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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 09-27-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02012

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com A delegation of military attachs from the diplomatic missions of 20 countries visited NAS Jacksonville on Sept. 20 as part of their 7-day tour of Navy and Marine Corps installations in the Navy Region Southeast area. Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Admiral Jack Scorby Jr. welcomed the highranking guests to his headquar ters with an overview of regional operations that support the fleet, families and warfighters. Regional priorities that guide the daily operations our instal lations include energy manage ment, compatible land use and continuous process improve ment. We also support joint exercises and port visits with our interna tional naval partners, said Scorby. Another example of our foreign military cooperation is making our The newest addition to the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community, the P-8A Poseidon, took flight for its very first detachment by a fleet squad ron during a visit to the Boeing facilities in Seattle, Wash. Sept. 14. VP-16 sent 21 aircrew, maintenance and support personnel on this momen tous occasion. The War Eagles have been busy training since July, learning how to operate and maintain the P-8A. This detachment gave the squadron a unique opportunity to see the aircraft from the beginning stages of produc tion to testing the newest improvements to mission equipment that will be incor porated in future upgrades. The War Eagles started at Boeings Weapon System Integration Lab, known as the WSIL. The lab represents the brainpower of the P-8A mission sys tems. It contains a mock replica of the Poseidon interior and was the first place Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven and VP-30 instructors trained before NAS Jacksonvilles Integrated Training Center was complete. At the WSIL, Boeing employees, including many former P-3C aircrew, work on current and future P-8A tech nologies. Their prior military experi ence gives them unique insight into how aircrew operators work and think. Their mission is to continuously test the P-8A software and systems, looking for any malfunctions that need to be corrected. They also focus on new fea tures that make the system more intui tive to the operators, allowing the mis sion to be completed as efficiently as possible. The aircrew were excited to see all of the new updates the aircraft will soon receive as well as the exposure to the behind-the-scenes of how the mission systems are designed. The maintenance and support per sonnel were eager to fly the simulator as well as get some hands-on experi ence and learn what their fellow War Eagles do operationally. PS3 Cori Shea said, Its interesting to see how much effort goes into how the airplanes are designed. Theres so much more to the process than I ever imagined. After seeing the future of the P-8A, the VP-16 personnel headed to Renton, Wash. to see where every 737 and P-8A begins the Boeing production lines. Boeing representatives Carl Lang, David Robinson, and James Detwiler led an eye-opening tour throughout the facilities. Lang first showed the main production line where all of Boeings 737 commercial aircraft are assembled and painted before being sent out for final testing. The tour then moved over to the P-8A line to show the similarities and differences in the process. For many personnel, the most excit ing part of this tour was being able to see the aircraft in various states of assembly, knowing that they are the first aircraft VP-16 will proudly fly dur ing their first operational deployment with the P-8A. The tour concluded at the Boeing Military Facility, where the aircraft is sent to have all of the mission equip ment installed after it is fully assem bled. Lt. Ryan Burke said, Seeing the air craft in this state was a good learn ing tool for the aircrew. It gave us the chance to see how things are connected and flow together, which gives us a bet ter understanding of how to operate the equipment. The information learned on this tour gave VP-16 an appreciation for all of the hard work that has been put into the aircraft design, production and mission system integration. Although it was a short detachment, the Sailors and offi cers of VP-16 view it as a sign of great things to come for squadron. VP-16 is scheduled to complete their transition to the P-8A by the end of the year and will commence pre-deployment train ing in January. Ombudsmen celebrate 42nd birthdayFifty Navy ombudsmen from NAS Jacksonville ten ant commands were honored during the NAS Jax Navy Family Ombudsman Program 42nd Anniversary Appreciation Luncheon at the NAS Jax Officers Club on Sept. 19. Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic Rear Adm. Ted Branch was the guest speaker. The event kicked off with the national anthem performed by Lt. Mark Corbliss, director of Navy Band Southeast, followed by the invocation by NAS Jax Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore. In his welcoming remarks, NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders said that recognizing the achievements of command ombudsmen significant. You are the glue that holds all our Navy families together. Youve all heard that family readiness equates to combat readiness and you are the ones who make that happen and solve those issues before they get to our level and break down our readiness. So thank-you for all that you do everyday, said Sanders. War Eagles take P-8A on first detachment Military attachs tour facilities

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Sept. 27 1922 Report on observations of experiments with short-wave radio at Anacostia, D.C., begins Navy develop ment of radar. 1941 Launch of first Liberty ship, SS Patrick Henry, in Baltimore, Md. 1942 Armed Guard on SS Stephen Hopkins engages German auxil iary cruiser Stier and supply ship Tannenfels. Stephen Hopkins and Stier both sink. 1944 Special Air Task Force (STAG1) commences operations with drones, controlled by TBM aircraft, against Japanese in Southwestern Pacific. 1950 First Marine Division captures Seoul, South Korea Sept. 28 1822 Sloop-of-war Peacock captures 5 pirate vessels 1850 Congress out laws flogging on Navy ships 1923 Navy aircraft take first and second places in international Schneider Cup Race 1944 Marines occupy islands in Palaus under cover of naval aircraft and gun fire support. 1964 First deployment of Polaris A-3 missile on USS Daniel Webster (SSBN 626) from Charleston, SC Sept. 29 1944 USS Narwhal (SS-167) evacu ates 81 Allied prisoners of war that sur vived sinking of Japanese Shinyo Maru from Sindangan Bay, Mindanao. 1946 Lockheed P2V Neptune, Truculent Turtle, leaves Perth, Australia on long-distance, non-stop, non-refueling flight that ends Oct. 1. 1959 Aircraft carrier USS Kearsarge (CVS-33), with Helicopter Squadron 6 and other 7th Fleet units, begins six days of disaster relief to Nagoya, Japan, after Typhoon Vera. Sept. 30 1944 USS Nautilus (SS-168) lands supplies and evacuates some personnel from Panay, Philippine Islands. 1946 U.S. Government announces that U.S. Navy units would be perma nently stationed in the Mediterranean to carry out American policy and diplo macy. 1954 Commissioning at Groton, Conn. of USS Nautilus (SSN-571), the worlds first nuclear-powered ship. 1958 Marines leave Lebanon. 1959 Last flight of airships assigned to the Naval Air Reserve at NAS Lakehurst, N.J. 1968 Battleship USS New Jersey (BB62) arrives off coast of Vietnam. Oct. 1 1800 U.S. schooner Experiment cap tures French Schooner Diana. 1844 Naval Observatory headed by Lt. Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters. 1874 Supply Corps purser, Lt. J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a pay department and instruct Japanese about accounting. 1880 John Phillip Sousa becomes leader of Marine Corps Band. 1928 First class at school for enlisted Navy and Marine Corps radio intercept operators. 1937 Patrol aviation transferred to Aircraft Scouting Force, a reestablished type command. Five patrol wings were established as separate administrative command over their squadrons. 1946 P2V Neptune Truculent Turtle lands at Columbus, Ohio, break ing the world record for distance with out refueling in a flight of 11,235 miles, originating in Perth, Australia. 1949 Military Sea Transportation Service activated. 1955 Commissioning of aircraft car rier USS Forrestal (CVA-59), first of postwar super carriers. 1979 President Jimmy Carter awards the Congressional Space Medal of Honor to former naval aviators Neil Armstrong, Capt. Charles Conrad Jr., USMC Col. John Glenn, and Rear Adm. Alan Shepard Jr. 1980 USS Cochrane (DDG-21) res cues 104 Vietnamese refugees 620 miles east of Saigon. 1990 USS Independence (CV-62) enters Persian Gulf (first carrier in Persian Gulf since 1974). Oct. 2 1799 Establishment of Washington Navy Yard. 1939 Foreign ministers of countries of the Western Hemisphere agree to establish a neutrality zone around the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of North and South America to be enforced by the U.S. Navy. Oct. 3 1921 USS Olympia sails for France to bring home the Unknown Soldier of World War I. 1955 USS Saipan (CVL48) begins disaster relief at Tampico, Mexico, rescuing injured and delivering supplies. 1962 Launch of NASA Mercury 8 piloted by Cmdr. Walter Schirra Jr. In a mission lasting 9 hours and 13 minutes, he made six orbits at an altitude of 175.8 statute miles at 17,558 mph. Recovery by aircraft carrier USS Kearsarge (CVS-33). Between the holiday week end, back-to-school stories and the political conventions, the following news about a mili tary wife who killed her child slipped through the main stream-media cracks. In mili tary-spouse circles, however, it has opened a whole new line of questions and concern: Should the military be doing regular checks on families? Are there enough systems in place to help family members affected by deployments? What else could the military have done? I answer these: no, yes and nothing. Im not buying any of the arguments against the military in this case. What Im about to explain to you is the fault of one woman, not an organization. On Aug. 31, Tiffany Nicole Klapheke, 21, a Texas military wife whose husband has been deployed for just two months, was arrested for neglect when her 22-month-old daughter was found unresponsive in their Dyess Air Force Base home. The baby, who weighed only 17.5 pounds, later died from dehydration, malnutrition and a lack of basic care, accord ing the Associated Press. There was evidence that she had been sitting in her own excrement and waste for quite some time. Klaphekes two other daugh ters6-months and 3-years oldwere also treated for neglect and taken into custody. Texas police say Klapheke left her three children alone and without food or water for days. Klapheke remains in a Texas jail and is charged with three counts of felony injury to a child. In a jailhouse interview with KTAB-TV in Abilene, Klapheke admitted to being frustrated with her childs potty training. She was tired of changing dirty sheets. Plus, her young daugh ter kept taking off her diaper and walking around the house. So Klapheke confined the child to her crib . for days. Klapheke described herself as depressed, stressed and without family or help. (This, by the way, is not unlike how most military spouses dealing with a deployment describe themselves.) She told KTXS news reporter Jennifer Kendall, Nobody took a second to ask me if there was anything they could do to help or if I needed anything, and I wish they would have. Klapheke sobbed as she described finding her life less daughter in the crib. She acknowledged that people will hate her, and she points out that she has never been in trouble with the law before, not even for a speeding ticket. According to KTXS, a drug test done on Kapheke came back clear. Are you feeling sorry for Klapheke yet? Unfortunately, mothers kill ing their own children is noth ing new. In 1994, Susan Smith drowned her two children in South Carolina. Andrea Yates did the same to her five chil dren in 2001. In fact, Cheryl Meyer, a psychology profes sor and researcher at Wright State University, claims to have found several thousand cases of mothers who killed their children between the years of 1990-99. Does anyone know what Susan Smiths husband did for a living? How about Andrea Yates? Like Klapheke, these women had severe and disturbing mental illnesses. Could their children have been saved if their husbands had stayed at home? Would Klaphekes chil dren be healthy today if her husband was not deployed? I think the answer is no. And yet, in the days that followed the news about Klapheke, military spouses flooded online message boards with solutions, including that we, as a military community, should check on families daily and that the military should be doing more to help people. Ive been a military depen dent for 36 years. Never before has there been so many resources available to fami lies. Its drilled into us: call this 1-800 helpline in an emer gency. Call this one if you just need to talk. Visit a fam ily support center at the nearest base. Talk to the base chaplain or a physician. Talking about stress and depression used to be taboo, especially for soldiers and pilots. Today, its encouraged at every opportunity. There are hotlines, books, counselors, pamphlets at the hospital and workshops on base. In fact, Id be willing to bet that a military spouse has more chance at getting help with her mental illness than a civilian does. But the military can only do so much. It is, after all, an insti tution built to protect the coun try, not to raise families. Why wasnt Susan Smiths or Andrea Yates husbands occu pations blamed for their chil drens death? Did their employ ers do enough? Did fellow co-workers check on them enough? Was it their obliga tion? Oh, but what about the long and recurring deployments, critics say. Dont those con tribute to the stress on military families? Yes, they do. But its impor tant to remember that thou sands of service members are deployed at any given time. Not all not even a majority of their spouses harm their children. And, of course, just because a husband is physical ly present doesnt mean that he is involved and supportive. If that were the case, why didnt Yatess or Smiths husbands stop their wives? There are alot of people ready to point fingers in this case, many people who want to blame Klaphekes husbands deployment. But the criminal here is the mother. She alone neglected her children and killed her 2-year old. Lets put her on trial for this murder. Not the mili tary. Military wife, not military, responsible for childs death

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 3

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Cmdr. Amy Bauernschmidt passed command of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 70 to Cmdr. Christopher Herr Sept. 20 in a cer emony at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117. Capt. Daniel Dwyer, command er, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 presented Bauernschmidt the Meritorious Service Medal. Bauernschmidt led the Spartans through their inaugural deployment, which was also the first deployment of an east coast MH-60R Seahawk squad ron. Under her command, HSM-70 flew more than 5,200 hours in support of Operations New Dawn and Enduring Freedom with CSG-2 for the inaugural deployment of USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). HSM-70 embarked six heli copters on three detachments, as well as five helicopters on board Bush. Under Bauernschmidts leadership, HSM-70 participated in numerous mul tinational exercises and 10 straits tran sits. Over all, the deployment resulted in more than 13,000 flight hours, 2,200 sorties, 14 aircraft commanders, and an exemplary 34 percent advancement rate. Through her leadership, the Spartans garnered several major awards, includ ing: COMNAVAIRLANT Capt. Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy; 2011 Admiral Thach Award; 2010 Bloodhound Award; CVW-8 Golden Wrench Award for the Third Line Period; CVW-8 Top Spot Award; and 2011 Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic Talon Award. A native of Milwaukee, Wis., Bauernschmidt graduated from the United States Naval Academy, in 1994, and became a naval aviator three years later. After completing training at Fleet Replacement Squadron HSL-41, she flew in two deployments with HSL-45 from San Diego. Bauernschmidt went on to instruct new helicopter pilots at HSL-41, before being assigned as Aide-de-camp to commander, Carrier Strike Group 7 for two different admirals. She returned to the fleet for two deployments with HSL-51 as Det. Three Officer-in-Charge, and operations department head. In Oct. 2007, she reported to Joint Staff/J6 to serve as action officer and executive assistant to the director. On June 11, 2011, Bauernschmidt became the third commanding officer of HSM-70. She has earned numerous personal awards including Defense Meritorious Service Medal Meritorious Service Medal, Navy/Marine Corps Commendation Medal (three awards), Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and various unit, campaign and service medals. Bauernschmidt will attend the Naval War College in Newport, R.I. Herr, the Spartans new commanding officer, is a native of Marthas Vineyard, Mass. and a 1995 graduate of Boston College. He earned his naval aviator wings in November 1997. Flying the UH-3H, he went on to serve at HSL-51 for three deployments. After transitioning to the SH-60B Seahawk, Herr joined HSL-43 and deployed for Operation Iraqi Freedom. Following a tour as a flag aide and studying at the Naval War College, he returned to HSL-43 as Det. Two officerin-charge and later maintenance officer. After completing a tour with the Joint Staff/J-3, Herr reported as HSM-70 exec utive officer in June 2011. Calling all flags: Cancer storiesWith Calling All Flags, Naval Hospital Jacksonville invites patients to promote healing by sharing stories about how cancer has touched their life or someone close to them. Patients can submit a flag of their own creation on this theme through Oct. 15. Everyone can vote on their favorite flag at the hospitals rotunda (next to Pharmacy), where all flags will be on display from Oct. 17 through Veterans Day. The display invites patients and visitors to reflect on the role of health and illness in everyones lives. Flags (size 5-by-8 to 8-by-10 inches), along with a dis play mechanism (such as a hanger and either tabs or a sleeve) can be submitted to Breast Care Coordinator Nikki Levinson-Lustgarten (542-7857) by Oct. 15. Herr relieves Bauernschmidt at HSM-70 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Rear Adm. Matthew Carter, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force 5th and 7th Fleet, visited VP-5 Sept. 5-8, at Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. Carter conducted all-hands quarters in the CTG 72.2 hangar with VP-5, VP-8, VP-26, VP-62 and VQ-1 personnel. Following quarters, he spent the day inter acting with members of the task group, toured spaces and observed the daily routine of the deployed mari time patrol and reconnaissance force personnel. As Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force 7th/5th Fleet, and Commander, Task Forces 57 and 72, Carter provides administrative oversight, plan ning, coordination, and control of forward deployed Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Forces (MPRF). Several members of the squadron received personal command coins from the admiral. AWV2 Amanda Johnson received a coin for her continuing role as the squadrons subject matter expert for the C4I for antisubmarine warfare communication system. It was a humbling experience to know that my efforts are noticed at such high levels, said Johnson. This taught me to continue to put my best foot for ward in all I do. MCSN Douglas Wojciechowski also received one of the admirals coins for his involvement during the visit. It was an amazing opportunity to participate in the visit, said Wojciechowski, VP-5s newly arrived mass communications specialist. I was glad to be able to document his time here with the squadron. The Mad Foxes were grateful for the honor of host ing Carter. The visit was an exciting opportunity for all those who interacted with the admiral and a positive morale boost to the MPRF task group. Navy Band Alumni invited to performNavy Band Southeast is inviting all Navy Band Alumni to perform at the Alumni Concert at Jacksonville Beach Band Shell Oct. 20 at 12:30 p.m., in conjunction with the 2012 Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular. A rehearsal will take place at Navy Band Southeasts facility aboard NAS Jax on the evening of Oct.19. Anyone interested should contact Navy Band Southeasts Public Affairs Officer MU2 Scott Farquhar at scott.farquhar@navy.mil by Oct. 10. Carter visits VP-5 on deployment JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 The early afternoon rain didnt deter more than 3,300 country music fans who turned out on Sept. 21 for the NAS Jax All-Hands Fall Concert, head lined by country music artist Chris Cagle. The event was pre sented by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department. The music kicked off at 6:30 p.m. with a set by country performer Evan Wright who played a mix of blues, southern rock and country under tones, including his top hit Small Town Anthem. I absolutely love being here and supporting the troops. I am so grateful for what our military does every day and blessed that I get to play for them, said Wright, after his performance. And to all those Sailors deployed I love you and wish you could have been here tonight. Come home safely! Also performing was Singer/ Songwriter/Actress Jana Kramer, whos had success with three songs that were fea tured on the CWs One Tree Hill, where she plays actress Alex Dupre. The singer-songwriter is lighting up country music with her emotionally moving songs and sweet vocals already selling nearly 200,000 digital singles in less than six months. Kramer wowed the crowd with her moving songs, Why ya Wanna, What I Love About Your Love, and Whiskey. I think this is great event and its awesome how our MWR here supports the troops. I am really enjoying the show and the music, especially Jana Kramer shes really great, said MA2(EXW) Keith Danalewich of the NAS Jax Security Department. After her show, Kramer said, I had a blast performing here tonight. This is our very first show on a military installa tion and we cant wait to come back. As the sky darkened, Cagle took to the stage to perform his No. 1 hit, I Breathe In, I Breathe Out. Cagles music career began with his first album, Play It Loud in 2000 that turned gold in 2002. The following year, Cagles second album, Chris Cagle was released featuring What a Beautiful Day and Chicks Dig It. After a brief medical hia tus, Cagle released Anywhere but Here in 2005. His fourth album, My Lifes a Country Song, was released in early 2008. Two years later, he signed with Bigger Picture Music Group, releasing his new single Got My Country On and new album Back in the Saddle in 2012. The familiar music had many Sailors and their families sing ing along and dancing to the bands perfor mance. This is a real ly fun and Im so grateful MWR is supporting our troops. Im a huge country fan. Some of us work really hard to get through each pay peri od so its nice to enjoy a free concert, said Pamela Diaz, who attended the event with her family. Cagle said he was thrilled to perform for the troops and had a message to those who are deployed in harms way. Your morale might get low and you might not realize how much you mean to us, but thank you so much. Freedom is a warm blanket provided by a special group of men and women who have the guts to stand up and protect our nation and we really appreciate what you do, he stated. MWR Liberty Director and Concert Coordinator Tom Kubalewski said, Weve been working on this event for the past two months, coordinat ing all the details to make it happen. It took quite a bit of planning and lots of behind the scenes volunteers helping out, said Kubalewski. It turned out to be a great show for our Sailors and fami lies. Our MWR team loves developing projects that add to the quality of life for Sailors at NAS Jacksonville. The fall concert was part of the Navys fleet-wide MWR program for Sailors, Department of Defense civil ians, retirees and their families to bring out their chairs and blankets and enjoy live music in a safe, family friendly envi ronment. NAS Jax MWR thanks spon sors USA Discounters, WQIK 99.1, Country Legends 100.7 and Gator Country 99.9 for their support on this event.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. COUNTRY MUSI C FANS ENJOY FALL C ON C ERT

