Herrie ten Cate directed the taping during the first visit, which was overseen by Michael Ellis, the productions director of photogra phy. The Mighty Planes series is featur ing not only the WP-3D Orion but also five other aircraft including the Navys Blue Angel F/A-18 Hornet; NASAs Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), the worlds larg est airborne astronomical observato ry; business magnate Donald Trumps private $100 million jet, a tricked out Boeing 757; The Omega Air KDC-10 refueling tanker; and the Boeing C-17 Globemaster, an enormous military transport aircraft. FRCSE JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012 9

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A Boots on the Ground event will be held Oct. 27 in Fernandina Beach. The event will portray a memorial of more than 7,000 boots, pictures and flags honoring the fallen Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom U.S. service members and fire fighters and police officers of 9/11. Donations of worn combat boots are needed for this event and can be dropped off at the NAS Jax or NS Mayport USO. The event is being sponsored by the Mothers of Americas Military Fallen. For more information, contact Julie Bargeron at juliebargeron@motherso famf.com or call (904) 468-0733.Boots on the Ground event slated 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012

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NAS Jacksonville firefight ers were highly visible last week as they visited numer ous commands and facilities to promote fire safety during the annual fire prevention week. The event is held every year during the week of Oct. 9 to commemorate the anniver sary of the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. Firefighters spent hours edu cating the public through static displays, lectures and demon strations. They also held fire drills at various buildings on the base in an effort to increase fire prevention and safety awareness. We are out here to provide an awareness about fire safe ty in workplaces and homes. We want people to check their smoke detectors and change the batteries yearly and teach all family members two ways out and have an evacuation plan, said NAS Jax Assistant Fire Prevention Chief Fire Thomas Claudio. Fires can be deadly. Each year, thousands of lives are lost and property is damaged due to fires. And, according to the base fire department, most people arent prepared to prevent or respond to fires. Learning some fire prevention facts will help put you on the same team as the fire depart ment. It may also save your familys lives or prevent your home from being destroyed in a fire. Last weeks events began with a visit to the Navy Exchange (NEX) Food Court where firefighters passed out information on fire safety to NEX patrons, answered ques Have 2 Ways OutFire Prevention Week observed JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012 11

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It was a sunny, yet unsea sonably cool day for the Navys 237th Birthday 5k run as 211 runners turned out to improve on their personal bests. The event was sponsored by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department. Placing first overall and first in the mens 20-24 age cat egory was Dron McAllister of CNATTU JAX with a time of 19:36. Nicole Amandor of NOSC Jax took first in the womens 35-39 category and was the first female to cross the finish line with a time of 24:34. Other finishers were: The next MWR-sponsored run will be the annual Monster Dash Oct. 26 at 11:30 a.m.For more information, call 542-3239/3518. Navy Birthday 5k brings out runners 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012

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tions about their shiny red ladder truck and gave firefighter hats to children. Also on hand to help promote fire safety was Sparky the Fire Dog who greeted the visitors. The firefighters also visited the NAS Jax Youth Activities Center where they gave the children a close-up look at one of their fire trucks as they explained each piece of fire-fighting gear. The chil dren asked questions as they learned about all the gadgets and tools a firefighter uses. Jalia Harris, 6, said, I was so excited to be able to sit in the fire truck and learn what the firefighters do. And, I love Sparky the Fire Dog he was really cool. Naval Hospital Jax also hosted the firefighters who visited the Childrens Ward and Pediatrics Clinic to meet with families. At the NAS Jax Child Development Center, fire fighters taught the children that they should never play with matches or lighters and how to stop, drop and roll during a fire and how to call 9-1-1 to report a fire. Several firefighters also put on his full firefight ing gear to show the children what they wear dur ing a fire. The firefighters explained to the children that if they should see someone dressed like him during a fire and they are still in their house, to call out to him for help. Overall, the week proved successful in getting the word out about fire safety. We talked to a lot of people and conducted many fire drills around the station, said Claudio. We want everyone to know that we are available to give fire prevention classes to commands and organizations.For more information, call 542-3928. FIRE PREVENTION You dont need to be an electrician, HVAC techni cian or engineer to save energy. All you need is the presence of mind to be aware of your surround ings. Are there lights that seem to be on all the time when nobody is using an area? Are windows open in spaces that are heated or cooled? Are doors in between conditioned and unconditioned areas left open? Nearly every build ing occupant can answer yes to at least one of these questions. So why are the lights on when they are not needed? Some of the explanations are: Several people use the area and nobody is tak ing responsibility for the light switch they may not know when other people are still in the area. There is no light switch, or its hard to find. Someone believes the old myth that it takes more energy to turn fluorescent lights back on than can be saved by shutting them off during the day, or even over night. Its convenient when the first person in the office turns on all the lights and nobody else has to think about light switches until the end of the day, but that isnt necessarily ener gy efficient. Take a look around your work area and see if there are areas that are switched on, but really dont need to be. Are there areas that look like they should have their own switch? Tell your building energy monitor (BEM). Depending on how many fixtures are involved, it might make sense to have another switch wired in. Is the switch on the other side of the room, thereby increasing chances it will be left on when peo ple leave? Report it. Sometimes it will make sense to install occupancy controls that shut lights off automatically when a room is unoccupied. If you see lights on when nobody is in the area, tell your BEM about the potential energy savings. Conference rooms are prime locations to find savings. Many offices, shops, warehouses and other facilities can easily reduce lighting without affecting productivity. Turn off as many unnecessary lights as possible. Use task light ing instead of overhead lighting, and light only those areas that are needed at the time. Utilize daylight from office windows or open hangar bay doors. Remember the best part about daylight is that its free! This is especially important on the flight line as our hangars use an incredible amount of energy to provide light ing during the daytime hours. Often times the ambient light already fil tering in is sufficient for the required tasks. According to the California Energy Commission, providing the right lighting can save up to 15 percent on your light ing bill. A buildings envelope consists of the pieces of the structure that seal the facilities indoor areas from the outdoors. Doors and windows are critical weak points in that envelope because they are opened and closed frequently, while a wall remains sealed. Some doors within the building are inside the air conditioning bound ary, and can be left open, unless they are designated as fire doors. Obviously, doors to the outside or unconditioned space need to be closed when the heat or A/C is on. If you notice a door that is frequently left open, report it to your BEM. The mechanical door closer may be in need of repair. Or maybe the build ing pressure needs to be adjusted. Its especially important that large loading doors be closed when not in use, if the heat or A/C is on. If large loading doors provid ing access to conditioned spaces are frequently left open, then report it to your BEM. It might be cost effec tive to install automated high-speed doors that save energy, and improve com fort and productivity. Solving these issues may be as simple as educat ing your coworkers. If the cause of the problem is a design issue, public works can evaluate the lighting requirements or building envelope issues and possibly make some chang es. Being observant and reporting what you find can help your building and your base to be greener. Keep an eye out to save energy JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012 13

