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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 10-04-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02013

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. held a press con ference Oct. 4 to announce the City of Jacksonvilles plans to host a Week of Valor to honor military members, veterans and their families. Numerous events will be held throughout the city Nov. 5-12 to recognize the contri butions and sacrifices of those serving or have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. Today, Im proud to announce the City of Jacksonvilles 2012 Week of Valor a celebration of service and sacrifice by all those who have served and those cur rently serving, said Brown, during the press conference at Jacksonville City Hall. It is so important for us to take these opportunities to say thank you. We must never for get just how much these brave men and women give. Valor is a powerful concept. It represents unparalleled courage, selfless service and commitment to our nation. The mayor then introduced Scorby to the podium. For the past year, Ive had the privilege of leading the Navys Southeast Region, which includes Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport, and Navy Submarine Base Kings Bay. Every day, I see our young men and women who have made the commitment to serve our country in a way that most people cannot imagine, said Scorby. The men and women in uni form today are but the latest in a long line of heroes who have served their nation in times of conflict and in times of peace, he continued. To each of these heroes, both past and present, we owe a debt that we may never be able to fully repay. And for that reason, I am pleased to be here for the launching the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor initiative. This tribute is a true expression of the longstanding friendship we share between the Armed Forces of the United States and the City of Jacksonville. During the Week of Valor, A deployment farewell cer emony was held Oct. 5 at NAS Jax to say goodbye to 71 members of the 345th Combat Support Hospital (CSH) who are headed to Afghanistan for the next year. The contingent of Soldiers and their families gathered for the short cer emony and some last minute family time before heading to Fort Hood, Texas for more training before deploying to Afghanistan. The Soldiers mission will focus on providing humane healthcare for detainees in U.S. custody; provide health care support to U.S. military policemen, Afghan police offi cers and foreign nationals; and offer medical training to Afghan National Security Force personnel. The hand-picked team consists of doctors, nurs es, medics, pharmacists, X-ray technicians and mental health specialists from all over the country. This mission is a challeng ing mission, but all of you are prepared. You have trained hard and you have the creden tials, qualifications and experi ence to accomplish this mis sion, 332nd Medical Brigade Command Sgt. Maj. Robert Boudnik told the detachment members. Boudnik also asked each of the Soldiers to look at the insig nia of the American flag on their right shoulders and then to their U.S. Army chest plate. You are a team. You need each other so respect and support one other. Working together as a team will make this a suc cessful mission, he added. In closing, Boudnik stressed to the families that they are Hundreds of active duty and civil ian personnel gathered for the Oct. 4 ribbon-cutting ceremony celebrat ing the grand opening of Deweys, the new all hands club developed by NAS Jacksonville Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department. The unique exterior design of Deweys evokes images of wings and aviation. Inside, the rooms and hall ways will be decorated with photo graphs and art work celebrating our stations 72 years of support for the fleet, family and warfighter, said NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders. The single story 25,000-sq.ft. multipurpose facility cost $8.2 million and has a capacity of more than 500 patrons. It includes a semi-circular entry lobby, a grand ballroom, a Chief Petty Officers Pub, a casual dining restaurant and lounge, as well as a full kitchen and catering service. Deweys is located between Saratoga and Enterprise ave nues at Keily Street. Sanders added, Deweys was con structed using green building practices and will attain Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver certification as defined by the U.S. Green Building Council. Some of the items included in the certification are the permeable paving parking lot, extensive use of day lighting, and use of insulated concrete form technology for walls with high energy efficiency. Deweys Manager John Duncan invit City of Jacksonville to host Week of Valor 345th Combat Support Hospital unit deploys to Afghanistan Deweys All Hands Club now open

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Oct. 11 1776 Battle of Valcour Island on Lake Champlain, New York. Although defeated, the American flotilla delayed the British advance and caused it to fall back into winter quarters. 1824 Marquis de Lafayette visits the Washington Navy Yard during his year long tour of America. 1942 Battle of Cape Esperance begins: In two-day battle, American task force stops Japanese attack on Guadalcanal and sinks two Japanese ships while losing only USS Duncan (DD-485). 1950 Task Force 77 aircraft destroy North Korean vessels off Songjin and Wonsan and north of Hungham. 1967 Operation Coronado VI began in Rung Sat Zone. 1968 Launch of Apollo 7, the first U.S. three-man space mission, com manded by Cmdr. Walter Schirra Jr., USMCR Maj. Ronnie Cunningham served as Lunar Module pilot. The mission lasted 10 days and 20 hours. Recovery was by HS-5 helicopters from USS Essex (CVS-9). Oct. 12 1914 USS Jupiter (AC-3) is first Navy ship to complete transit of Panama Canal. 1944 Aircraft from Carrier Task Force 38 attack Formosa. 1957 Rear Adm. Dufek arrives at McMurdo Sound, Antarctica to com mand Operation Deep Freeze III during the International Geophysical Year of 1957-58. 1965 End of Project Sealab II where teams of naval divers and scientists spent 15 days moored 205 feet below surface near La Jolla, Calif. 2000 Terrorists in a boat make sui cide attack on USS Cole (DDG-67) while the ship refuels in the port of Aden, Yemen. Seventeen Sailors are killed. Oct. 13 1775 Birthday of U.S. Navy. The Continental Congress establishes Continental Navy, later the U.S. Navy. Oct. 14 1918 Naval Aviators of Marine Day Squadron 9 make first raid-in-force for the Northern Bombing Group in World War I when they bombed German rail road at Thielt Rivy, Belgium. Oct. 15 1917 USS Cassin (DD-43) torpedoed by German submarine U-61 off coast of Ireland. In trying to save the ship, Gunners Mate Osmond Kelly Ingram becomes first American sailor killed in World War I and later is awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroism. He becomes the first enlisted man to have a ship named for him, in 1919. 1948 First women officers on active duty sworn in as commissioned offi cers in regular Navy under Womens Service Integration Act of June 1948 by Secretary of the Navy John Sullivan: Capt. Joy Hancock; Lt. Cmdr. Winifred Quick; Lt. Cmdr. Anne King; Lt. Cmdr. Frances Willoughby; Lt. Ellen Ford; Lt. Doris Cranmore; Lt. j.g. Doris Defenderfer and Lt. j.g. Betty Rae Tennant. 1960 USS Patrick Henry (SSBN-599) begins successful firing of four Polaris test vehicles under operational rather than test conditions. 1965 U.S. Naval Support Activity at Danang Vietnam, is established. Oct. 16 1885 Capt. Alfred Thayer Mahan becomes Superintendent of the Naval War College. 1940 Fifth group of 10 destroyers from the Destroyers for Bases Deal turned over to British at Halifax, Canada. 1942 Carrier aircraft from USS Hornet (CV-8) conduct attacks on Japanese troops on Guadalcanal. 1943 Navy accepts its first helicopter, a Sikorsky YR-4B (HNS-1) at Bridgeport, Connecticut. Oct. 17 1922 Lt. Cmdr. Virgil Griffin in Vought VE-7SF makes first takeoff from aircraft carrier USS Langley (CV-1) anchored in York River, Va. 1941 U-568 torpedoes and damag es USS Kearny (DD-432) near Iceland, resulting in 11 killed and 22 injured. 1944 Naval Forces land Army rang ers on islands at the entrance to Leyte Gulf in preparation for landings. 1989 Following San Francisco earth quake, 24 Navy and Military Sealift Command ships rendered assistance. Our 41st Dinner with the Smileys guest, former Maine governor and current candi date for Sen. Olympia Snowes Senate seat, Angus King, lives in Brunswick, Maine. At din ner, between answering Fords tough questions (Why do people call Maine a liber al state when we always have Republican senators?), King shared with us how much the Department of Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commissions decision to shut down NAS Brunswick has affected the community. In particular, King and his wife, Mary, spoke about feeling the loss of the positive cultural impact a military community brings to a region. We military families usu ally focus on how our moveevery-three-years lifestyle positively influences our own lives. We acquire new tastes and interests. Our children are exposed to different ways of living around the world. We are introduced to different politics and regional concerns (whats politically critical in, say, San Diego, isnt necessarily critical in Omaha). Too often, however, military families neglect to appreciate how much of an asset we are to the communities in which we live. Our experiences abroad become part of our identity, creating new demands for culturally diverse food. (You havent seen a variety of eth nic food selections until youve been to a military commis sary.) In schools, our military dependents share stories from their travels. In states where many parents work in the same business or even for the same company, factory or mill military children bring new perspective about the workingand middle-class and what it means to be a family. The flip-side to all of this, of course, is that military fami lies dont stay in one place long enough to really make a lasting difference. Or so we think. Kings comments about what military families bring to a community came, coin cidentally, on the heels of my decision to run for the school committee in Bangor. At first, I was hesitant about put ting my name on the ballot. Bangor is a small town. Many people involved in the local government have been in the area their whole lives. I dont know the complete history of the school department, and my kids have only been in the district for four years. What could I offer (besides my BS in Elementary Education)? But Kings comments sparked in a me a new way of thinking because. Ive seen schools in California, Florida, Virginia and Alabama. Ive wit nessed good districts and bad districts. In college, I worked at an inner-city school; in Florida, the school was rural. Ive vol unteered in countless class rooms and tutored at-risk stu dents. In other words, I have a wide perspective. And what Ive always said, even before deciding to run for school committee, is that the difference between the good schools and the bad ones is people. In all of these cases big, little; rich, poor; well-fund ed and not the difference is teachers. They are a schools best, most important resource. Teachers set the tone for the school. They bring culture, variety, perspective and influ ence. Schools (and parents) want to hang on to the good teachers. They jockey to make sure their children are in that teachers class. I hope other military spouses get involved in their communi ties as well. For too long weve second guessed our ability and our right to be involved in local politics. Weve neglected all that we can give back and the chance to share our wealth of experiences and perspective. As always, you can see pictures from our dinner with King by going to www. Facebook.com/DinnerWith TheSmileys. NAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Councils will host the semi-annual Individual Augmentee (IA) Luncheon Nov. 1 at 11 a.m. at the NAS Jax Officers Club. During this event, all NAS Jax Sailors who have returned from an IA assignment (within the last six months) will be recognized. There is no cost for IAs and their spouses. The cost for other military and civilian guests is $10. Tickets may be purchased at the Fleet and Family Support Center, Monday-Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The deadline to purchase tickets is Oct. 25. Childcare will be provided at the Child Development Center (CDC) for children of all IAs and spouses in attendance. Call the CDC at 542-9075 to reserve childcare. Pre-registration is required. Base commands and departments are asked to pro vide a list of attendees to Shannon Klein of the Fleet and Family Support Center at shannon.klein.ctr@ navy.mil by Oct. 18. Please include rate/rank (warfare pin if applicable), command and full name of IAs and their spouse for plaque and certificate information. Commands with IAs attending are also asked to submit photos of IAs on deployment to Miriam. gallet@navy.mil for inclusion in a multimedia show that will be shown during this event. Photos are needed by Oct. 25. Navy Band Alumni invited to performNavy Band Southeast is inviting all Navy Band Alumni to perform at the Alumni Concert at Jacksonville Beach Band Shell Oct. 20 at 12:30 p.m., in conjunction with the 2012 Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular. A rehearsal will take place at Navy Band Southeasts facility aboard NAS Jax on the evening of Oct.19. Anyone interested should contact Navy Band Southeasts Public Affairs Officer MU2 Scott Farquhar at scott.farquhar@navy.mil by Oct. 10. Teachers, like military families, are valuable assetsIA Luncheon set for Nov. 1 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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VP-30 Pros Nest earns CNO Aviation Safety AwardOfficers, enlisted and civilian personnel stood proudly in the VP-30 auditorium Sept. 21 as Commander, Navy Safety Center, Rear Adm. Brian Prindle presented the 2011 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Aviation Safety Award (also known as the Safety S) to the VP-30 Pros Nest aboard NAS Jacksonville. The VP-30 Safety Team accepted their seventh Safety S award on behalf of all the Sailors assigned to the P-3 fleet replacement squadron, and who work to maintain VP-30s stellar safety reputation. Prindle noted in his remarks that this exempla ry record wasnt created by chance. Representing the Navys only maritime patrol fleet replacement squadron, the command has created a safety climate that does not tolerate any deviation from procedure because we know it takes us down a road where bad things happen, said Prindle. The award citation commends VP-30s superior leadership, superlative airmanship and proactive allhands commitment to the principles of Operational Risk Management. Along with his Safety Team, VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens, also made it clear that it was an all-hands effort that earned this prestigious award and that he counts on every members con tinued diligence to carry this standard into the future. The award recognized the squadrons proven com mitment to aviation safety. VP-30 aircrew surpassed 7,141 flight hours and 15,465 landings during 2011. This annual milestone contributed to the squadrons record of 452,000 mishap-free flight hours over the past 47 years. Navy and Marine Corps aircraft squadrons that win this award receive engraved plaques and citations for permanent display. They are also entitled to paint a prominent green S on their aircraft until the next years selections are announced. The CNO Aviation Safety Award recognizes opera tional excellence and exemplary safety contributions that further the Naval Aviation Safety Program. In addition to an outstanding safety record, com mands and ships selected must have aggressive avia tion safety programs that contribute new ideas in mishap prevention for the general benefit of naval aviation. Dont accept defeat. Fight deadly childhood diseases.800-822-6344 www.stjude.orgA CFC Participant provided as a public service. a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org NAS Jax to host World Military Golf ChampionshipNAS Jacksonville is hosting the seventh World Military Golf Championship, Conseil International du Sport Militaire (CISM) at the NAS Jax Golf Course Oct. 13-18. CISM began in 1948 with five participat ing nations. From those five founder nations CISM has grown to 126 member nations. The United Stated joined the organization in 1951. The aim of CISM is the encouragement of mili tary sports and the development of friendly relations between the armed forces of the various fields related to sport and physical readiness. The official CISM motto is: SPORT means peace. SPORT is the opposite of war. SPORT is a cure for war. SPORT is international. SPORT brings nations closer. Friendship through sport The following countries are planning to attend the 2012 CISM Golf Championships and registration is ongoing with a few more countries expected: Bahrain, Canada, Estonia, Germany, Italy, Namibia, Pakistan, Spain, Uganda, United States and Zambia. CISM schedule of events Opening ceremonies Oct. 13 at 9 a.m. Oct. 14 first round of play Oct. 15 second round of play Oct. 16 third round of play Oct. 17 fourth and final round of play Oct. 18 cultural day and closing ceremonies For more information, call 542-3111. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 3