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 7 PHOTOS BY KAYLEE LARO C QUE AND MORGAN KEHNERT

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Energy awareness activities announcedOctober is Energy Awareness Month, a national effort to underscore how important energy is to our national prosperity, security and environmental well-being. In commemoration of Energy Awareness Month, NAS Jacksonville is kicking off a month of energy saving events and activities. NAS Jacksonville Energy Manager Joshua Bass will be highlighting products and projects that can help you position your household for a more sustainable future. Bass will contribute weekly energy tips articles to Jax Air News, including: tips; computer. Meet Bass in person, Oct. 12 13 at the NEX Food Court. Check out his display of energy efficient products, including a solar-powered GEM low speed vehicle. A delegation of two officers and 15 officer candidates from Japanese Military Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) VP-5 visited the U.S. Navys VP-5 Mad Foxes at the Commander, Task Group 72.2 hangar on Sept. 3 aboard Kadena Air Base, Japan. The goal was to further devel op the relationship between the JMSDF and U.S. Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force squadrons. The visit consisted of a series of briefings about the history of the squadron, the capabilities of the P-3C Orion aircraft and the upcoming transition to the P-8A Poseidon aircraft follow ing deployment. Following the briefings, the JMSDF received a tour of a P-3C Orion aircraft. It was an abso lute pleasure to interact with the Japanese officer candi dates, said Lt. Denis Alford, a VP-5 pilot who participated in the event. After both the briefings and tour were complete, Mad Fox naval aviators and naval flight officers met the JMSDF candi dates in their wardroom for the opportunity to interact and dis cuss experiences in each oth ers naval service. During this time, the visit ing candidates graciously pre sented their hosts with gifts and were provided with gifts in return. It was amazing how polite and attentive all the candidates were during the tour, said Lt. Timothy Clemens, the NFO in charge of the P-3C on display for the visitors. I really look forward to future events with JMSDF VP-5. The candidates bid the VP-5 wardroom farewell with the promise of a joint-command sports and social day to come, an event greatly anticipated by both squadrons. The Mad Foxes of VP-5 are on a scheduled deployment to the 7th Fleet area of responsibil ity, conducting maritime patrol operations. The squadron was grateful for the opportunity to interact with the JMSDF and looks forward to participating in future events. The flu season creeps up on us just as the kids get back to school. Seasonal epidemics of influenza occur every year in the United States, beginning in the fall. Typically epidemics cause thou sands to tens of thousands of deaths and about 200,000 hospitalizations. Since the 1940s a vaccine has been available to prevent influenza unfortunate ly, even with the recent H1N1 novel flu epidemic many patients dont take the time to get the vaccine. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recom mends that everyone age six months of age and older receive the influenza vaccine. This recommendation has the potential to save thousands of lives. Here are a few of the more common questions Ive heard about the flu this year. Q: What is the flu, anyway? Influenza (flu) is a virus that infects the nose, throat, windpipe and lungs. It is highly contagious, spread from per son to person by coughing, sneezing or talking close to another person. Shaking hands is also a common way to transmit the virus. Influenza epidemics occur usually between October and April every year. Q: What are the symptoms of the flu? Typical flu symptoms include fever, chills, muscle aches, congestion, cough, runny nose and difficulty breathing. Other viruses can cause symptoms sim ilar to influenza, but influenza is more likely to cause severe infections leading to pneumonia, especially in the elderly and the immunocompromised. H1N1 flu causes severe infections in younger patients, especially in young pregnant women and children. Because influenza is a virus, it cant be successfully treated with antibiotics. Q: If I got last years vaccine, why do I need to get another vaccine this year? The vaccine this year is different from last years vaccine. The vaccine this year contains protection against the H1N1 strain as well two other novel types of influenza virus. There are two different kinds of flu vaccine. One type can be given to healthy patients between age two and 49 its flu mist, an intranasal vaccine that can be squirted into your nose. The flu mist actually works even better than the shot for children. The injectable vaccine (flu shot) is given to pregnant moms, diabetic patients, asthmatics and anyone with any chronic medical condition such as emphysema. Smokers are at especially high risk for influenza and should be in line just behind pregnant moms and diabetic patients for their vaccines. Q: Is the vaccine really safe can pregnant moms and small children feel safe getting the shot this year? Yes! The shot is safe for pregnant women at any time during pregnancy. Since babies are not able to get shots until age 6 months, moms shot is babys best protection. Breastfeeding also helps protect baby protective flu anti bodies appear in moms milk about two weeks after her immunization. The flu shot can cause some redness and pain at the injection site, mus cle ache, and a low grade fever but because the virus is completely inactivated it cannot possibly cause influ enza. The flu mist can cause mild con gestion and a runny nose, but it can not grow in the lungs and cannot cause pneumonia. The flu vaccine ranks 6th of the top VP-5 briefs VP-5 Welcome to flu season 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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30 preventive medicine actions a doctor can take for their patients. I encour age patients to ask their doctor questions about vaccines and consult reputable medical websites, such as the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu/ I encourage patients to get a flu vac cine by walking-in at Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Immunizations Clinic. Flu shot walk-in hours are weekdays 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (except Thursdays, which is 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.). For infor mation, call Immunizations at 542-7810. Fire Prevention Week commemorates the Great Chicago Fire when a twoday blaze killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless and destroyed more than 17,000 buildings Oct. 8-9, 1871. That tragedy inspired reform across America, spurring new fire safety codes and public awareness campaigns. In October, the National Fire Protection Association highlights the importance of fire safety education. This years theme, Have 2 Ways Out, focuses on establishing several evacua tion routes for your family members if a fire should occur in the home. The following is the NAS Jax Fire Prevention Week schedule of events: Oct. 7 13, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Daily open house at base fire stations. Oct. 9-12 Unannounced fire evacu ation drills. Oct. 9, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Fire Prevention table display with fire safety materials, red fire hats, fire apparatus, Pluggie the talking fire hydrant at the Navy Exchange Courtyard. Oct. 9, 4 p.m. Fire inspectors, Pluggie the talking fire hydrant and fire apparatus at the NAS Jax Youth Center, Building 2069. Oct. 10, 10-11 a.m. Fire inspectors and Pluggie the talking fire hydrant visit the Childrens Ward and Pediatrics Clinic at the Naval Hospital, Building H2080. Oct. 11, 9:30 a.m. Fire Inspectors and Pluggie the talking fire hydrant at the Child Development Center, Building 2070. NAS Jax to recognize Fire Prevention Week DR. JOE JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 9

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training facilities available for pilots and aircrewmen of other nations for both fixed-wing and rotary wing aircraft. Accompanying the attaches were: Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence Rear Adm. Matthew Kohler; Capt. John Coles, direc tor, U.S. Navy Foreign Liaison Office; and Debra Gustowski, deputy director, U.S. Navy Foreign Liaison Office. Coles said, My team coordi nates these visits on behalf of the chief of naval operations (CNO) for all military attaches posted to the United States. This is part of the CNOs program to build trust among naval allies and to share information that strengthens interoperability. So far on this tour, every command we visited has been top notch as far as enthusiastically wel coming us and advancing our knowledge of their operations. Military attach Capt. Renzo Rospigliosi, a surface gunnery officer of the Peruvian Navy, said, I was impressed with the preparation and training of aircraft pilots here at NAS Jacksonville in addition to training the maintainers of the equipment and systems. The Wing 11 commodore has many tasks that he is balancing with the arrival of the new P-8. Rospigliosi also noted Perus participation in the annual UNITAS exercise, a multilater al naval operation designed to build lasting partnerships and naval coalitions throughout Central and South America. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders said it was his pleasure to host Adm. Kohler, along with so many influential military attaches representing allies from around the world. Today, as the U.S. seeks to respond to requirements for military force in concert with other countries, its impor tant for high-ranking attaches to understand the U.S. Navys role in how it operates with key allies, said Sanders. The dimensions of pursu ing effective interoperability with allied navies can only be enhanced through informative attach tours such as this. ATTACHSAfter lunch, Sanders intro duced Branch who said he was honored to recognized ombudsmen for their contribu tions to military families. You do incredible work and I know that what you do day in and out is not always easy but I cant imagine how differently our commands would operate if we didnt have you as a part of the team. And, the fact that you are all volunteers is a testament to the idea of service above self. Every one of you joined the team because you want to make a difference and you truly have, said Branch. You are a source of needed information, sage advice and counsel for our Sailors fami lies. You are that indispensable link between the command and family members. From that 3 a.m. phone call, to the frantic emails, to the questions on the Fleet Readiness Group Website and command Facebook page it is a very different world. And you handle that challeng ing environment with a level of grace under pressure that is simply amazing, Branch told the ombudsmen. The admiral also discussed suicide and sexual assault pre vention. Weve come to realize that our ombudsmen might have the first indication that a deployed Sailor has a problem through their connection with the fami lies. We really need to build on that it is such an important channel and it may be a life saver, said Branch. Sexual assault is a tough problem that is affecting all the Defense Department services. It is corrosive to the force, it degrades our readiness and it is a crime that we will not tolerate. We have seen that an assault can happen on the homefront when Sailors deploy, and in these cases, our ombudsman again become a key resource for the command. Were going to continue to rely on all of you as we tackle this problem. Branch concluded, You have set a high standard and for that you have my sincere apprecia tion. In an era of long deploy ments, stressful schedules and complex issues, the ombuds mans role has never been more necessary. The event concluded as each ombudsman was presented a certificate of appreciation by Branch and a goodie bags courtesy of Navy Wives Club of America Jacksonville No. 86 and the Navy Exchange. The Navy Family Ombudsman Program was created in 1970 by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo Zumwalt as a way to commu nicate between commands and the families of Sailors who served in them. Ombudsmen are appointed by commanding officers and trained to disseminate Navy information, help resolve fam ily issues and provide resource referrals. Ombudsmen are our shining stars and support military fam ilies especially during deploy ments. They provide a wealth of resources to help families thrive while their service mem bers are called our to serve our nation, stated NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center Ombudsman Coordinator Wilhelmina Nash who orga nized the event. OMBUDSMEN 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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More than a dozen Department of Defense (DoD) active duty and civilian person nel recently attended the Pest Management Certification Course at the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) aboard NAS Jacksonville. This four-week course is targeted at individuals who need DoD pesticide applica tor certification, explained NECE Training Department Head Dr. Andrew Beck. Were sanctioned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to certify and license pesticide applica tors across the spectrum of DoD installations. The course is taught twice each year, in March and September. The primary goal of the cer tification program is educating applicators to safely and effec tively deploy restricted-use pesticides. The course consists of three phases: the first is required of all participants; the second and third phases focus on the dif ferent application categories that EPA recognizes for pest control workers. So someone who is licensed to control mosquitoes by oper ating a spray truck may not necessarily be licensed to per form aerial spraying, or apply weed-control chemicals on your yard, said Beck. This week, were teaching the plant pests and vegetation management phase, which is targeted primarily at golf course maintenance person nel. One of the challenges of controlling weeds is that her bicides that kill weeds can also kill desirable plants. To build awareness for protecting natural resources from pesti cides, we bring in guest speak ers from the NAS Jacksonville Environmental Department. Todays speaker was Natural Resources Manager Christine Bauer, who discussed how to integrate toxicity information with exposure data to deter mine the ecological risk from the use of a pesticide, and whether it is safe for the envi ronment and wildlife, said Beck. No matter what the topic, NECE instructors work to instill the overall pest control philosophy of DoD safety, efficacy and environmental soundness, added Beck. In addition to her class room lesson, Bauer also invited NECE participants to visit the stations Black Point Interpretive Center, where con servation education is provided free to schools and community groups. Our center features live exhibits of native fish and rep tiles, as well as preserved spec imens of birds, mammals and reptiles, said Bauer. In addi tion to the traditional indoor exhibits and learning area, Black Point also has two nature trails to facilitate a hands on approach to learning about the environment and local habi tats. NECE Jacksonville is an ech elon five command under the Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center, Portsmouth, Va. Since its inception in 1949, NECE has helped ensure the readiness of U.S. military forc es by providing technical ser vices and expert training in reducing the risk of diseases transmitted by insects and other arthropods. The command supports the Global War on Terror by sup plying medical entomolo gists and preventive medicine technicians for Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. NECE also provides direct support to the fleet by conduct ing shipboard and shore sta tion technical assistance visits in support of those commands disease vector and pest man agement programs. Beginning in October, the Judge Advocate Generals Corps will reorganize the Naval Legal Service Command (NLSC) to meet the Navys evolving demands for expeditionary legal services support, while continuing to provide quality mili tary justice services. The demand for Navy JAG Corps ser vices is greater than ever, but the nature of our practice has changed signifi cantly over the past several years, said Vice Adm. Nanette DeRenzi, the Judge Advocate General of the Navy. The Department of the Navy and joint forces operate in an increasingly complex legal and policy environment and expect more from our community than ever before. To prepare the JAG Corps to meet the challenges that lie ahead, they are replac ing the Naval Legal Service Offices (NLSOs) with Defense Service Offices (DSOs). There are currently eight NLSOs head quartered in: Pensacola, Fla.; Norfolk, Va.; Bremerton, Wash.; Jacksonville, Fla.; San Diego; Washington, D.C.; Naples, Italy and Yokosuka, Japan. These NLSOs will realign to become four DSOs that will be headquartered in San Diego, Washington, D.C., Norfolk, and Yokosuka. The DSOs mission will be to defend service mem bers in military justice proceedings, rep resent them at administrative boards, and provide other representational services, including advice on non-judicial punish ment and adverse personnel actions. NLSOs will transfer the mission of pro viding legal assistance services to the nine Region Legal Service Offices (RLSOs). Legal assistance services include wills and powers of attorney, and matters involving consumer, family, landlord-tenant, and predatory lending law. Sailors and their families will contin ue to receive legal assistance, but those services will now be provided by the RLSOs said Rear Adm. James Crawford, Commander, Naval Legal Service Command. On most bases, the location where legal assistance services are provided will remain the same. This realignment will change the way Sailors receive defense services in 12 loca tions around the fleet. This change will be similar to the way Sailors currently receive personal defense services when they are at sea. Sailors requesting defense services such as representation for courts-martial or Certifying DoD pesticide applicators Naval Legal Service Command adapts to better serve Navy, clients JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 11