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U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a mem ber of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of special recogni tion in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in ter ritorial waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve recognition and thanks for put ting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans during my annual Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the highlights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are urged to con tact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 598-0481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll-free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www. crenshaw.house.gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and docu mentation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the cer tificate, veterans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214. Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this pro gram. New ship museum to honor military heritage The retired USS Charles F. Adams (DDG-2) is closer to coming home as an interactive attraction and venue in downtown Jacksonville on the St. Johns River. The aim is to become the first Naval Ship Museum in Florida or Georgia and to honor our military heritage and increase educational opportunities, tourism and business as a key element of downtown revitalization. Outwardly similar to the Shermanclass destroyer, USS Adams was the first U.S. Navy ship designed from the keel up to launch anti-aircraft missiles. USS Adams, the first guided missile destroyer in its class, was home ported for 21 years at Naval Station Mayport from 1969-90. The last existent ship in its class, USS Adams is currently moored in Philadelphias Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility. With the Jacksonville Historic Naval Ship Association leading the way, the latest discussions have focused on placing the USS Adams at the Shipyards location along the Northbank in down town, adjacent to the citys sports com plex and as part of a hub of new activity along Bay Street. With nearly 20 percent of the Jacksonville areas population made up of active and retired military and their families, the venue would have a natu ral attraction. In addition, it would add to tourism traffic and offer a site for business meet ings, Scout campouts and other gather ings.For more information, go to www.adam s2jax.org Desert Shield/Desert Storm Recognition Ceremony set for Nov. 8 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012

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DEWEYSCall 542-3521 Deweys is now open in Bldg. 608 between Gillis St. and Keily St. off of Enterprise Ave. Enjoy a full service menu, bar and a friendly atmosphere that is great for all ages. Mon. Fri. 10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. Sat. & Sun. 4 10 p.m. CPO Pub Mon., Tues. & Fri. 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Wed. Thurs. 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Fall Bowling Leagues now forming! Mixed league Mon. @ 7 p.m. After-work league Wed. @ 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thurs. @ 9 a.m. Mixed league Thurs. @ 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Fri. @ 11:45 a.m. Friday night league @ 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Sat.@ 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Mon. Fri. 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wed. at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor pool Open for lap swimming Mon. Fri. 5:30 8 a.m. & 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Recreational swimming Mon. Fri. 4:30 8 p.m. Sat. & Sun. 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Kennedy Space Center Military member is free (pick-up vouch er at ITT) Family member tickets available at ITT Adult $44.50, child $35.50 Warehouse 31 $20 Entertainment Books $30 Stone Mountain State Park $21.25 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zip line Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam February 23, 2013 Preferred seating $41, lower level seat ing $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sec tions 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Tampa Zoo $19 (Adult) $17.50 (Child) Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9 MOSH $7 $12 Blue Man Group in Orlando $59, includes City Walk venue Upcoming ITT Trips: Lakeridge Winery Nov. 10 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4-day hopper $135.50 Universal Studios Special 2-day 1 park each day w/ 3rd day free $101.50 2-day park to park w/ 3rd day free $120.50 Tickets valid through Dec. 14, 2012 Universal Studios Halloween Horror Nights $41.25 $71 Order Gator Bowl tickets now $35 Gator Bowl Patch $9 Florida Classic $37.50 & $52.50 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Halloween Horror Nights Trip Oct. 20 21 $60 per person Slam Dunk Contest Oct. 24 Ghosts & Gravestones Tour St. Augustine Oct. 27 at 5 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Oct. 23 for active duty Oct. 25 for retirees & DoD personnel Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DOD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. CFC Charity Golf Tournament October 25, 12:30 p.m. shotgun start $60 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thurs. for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thurs., 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding. ASE certified mechanic on site.Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation avail able Family Fitness Center hours are Mon. Fri., 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Oct. 29 Dec. 10 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012 15

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Pharmacists and pharmacy techni cians, play a number of roles filling and dispensing medications, educating patients, coordinating care with physi cians, and managing supply lines. And in the Navy, this is all in support of the health and medical readiness of warf ighters, their families and retirees. At Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, phar macies fill 4,700 prescriptions each day. To help patients make the best use of the pharmacy, here are some common questions and answers. What drugs does the pharmacy cover? Pharmacies use formularies to decide what to stock, because no pharmacy can carry every drug, due to both budget and size constraints. A formulary is a list of drugs that a pharmacy carriesand its developed by a group of healthcare professionals including physicians and pharmacists. To find the military health systems formulary, ask a pharmacy staffer or go online to http://pec.ha.osd. mil/formulary_search.php. Why does it take so long to fill a prescription? Each day, pharmacists fill orders for patients seen in the clinics, the ER, laboring moms, surgery patients and hospitalized patients. Pharmacys num ber one job is to correctly fill prescrip tions so that patients get the correct medication 100 percent of the time. This means that staff review prescriptions for potential negative drug interactions and to ensure consistency with current medi cal guidelines and sometimes involves contacting the prescribing provider. Can medications be delivered to patients homes? Yes. Patients can save travel time by using TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery. This is an inexpensive option, including generics at no-cost. It offers a 90-day supply for most medications; refills by mail, phone or online; and an automatic refill option. To sign up, go to www.tricare.mil/homedelivery or call 877-363-1303 (option 2). How about getting medications at NH Jacksonville? For refills, call 800-NAV-PHAR (6287427). The hospitals outpatient pharma cy (542-7405) is open Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The satellite pharmacy (5422537, refills and new civilian prescrip tions only), near the Exchange, is open Monday to Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The satellites drive-up window (refills only) is open Monday to Friday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Whats the best way to get rid of old or unwanted medications? The best way is to take advantage of local drug take-back events check www.dea.gov. To dispose of most medi cations at home, dont flush them down the toilet this can poison the water ways with drugs. For non-narcotics, dispose in household garbage: seal in a bag and (optionally) mix the medicine with something undesirable like coffee grounds or kitty litter. And remove the label to protect privacy. NH Jacksonville cannot accept medication for disposal. What can patients do to be safe? Be involved talk to the provider and pharmacist, and ask questions. Take medication exactly as prescribed and be just as careful with over-the-coun ter items like tylenol and cold medicine. Dont share medication. Keep a list of all medications. Check expiration dates. Find out more at www.med. navy.mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax, and keep up with current news on Facebook www.facebook.com/ NavalHospitalJacksonville. National Pharmacy Month: Ensuring safe, effective medication use 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012