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Navy ombudsman at large visits NAS JacksonvilleNavys Ombudsman at Large Monika French visited NAS Jacksonville Oct. 3 as part of her Southeast Region mili tary installation tour to connect with base ombudsman and learn more about installation capabilities. Frenchs visit began with a briefing by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders, NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander and NAS Jax Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Brad Shepherd on family readiness. Being appointed as the United States Navys Ombudsman at Large by the Chief of Naval Operations, Mrs. French is very interested in many issues regarding the family readiness of our military members and some of the dif ferent programs we offer through our Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department, Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), base chapel and housing office, said Sanders. We realize that family readiness is a cornerstone of warfighting readiness, he continued. Family readiness affects job satisfaction, performance and per sonnel retention. It is a key element to overall mission performance because a Sailors strength and commitment originates from and remains with the family. French also visited the NAS Jax FFSC where she was met by FFSC Director Myrna Wilson who highlighted the cen ters three functional areas including deployment readiness, crisis response and career support and retention. Wilson also discussed the numer ous programs available to assist mili tary members and their families such as the Family Employment Readiness Program, Relocation Assistance Program, Exceptional Family Member Program, New Parent Support, financial management and ombudsman support. Several ombudsmen from various NAS Jax tenant commands also met with French to share their concerns about issues relating to military fami lies. One of the biggest issues we dis cussed was spouse employment, which is an ongoing concern at most bases because military families move so often, stated Kandi Debus, ombuds man for Commander, Navy Region Southeast. We also praised the base CO, Capt. Sanders for all his support and how he listens to our concerns and continually provides positive feedback. Other facilities French toured dur ing her visit to NAS Jax included the base chapel, housing office, Child Development Center and Youth Activities Center. Fruits, veggies: More matterIts Fruits & Veggies More Matters Month, raising aware ness about fruits and vegetables in ones daily diet. Although people know that fruits and vegetables are associated with good nutrition, many still dont consume the recommended daily amount. The U.S. Department of Agricultures food guide, My Plate, recommends filling half of ones plateat each mealwith fruits and vegetables. Eating more fruits and veggies does matter. Theyre high in many vitamins and minerals, contain fiber that helps with digestion, are usually low in calories (which can help with a healthy weight), and can reduce the risk of many diseases (such as heart disease, high blood pressure, and some cancers). Plan ahead to add fruits and vegetables to each meal, and heres a few tips. Begin with breakfast: Add fruit to cereal, or vegetables to an omelet. Snack smart: Snack on fruit and veggies, instead of chips and sweets. Double-up at dinner: Include veggies as part of the main meal, and fruits as sides or desserts. Substitute: Order veggies instead of fries at restaurants. There are many fruits and vegetables to choose from, so dont be afraid to try new types. For more ideas and recipes, contact Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Wellness Center at 542-5292 or visit www.fruit sandveggiesmorematters.org. 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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FRCSE nominated for prestigious manufacturing awardA team from the Manufacturers Association of Florida (MAF) conducted a site visit Oct. 2 at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) to review the military depots manufacturing capabilities as part of the evaluation process for this years Florida Manufacturer of the Year Award to be named later this year. The FRCSE Manufacturing Division fabricates, repairs and refurbishes aircraft components and sheet metal parts for a variety of military aircraft includ ing the F/A-18 Strike Fighter, the P-3 Orion mari time patrol aircraft, the SH-60 Seahawk and the EA-6B Prowler Electronic Warfare aircraft. FRCSE won the 2009 MAF Manufacturer of the Year Award for large category. MAF is an organization that serves to improve the business climate for manufac turers in Florida. Joint Warrior, a two-week exercise, designed and led by the Joint Tactical Exercise Planning Staff (JTEPS) in the United Kingdom, is the largest military exercise in Europe and began off the coast of Scotland, Oct. 1. The exercise is designed to test the skill, knowledge and equipment of the participants in a range of different envi ronments, said Capt. Paul Titterton, director of JTEPS. By training in this fashion, we are able to prepare for a whole range of potential and ultimately realistic tactical scenarios, from outand-out warfare to rescuing fishermen captured by pirates. Three U.S. Navy ships are taking part in the exercise, led by Commander Destroyer Squadron (COMDESRON) 26. They are guided missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64), guided missile destroyer USS Mitscher (DDG 57) and fleet replenishment oiler USNS Leroy Grumman (TAO 195). Joining the ships is Detachment 2 from the Grandmasters of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 46 and U.S. maritime patrol and recon naissance aircraft from Experimental Evaluation Test Squadron (VX) 1, Patrol Squadrons (VP) 9 and VP-10. For us, its kind of a special treat to be one of the ships that gets to go out there and do this exercise with our coalition partners, said Capt. Bob Hein, commanding officer of Gettysburg. Most likely, these same folks that we are training with, Im going to see out there in eight months doing operations. Joint Warrior is designed to improve interoperability and help integrate coalition forces and prepare them for possible joint exercises in a real-world environment. Allied and Coalition operations are the standard when units deploy, said Capt. Nelson Castro, commander of COMDESRON 26. This exercise provides a venue for our Sailors to practice and learn NATO operating procedures. Joint Warrior involves sea, ground and air assets from participating allied and NATO forces and aims to foster a spirit of teamwork between nations. There are land, air and sea units par ticipating from the U.S. and eight other countries: the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Holland, Belgium, Estonia, Norway and Sweden. The Florida League of Defense Contractors and the Jacksonville Aviation Authority will launch the inaugural First Coast Defense Expo at Jacksonville Jetport at Cecil Airport on Oct. 17 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The one-day event will allow the First Coast community includ ing personnel from regional military installations such asNaval Station Mayport and Naval Air Station Jacksonville the opportunity to see how the regional defense industry contributes to our national security and creates jobs on the First Coast. The U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, and the Florida Air National Guard will have displays at the event, where local, regional and national defense contractors will exhibit their business es. In the afternoon, U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a member of the House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, along with Florida Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll, Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and key defense industry leaders, will participate in a town hall-style discussion on the role and importance of the defense industry to our national security and economy. The First Coast is an anchor to our national security a standing not pos sible without the dedication of our men and women in uniform and the support and expertise of the compa nies that make up our defense indus trial base, said Crenshaw. The First Coast Defense Expo is a great opportunity to learn about Northeast Floridas contributions to our military. Ill be sharing the Capitol Hill perspective on how defense pol icy impacts Naval Station Mayport, Naval Air Station Jacksonville, the local industrial base, and our econ omy. Folks will be able to network, view exhibits, participate in work shops, and meet the people who play a central role in supporting our men and women in uniform in Florida and around the globe. More information and admission tickets can be obtained on the Florida League of Defense Contractors web site at www.fl-dc.org. The Jacksonville Jetport is located at Cecil Airport, 13446 Aerospace Way, in Jacksonville, Fla. VP-10 supports Joint Warrior exercise in ScotlandFirst Coast Defense Expo Oct. 17 at Cecil Airport JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 Members of Team Navy Jax gathered with more than 2,000 cyclists at the St. Augustine Airport Sept. 29 to partici pate in the 26th annual Bike MS: PGA Tour Cycle to the Shore benefiting the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society. This is the eighth consecu tive year the team has partici pated in the event, a Combined Federal Campaign-supported charity. Team members arrived before dawn to prep their bicycles, check in, grab a quick breakfast and prepare them selves for the challenging, but scenic, 86-mile ride on Day 1. The Saturday portion of the event took the riders on the back roads of North Florida to their destination in Daytona Beach. While some chose to ride only one leg of the race, many spent the night in Daytona and got up the next morn ing to pedal back to the finish line. Several members of the team chose to ride the Century course of 100 miles. Ive lost 135 pounds over the past three years so its pretty exciting for me personally to be participating in this ride. And, its for such an impor tant cause. Anything we can do to help while having fun is definitely a good thing, said Team Navy Jax member Tricia Johnson, a first-time rider in the event. Weve been training pretty hard and Im ready for this. Im out here to support the MS Society and am thrilled to be part of Team Navy Jax. I rode last year and its really a great event, added LS1(SW) John Jinenez of Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command. When we participate in events like this, everyone wins. However, we could not do it without the support of our sponsor, VyStar Credit Union and our families and friends. I am thrilled to be part of such a great team. This year, we raised $15,000 in support of the MS Society Team Navy Jax is a plea sure to associate and ride with. Never have I seen so many people from so many different backgrounds and careers come together for a common cause. We raised more than $14,000 to support the MS Society. This is only one of many events we participate in each year sup porting charities to find cures fordiseases that in someway affect us all, said Team Navy Jax Co-Captain Jerry Dryden. After safety announce ments, the horn was blown and the riders took off heading down U.S. Highway 1 South to Daytona. After hours of ped aling, team members arrived in Daytona to rest and enjoy a special dinner with the other riders. This ride today was awe some. Even though I havent been on a road bike for 10 months, I had a great team that really helped push me to continue. During my recent deployment to Afghanistan, I took a lot of spin classes because you cant go out and ride there, stated Lt. Cmdr. Maria Barefield of Naval Hospital Jax after completing the Century Ride to Daytona. I really think this years team was the strongest weve ever had. The next morning the team members headed back to St. Augustine towards the finish line. We love Team Navy Jax. Its a great team which has really grown over the years. They are very supportive of this event and the team members are always very concerned about cycling safety and rules of the road. They are a great influ ence on other riders, said Cara OReilly, vice president of development for Bike MS PGA Tour Cycle to the Shore. For more information on Team Navy Jax and the charity rides they participate in, call 318-7242. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the fed eral govern ment officially endorses any company, spon sor or its prod ucts or services. Sailors, civilians cycle to the shore to benefit MS Society

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 7

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the following events will be held to pay tribute to the military: Nov. 5, 11:30 a.m. Military Appreciation Luncheon at the Prime Osborn Convention Center Nov. 5-12 Active duty military and veteran school visits Nov. 7, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Veterans Summit University of North Florida University Center Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colts Military Appreciation Game Nov. 9, 8:30 a.m. Veterans Job Fair P rime Osborn Convention Center Nov. 9, 4:30 p.m. Mayport Music Concert NS Mayport Nov. 9, 9 p.m. Navy-Marine Corps Classic, Florida vs. Georgetown NS Mayport Nov. 12, 9 a.m. Veterans Recognition Breakfast Times Union Center Nov. 12, 11:01 a.m. Veterans Day Parade Downtown Jacksonville The Department of the Navy is par ticularly excited to be part of the NavyMarine Corps Basketball Classic, which will be played on board USS Bataan at Naval Station Mayport. Ships such as the Bataan are part of Americas Away Team, ready to deploy around the world to defend our nations interests, giving the United States a home-court advan tage that cannot be duplicated, said Scorby. Bataan will be coming to Mayport along with USS Mesa Verde and USS Carter Hall, two other amphibious warships that con stitute a representa tional amphibious ready group that will match the ships that Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced would be homeported in Mayport beginning in 2013, he added. These ships not only reinforce the importance of Northeast Florida in the Navys strategic dispersal, but dem onstrate the value of the Navy-Marine Corps team. Scorby concluded by praising the City of Jacksonville for their continual sup port of the military. The City of Jacksonville has public ly declared itself as the most militaryfriendly city in the nation. While the Week of Valor is more of a public dem onstration of support; the city has put in place numerous programs and ini tiatives that provide tangible benefits to our veterans and active duty service members. This can be seen by the fact that many of our Sailors and Marines who come to Jacksonville often stay in Jacksonville, even after they leave the military service. For more information on the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor events, go to: www.coj.net/MilitaryAffairs VALOR VP-30 Executive Officer Commander David Gardella recognized recent graduates of the P-3C CAT I (initial training syllabus) Acoustic and NonAcoustic Operator Class 1205, Flight Engineer Class 1204, and In-flight Technician Class 1203 Sept. 28. The honor graduates for the classes were: AWF3 Stephan Johnson (Naval Aircrewman Mechanical Class 1204), AWV3 Derek Rustick (Naval Aircrewman Avionics Class 1203), AWO3 Melissa Goodyear (Naval Aircrewman Operator Class 1205-Non-Acoustic), and AWO3 Blake Pockrandt (Naval Aircrewman Operator Class 1205-Acoustic). All graduating Sailors were advanced to their listed rank during the ceremony. These naval aircrewmen will now report to their assigned operational squadrons to begin their ini tial sea tour. Class 1205 CAT I Acoustic Operator AWO2 Erich Kohler AWO2(AW) Michael Toenies AWO3 Alec Darson AWO3 Jerle Dungan AWO3 Zachary Haney AWO3 Daniel Phillips AWO3 Blake Pockrandt AWO3 Cassandra Powell AWO3 Edward Vandervoort, Jr. AWO3 Edward Weber Class 1205 CAT I Non-acoustic Operator AWO1(AW) Russell Furgason AWO3 Melissa Goodyear AWO3 Robert Hawkins AWO3 Howard Heim III AWO3 Jonathan Hull AWO3 Andrew Montenegro Class 1204 CAT I Flight Engineer AWF3 Derrick Chalk AWF3 Stephan Johnson AWF3 Kirsten Jones Class 1203 CAT I In-flight Technician AWV3 Thomas Murillo AWV3 David Stones AWV3 Derek Rustick AWV3 Jaimeson Whiteley VP-30 aircrewman classes graduate 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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all part of the Army team and encour aged them to use available resources to help them while their loved ones are deployed. Thank you for your support and dedication for this mission, he said. Lt. Col. Sandra Hetzel. commander, 345th CSH Detachment 3, praised her team and thanked them for their ser vice. We had a long vetting process for this mission. We had to look for not only specific skill levels, but the personality traits of Soldiers who could qualify for this unique and challenging tasking, said Hetzel. I am so proud of them and appreciate them and their families. They came together from across the country and have gone through some extremely intense training for many months. This is such a complex mission and these are highly skilled individuals who volunteered and were specifically chosen for this deployment. This is the third tour with the unit for Staff Sgt. David Nyholm, non-commis sioned officer in charge of the mission, who is a paramedic in his civilian job. Ive deployed twice to Iraq and now were headed to Afghanistan. I look for ward to the challenge. This is a highly skilled mission and the taskings keep changing but we have an outstanding team. We need to succeed and will suc ceed and come home safely, he said. Many of the Soldiers were heartbro ken to be leaving their families but real ized the importance of the mission. This is very emotional but its some thing I have to do and definitely have a lot of support from my family, said Spc. Eduardo Torres, who was deploying for the second time with the unit. This time is quite a bit different. Last time, I was single and now Im married and a dad. I think this deployment will be much harder. The detachment is expected to return home in August 2013. CSH JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 9

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DEWEYSed those in attendance to tour the all hands club and enjoy complemen tary appetizers, desserts and beverages. It was a little over whelming at times, but our MWR club team has really pulled together to create a first-class dining and entertainment expe rience for our Sailors. Weve gotten great feed back from NAS Jax chiefs, petty officers and retir ees that well incorpo rate into our operation in the months ahead, said Duncan. And our state-of-theart BINGO system is gen erating a lot of excitement among players. On Oct. 7, we continue our grand opening celebration with a super BINGO session. Were expecting up to 200 or more players. Duncan also announced that recently retired Navy culinary specialist Shannon Sonnier had joined Deweys as executive chef. In addition to being mess specialist for a number of admirals including CNRSE Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. Chef Sonnier also cre ated menus featured at the presidential retreat at Camp David, Md. In the near future, diners will be seeing delicious new products and flavor com binations from Deweys kitchen, thanks to Chef Sonnier, said Duncan. MWR Installation Program Director John Bushick said the both the architect, Powell Design Group, and the general contractor, Friedrich Watkins Company, have previously worked with the Walt Disney Company. You can see some of that Disney kind of style when you approach the facility with its soar ing roofs that emulate wings, said Bushick. Were very proud of the Chiefs Pub that uti lizes a modern brew house concept and features a number of interesting branded tap handles behind the bar. As for the all hands din ing area, we listened to focus groups that wanted a more light, colorful and family friendly atmo sphere with a low-key approach to alcohol ser vice, explained Bushick. Right now, our plan is to smoothly transi tion our staff from The Zone to this outstand ing new facility by offer ing familiar and proven menu items. Within six months, Chef Sonnier and the Deweys culi nary team will evaluate the menu and customer comment cards to see what new directions can be explored with our food and beverage ser vice. Patrons can expect a number of tasty surpris es, said Bushick. The Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion recently presented an over view of the Career Intermission Pilot Program (CIPP) to more than 1,000 Sailors during the 24th Navy Career Counselor Symposium. The presentation, briefed by Lt. Cmdr. Chris Muller, Career Intermission program manager, dis cussed current CIPP requirements, future potential changes, and how CIPP can provide balance to a Sailors career, by setting them on a path to long-term life/work success. CIPP is not a one-size-fits-all pro gram. Its not supposed to be, said Muller. For those Sailors looking to take a break from active duty service to pursue other career-enhancing options, it can be a great way to meet their needs but they need to know about the program. Muller said Sailors have heard the acronym CIPP but have a misconcep tion that the program is only open to women who want to take time off to start a family. CIPP can also be used to pursue higher education, better align dual-military careers, care for an ill family member, or even travel the world. CIPP is not just a program for women who want to take time off to have children, although for those that want a break in service to do so, it can be a viable option, said Muller. Sailors are using CIPP for a variety of reasons, the biggest being pursuit of higher education. CIPP is a great program to use for educational oppor tunities that wouldnt normally be as compatible with full-time active duty service. CIPP is currently authorized through FY 2015, providing 20 officer and 20 enlisted program application slots each year. Upon acceptance to CIPP, partici pants transfer out of the active compo nent and directly into the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR). Participants can utilize the program from one to three years, incurring an active duty obliga tion of two months for every month of program participation following their return to active duty. While in CIPP, participants retain full medical and dental benefits for themselves and their dependents, full Navy Exchange and Commissary benefits, a monthly stipend equal to 1/15 of the participants active duty basic pay, and a one-time CONUS permanent change of station (PCS). During CIPP, participants elec tronically muster for accountabil ity purposes, but remain in IRR sta tus. All CIPP participants are exempt from consideration for promotion or advancement during intermission. Upon returning to active duty, the CIPP participants date of rank is adjusted, allowing the participant to remain competitive with those peo ple at the same experience level. For officers, the date of rank is adjusted to a later date based on the length of the participants intermission. For enlisted Sailors, enlisted Time in Rate (TIR) and effective date of paygrade are adjusted to a later date based on length of the participants intermis sion. Muller emphasized that applicants are encouraged to apply for CIPP dur ing their normal orders negotiation period, approximately six to nine months in advance of their project ed rotation date. Sailors in receipt of PCS orders, Full Time Support (FTS), Sailors currently receiving a CSRB or Sailors who have not completed their first active duty fleet utilization tour are not eligible for CIPP by congressio nal mandate. Career Intermission Pilot Program presented 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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NAS Jax hosts three golf championshipsThe NAS Jacksonville Golf Course host ed the stroke play All-Navy Golf Camp Sept. 29 Oct. 2. The next week, inter-ser vice teams competed in the stroke play Armed Forces Golf Championship Oct. 6-9, followed by the CISM World Military Golf Championship, being held here Oct. 136. One of the things that makes our golf course ideal for championship play is that riverfront lodging and dining are within walking distance of the club house, said Mike McCool, operations manager of the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department that manages the golf course. Weve host ed the All-Navy event several times over the years. This is our first Armed Forces championship and our second time for CISM (Conseil International du Sport Militaire). Hosting these three golf cham pionships at NAS Jacksonville is a lot of work for MWR but it simplifies logis tics and helps control travel costs for the players, said McCool. The All-Navy Golf Camp consisted of 20 men and three women, with the topsix men and top-three women advanc ing to the inter-service Armed Forces Golf Championship. All-Navy Golf is an opportunity forSailors with the appro priate skill set to compete at the highest level outside of the service academies. At the Armed Forces competition, each foursome is made up of one play er from each service branch (Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps). At the end of play, the top-six men and top-two women will advance to the CISM World Military Golf Championship, said McCool. He explained that CISM, founded in 1948, supports military sports and physi cal fitness through the development of friendly relations between armed forces in various fields of sports. CISM President for Asia, Lt. Col. Hakeem Al-Shino of Bahrain, is the onsite CISM representative. He will join all participants, chiefs of missions and team captains to play the practice round on Saturday. Countries rep resented in the championship include Bahrain, Canada, Italy, Netherlands, Pakistan, Namibia, Germany, Spain, Uganda, Zambia and the United States. NAS Jacksonville Golf Director Joe Carreiro said despite the abun dance of summer thunderstorms, the tees, fairways, roughs and greens are in good shape for the tournaments. Players will compete each day over the nine holes of the red and white cours es that are each par 36. Our groundskeeping staff has worked tirelessly to maintain the courses appearance and functionality for these tournaments, said Carreiro. Whats the most challenging hole on the course? So far, players have agreed that the back nine (white course) was the most challenging. Its a more narrow, more target-oriented course that rewards pre cision. Spectators will enjoy watching players on the white course, par 4, no. 9, said Carreiro. Stroke play, also known as medal play, is a scoring system in golf where players record the number of strokes taken at each hole and total them up at the end of a given round. The player with the lowest total is the winner. SECDEF releases voting guidance Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta released the following message Oct. 5. On November 6th, Americans will have the opportunity to exer cise the most important responsi bility we have in a democracy the right to vote. Voters will choose from candidates at every level from the commander-in-chief, to legislative representatives, to county commissioners, city coun cil members and others. I dont have to tell you that your vote can determine the future. It really counts. And thats why its so important to participate in this process no matter where you are in the world, no matter who you plan to vote for. Please exercise the very privilege that youre willing to fight and die for in order to protect. But there isnt much time. If youre overseas or away from home, request your absentee bal lot immediately, and mail it back in time so that your vote will count. And if you need help, visit your Installation Voter Assistance Office, or see your units voting assistance officer, or visit the web site www.fvap.gov
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Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville physicians spoke at the annual Pink Ribbon Symposium in Jacksonville on Oct. 6. Capt. Joseph McQuade, director of public health, addressed the role of exercise in cancer prevention and Cmdr. Carlos Godinez, general surgeon, spoke at a Spanish-language session. NH Jacksonvilles Ribbons & Roses breast cancer support group also attended. The event is held to help educate the Northeast Florida community on advances in detecting, treating and surviving breast cancer. This years special guest was Olympic skating gold medalist and cancer suvivor Peggy Fleming. To learn more about NH Jacksonville resources, contact Breast Care Coordinator Nikki Levinson-Lustgarten at 542-7857. Everyone is welcome at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Breastival on Oct. 17, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., near the hospitals first floor pharmacy. The event features numerous community organizations that provide tools and education to prevent and manage breast cancer. The hospital is also accepting entries for the Calling All Flags contest through Oct. 15. The contest welcomes flags that fea ture patients stories about how cancer has touched their lives. For information about both events, contact NH Jacksonville Breast Care Coordinator Nikki Levinson-Lustgarten at 542-7857. The American Red Cross Northeast Florida Chapter hosted a luncheon Oct. 4 to recognize its volunteers at NAS Jacksonville. In addition to honoring years of dedicat ed service by each volunteer, the event included live music by Helen Donahoe and Gigi Mitchell, remarks by Red Cross North Florida Region CEO Jack Morgan and NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders, and keynote speaker Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer. Red Cross volunteers have served Northeast Florida since 1914, when the national orga nization was first chartered by President Woodrow Wilson. For NH Jacksonvilles 57,000 patients, a tireless team of 55 Red Cross volunteers plays an invaluable role across 16 departments. Under the leader ship of Chair Helen Donahoe and Co-Chair Anne Owen, this team contributes about 1,900 hours each month or almost 23,000 hours each year. Volunteers provide vital ser vices, including: counseling patients on personal and fami ly problems; helping with plans for emergency or convales cent leave; getting background information from patients for use by medical staff in diag nosis and treatment; comfort ing families of seriously ill patients; and serving as NH Jacksonville ambassadors lifting the spirits of patients, visitors and staff. Just a few of these out standing volunteers include: Donahoe, who has served 39 years; Owen, who has served 13 years; Gwendy Baldwin, with 14 years in the Maternal Infant Unit; Thelma Trutna, with 30 years in Pharmacy; Podiatrist Dr. Jeffrey Schoen, whos new to the team; Terry Miles, who leads the Junior Red Cross volunteer program; George Perry, who volunteers in the Pharmacy five days per week; and husband-wife teams Epifania and Fred Cabales (with a combined 24 years) and Teresa and Robert Wheeler (with a combined 25 years). Whether driving the park ing lot shuttle; welcoming and checking-in patients in the clinics, emergency room and pharmacy; providing lactation counseling for new moms and babies; filing medical records; delivering cookies on the inpa tient units; or providing direct patient care as physicians or nurses these volunteers, like American Red Cross founder Clara Barton, demonstrate an abiding faith in the possibility of something better. Shaffer concluded, Thank you so much for being part of the Naval Hospital Jacksonville family. We truly could not accomplish our mission with out you. I know that you all do this out of generosity of heart and devotion to country. On behalf of Naval Hospital Jacksonville and from my own heart, thank you! Red Cross volunteers honored Navy doctors speak at Pink Ribbon SymposiumHospital to host Breastival on Oct. 17 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 13