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administrative boards will make initial contact with an attorney by telephone or other remote communica tion technology, with subsequent in-person consultation arranged, if necessary. These locations are Everett, Whidbey Island, Port Hueneme, Lemoore, Corpus Christi, New Orleans, Millington, Kings Bay, Guantanamo Bay, Newport, Earle, and Sigonella. Navy commands will retain their current staff judge advocate support. RLSOs will continue to provide courtmartial prosecution and command legal advice to Navy region and installation commanders, and tenant com mands such as ships and squadrons. As part of the realignment, the JAG Corps will focus the first two years of all new judge advocates careers on com prehensive training in prosecuting and defending cases, providing legal assistance, and advising Navy commands. This realignment will improve the JAG Corps training for new accession judge advocates by more thoroughly preparing them to meet the Navys legal needs, said Vice Adm. DeRenzi. For a complete list of services and contact information for the closest legal office, visit www.jag.navy.mil. NLSC The VP-8 Fighting Tigers took time out of their busy schedules volunteering to help the Misawa community by par ticipating in the 2012 Misawa Special Olympics, Sept. 15. Thirteen squadron members vol unteered to help with different tasks including serving food, organizing activities, escorting Special Olympians and tearing down equipment. Its been a great experience to be able to work and meet such wonderful peo ple, said AOAA Samatha Taylor. Ive worked with individuals with special needs before and it is always a blast, Id love to do it again. More than 60 athletes from three dif ferent schools in the local community participated in the 23rd annual event held at Misawa Air Base. Sailors from VP-8 teamed up in pairs to escort a Special Olympi-an through various events, ensuring each athlete had a special day that they will remem ber for years to come. Events included basketball, tee ball, football throwing, running sprints and face painting. Additionally, participants and volun teers were treated to burgers and hot dogs for lunch, and a Taiko Drum dem onstration for entertainment. The kids got to run around, throw basketballs, hit baseballs, throw foot balls and get their faces painted, its been a really awesome time, said ATAN Allison Arroyo. Just seeing them walking around with smiles on their faces, you knew today was a chance for them to get to have some fun. I think they really enjoyed themselves today, this has been a really good day and Im glad I was able to be a part of the event. The mission of Special Olympics is to provide year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of Olympic-type sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities, giv ing them continuing opportunities to develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage, experience joy and participate in a sharing of gifts, skills and friend ship with their families, other Special Olympics athletes and the community. The NAS Jacksonville-based Fighting Tigers are on a scheduled six-month deployment in support of U.S. 7th Fleet. VP-8 participates in Misawa Special Olympics 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Sept. 24 that the first Armstrong-class Auxiliary General Oceanographic Research (AGOR) ship will be named Neil Armstrong. Mabus named the future R/V Neil Armstrong (AGOR 27) to honor the memory of Neil Armstrong, best known for being the first man to walk on the moon. Armstrong was an aeronautics pioneer and explorer for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) serving as an engineer, test pilot, astronaut and administra tor.Armstrong also served as a naval aviator flying nearly 80 combat mis sions during the Korean War. Neil Armstrong rightly belongs to the ages as the man who first walked on the moon. While he was a true pioneer of space exploration and science, he was also a combat-proven naval aviator, said Mabus. Naming this class of ships and this vessel after Neil Armstrong honors the memory of an extraordinary individual, but more importantly, it reminds us all to embrace the chal lenges of exploration and to never stop discovering. Armstrongs widow, Carol, will serve as the ships sponsor. The Armstrong-class AGOR ship will be a modern oceanographic research platform equipped with acoustic equip ment capable of mapping the deepest parts of the oceans, and modular onboard laboratories that will provide the flexibility to meet a wide variety of oceanographic research challenges. Research vessel to be named in honor of Neil Armstrong JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 13

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The VP-45 Pelicans held a retire ment ceremony to honor the career of AWO1(NAC/AW) David Honchen, Sept. 7. Many family members, friends, and dis tinguished guests gathered at the NAS Jacksonville Chapel to honor Honchen and his family. Guest Speaker, AWCS Tom George, also of VP-45, gave a fitting tribute to the aircrewman who tirelessly stood the watch over his decorated 20 years of service. Other speakers included VP-45 Commanding Officer Mike Vitali, AWV1 Calvin Franklin, who read Old Glory, and AWO2 Timothy Meads, who official ly relieved Honchen from watch. Honchen, a native of Iselin, N.J., enlisted into the U.S. Navy in 1992. After completion of Basic Training and Aviation Apprenticeship, Honchen reported to his first command, HSL42 at NS Mayport. There he qualified as plane captain on the Navy SH-60B Seahawk helicopter. In 1997, he reported to Naval Air Maintenance Training Group Mayport for interim training on the SH-60B receiving the Airframe Navy Enlisted Classification. Honchen then trans ferred to HSL-40 where he qualified as a work center supervisor, collateral duty inspector for W/C 310, and completed his enlisted aviation warfare specialist qualification. In 2000, Honchen reported to Naval Air Crew Candidate School in Pensacola, Fla. He then reported to the VP-8 Fighting Tigers in Brunswick, Maine. There he qualified as a SS-3 operator, a fleet instructor, and was selected as VP-8 SS-3 Operator of the Year. In 2007, he reported to Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven at NAS Jacksonville as an ACTC Level 5 weapons training instructor. In 2010, Honchen deployed to Iraq as an Individual Augmentee working as a liaison with the U.S. Army. He reported to VP-45 in late 2012. U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a member of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of special rec ognition in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. The registra tion deadline is Oct. 5. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in territo rial waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve recognition and thanks for putting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans dur ing my annual Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the highlights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are strongly encouraged to contact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 598-0481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www.crenshaw.house. gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and doc umentation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the certificate, veterans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214. Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program. The Navy is seeking applications from highly quali fied Sailors in pay grades E-6 through E-9 for the Fiscal Year 2014 Active Duty Limited Duty Officer (LDO) and Chief Warrant Officer (CWO) programs, officials said Sept. 20. LDOs and CWOs bring a variety of technical exper tise and a seasoned perspective into the wardroom from their enlisted service, said Lt. Shane Walker, assistant LDO/CWO community manager, Bureau of Naval Personnel and an LDO. These programs deliver to the officer corps sea soned technical professionals with proven leadership abilities. LDOs and CWOs are composed of Sailors from the enlisted ranks who serve in 56 different officer techni cal fields. These programs serve as a path to commis sioning for qualified Sailors, but more importantly the LDO and CWO communities support the warfighting capability and readiness of naval forces through lead ership, technical proficiency, and experience, accord ing to Walker. They are the primary manpower source for tech nically specific billets not best suited for traditional unrestricted line, restricted line or staff corps career path officers, said Walker. Using critical enlisted experience, they are com mitted to the continuous leadership, improvement, training and mentoring of Sailors. The LDO and CWO communities have designa tors in the surface, submarine, aviation, information dominance, expeditionary, and general series as well as staff corps communities and serve in a variety of leadership billets within their technical fields, ranging from division officer to commanding officer ashore. Eligibility requirements for LDO include US citizen ship, serving in pay grade E-7 through E-9 or an E-6 who has passed the exam for E-7 and been determined board eligible. Active-duty applicants for LDO must have at least eight, but not more than 15 years of active-duty ser vice. Eligibility requirements for CWO include U.S. citi zenship, serving in pay grade E-7 through E-9. Activeduty applicants for CWO must have at least 13, but not more than 22 years of active-duty service. These programs do not require applicants to have a college degree. Applications must be postmarked no later than Nov. 1, 2012. The in-service procure ment board is scheduled to convene Jan. 7, 2013. NAVADMINs 285/12 contains additional application criteria and guidance. Nuclear qualified candidates must also refer to NAVADMINs 099/12 and 238/12. Eligible Sailors should apply for the designator for which they are most qualified, regardless of their cur rent rating. Upon commissioning, Sailors selected for LDO/ CWO will attend the four-week Officer Development School in Newport, R.I. Honchen retires after 20 years of honorable service LDO/CWO Programs provide commissioning opportunities for enlisted Sailors Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony Nov. 8 Beginner Rider Course Experienced Rider Course Military Sportbike Rider CourseCall for class datesNAS Jax Safety Office 542-2584 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Deweys Coming Soon! Ribbon cutting and grand opening celebration Oct. 4, 3 9 p.m. Free food sampling, DJ, live band Cloud Nine, games, prizes, childrens activities and much more!Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Fall Bowling Leagues now forming! Mixed league Monday 7 p.m. After-work league Wednesday 4:30 p.m.Seniors league Thursday 9 a.m. Mixed league Thursday 6:30 p.m.Intramural (Captains Cup) league Friday 11:45 a.m. Friday night league 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Saturday 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Open Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. until October 1. Free for military and DOD civilians, $3 for guestsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Entertainment Books $30 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam February 23, 2013 Preferred seating $41, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! 201213 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Upcoming ITT Trips: Mt. Dora Oct. 27 Lakeridge Winery Nov. 10 New Armed Forces Disney Salute: $153.25 for 4-day ticket with hopper option $153.25 for 4-day ticket with water park fun & more $180.75 for 4-day ticket with both park hopper and water park fun &more Universal Studios Special 2 day 1 park each day w/ 3rd day free $101.75 2 day park to park w/ 3rd day free $120.50 Tickets valid through Dec. 14, 2012 Universal Studios Halloween Horror Nights $41.25 $71 Order Gator Bowl tickets now $35 Fl Classic $37.50 & $52.50 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Kennedy Space Center Trip Sept. 30 9 a.m. Mall & Movie Trip Oct. 5 at 6 p.m. Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater Jaguars vs. Bears Oct. 7 at 2 p.m. Free admission and transpor tation NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Oct. 9 & 23 for active duty Oct. 11 & 25 for retirees & DoD personnel Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! CFC Golf Tournament Oct. 25, 12:30 p.m. shotgun start $60 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove Marina Mulberry Cove Marina Riverfest Sept. 29, 11 a.m. 5 p.m. Free cookout, music, games & prizes, fishing clinics, Stand-up paddle board lessons and more!Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recre ation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more infor mation.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Oct. 29 Dec. 10 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 On Sept. 29, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) and Naval Hospital Jacksonville/ Branch Health Clinic Mayport provide the public another opportu nity to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dan gerous expired, unused and unwanted prescrip tion drugs. Bring medications for disposal to the Target Superstore, next door to NAS Jacksonville on Roosevelt Blvd., or to the Navy Exchange main entrance at Naval Station Mayport. The service is free and anonymous, with no questions asked. Last April, Americans turned in 552,161 pounds 276 tons of pre scription drugs at more than 5,600 sites operated by the DEA and nearly 4,300 state and local law enforcement partners. This initiative address es a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that lan guish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdos es due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused pre scription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabi net. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicines flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash both pose poten tial safety and health hazards. Law enforcement agen cies like NCIS and the DEA will continue to hold prescription drug takeback events every few months. Additional local area collection sites and infor mation can be found by visiting www.dea.gov, and clicking on the link Got Drugs? Navy personnel assigned to Navy Munitions Command Conus East Division Detachment Jacksonville (NMC CED Det Jax) conducted an avia tion weapons safety exercise on Sept. 20 that simulated a fuel spill while defuel ing a MK-46 torpedo. The exercise, which took place at the Advanced Undersea Weapons Torpedo Shop, was designed to test Gunners mates (GMs) safety skills and response time to a hazardous and potentially life threatening situation. Our first priority is safety of our per sonnel, commented GM1 Lamarcus Hopson with NMC CED Det Jax. All our sailors are evacuated to the outside parking lot, considered the safe zone, while we wait for the Fire Department to evaluate the status of our building and potentially contami nated personnel. The drill itself consisted of GM2 Anthony Trontl of NMC CED Det Jax exposed to simulated torpedo fuel on the ground and on his person, working to contain the spill, then being assisted by two other Sailors in a decontamina tion process. After the initial threat is contained and all personnel are evacuated, mem bers of the NAS Jax Fire Department enter the scene to assess the spill and any potential hazards it may cause, while evaluating the level of contamina tion that may have spread beyond the building to other sailors. Once the threat level has been assessed, and depending on the size of the spill, a HAZMAT team from a base contractor called Fluor will begin clean up of the hazardous material, said Jim Butters, NAS Jacksonville training offi cer. NMC CED Det Jax conducts this type of training quarterly, presenting differ ent scenarios to the sailors each time, including simulated drills that might involve an injured sailor or dropped weapon. Overall today was a good and safe drill, but as with anything in the Navy, communication can always be improved, Butters commented. Torpedo shop conducts spill drill Safely dispose of unwanted prescription drugs Sept. 29

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This year marks the high est number of West Nile Virus (WNV) cases in the United States since the disease was first discovered in New York City during the summer of 1999. As of Sept. 11, 2012, there have been 2,636 reported cases with 118 deaths attrib uted to WNV nationally. The highest number of cases occurred in Texas (1,057) with Louisiana (147), Michigan (136), Mississippi (142), Oklahoma (129) and South Dakota (144) rounding out the top 6. Locally, the number of cases has been significantly fewer. In Florida there have been 34 cases statewide, 22 of which were in Duval County. In response, the Duval County Health Department issued a mosquito-borne illness alert ( http://www.dchd.net/compo nent/content/article/5-flashnews/103-mosquito-borne-ill ness-awareness-in-duval-coun ty ). To date WNV has not been reported from Clay, Nassau, or St. Johns counties this year. Symptoms of WNV usually occur three to 14 days after being bitten by an infected mosquito. Most symptoms are mild and flu-like in nature. However, severe infections can occur with signs and symp toms of high fever, headache, stiff neck and disorientation, and severe infections can result in death. The individuals who are at greatest risk of acquiring WNV are those over 50 years old and those with already compromised immune sys tems. The best way to prevent WNV is by protecting yourself and family from mosquito bites. Individuals who plan on spending time outdoors, espe cially from dusk to late eve ning, should wear insect repel lent containing 20-35 percent DEET or 20 percent Picaridin. Additionally, wearing per methrin-impregnated cloth ing provides an extra layer of protection, said Cmdr. Peter Obenauer, assistant officer in charge, Navy Entomology Center of Excellence. Long sleeve shirts and pants will also provide added protec tion from mosquito bites. Mosquitoes use stand ing water to lay their eggs. Containers in the yard that hold water, like flower pots and bird baths, should be emptied of water or removed to eliminate potential mosquito breeding sites. Maintaining your landscap ing by consistently mowing grass and trimming surround ing vegetation will make your yard less attractive to adult mosquitoes. Also ensure all window screens are in good working order to prevent mos quito entry into your home. Contact your local mosquito control district if there are an abundance of mosquitoes on your property. Jacksonville Mosquito Control (Duval County) http:// www.coj.net/departments/ neighborhoods/mosquito-con trol.aspx Clay County Mosquito Control Division http://www. claycountygov.com/news/2012news/clay-county-emergencymanagement-notification-ofaerial-spraying Amelia Island Mosquito Control District (Nassau County) http://www.ameliais landmosquitocontrol.org/ Anastasia Mosquito Control District (St. Johns County) http://www.amcdsjc.org/ Additional information about WNV can be found at the Duval County Health Department, the Florida Department of Health ( http://doh.state.fl.us/ Environment/medicine/arbo viral/index.html ) and the Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov/features/ StopMosquitoes/). U.S. experiencing the worst West Nile Virus year on record For more information, contact Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 17

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USS Enterprise to inactivate after 51 years of service After 51 years of distinguished ser vice, the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) will inactivate on Dec. 1, in a ceremony to be held at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. The inactivation ceremony will be the last official public event for the ship, and will serve as a celebration of life for the ship and the more than 100,000 Sailors who have served aboard. Details of the ceremony are still being final ized, however, numerous dignitaries and thousands of veterans of the ship are expected to attend the event. Commissioned on Nov. 25, 1961, the eighth ship to bear the illustrious name Enterprise, the Big E was the worlds first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. A veteran of 25 deployments to the Mediterranean Sea, Pacific Ocean and the Middle East, Enterprise has served in nearly every major conflict to take place during her history. From the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 to six deployments in support of the Vietnam conflict through the Cold War and the Gulf Wars, Enterprise was there. On Sept. 11, 2001, Enterprise aborted her transit home from a long deploy ment after the terrorist attacks, and steamed overnight to the North Arabian Sea. Big E once again took her place in history when she launched the first strikes in direct support of Operation Enduring Freedom. All Enterprise veterans, their fami lies, shipyard workers, and friends of Enterprise are invited to register to attend the inactivation week events and the ceremony on the ships website, www.enterprise.navy.mil. Tickets to the events will be on a first available basis. 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Defense Department civilians need to understand and recognize the warn ing signs for suicide just as their mili tary counterparts are being trained to do, the acting director of the Defense Suicide Prevention Office said today. We want to make sure our civilians are as comfortable talking to our mili tary members as their military lead ers are, Jacqueline Garrick, a licensed clinical social worker and former Army captain, said during an educational session about suicide prevention at the Pentagon conference center. Garrick made the presentation today and yesterday as part of increased out reach during Septembers National Suicide Prevention Awareness and Awareness Month. She and others spoke to small groups of mostly mental health professionals about how to man age crisis and increase resilience. Suicide affects us as a nation, Garrick said, although currently there are not comparable numbers to compare the suicide rate in the mil itary with that in the civilian sector. The Centers for Disease Control just released its 2010 suicide figures, while the DOD is about to release its 2012 statistics, she said. Also, suicide often is not given as the cause of death, but rather asphyxiation or heart attack, when someone has hanged themselves of taken a drug overdose, she said. But Garrick said the information is clear enough to know that suicides have been trending up in both the military and civilian sectors for several years. To combat military suicides, Garrick said, you also have to look to civilians who not only work alongside and man age service members, but civilians also are our family members. Managers need to be attuned to those on their staff who may be suicid al, Garrick said. Information gathered by the department shows that young, white men make up the largest block of military suicides, usually committed at home with their own firearm, she said. Half had never deployed and many joined the military with personal prob lems that can mount into emotional instability. Managers have to understand that employees also are dealing with stress with spouses, kids, finances or legal trouble. We know all of this comes into the workplace constantly, she said. Thats just life. It flows all over the place. The first step for managers is to be open to talking when an employee approaches with a problem, Garrick said. She offered these tips for effective communication with employees: make it clear that you want to talk to them and soon. If its not an emergency, ask if they can come back in 20 minutes; guage show concern and a mentoring stance; without being condescending; the person in crisis; conversation; tions; about that, and How can I help? and the answers. They really just need to know that youre listening and you will try to help, Garrick said. You dont need to solve it all in 15 minutes. People should listen for emotional red flags such as I just cant take it any more, she said. If you think someone may be contem plating suicide, Garrick said, ask them, Are you considering hurting yourself? and Do you have the means to do it? The three main places for help with suicide prevention are: 273-8255, then press the No. 1; It is important for family members also to reach out to these resources if they think their service member may be suicidal, Garrick said. All conversations are confidential and seeking medical treatment rarely affects a service mem bers career or security clearances, she said. Getting help early is really what will help your career, she said. In 2011, a home fire was reported every 87 seconds, killing 2,565 people and injuring 12,650 and causing $7.6 billion in direct damage. Many fatalities, injuries, and property losses can be prevented by planning ahead and integrating fire safe behaviors into your daily activities. Dont be a statistic . be smart. Put a smoke alarm on every level of the home outside each sleeping area, and in every bedroom. Smoke alarms can be battery-oper ated or electrically hardwired in your home and are available at a variety of price points. If you have hearing problems, use alarms with flashing strobe lights and vibration. Test smoke alarms every month. Replace batteries once a year, even if alarms are hardwired. Test your smoke alarms at night to see if your child will wake up and respond to the alarm. Children sleep more deeply and may not wake up. If your child does not wake up to the alarm, try an alarm where you can program your voice to alert them. Mount smoke alarms high on the walls or ceilings since smoke rises. Ceiling-mounted alarms should be installed at least 4 inches away from the nearest wall. Wall-mounted alarms should be installed 4 to 12 inches away from the ceiling. Replace all smoke alarms every 10 years, or sooner if they dont respond properly. Consider installing both ionization alarms, which are better at sensing flaming fires, and photoelectric alarms, which are better at sensing slow, smoky fires, or dual sensor alarms. Cooking is the number one cause of home fires and injuries. Unattended cooking is by far the leading cause of cooking fires. Keep anything that can catch fire away from the stovetop. Dont use the oven or stovetop if you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol. Stay in the kitchen when frying, grill ing or boiling food. If you have to leave, even for a short time, turn off the stove. Civilians can help prevent military suicide, official says JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 19