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The NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center hosted a Listening Session Oct. 10 at the base chapel to gain perspective on some of the issues military members and their families face regard ing raising children in America today. The event was kicked off by NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander. I think this is a very important opportu nity to provide feedback. This allows you to reflect on how we can better take care of children in todays society, he said. Undersander then intro duced Jim Hmurovich, presi dent and CEO of Prevent Child Abuse America. Hmurovich, who previously worked for the Indiana Department of Corrections and as the Indiana State Welfare director, is cur rently touring the country to gain knowledge and input to create a comprehensive nation al strategy to ensure children are provided the opportu nity to develop on all levels in healthy, nurturing homes, schools and communities. In 1988, when I was working for the Indiana Department of Corrections I remember a con sultant coming in and stating that 63 percent of all the juve niles in detention have been abused. A couple years later, I was visiting the supervisor of the womens maximum secu rity prison in Indiana and I asked what was the most com mon thing the women stated when they arrived. He said the most common thing they say is that this is the first time in their lives that they feel safe. That stunned me, said Hmurovich. I wondered how could we have a community norm that allows this to hap pen. Several years later, Hmurovich became Indianas Welfare director. I traveled the state to talk to people about what happened to help them get off welfare. Again, I was surprised at the answers. Most said, because someone took the time to help me. It made me realize that the government cant solely take care of our families. They need help from their communities partner ships with businesses, social agencies all working togeth er, he continued. I realized that we need to change the way we do business regarding child welfare cases and foster care. If we want to reduce the number of children in special education class es and reduce the number of prisons we are building then maybe the answer is to work with the families and invest more in Americas children, said Hmurovich. Hmurovich took his case to a national level by heading to Washington, DC to ask legis lators what the plan was for the children of our country. Unfortunately, there was no national strategy for the pre vention of abuse or neglect of our children, he said. He then asked the audience, How can we ensure that every child has an equal opportunity for healthy growth and devel opment in our country? Base personnel had a variety of answers but many pertained to budget constraints within the school systems which cre ates a lack of resources for students and the inability for teachers to provide individual assessments to help those in need both academically and on a personal level. Others stated that communi ties need to be more empow ered and corporations should create more incentive pro grams to support community efforts towards helping fami lies. Another topic was to put more emphasis on faith and that spiritual guidance pro motes a supportive and healthy environment for children and their parents. Many also stressed that if individuals gave back by volunteering or just spending time with children and showed they cared, what a huge difference it could make. The comments have been pretty consistent with what we have heard around the coun try, he told the audience. We plan to take these thoughts and hope to start a national move ment by taking the common themes to corporations to cre ate partnerships and come up with a framework of what a national strategy should be, said Hmurovich. We are com mitted to ensuring that our children grow up to be adults who are contributing to our society. For more information about any sports, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239, or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com nasjaxmwr NAS Jax personnel offer input to support Americas children NEX web store expands its selection, adds merchandise To further enhance customer shop ping experience at myNavyExchange. com, the Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) will be adding a number of new products to its Navy Exchange (NEX) web store over the next several months. We are constantly looking to add new products to our web store, said Tess Paquette, NEXCOM senior vice president, chief merchandising officer. We know that some of our authorized customers dont have access to shop a NEX, so the web store is the only way they can use this benefit they have earned. We want to make sure we have the products our customers need and want at a savings, no matter where they live around the world. In honor of its decommissioning, USS Enterprise (CVN 65) apparel and gifts will be added to the NEX web store in mid-October. Customers will find a variety of Enterprise merchan dise available to purchase including ball caps, shirts, coffee mugs and coins. Commissioned in 1961, the Enterprise is the worlds first nuclear-powered carrier and is both the largest and oldest active combat vessel in the Navy. Launching Oct. 31, customers will find a wider variety of toys on myNa vyExchange.com to coincide with the start of Toyland. Customers will be able to purchase action figures, building sets and blocks, dolls, kids electron ics, learning toys, riding toys and much more from their favorite brands. Toys were one of the top requests from customers and until now, we only offered early learning toys, said Paquette. We will now be offering toys for boys and girls for all age ranges, just in time for the holidays. MyNavyExchange.com currently has over 15,000 items in its web store. This holiday season, mynavyex change.com is offering several free shipping deals for its customers. From Oct. 31 Nov. 21, customers will receive free standard shipping on any toy purchase of $150 or more. Customers will get free standard ship ping on any purchase of $150 or more from Nov. 22-26. Finally, from Nov. 30 Dec. 21, in addition to free standard shipping on any $150 or more purchase, customers will receive discounted priority delivery for $9.95 or discounted express delivery for $17.95. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012 17

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jax rings in new yearSailors and civilians joined NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders at the headquarters flag pole Oct. 12 for the Navy Birthday Bell Ringing Ceremony. BMC(AW/ SW) Maurice Mabry served as the bell ringer. As a prelude to the bell ring ing ceremony, Sanders read the birthday message from Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert. As we celebrate our naval heritage, we proudly reflect on more than two centuries of warfighting excellence as the worlds preeminent maritime force. We had an extremely busy year answering our nations calls to operate forward and like those Sailors that served before us we assured allies, projected power, and defended our nations interests around the globe. This past year also signified a landmark year for our Navy, as we commemorated the War of 1812. Two hundred years ago on the Great Lakes, along the eastern seaboard, and the waters of New Orleans our legacy was forged and traditions were created. We can never forget the Sailors who fought in 1812 and what we learned. They were brave and innovative Sailors with an amazing warfighting spirit. They made us what we are today, and their spirit and sacrifices live on today in our bold, proficient and confident Sailors. As we begin this new year, I ask you to remember our tenets: warfighting first; oper ate forward; and be ready. We must be prepared to fight and win today, while building the ability to win tomorrow. We must provide off shore options to deter, influence, and win in an era of uncertainty. Finally, we must harness the teamwork, talent and imagination of our diverse force to be ready to fight and responsibly employ our resources. The Conseil International du Sport Militaire (CISM) World Military Golf Championship has attracted teams from 11 nations that will compete at the NAS Jacksonville Golf Club for four rounds over the nine holes of the red and white courses that are each par 36. Countries represented in the CISM championship include Bahrain, Canada, Italy, Netherlands, Pakistan, Namibia, Germany, Spain, Uganda, Zambia and the United States. Each nations team is composed of six men and two women. At the opening ceremony Oct. 13, Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. said, Welcome to the NAS Jacksonville Golf Club. This is going to be a great competition, but more importantly, its a great opportunity for members of all teams to build lasting friendships through sport. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders said it was indeed an honor for NAS Jacksonville to host the CISM World Military Golf Championship. We look forward to four days of exciting golf and wish the best of luck to each player. Sanders said he had watched some of On Sept. 27, a Canadian film crew wrapped up the second of two seg ments filmed at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) highlighting depotlevel maintenance on a P-3 Orion maritime patrol aircraft, one of two owned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Discovery Channel Canada is pro ducing a series entitled Mighty Planes featuring six aircraft, with one program devoted to NOAAs two Hurricane Hunters, both Lockheed WP-3D Orion turboprop planes used for hurricane research and reconnaissance missions. The series is scheduled to air in the spring of 2013. Nadine Pequeneza, the Orion epi sode director, said coordination among the production studio, NOAA and other agencies was much like conducting a well-orchestrated symphony with its many working parts. We flew into Hurricane Leslie, a two-day mission with three shots, said Pequeneza of her flights on Sept. 7 and 8.I was on Kermit flown by a female pilot, Lt. Cmdr. Cathy Martin. There were also meteorologists, mechan ics and technicians onboard. I was intrigued by the planes capabilities to fly into the eye of a hurricane. David Celebrating 237 years of service NAS Jacksonville Golf Club hosts CISM World Military Golf Championship FRCSE aids Canadian filmmaker with Mighty Planes series