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The U.S. Navys top doctor released his strategy map for the future of Navy Medicine on his Falls Church, Va. headquarters website, Oct. 1. Readiness, value and jointness were the three clear priorities laid out for Navy Medicine in the plan, Navy Medicine: Charted Course. Vice Adm. Matthew Nathan, U.S. Navy surgeon gen eral and chief, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, chose the release date to coincide with the new fiscal year for the Department of Defense representing a new way of thinking and a new way of conducting business for the community he leads. Navy Medicine is the second largest community in the Navy with more than 63,000 personnel dispersed around the globe. We live in dynamic times, said Nathan to the top military and civilian health care executives in the Navy, during a workshop aimed at fine-tuning his priorities. We must concentrate on bringing more value and jointness while maintain ing the high state of medical readiness. When the world dials 9-1-1, it is not to make an appointment. Each of the goals value, readiness and jointness have metrics assigned to track their success. They will be assessed and evaluated over the next year. For example, one of the metrics for the value goal includes enrollee network costs and the ability of Navy medical treatment facilities to recapture out of network care. All three goals also have strategic enabling objec tives. According to the plan, Strategic enablers help organizations achieve the success of a goal or objec tive. For example, Navy Medicine is a strategic enabler for the Department of the Navy because it delivers force health protection and a ready force able to meet missions, explained Nathan. The plan maps out a course for achieving the value, readiness and jointness goals by optimizing the use of medical informatics, technology and telemedicine, standardizing clinical, non-clinical and business pro cesses, and improving strategic communication and message alignment across the enterprise. Medical informatics and use of telemedicine solu tions will create efficiencies and improve responsive ness to the needs of [Navy Medicines] stakeholders and customers. This in turn adds value and improves overall readiness, according to Nathan, who also used the plan to reiterate his guiding principles for Navy Medicine, that he conveyed to the enterprise in a video message earlier this year. I want to talk about the philosophy Ive had ever since Ive been in command and if youve worked for me before, youve heard it, said Nathan in his video message. Its ship, shipmate, self take care of the ship, take care of each other, take care of yourself. According to Nathan, the ship is the mission, whether its caring for patients, creating new vaccines or training new corpsmen. He said shipmate rep resents his expectation that Navy Medicine person nel be vigilant to the needs of those they serve with, always preserving the ethos and professionalism that are the pinnacle of Navy Medicine. Finally, the self is important because Nathan believes Navy Medicine personnel cannot care for others and meet the mission if they are not first caring for themselves. Asking for help is a sign of strength, according to the guiding principles laid out in the Navy Medicine plan. You must constantly reflect on your own needs and those of your family. Speak up so we can better equip you to meet the challenges you are facing, said Nathan. Navy Surgeon General charts strategic course for Navy Medicine U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a mem ber of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of special recogni tion in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in ter ritorial waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve recognition and thanks for putting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans during my annual Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the highlights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are urged to con tact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 598-0481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll-free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www. crenshaw.house.gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and docu mentation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the cer tificate, veterans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214.Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program. For students antici pating graduation in June 2013, the eligibil ity requirements have changed for Florida Bright Futures scholar ships. General eligibility requirements include: and a U.S. citizen or eli gible non-citizen. uate degree at an eligible Florida postsecondary institution. arship funds within two not the previous three years of high school graduation. This is a 2012 legislative change. guilty or have pled not contest to a felony charge. six non-remedial semes ter credit hours. A major change imple mented in 2011 was the submission of a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This is still a require ment for Bright Futures eligibility. New language states students must sub mit an error-free FAFSA. The FAFSA is also required in the submis sion of a Florida Resident Access Grant and Access to Better Learning and Education Grant. Students, after the ini tial submission of the FAFSA, must then annu ally submit the FAFSA for renewal of the schol arship prior to disburse ment of funds. Another 2011 change was the increased com munity service require ments for all three Bright Futures award levels. FAS 100 hours (increased from 75 hours) FMS 75 hours (increased from 0 hours) GSV 30 hours (increased from 0 hours). Nan Worsowicz, super visor of guidance for Duval County Schools, indicated this new requirement caused the most problems for 2012 graduates. Ensure this infor mation is given to the childs school counselor or designee by the end of the first semester of the senior year for seventh semester evaluation or by graduation for eighth semester evaluation. SAT and ACT test score requirements also changed for this years graduating class. 2011-12 FAS SAT 1270, ACT 28 2012-13 FAS SAT 1280, ACT 28 2011-12 FMS SAT 980, ACT 21 2012-13 FMS SAT 1020, ACT 22 The Florida Gold Seal Vocational (GSV) Scholars Award is no lon ger funded for an AA or BA degree program. The GSV award is now limited to 72 semester hours towards an AS, AAS, CCC, and PSAV. However in the Applied Technology Diploma it is limited to 60 semester hours. GSV no longer rolls over to the Medallion level award. For more infor mation, go to: www. FloridaStudentFinancial Aid.org. or attend the free National Association of College Admissions Counselors National College Fair at the Prime Osborn Oct. 13 from 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Dawn Mills is the NAS Jax school liaison offi cer. If you have questions about educational issues, email dawn.m.mills@ navy.mil or call 778-2236.Desert Shield/Desert Storm Recognition Ceremony set for Nov. 8Changes for Florida Bright Futures scholarships 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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NAS Jacksonvilles Flight Line Caf hosted a chef certifi cation event on Sept. 28 for five culinary students, presenting them with different food items and challenges to be judged and graded on. The students, some of whom have culinary degrees, attend ed training in both a classroom and kitchen setting for two weeks, learning the finer arts of food preparation. This event provides stu dents a chance to demonstrate the skills they have learned, and upon successful comple tion of prepping and serv ing a full meal, they will have become either certified culi nary or certified sous-chefs, respectively, said Karin George, food service direc tor for Commander, Navy Installations Command gal leys. This certification is some thing they can take with them beyond their military careers, as it will also be recognized in the civilian sector. The students were presented with numerous food prepara tion challenges, including sea soning assorted vegetables, creating a salad with home made dressing, and properly filleting and cooking fish, steak and chicken. During the entire event, a panel of four judges observed and graded them. Our grading criteria includes safety, adhering to sanitation standards, food preparation and plated pre sentation, commented CWO3 Michael Carter, executive chef and officer in charge of Navy Food Management Team Mayport, who judged the event. Another key element is that the students must utilize all the ingredients given to them for any part of the meal they pre pare. Upon completion of the cooking challenge, the judg es sample and critique all the food items prepared, and advise the chefs on any improvements they could make. George stated, Its an exciting event, and great to see these students using their creativity to prepare and serve such great meals. The Navy is a Global Force for Good and our Sailors embody its Core Values of Honor, Courage and Commitment. Each day, Im energized when I see Sailors challenging themselves to reach their personal and professional goals. Because of their enthusiasm I have no doubt that the outlook of our maritime force shines bright as these individuals motivated by dedication, service and sacrifice continue to perfect their tal ents across the fleet and around the globe. Yet for all of the positive things going on in our Sailors lives, our Navy is being plagued by a sickness among our ranks. Each week, in all-too-familiar reports, we see detailed accounts of Sailors being caught, testing positive and being separated from the Navy for using synthetic marijuana or Spice. This threat to our Navys readiness is also known as K2, Spice Gold, Spice Silver, Spice Diamond, Genie, Yucatan Fire, Bliss, Black Mamba, Bombay Blue, Fake Weed, Zohai or Red Magic. Whatever its called, not in my Navy! This synthetic drug presents a real and existing danger to a users men tal and physical health, as well as their military careers. Being under the influ ence of this drug can adversely affect the performance of our shipmates on and off duty. Some of the short-term effects include auditory and visual hallucinations, Navy chefs seek certification Spice: Another way to spell disaster JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 painless head pressure, panic attacks, time distortion and delirium. Psychotic symptoms can last for days, even months in some cases. Long-term effects from this mind-altering drug can include permanent physical impairment, mental illness or death. These products arent approved for human consump tion and there is no oversight of the manufacturing process. Similar to other drugs on the street, experts warn that you never know what mixture of chemicals could be present in the drugs and users are experi menting with the combination of multiple products which can dramatically change or increase its effects on a caseby-case basis. In San Diego, one of our major fleet concentration areas, multiple patients have been treated at Naval Medical Center San Diego for using Spice, some resulting in months of inpatient treatment for persistent psychotic symp toms. According to the Drug Enforcement Agency, increased dosage, addiction and use of synthetic marijuana has led to a surge in emergency room visits and calls to poison control centers. It saddens me that even though they know that the odds are against them, some of our Sailors continue to gamble with their lives, playing Russian roulette with no pos sible way to win. Regrettably, simple message traffic cant portray the nega tive impact the use of this manmade drug has on unit cohe sion. Drug abuse puts lives and missions at risk and undercuts unit readiness, morale and esprit de corps. On flight lines, onboard ships and on bases around the world, we put our lives in the hands of our ship mates. We trust that the Sailor or Marine we are working with is focused and capable. If they have used Spice, their readi ness for duty and their profes sional judgment is in question. I also cant adequately express the drugs impact in terms of permanent personal consequences including crimi nal charges, discharge, and long-term medical issues, not to mention the impact to the Sailors family. Those most painful and private elements often go untold. The Navys implementation of synthetic drug testing is a necessary step in putting a halt to Sailors and Marines using these outlawed and hazardous substances. If unclear of the Navys policy on drug abuse, its straightforward and to the point zero tolerance and illegal. Using Spice, or other trendy drugs and artificial compounds by any member of our Navy and Marine Corps team is incompatible with the guidelines for performance, military discipline, and readi ness characterized by todays Sailors and Marines. In 2011, close to 400 Sailors were processed out of the Navy because they chose to use these drugs. As shipmates we must all watch out for each other and remind each other that abusers will be caught, they will be sep arated, lose benefits and will let down the Navy team. With that gloomy forecast said, I want you to understand that Im only identifying a very small population of mis guided individuals and that an overwhelming majority of our Sailors and Marines conduct themselves honorably. There are also signs that we are winning the battle. The Navys history of Zero Tolerance clearly shows dra matic gains in reducing illegal drug use. In 1982, the first year of urinalysis screening, the percent of positive samples was 7.21 percent. For FY 2011, that number was less than one per cent, with a total of 1,515 out of 1,184,160 samples testing posi tive. At Naval Education and Training Command (NETC) headquarters and throughout our domain, we understand that fleet readiness starts here and we go the extra mile to make sure that our students are equipped to succeed in the fleet. Our instructors and staff are charged with their train ing, mentoring, setting a per sonal example, and are com mitted to good order and dis cipline. As a team, we take on challenges by developing situ ational awareness, coaching our shipmates, taking advan tage of resources and provid ing positive leadership. We also faithfully help our shipmates navigate through rough seas, and go the extra mile to pre vent a shipmate from making a bad decision that could ruin their lives. If you or someone you know needs help, all you have to do is ask. SPICE DeweysCall 542-3521 Now open in Bldg. 608 between Gillis St. and Keily St. off of Enterprise Ave. Enjoy Deweys full-service menu, bar and a friendly atmosphere that is great for all ages! Monday Friday 10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 410 p.m. CPO Pub Monday, Tuesday & Friday 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Wednesday Thursday 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. 10th annual PBA South Region Adult Pro-Am 9-Pin Tap Oct.12, 6:30 p.m. & 8:30 p.m. $25 entry fee Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Fall Bowling Leagues now forming! Mixed league Monday 7 p.m. After-work league Wednesday 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thursday 9 a.m. Mixed league Thursday 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Friday 11:45 a.m. Friday night league 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Saturday 10:30 a.m. Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor pool Open for lap swimming Monday Friday 5:30 8 a.m. & 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Recreational swimming Monday Friday 4:30 8 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Entertainment Books $30 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23, 2013 Preferred seating $41, lower level seat ing $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sec tions 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Upcoming ITT Trips: Mt. Dora Oct. 27 Lakeridge Winery Nov. 10 New Armed Forces Disney Salute: $153.25 for 4 day ticket with hopper option $153.25 for 4 day ticket with water park fun & more $180.75 for 4 day ticket with both park hopper and water park fun &more Universal Studios Special 2 day 1 park each day w/ 3rd day free $101.75 2 day park to park w/ 3rd day free $120.50 Tickets valid through December 14, 2012 Universal Studios Halloween Horror Nights $41.25 $71 Order Gator Bowl tickets now $35 Fl Classic $37.50 & $52.50 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Fall Barracks Bash Oct. 11, 49 p.m. Free food, entertainment, games & prizes!Tim Meadows Comedy Show Oct. 13 at the Comedy Zone Free admission, soda and appetizers! Departs Liberty at 7 p.m. Free Bowling Night Oct. 17, 710 p.m. NAS Freedom LanesNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Oct. 23 for active duty Oct. 11 & 25 for retirees & DoD person nel Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. CFC Golf Tournament Oct. 25, 12:30 p.m. shotgun start $60 per person Mulberry Cove Marina Call 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 The Sesame Street / USO Experience Nov. 13 at 6 p.m. Youth Center Gym Tickets will be available beginning Oct. 9, 8 a.m. 2 p.m. Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Oct. 29 Dec. 10 $500 per person For more information, contact Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil.