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The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) announced Sept. 20 that NEXs worldwide will be taking a new approach to the holiday shopping season this year. NEXs will offer sales and specials throughout the holiday season begin ning in early November instead of starting off the holiday shopping season with a big sale the day after Thanksgiving. Also new this year, deployed Sailors will be able to take advantage of holiday specials by shop ping on-line. For the 2012 holiday shopping season, we have revised and refreshed our approach to the traditional Black Friday sales events. We are calling it Navy Blue Friday and will emphasize Navy core values, Navy family and pre serving Thanksgiving cultural values, said Robert J. Bianchi, chief executive officer, NEXCOM. We will also provide broader access to NEX sale items for afloat and deployed Sailors. NEX customers will still find a wide variety of holiday gifts on sale as they have in the past. The prices on the items for sale will last for the duration of the sale, not be limited to a certain day or time period. NEX events will begin, worldwide, at 6 a.m. on Friday morning, featuring all-day Friday specials and additional sale items will be available across the entire three-day weekend. We took this approach so customers wouldnt feel obligated to get up early and leave their families to go shopping for the holidays, said Tess Paquette, NEXCOM senior vice president and chief merchandising officer. Beginning our sales earlier in the season will allow our customers to bet ter budget their holiday spending by purchasing gifts over a longer period of time. NEXCOM also looked into how it could better serve its deployed custom ers. Based on feedback gained through focus groups, NEXCOM will run a special sale event for afloat Sailors at mynavyexchange.com three days prior to Thanksgiving, with exclusive sales tailored specifically to their needs. Deployed customers will start receiv ing electronic or paper copies of the sales flyer onboard their ship in midNovember through their supply officer or sales officer. We have developed an assortment of Sailor requested items such as elec tronics, games and sports nutrition products which will be featured in the three-day sale, said Paquette. If Sailors are unable to participate in the sale due to operational or mission requirements, they will be able to con tact NEXCOMs call center after the sale dates and NEXCOM will accommodate them. The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 300 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Sept. 30, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Cincinnati Bengals (Tickets on sale now) Oct. 7, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Chicago Bears (Tickets on sale now) Nov. 4, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Detroit Lions (Tickets on sale Oct. 22) Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jags vs. Indianapolis Colts (Tickets on sale Oct. 29) Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to pur chase/use these tickets. Retirees and Veterans/DoD employ ees are eligible to purchase tickets for New York Giants and Atlanta Falcons games. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for mili tary personnel, but under no circum stances are dependent children autho rized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger fami lies desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may pur chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No excep tions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the sea son.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@ usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tick ets for the entire season. NEX offers new approach to holiday shoppingJacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 21 Naval forces from Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Mexico, the United Kingdom and the United States departed Naval Air Station Key West Sept. 20 and conducted air defense exercises to begin the at-sea phase of the Atlantic phase of UNITAS, an annual multinational exercise hosted by Commander, U.S. 4th Fleet. Thirteen warships are con ducting operations in the Atlantic Ocean and Western Caribbean through Sept. 28. UNITAS trains the participat ing forces in a variety of mari time scenarios to test com mand and control of forces at sea, while operating as a multinational force to provide the maximum opportunity to improve interoperability. Shortly after departing NAS Key West, F-5N Tiger II attack aircraft from adversary squad ron VFC-111 tested the ships air defense capabilities. This was a very impor tant evolution as it was the first time the multinational ships were able to assemble at sea and work as a team to defend the task group from aerial threats, Capt. Ace VanWagoner, commander, Combined Task Group 138.20 said. The adversary airplanes flew threatening approaches towards the task group and the ships were able to respond quickly and successfully defended themselves, he said. This years Atlantic phase includes live-free exercises and a Navy Standard Missile (SM-2) launch against remote control aerial targets launched from the flight deck of the frig ate USS Underwood (FFG 36) home-ported at NS Mayport. While the overarching goal of the exercise is to develop and test command and control of forces at sea, training in this exercise will address the spec trum of maritime operations, Commander, U.S. 4th Fleet, Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris said. Specifically, there will be high-end warfare scenarios addressing electronic war fare, anti-air warfare and air defense, anti-submarine war fare, anti-surface warfare, and maritime interdiction opera tions, he said. UNITAS develops and sus tains relationships to improve the capacity of U.S. partners maritime forces. The annual exercise fosters friendly, mutu al cooperation and under standing between participating navies. The ships have swapped crews as part of a subject mat ter expert exchange. USS Anzio (CG 68), the UNITAS flagship, embarked personnel from Peru, Brazil, Mexico, France and Canada. Navy announces 2011 Spirit of Hope winner Carolyn Blashek, the founder of Operation Gratitude, is the Navys 2011 Spirit of Hope winner, officials announced, Sept. 17 in NAVADMIN 286/12. Blashek founded Operation Gratitude in 2003 as a nonprofit, volunteer-based organization to support deployed service members, their children and wound ed warriors. Since its inception, Operation Gratitude has sent more than 750,000 care packages addressed to indi vidual Sailors, Soldiers, Airmen and Marines in hos tile regions such as Afghanistan, the Middle East and onto military ships. The organization has also sent thousands of Battalion Buddy packages with stuffed animals to the children of deploying troops. Cmdr. Randolph Borges, commanding officer of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 85, Air Station North Island, Calif. nominated Blashek. In his nomination letter he said her service to the spiritual, social, wel fare, education and entertainment needs of the men and women in the armed services and truly represents the core values of the Navy. Blashek will be presented her award at a joint cer emony honoring awardees from all services at the Pentagon, Nov. 15. Established in 1997, the Spirit of Hope Award is presented by the Wiegand Foundation in honor of the famed entertainer and supporter of military person nel, Bob Hope. The award is presented to individuals or organizations that embody Hopes commitment and service to the men and women of the military. A Navy Sailor or civilian has been honored with this award every year since 2005. Jacksonvilles only pet food bank has critical shortageFood needed to keep pets out of shelters and with their families Cat food is critically low at Jacksonvilles only Pet Food Bank, which is run by First Coast No More Homeless Pets (FCNMHP). The pet food bank is holding a Fill the Truck event in hopes of rais ing enough donations to continue to give pet food to low-income pet owners on the First Coast. Supporters are asked to bring any brand of dry cat food to the Fill the Truck food drive Sept. 29 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Regency Square Mall. Look for the Two Men and a Truck moving van. Donations can also be dropped off between now and Sept. 29 at designated drop-off locations. The FCNMHP Pet Food Bank helps to reduce the number of animals euthanized due to overpopu lation and owner surrenders to the shelter. Local shelters are full, so keeping pets with their families saves lives. Pet food bank clients include disabled veterans, seniors on a fixed income, victims of lay offs, single-parent families, and many others who are struggling to make ends meet and do not want to give up their family pets. Pet owners who receive food must meet income qualifications and pets must be spayed or neutered. FCNMHP offers free spay/neuter surgeries to those who qualify for food through the pet food bank. Locations will be updated on www.jaxpetfood bank.org. Multinational forces underway for UNITAS Atlantic



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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com A delegation of military attachs from the diplomatic missions of 20 countries visited NAS Jacksonville on Sept. 20 as part of their 7-day tour of Navy and Marine Corps installations in the Navy Region Southeast area. Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Admiral Jack Scorby Jr. welcomed the highranking guests to his headquar ters with an overview of regional operations that support the fleet, families and warfighters. Regional priorities that guide the daily operations our instal lations include energy manage ment, compatible land use and continuous process improve ment. We also support joint exercises and port visits with our international naval partners, said Scorby. Another example of our foreign military cooperation is making our The newest addition to the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community, the P-8A Poseidon, took flight for its very first detachment by a fleet squad ron during a visit to the Boeing facilities in Seattle, Wash. Sept. 14. VP-16 sent 21 aircrew, maintenance and support personnel on this momentous occasion. The War Eagles have been busy training since July, learning how to operate and maintain the P-8A. This detachment gave the squadron a unique opportunity to see the aircraft from the beginning stages of produc tion to testing the newest improvements to mission equipment that will be incorporated in future upgrades. The War Eagles started at Boeings Weapon System Integration Lab, known as the WSIL. The lab represents the brainpower of the P-8A mission sys tems. It contains a mock replica of the Poseidon interior and was the first place Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven and VP-30 instructors trained before NAS Jacksonvilles Integrated Training Center was complete. At the WSIL, Boeing employees, including many former P-3C aircrew, work on current and future P-8A tech nologies. Their prior military experi ence gives them unique insight into how aircrew operators work and think. Their mission is to continuously test the P-8A software and systems, looking for any malfunctions that need to be corrected. They also focus on new fea tures that make the system more intuitive to the operators, allowing the mis sion to be completed as efficiently as possible. The aircrew were excited to see all of the new updates the aircraft will soon receive as well as the exposure to the behind-the-scenes of how the mission systems are designed. The maintenance and support per sonnel were eager to fly the simulator as well as get some hands-on experi ence and learn what their fellow War Eagles do operationally. PS3 Cori Shea said, Its interesting to see how much effort goes into how the airplanes are designed. Theres so much more to the process than I ever imagined. After seeing the future of the P-8A, the VP-16 personnel headed to Renton, Wash. to see where every 737 and P-8A begins the Boeing production lines. Boeing representatives Carl Lang, David Robinson, and James Detwiler led an eye-opening tour throughout the facilities. Lang first showed the main production line where all of Boeings 737 commercial aircraft are assembled and painted before being sent out for final testing. The tour then moved over to the P-8A line to show the similarities and differences in the process. For many personnel, the most excit ing part of this tour was being able to see the aircraft in various states of assembly, knowing that they are the first aircraft VP-16 will proudly fly during their first operational deployment with the P-8A. The tour concluded at the Boeing Military Facility, where the aircraft is sent to have all of the mission equip ment installed after it is fully assem bled. Lt. Ryan Burke said, Seeing the air craft in this state was a good learn ing tool for the aircrew. It gave us the chance to see how things are connected and flow together, which gives us a better understanding of how to operate the equipment. The information learned on this tour gave VP-16 an appreciation for all of the hard work that has been put into the aircraft design, production and mission system integration. Although it was a short detachment, the Sailors and offi cers of VP-16 view it as a sign of great things to come for squadron. VP-16 is scheduled to complete their transition to the P-8A by the end of the year and will commence pre-deployment train ing in January. Ombudsmen celebrate 42nd birthdayFifty Navy ombudsmen from NAS Jacksonville ten ant commands were honored during the NAS Jax Navy Family Ombudsman Program 42nd Anniversary Appreciation Luncheon at the NAS Jax Officers Club on Sept. 19. Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic Rear Adm. Ted Branch was the guest speaker. The event kicked off with the national anthem performed by Lt. Mark Corbliss, director of Navy Band Southeast, followed by the invocation by NAS Jax Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore. In his welcoming remarks, NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders said that recognizing the achievements of command ombudsmen significant. You are the glue that holds all our Navy families together. Youve all heard that family readiness equates to combat readiness and you are the ones who make that happen and solve those issues before they get to our level and break down our readiness. So thank-you for all that you do everyday, said Sanders. War Eagles take P-8A on first detachment Military attachs tour facilities

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Sept. 27 1922 Report on observations of experiments with short-wave radio at Anacostia, D.C., begins Navy develop ment of radar. 1941 Launch of first Liberty ship, SS Patrick Henry, in Baltimore, Md. 1942 Armed Guard on SS Stephen Hopkins engages German auxil iary cruiser Stier and supply ship Tannenfels. Stephen Hopkins and Stier both sink. 1944 Special Air Task Force (STAG1) commences operations with drones, controlled by TBM aircraft, against Japanese in Southwestern Pacific. 1950 First Marine Division captures Seoul, South Korea Sept. 28 1822 Sloop-of-war Peacock captures 5 pirate vessels 1850 Congress out laws flogging on Navy ships 1923 Navy aircraft take first and second places in international Schneider Cup Race 1944 Marines occupy islands in Palaus under cover of naval aircraft and gun fire support. 1964 First deployment of Polaris A-3 missile on USS Daniel Webster (SSBN 626) from Charleston, SC Sept. 29 1944 USS Narwhal (SS-167) evacu ates 81 Allied prisoners of war that survived sinking of Japanese Shinyo Maru from Sindangan Bay, Mindanao. 1946 Lockheed P2V Neptune, Truculent Turtle, leaves Perth, Australia on long-distance, non-stop, non-refueling flight that ends Oct. 1. 1959 Aircraft carrier USS Kearsarge (CVS-33), with Helicopter Squadron 6 and other 7th Fleet units, begins six days of disaster relief to Nagoya, Japan, after Typhoon Vera. Sept. 30 1944 USS Nautilus (SS-168) lands supplies and evacuates some personnel from Panay, Philippine Islands. 1946 U.S. Government announces that U.S. Navy units would be perma nently stationed in the Mediterranean to carry out American policy and diplomacy. 1954 Commissioning at Groton, Conn. of USS Nautilus (SSN-571), the worlds first nuclear-powered ship. 1958 Marines leave Lebanon. 1959 Last flight of airships assigned to the Naval Air Reserve at NAS Lakehurst, N.J. 1968 Battleship USS New Jersey (BB62) arrives off coast of Vietnam. Oct. 1 1800 U.S. schooner Experiment captures French Schooner Diana. 1844 Naval Observatory headed by Lt. Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters. 1874 Supply Corps purser, Lt. J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a pay department and instruct Japanese about accounting. 1880 John Phillip Sousa becomes leader of Marine Corps Band. 1928 First class at school for enlisted Navy and Marine Corps radio intercept operators. 1937 Patrol aviation transferred to Aircraft Scouting Force, a reestablished type command. Five patrol wings were established as separate administrative command over their squadrons. 1946 P2V Neptune Truculent Turtle lands at Columbus, Ohio, breaking the world record for distance without refueling in a flight of 11,235 miles, originating in Perth, Australia. 1949 Military Sea Transportation Service activated. 1955 Commissioning of aircraft carrier USS Forrestal (CVA-59), first of postwar super carriers. 1979 President Jimmy Carter awards the Congressional Space Medal of Honor to former naval aviators Neil Armstrong, Capt. Charles Conrad Jr., USMC Col. John Glenn, and Rear Adm. Alan Shepard Jr. 1980 USS Cochrane (DDG-21) res cues 104 Vietnamese refugees 620 miles east of Saigon. 1990 USS Independence (CV-62) enters Persian Gulf (first carrier in Persian Gulf since 1974). Oct. 2 1799 Establishment of Washington Navy Yard. 1939 Foreign ministers of countries of the Western Hemisphere agree to establish a neutrality zone around the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of North and South America to be enforced by the U.S. Navy. Oct. 3 1921 USS Olympia sails for France to bring home the Unknown Soldier of World War I. 1955 USS Saipan (CVL48) begins disaster relief at Tampico, Mexico, rescuing injured and delivering supplies. 1962 Launch of NASA Mercury 8 piloted by Cmdr. Walter Schirra Jr. In a mission lasting 9 hours and 13 minutes, he made six orbits at an altitude of 175.8 statute miles at 17,558 mph. Recovery by aircraft carrier USS Kearsarge (CVS-33). Between the holiday week end, back-to-school stories and the political conventions, the following news about a mili tary wife who killed her child slipped through the main stream-media cracks. In mili tary-spouse circles, however, it has opened a whole new line of questions and concern: Should the military be doing regular checks on families? Are there enough systems in place to help family members affected by deployments? What else could the military have done? I answer these: no, yes and nothing. Im not buying any of the arguments against the military in this case. What Im about to explain to you is the fault of one woman, not an organization. On Aug. 31, Tiffany Nicole Klapheke, 21, a Texas military wife whose husband has been deployed for just two months, was arrested for neglect when her 22-month-old daughter was found unresponsive in their Dyess Air Force Base home. The baby, who weighed only 17.5 pounds, later died from dehydration, malnutrition and a lack of basic care, accord ing the Associated Press. There was evidence that she had been sitting in her own excrement and waste for quite some time. Klaphekes two other daughters6-months and 3-years oldwere also treated for neglect and taken into custody. Texas police say Klapheke left her three children alone and without food or water for days. Klapheke remains in a Texas jail and is charged with three counts of felony injury to a child. In a jailhouse interview with KTAB-TV in Abilene, Klapheke admitted to being frustrated with her childs potty training. She was tired of changing dirty sheets. Plus, her young daugh ter kept taking off her diaper and walking around the house. So Klapheke confined the child to her crib . for days. Klapheke described herself as depressed, stressed and without family or help. (This, by the way, is not unlike how most military spouses dealing with a deployment describe themselves.) She told KTXS news reporter Jennifer Kendall, Nobody took a second to ask me if there was anything they could do to help or if I needed anything, and I wish they would have. Klapheke sobbed as she described finding her life less daughter in the crib. She acknowledged that people will hate her, and she points out that she has never been in trouble with the law before, not even for a speeding ticket. According to KTXS, a drug test done on Kapheke came back clear. Are you feeling sorry for Klapheke yet? Unfortunately, mothers kill ing their own children is nothing new. In 1994, Susan Smith drowned her two children in South Carolina. Andrea Yates did the same to her five chil dren in 2001. In fact, Cheryl Meyer, a psychology profes sor and researcher at Wright State University, claims to have found several thousand cases of mothers who killed their children between the years of 1990-99. Does anyone know what Susan Smiths husband did for a living? How about Andrea Yates? Like Klapheke, these women had severe and disturbing mental illnesses. Could their children have been saved if their husbands had stayed at home? Would Klaphekes chil dren be healthy today if her husband was not deployed? I think the answer is no. And yet, in the days that followed the news about Klapheke, military spouses flooded online message boards with solutions, including that we, as a military community, should check on families daily and that the military should be doing more to help people. Ive been a military depen dent for 36 years. Never before has there been so many resources available to fami lies. Its drilled into us: call this 1-800 helpline in an emergency. Call this one if you just need to talk. Visit a family support center at the nearest base. Talk to the base chaplain or a physician. Talking about stress and depression used to be taboo, especially for soldiers and pilots. Today, its encouraged at every opportunity. There are hotlines, books, counselors, pamphlets at the hospital and workshops on base. In fact, Id be willing to bet that a military spouse has more chance at getting help with her mental illness than a civilian does. But the military can only do so much. It is, after all, an institution built to protect the country, not to raise families. Why wasnt Susan Smiths or Andrea Yates husbands occu pations blamed for their chil drens death? Did their employers do enough? Did fellow co-workers check on them enough? Was it their obliga tion? Oh, but what about the long and recurring deployments, critics say. Dont those con tribute to the stress on military families? Yes, they do. But its impor tant to remember that thou sands of service members are deployed at any given time. Not all not even a majority of their spouses harm their children. And, of course, just because a husband is physically present doesnt mean that he is involved and supportive. If that were the case, why didnt Yatess or Smiths husbands stop their wives? There are alot of people ready to point fingers in this case, many people who want to blame Klaphekes husbands deployment. But the criminal here is the mother. She alone neglected her children and killed her 2-year old. Lets put her on trial for this murder. Not the mili tary. Military wife, not military, responsible for childs death