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Oct. 18 1812 U.S. sloop of war Wasp captures HM brig Frolic. 1859 U.S. Marines reach Harpers Ferry, Va. and assault the arsenal seized by John Brown and his followers. 1867 USS Ossippee and USS Resaca participate in formal transfer of Alaska to U.S. authority at Sitka and remain to enforce law and order in new territory. 1944 3rd Fleet carrier aircraft attack Japanese ships in harbor, as well as land forces around Manila. 1968 In Operation Sea Lords, the Navys three major operating forces in Vietnam (TF 115, 116, and 117) are brought together for the first time to stop Vietcong infiltration deep into South Vietnams Mekong Delta. Oct. 19 1843 Capt. Robert Stockton in USS Princeton, the first screw-propelled naval steamer, challenges British merchant ship Great Western to a race near New York, which Princeton won easily. 1915 Establishment of submarine base at New London, Conn. 1944 Secretary of Navy orders African American women accepted into Naval Reserve. 1987 Destruction of an Iranian oil-drilling plat form used for military purposes. Oct. 20 1824 U.S. schooner Porpoise captures four pirate ships off Cuba. 1944 Seventh Fleet lands more than 60,000 Army troops on Leyte, Philippines while Japanese aircraft attack. 1952 Task Force 77 establishes ECM Hunter/Killer Teams of two ECM-equipped aircraft and an armed escort of four Skyraiders and four Corsairs. 1967 Operation Coronado VII began in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. 1983 Due to political strife, USS Independence (CV-59 ) ordered to Grenada. Oct. 21 1797 Launching of USS Constitution at the Harts Boston shipyard, Boston, Mass. The ship is now the oldest commissioned ship in the U.S. Navy. 1942 British submarine lands Capt. Jerauld Wright and four Army officers at Cherchel, French North Africa, to meet with a French military delegation to learn the French attitude toward future Allied landings. Oct. 22 1846 Lavinia Fanning Watson of Philadelphia christens the sloop-of-war Germantown, the first U.S. Navy ship sponsored by a woman. 1951 First of seven detonations, Operation BusterJangle nuclear test. 1962 President John F. Kennedy orders surface blockade (quarantine) of Cuba to prevent Soviet offensive weapons from reaching Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Oct. 23 1944 Battle of Leyte Gulf, a series of separate battles, begins with attacks on Japanese ships. 1983 A suicide truck bomber attacks the Marine barracks at Beirut airport, Lebanon killing 241 (220 Marines, 18 Sailors, and 3 soldiers) 1983 Operation Urgent Fury (Grenada, West Indies) begins. Oct. 24 1944 In air-sea battle in the Sibuyan Sea, carrier aircraft attack Japanese Center Force. 1958 USS Kleinsmith (APD-134) evacuates U.S. nationals from Nicaro, Cuba. 1962 Atlantic Fleet begins quarantine operations to force Soviet Union to agree to remove ballistic missiles and long range bombers from Cuba. Many people were shocked when Dustin and I surprised the boys last Halloween with a puppy, just three weeks before Dustin left for his deployment. Are you sure you want to take on the extra responsibility? they said. Do you know what youre getting into? What most people didnt know was that we had a 4-year-old who believed he was a dog, to the point of eating off the floor and carrying a tennis ball in his mouth. Before Sparky, the last dog we lived with was a border collie named Annie, who, I suspect, could manage pre-Algebra. She was one of the smartest dogs Ive ever known, except for that time she ate an SOS pad. But Annie also liked to eat wood specifically our back porch so she left us to work on a 13-acre farm in Florida. Lindell never knew Annie. We had a long, pet-free period (unless you count fish), until one year ago when the boys ran from the schoolyard to greet the new puppy waiting for them on the sidewalk. So long as Sparky wasnt on a mission, like Annie, to destroy stuff, I knew he would be a welcome addition. As it turns out, Sparky, a Brittany Spaniel, is a great distraction, especially for Lindell. Sparky has been cried on, hugged (perhaps too tightly) and fought over (Hes sleeping in my room. No, my room!). Sparky was even an accomplice to the great runaway epi sode several months ago. I cant say which one, but a son ran away to the end of the street with no suitcase or change of clothes, but with a willing dog by his side. Sparky has also done wonders for Lindells confusion about being a dog. At first, Sparky and Lindell had some getting used to (Lindells words). Sparky often sighed, and sometimes ran away, when Lindell approached him. This might have had something to do with the Scooby Doo costume Lindell wore and the fact that he took naps in Sparkys bed usually on top of Sparky. Eventually, however, Lindell learned Sparkys lessons (again, Lindells words), and besides that time Sparky ran out the backdoor with Lindells underwear, the two seldom make each other cry. They have settled into a nice, passive-aggressive relationship of sibling rivalry. Sparky has brought out many aspects of all my boys personalities. Lindell is the needler, the instigator. He is not opposed to blaming his mess on Sparky. Ford is the dutiful helper, always willing to take Sparky for a walk or feed him breakfast. Owen is the empathizer. When Sparky had to wear the dreaded cone of shame (a post-surgery e-collar) last week, Owen hand-fed his meals to him. Just as a husband and wife unite in their children, the older boys and I have bonded over our shared love of Sparky. When we pick up Sparky after a bath or time spent playing with another dog, Ford and Owen smile uncontrollably. Look at him just sitting there with those other dogs, they say. Or, Look at how smart he is! This reminds me of human parents behavior when they pick up their children at school. Also, it reminds me of the way Ford and Owen act when they see Lindell playing at the park with friends. Lindell doesnt participate in these loving observations of Sparky, because he doesnt view Sparky as a child. He sees him as a brother. While Lindell has moved past believing he himself is 100 percent dog (its been a long time since he carried a tennis ball in his mouth), he and Sparky are still growing up together. They are in parallel states of innocence and wonder. I wish I could suspend them there. Soon, Lindell will move past Sparky (ageand experiencewise), even though I know he will never outgrow him. Which brings me back to Lindells species identity. When my mother-in-law, Robin, was visiting last month, she told the boys about a new way to study genealogy. Using a testtube provided by a scientific company, Robin sends a sample of her saliva to be analyzed for DNA. The results tell her what percentage of her DNA is European, Middle Eastern, etc. Fords and Owens eyes lit up at the thought. Later, they asked me, Can we do this with Lindell and add a little bit of Sparkys spit before sending it off, so that the results come back with You are 10 percent dog? I laughed. And then I felt sad. If that could actually workif it would keep my two youngest boys, Lindell and Sparky, in a suspended state of blissful innocenceI just might try it. IA Luncheon set for Nov. 1 NAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Councils will host the semi-annu al Individual Augmentee (IA) Luncheon Nov. 1 at 11 a.m. at the NAS Jax Officers Club. During this event, all NAS Jax Sailors who have returned from an IA assignment (within the last six months) will be recognized. There is no cost for IAs and their spouses. The cost for other military and civilian guests is $10. Tickets may be purchased at the Fleet and Family Support Center, MondayThursday from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The deadline to purchase tickets is Oct. 25. Childcare will be provided at the Child Development Center (CDC) for children of all IAs and spouses in attendance. Call the CDC at 542-9075 to reserve child care. Pre-registration is required. Base commands and depart ments are asked to provide a list of attendees to Shannon Klein of the Fleet and Family Support Center at shannon.klein.ctr@navy.mil by Oct. 18. Please include rate/rank (warfare pin if applicable), com mand and full name of IAs and their spouse for plaque and certificate information. Commands with IAs attending are also asked to submit photos of IAs on deployment to Miriam. gallet@navy.mil for inclusion in a multimedia show that will be shown during this event. Photos are needed by Oct. 25.Family dog trains boy to be human