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New advanced rider motorcycle safety courseCape Fox Professional Services at NAS Jacksonville is offering a new motorcycle safety class called the Advanced Rider Course (ARC). Designed by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation, this class is nearly identical to the Military Sport Bike Course (MSRC), except that it is open to all types standard street, touring, chopper and dual-sport of two wheeled motorcycles. Beginning in a classroom environment where stu dents learn how to improve perception skills and haz ard awareness, the course will also promote an open group setting. Students will work together by analyz ing their riding decisions and understanding their risk skill levels. The driving range, located off of Birmingham Avenue., will focus on enhancing performance capa bilities related to cornering, breaking and hazard avoidance. The eight-hour ARC is considered a level-two train ing class, being equivalent to the Experienced Rider Course (ERC), Basic Rider Course 2 (BRC2) and the MSRC. The prerequisite is completion of level-one training. Students will meet at the second deck motorcy cle training room at the NAS Jax Auto Hobby Shop. In addition to students wearing proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), all bikes must be in good working condition. For ARC registration, contact Cindy at 542-2584 or Kristen at 542-8810. Basic Rider Course for ladies A two-day Basic Rider Course (BRC) will be offered Nov. 19-20 for female riders only (active duty have priority, dependents/civilians will be accepted on standby status) at NAS Jax. Be the first to sign up for this skill-building class. If you have always wanted to ride a motorcycle, or have tried to learn from someone else, now is the time to enroll and learn from the Motorcycle Safety Foundation female instructors. Motorcycles, helmets, and gloves are provided, although you may bring your own if you wish just ensure you wear long sleeve shirts, long pants and over-the-ankle footwear. We will teach this twoday class rain or shine so dress appropriately for the weather. You will have classroom and riding time each day with a written exam and range rid ing to test your knowledge and skill. There are only 12 slots available, so contact your command motorcycle safety representative, self enroll on ESAMS, or call Cindy at 542-2584. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 17

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Expectant parents received a crash course on infant care dur ing a Baby Boot Camp class at Naval Hospital Jacksonville (NH Jax) Oct. 3. Baby Boot Camp focuses on the newborn and what to expect the first few days and weeks at home, as well as prepare them for a positive parenting experi ence. There is a lot of information that parents dont know they need until they need it. Parents are on a very steep learning curve, especially with a first child, so its important to give them as much information ahead of time, said Alisa Davis R.N., prenatal nurse educator at NH Jax, where two to three babies are born each day. It makes it a little less overwhelm ing when they bring their new born home. Father-to-be, AE2 Jonathan Musick, assigned to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, found the class to be very infor mative. He particularly enjoyed the Happiest Baby on the Block section teaching a five-step method used to soothe infants and greatly reduce crying time. I had no idea what swaddling was, let alone how to swaddle a baby. It gives me the confidence to feel at ease, and know I can care for my child. I feel better prepared, said Musick. Participants received infor mation on basic baby care, pediatric dental health, tobacco cessation, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Visiting Nurse Program, Happiest Baby on the Block, injury prevention, car seat safety and a demonstration of infant CPR. A pediatric provider was also on hand to discuss the impor tance of immunizations and answer other questions. STG3 Kimberly Campbell of VP-30, and her husband, Brandon, attended other classes before Baby Boot Camp and feel all parents should participate in the prenatal classes. I feel the classes helped us to be more positive about the pregnancy and work better together, said Campbell. We received a lot of information that helped us prepare for the delivery. NH Jax is the first hospital on Floridas First Coast mili tary or civilian to earn Baby Friendly designation from United Nations Childrens Fund (UNICEF) and World Health Organization. Its the third hospital in DoD and fourth in Florida with the certification. Baby Friendly hospitals seek to improve the health of babies and moms by promoting breast feeding. If you want to develop a pre natal education plan can, call 542-BABY (542-2229) to register for classes. Naval Hospital Jacksonville conducts Baby Boot Camp 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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October is Energy Awareness Month, a national effort to underscore how important energy is to our national prosperity, security and environmental well-being. In commemoration of Energy Awareness Month, NAS Jacksonville is kicking off a month of energy saving events and activities. NAS Jacksonville Energy Manager Joshua Bass will be highlighting products and projects that can help you position your household for a more sustainable future. Bass will contribute weekly energy tips arti cles to Jax Air News including: Meet Bass in person, Oct. 12 13 at the NEX Courtyard. Check out his display of energy effi cient products, including a solar-powered GEM low speed vehicle. Utility companies want us to use energy in a predictable way in a way that makes it easier for them to guarantee they can provide the energy we want. When we call for more energy than they can easily provide, they are usually able to deliver, but the cost can be very high for the last little bit that gets everyone through a cold snap in the winter or a heat wave in the summer. It is not cost effective for the utility to produce power at maximum capacity all of the time, when the maximum demand is not continuously required. When the maximum demand is placed on the grid, the utility company may need to start up inefficient and dirty generators for awhile, or pur chase from another utility pro vider, or pay some customers to use less until the shortage is over. This is why utility bills can be complicated. Today, more home accounts are charged in a similar fashion to the way commercial accounts have been charged for years. This method rewards using ener gy at a steady rate, as well as using energy at night when the overall demand is low. Energy used during the peak demand period is charged at a higher rate, because it is more expen sive for the utility to meet that demand. There are three ways utilities encourage stable energy use: Time-of-use rates are dif ferent rates for different times of day. Higher on-peak rates encourage us to use less on weekdays during the day when people are using the most ener gy. Your utility company will set on-peak and off-peak times based on typical energy use patterns in your area. Demand charges are charg es based on your single high est peak use during the billing period. These charges encour age us to fit periodic high energy consuming processes into lower energy use periods. Most Navy bases pay demand charges, and they can be sub stantial in high electric rate areas. Some utility companies are so serious about encourag ing us to limit our highest use that they charge for the highest demand on the system for an entire year. Demand charges can also be called transpor tation charges, and are start ing to show up on natural gas bills as well as electricity bills. These charges help the util ity have confidence that the capacity of their transmission lines will be adequate to deliv er the required energy to cus tomers. Tiered rates use one rate for the first so many kilowatthours used during the billing period, then a higher rate for the next so many kilowatthours used, and so on. Tiered rates require us to pay more for what we use thats above a basic minimum allotment of energy, and, again, encourage us to try to stay within an ener gy budget. Understanding how util ity companies bill for their ser vices can help us make wise choices regarding energy use, both at work and at home. If you have questions about utility bills, stop by the NAS Jax Energy Awareness Month display located near the Navy Exchange food court on Oct. 12-13, from 8 a.m. 1 p.m. each day. The NAS Jax Energy Team will be there to discuss ener gy saving opportunities and answer any questions. A light ing comparison board, water saving showerhead display and solar photovoltaic demonstra tion will also be on display. Also, the energy conservation mascot, BRITE, will be avail able to silently act out energy conservation practices just like a mime who looks like a light bulb! Understanding how utilities bill customers Save energy Oct. 12-13 at NEX courtyard JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 19

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A $925,000 contract was recently awarded for the roof replacement of the NAS Jax indoor swimming pool (build ing 614) at Enterprise Ave. and Gillis Street. This past August, deteriorated pieces of roof deck ing began to fall from the ceil ing into the pool and surround ing areas forcing a complete closure of the building. This affects not only recreational swimmers, but also the U.S. Navy Surface Rescue Swimmer School (SRSS). The roof replacement project is scheduled for completion no later than December. The old gravel roof is being replaced with a torch-down modi fied bitumen roofing system. Deteriorated corrugated steel decking is also being replaced. The replacement surface is called a cool roof because it is covered with a white finish coating that reflects sunlight resulting in a more energy effi cient building by lowering the amount of energy required to cool and heat the space. In addition to the roof replacement, the east and west sides of the building will get new energy efficient windows. This project is part of a larger $3.4 million contract that has already replaced the roofs on buildings 4, 850, 851 and 858. All of these buildings now have the new cool roof that helps contribute to an overall more energy efficient building. Lt. Kevin Harrington, officer in charge of the SRSS at NAS Jax, said the schools instructors have been flexible. When the pool was closed for safety concerns in August, we had a class on board that was only two days away from graduating. We worked with the MWR fitness staff to sched ule the students final in-water pool evaluation at the stations outdoor pool on Allegheny Road, said Harrington. Fleet readiness is not being affected because we worked with SRSS at San Diego and they were able to absorb our scheduled classes through December. Harrington explained, Our four-week CAT I course for sur face (ship-borne) swimmers uses the pool to teach basic life saving procedures and how to use lifesaving equipment. Every Navy ship is required to have two qualified rescue swimmers on board before it can pull away from the pier, so our graduates are considered mission essen tial. The SRSS staff includes 18 rescue swimmer instructors, a hospital corpsman and a para chute rigger. During the pool project, staff are volunteering at elementary schools, helping MWR to install new exercise equipment at the fitness cen ter, and working with Seabees and the NAS Jax Environmental Department to improve base nature trails. MWR Fitness Director Tanya Henigman said before the indoor pool was closed, it was available to lap swimmers from 5:30 to 8 a.m. and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Recreational swimming is 4:30 to 8 p.m. Water aerobics is Tuesday and Thursday at 11 a.m. Fortunately, the recent warm weather has allowed patrons to swim those same hours at our outdoor pool. This also enables MWR to keep supporting base and tenant commands for their Physical Readiness Tests, as long as the water temperature is 70 degrees or higher, to avoid hypothermia. Were glad to accommodate swimmers dur ing the construction project, said Henigman. The percentage of teens in high school (aged 16 and older) who drove when they had been drinking alcohol decreased by 54 percent between 1991 and 2011, according to a Vital Signs study released Oct. 2 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nine out of 10 high school teens (aged 16 and older) did not drink and drive during 2011. We are moving in the right direction. Rates of teen drinking and driving have been cut in half in 20 years, said CDC Director Thomas Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. But we must keep up the momentum -one in 10 high school teens, aged 16 and older, drinks and drives each month, endangering themselves and others. For the study, CDC analyzed data from the 1991-2011 national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBS). These nation al surveys asked high school students if they had driven a vehicle when they had been drinking alcohol one or more times during the 30 days before the survey; CDC researchers focused their analysis on students aged 16 and older. The study also found that: mately 2.4 million episodes of drinking and driving a month in 2011. behavior more than once a month. were most likely to drink and drive (18 percent), while 16-year-old high school girls were least likely (6 percent). school who reported drinking and driv ing in the past month also reported binge drinking. For YRBS, binge drink ing means five or more drinks during a short period of time. Teens learn from adults, said Pamela Hyde, the Administrator of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. That is why it is critically important that parents, teachers, coaches and all caring adults in a young persons life talk with them early and often about the dangers of underage alcohol use as well as drinking and driving. Many efforts have been helping to reduce teen drinking and driving. Some of the proven, effective strate gies include the laws in place in every state that make it illegal to sell alcohol to anyone under age 21 and for those under age 21 to drive after drinking any alcohol. In addition, the graduated driver licensing systems in some states allow teens to gain privileges, such as driving at night or driving with passengers, over time. Parents also have a crucial role to play in keeping their teens safe on the road. They can model safe driving behav ior and can consider using tools like parent-teen driving agreements with their teens. Safe driving habits for teens include never drinking and driving and wearing a seat belt on every trip. In 2011, a home fire was reported every 87 sec onds, killing 2,565 people and injuring 12,650 and causing $7.6 billion in direct damage. Many fatalities, injuries, and property losses can be prevented by plan ning ahead and integrat ing fire safe behaviors into your daily activities. Dont be a statistic . be smart. Put a smoke alarm on every level of the home outside each sleeping area, and in every bed room. Smoke alarms can be battery-operated or elec trically hardwired in your home and are available at a variety of price points. If you have hearing problems, use alarms with flashing strobe lights and vibration. Test smoke alarms every month. Replace batteries once a year, even if alarms are hard wired. Test your smoke alarms Indoor pool roof replacement underway CDC study shows 54 percent decrease in teen drinking and driving since 1991 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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at night to see if your child will wake up and respond to the alarm. Children sleep more deeply and may not wake up. If your child does not wake up to the alarm, try an alarm where you can program your voice to alert them. Mount smoke alarms high on the walls or ceilings since smoke rises. Ceiling-mounted alarms should be installed at least 4 inches away from the nearest wall. Wall-mounted alarms should be installed 4 to 12 inches away from the ceiling. Replace all smoke alarms every 10 years, or sooner if they dont respond properly. Consider installing both ionization alarms, which are better at sensing flaming fires, and photoelectric alarms, which are better at sensing slow, smoky fires, or dual sensor alarms. Cooking is the No. 1 cause of home fires and injuries. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of cooking fires. Keep anything that can catch fire away from the stovetop. Dont use the oven or stovetop if you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol. Stay in the kitchen when frying, grill ing or boiling food. If you have to leave, even for a short time, turn off the stove. FIRE FACTS The Naval Legal Service Command realigned its offices Oct. 1, but its legal services to the fleet did not change. Legal assistance services were previ ously provided by Naval Legal Service Offices (NLSOs). As a result of the realignment, a ser vice member seeking legal assistance with an issue such as a will, power of attorney, family law advice or any simi lar personal legal matter can now find assistance at the closest Region Legal Service Office (RLSO). The provision of legal assistance will continue at all prior NLSO locations, but will now be deliv ered by RLSO commands. There are legal assistance offices in fleet concentration areas, and at or near most Navy bases around the world, with legal support providers prepared to assist service members, their families, retirees, and other eligible clients. All legal assistance services are provided free of charge to those eligible. RLSOs will continue to prosecute courts-martial and provide legal advice to commands around the globe. Command services include advice on military justice, ethics, JAG Manual investigations, administrative law, and other legal issues involving Navy com mands. On Oct. 1, eight NLSOs headquar tered in Pensacola; Norfolk; Bremerton; Jacksonville; San Diego; Washington, D.C.; Naples, Italy; and Yokosuka, Japan, realigned to become four Defense Service Offices (DSOs) head quartered in San Diego; Washington, D.C.; Norfolk; and Yokosuka, Japan. The DSOs mission is to defend service members in military justice proceed ings, represent them at administrative boards, and provide other represen tational services, including advice on non-judicial punishment and adverse personnel actions. This realignment also changed the way service members receive defense services in 12 locations around the fleet where former NLSO detachments were closed. In those locations, service mem bers will receive personal defense ser vices in a manner similar to the way service members at sea are supported. Service members requesting defense services, such as representation for courts-martial or administrative boards, will make initial contact with a DSO attorney by telephone or other remote communication technology, with subsequent in-person consultation if necessary. The 12 locations are Everett, Whidbey Island, Port Hueneme, Lemoore, Corpus Christi, New Orleans, Millington, Kings Bay, Guantanamo Bay, Newport, Earle, and Sigonella. Navy Legal Office changes name, services remain intact The following are upcoming Fleet and Family Support Center classes for mili tary members and their families: For more information or to register, call 542-5745.Red Ribbon Week contest to help schools The National Family Partnership announces the national contest for its 27th annual Red Ribbon Week, Oct. 23-31. Red Ribbon Week is the oldest and largest drug prevention campaign in the country. In 1985 after the mur der of a DEA agent, parents, youth and teachers in communities across the country began wearing Red Ribbons as a symbol of their commitment to raise awareness of the destruction caused by drugs. This year, families can get involved by entering a contest to promote aware ness in their neighborhoods and win a drug prevention grant for their schools. Families can enter Red Ribbon Weeks contest to win a $1,000 grant for their school and a new iPad for their home. To participate in the contest fami lies and students will decorate the front of their homes with this years message: The Best Me Is Drug Free. Heres how students and their fami lies can enter to win $1,000 for their K-12 school and a new iPad: Students bring the Red Ribbon Week message home by working alongside parents to decorate their front door, mailbox, fence, etc. with this years theme The Best Me Is Drug Free. Take a photo with the family and their Red Ribbon Week decora tion, then upload to www.redribbon. org/contest or www.facebook.com/ RedRibbonWeek by Nov. 2 (must be parents or 18+ to upload photos). The voting begins! Ask family and friends to vote for your entry at www.redribbon.org/vote Nov. 2-16. Ten lucky winners from regions across the U.S. will win. Winners will be announced at events at their winning schools in December.Improve your life skills with free knowledge VA help availableIf you are retiring or sep arating from active duty and need assistance with submitting your claim for disability and compen sation to the Veterans Administration (VA), you can start up to one year prior to retiring/separating with getting our medical information in order. AMVETS is the Veterans Service Organization advocate for sepa rating or retiring service members and their fami lies providing assistance with submission of claims to the VA for benefits, dis abilities and compensa tion. All assistance is free and you are not required to become a member of AMVETS to use their ser vices. For more information and to make an appoint ment, call David Sanders at 542-2834 or e-mail david.d.sanders@navy.mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 21

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Operation Homefront, the national nonprofit dedicated to providing emer gency financial and other assistance to military families, has announced that nominations for the Military Child of the Year Awards are being accepted online at MilitaryChildOfTheYear.org through Dec. 15.Winners will be recog nized in April 2013. The Military Child of the Year Award recognizes children who stand out among their peers. Ideal candidates for the award demonstrate resilience, strength of character, and thrive in the face of the challenges of military life.These young heroes embody lead ership within their families and com munities. This award is presented to an out standing child from each branch of ser vice Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard.The winners each receive $5,000 and a laptop, and are flown with a parent or guardian to Washington, D.C., for a special recogni tion ceremony on April 11.In previous years, recipients have had the honor of meeting Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey and First Lady Michelle Obama, who were guest speakers for the event awards ceremo nies. With so much uncertainty living in a military family, from constantly hav ing to move to knowing that a parent is fighting for our country, it is amazing to see how strong these young people are to excel in the face of these challenges, said Jim Knotts, president and CEO of Operation Homefront.Its not just the military members who serve, but their families as well.We think these young patriots deserve to be honored for their sacrifice and their leadership. The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Nov. 4, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Detroit Lions (Tickets on sale Oct. 22) Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jags vs. Indianapolis Colts (Tickets on sale Oct. 29) Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to pur chase/use these tickets. Retirees and Veterans/DoD employ ees are eligible to purchase tickets for New York Giants and Atlanta Falcons games. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for mil itary personnel, but under no circum stances are dependent children autho rized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to pur chase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may pur chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No excep tions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the sea son.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@ usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tick ets for the entire season. Select Navy Lodges will be offering even greater savings this holiday sea son. From Dec. 3 to Jan. 7, guests who stay at select Navy Lodges will receive 20 percent off their lodging. Guests can book their lodging now through Jan. 2, 2013. Navy Lodges are a great place for guests of military members to stay dur ing the holidays, said Mike Bockelman, vice president, Navy Lodge Program. Navy Lodges normally offer a value up to 45 percent less than comparable civilian hotels. With this additional 20 percent savings, guests will really get a good value for their money. To take advantage of these sav ings, guests must make their reserva tion online at www.navy-lodge.com Reservations will not be accepted through the Reservation Center or the local Navy Lodge for this promotion. All rooms must be booked in advance. Every Navy Lodge guest room offers queen-sized beds, high-speed Internet access, and a kitchenette complete with microwave and refrigerator. Guest laundry facilities are on site, breakfast is offered daily in the lobby where free Wi-Fi access is available as well as free newspapers. Navy Lodges also offer convenient on-base parking as well as handicapped accessible and non-smoking rooms. As an added convenience, many Navy Lodges allow dogs and cats up to 50 pounds in weight to stay when traveling with their owners. Check with the Navy Lodge for more details. Navy Lodges participating in the holiday promotion include Navy Lodge Patuxent River, Annapolis and Bethesda, Md.; Navy Lodge Fort Worth and Corpus Christi, Texas; Navy Lodge and Navy Inn Memphis, Tenn.; Navy Lodge Mayport, Fla.; Navy Lodge Kings Bay, Ga.; Navy Lodge New London, Conn.; Navy Lodge Washington, DC; Navy Lodge Everett, Wash.; Navy Lodge Moffett Field and Staten Island, NY; and Navy Lodge Great Lakes, Ill. The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) is making improve ments to its return policy. Merchandise purchased at a NEX or from myNavy Exchange.com can be returned to any NEX store within 45 days of purchase for a refund or even exchange. We made this improvement to our return policy make it more convenient for our customers, said Richard Dow, NEXCOMs senior vice president store operations. By extending our return policy to 45 days, it gives our custom ers more time to bring back an item to our store. In todays busy world, thats important to our customers. The standardized 45 day return poli cy on merchandise eliminates the pre vious exclusions including the 14 day return policy on certain items, such as computers, software and digital cam eras. Now, the only exception to the 45 day NEX Customer Return Policy are pre-paid cards, such as financial, music, phone and gift cards, which are not returnable. The refund will be processed in the same payment form as the original purchase. A return without a receipt will be issued on an NEX Gift Card at the items current NEX price. Refunds made without a receipt can only be made at the NEXs Customer Service desk. Finally, diamond jewelry returns may be subject to an IGI appraisal prior to issuing a refund.Jacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USOSelect Navy Lodges offer greater savings this holiday seasonSend your nomination for Military Child of the YearNEXCOM improves its customer return policy 22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012