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Cmdr. Amy Bauernschmidt passed command of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 70 to Cmdr. Christopher Herr Sept. 20 in a cer emony at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117. Capt. Daniel Dwyer, commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 presented Bauernschmidt the Meritorious Service Medal. Bauernschmidt led the Spartans through their inaugural deployment, which was also the first deployment of an east coast MH-60R Seahawk squad ron. Under her command, HSM-70 flew more than 5,200 hours in support of Operations New Dawn and Enduring Freedom with CSG-2 for the inaugural deployment of USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). HSM-70 embarked six heli copters on three detachments, as well as five helicopters on board Bush. Under Bauernschmidts leadership, HSM-70 participated in numerous mul tinational exercises and 10 straits tran sits. Over all, the deployment resulted in more than 13,000 flight hours, 2,200 sorties, 14 aircraft commanders, and an exemplary 34 percent advancement rate. Through her leadership, the Spartans garnered several major awards, includ ing: COMNAVAIRLANT Capt. Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy; 2011 Admiral Thach Award; 2010 Bloodhound Award; CVW-8 Golden Wrench Award for the Third Line Period; CVW-8 Top Spot Award; and 2011 Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic Talon Award. A native of Milwaukee, Wis., Bauernschmidt graduated from the United States Naval Academy, in 1994, and became a naval aviator three years later. After completing training at Fleet Replacement Squadron HSL-41, she flew in two deployments with HSL-45 from San Diego. Bauernschmidt went on to instruct new helicopter pilots at HSL-41, before being assigned as Aide-de-camp to commander, Carrier Strike Group 7 for two different admirals. She returned to the fleet for two deployments with HSL-51 as Det. Three Officer-in-Charge, and operations department head. In Oct. 2007, she reported to Joint Staff/J6 to serve as action officer and executive assistant to the director. On June 11, 2011, Bauernschmidt became the third commanding officer of HSM-70. She has earned numerous personal awards including Defense Meritorious Service Medal Meritorious Service Medal, Navy/Marine Corps Commendation Medal (three awards), Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and various unit, campaign and service medals. Bauernschmidt will attend the Naval War College in Newport, R.I. Herr, the Spartans new commanding officer, is a native of Marthas Vineyard, Mass. and a 1995 graduate of Boston College. He earned his naval aviator wings in November 1997. Flying the UH-3H, he went on to serve at HSL-51 for three deployments. After transitioning to the SH-60B Seahawk, Herr joined HSL-43 and deployed for Operation Iraqi Freedom. Following a tour as a flag aide and studying at the Naval War College, he returned to HSL-43 as Det. Two officerin-charge and later maintenance officer. After completing a tour with the Joint Staff/J-3, Herr reported as HSM-70 executive officer in June 2011. Calling all flags: Cancer storiesWith Calling All Flags, Naval Hospital Jacksonville invites patients to promote healing by sharing stories about how cancer has touched their life or someone close to them. Patients can submit a flag of their own creation on this theme through Oct. 15. Everyone can vote on their favorite flag at the hospitals rotunda (next to Pharmacy), where all flags will be on display from Oct. 17 through Veterans Day. The display invites patients and visitors to reflect on the role of health and illness in everyones lives. Flags (size 5-by-8 to 8-by-10 inches), along with a display mechanism (such as a hanger and either tabs or a sleeve) can be submitted to Breast Care Coordinator Nikki Levinson-Lustgarten (542-7857) by Oct. 15. Herr relieves Bauernschmidt at HSM-70 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Rear Adm. Matthew Carter, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force 5th and 7th Fleet, visited VP-5 Sept. 5-8, at Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. Carter conducted all-hands quarters in the CTG 72.2 hangar with VP-5, VP-8, VP-26, VP-62 and VQ-1 personnel. Following quarters, he spent the day interacting with members of the task group, toured spaces and observed the daily routine of the deployed maritime patrol and reconnaissance force personnel. As Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force 7th/5th Fleet, and Commander, Task Forces 57 and 72, Carter provides administrative oversight, plan ning, coordination, and control of forward deployed Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Forces (MPRF). Several members of the squadron received personal command coins from the admiral. AWV2 Amanda Johnson received a coin for her continuing role as the squadrons subject matter expert for the C4I for antisubmarine warfare communication system. It was a humbling experience to know that my efforts are noticed at such high levels, said Johnson. This taught me to continue to put my best foot for ward in all I do. MCSN Douglas Wojciechowski also received one of the admirals coins for his involvement during the visit. It was an amazing opportunity to participate in the visit, said Wojciechowski, VP-5s newly arrived mass communications specialist. I was glad to be able to document his time here with the squadron. The Mad Foxes were grateful for the honor of hosting Carter. The visit was an exciting opportunity for all those who interacted with the admiral and a positive morale boost to the MPRF task group. Navy Band Alumni invited to performNavy Band Southeast is inviting all Navy Band Alumni to perform at the Alumni Concert at Jacksonville Beach Band Shell Oct. 20 at 12:30 p.m., in conjunction with the 2012 Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular. A rehearsal will take place at Navy Band Southeasts facility aboard NAS Jax on the evening of Oct.19. Anyone interested should contact Navy Band Southeasts Public Affairs Officer MU2 Scott Farquhar at scott.farquhar@navy.mil by Oct. 10. Carter visits VP-5 on deployment JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 The early afternoon rain didnt deter more than 3,300 country music fans who turned out on Sept. 21 for the NAS Jax All-Hands Fall Concert, head lined by country music artist Chris Cagle. The event was presented by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department. The music kicked off at 6:30 p.m. with a set by country performer Evan Wright who played a mix of blues, southern rock and country under tones, including his top hit Small Town Anthem. I absolutely love being here and supporting the troops. I am so grateful for what our military does every day and blessed that I get to play for them, said Wright, after his performance. And to all those Sailors deployed I love you and wish you could have been here tonight. Come home safely! Also performing was Singer/ Songwriter/Actress Jana Kramer, whos had success with three songs that were featured on the CWs One Tree Hill, where she plays actress Alex Dupre. The singer-songwriter is lighting up country music with her emotionally moving songs and sweet vocals already selling nearly 200,000 digital singles in less than six months. Kramer wowed the crowd with her moving songs, Why ya Wanna, What I Love About Your Love, and Whiskey. I think this is great event and its awesome how our MWR here supports the troops. I am really enjoying the show and the music, especially Jana Kramer shes really great, said MA2(EXW) Keith Danalewich of the NAS Jax Security Department. After her show, Kramer said, I had a blast performing here tonight. This is our very first show on a military installa tion and we cant wait to come back. As the sky darkened, Cagle took to the stage to perform his No. 1 hit, I Breathe In, I Breathe Out. Cagles music career began with his first album, Play It Loud in 2000 that turned gold in 2002. The following year, Cagles second album, Chris Cagle was released featuring What a Beautiful Day and Chicks Dig It. After a brief medical hia tus, Cagle released Anywhere but Here in 2005. His fourth album, My Lifes a Country Song, was released in early 2008. Two years later, he signed with Bigger Picture Music Group, releasing his new single Got My Country On and new album Back in the Saddle in 2012. The familiar music had many Sailors and their families sing ing along and dancing to the bands perfor mance. This is a real ly fun and Im so grateful MWR is supporting our troops. Im a huge country fan. Some of us work really hard to get through each pay peri od so its nice to enjoy a free concert, said Pamela Diaz, who attended the event with her family. Cagle said he was thrilled to perform for the troops and had a message to those who are deployed in harms way. Your morale might get low and you might not realize how much you mean to us, but thank you so much. Freedom is a warm blanket provided by a special group of men and women who have the guts to stand up and protect our nation and we really appreciate what you do, he stated. MWR Liberty Director and Concert Coordinator Tom Kubalewski said, Weve been working on this event for the past two months, coordinat ing all the details to make it happen. It took quite a bit of planning and lots of behind the scenes volunteers helping out, said Kubalewski. It turned out to be a great show for our Sailors and families. Our MWR team loves developing projects that add to the quality of life for Sailors at NAS Jacksonville. The fall concert was part of the Navys fleet-wide MWR program for Sailors, Department of Defense civil ians, retirees and their families to bring out their chairs and blankets and enjoy live music in a safe, family friendly envi ronment. NAS Jax MWR thanks spon sors USA Discounters, WQIK 99.1, Country Legends 100.7 and Gator Country 99.9 for their support on this event.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. COUNTRY MUSI C FANS ENJOY FALL C ON C ERT

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 7 PHOTOS BY KAYLEE LAROC QUE AND MORGAN KEHNERT

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Energy awareness activities announcedOctober is Energy Awareness Month, a national effort to underscore how important energy is to our national prosperity, security and environmental well-being. In commemoration of Energy Awareness Month, NAS Jacksonville is kicking off a month of energy saving events and activities. NAS Jacksonville Energy Manager Joshua Bass will be highlighting products and projects that can help you position your household for a more sustainable future. Bass will contribute weekly energy tips articles to Jax Air News, including: tips; computer. Meet Bass in person, Oct. 12 13 at the NEX Food Court. Check out his display of energy efficient products, including a solar-powered GEM low speed vehicle. A delegation of two officers and 15 officer candidates from Japanese Military Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) VP-5 visited the U.S. Navys VP-5 Mad Foxes at the Commander, Task Group 72.2 hangar on Sept. 3 aboard Kadena Air Base, Japan. The goal was to further devel op the relationship between the JMSDF and U.S. Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force squadrons. The visit consisted of a series of briefings about the history of the squadron, the capabilities of the P-3C Orion aircraft and the upcoming transition to the P-8A Poseidon aircraft follow ing deployment. Following the briefings, the JMSDF received a tour of a P-3C Orion aircraft. It was an absolute pleasure to interact with the Japanese officer candi dates, said Lt. Denis Alford, a VP-5 pilot who participated in the event. After both the briefings and tour were complete, Mad Fox naval aviators and naval flight officers met the JMSDF candi dates in their wardroom for the opportunity to interact and discuss experiences in each oth ers naval service. During this time, the visit ing candidates graciously pre sented their hosts with gifts and were provided with gifts in return. It was amazing how polite and attentive all the candidates were during the tour, said Lt. Timothy Clemens, the NFO in charge of the P-3C on display for the visitors. I really look forward to future events with JMSDF VP-5. The candidates bid the VP-5 wardroom farewell with the promise of a joint-command sports and social day to come, an event greatly anticipated by both squadrons. The Mad Foxes of VP-5 are on a scheduled deployment to the 7th Fleet area of responsibil ity, conducting maritime patrol operations. The squadron was grateful for the opportunity to interact with the JMSDF and looks forward to participating in future events. The flu season creeps up on us just as the kids get back to school. Seasonal epidemics of influenza occur every year in the United States, beginning in the fall. Typically epidemics cause thou sands to tens of thousands of deaths and about 200,000 hospitalizations. Since the 1940s a vaccine has been available to prevent influenza unfortunate ly, even with the recent H1N1 novel flu epidemic many patients dont take the time to get the vaccine. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recom mends that everyone age six months of age and older receive the influenza vaccine. This recommendation has the potential to save thousands of lives. Here are a few of the more common questions Ive heard about the flu this year. Q: What is the flu, anyway? Influenza (flu) is a virus that infects the nose, throat, windpipe and lungs. It is highly contagious, spread from per son to person by coughing, sneezing or talking close to another person. Shaking hands is also a common way to transmit the virus. Influenza epidemics occur usually between October and April every year. Q: What are the symptoms of the flu? Typical flu symptoms include fever, chills, muscle aches, congestion, cough, runny nose and difficulty breathing. Other viruses can cause symptoms similar to influenza, but influenza is more likely to cause severe infections leading to pneumonia, especially in the elderly and the immunocompromised. H1N1 flu causes severe infections in younger patients, especially in young pregnant women and children. Because influenza is a virus, it cant be successfully treated with antibiotics. Q: If I got last years vaccine, why do I need to get another vaccine this year? The vaccine this year is different from last years vaccine. The vaccine this year contains protection against the H1N1 strain as well two other novel types of influenza virus. There are two different kinds of flu vaccine. One type can be given to healthy patients between age two and 49 its flu mist, an intranasal vaccine that can be squirted into your nose. The flu mist actually works even better than the shot for children. The injectable vaccine (flu shot) is given to pregnant moms, diabetic patients, asthmatics and anyone with any chronic medical condition such as emphysema. Smokers are at especially high risk for influenza and should be in line just behind pregnant moms and diabetic patients for their vaccines. Q: Is the vaccine really safe can pregnant moms and small children feel safe getting the shot this year? Yes! The shot is safe for pregnant women at any time during pregnancy. Since babies are not able to get shots until age 6 months, moms shot is babys best protection. Breastfeeding also helps protect baby protective flu antibodies appear in moms milk about two weeks after her immunization. The flu shot can cause some redness and pain at the injection site, mus cle ache, and a low grade fever but because the virus is completely inactivated it cannot possibly cause influ enza. The flu mist can cause mild con gestion and a runny nose, but it can not grow in the lungs and cannot cause pneumonia. The flu vaccine ranks 6th of the top VP-5 briefs VP-5 Welcome to flu season 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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30 preventive medicine actions a doctor can take for their patients. I encour age patients to ask their doctor questions about vaccines and consult reputable medical websites, such as the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu/ I encourage patients to get a flu vac cine by walking-in at Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Immunizations Clinic. Flu shot walk-in hours are weekdays 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (except Thursdays, which is 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.). For infor mation, call Immunizations at 542-7810. Fire Prevention Week commemorates the Great Chicago Fire when a twoday blaze killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless and destroyed more than 17,000 buildings Oct. 8-9, 1871. That tragedy inspired reform across America, spurring new fire safety codes and public awareness campaigns. In October, the National Fire Protection Association highlights the importance of fire safety education. This years theme, Have 2 Ways Out, focuses on establishing several evacuation routes for your family members if a fire should occur in the home. The following is the NAS Jax Fire Prevention Week schedule of events: Oct. 7 13, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Daily open house at base fire stations. Oct. 9-12 Unannounced fire evacu ation drills. Oct. 9, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Fire Prevention table display with fire safety materials, red fire hats, fire apparatus, Pluggie the talking fire hydrant at the Navy Exchange Courtyard. Oct. 9, 4 p.m. Fire inspectors, Pluggie the talking fire hydrant and fire apparatus at the NAS Jax Youth Center, Building 2069. Oct. 10, 10-11 a.m. Fire inspectors and Pluggie the talking fire hydrant visit the Childrens Ward and Pediatrics Clinic at the Naval Hospital, Building H2080. Oct. 11, 9:30 a.m. Fire Inspectors and Pluggie the talking fire hydrant at the Child Development Center, Building 2070. NAS Jax to recognize Fire Prevention Week DR. JOE JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 9