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012 A cool evening provided the perfect setting for the fall NAS Jax Barracks Bash on Oct. 11, with Sailors in high attendance for the festivities. With free food and prizes, plus, music provided by a DJ and a dance stage, there was something for every one including a myriad of events such as rock climbing, sumo-suit wrestling, paintball, volleyball and other competitive events. Over the years, our Barracks Bash has proven to be an all around suc cess for the NAS Jacksonville Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Liberty Program, said MWR Marketing Manager Shannon Leonard. We organize and hold the Barracks Bash bi-annually. This time around, our focus was not only improving morale, but also to encourage physical activities, commented MWR Liberty Assistant Manager Brittany Brown. We have over $2,000 worth of prizes to give away, that are meant to promote healthy living. For example, we are giving away gift cards to the golf course and other MWR facilities around base. Not only were Sailors attracted by free food and activities live appear ances by the Jacksonville Jaguars Roarcheerleaders and the Jacksonville Bullies Belles Dancers seemed to top the night off. Both groups of cheerleaders graciously signed autographs, took pictures and performed their routines on stage, all the while grateful for the opportunity to entertain Sailors at the event. We are always excited to put this event together for our Sailors, Brown said. It gives them a chance to get out of the barracks and have fun, and allows us a chance to show our appreciation to them. MWR thanks everyone who supported or volunteered for this event including, sponsors Jacksonville Jaguars, Jacksonville Bullies, USAA, GEICO, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, VyStar Credit Union, University of Phoenix and Allied University.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government offi cially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Barracks Bash provides challenging entertainment for Sailors

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012 5 Photos by Lt. j.g. Kevin Wendt and Shannon Leonard

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Police Athletic League tours VP-45The Pelicans of VP-45 recently hosted a field trip at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 511 for 45 middle school children from the Police Athletic League (PAL). The children toured the mighty P-3C Orion, learned about its mission and tried on aircrew survival gear. On the aircraft, we had an operator at every crew station to explain their responsibilities to the students said Lt. Jordan Schneider. Outside the aircraft, our paraloft personnel set up a survival equipment display. The kids really enjoyed trying on parachutes and life vests. We take our responsibility for community outreach in the city of Jacksonville very seriously. It was a privilege to provide an opportunity for the youth of the First Coast to learn first hand about the venerable P-3C Orion and its mission set, remarked Lt. Cmdr. Mike Saylor, VP-45 com mand services officer. The children of the Police Athletic League brought a lot of energy to Hangar 511 and I think they really enjoyed their time here. PAL is a nationwide, non-profit organization that exists to prevent juvenile crime and violence by providing civic, athletic, recreational and education al opportunities to youth. The Police Athletic League of Jacksonville has six locations throughout Duval County. PAL offers year-round and sea sonal sports programs, after-school education programs, and summer camps.PAL programs and facilities are available to all youth, regardless of their race, religion or financial situation. 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012

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Happy 237th birthday, shipmates. I could not be more proud of our Sailors, civilian work force and families. Im grateful to be your shipmate and a part of the greatest Navy the world has ever known. Mabry then took his station at the ceremonial bell and Sanders asked the attendees to rise and remain standing for the bell ringing ceremony. At 0900, the bell will strike eight times signifying the end of the watch and representing the end of the current birthday year. Then a single bell, traditionally used to signal the start of a new watch, represents the start of the new year the Navys 238th, explained Sanders. Sanders then introduced Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., who administered the oath of enlistment to three NAS Jacksonville Sailors. Afterward, he pre sented each with his command coin and said, On this historic day, you represent the Navys best. Thank you for renewing your oath to support our Navy ideals and our country. The first Navy Day was initiated Oct. 27 1922 by the New York Navy League in honor of the birthday of President Theodore Roosevelt, the sponsor of the modern peace keeping navy, who was noted for his big stick diplomacy and the Great White Fleet. In 1972, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo Zumwalt (on the advice of Vice Adm. Edwin Hooper, director of Naval History) designated Oct. 13 as the Navys birthday recognizing the date in 1775 when the Continental Congress passed legislation authorizing the con struction of Americas first naval ships. Today the Navy birthday celebration honors the United States emergence as a great naval power, as well as being an internal Sailor-focused commemoration. BIRTHDAYthe United States teams practice rounds. I must warn you that weve got some excellent golf ers who are ready to compete. So all I can say is, watch out, world, the friendly Americans are going for the gold. The weather forecast is good, so I expect to see some low scores, said Chair of the Armed Forces Sports Council and U.S. Chief of Delegation USAF Brig. Gen. Eden Murrie. Be sure to remember the CISM motto and take the time to cultivate friendships with your competitors. CISM President for Asia Lt. Col. Hakeem Al-Shino is also head of Bahrain s military sports teams, which keeps him traveling throughout the year. Im very pleased to visit Jacksonville with my wife. We find the people here most welcoming, and after the golf championship, we look forward to visiting St. Augustine and other attractions in Florida. The official CISM motto is: SPORT means peace. SPORT is the opposite of war. SPORT is a cure for war. SPORT is international. SPORT brings nations closer. Friendship through sport. CISM 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012