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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. held a press conference Oct. 4 to announce the City of Jacksonvilles plans to host a Week of Valor to honor military members, veterans and their families. Numerous events will be held throughout the city Nov. 5-12 to recognize the contri butions and sacrifices of those serving or have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. Today, Im proud to announce the City of Jacksonvilles 2012 Week of Valor a celebration of service and sacrifice by all those who have served and those cur rently serving, said Brown, during the press conference at Jacksonville City Hall. It is so important for us to take these opportunities to say thank you. We must never forget just how much these brave men and women give. Valor is a powerful concept. It represents unparalleled courage, selfless service and commitment to our nation. The mayor then introduced Scorby to the podium. For the past year, Ive had the privilege of leading the Navys Southeast Region, which includes Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport, and Navy Submarine Base Kings Bay. Every day, I see our young men and women who have made the commitment to serve our country in a way that most people cannot imagine, said Scorby. The men and women in uniform today are but the latest in a long line of heroes who have served their nation in times of conflict and in times of peace, he continued. To each of these heroes, both past and present, we owe a debt that we may never be able to fully repay. And for that reason, I am pleased to be here for the launching the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor initiative. This tribute is a true expression of the longstanding friendship we share between the Armed Forces of the United States and the City of Jacksonville. During the Week of Valor, A deployment farewell cer emony was held Oct. 5 at NAS Jax to say goodbye to 71 members of the 345th Combat Support Hospital (CSH) who are headed to Afghanistan for the next year. The contingent of Soldiers and their families gathered for the short cer emony and some last minute family time before heading to Fort Hood, Texas for more training before deploying to Afghanistan. The Soldiers mission will focus on providing humane healthcare for detainees in U.S. custody; provide health care support to U.S. military policemen, Afghan police offi cers and foreign nationals; and offer medical training to Afghan National Security Force personnel. The hand-picked team consists of doctors, nurs es, medics, pharmacists, X-ray technicians and mental health specialists from all over the country. This mission is a challeng ing mission, but all of you are prepared. You have trained hard and you have the credentials, qualifications and experience to accomplish this mis sion, 332nd Medical Brigade Command Sgt. Maj. Robert Boudnik told the detachment members. Boudnik also asked each of the Soldiers to look at the insignia of the American flag on their right shoulders and then to their U.S. Army chest plate. You are a team. You need each other so respect and support one other. Working together as a team will make this a suc cessful mission, he added. In closing, Boudnik stressed to the families that they are Hundreds of active duty and civil ian personnel gathered for the Oct. 4 ribbon-cutting ceremony celebrat ing the grand opening of Deweys, the new all hands club developed by NAS Jacksonville Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department. The unique exterior design of Deweys evokes images of wings and aviation. Inside, the rooms and hall ways will be decorated with photo graphs and art work celebrating our stations 72 years of support for the fleet, family and warfighter, said NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders. The single story 25,000-sq.ft. multipurpose facility cost $8.2 million and has a capacity of more than 500 patrons. It includes a semi-circular entry lobby, a grand ballroom, a Chief Petty Officers Pub, a casual dining restaurant and lounge, as well as a full kitchen and catering service. Deweys is located between Saratoga and Enterprise ave nues at Keily Street. Sanders added, Deweys was con structed using green building practices and will attain Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver certification as defined by the U.S. Green Building Council. Some of the items included in the certification are the permeable paving parking lot, extensive use of day lighting, and use of insulated concrete form technology for walls with high energy efficiency. Deweys Manager John Duncan invitCity of Jacksonville to host Week of Valor 345th Combat Support Hospital unit deploys to Afghanistan Deweys All Hands Club now open

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Oct. 11 1776 Battle of Valcour Island on Lake Champlain, New York. Although defeated, the American flotilla delayed the British advance and caused it to fall back into winter quarters. 1824 Marquis de Lafayette visits the Washington Navy Yard during his year long tour of America. 1942 Battle of Cape Esperance begins: In two-day battle, American task force stops Japanese attack on Guadalcanal and sinks two Japanese ships while losing only USS Duncan (DD-485). 1950 Task Force 77 aircraft destroy North Korean vessels off Songjin and Wonsan and north of Hungham. 1967 Operation Coronado VI began in Rung Sat Zone. 1968 Launch of Apollo 7, the first U.S. three-man space mission, com manded by Cmdr. Walter Schirra Jr., USMCR Maj. Ronnie Cunningham served as Lunar Module pilot. The mission lasted 10 days and 20 hours. Recovery was by HS-5 helicopters from USS Essex (CVS-9). Oct. 12 1914 USS Jupiter (AC-3) is first Navy ship to complete transit of Panama Canal. 1944 Aircraft from Carrier Task Force 38 attack Formosa. 1957 Rear Adm. Dufek arrives at McMurdo Sound, Antarctica to com mand Operation Deep Freeze III during the International Geophysical Year of 1957-58. 1965 End of Project Sealab II where teams of naval divers and scientists spent 15 days moored 205 feet below surface near La Jolla, Calif. 2000 Terrorists in a boat make sui cide attack on USS Cole (DDG-67) while the ship refuels in the port of Aden, Yemen. Seventeen Sailors are killed. Oct. 13 1775 Birthday of U.S. Navy. The Continental Congress establishes Continental Navy, later the U.S. Navy. Oct. 14 1918 Naval Aviators of Marine Day Squadron 9 make first raid-in-force for the Northern Bombing Group in World War I when they bombed German rail road at Thielt Rivy, Belgium. Oct. 15 1917 USS Cassin (DD-43) torpedoed by German submarine U-61 off coast of Ireland. In trying to save the ship, Gunners Mate Osmond Kelly Ingram becomes first American sailor killed in World War I and later is awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroism. He becomes the first enlisted man to have a ship named for him, in 1919. 1948 First women officers on active duty sworn in as commissioned offi cers in regular Navy under Womens Service Integration Act of June 1948 by Secretary of the Navy John Sullivan: Capt. Joy Hancock; Lt. Cmdr. Winifred Quick; Lt. Cmdr. Anne King; Lt. Cmdr. Frances Willoughby; Lt. Ellen Ford; Lt. Doris Cranmore; Lt. j.g. Doris Defenderfer and Lt. j.g. Betty Rae Tennant. 1960 USS Patrick Henry (SSBN-599) begins successful firing of four Polaris test vehicles under operational rather than test conditions. 1965 U.S. Naval Support Activity at Danang Vietnam, is established. Oct. 16 1885 Capt. Alfred Thayer Mahan becomes Superintendent of the Naval War College. 1940 Fifth group of 10 destroyers from the Destroyers for Bases Deal turned over to British at Halifax, Canada. 1942 Carrier aircraft from USS Hornet (CV-8) conduct attacks on Japanese troops on Guadalcanal. 1943 Navy accepts its first helicopter, a Sikorsky YR-4B (HNS-1) at Bridgeport, Connecticut. Oct. 17 1922 Lt. Cmdr. Virgil Griffin in Vought VE-7SF makes first takeoff from aircraft carrier USS Langley (CV-1) anchored in York River, Va. 1941 U-568 torpedoes and damag es USS Kearny (DD-432) near Iceland, resulting in 11 killed and 22 injured. 1944 Naval Forces land Army rang ers on islands at the entrance to Leyte Gulf in preparation for landings. 1989 Following San Francisco earthquake, 24 Navy and Military Sealift Command ships rendered assistance. Our 41st Dinner with the Smileys guest, former Maine governor and current candi date for Sen. Olympia Snowes Senate seat, Angus King, lives in Brunswick, Maine. At din ner, between answering Fords tough questions (Why do people call Maine a liber al state when we always have Republican senators?), King shared with us how much the Department of Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commissions decision to shut down NAS Brunswick has affected the community. In particular, King and his wife, Mary, spoke about feeling the loss of the positive cultural impact a military community brings to a region. We military families usu ally focus on how our moveevery-three-years lifestyle positively influences our own lives. We acquire new tastes and interests. Our children are exposed to different ways of living around the world. We are introduced to different politics and regional concerns (whats politically critical in, say, San Diego, isnt necessarily critical in Omaha). Too often, however, military families neglect to appreciate how much of an asset we are to the communities in which we live. Our experiences abroad become part of our identity, creating new demands for culturally diverse food. (You havent seen a variety of eth nic food selections until youve been to a military commis sary.) In schools, our military dependents share stories from their travels. In states where many parents work in the same business or even for the same company, factory or mill military children bring new perspective about the workingand middle-class and what it means to be a family. The flip-side to all of this, of course, is that military fami lies dont stay in one place long enough to really make a lasting difference. Or so we think. Kings comments about what military families bring to a community came, coin cidentally, on the heels of my decision to run for the school committee in Bangor. At first, I was hesitant about put ting my name on the ballot. Bangor is a small town. Many people involved in the local government have been in the area their whole lives. I dont know the complete history of the school department, and my kids have only been in the district for four years. What could I offer (besides my BS in Elementary Education)? But Kings comments sparked in a me a new way of thinking because. Ive seen schools in California, Florida, Virginia and Alabama. Ive witnessed good districts and bad districts. In college, I worked at an inner-city school; in Florida, the school was rural. Ive vol unteered in countless class rooms and tutored at-risk stu dents. In other words, I have a wide perspective. And what Ive always said, even before deciding to run for school committee, is that the difference between the good schools and the bad ones is people. In all of these cases big, little; rich, poor; well-funded and not the difference is teachers. They are a schools best, most important resource. Teachers set the tone for the school. They bring culture, variety, perspective and influ ence. Schools (and parents) want to hang on to the good teachers. They jockey to make sure their children are in that teachers class. I hope other military spouses get involved in their communities as well. For too long weve second guessed our ability and our right to be involved in local politics. Weve neglected all that we can give back and the chance to share our wealth of experiences and perspective. As always, you can see pictures from our dinner with King by going to www. Facebook.com/DinnerWith TheSmileys. NAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Councils will host the semi-annual Individual Augmentee (IA) Luncheon Nov. 1 at 11 a.m. at the NAS Jax Officers Club. During this event, all NAS Jax Sailors who have returned from an IA assignment (within the last six months) will be recognized. There is no cost for IAs and their spouses. The cost for other military and civilian guests is $10. Tickets may be purchased at the Fleet and Family Support Center, Monday-Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The deadline to purchase tickets is Oct. 25. Childcare will be provided at the Child Development Center (CDC) for children of all IAs and spouses in attendance. Call the CDC at 542-9075 to reserve childcare. Pre-registration is required. Base commands and departments are asked to pro vide a list of attendees to Shannon Klein of the Fleet and Family Support Center at shannon.klein.ctr@ navy.mil by Oct. 18. Please include rate/rank (warfare pin if applicable), command and full name of IAs and their spouse for plaque and certificate information. Commands with IAs attending are also asked to submit photos of IAs on deployment to Miriam. gallet@navy.mil for inclusion in a multimedia show that will be shown during this event. Photos are needed by Oct. 25. Navy Band Alumni invited to performNavy Band Southeast is inviting all Navy Band Alumni to perform at the Alumni Concert at Jacksonville Beach Band Shell Oct. 20 at 12:30 p.m., in conjunction with the 2012 Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular. A rehearsal will take place at Navy Band Southeasts facility aboard NAS Jax on the evening of Oct.19. Anyone interested should contact Navy Band Southeasts Public Affairs Officer MU2 Scott Farquhar at scott.farquhar@navy.mil by Oct. 10. Teachers, like military families, are valuable assetsIA Luncheon set for Nov. 1 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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VP-30 Pros Nest earns CNO Aviation Safety AwardOfficers, enlisted and civilian personnel stood proudly in the VP-30 auditorium Sept. 21 as Commander, Navy Safety Center, Rear Adm. Brian Prindle presented the 2011 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Aviation Safety Award (also known as the Safety S) to the VP-30 Pros Nest aboard NAS Jacksonville. The VP-30 Safety Team accepted their seventh Safety S award on behalf of all the Sailors assigned to the P-3 fleet replacement squadron, and who work to maintain VP-30s stellar safety reputation. Prindle noted in his remarks that this exempla ry record wasnt created by chance. Representing the Navys only maritime patrol fleet replacement squadron, the command has created a safety climate that does not tolerate any deviation from procedure because we know it takes us down a road where bad things happen, said Prindle. The award citation commends VP-30s superior leadership, superlative airmanship and proactive allhands commitment to the principles of Operational Risk Management. Along with his Safety Team, VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens, also made it clear that it was an all-hands effort that earned this prestigious award and that he counts on every members con tinued diligence to carry this standard into the future. The award recognized the squadrons proven com mitment to aviation safety. VP-30 aircrew surpassed 7,141 flight hours and 15,465 landings during 2011. This annual milestone contributed to the squadrons record of 452,000 mishap-free flight hours over the past 47 years. Navy and Marine Corps aircraft squadrons that win this award receive engraved plaques and citations for permanent display. They are also entitled to paint a prominent green S on their aircraft until the next years selections are announced. The CNO Aviation Safety Award recognizes operational excellence and exemplary safety contributions that further the Naval Aviation Safety Program. In addition to an outstanding safety record, com mands and ships selected must have aggressive aviation safety programs that contribute new ideas in mishap prevention for the general benefit of naval aviation. Dont accept defeat. Fight deadly childhood diseases.800-822-6344 www.stjude.orgA CFC Participant provided as a public service. a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org NAS Jax to host World Military Golf ChampionshipNAS Jacksonville is hosting the seventh World Military Golf Championship, Conseil International du Sport Militaire (CISM) at the NAS Jax Golf Course Oct. 13-18. CISM began in 1948 with five participat ing nations. From those five founder nations CISM has grown to 126 member nations. The United Stated joined the organization in 1951. The aim of CISM is the encouragement of mili tary sports and the development of friendly relations between the armed forces of the various fields related to sport and physical readiness. The official CISM motto is: SPORT means peace. SPORT is the opposite of war. SPORT is a cure for war. SPORT is international. SPORT brings nations closer. Friendship through sport The following countries are planning to attend the 2012 CISM Golf Championships and registration is ongoing with a few more countries expected: Bahrain, Canada, Estonia, Germany, Italy, Namibia, Pakistan, Spain, Uganda, United States and Zambia. CISM schedule of events Opening ceremonies Oct. 13 at 9 a.m. Oct. 14 first round of play Oct. 15 second round of play Oct. 16 third round of play Oct. 17 fourth and final round of play Oct. 18 cultural day and closing ceremonies For more information, call 542-3111. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 3