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training facilities available for pilots and aircrewmen of other nations for both fixed-wing and rotary wing aircraft. Accompanying the attaches were: Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence Rear Adm. Matthew Kohler; Capt. John Coles, direc tor, U.S. Navy Foreign Liaison Office; and Debra Gustowski, deputy director, U.S. Navy Foreign Liaison Office. Coles said, My team coordi nates these visits on behalf of the chief of naval operations (CNO) for all military attaches posted to the United States. This is part of the CNOs program to build trust among naval allies and to share information that strengthens interoperability. So far on this tour, every command we visited has been top notch as far as enthusiastically wel coming us and advancing our knowledge of their operations. Military attach Capt. Renzo Rospigliosi, a surface gunnery officer of the Peruvian Navy, said, I was impressed with the preparation and training of aircraft pilots here at NAS Jacksonville in addition to training the maintainers of the equipment and systems. The Wing 11 commodore has many tasks that he is balancing with the arrival of the new P-8. Rospigliosi also noted Perus participation in the annual UNITAS exercise, a multilater al naval operation designed to build lasting partnerships and naval coalitions throughout Central and South America. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders said it was his pleasure to host Adm. Kohler, along with so many influential military attaches representing allies from around the world. Today, as the U.S. seeks to respond to requirements for military force in concert with other countries, its impor tant for high-ranking attaches to understand the U.S. Navys role in how it operates with key allies, said Sanders. The dimensions of pursu ing effective interoperability with allied navies can only be enhanced through informative attach tours such as this. ATTACHSAfter lunch, Sanders intro duced Branch who said he was honored to recognized ombudsmen for their contribu tions to military families. You do incredible work and I know that what you do day in and out is not always easy but I cant imagine how differently our commands would operate if we didnt have you as a part of the team. And, the fact that you are all volunteers is a testament to the idea of service above self. Every one of you joined the team because you want to make a difference and you truly have, said Branch. You are a source of needed information, sage advice and counsel for our Sailors fami lies. You are that indispensable link between the command and family members. From that 3 a.m. phone call, to the frantic emails, to the questions on the Fleet Readiness Group Website and command Facebook page it is a very different world. And you handle that challeng ing environment with a level of grace under pressure that is simply amazing, Branch told the ombudsmen. The admiral also discussed suicide and sexual assault pre vention. Weve come to realize that our ombudsmen might have the first indication that a deployed Sailor has a problem through their connection with the families. We really need to build on that it is such an important channel and it may be a life saver, said Branch. Sexual assault is a tough problem that is affecting all the Defense Department services. It is corrosive to the force, it degrades our readiness and it is a crime that we will not tolerate. We have seen that an assault can happen on the homefront when Sailors deploy, and in these cases, our ombudsman again become a key resource for the command. Were going to continue to rely on all of you as we tackle this problem. Branch concluded, You have set a high standard and for that you have my sincere apprecia tion. In an era of long deploy ments, stressful schedules and complex issues, the ombuds mans role has never been more necessary. The event concluded as each ombudsman was presented a certificate of appreciation by Branch and a goodie bags courtesy of Navy Wives Club of America Jacksonville No. 86 and the Navy Exchange. The Navy Family Ombudsman Program was created in 1970 by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo Zumwalt as a way to commu nicate between commands and the families of Sailors who served in them. Ombudsmen are appointed by commanding officers and trained to disseminate Navy information, help resolve fam ily issues and provide resource referrals. Ombudsmen are our shining stars and support military families especially during deploy ments. They provide a wealth of resources to help families thrive while their service members are called our to serve our nation, stated NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center Ombudsman Coordinator Wilhelmina Nash who orga nized the event. OMBUDSMEN 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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More than a dozen Department of Defense (DoD) active duty and civilian person nel recently attended the Pest Management Certification Course at the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) aboard NAS Jacksonville. This four-week course is targeted at individuals who need DoD pesticide applica tor certification, explained NECE Training Department Head Dr. Andrew Beck. Were sanctioned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to certify and license pesticide applica tors across the spectrum of DoD installations. The course is taught twice each year, in March and September. The primary goal of the cer tification program is educating applicators to safely and effec tively deploy restricted-use pesticides. The course consists of three phases: the first is required of all participants; the second and third phases focus on the dif ferent application categories that EPA recognizes for pest control workers. So someone who is licensed to control mosquitoes by operating a spray truck may not necessarily be licensed to per form aerial spraying, or apply weed-control chemicals on your yard, said Beck. This week, were teaching the plant pests and vegetation management phase, which is targeted primarily at golf course maintenance person nel. One of the challenges of controlling weeds is that her bicides that kill weeds can also kill desirable plants. To build awareness for protecting natural resources from pesti cides, we bring in guest speakers from the NAS Jacksonville Environmental Department. Todays speaker was Natural Resources Manager Christine Bauer, who discussed how to integrate toxicity information with exposure data to deter mine the ecological risk from the use of a pesticide, and whether it is safe for the envi ronment and wildlife, said Beck. No matter what the topic, NECE instructors work to instill the overall pest control philosophy of DoD safety, efficacy and environmental soundness, added Beck. In addition to her class room lesson, Bauer also invited NECE participants to visit the stations Black Point Interpretive Center, where conservation education is provided free to schools and community groups. Our center features live exhibits of native fish and rep tiles, as well as preserved specimens of birds, mammals and reptiles, said Bauer. In addi tion to the traditional indoor exhibits and learning area, Black Point also has two nature trails to facilitate a hands on approach to learning about the environment and local habi tats. NECE Jacksonville is an echelon five command under the Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center, Portsmouth, Va. Since its inception in 1949, NECE has helped ensure the readiness of U.S. military forces by providing technical ser vices and expert training in reducing the risk of diseases transmitted by insects and other arthropods. The command supports the Global War on Terror by sup plying medical entomolo gists and preventive medicine technicians for Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. NECE also provides direct support to the fleet by conducting shipboard and shore sta tion technical assistance visits in support of those commands disease vector and pest man agement programs. Beginning in October, the Judge Advocate Generals Corps will reorganize the Naval Legal Service Command (NLSC) to meet the Navys evolving demands for expeditionary legal services support, while continuing to provide quality mili tary justice services. The demand for Navy JAG Corps ser vices is greater than ever, but the nature of our practice has changed signifi cantly over the past several years, said Vice Adm. Nanette DeRenzi, the Judge Advocate General of the Navy. The Department of the Navy and joint forces operate in an increasingly complex legal and policy environment and expect more from our community than ever before. To prepare the JAG Corps to meet the challenges that lie ahead, they are replacing the Naval Legal Service Offices (NLSOs) with Defense Service Offices (DSOs). There are currently eight NLSOs head quartered in: Pensacola, Fla.; Norfolk, Va.; Bremerton, Wash.; Jacksonville, Fla.; San Diego; Washington, D.C.; Naples, Italy and Yokosuka, Japan. These NLSOs will realign to become four DSOs that will be headquartered in San Diego, Washington, D.C., Norfolk, and Yokosuka. The DSOs mission will be to defend service mem bers in military justice proceedings, rep resent them at administrative boards, and provide other representational services, including advice on non-judicial punish ment and adverse personnel actions. NLSOs will transfer the mission of pro viding legal assistance services to the nine Region Legal Service Offices (RLSOs). Legal assistance services include wills and powers of attorney, and matters involving consumer, family, landlord-tenant, and predatory lending law. Sailors and their families will contin ue to receive legal assistance, but those services will now be provided by the RLSOs said Rear Adm. James Crawford, Commander, Naval Legal Service Command. On most bases, the location where legal assistance services are provided will remain the same. This realignment will change the way Sailors receive defense services in 12 locations around the fleet. This change will be similar to the way Sailors currently receive personal defense services when they are at sea. Sailors requesting defense services such as representation for courts-martial or Certifying DoD pesticide applicators Naval Legal Service Command adapts to better serve Navy, clients JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 11

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administrative boards will make initial contact with an attorney by telephone or other remote communica tion technology, with subsequent in-person consultation arranged, if necessary. These locations are Everett, Whidbey Island, Port Hueneme, Lemoore, Corpus Christi, New Orleans, Millington, Kings Bay, Guantanamo Bay, Newport, Earle, and Sigonella. Navy commands will retain their current staff judge advocate support. RLSOs will continue to provide courtmartial prosecution and command legal advice to Navy region and installation commanders, and tenant com mands such as ships and squadrons. As part of the realignment, the JAG Corps will focus the first two years of all new judge advocates careers on comprehensive training in prosecuting and defending cases, providing legal assistance, and advising Navy commands. This realignment will improve the JAG Corps training for new accession judge advocates by more thoroughly preparing them to meet the Navys legal needs, said Vice Adm. DeRenzi. For a complete list of services and contact information for the closest legal office, visit www.jag.navy.mil. NLSC The VP-8 Fighting Tigers took time out of their busy schedules volunteering to help the Misawa community by par ticipating in the 2012 Misawa Special Olympics, Sept. 15. Thirteen squadron members vol unteered to help with different tasks including serving food, organizing activities, escorting Special Olympians and tearing down equipment. Its been a great experience to be able to work and meet such wonderful people, said AOAA Samatha Taylor. Ive worked with individuals with special needs before and it is always a blast, Id love to do it again. More than 60 athletes from three different schools in the local community participated in the 23rd annual event held at Misawa Air Base. Sailors from VP-8 teamed up in pairs to escort a Special Olympi-an through various events, ensuring each athlete had a special day that they will remember for years to come. Events included basketball, tee ball, football throwing, running sprints and face painting. Additionally, participants and volunteers were treated to burgers and hot dogs for lunch, and a Taiko Drum demonstration for entertainment. The kids got to run around, throw basketballs, hit baseballs, throw foot balls and get their faces painted, its been a really awesome time, said ATAN Allison Arroyo. Just seeing them walking around with smiles on their faces, you knew today was a chance for them to get to have some fun. I think they really enjoyed themselves today, this has been a really good day and Im glad I was able to be a part of the event. The mission of Special Olympics is to provide year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of Olympic-type sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities, giving them continuing opportunities to develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage, experience joy and participate in a sharing of gifts, skills and friend ship with their families, other Special Olympics athletes and the community. The NAS Jacksonville-based Fighting Tigers are on a scheduled six-month deployment in support of U.S. 7th Fleet. VP-8 participates in Misawa Special Olympics 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Sept. 24 that the first Armstrong-class Auxiliary General Oceanographic Research (AGOR) ship will be named Neil Armstrong. Mabus named the future R/V Neil Armstrong (AGOR 27) to honor the memory of Neil Armstrong, best known for being the first man to walk on the moon. Armstrong was an aeronautics pioneer and explorer for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) serving as an engineer, test pilot, astronaut and administra tor.Armstrong also served as a naval aviator flying nearly 80 combat mis sions during the Korean War. Neil Armstrong rightly belongs to the ages as the man who first walked on the moon. While he was a true pioneer of space exploration and science, he was also a combat-proven naval aviator, said Mabus. Naming this class of ships and this vessel after Neil Armstrong honors the memory of an extraordinary individual, but more importantly, it reminds us all to embrace the chal lenges of exploration and to never stop discovering. Armstrongs widow, Carol, will serve as the ships sponsor. The Armstrong-class AGOR ship will be a modern oceanographic research platform equipped with acoustic equipment capable of mapping the deepest parts of the oceans, and modular onboard laboratories that will provide the flexibility to meet a wide variety of oceanographic research challenges. Research vessel to be named in honor of Neil Armstrong JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 13

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The VP-45 Pelicans held a retire ment ceremony to honor the career of AWO1(NAC/AW) David Honchen, Sept. 7. Many family members, friends, and distinguished guests gathered at the NAS Jacksonville Chapel to honor Honchen and his family. Guest Speaker, AWCS Tom George, also of VP-45, gave a fitting tribute to the aircrewman who tirelessly stood the watch over his decorated 20 years of service. Other speakers included VP-45 Commanding Officer Mike Vitali, AWV1 Calvin Franklin, who read Old Glory, and AWO2 Timothy Meads, who officially relieved Honchen from watch. Honchen, a native of Iselin, N.J., enlisted into the U.S. Navy in 1992. After completion of Basic Training and Aviation Apprenticeship, Honchen reported to his first command, HSL42 at NS Mayport. There he qualified as plane captain on the Navy SH-60B Seahawk helicopter. In 1997, he reported to Naval Air Maintenance Training Group Mayport for interim training on the SH-60B receiving the Airframe Navy Enlisted Classification. Honchen then trans ferred to HSL-40 where he qualified as a work center supervisor, collateral duty inspector for W/C 310, and completed his enlisted aviation warfare specialist qualification. In 2000, Honchen reported to Naval Air Crew Candidate School in Pensacola, Fla. He then reported to the VP-8 Fighting Tigers in Brunswick, Maine. There he qualified as a SS-3 operator, a fleet instructor, and was selected as VP-8 SS-3 Operator of the Year. In 2007, he reported to Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven at NAS Jacksonville as an ACTC Level 5 weapons training instructor. In 2010, Honchen deployed to Iraq as an Individual Augmentee working as a liaison with the U.S. Army. He reported to VP-45 in late 2012. U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a member of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of special rec ognition in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. The registra tion deadline is Oct. 5. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in territo rial waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve recognition and thanks for putting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans dur ing my annual Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the highlights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are strongly encouraged to contact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 598-0481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www.crenshaw.house. gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and documentation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the certificate, veterans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214. Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program. The Navy is seeking applications from highly qualified Sailors in pay grades E-6 through E-9 for the Fiscal Year 2014 Active Duty Limited Duty Officer (LDO) and Chief Warrant Officer (CWO) programs, officials said Sept. 20. LDOs and CWOs bring a variety of technical expertise and a seasoned perspective into the wardroom from their enlisted service, said Lt. Shane Walker, assistant LDO/CWO community manager, Bureau of Naval Personnel and an LDO. These programs deliver to the officer corps sea soned technical professionals with proven leadership abilities. LDOs and CWOs are composed of Sailors from the enlisted ranks who serve in 56 different officer technical fields. These programs serve as a path to commissioning for qualified Sailors, but more importantly the LDO and CWO communities support the warfighting capability and readiness of naval forces through leadership, technical proficiency, and experience, according to Walker. They are the primary manpower source for tech nically specific billets not best suited for traditional unrestricted line, restricted line or staff corps career path officers, said Walker. Using critical enlisted experience, they are com mitted to the continuous leadership, improvement, training and mentoring of Sailors. The LDO and CWO communities have designa tors in the surface, submarine, aviation, information dominance, expeditionary, and general series as well as staff corps communities and serve in a variety of leadership billets within their technical fields, ranging from division officer to commanding officer ashore. Eligibility requirements for LDO include US citizenship, serving in pay grade E-7 through E-9 or an E-6 who has passed the exam for E-7 and been determined board eligible. Active-duty applicants for LDO must have at least eight, but not more than 15 years of active-duty ser vice. Eligibility requirements for CWO include U.S. citi zenship, serving in pay grade E-7 through E-9. Activeduty applicants for CWO must have at least 13, but not more than 22 years of active-duty service. These programs do not require applicants to have a college degree. Applications must be postmarked no later than Nov. 1, 2012. The in-service procure ment board is scheduled to convene Jan. 7, 2013. NAVADMINs 285/12 contains additional application criteria and guidance. Nuclear qualified candidates must also refer to NAVADMINs 099/12 and 238/12. Eligible Sailors should apply for the designator for which they are most qualified, regardless of their current rating. Upon commissioning, Sailors selected for LDO/ CWO will attend the four-week Officer Development School in Newport, R.I. Honchen retires after 20 years of honorable service LDO/CWO Programs provide commissioning opportunities for enlisted Sailors Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony Nov. 8 Beginner Rider Course Experienced Rider Course Military Sportbike Rider CourseCall for class datesNAS Jax Safety Office 542-2584 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Deweys Coming Soon! Ribbon cutting and grand opening celebration Oct. 4, 3 9 p.m. Free food sampling, DJ, live band Cloud Nine, games, prizes, childrens activities and much more!Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Fall Bowling Leagues now forming! Mixed league Monday 7 p.m. After-work league Wednesday 4:30 p.m.Seniors league Thursday 9 a.m. Mixed league Thursday 6:30 p.m.Intramural (Captains Cup) league Friday 11:45 a.m. Friday night league 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Saturday 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Open Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. until October 1. Free for military and DOD civilians, $3 for guestsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Entertainment Books $30 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam February 23, 2013 Preferred seating $41, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! 201213 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Upcoming ITT Trips: Mt. Dora Oct. 27 Lakeridge Winery Nov. 10 New Armed Forces Disney Salute: $153.25 for 4-day ticket with hopper option $153.25 for 4-day ticket with water park fun & more $180.75 for 4-day ticket with both park hopper and water park fun &more Universal Studios Special 2 day 1 park each day w/ 3rd day free $101.75 2 day park to park w/ 3rd day free $120.50 Tickets valid through Dec. 14, 2012 Universal Studios Halloween Horror Nights $41.25 $71 Order Gator Bowl tickets now $35 Fl Classic $37.50 & $52.50 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Kennedy Space Center Trip Sept. 30 9 a.m. Mall & Movie Trip Oct. 5 at 6 p.m. Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater Jaguars vs. Bears Oct. 7 at 2 p.m. Free admission and transportation NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Oct. 9 & 23 for active duty Oct. 11 & 25 for retirees & DoD personnel Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! CFC Golf Tournament Oct. 25, 12:30 p.m. shotgun start $60 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove Marina Mulberry Cove Marina Riverfest Sept. 29, 11 a.m. 5 p.m. Free cookout, music, games & prizes, fishing clinics, Stand-up paddle board lessons and more!Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Oct. 29 Dec. 10 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 On Sept. 29, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) and Naval Hospital Jacksonville/ Branch Health Clinic Mayport provide the public another opportu nity to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused and unwanted prescrip tion drugs. Bring medications for disposal to the Target Superstore, next door to NAS Jacksonville on Roosevelt Blvd., or to the Navy Exchange main entrance at Naval Station Mayport. The service is free and anonymous, with no questions asked. Last April, Americans turned in 552,161 pounds 276 tons of pre scription drugs at more than 5,600 sites operated by the DEA and nearly 4,300 state and local law enforcement partners. This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that lan guish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdos es due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused pre scription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicines flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash both pose potential safety and health hazards. Law enforcement agencies like NCIS and the DEA will continue to hold prescription drug takeback events every few months. Additional local area collection sites and information can be found by visiting www.dea.gov, and clicking on the link Got Drugs? Navy personnel assigned to Navy Munitions Command Conus East Division Detachment Jacksonville (NMC CED Det Jax) conducted an aviation weapons safety exercise on Sept. 20 that simulated a fuel spill while defueling a MK-46 torpedo. The exercise, which took place at the Advanced Undersea Weapons Torpedo Shop, was designed to test Gunners mates (GMs) safety skills and response time to a hazardous and potentially life threatening situation. Our first priority is safety of our personnel, commented GM1 Lamarcus Hopson with NMC CED Det Jax. All our sailors are evacuated to the outside parking lot, considered the safe zone, while we wait for the Fire Department to evaluate the status of our building and potentially contami nated personnel. The drill itself consisted of GM2 Anthony Trontl of NMC CED Det Jax exposed to simulated torpedo fuel on the ground and on his person, working to contain the spill, then being assisted by two other Sailors in a decontamina tion process. After the initial threat is contained and all personnel are evacuated, mem bers of the NAS Jax Fire Department enter the scene to assess the spill and any potential hazards it may cause, while evaluating the level of contamina tion that may have spread beyond the building to other sailors. Once the threat level has been assessed, and depending on the size of the spill, a HAZMAT team from a base contractor called Fluor will begin cleanup of the hazardous material, said Jim Butters, NAS Jacksonville training offi cer. NMC CED Det Jax conducts this type of training quarterly, presenting differ ent scenarios to the sailors each time, including simulated drills that might involve an injured sailor or dropped weapon. Overall today was a good and safe drill, but as with anything in the Navy, communication can always be improved, Butters commented. Torpedo shop conducts spill drill Safely dispose of unwanted prescription drugs Sept. 29