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(Johns), the director of photography, filmed on the G-4 (Gulfstream IV-SP jet). NOAAs two P-3 aircraft are named Kermit and Miss Piggy after two of Jim Hensons famous Muppet characters. NOAA pilots also fly the G-IV, a high altitude, high speed, twin turbofan jet aircraft that augments the Orions low altitude data with upper atmospher ic soundings and meteorological data according to the NOAA website. The crew also filmed in Miami at the National Hurricane Center, the NOAA National Research Center, and at NOAAs Aircraft Operations Center at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Fla., where the P-3s and G-IV are home based. While shooting at FRCSE Sept. 26 and 27, Pequeneza said she was highly impressed with the artisans knowledge and skill level. Ive never seen a plane taken apart like that, she said. Its very intricate. The mechanics were showing us all the rivet holes and how each one has to line up. They showed us lightning strikes they were repairing on Miss Piggy. There were four or five, and you could see them very clearly. Its quite incredible. Pequeneza also shot footage at FRCSE with Navy Cmdr. Dervin Brakob, the NOAA maintenance officer, Wes Couch, the crew chief responsible for Kermits maintenance, and Clinton Batten, a business management specialist and P-3 program manager from July 2010 to August 2012, who escorted the crew while filming at the military depot. Batten said the aircraft is at the facility for 6-year maintenance, a plan that includes scheduled depot-level maintenance and repairs, Zone 5 wing plank inspection and repairs, as well as wing center section removal and replace ment. Earlier in September an advance film crew arrived at FRCSE to begin taping footage for the maintenance segment of the episode. Canadian Herrie ten Cate directed the taping during the first visit, which was overseen by Michael Ellis, the productions director of photogra phy. The Mighty Planes series is featur ing not only the WP-3D Orion but also five other aircraft including the Navys Blue Angel F/A-18 Hornet; NASAs Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), the worlds larg est airborne astronomical observato ry; business magnate Donald Trumps private $100 million jet, a tricked out Boeing 757; The Omega Air KDC-10 refueling tanker; and the Boeing C-17 Globemaster, an enormous military transport aircraft. FRCSE JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012 9

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A Boots on the Ground event will be held Oct. 27 in Fernandina Beach. The event will portray a memorial of more than 7,000 boots, pictures and flags honoring the fallen Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom U.S. service members and firefighters and police officers of 9/11. Donations of worn combat boots are needed for this event and can be dropped off at the NAS Jax or NS Mayport USO. The event is being sponsored by the Mothers of Americas Military Fallen. For more information, contact Julie Bargeron at juliebargeron@motherso famf.com or call (904) 468-0733.Boots on the Ground event slated 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012

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NAS Jacksonville firefight ers were highly visible last week as they visited numer ous commands and facilities to promote fire safety during the annual fire prevention week. The event is held every year during the week of Oct. 9 to commemorate the anniver sary of the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. Firefighters spent hours educating the public through static displays, lectures and demon strations. They also held fire drills at various buildings on the base in an effort to increase fire prevention and safety awareness. We are out here to provide an awareness about fire safe ty in workplaces and homes. We want people to check their smoke detectors and change the batteries yearly and teach all family members two ways out and have an evacuation plan, said NAS Jax Assistant Fire Prevention Chief Fire Thomas Claudio. Fires can be deadly. Each year, thousands of lives are lost and property is damaged due to fires. And, according to the base fire department, most people arent prepared to prevent or respond to fires. Learning some fire prevention facts will help put you on the same team as the fire depart ment. It may also save your familys lives or prevent your home from being destroyed in a fire. Last weeks events began with a visit to the Navy Exchange (NEX) Food Court where firefighters passed out information on fire safety to NEX patrons, answered ques Have 2 Ways OutFire Prevention Week observed JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012 11

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It was a sunny, yet unsea sonably cool day for the Navys 237th Birthday 5k run as 211 runners turned out to improve on their personal bests. The event was sponsored by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department. Placing first overall and first in the mens 20-24 age cat egory was Dron McAllister of CNATTU JAX with a time of 19:36. Nicole Amandor of NOSC Jax took first in the womens 35-39 category and was the first female to cross the finish line with a time of 24:34. Other finishers were: The next MWR-sponsored run will be the annual Monster Dash Oct. 26 at 11:30 a.m.For more information, call 542-3239/3518. Navy Birthday 5k brings out runners 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012