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Navy ombudsman at large visits NAS JacksonvilleNavys Ombudsman at Large Monika French visited NAS Jacksonville Oct. 3 as part of her Southeast Region military installation tour to connect with base ombudsman and learn more about installation capabilities. Frenchs visit began with a briefing by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders, NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander and NAS Jax Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Brad Shepherd on family readiness. Being appointed as the United States Navys Ombudsman at Large by the Chief of Naval Operations, Mrs. French is very interested in many issues regarding the family readiness of our military members and some of the different programs we offer through our Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department, Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), base chapel and housing office, said Sanders. We realize that family readiness is a cornerstone of warfighting readiness, he continued. Family readiness affects job satisfaction, performance and per sonnel retention. It is a key element to overall mission performance because a Sailors strength and commitment originates from and remains with the family. French also visited the NAS Jax FFSC where she was met by FFSC Director Myrna Wilson who highlighted the centers three functional areas including deployment readiness, crisis response and career support and retention. Wilson also discussed the numer ous programs available to assist mili tary members and their families such as the Family Employment Readiness Program, Relocation Assistance Program, Exceptional Family Member Program, New Parent Support, financial management and ombudsman support. Several ombudsmen from various NAS Jax tenant commands also met with French to share their concerns about issues relating to military fami lies. One of the biggest issues we dis cussed was spouse employment, which is an ongoing concern at most bases because military families move so often, stated Kandi Debus, ombuds man for Commander, Navy Region Southeast. We also praised the base CO, Capt. Sanders for all his support and how he listens to our concerns and continually provides positive feedback. Other facilities French toured dur ing her visit to NAS Jax included the base chapel, housing office, Child Development Center and Youth Activities Center. Fruits, veggies: More matterIts Fruits & Veggies More Matters Month, raising awareness about fruits and vegetables in ones daily diet. Although people know that fruits and vegetables are associated with good nutrition, many still dont consume the recommended daily amount. The U.S. Department of Agricultures food guide, My Plate, recommends filling half of ones plateat each mealwith fruits and vegetables. Eating more fruits and veggies does matter. Theyre high in many vitamins and minerals, contain fiber that helps with digestion, are usually low in calories (which can help with a healthy weight), and can reduce the risk of many diseases (such as heart disease, high blood pressure, and some cancers). Plan ahead to add fruits and vegetables to each meal, and heres a few tips. Begin with breakfast: Add fruit to cereal, or vegetables to an omelet. Snack smart: Snack on fruit and veggies, instead of chips and sweets. Double-up at dinner: Include veggies as part of the main meal, and fruits as sides or desserts. Substitute: Order veggies instead of fries at restaurants. There are many fruits and vegetables to choose from, so dont be afraid to try new types. For more ideas and recipes, contact Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Wellness Center at 542-5292 or visit www.fruit sandveggiesmorematters.org. 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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FRCSE nominated for prestigious manufacturing awardA team from the Manufacturers Association of Florida (MAF) conducted a site visit Oct. 2 at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) to review the military depots manufacturing capabilities as part of the evaluation process for this years Florida Manufacturer of the Year Award to be named later this year. The FRCSE Manufacturing Division fabricates, repairs and refurbishes aircraft components and sheet metal parts for a variety of military aircraft includ ing the F/A-18 Strike Fighter, the P-3 Orion mari time patrol aircraft, the SH-60 Seahawk and the EA-6B Prowler Electronic Warfare aircraft. FRCSE won the 2009 MAF Manufacturer of the Year Award for large category. MAF is an organization that serves to improve the business climate for manufac turers in Florida. Joint Warrior, a two-week exercise, designed and led by the Joint Tactical Exercise Planning Staff (JTEPS) in the United Kingdom, is the largest military exercise in Europe and began off the coast of Scotland, Oct. 1. The exercise is designed to test the skill, knowledge and equipment of the participants in a range of different environments, said Capt. Paul Titterton, director of JTEPS. By training in this fashion, we are able to prepare for a whole range of potential and ultimately realistic tactical scenarios, from outand-out warfare to rescuing fishermen captured by pirates. Three U.S. Navy ships are taking part in the exercise, led by Commander Destroyer Squadron (COMDESRON) 26. They are guided missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64), guided missile destroyer USS Mitscher (DDG 57) and fleet replenishment oiler USNS Leroy Grumman (TAO 195). Joining the ships is Detachment 2 from the Grandmasters of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 46 and U.S. maritime patrol and recon naissance aircraft from Experimental Evaluation Test Squadron (VX) 1, Patrol Squadrons (VP) 9 and VP-10. For us, its kind of a special treat to be one of the ships that gets to go out there and do this exercise with our coalition partners, said Capt. Bob Hein, commanding officer of Gettysburg. Most likely, these same folks that we are training with, Im going to see out there in eight months doing operations. Joint Warrior is designed to improve interoperability and help integrate coalition forces and prepare them for possible joint exercises in a real-world environment. Allied and Coalition operations are the standard when units deploy, said Capt. Nelson Castro, commander of COMDESRON 26. This exercise provides a venue for our Sailors to practice and learn NATO operating procedures. Joint Warrior involves sea, ground and air assets from participating allied and NATO forces and aims to foster a spirit of teamwork between nations. There are land, air and sea units participating from the U.S. and eight other countries: the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Holland, Belgium, Estonia, Norway and Sweden. The Florida League of Defense Contractors and the Jacksonville Aviation Authority will launch the inaugural First Coast Defense Expo at Jacksonville Jetport at Cecil Airport on Oct. 17 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The one-day event will allow the First Coast community includ ing personnel from regional military installations such asNaval Station Mayport and Naval Air Station Jacksonville the opportunity to see how the regional defense industry contributes to our national security and creates jobs on the First Coast. The U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, and the Florida Air National Guard will have displays at the event, where local, regional and national defense contractors will exhibit their businesses. In the afternoon, U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a member of the House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, along with Florida Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll, Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and key defense industry leaders, will participate in a town hall-style discussion on the role and importance of the defense industry to our national security and economy. The First Coast is an anchor to our national security a standing not possible without the dedication of our men and women in uniform and the support and expertise of the compa nies that make up our defense indus trial base, said Crenshaw. The First Coast Defense Expo is a great opportunity to learn about Northeast Floridas contributions to our military. Ill be sharing the Capitol Hill perspective on how defense pol icy impacts Naval Station Mayport, Naval Air Station Jacksonville, the local industrial base, and our econ omy. Folks will be able to network, view exhibits, participate in work shops, and meet the people who play a central role in supporting our men and women in uniform in Florida and around the globe. More information and admission tickets can be obtained on the Florida League of Defense Contractors web site at www.fl-dc.org. The Jacksonville Jetport is located at Cecil Airport, 13446 Aerospace Way, in Jacksonville, Fla. VP-10 supports Joint Warrior exercise in ScotlandFirst Coast Defense Expo Oct. 17 at Cecil Airport JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 Members of Team Navy Jax gathered with more than 2,000 cyclists at the St. Augustine Airport Sept. 29 to partici pate in the 26th annual Bike MS: PGA Tour Cycle to the Shore benefiting the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society. This is the eighth consecu tive year the team has partici pated in the event, a Combined Federal Campaign-supported charity. Team members arrived before dawn to prep their bicycles, check in, grab a quick breakfast and prepare them selves for the challenging, but scenic, 86-mile ride on Day 1. The Saturday portion of the event took the riders on the back roads of North Florida to their destination in Daytona Beach. While some chose to ride only one leg of the race, many spent the night in Daytona and got up the next morn ing to pedal back to the finish line. Several members of the team chose to ride the Century course of 100 miles. Ive lost 135 pounds over the past three years so its pretty exciting for me personally to be participating in this ride. And, its for such an impor tant cause. Anything we can do to help while having fun is definitely a good thing, said Team Navy Jax member Tricia Johnson, a first-time rider in the event. Weve been training pretty hard and Im ready for this. Im out here to support the MS Society and am thrilled to be part of Team Navy Jax. I rode last year and its really a great event, added LS1(SW) John Jinenez of Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command. When we participate in events like this, everyone wins. However, we could not do it without the support of our sponsor, VyStar Credit Union and our families and friends. I am thrilled to be part of such a great team. This year, we raised $15,000 in support of the MS Society Team Navy Jax is a plea sure to associate and ride with. Never have I seen so many people from so many different backgrounds and careers come together for a common cause. We raised more than $14,000 to support the MS Society. This is only one of many events we participate in each year sup porting charities to find cures fordiseases that in someway affect us all, said Team Navy Jax Co-Captain Jerry Dryden. After safety announce ments, the horn was blown and the riders took off heading down U.S. Highway 1 South to Daytona. After hours of ped aling, team members arrived in Daytona to rest and enjoy a special dinner with the other riders. This ride today was awe some. Even though I havent been on a road bike for 10 months, I had a great team that really helped push me to continue. During my recent deployment to Afghanistan, I took a lot of spin classes because you cant go out and ride there, stated Lt. Cmdr. Maria Barefield of Naval Hospital Jax after completing the Century Ride to Daytona. I really think this years team was the strongest weve ever had. The next morning the team members headed back to St. Augustine towards the finish line. We love Team Navy Jax. Its a great team which has really grown over the years. They are very supportive of this event and the team members are always very concerned about cycling safety and rules of the road. They are a great influ ence on other riders, said Cara OReilly, vice president of development for Bike MS PGA Tour Cycle to the Shore. For more information on Team Navy Jax and the charity rides they participate in, call 318-7242. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the fed eral govern ment officially endorses any company, spon sor or its prod ucts or services. Sailors, civilians cycle to the shore to benefit MS Society

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the following events will be held to pay tribute to the military: Nov. 5, 11:30 a.m. Military Appreciation Luncheon at the Prime Osborn Convention Center Nov. 5-12 Active duty military and veteran school visits Nov. 7, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Veterans Summit University of North Florida University Center Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colts Military Appreciation Game Nov. 9, 8:30 a.m. Veterans Job Fair P rime Osborn Convention Center Nov. 9, 4:30 p.m. Mayport Music Concert NS Mayport Nov. 9, 9 p.m. Navy-Marine Corps Classic, Florida vs. Georgetown NS Mayport Nov. 12, 9 a.m. Veterans Recognition Breakfast Times Union Center Nov. 12, 11:01 a.m. Veterans Day Parade Downtown Jacksonville The Department of the Navy is par ticularly excited to be part of the NavyMarine Corps Basketball Classic, which will be played on board USS Bataan at Naval Station Mayport. Ships such as the Bataan are part of Americas Away Team, ready to deploy around the world to defend our nations interests, giving the United States a home-court advan tage that cannot be duplicated, said Scorby. Bataan will be coming to Mayport along with USS Mesa Verde and USS Carter Hall, two other amphibious warships that con stitute a representa tional amphibious ready group that will match the ships that Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced would be homeported in Mayport beginning in 2013, he added. These ships not only reinforce the importance of Northeast Florida in the Navys strategic dispersal, but demonstrate the value of the Navy-Marine Corps team. Scorby concluded by praising the City of Jacksonville for their continual sup port of the military. The City of Jacksonville has public ly declared itself as the most militaryfriendly city in the nation. While the Week of Valor is more of a public demonstration of support; the city has put in place numerous programs and ini tiatives that provide tangible benefits to our veterans and active duty service members. This can be seen by the fact that many of our Sailors and Marines who come to Jacksonville often stay in Jacksonville, even after they leave the military service. For more information on the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor events, go to: www.coj.net/MilitaryAffairs VALOR VP-30 Executive Officer Commander David Gardella recognized recent graduates of the P-3C CAT I (initial training syllabus) Acoustic and NonAcoustic Operator Class 1205, Flight Engineer Class 1204, and In-flight Technician Class 1203 Sept. 28. The honor graduates for the classes were: AWF3 Stephan Johnson (Naval Aircrewman Mechanical Class 1204), AWV3 Derek Rustick (Naval Aircrewman Avionics Class 1203), AWO3 Melissa Goodyear (Naval Aircrewman Operator Class 1205-Non-Acoustic), and AWO3 Blake Pockrandt (Naval Aircrewman Operator Class 1205-Acoustic). All graduating Sailors were advanced to their listed rank during the ceremony. These naval aircrewmen will now report to their assigned operational squadrons to begin their initial sea tour. Class 1205 CAT I Acoustic Operator AWO2 Erich Kohler AWO2(AW) Michael Toenies AWO3 Alec Darson AWO3 Jerle Dungan AWO3 Zachary Haney AWO3 Daniel Phillips AWO3 Blake Pockrandt AWO3 Cassandra Powell AWO3 Edward Vandervoort, Jr. AWO3 Edward Weber Class 1205 CAT I Non-acoustic Operator AWO1(AW) Russell Furgason AWO3 Melissa Goodyear AWO3 Robert Hawkins AWO3 Howard Heim III AWO3 Jonathan Hull AWO3 Andrew Montenegro Class 1204 CAT I Flight Engineer AWF3 Derrick Chalk AWF3 Stephan Johnson AWF3 Kirsten Jones Class 1203 CAT I In-flight Technician AWV3 Thomas Murillo AWV3 David Stones AWV3 Derek Rustick AWV3 Jaimeson Whiteley VP-30 aircrewman classes graduate 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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all part of the Army team and encour aged them to use available resources to help them while their loved ones are deployed. Thank you for your support and dedication for this mission, he said. Lt. Col. Sandra Hetzel. commander, 345th CSH Detachment 3, praised her team and thanked them for their ser vice. We had a long vetting process for this mission. We had to look for not only specific skill levels, but the personality traits of Soldiers who could qualify for this unique and challenging tasking, said Hetzel. I am so proud of them and appreciate them and their families. They came together from across the country and have gone through some extremely intense training for many months. This is such a complex mission and these are highly skilled individuals who volunteered and were specifically chosen for this deployment. This is the third tour with the unit for Staff Sgt. David Nyholm, non-commis sioned officer in charge of the mission, who is a paramedic in his civilian job. Ive deployed twice to Iraq and now were headed to Afghanistan. I look forward to the challenge. This is a highly skilled mission and the taskings keep changing but we have an outstanding team. We need to succeed and will succeed and come home safely, he said. Many of the Soldiers were heartbro ken to be leaving their families but realized the importance of the mission. This is very emotional but its something I have to do and definitely have a lot of support from my family, said Spc. Eduardo Torres, who was deploying for the second time with the unit. This time is quite a bit different. Last time, I was single and now Im married and a dad. I think this deployment will be much harder. The detachment is expected to return home in August 2013. CSH JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 9

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DEWEYSed those in attendance to tour the all hands club and enjoy complemen tary appetizers, desserts and beverages. It was a little over whelming at times, but our MWR club team has really pulled together to create a first-class dining and entertainment expe rience for our Sailors. Weve gotten great feed back from NAS Jax chiefs, petty officers and retir ees that well incorpo rate into our operation in the months ahead, said Duncan. And our state-of-theart BINGO system is generating a lot of excitement among players. On Oct. 7, we continue our grand opening celebration with a super BINGO session. Were expecting up to 200 or more players. Duncan also announced that recently retired Navy culinary specialist Shannon Sonnier had joined Deweys as executive chef. In addition to being mess specialist for a number of admirals including CNRSE Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. Chef Sonnier also cre ated menus featured at the presidential retreat at Camp David, Md. In the near future, diners will be seeing delicious new products and flavor combinations from Deweys kitchen, thanks to Chef Sonnier, said Duncan. MWR Installation Program Director John Bushick said the both the architect, Powell Design Group, and the general contractor, Friedrich Watkins Company, have previously worked with the Walt Disney Company. You can see some of that Disney kind of style when you approach the facility with its soar ing roofs that emulate wings, said Bushick. Were very proud of the Chiefs Pub that uti lizes a modern brew house concept and features a number of interesting branded tap handles behind the bar. As for the all hands din ing area, we listened to focus groups that wanted a more light, colorful and family friendly atmo sphere with a low-key approach to alcohol ser vice, explained Bushick. Right now, our plan is to smoothly transi tion our staff from The Zone to this outstand ing new facility by offer ing familiar and proven menu items. Within six months, Chef Sonnier and the Deweys culi nary team will evaluate the menu and customer comment cards to see what new directions can be explored with our food and beverage ser vice. Patrons can expect a number of tasty surpris es, said Bushick. The Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion recently presented an over view of the Career Intermission Pilot Program (CIPP) to more than 1,000 Sailors during the 24th Navy Career Counselor Symposium. The presentation, briefed by Lt. Cmdr. Chris Muller, Career Intermission program manager, dis cussed current CIPP requirements, future potential changes, and how CIPP can provide balance to a Sailors career, by setting them on a path to long-term life/work success. CIPP is not a one-size-fits-all pro gram. Its not supposed to be, said Muller. For those Sailors looking to take a break from active duty service to pursue other career-enhancing options, it can be a great way to meet their needs but they need to know about the program. Muller said Sailors have heard the acronym CIPP but have a misconcep tion that the program is only open to women who want to take time off to start a family. CIPP can also be used to pursue higher education, better align dual-military careers, care for an ill family member, or even travel the world. CIPP is not just a program for women who want to take time off to have children, although for those that want a break in service to do so, it can be a viable option, said Muller. Sailors are using CIPP for a variety of reasons, the biggest being pursuit of higher education. CIPP is a great program to use for educational opportunities that wouldnt normally be as compatible with full-time active duty service. CIPP is currently authorized through FY 2015, providing 20 officer and 20 enlisted program application slots each year. Upon acceptance to CIPP, partici pants transfer out of the active component and directly into the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR). Participants can utilize the program from one to three years, incurring an active duty obligation of two months for every month of program participation following their return to active duty. While in CIPP, participants retain full medical and dental benefits for themselves and their dependents, full Navy Exchange and Commissary benefits, a monthly stipend equal to 1/15 of the participants active duty basic pay, and a one-time CONUS permanent change of station (PCS). During CIPP, participants elec tronically muster for accountabil ity purposes, but remain in IRR sta tus. All CIPP participants are exempt from consideration for promotion or advancement during intermission. Upon returning to active duty, the CIPP participants date of rank is adjusted, allowing the participant to remain competitive with those peo ple at the same experience level. For officers, the date of rank is adjusted to a later date based on the length of the participants intermission. For enlisted Sailors, enlisted Time in Rate (TIR) and effective date of paygrade are adjusted to a later date based on length of the participants intermis sion. Muller emphasized that applicants are encouraged to apply for CIPP during their normal orders negotiation period, approximately six to nine months in advance of their project ed rotation date. Sailors in receipt of PCS orders, Full Time Support (FTS), Sailors currently receiving a CSRB or Sailors who have not completed their first active duty fleet utilization tour are not eligible for CIPP by congressional mandate. Career Intermission Pilot Program presented 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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NAS Jax hosts three golf championshipsThe NAS Jacksonville Golf Course hosted the stroke play All-Navy Golf Camp Sept. 29 Oct. 2. The next week, inter-service teams competed in the stroke play Armed Forces Golf Championship Oct. 6-9, followed by the CISM World Military Golf Championship, being held here Oct. 136. One of the things that makes our golf course ideal for championship play is that riverfront lodging and dining are within walking distance of the club house, said Mike McCool, operations manager of the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department that manages the golf course. Weve host ed the All-Navy event several times over the years. This is our first Armed Forces championship and our second time for CISM (Conseil International du Sport Militaire). Hosting these three golf cham pionships at NAS Jacksonville is a lot of work for MWR but it simplifies logis tics and helps control travel costs for the players, said McCool. The All-Navy Golf Camp consisted of 20 men and three women, with the topsix men and top-three women advanc ing to the inter-service Armed Forces Golf Championship. All-Navy Golf is an opportunity forSailors with the appro priate skill set to compete at the highest level outside of the service academies. At the Armed Forces competition, each foursome is made up of one play er from each service branch (Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps). At the end of play, the top-six men and top-two women will advance to the CISM World Military Golf Championship, said McCool. He explained that CISM, founded in 1948, supports military sports and physical fitness through the development of friendly relations between armed forces in various fields of sports. CISM President for Asia, Lt. Col. Hakeem Al-Shino of Bahrain, is the onsite CISM representative. He will join all participants, chiefs of missions and team captains to play the practice round on Saturday. Countries rep resented in the championship include Bahrain, Canada, Italy, Netherlands, Pakistan, Namibia, Germany, Spain, Uganda, Zambia and the United States. NAS Jacksonville Golf Director Joe Carreiro said despite the abun dance of summer thunderstorms, the tees, fairways, roughs and greens are in good shape for the tournaments. Players will compete each day over the nine holes of the red and white courses that are each par 36. Our groundskeeping staff has worked tirelessly to maintain the courses appearance and functionality for these tournaments, said Carreiro. Whats the most challenging hole on the course? So far, players have agreed that the back nine (white course) was the most challenging. Its a more narrow, more target-oriented course that rewards pre cision. Spectators will enjoy watching players on the white course, par 4, no. 9, said Carreiro. Stroke play, also known as medal play, is a scoring system in golf where players record the number of strokes taken at each hole and total them up at the end of a given round. The player with the lowest total is the winner. SECDEF releases voting guidance Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta released the following message Oct. 5. On November 6th, Americans will have the opportunity to exer cise the most important responsi bility we have in a democracy the right to vote. Voters will choose from candidates at every level from the commander-in-chief, to legislative representatives, to county commissioners, city coun cil members and others. I dont have to tell you that your vote can determine the future. It really counts. And thats why its so important to participate in this process no matter where you are in the world, no matter who you plan to vote for. Please exercise the very privilege that youre willing to fight and die for in order to protect. But there isnt much time. If youre overseas or away from home, request your absentee bal lot immediately, and mail it back in time so that your vote will count. And if you need help, visit your Installation Voter Assistance Office, or see your units voting assistance officer, or visit the website www.fvap.gov
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Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville physicians spoke at the annual Pink Ribbon Symposium in Jacksonville on Oct. 6. Capt. Joseph McQuade, director of public health, addressed the role of exercise in cancer prevention and Cmdr. Carlos Godinez, general surgeon, spoke at a Spanish-language session. NH Jacksonvilles Ribbons & Roses breast cancer support group also attended. The event is held to help educate the Northeast Florida community on advances in detecting, treating and surviving breast cancer. This years special guest was Olympic skating gold medalist and cancer suvivor Peggy Fleming. To learn more about NH Jacksonville resources, contact Breast Care Coordinator Nikki Levinson-Lustgarten at 542-7857. Everyone is welcome at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Breastival on Oct. 17, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., near the hospitals first floor pharmacy. The event features numerous community organizations that provide tools and education to prevent and manage breast cancer. The hospital is also accepting entries for the Calling All Flags contest through Oct. 15. The contest welcomes flags that fea ture patients stories about how cancer has touched their lives. For information about both events, contact NH Jacksonville Breast Care Coordinator Nikki Levinson-Lustgarten at 542-7857. The American Red Cross Northeast Florida Chapter hosted a luncheon Oct. 4 to recognize its volunteers at NAS Jacksonville. In addition to honoring years of dedicat ed service by each volunteer, the event included live music by Helen Donahoe and Gigi Mitchell, remarks by Red Cross North Florida Region CEO Jack Morgan and NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders, and keynote speaker Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer. Red Cross volunteers have served Northeast Florida since 1914, when the national orga nization was first chartered by President Woodrow Wilson. For NH Jacksonvilles 57,000 patients, a tireless team of 55 Red Cross volunteers plays an invaluable role across 16 departments. Under the leadership of Chair Helen Donahoe and Co-Chair Anne Owen, this team contributes about 1,900 hours each month or almost 23,000 hours each year. Volunteers provide vital ser vices, including: counseling patients on personal and family problems; helping with plans for emergency or convales cent leave; getting background information from patients for use by medical staff in diag nosis and treatment; comfort ing families of seriously ill patients; and serving as NH Jacksonville ambassadors lifting the spirits of patients, visitors and staff. Just a few of these out standing volunteers include: Donahoe, who has served 39 years; Owen, who has served 13 years; Gwendy Baldwin, with 14 years in the Maternal Infant Unit; Thelma Trutna, with 30 years in Pharmacy; Podiatrist Dr. Jeffrey Schoen, whos new to the team; Terry Miles, who leads the Junior Red Cross volunteer program; George Perry, who volunteers in the Pharmacy five days per week; and husband-wife teams Epifania and Fred Cabales (with a combined 24 years) and Teresa and Robert Wheeler (with a combined 25 years). Whether driving the park ing lot shuttle; welcoming and checking-in patients in the clinics, emergency room and pharmacy; providing lactation counseling for new moms and babies; filing medical records; delivering cookies on the inpatient units; or providing direct patient care as physicians or nurses these volunteers, like American Red Cross founder Clara Barton, demonstrate an abiding faith in the possibility of something better. Shaffer concluded, Thank you so much for being part of the Naval Hospital Jacksonville family. We truly could not accomplish our mission with out you. I know that you all do this out of generosity of heart and devotion to country. On behalf of Naval Hospital Jacksonville and from my own heart, thank you! Red Cross volunteers honored Navy doctors speak at Pink Ribbon SymposiumHospital to host Breastival on Oct. 17 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 13