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This year marks the high est number of West Nile Virus (WNV) cases in the United States since the disease was first discovered in New York City during the summer of 1999. As of Sept. 11, 2012, there have been 2,636 reported cases with 118 deaths attrib uted to WNV nationally. The highest number of cases occurred in Texas (1,057) with Louisiana (147), Michigan (136), Mississippi (142), Oklahoma (129) and South Dakota (144) rounding out the top 6. Locally, the number of cases has been significantly fewer. In Florida there have been 34 cases statewide, 22 of which were in Duval County. In response, the Duval County Health Department issued a mosquito-borne illness alert ( http://www.dchd.net/compo nent/content/article/5-flashnews/103-mosquito-borne-ill ness-awareness-in-duval-coun ty ). To date WNV has not been reported from Clay, Nassau, or St. Johns counties this year. Symptoms of WNV usually occur three to 14 days after being bitten by an infected mosquito. Most symptoms are mild and flu-like in nature. However, severe infections can occur with signs and symp toms of high fever, headache, stiff neck and disorientation, and severe infections can result in death. The individuals who are at greatest risk of acquiring WNV are those over 50 years old and those with already compromised immune sys tems. The best way to prevent WNV is by protecting yourself and family from mosquito bites. Individuals who plan on spending time outdoors, espe cially from dusk to late eve ning, should wear insect repel lent containing 20-35 percent DEET or 20 percent Picaridin. Additionally, wearing per methrin-impregnated cloth ing provides an extra layer of protection, said Cmdr. Peter Obenauer, assistant officer in charge, Navy Entomology Center of Excellence. Long sleeve shirts and pants will also provide added protec tion from mosquito bites. Mosquitoes use stand ing water to lay their eggs. Containers in the yard that hold water, like flower pots and bird baths, should be emptied of water or removed to eliminate potential mosquito breeding sites. Maintaining your landscap ing by consistently mowing grass and trimming surround ing vegetation will make your yard less attractive to adult mosquitoes. Also ensure all window screens are in good working order to prevent mos quito entry into your home. Contact your local mosquito control district if there are an abundance of mosquitoes on your property. Jacksonville Mosquito Control (Duval County) http:// www.coj.net/departments/ neighborhoods/mosquito-con trol.aspx Clay County Mosquito Control Division http://www. claycountygov.com/news/2012news/clay-county-emergencymanagement-notification-ofaerial-spraying Amelia Island Mosquito Control District (Nassau County) http://www.ameliais landmosquitocontrol.org/ Anastasia Mosquito Control District (St. Johns County) http://www.amcdsjc.org/ Additional information about WNV can be found at the Duval County Health Department, the Florida Department of Health ( http://doh.state.fl.us/ Environment/medicine/arbo viral/index.html ) and the Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov/features/ StopMosquitoes/). U.S. experiencing the worst West Nile Virus year on record For more information, contact Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 17

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USS Enterprise to inactivate after 51 years of service After 51 years of distinguished ser vice, the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) will inactivate on Dec. 1, in a ceremony to be held at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. The inactivation ceremony will be the last official public event for the ship, and will serve as a celebration of life for the ship and the more than 100,000 Sailors who have served aboard. Details of the ceremony are still being final ized, however, numerous dignitaries and thousands of veterans of the ship are expected to attend the event. Commissioned on Nov. 25, 1961, the eighth ship to bear the illustrious name Enterprise, the Big E was the worlds first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. A veteran of 25 deployments to the Mediterranean Sea, Pacific Ocean and the Middle East, Enterprise has served in nearly every major conflict to take place during her history. From the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 to six deployments in support of the Vietnam conflict through the Cold War and the Gulf Wars, Enterprise was there. On Sept. 11, 2001, Enterprise aborted her transit home from a long deploy ment after the terrorist attacks, and steamed overnight to the North Arabian Sea. Big E once again took her place in history when she launched the first strikes in direct support of Operation Enduring Freedom. All Enterprise veterans, their fami lies, shipyard workers, and friends of Enterprise are invited to register to attend the inactivation week events and the ceremony on the ships website, www.enterprise.navy.mil. Tickets to the events will be on a first available basis. 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Defense Department civilians need to understand and recognize the warning signs for suicide just as their mili tary counterparts are being trained to do, the acting director of the Defense Suicide Prevention Office said today. We want to make sure our civilians are as comfortable talking to our mili tary members as their military lead ers are, Jacqueline Garrick, a licensed clinical social worker and former Army captain, said during an educational session about suicide prevention at the Pentagon conference center. Garrick made the presentation today and yesterday as part of increased outreach during Septembers National Suicide Prevention Awareness and Awareness Month. She and others spoke to small groups of mostly mental health professionals about how to manage crisis and increase resilience. Suicide affects us as a nation, Garrick said, although currently there are not comparable numbers to compare the suicide rate in the mil itary with that in the civilian sector. The Centers for Disease Control just released its 2010 suicide figures, while the DOD is about to release its 2012 statistics, she said. Also, suicide often is not given as the cause of death, but rather asphyxiation or heart attack, when someone has hanged themselves of taken a drug overdose, she said. But Garrick said the information is clear enough to know that suicides have been trending up in both the military and civilian sectors for several years. To combat military suicides, Garrick said, you also have to look to civilians who not only work alongside and manage service members, but civilians also are our family members. Managers need to be attuned to those on their staff who may be suicidal, Garrick said. Information gathered by the department shows that young, white men make up the largest block of military suicides, usually committed at home with their own firearm, she said. Half had never deployed and many joined the military with personal problems that can mount into emotional instability. Managers have to understand that employees also are dealing with stress with spouses, kids, finances or legal trouble. We know all of this comes into the workplace constantly, she said. Thats just life. It flows all over the place. The first step for managers is to be open to talking when an employee approaches with a problem, Garrick said. She offered these tips for effective communication with employees: make it clear that you want to talk to them and soon. If its not an emergency, ask if they can come back in 20 minutes; guage show concern and a mentoring stance; without being condescending; the person in crisis; conversation; tions; about that, and How can I help? and the answers. They really just need to know that youre listening and you will try to help, Garrick said. You dont need to solve it all in 15 minutes. People should listen for emotional red flags such as I just cant take it any more, she said. If you think someone may be contemplating suicide, Garrick said, ask them, Are you considering hurting yourself? and Do you have the means to do it? The three main places for help with suicide prevention are: 273-8255, then press the No. 1; It is important for family members also to reach out to these resources if they think their service member may be suicidal, Garrick said. All conversations are confidential and seeking medical treatment rarely affects a service members career or security clearances, she said. Getting help early is really what will help your career, she said. In 2011, a home fire was reported every 87 seconds, killing 2,565 people and injuring 12,650 and causing $7.6 billion in direct damage. Many fatalities, injuries, and property losses can be prevented by planning ahead and integrating fire safe behaviors into your daily activities. Dont be a statistic . be smart. Put a smoke alarm on every level of the home outside each sleeping area, and in every bedroom. Smoke alarms can be battery-oper ated or electrically hardwired in your home and are available at a variety of price points. If you have hearing problems, use alarms with flashing strobe lights and vibration. Test smoke alarms every month. Replace batteries once a year, even if alarms are hardwired. Test your smoke alarms at night to see if your child will wake up and respond to the alarm. Children sleep more deeply and may not wake up. If your child does not wake up to the alarm, try an alarm where you can program your voice to alert them. Mount smoke alarms high on the walls or ceilings since smoke rises. Ceiling-mounted alarms should be installed at least 4 inches away from the nearest wall. Wall-mounted alarms should be installed 4 to 12 inches away from the ceiling. Replace all smoke alarms every 10 years, or sooner if they dont respond properly. Consider installing both ionization alarms, which are better at sensing flaming fires, and photoelectric alarms, which are better at sensing slow, smoky fires, or dual sensor alarms. Cooking is the number one cause of home fires and injuries. Unattended cooking is by far the leading cause of cooking fires. Keep anything that can catch fire away from the stovetop. Dont use the oven or stovetop if you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol. Stay in the kitchen when frying, grilling or boiling food. If you have to leave, even for a short time, turn off the stove. Civilians can help prevent military suicide, official says JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 19

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The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) announced Sept. 20 that NEXs worldwide will be taking a new approach to the holiday shopping season this year. NEXs will offer sales and specials throughout the holiday season begin ning in early November instead of starting off the holiday shopping season with a big sale the day after Thanksgiving. Also new this year, deployed Sailors will be able to take advantage of holiday specials by shop ping on-line. For the 2012 holiday shopping season, we have revised and refreshed our approach to the traditional Black Friday sales events. We are calling it Navy Blue Friday and will emphasize Navy core values, Navy family and preserving Thanksgiving cultural values, said Robert J. Bianchi, chief executive officer, NEXCOM. We will also provide broader access to NEX sale items for afloat and deployed Sailors. NEX customers will still find a wide variety of holiday gifts on sale as they have in the past. The prices on the items for sale will last for the duration of the sale, not be limited to a certain day or time period. NEX events will begin, worldwide, at 6 a.m. on Friday morning, featuring all-day Friday specials and additional sale items will be available across the entire three-day weekend. We took this approach so customers wouldnt feel obligated to get up early and leave their families to go shopping for the holidays, said Tess Paquette, NEXCOM senior vice president and chief merchandising officer. Beginning our sales earlier in the season will allow our customers to better budget their holiday spending by purchasing gifts over a longer period of time. NEXCOM also looked into how it could better serve its deployed customers. Based on feedback gained through focus groups, NEXCOM will run a special sale event for afloat Sailors at mynavyexchange.com three days prior to Thanksgiving, with exclusive sales tailored specifically to their needs. Deployed customers will start receiving electronic or paper copies of the sales flyer onboard their ship in midNovember through their supply officer or sales officer. We have developed an assortment of Sailor requested items such as electronics, games and sports nutrition products which will be featured in the three-day sale, said Paquette. If Sailors are unable to participate in the sale due to operational or mission requirements, they will be able to contact NEXCOMs call center after the sale dates and NEXCOM will accommodate them. The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 300 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Sept. 30, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Cincinnati Bengals (Tickets on sale now) Oct. 7, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Chicago Bears (Tickets on sale now) Nov. 4, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Detroit Lions (Tickets on sale Oct. 22) Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jags vs. Indianapolis Colts (Tickets on sale Oct. 29) Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. Retirees and Veterans/DoD employ ees are eligible to purchase tickets for New York Giants and Atlanta Falcons games. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but under no circum stances are dependent children autho rized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may pur chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No exceptions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@ usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tick ets for the entire season. NEX offers new approach to holiday shoppingJacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 27, 2012 21 Naval forces from Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Mexico, the United Kingdom and the United States departed Naval Air Station Key West Sept. 20 and conducted air defense exercises to begin the at-sea phase of the Atlantic phase of UNITAS, an annual multinational exercise hosted by Commander, U.S. 4th Fleet. Thirteen warships are con ducting operations in the Atlantic Ocean and Western Caribbean through Sept. 28. UNITAS trains the participat ing forces in a variety of maritime scenarios to test com mand and control of forces at sea, while operating as a multinational force to provide the maximum opportunity to improve interoperability. Shortly after departing NAS Key West, F-5N Tiger II attack aircraft from adversary squad ron VFC-111 tested the ships air defense capabilities. This was a very impor tant evolution as it was the first time the multinational ships were able to assemble at sea and work as a team to defend the task group from aerial threats, Capt. Ace VanWagoner, commander, Combined Task Group 138.20 said. The adversary airplanes flew threatening approaches towards the task group and the ships were able to respond quickly and successfully defended themselves, he said. This years Atlantic phase includes live-free exercises and a Navy Standard Missile (SM-2) launch against remote control aerial targets launched from the flight deck of the frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) home-ported at NS Mayport. While the overarching goal of the exercise is to develop and test command and control of forces at sea, training in this exercise will address the spectrum of maritime operations, Commander, U.S. 4th Fleet, Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris said. Specifically, there will be high-end warfare scenarios addressing electronic war fare, anti-air warfare and air defense, anti-submarine war fare, anti-surface warfare, and maritime interdiction opera tions, he said. UNITAS develops and sus tains relationships to improve the capacity of U.S. partners maritime forces. The annual exercise fosters friendly, mutual cooperation and under standing between participating navies. The ships have swapped crews as part of a subject mat ter expert exchange. USS Anzio (CG 68), the UNITAS flagship, embarked personnel from Peru, Brazil, Mexico, France and Canada. Navy announces 2011 Spirit of Hope winner Carolyn Blashek, the founder of Operation Gratitude, is the Navys 2011 Spirit of Hope winner, officials announced, Sept. 17 in NAVADMIN 286/12. Blashek founded Operation Gratitude in 2003 as a nonprofit, volunteer-based organization to support deployed service members, their children and wounded warriors. Since its inception, Operation Gratitude has sent more than 750,000 care packages addressed to individual Sailors, Soldiers, Airmen and Marines in hostile regions such as Afghanistan, the Middle East and onto military ships. The organization has also sent thousands of Battalion Buddy packages with stuffed animals to the children of deploying troops. Cmdr. Randolph Borges, commanding officer of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 85, Air Station North Island, Calif. nominated Blashek. In his nomination letter he said her service to the spiritual, social, welfare, education and entertainment needs of the men and women in the armed services and truly represents the core values of the Navy. Blashek will be presented her award at a joint cer emony honoring awardees from all services at the Pentagon, Nov. 15. Established in 1997, the Spirit of Hope Award is presented by the Wiegand Foundation in honor of the famed entertainer and supporter of military person nel, Bob Hope. The award is presented to individuals or organizations that embody Hopes commitment and service to the men and women of the military. A Navy Sailor or civilian has been honored with this award every year since 2005. Jacksonvilles only pet food bank has critical shortageFood needed to keep pets out of shelters and with their families Cat food is critically low at Jacksonvilles only Pet Food Bank, which is run by First Coast No More Homeless Pets (FCNMHP). The pet food bank is holding a Fill the Truck event in hopes of rais ing enough donations to continue to give pet food to low-income pet owners on the First Coast. Supporters are asked to bring any brand of dry cat food to the Fill the Truck food drive Sept. 29 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Regency Square Mall. Look for the Two Men and a Truck moving van. Donations can also be dropped off between now and Sept. 29 at designated drop-off locations. The FCNMHP Pet Food Bank helps to reduce the number of animals euthanized due to overpopu lation and owner surrenders to the shelter. Local shelters are full, so keeping pets with their families saves lives. Pet food bank clients include disabled veterans, seniors on a fixed income, victims of layoffs, single-parent families, and many others who are struggling to make ends meet and do not want to give up their family pets. Pet owners who receive food must meet income qualifications and pets must be spayed or neutered. FCNMHP offers free spay/neuter surgeries to those who qualify for food through the pet food bank. Locations will be updated on www.jaxpetfood bank.org. Multinational forces underway for UNITAS Atlantic