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tions about their shiny red ladder truck and gave firefighter hats to children. Also on hand to help promote fire safety was Sparky the Fire Dog who greeted the visitors. The firefighters also visited the NAS Jax Youth Activities Center where they gave the children a close-up look at one of their fire trucks as they explained each piece of fire-fighting gear. The children asked questions as they learned about all the gadgets and tools a firefighter uses. Jalia Harris, 6, said, I was so excited to be able to sit in the fire truck and learn what the firefighters do. And, I love Sparky the Fire Dog he was really cool. Naval Hospital Jax also hosted the firefighters who visited the Childrens Ward and Pediatrics Clinic to meet with families. At the NAS Jax Child Development Center, fire fighters taught the children that they should never play with matches or lighters and how to stop, drop and roll during a fire and how to call 9-1-1 to report a fire. Several firefighters also put on his full firefight ing gear to show the children what they wear during a fire. The firefighters explained to the children that if they should see someone dressed like him during a fire and they are still in their house, to call out to him for help. Overall, the week proved successful in getting the word out about fire safety. We talked to a lot of people and conducted many fire drills around the station, said Claudio. We want everyone to know that we are available to give fire prevention classes to commands and organizations.For more information, call 542-3928. FIRE PREVENTION You dont need to be an electrician, HVAC techni cian or engineer to save energy. All you need is the presence of mind to be aware of your surround ings. Are there lights that seem to be on all the time when nobody is using an area? Are windows open in spaces that are heated or cooled? Are doors in between conditioned and unconditioned areas left open? Nearly every build ing occupant can answer yes to at least one of these questions. So why are the lights on when they are not needed? Some of the explanations are: Several people use the area and nobody is tak ing responsibility for the light switch they may not know when other people are still in the area. There is no light switch, or its hard to find. Someone believes the old myth that it takes more energy to turn fluorescent lights back on than can be saved by shutting them off during the day, or even over night. Its convenient when the first person in the office turns on all the lights and nobody else has to think about light switches until the end of the day, but that isnt necessarily ener gy efficient. Take a look around your work area and see if there are areas that are switched on, but really dont need to be. Are there areas that look like they should have their own switch? Tell your building energy monitor (BEM). Depending on how many fixtures are involved, it might make sense to have another switch wired in. Is the switch on the other side of the room, thereby increasing chances it will be left on when people leave? Report it. Sometimes it will make sense to install occupancy controls that shut lights off automatically when a room is unoccupied. If you see lights on when nobody is in the area, tell your BEM about the potential energy savings. Conference rooms are prime locations to find savings. Many offices, shops, warehouses and other facilities can easily reduce lighting without affecting productivity. Turn off as many unnecessary lights as possible. Use task light ing instead of overhead lighting, and light only those areas that are needed at the time. Utilize daylight from office windows or open hangar bay doors. Remember the best part about daylight is that its free! This is especially important on the flight line as our hangars use an incredible amount of energy to provide light ing during the daytime hours. Often times the ambient light already fil tering in is sufficient for the required tasks. According to the California Energy Commission, providing the right lighting can save up to 15 percent on your lighting bill. A buildings envelope consists of the pieces of the structure that seal the facilities indoor areas from the outdoors. Doors and windows are critical weak points in that envelope because they are opened and closed frequently, while a wall remains sealed. Some doors within the building are inside the air conditioning bound ary, and can be left open, unless they are designated as fire doors. Obviously, doors to the outside or unconditioned space need to be closed when the heat or A/C is on. If you notice a door that is frequently left open, report it to your BEM. The mechanical door closer may be in need of repair. Or maybe the build ing pressure needs to be adjusted. Its especially important that large loading doors be closed when not in use, if the heat or A/C is on. If large loading doors providing access to conditioned spaces are frequently left open, then report it to your BEM. It might be cost effective to install automated high-speed doors that save energy, and improve com fort and productivity. Solving these issues may be as simple as educat ing your coworkers. If the cause of the problem is a design issue, public works can evaluate the lighting requirements or building envelope issues and possibly make some chang es. Being observant and reporting what you find can help your building and your base to be greener. Keep an eye out to save energy JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012 13

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U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a mem ber of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of special recogni tion in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in ter ritorial waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve recognition and thanks for putting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans during my annual Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the highlights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are urged to con tact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 598-0481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll-free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www. crenshaw.house.gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and docu mentation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the cer tificate, veterans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214. Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program. New ship museum to honor military heritage The retired USS Charles F. Adams (DDG-2) is closer to coming home as an interactive attraction and venue in downtown Jacksonville on the St. Johns River. The aim is to become the first Naval Ship Museum in Florida or Georgia and to honor our military heritage and increase educational opportunities, tourism and business as a key element of downtown revitalization. Outwardly similar to the Shermanclass destroyer, USS Adams was the first U.S. Navy ship designed from the keel up to launch anti-aircraft missiles. USS Adams, the first guided missile destroyer in its class, was home ported for 21 years at Naval Station Mayport from 1969-90. The last existent ship in its class, USS Adams is currently moored in Philadelphias Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility. With the Jacksonville Historic Naval Ship Association leading the way, the latest discussions have focused on placing the USS Adams at the Shipyards location along the Northbank in downtown, adjacent to the citys sports complex and as part of a hub of new activity along Bay Street. With nearly 20 percent of the Jacksonville areas population made up of active and retired military and their families, the venue would have a natural attraction. In addition, it would add to tourism traffic and offer a site for business meetings, Scout campouts and other gatherings.For more information, go to www.adam s2jax.org Desert Shield/Desert Storm Recognition Ceremony set for Nov. 8 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012

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DEWEYSCall 542-3521 Deweys is now open in Bldg. 608 between Gillis St. and Keily St. off of Enterprise Ave. Enjoy a full service menu, bar and a friendly atmosphere that is great for all ages. Mon. Fri. 10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. Sat. & Sun. 4 10 p.m. CPO Pub Mon., Tues. & Fri. 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Wed. Thurs. 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Fall Bowling Leagues now forming! Mixed league Mon. @ 7 p.m. After-work league Wed. @ 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thurs. @ 9 a.m. Mixed league Thurs. @ 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Fri. @ 11:45 a.m. Friday night league @ 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Sat.@ 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Mon. Fri. 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wed. at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor pool Open for lap swimming Mon. Fri. 5:30 8 a.m. & 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Recreational swimming Mon. Fri. 4:30 8 p.m. Sat. & Sun. 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Kennedy Space Center Military member is free (pick-up voucher at ITT) Family member tickets available at ITT Adult $44.50, child $35.50 Warehouse 31 $20 Entertainment Books $30 Stone Mountain State Park $21.25 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zip line Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam February 23, 2013 Preferred seating $41, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Tampa Zoo $19 (Adult) $17.50 (Child) Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9 MOSH $7 $12 Blue Man Group in Orlando $59, includes City Walk venue Upcoming ITT Trips: Lakeridge Winery Nov. 10 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4-day hopper $135.50 Universal Studios Special 2-day 1 park each day w/ 3rd day free $101.50 2-day park to park w/ 3rd day free $120.50 Tickets valid through Dec. 14, 2012 Universal Studios Halloween Horror Nights $41.25 $71 Order Gator Bowl tickets now $35 Gator Bowl Patch $9 Florida Classic $37.50 & $52.50 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Halloween Horror Nights Trip Oct. 20 21 $60 per person Slam Dunk Contest Oct. 24 Ghosts & Gravestones Tour St. Augustine Oct. 27 at 5 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Oct. 23 for active duty Oct. 25 for retirees & DoD personnel Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DOD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. CFC Charity Golf Tournament October 25, 12:30 p.m. shotgun start $60 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thurs. for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thurs., 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding. ASE certified mechanic on site.Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation available Family Fitness Center hours are Mon. Fri., 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Oct. 29 Dec. 10 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012 15