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The U.S. Navys top doctor released his strategy map for the future of Navy Medicine on his Falls Church, Va. headquarters website, Oct. 1. Readiness, value and jointness were the three clear priorities laid out for Navy Medicine in the plan, Navy Medicine: Charted Course. Vice Adm. Matthew Nathan, U.S. Navy surgeon general and chief, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, chose the release date to coincide with the new fiscal year for the Department of Defense representing a new way of thinking and a new way of conducting business for the community he leads. Navy Medicine is the second largest community in the Navy with more than 63,000 personnel dispersed around the globe. We live in dynamic times, said Nathan to the top military and civilian health care executives in the Navy, during a workshop aimed at fine-tuning his priorities. We must concentrate on bringing more value and jointness while maintain ing the high state of medical readiness. When the world dials 9-1-1, it is not to make an appointment. Each of the goals value, readiness and jointness have metrics assigned to track their success. They will be assessed and evaluated over the next year. For example, one of the metrics for the value goal includes enrollee network costs and the ability of Navy medical treatment facilities to recapture out of network care. All three goals also have strategic enabling objec tives. According to the plan, Strategic enablers help organizations achieve the success of a goal or objective. For example, Navy Medicine is a strategic enabler for the Department of the Navy because it delivers force health protection and a ready force able to meet missions, explained Nathan. The plan maps out a course for achieving the value, readiness and jointness goals by optimizing the use of medical informatics, technology and telemedicine, standardizing clinical, non-clinical and business processes, and improving strategic communication and message alignment across the enterprise. Medical informatics and use of telemedicine solutions will create efficiencies and improve responsiveness to the needs of [Navy Medicines] stakeholders and customers. This in turn adds value and improves overall readiness, according to Nathan, who also used the plan to reiterate his guiding principles for Navy Medicine, that he conveyed to the enterprise in a video message earlier this year. I want to talk about the philosophy Ive had ever since Ive been in command and if youve worked for me before, youve heard it, said Nathan in his video message. Its ship, shipmate, self take care of the ship, take care of each other, take care of yourself. According to Nathan, the ship is the mission, whether its caring for patients, creating new vaccines or training new corpsmen. He said shipmate rep resents his expectation that Navy Medicine person nel be vigilant to the needs of those they serve with, always preserving the ethos and professionalism that are the pinnacle of Navy Medicine. Finally, the self is important because Nathan believes Navy Medicine personnel cannot care for others and meet the mission if they are not first caring for themselves. Asking for help is a sign of strength, according to the guiding principles laid out in the Navy Medicine plan. You must constantly reflect on your own needs and those of your family. Speak up so we can better equip you to meet the challenges you are facing, said Nathan. Navy Surgeon General charts strategic course for Navy Medicine U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a mem ber of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of special recogni tion in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in ter ritorial waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve recognition and thanks for putting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans during my annual Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the highlights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are urged to con tact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 598-0481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll-free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www. crenshaw.house.gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and docu mentation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the cer tificate, veterans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214.Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program. For students antici pating graduation in June 2013, the eligibil ity requirements have changed for Florida Bright Futures scholar ships. General eligibility requirements include: and a U.S. citizen or eli gible non-citizen. uate degree at an eligible Florida postsecondary institution. arship funds within two not the previous three years of high school graduation. This is a 2012 legislative change. guilty or have pled not contest to a felony charge. six non-remedial semester credit hours. A major change imple mented in 2011 was the submission of a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This is still a require ment for Bright Futures eligibility. New language states students must submit an error-free FAFSA. The FAFSA is also required in the submis sion of a Florida Resident Access Grant and Access to Better Learning and Education Grant. Students, after the ini tial submission of the FAFSA, must then annu ally submit the FAFSA for renewal of the schol arship prior to disburse ment of funds. Another 2011 change was the increased com munity service require ments for all three Bright Futures award levels. FAS 100 hours (increased from 75 hours) FMS 75 hours (increased from 0 hours) GSV 30 hours (increased from 0 hours). Nan Worsowicz, supervisor of guidance for Duval County Schools, indicated this new requirement caused the most problems for 2012 graduates. Ensure this infor mation is given to the childs school counselor or designee by the end of the first semester of the senior year for seventh semester evaluation or by graduation for eighth semester evaluation. SAT and ACT test score requirements also changed for this years graduating class. 2011-12 FAS SAT 1270, ACT 28 2012-13 FAS SAT 1280, ACT 28 2011-12 FMS SAT 980, ACT 21 2012-13 FMS SAT 1020, ACT 22 The Florida Gold Seal Vocational (GSV) Scholars Award is no longer funded for an AA or BA degree program. The GSV award is now limited to 72 semester hours towards an AS, AAS, CCC, and PSAV. However in the Applied Technology Diploma it is limited to 60 semester hours. GSV no longer rolls over to the Medallion level award. For more infor mation, go to: www. FloridaStudentFinancial Aid.org. or attend the free National Association of College Admissions Counselors National College Fair at the Prime Osborn Oct. 13 from 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Dawn Mills is the NAS Jax school liaison offi cer. If you have questions about educational issues, email dawn.m.mills@ navy.mil or call 778-2236.Desert Shield/Desert Storm Recognition Ceremony set for Nov. 8Changes for Florida Bright Futures scholarships 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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NAS Jacksonvilles Flight Line Caf hosted a chef certification event on Sept. 28 for five culinary students, presenting them with different food items and challenges to be judged and graded on. The students, some of whom have culinary degrees, attend ed training in both a classroom and kitchen setting for two weeks, learning the finer arts of food preparation. This event provides stu dents a chance to demonstrate the skills they have learned, and upon successful comple tion of prepping and serv ing a full meal, they will have become either certified culi nary or certified sous-chefs, respectively, said Karin George, food service direc tor for Commander, Navy Installations Command gal leys. This certification is some thing they can take with them beyond their military careers, as it will also be recognized in the civilian sector. The students were presented with numerous food prepara tion challenges, including seasoning assorted vegetables, creating a salad with home made dressing, and properly filleting and cooking fish, steak and chicken. During the entire event, a panel of four judges observed and graded them. Our grading criteria includes safety, adhering to sanitation standards, food preparation and plated pre sentation, commented CWO3 Michael Carter, executive chef and officer in charge of Navy Food Management Team Mayport, who judged the event. Another key element is that the students must utilize all the ingredients given to them for any part of the meal they pre pare. Upon completion of the cooking challenge, the judg es sample and critique all the food items prepared, and advise the chefs on any improvements they could make. George stated, Its an exciting event, and great to see these students using their creativity to prepare and serve such great meals. The Navy is a Global Force for Good and our Sailors embody its Core Values of Honor, Courage and Commitment. Each day, Im energized when I see Sailors challenging themselves to reach their personal and professional goals. Because of their enthusiasm I have no doubt that the outlook of our maritime force shines bright as these individuals motivated by dedication, service and sacrifice continue to perfect their tal ents across the fleet and around the globe. Yet for all of the positive things going on in our Sailors lives, our Navy is being plagued by a sickness among our ranks. Each week, in all-too-familiar reports, we see detailed accounts of Sailors being caught, testing positive and being separated from the Navy for using synthetic marijuana or Spice. This threat to our Navys readiness is also known as K2, Spice Gold, Spice Silver, Spice Diamond, Genie, Yucatan Fire, Bliss, Black Mamba, Bombay Blue, Fake Weed, Zohai or Red Magic. Whatever its called, not in my Navy! This synthetic drug presents a real and existing danger to a users men tal and physical health, as well as their military careers. Being under the influence of this drug can adversely affect the performance of our shipmates on and off duty. Some of the short-term effects include auditory and visual hallucinations, Navy chefs seek certification Spice: Another way to spell disaster JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 painless head pressure, panic attacks, time distortion and delirium. Psychotic symptoms can last for days, even months in some cases. Long-term effects from this mind-altering drug can include permanent physical impairment, mental illness or death. These products arent approved for human consumption and there is no oversight of the manufacturing process. Similar to other drugs on the street, experts warn that you never know what mixture of chemicals could be present in the drugs and users are experimenting with the combination of multiple products which can dramatically change or increase its effects on a caseby-case basis. In San Diego, one of our major fleet concentration areas, multiple patients have been treated at Naval Medical Center San Diego for using Spice, some resulting in months of inpatient treatment for persistent psychotic symp toms. According to the Drug Enforcement Agency, increased dosage, addiction and use of synthetic marijuana has led to a surge in emergency room visits and calls to poison control centers. It saddens me that even though they know that the odds are against them, some of our Sailors continue to gamble with their lives, playing Russian roulette with no pos sible way to win. Regrettably, simple message traffic cant portray the nega tive impact the use of this manmade drug has on unit cohe sion. Drug abuse puts lives and missions at risk and undercuts unit readiness, morale and esprit de corps. On flight lines, onboard ships and on bases around the world, we put our lives in the hands of our ship mates. We trust that the Sailor or Marine we are working with is focused and capable. If they have used Spice, their readi ness for duty and their profes sional judgment is in question. I also cant adequately express the drugs impact in terms of permanent personal consequences including crimi nal charges, discharge, and long-term medical issues, not to mention the impact to the Sailors family. Those most painful and private elements often go untold. The Navys implementation of synthetic drug testing is a necessary step in putting a halt to Sailors and Marines using these outlawed and hazardous substances. If unclear of the Navys policy on drug abuse, its straightforward and to the point zero tolerance and illegal. Using Spice, or other trendy drugs and artificial compounds by any member of our Navy and Marine Corps team is incompatible with the guidelines for performance, military discipline, and readi ness characterized by todays Sailors and Marines. In 2011, close to 400 Sailors were processed out of the Navy because they chose to use these drugs. As shipmates we must all watch out for each other and remind each other that abusers will be caught, they will be separated, lose benefits and will let down the Navy team. With that gloomy forecast said, I want you to understand that Im only identifying a very small population of mis guided individuals and that an overwhelming majority of our Sailors and Marines conduct themselves honorably. There are also signs that we are winning the battle. The Navys history of Zero Tolerance clearly shows dra matic gains in reducing illegal drug use. In 1982, the first year of urinalysis screening, the percent of positive samples was 7.21 percent. For FY 2011, that number was less than one percent, with a total of 1,515 out of 1,184,160 samples testing posi tive. At Naval Education and Training Command (NETC) headquarters and throughout our domain, we understand that fleet readiness starts here and we go the extra mile to make sure that our students are equipped to succeed in the fleet. Our instructors and staff are charged with their train ing, mentoring, setting a per sonal example, and are com mitted to good order and dis cipline. As a team, we take on challenges by developing situ ational awareness, coaching our shipmates, taking advan tage of resources and provid ing positive leadership. We also faithfully help our shipmates navigate through rough seas, and go the extra mile to pre vent a shipmate from making a bad decision that could ruin their lives. If you or someone you know needs help, all you have to do is ask. SPICE DeweysCall 542-3521 Now open in Bldg. 608 between Gillis St. and Keily St. off of Enterprise Ave. Enjoy Deweys full-service menu, bar and a friendly atmosphere that is great for all ages! Monday Friday 10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 410 p.m. CPO Pub Monday, Tuesday & Friday 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Wednesday Thursday 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. 10th annual PBA South Region Adult Pro-Am 9-Pin Tap Oct.12, 6:30 p.m. & 8:30 p.m. $25 entry fee Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Fall Bowling Leagues now forming! Mixed league Monday 7 p.m. After-work league Wednesday 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thursday 9 a.m. Mixed league Thursday 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Friday 11:45 a.m. Friday night league 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Saturday 10:30 a.m. Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor pool Open for lap swimming Monday Friday 5:30 8 a.m. & 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Recreational swimming Monday Friday 4:30 8 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Entertainment Books $30 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23, 2013 Preferred seating $41, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Upcoming ITT Trips: Mt. Dora Oct. 27 Lakeridge Winery Nov. 10 New Armed Forces Disney Salute: $153.25 for 4 day ticket with hopper option $153.25 for 4 day ticket with water park fun & more $180.75 for 4 day ticket with both park hopper and water park fun &more Universal Studios Special 2 day 1 park each day w/ 3rd day free $101.75 2 day park to park w/ 3rd day free $120.50 Tickets valid through December 14, 2012 Universal Studios Halloween Horror Nights $41.25 $71 Order Gator Bowl tickets now $35 Fl Classic $37.50 & $52.50 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Fall Barracks Bash Oct. 11, 49 p.m. Free food, entertainment, games & prizes!Tim Meadows Comedy Show Oct. 13 at the Comedy Zone Free admission, soda and appetizers! Departs Liberty at 7 p.m. Free Bowling Night Oct. 17, 710 p.m. NAS Freedom LanesNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Oct. 23 for active duty Oct. 11 & 25 for retirees & DoD personnel Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. CFC Golf Tournament Oct. 25, 12:30 p.m. shotgun start $60 per person Mulberry Cove Marina Call 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 The Sesame Street / USO Experience Nov. 13 at 6 p.m. Youth Center Gym Tickets will be available beginning Oct. 9, 8 a.m. 2 p.m. Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Oct. 29 Dec. 10 $500 per person For more information, contact Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil.