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Pharmacists and pharmacy techni cians, play a number of roles filling and dispensing medications, educating patients, coordinating care with physi cians, and managing supply lines. And in the Navy, this is all in support of the health and medical readiness of warf ighters, their families and retirees. At Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, phar macies fill 4,700 prescriptions each day. To help patients make the best use of the pharmacy, here are some common questions and answers. What drugs does the pharmacy cover? Pharmacies use formularies to decide what to stock, because no pharmacy can carry every drug, due to both budget and size constraints. A formulary is a list of drugs that a pharmacy carriesand its developed by a group of healthcare professionals including physicians and pharmacists. To find the military health systems formulary, ask a pharmacy staffer or go online to http://pec.ha.osd. mil/formulary_search.php. Why does it take so long to fill a prescription? Each day, pharmacists fill orders for patients seen in the clinics, the ER, laboring moms, surgery patients and hospitalized patients. Pharmacys num ber one job is to correctly fill prescrip tions so that patients get the correct medication 100 percent of the time. This means that staff review prescriptions for potential negative drug interactions and to ensure consistency with current medical guidelines and sometimes involves contacting the prescribing provider. Can medications be delivered to patients homes? Yes. Patients can save travel time by using TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery. This is an inexpensive option, including generics at no-cost. It offers a 90-day supply for most medications; refills by mail, phone or online; and an automatic refill option. To sign up, go to www.tricare.mil/homedelivery or call 877-363-1303 (option 2). How about getting medications at NH Jacksonville? For refills, call 800-NAV-PHAR (6287427). The hospitals outpatient pharma cy (542-7405) is open Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The satellite pharmacy (5422537, refills and new civilian prescrip tions only), near the Exchange, is open Monday to Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The satellites drive-up window (refills only) is open Monday to Friday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Whats the best way to get rid of old or unwanted medications? The best way is to take advantage of local drug take-back events check www.dea.gov. To dispose of most medi cations at home, dont flush them down the toilet this can poison the water ways with drugs. For non-narcotics, dispose in household garbage: seal in a bag and (optionally) mix the medicine with something undesirable like coffee grounds or kitty litter. And remove the label to protect privacy. NH Jacksonville cannot accept medication for disposal. What can patients do to be safe? Be involved talk to the provider and pharmacist, and ask questions. Take medication exactly as prescribed and be just as careful with over-the-coun ter items like tylenol and cold medicine. Dont share medication. Keep a list of all medications. Check expiration dates. Find out more at www.med. navy.mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax, and keep up with current news on Facebook www.facebook.com/ NavalHospitalJacksonville. National Pharmacy Month: Ensuring safe, effective medication use 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012

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The NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center hosted a Listening Session Oct. 10 at the base chapel to gain perspective on some of the issues military members and their families face regard ing raising children in America today. The event was kicked off by NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander. I think this is a very important opportu nity to provide feedback. This allows you to reflect on how we can better take care of children in todays society, he said. Undersander then intro duced Jim Hmurovich, presi dent and CEO of Prevent Child Abuse America. Hmurovich, who previously worked for the Indiana Department of Corrections and as the Indiana State Welfare director, is cur rently touring the country to gain knowledge and input to create a comprehensive nation al strategy to ensure children are provided the opportu nity to develop on all levels in healthy, nurturing homes, schools and communities. In 1988, when I was working for the Indiana Department of Corrections I remember a consultant coming in and stating that 63 percent of all the juve niles in detention have been abused. A couple years later, I was visiting the supervisor of the womens maximum security prison in Indiana and I asked what was the most common thing the women stated when they arrived. He said the most common thing they say is that this is the first time in their lives that they feel safe. That stunned me, said Hmurovich. I wondered how could we have a community norm that allows this to hap pen. Several years later, Hmurovich became Indianas Welfare director. I traveled the state to talk to people about what happened to help them get off welfare. Again, I was surprised at the answers. Most said, because someone took the time to help me. It made me realize that the government cant solely take care of our families. They need help from their communities partner ships with businesses, social agencies all working togeth er, he continued. I realized that we need to change the way we do business regarding child welfare cases and foster care. If we want to reduce the number of children in special education class es and reduce the number of prisons we are building then maybe the answer is to work with the families and invest more in Americas children, said Hmurovich. Hmurovich took his case to a national level by heading to Washington, DC to ask legis lators what the plan was for the children of our country. Unfortunately, there was no national strategy for the pre vention of abuse or neglect of our children, he said. He then asked the audience, How can we ensure that every child has an equal opportunity for healthy growth and devel opment in our country? Base personnel had a variety of answers but many pertained to budget constraints within the school systems which cre ates a lack of resources for students and the inability for teachers to provide individual assessments to help those in need both academically and on a personal level. Others stated that communities need to be more empow ered and corporations should create more incentive pro grams to support community efforts towards helping fami lies. Another topic was to put more emphasis on faith and that spiritual guidance pro motes a supportive and healthy environment for children and their parents. Many also stressed that if individuals gave back by volunteering or just spending time with children and showed they cared, what a huge difference it could make. The comments have been pretty consistent with what we have heard around the coun try, he told the audience. We plan to take these thoughts and hope to start a national move ment by taking the common themes to corporations to cre ate partnerships and come up with a framework of what a national strategy should be, said Hmurovich. We are committed to ensuring that our children grow up to be adults who are contributing to our society. For more information about any sports, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239, or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com nasjaxmwr NAS Jax personnel offer input to support Americas children NEX web store expands its selection, adds merchandise To further enhance customer shop ping experience at myNavyExchange. com, the Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) will be adding a number of new products to its Navy Exchange (NEX) web store over the next several months. We are constantly looking to add new products to our web store, said Tess Paquette, NEXCOM senior vice president, chief merchandising officer. We know that some of our authorized customers dont have access to shop a NEX, so the web store is the only way they can use this benefit they have earned. We want to make sure we have the products our customers need and want at a savings, no matter where they live around the world. In honor of its decommissioning, USS Enterprise (CVN 65) apparel and gifts will be added to the NEX web store in mid-October. Customers will find a variety of Enterprise merchan dise available to purchase including ball caps, shirts, coffee mugs and coins. Commissioned in 1961, the Enterprise is the worlds first nuclear-powered carrier and is both the largest and oldest active combat vessel in the Navy. Launching Oct. 31, customers will find a wider variety of toys on myNa vyExchange.com to coincide with the start of Toyland. Customers will be able to purchase action figures, building sets and blocks, dolls, kids electron ics, learning toys, riding toys and much more from their favorite brands. Toys were one of the top requests from customers and until now, we only offered early learning toys, said Paquette. We will now be offering toys for boys and girls for all age ranges, just in time for the holidays. MyNavyExchange.com currently has over 15,000 items in its web store. This holiday season, mynavyex change.com is offering several free shipping deals for its customers. From Oct. 31 Nov. 21, customers will receive free standard shipping on any toy purchase of $150 or more. Customers will get free standard shipping on any purchase of $150 or more from Nov. 22-26. Finally, from Nov. 30 Dec. 21, in addition to free standard shipping on any $150 or more purchase, customers will receive discounted priority delivery for $9.95 or discounted express delivery for $17.95. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 18, 2012 17

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