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New advanced rider motorcycle safety courseCape Fox Professional Services at NAS Jacksonville is offering a new motorcycle safety class called the Advanced Rider Course (ARC). Designed by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation, this class is nearly identical to the Military Sport Bike Course (MSRC), except that it is open to all types standard street, touring, chopper and dual-sport of two wheeled motorcycles. Beginning in a classroom environment where stu dents learn how to improve perception skills and hazard awareness, the course will also promote an open group setting. Students will work together by analyz ing their riding decisions and understanding their risk skill levels. The driving range, located off of Birmingham Avenue., will focus on enhancing performance capa bilities related to cornering, breaking and hazard avoidance. The eight-hour ARC is considered a level-two training class, being equivalent to the Experienced Rider Course (ERC), Basic Rider Course 2 (BRC2) and the MSRC. The prerequisite is completion of level-one training. Students will meet at the second deck motorcy cle training room at the NAS Jax Auto Hobby Shop. In addition to students wearing proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), all bikes must be in good working condition. For ARC registration, contact Cindy at 542-2584 or Kristen at 542-8810. Basic Rider Course for ladies A two-day Basic Rider Course (BRC) will be offered Nov. 19-20 for female riders only (active duty have priority, dependents/civilians will be accepted on standby status) at NAS Jax. Be the first to sign up for this skill-building class. If you have always wanted to ride a motorcycle, or have tried to learn from someone else, now is the time to enroll and learn from the Motorcycle Safety Foundation female instructors. Motorcycles, helmets, and gloves are provided, although you may bring your own if you wish just ensure you wear long sleeve shirts, long pants and over-the-ankle footwear. We will teach this twoday class rain or shine so dress appropriately for the weather. You will have classroom and riding time each day with a written exam and range rid ing to test your knowledge and skill. There are only 12 slots available, so contact your command motorcycle safety representative, self enroll on ESAMS, or call Cindy at 542-2584. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 17

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Expectant parents received a crash course on infant care during a Baby Boot Camp class at Naval Hospital Jacksonville (NH Jax) Oct. 3. Baby Boot Camp focuses on the newborn and what to expect the first few days and weeks at home, as well as prepare them for a positive parenting experi ence. There is a lot of information that parents dont know they need until they need it. Parents are on a very steep learning curve, especially with a first child, so its important to give them as much information ahead of time, said Alisa Davis R.N., prenatal nurse educator at NH Jax, where two to three babies are born each day. It makes it a little less overwhelming when they bring their new born home. Father-to-be, AE2 Jonathan Musick, assigned to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, found the class to be very informative. He particularly enjoyed the Happiest Baby on the Block section teaching a five-step method used to soothe infants and greatly reduce crying time. I had no idea what swaddling was, let alone how to swaddle a baby. It gives me the confidence to feel at ease, and know I can care for my child. I feel better prepared, said Musick. Participants received infor mation on basic baby care, pediatric dental health, tobacco cessation, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Visiting Nurse Program, Happiest Baby on the Block, injury prevention, car seat safety and a demonstration of infant CPR. A pediatric provider was also on hand to discuss the impor tance of immunizations and answer other questions. STG3 Kimberly Campbell of VP-30, and her husband, Brandon, attended other classes before Baby Boot Camp and feel all parents should participate in the prenatal classes. I feel the classes helped us to be more positive about the pregnancy and work better together, said Campbell. We received a lot of information that helped us prepare for the delivery. NH Jax is the first hospital on Floridas First Coast mili tary or civilian to earn Baby Friendly designation from United Nations Childrens Fund (UNICEF) and World Health Organization. Its the third hospital in DoD and fourth in Florida with the certification. Baby Friendly hospitals seek to improve the health of babies and moms by promoting breastfeeding. If you want to develop a pre natal education plan can, call 542-BABY (542-2229) to register for classes. Naval Hospital Jacksonville conducts Baby Boot Camp 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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October is Energy Awareness Month, a national effort to underscore how important energy is to our national prosperity, security and environmental well-being. In commemoration of Energy Awareness Month, NAS Jacksonville is kicking off a month of energy saving events and activities. NAS Jacksonville Energy Manager Joshua Bass will be highlighting products and projects that can help you position your household for a more sustainable future. Bass will contribute weekly energy tips arti cles to Jax Air News including: Meet Bass in person, Oct. 12 13 at the NEX Courtyard. Check out his display of energy efficient products, including a solar-powered GEM low speed vehicle. Utility companies want us to use energy in a predictable way in a way that makes it easier for them to guarantee they can provide the energy we want. When we call for more energy than they can easily provide, they are usually able to deliver, but the cost can be very high for the last little bit that gets everyone through a cold snap in the winter or a heat wave in the summer. It is not cost effective for the utility to produce power at maximum capacity all of the time, when the maximum demand is not continuously required. When the maximum demand is placed on the grid, the utility company may need to start up inefficient and dirty generators for awhile, or pur chase from another utility provider, or pay some customers to use less until the shortage is over. This is why utility bills can be complicated. Today, more home accounts are charged in a similar fashion to the way commercial accounts have been charged for years. This method rewards using ener gy at a steady rate, as well as using energy at night when the overall demand is low. Energy used during the peak demand period is charged at a higher rate, because it is more expensive for the utility to meet that demand. There are three ways utilities encourage stable energy use: Time-of-use rates are dif ferent rates for different times of day. Higher on-peak rates encourage us to use less on weekdays during the day when people are using the most energy. Your utility company will set on-peak and off-peak times based on typical energy use patterns in your area. Demand charges are charg es based on your single high est peak use during the billing period. These charges encour age us to fit periodic high energy consuming processes into lower energy use periods. Most Navy bases pay demand charges, and they can be sub stantial in high electric rate areas. Some utility companies are so serious about encourag ing us to limit our highest use that they charge for the highest demand on the system for an entire year. Demand charges can also be called transpor tation charges, and are start ing to show up on natural gas bills as well as electricity bills. These charges help the util ity have confidence that the capacity of their transmission lines will be adequate to deliver the required energy to cus tomers. Tiered rates use one rate for the first so many kilowatthours used during the billing period, then a higher rate for the next so many kilowatthours used, and so on. Tiered rates require us to pay more for what we use thats above a basic minimum allotment of energy, and, again, encourage us to try to stay within an energy budget. Understanding how util ity companies bill for their services can help us make wise choices regarding energy use, both at work and at home. If you have questions about utility bills, stop by the NAS Jax Energy Awareness Month display located near the Navy Exchange food court on Oct. 12-13, from 8 a.m. 1 p.m. each day. The NAS Jax Energy Team will be there to discuss ener gy saving opportunities and answer any questions. A lighting comparison board, water saving showerhead display and solar photovoltaic demonstra tion will also be on display. Also, the energy conservation mascot, BRITE, will be avail able to silently act out energy conservation practices just like a mime who looks like a light bulb! Understanding how utilities bill customers Save energy Oct. 12-13 at NEX courtyard JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 19

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A $925,000 contract was recently awarded for the roof replacement of the NAS Jax indoor swimming pool (build ing 614) at Enterprise Ave. and Gillis Street. This past August, deteriorated pieces of roof deck ing began to fall from the ceil ing into the pool and surrounding areas forcing a complete closure of the building. This affects not only recreational swimmers, but also the U.S. Navy Surface Rescue Swimmer School (SRSS). The roof replacement project is scheduled for completion no later than December. The old gravel roof is being replaced with a torch-down modi fied bitumen roofing system. Deteriorated corrugated steel decking is also being replaced. The replacement surface is called a cool roof because it is covered with a white finish coating that reflects sunlight resulting in a more energy effi cient building by lowering the amount of energy required to cool and heat the space. In addition to the roof replacement, the east and west sides of the building will get new energy efficient windows. This project is part of a larger $3.4 million contract that has already replaced the roofs on buildings 4, 850, 851 and 858. All of these buildings now have the new cool roof that helps contribute to an overall more energy efficient building. Lt. Kevin Harrington, officer in charge of the SRSS at NAS Jax, said the schools instructors have been flexible. When the pool was closed for safety concerns in August, we had a class on board that was only two days away from graduating. We worked with the MWR fitness staff to schedule the students final in-water pool evaluation at the stations outdoor pool on Allegheny Road, said Harrington. Fleet readiness is not being affected because we worked with SRSS at San Diego and they were able to absorb our scheduled classes through December. Harrington explained, Our four-week CAT I course for sur face (ship-borne) swimmers uses the pool to teach basic lifesaving procedures and how to use lifesaving equipment. Every Navy ship is required to have two qualified rescue swimmers on board before it can pull away from the pier, so our graduates are considered mission essen tial. The SRSS staff includes 18 rescue swimmer instructors, a hospital corpsman and a para chute rigger. During the pool project, staff are volunteering at elementary schools, helping MWR to install new exercise equipment at the fitness cen ter, and working with Seabees and the NAS Jax Environmental Department to improve base nature trails. MWR Fitness Director Tanya Henigman said before the indoor pool was closed, it was available to lap swimmers from 5:30 to 8 a.m. and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Recreational swimming is 4:30 to 8 p.m. Water aerobics is Tuesday and Thursday at 11 a.m. Fortunately, the recent warm weather has allowed patrons to swim those same hours at our outdoor pool. This also enables MWR to keep supporting base and tenant commands for their Physical Readiness Tests, as long as the water temperature is 70 degrees or higher, to avoid hypothermia. Were glad to accommodate swimmers dur ing the construction project, said Henigman. The percentage of teens in high school (aged 16 and older) who drove when they had been drinking alcohol decreased by 54 percent between 1991 and 2011, according to a Vital Signs study released Oct. 2 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nine out of 10 high school teens (aged 16 and older) did not drink and drive during 2011. We are moving in the right direction. Rates of teen drinking and driving have been cut in half in 20 years, said CDC Director Thomas Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. But we must keep up the momentum -one in 10 high school teens, aged 16 and older, drinks and drives each month, endangering themselves and others. For the study, CDC analyzed data from the 1991-2011 national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBS). These national surveys asked high school students if they had driven a vehicle when they had been drinking alcohol one or more times during the 30 days before the survey; CDC researchers focused their analysis on students aged 16 and older. The study also found that: mately 2.4 million episodes of drinking and driving a month in 2011. behavior more than once a month. were most likely to drink and drive (18 percent), while 16-year-old high school girls were least likely (6 percent). school who reported drinking and driving in the past month also reported binge drinking. For YRBS, binge drinking means five or more drinks during a short period of time. Teens learn from adults, said Pamela Hyde, the Administrator of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. That is why it is critically important that parents, teachers, coaches and all caring adults in a young persons life talk with them early and often about the dangers of underage alcohol use as well as drinking and driving. Many efforts have been helping to reduce teen drinking and driving. Some of the proven, effective strate gies include the laws in place in every state that make it illegal to sell alcohol to anyone under age 21 and for those under age 21 to drive after drinking any alcohol. In addition, the graduated driver licensing systems in some states allow teens to gain privileges, such as driving at night or driving with passengers, over time. Parents also have a crucial role to play in keeping their teens safe on the road. They can model safe driving behav ior and can consider using tools like parent-teen driving agreements with their teens. Safe driving habits for teens include never drinking and driving and wearing a seat belt on every trip. In 2011, a home fire was reported every 87 sec onds, killing 2,565 people and injuring 12,650 and causing $7.6 billion in direct damage. Many fatalities, injuries, and property losses can be prevented by plan ning ahead and integrat ing fire safe behaviors into your daily activities. Dont be a statistic . be smart. Put a smoke alarm on every level of the home outside each sleeping area, and in every bed room. Smoke alarms can be battery-operated or elec trically hardwired in your home and are available at a variety of price points. If you have hearing problems, use alarms with flashing strobe lights and vibration. Test smoke alarms every month. Replace batteries once a year, even if alarms are hard wired. Test your smoke alarms Indoor pool roof replacement underway CDC study shows 54 percent decrease in teen drinking and driving since 1991 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012

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at night to see if your child will wake up and respond to the alarm. Children sleep more deeply and may not wake up. If your child does not wake up to the alarm, try an alarm where you can program your voice to alert them. Mount smoke alarms high on the walls or ceilings since smoke rises. Ceiling-mounted alarms should be installed at least 4 inches away from the nearest wall. Wall-mounted alarms should be installed 4 to 12 inches away from the ceiling. Replace all smoke alarms every 10 years, or sooner if they dont respond properly. Consider installing both ionization alarms, which are better at sensing flaming fires, and photoelectric alarms, which are better at sensing slow, smoky fires, or dual sensor alarms. Cooking is the No. 1 cause of home fires and injuries. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of cooking fires. Keep anything that can catch fire away from the stovetop. Dont use the oven or stovetop if you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol. Stay in the kitchen when frying, grilling or boiling food. If you have to leave, even for a short time, turn off the stove. FIRE FACTS The Naval Legal Service Command realigned its offices Oct. 1, but its legal services to the fleet did not change. Legal assistance services were previously provided by Naval Legal Service Offices (NLSOs). As a result of the realignment, a ser vice member seeking legal assistance with an issue such as a will, power of attorney, family law advice or any similar personal legal matter can now find assistance at the closest Region Legal Service Office (RLSO). The provision of legal assistance will continue at all prior NLSO locations, but will now be deliv ered by RLSO commands. There are legal assistance offices in fleet concentration areas, and at or near most Navy bases around the world, with legal support providers prepared to assist service members, their families, retirees, and other eligible clients. All legal assistance services are provided free of charge to those eligible. RLSOs will continue to prosecute courts-martial and provide legal advice to commands around the globe. Command services include advice on military justice, ethics, JAG Manual investigations, administrative law, and other legal issues involving Navy com mands. On Oct. 1, eight NLSOs headquar tered in Pensacola; Norfolk; Bremerton; Jacksonville; San Diego; Washington, D.C.; Naples, Italy; and Yokosuka, Japan, realigned to become four Defense Service Offices (DSOs) head quartered in San Diego; Washington, D.C.; Norfolk; and Yokosuka, Japan. The DSOs mission is to defend service members in military justice proceed ings, represent them at administrative boards, and provide other represen tational services, including advice on non-judicial punishment and adverse personnel actions. This realignment also changed the way service members receive defense services in 12 locations around the fleet where former NLSO detachments were closed. In those locations, service members will receive personal defense ser vices in a manner similar to the way service members at sea are supported. Service members requesting defense services, such as representation for courts-martial or administrative boards, will make initial contact with a DSO attorney by telephone or other remote communication technology, with subsequent in-person consultation if necessary. The 12 locations are Everett, Whidbey Island, Port Hueneme, Lemoore, Corpus Christi, New Orleans, Millington, Kings Bay, Guantanamo Bay, Newport, Earle, and Sigonella. Navy Legal Office changes name, services remain intact The following are upcoming Fleet and Family Support Center classes for military members and their families: For more information or to register, call 542-5745.Red Ribbon Week contest to help schools The National Family Partnership announces the national contest for its 27th annual Red Ribbon Week, Oct. 23-31. Red Ribbon Week is the oldest and largest drug prevention campaign in the country. In 1985 after the mur der of a DEA agent, parents, youth and teachers in communities across the country began wearing Red Ribbons as a symbol of their commitment to raise awareness of the destruction caused by drugs. This year, families can get involved by entering a contest to promote awareness in their neighborhoods and win a drug prevention grant for their schools. Families can enter Red Ribbon Weeks contest to win a $1,000 grant for their school and a new iPad for their home. To participate in the contest fami lies and students will decorate the front of their homes with this years message: The Best Me Is Drug Free. Heres how students and their fami lies can enter to win $1,000 for their K-12 school and a new iPad: Students bring the Red Ribbon Week message home by working alongside parents to decorate their front door, mailbox, fence, etc. with this years theme The Best Me Is Drug Free. Take a photo with the family and their Red Ribbon Week decora tion, then upload to www.redribbon. org/contest or www.facebook.com/ RedRibbonWeek by Nov. 2 (must be parents or 18+ to upload photos). The voting begins! Ask family and friends to vote for your entry at www.redribbon.org/vote Nov. 2-16. Ten lucky winners from regions across the U.S. will win. Winners will be announced at events at their winning schools in December.Improve your life skills with free knowledge VA help availableIf you are retiring or separating from active duty and need assistance with submitting your claim for disability and compen sation to the Veterans Administration (VA), you can start up to one year prior to retiring/separating with getting our medical information in order. AMVETS is the Veterans Service Organization advocate for sepa rating or retiring service members and their fami lies providing assistance with submission of claims to the VA for benefits, dis abilities and compensa tion. All assistance is free and you are not required to become a member of AMVETS to use their ser vices. For more information and to make an appoint ment, call David Sanders at 542-2834 or e-mail david.d.sanders@navy.mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012 21

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Operation Homefront, the national nonprofit dedicated to providing emergency financial and other assistance to military families, has announced that nominations for the Military Child of the Year Awards are being accepted online at MilitaryChildOfTheYear.org through Dec. 15.Winners will be recognized in April 2013. The Military Child of the Year Award recognizes children who stand out among their peers. Ideal candidates for the award demonstrate resilience, strength of character, and thrive in the face of the challenges of military life.These young heroes embody lead ership within their families and com munities. This award is presented to an out standing child from each branch of service Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard.The winners each receive $5,000 and a laptop, and are flown with a parent or guardian to Washington, D.C., for a special recognition ceremony on April 11.In previous years, recipients have had the honor of meeting Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey and First Lady Michelle Obama, who were guest speakers for the event awards ceremo nies. With so much uncertainty living in a military family, from constantly having to move to knowing that a parent is fighting for our country, it is amazing to see how strong these young people are to excel in the face of these challenges, said Jim Knotts, president and CEO of Operation Homefront.Its not just the military members who serve, but their families as well.We think these young patriots deserve to be honored for their sacrifice and their leadership. The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Nov. 4, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Detroit Lions (Tickets on sale Oct. 22) Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jags vs. Indianapolis Colts (Tickets on sale Oct. 29) Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. Retirees and Veterans/DoD employ ees are eligible to purchase tickets for New York Giants and Atlanta Falcons games. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but under no circum stances are dependent children autho rized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to pur chase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may pur chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No exceptions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@ usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tick ets for the entire season. Select Navy Lodges will be offering even greater savings this holiday sea son. From Dec. 3 to Jan. 7, guests who stay at select Navy Lodges will receive 20 percent off their lodging. Guests can book their lodging now through Jan. 2, 2013. Navy Lodges are a great place for guests of military members to stay during the holidays, said Mike Bockelman, vice president, Navy Lodge Program. Navy Lodges normally offer a value up to 45 percent less than comparable civilian hotels. With this additional 20 percent savings, guests will really get a good value for their money. To take advantage of these sav ings, guests must make their reserva tion online at www.navy-lodge.com Reservations will not be accepted through the Reservation Center or the local Navy Lodge for this promotion. All rooms must be booked in advance. Every Navy Lodge guest room offers queen-sized beds, high-speed Internet access, and a kitchenette complete with microwave and refrigerator. Guest laundry facilities are on site, breakfast is offered daily in the lobby where free Wi-Fi access is available as well as free newspapers. Navy Lodges also offer convenient on-base parking as well as handicapped accessible and non-smoking rooms. As an added convenience, many Navy Lodges allow dogs and cats up to 50 pounds in weight to stay when traveling with their owners. Check with the Navy Lodge for more details. Navy Lodges participating in the holiday promotion include Navy Lodge Patuxent River, Annapolis and Bethesda, Md.; Navy Lodge Fort Worth and Corpus Christi, Texas; Navy Lodge and Navy Inn Memphis, Tenn.; Navy Lodge Mayport, Fla.; Navy Lodge Kings Bay, Ga.; Navy Lodge New London, Conn.; Navy Lodge Washington, DC; Navy Lodge Everett, Wash.; Navy Lodge Moffett Field and Staten Island, NY; and Navy Lodge Great Lakes, Ill. The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) is making improve ments to its return policy. Merchandise purchased at a NEX or from myNavy Exchange.com can be returned to any NEX store within 45 days of purchase for a refund or even exchange. We made this improvement to our return policy make it more convenient for our customers, said Richard Dow, NEXCOMs senior vice president store operations. By extending our return policy to 45 days, it gives our custom ers more time to bring back an item to our store. In todays busy world, thats important to our customers. The standardized 45 day return poli cy on merchandise eliminates the previous exclusions including the 14 day return policy on certain items, such as computers, software and digital cam eras. Now, the only exception to the 45 day NEX Customer Return Policy are pre-paid cards, such as financial, music, phone and gift cards, which are not returnable. The refund will be processed in the same payment form as the original purchase. A return without a receipt will be issued on an NEX Gift Card at the items current NEX price. Refunds made without a receipt can only be made at the NEXs Customer Service desk. Finally, diamond jewelry returns may be subject to an IGI appraisal prior to issuing a refund.Jacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USOSelect Navy Lodges offer greater savings this holiday seasonSend your nomination for Military Child of the YearNEXCOM improves its customer return policy 22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 11, 2012