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Members of the NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), along with several Seabees from Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU202) Detachment Jacksonville, placed 250 purple ribbons around the base Sept. 28 to help commemorate Domestic Violence Awareness Month at NAS Jacksonville. The purple ribbon recognizes and honors victims of domestic violence and celebrates survivors. The purple ribbon also celebrates that the silence previ ously facilitated domestic abuse and violence has been broken, said FFSC Victim Advocate LaTresa Henderson. For more than two decades, the purple ribbon has been the symbol that highlights the issue of domestic abuse and the commitment of survivors, fam ily members and other concerned persons deter mined to end domestic abuse, she continued. She appreci ated the time and equipment the Seabees contrib ute to the annual project. We simply couldnt accomplish this every year without their help. The Seabees do great work that always exceeds our expectations, said Henderson. USS Winston S. Churchill aids Belde Guided-missile destroyer USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) and HSL-42 Proud Warriors recently rendered medical assistance to Panamanian-flagged, bulk carrier M/V Belde, around 110 miles north of Socotra Island, Yemen. At approximately 1:10 p.m. local time, Churchill responded to a distress call following a cargo-handling accident aboard Belde. After arriving on scene, Churchill dis patched two rigid-hull inflatable boats, transporting the ships hospital corpsman, and the visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team to assess the injured personnel. One Belde crew member was killed in the accident and another required advanced medical care for injuries sus tained. Churchill conducted a medical evacua tion, transporting the injured crew mem ber by an SH-60B helicopter attached to HSL-42 Detachment 8, to an Oman medical facility for treatment. No further assistance was required. There are a multitude of hazards in the maritime domain. As such, we are always ready to assist, said Cmdr. Christopher Stone, Churchill commanding officer. Our sympathies go out to those affected by this tragic incident. We, as partners in the maritime commons, are always ready and willing to help and are glad that we were in the right place at the right time to lend a hand. Stone added that he was proud of his crew for successfully completing a rescue mission in incredibly complex condi tions. The personal and professional satis faction of knowing that the outstanding efforts of this ship and this crew saved another mariners life is second to none. It is days like today that makes me proud to be a member of the United States Navy and this coalition. I am incredibly proud to be the commanding officer of Winston S. Churchill, said Stone. Churchill is assigned to Commander, Task Force 150, as part of Combined Maritime Forces, conducting counterterrorism and maritime security opera tions in the Gulf of Aden, Gulf of Oman, Arabian Sea, Red Sea and Indian Ocean. Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) (SS/ SW) Rick West gave his last Hoo-Yah during the changeof-office ceremony at the Washington Navy Yard, Sept. 28. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert was the guest speaker for the ceremony and highlighted MCPON Wests accomplishments dur ing his naval career while thanking him for his leader ship. MCPON West, you made the Navy better through your will ingness to listen and learn, said Greenert. I watched you firsthand in the Pacific Fleet, at U.S. Fleet Forces, as VCNO, and I had the honor to serve with you for one year as CNO. MCPON West had the heartbeat of the Navy. Sailors communicated with him. He challenged Sailors and they loved it. The ceremony marked the end of a nearly 32-year career for West, who had served as the 12th MCPON since Dec. 12, 2008. During his time as MCPON, West instituted the Senior Enlisted Continuation Board, introduced CPO 365, and implemented the manda tory enlisted warfare designa tion. MCPON West made a dif ference and led by example. He made a tangible improvement in our Navy, said Greenert. I say to you and Bobbi (wife), thank you very much and our nation and our Navy thanks you. West did not discuss per sonal accomplishments during his retirement remarks, instead focusing on thanking family, friends, shipmates and mentors who helped shape him into a leader and the memories hell take with him of his years of service. There is simply no way I can mention you all. Just know that if you are here today, you played some part in the success that I have enjoyed, said West. It has been an honor and privilege to serve our great Navy for nearly 32 years and especially to serve as MCPON for the last four. Thirty-two years is a long time, but when you are talking about the end of a fantastic journey, it was just a flash of time. Ive never had a THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jax to host World Military Golf ChampionshipNAS Jacksonville is hosting the seventh World Military Golf Championship, Conseil International du Sport Militaire (CISM) at the NAS Jax Golf Course Oct. 13-18. CISM began in 1948 with five participating nations. From those five founder nations CISM has grown to 126 member nations. The United Stated joined the organiza tion in 1951. The aim of CISM is the encouragement of military sports and the development of friendly relations between the armed forces of the vari ous fields related to sport and physical readiness. The official CISM motto is: SPORT means peace. SPORT is the opposite of war. SPORT is a cure for war. SPORT is international. SPORT brings nations closer. Friendship through sport The following countries are planning to attend the 2012 CISM Golf Championships and registration is ongoing with a few more countries expected: Bahrain, Canada, Estonia, Germany, Italy, Namibia, Pakistan, Spain, Uganda, United States and Zambia. CISM schedule of events Opening ceremonies Oct. 13 at 9 a.m. Oct. 14 first round of play Oct. 15 second round of play Oct. 16 third round of play Oct. 17 fourth and final round of play Oct. 18 cultural day and closing ceremoniesFor more information, call 542-3111.Wests last Hoo-YahStevens takes helm as Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Proud Warriors provide air ambulance Purple ribbons bring domestic violence awareness

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Oct. 4 1821 Lt. Robert Stockton sails from Boston for Africa to help stop the international slave trade. 1943 Aircraft from USS Ranger (CV-4) sink five German ships and damage three in Operation Leader, the only U.S. Navy carrier operation in northern European waters during World War II. 1952 Task Force 77 aircraft encounter MIG-15 aircraft for the first time. Oct. 5 1863 Confederate David seriously damages USS New Ironsides with a spar torpedo off Charleston, S.C. 1913 Trial of OWL, Navys first amphibian flying boat. 1957 Minitrack, a satellite tracking net developed by the Naval Research Laboratory, becomes operational. This network, with stations from Maine to Chile, tracked the Vangard satellite. Oct. 6 1884 Department of the Navy estab lishes the Naval War College at Newport, R.I. (General Order 325). 1940 Fourth group of eight U.S. destroyers involved in Destroyers for Bases deal are turned over to British authorities at Halifax, Canada. 1943 In night Battle of Vella Lavella, three U.S. destroyers attack nine Japanese destroyers to stop evacuation of Japanese troops from Vella Lavella, Solomon Islands. 1958 USS Seawolf (SSN-575) com pletes record submerged run of 60 days, logging over 13,700 nautical miles. 1962 Commissioning of USS Bainbridge (DLGN-25), first nuclear-pow ered frigate. 1997 NASA Astronaut and Navy Cmdr. Wendy Lawrence returns from mission of STS-86: Shuttle -Mir 7 when Atlantis docked with Mir Space Station. The mission began on 25 September. Oct. 7 1864 USS Washusett captures Confederate raider CSS Florida in harbor of Bahia, Brazil. 1924 Rigid airship Shenandoah com mences transcontinental flight. 1975 President Gerald Ford signs law allowing admission of women into ser vice academies. 2001 Operation Enduring Freedom begins with carrier air strikes, plus, ship and submarine Tomahawk strikes. Oct. 8 1812 Boat party under Lt. Jesse Elliott captures HMS Detroit and Caledonia on Niagara River. 1842 Commodore Lawrence Kearny in USS Constitution, addresses a letter to the Viceroy of China, urging that American merchants in China be granted the same treaty privileges as the British. His negotiations are successful. 1950 1st Marine Division commences embarkation at Inchon for landings at Wonsan, Korea. Oct. 9 1873 Lt. Charles Belknap calls a meeting at the Naval Academy to establish the U.S. Naval Institute for the purpose of disseminating scientific and professional knowledge throughout the Navy. 1942 First three schools for enlisted WAVES open at Stillwater, Okla. (Yeoman), Bloomington, Ind. (Storekeeper), and Madison, Wis. (Radioman). 1945 Parade in New York City honors Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz and 13 other Navy and Marine Corps Medal of Honor awardees. 1945 Typhoon hits Okinawa, damag ing many Navy ships. Oct. 10 1845 Naval School, later the Naval Academy, opens in Annapolis, Md., with 50 midshipmen and seven faculty. 1923 First American-built rigid air ship, Shenandoah, is christened. It used helium gas instead of hydrogen. 1944 Opening of Leyte campaign begins with attack of four Carrier Task Groups of Task Force 38 on Okinawa and Ryukyus. 1985 Fighters from USS Saratoga (CV-60) force Egyptian airliner, with the hijackers of the cruise ship Achille Lauro aboard, to Italy, where the hijackers were taken into custody. It was Saturday. Before I even opened my eyes, I knew the grass was covered in a blanket of shim mering, silver dew. Not frost yet, but cold and wet, just the same. The window panes beside my bed seemed suddenly thinner. A chill filled the bedroom. I heard a few lone, brave birds squawking, but their calls seemed to echo instead of clamor, as they do in the spring, when it sounds like there is a bird party in the backyard. Indeed, the squawks seemed only to come from crows. Also, it was dark. I opened my eyes and sat up in bed. I knew: winter is coming. Im not exaggerating when I say a cold sweat broke out on my forehead and my heart began to pound. Dont get me wrong, I love winter. And I especially love fall. But there seems to be an almost chemical reaction that happens when the sunlight moves sideways, casting long, cool shadows across the street, and the crows take over the landscape again. Its like my body just knows. Adjusting to climates and time changes can be considered an occupational hazard for military fami lies. But the risks, so to speak, become even greater when you live in the farthest northern corners of the country. Here, its not just the clocks on the wall that get messed up, its the internal ones as well. When the military first moved us to Maine, I didnt understand the seasonal changes yet. Neither did my body, which leads me to believe that the process is at least as men tal as it is biological. Back then, I grew more sluggish in October, and eight months later, I had trouble falling asleep in sun-filled June, but my brain didnt understand the differ ences. There was no logical component. Now that Ive been through sev eral winters now that Ive learned what happens when you dont rake your roof or water gets inside the keyhole in your car door a new dimension takes hold in the antici pation of snow: I dont want to be caught unprepared. Also: I dont want to be left behind. I used to think it was just the shortened days (by November, it will be dark by 4:15 p.m.) that affected me. When the shadows grew long and the sunlight more cool, my heart would quicken. But now I know that the squirrels and crows and even my forward-thinking friends are to blame. Beginning in September, the squirrels that live in the large tree in our front yard, start getting fat. Literally. Those animals that look almost rat-like in spring grow pudgy and hefty in the fall. They dig holes in the yard, and they suck on acorns, driving our dog, Sparky, insane. I liken this to the crowd mentality I experienced in Florida just before a hurricane. When jugs of water start flying off the shelf, you cant help but buy one (or twenty) your self. I mean, youre not going to be the schmuck whos caught with out water. Even if the shelves seem emptied of prunes (which you hate), a clear sign that the crowd knows something you do not, youll feel compelled to drive to another store to find some. This is how I feel when I see the squirrels getting ready for winter. As their rounded pre-winter bod ies scurry across the yard and dig in the flowerbeds, I wonder, Should I maybe be digging for acorns, too? Acorns are legitimate food, right? Can you burn acorns as firewood if the heater breaks? Would it work to use an acorn to break the ice on my windshield? When it comes to winter pre paredness, everyone probably has a better plan than I do. Especially my neighbors with the reflective sticks to show the plow guy where the edge of the yard is buried, or the A-frame protective tents for their shrubs. This feeling of being left behind and caught unprepared, Im con vinced, leads to the feeling of panic and despair of fall. Ive heard that light therapy boxes can help. Im giving it a try this year. My box arrived last week, and so far, what Ive learned is this: when the instructions say dont stare direct ly into the light they mean dont stare directly into the light. The light box hasnt yet shown me miracles (like feeling less tired at 6 a.m.), and, in fact, if I wasnt depressed before, I am now after putting on my make up with 10,000 lux of light illuminating every pore and blemish on my face. But I have great hopes for the box. Also, Im not above taunting those over-achieving squirrels with my preparedness. I wonder if theyve thought of a light box yet? Maybe I should show it to them through the glass front door: Hey, squirrels, can your acorns do this? Just knowing that I have some thing the squirrels dont makes me rest a little easier this winter. Waiting for winter with my new, handy light box FOD walkdown set for Oct. 10NAS Jax Air Operations announced an installation-wide foreign object damage (FOD) walkdown of the airfield Oct. 10, from 7:30 9 a.m. Operations Officer Cmdr. Mark McManus said, The entire flight line will be visual ly inspected for any small, loose items that could become Foreign Object Damage. Even a tiny screw sucked into a jet engine intake can cause disastrous results on takeoff or land ing.

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Cmdr. James Miller relieved Cmdr. Joseph OBrien as com manding officer of HSM-74 Swamp Foxes Sept. 28 at Hangar 1122 aboard NAS Jacksonville. The guest speaker was Commander, Carrier Air Wing 3 Capt. Michael Wallace. Miller assumed the duties of executive officer of HSM-74 inJune of 2011.He has deployed with HSL-44 on board USS De Wert (FFG 45)and USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) as part of the Enterprise Battle Group. He also served on board USS George Washington (CVN 73) as helicopter element coordina tor for Carrier Air Wing 7 and deployed on board USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) as officer in charge with HSL-46. Ashore, Miller has served as an instructor at HSL-40, attended the Naval War College, and worked as integrated missile defense watch com mander at the United States Strategic Command Functional Component Command for Integrated Missile Defense in Colorado Springs, Colo. OBrien became the com manding officer in June 2011.His next assignment will be as navigation officer on board USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) home ported in Norfolk, Va. Coming in as executive officer is Cmdr. Matt Boren. He previ ously served with Headquarters, U.S. Special Operations Command. HSM-74 deploys people and helicopters to all corners of the globe in support of Carrier Air Wing 3. The Mad Foxes deploy aboard aircraft carriers, cruis ers, destroyers, and frigates. On Sept. 21, Commander, Naval Safety Center Rear Adm. Brian Prindle and VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to the following 10 officers: Ensign Nicholas Chappell, Lt. j.g. John Chatfield, Ensign Joshua Cochran, Ensign Robert Gammons, Ensign Dennis Haynes, Ensign John Jakes, Ensign Dennie Johnson Jr., CWO2 Jeffrey Moore, Ensign Taylor Stang and Ensign Marc Wallis. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer syllabus at VP-30, earning their coveted wings of gold. These newly winged avi ators will now enroll in the CAT 1 Fleet Replacement Squadron syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT 1 syllabus, they will report to operational P-3C or EP-3 squadrons to begin their initial sea tours in either Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, Whidbey Island, Wash., or NAS Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, where all avi ation officers undergo a classroom syl labus and are taught the basics of naval aviation which includes aerodynamics, meteorology and principles of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10 at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transition from a classroom learning environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of pri mary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3C or P-8A training pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. VP-30 wings Navys newest naval flight officers Miller takes the helm of HSM-74 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 Mobile Tactical Operations Center Three (MTOC-3) recently completed a two-week operational readiness evaluation (ORE) prior to its deployment in the 5th Fleet area of respon sibility. MTOC-3 is a rapidly deploy able mobile command and control, communications, computers and intelligence (C4I) unit supporting Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance/ Navy expeditionary operations worldwide. MTOC-3 is one of four MTOCs under Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 (CPRW-11) at NAS Jacksonville. ORE is an evaluation pro gram that is used to compre hensively test the capability of all MTOC equipment and per sonnel to accomplish all facets of their mission set, to ensure their ability to deploy when needed by a theater command er. MTOC Sailors deploy across the globe, supporting the P-3C Orion maritime patrol and surveillance aircraft. From the ground, they provide critical communication links between task force commanders and P-3C aircrews. They go wher ever the P-3C requires their support. MTOC Sailors are consid ered rapid deployers, pack ing their tactical gear in a P-3C, C-130 or C-17, depending on the scope of the mission they are needed to support, arriving on scene first and setting up within one to four days. Typically, the MTOCs set up support operations in a struc ture or building close to the airfield the aircraft are operat ing from, but they can also set up a self-sufficient expedition ary site, like they did during their most recent ORE at NAS Jax. The ORE consisted of writ ten examinations and a field exercise, that included the set up of a full expeditionary site with tents, generators and electronic C4I equipment. The only things missing were cots and showers. During the evalu ation, MTOC Sailors manned a highly capable Operations Control (OPCON) center around the clock supporting East Coast training flights, in support of Fleet exercises. During operations, MTOC personnel connect P-3 aircrews to the Internet for preflight mission planning, to include commanders tasking, radio frequencies and environmen tal data. While airborne, P-3C aircrews rely heavily on the critical communications paths provided by the MTOC for bidirectional flow of tasking and operational information. When a flight is over, MTOC mem bers utilize their specialized equipment to download data from the aircraft for analysis and quickly disseminate it to commanders. Although the exercise was just two weeks in length, the success was a result of exten sive training and planning over the last 12 months by all hands. Because the unit is so small, everyone has to learn each others jobs, said Lt. Ron Williams, the units officer in charge. I really didnt know what to expect to be honest. I see now why they say MTOCs are expeditionary, stated AWO1(NAC/ AW) Josh Mounts, who just recently transferred from the CPRW-11 Weapons Tactics Unit Department. Theres nothing in the entire Navy like working in the MTOC, exclaimed OS2(AW/ SW) Jeffrey Maricic after run ning the last event in the OPCON as watch supervisor. He continued, As a shipgoing rate, I never imagined Id be setting up expedition ary tents, working on genera tors, driving a forklift and be fully operational in a matter of hours. Williams said, Its hard to find Sailors interested in going to an MTOC. Because its such a small community in the Navy, not many Sailors know about it. If youre interested in seeing the world, interested in learning about new equip ment, MTOC might be a place for you. When a billet comes up on CMS/ID for sea duty to an MTOC, many Sailors are left wondering what exactly an MTOC is and the scope of the job. There are four source ratings for Sailors interested in serving within an MTOC. Those ratings are Aviation Warfare Specialist Operator, Electronics Technician, Information Technology Technician, and Operations Specialist. Although this sea duty might not be on a ship, duty at a MTOC is in an expe ditionary setting and will have its fair share of deployments, labor-intensive work days, opportunities and rewards. MTOC-3 completes operational readiness evaluation

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 5 Photos by ET3 Justin Goss, ET1(SW/IDW) Justin Weakland and Lt. Craig Mueller

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A gathering of regional chaplains and Chaplain Religious Enrichment Development Operation (CREDO) directors from around the globe, as well as large-installation command chap lains and senior enlisted advisors, took place at NAS Jacksonville Sept. 26 -28 to develop a strategic plan for ministry support from the shore to the fleet. Sponsored by Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC), the Religious Program Office Oversight Meeting attracted about 50 chaplains, enlisted and civilian personnel eager to share ideas and renew their spiritual energy. Kicking off the three-day event was Rear Adm. Mark Tidd, the Chief of Chaplains, who said he was pleased to meet with his Chaplain Corps col leagues. Tidd reminded the gathering that, The heart of the Navy is ships at sea but the heart of a Sailor is always with his or her family ashore. The job of our religious ministry teams made up of chaplains and religious program spe cialists is to serve the everyday spiritual needs of these exceptional service members in the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. We help guide them through lifes trials and tribulations, as we do the same for their families back home. The chaplains and religious program specialists of CNIC are key people who provide and coordinate the religious ministry support program ashore. He added, Im here today to thank them for their commitment, dedica tion and sacrifice as well as encourage them to develop new types of minis try and spiritual support during these dynamic and changing times. Capt. Johnny Poole, the CNIC chap lain who helped organize the event, challenged the attendees to imagine how the ministries of base chapels will evolve in the future. What innovations can we bring aboard? What opportunities can we seize to better serve our Sailors, Marines and their families? Poole asked. We want our chaplains and RP teams to leave this conference with a clear vision of the challenges, but also of the ministry opportunities they plan to coordinate. Todays chaplains and RPs must be looking for creative ways to approach their ministries such as an expansion of their CREDO program and retreat ministries, Tidd agreed. At the NAS Jacksonville Chapel Center, Tidd also visited a training class on the new Naval Chaplaincy Ministry Support Tool (NCMST). Using commercial-off-the-shelf software, NCMST is a new way to more effectively manage the ministry that we provide, as well as collect information on the spiritual impact that we gener ate, explained Tidd. At NAS Jacksonville, for instance, NCMST gives Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore and his RP team an information system that pro vides both his base and region com manders with detailed information about ministry activities. But please note, that as we talk about tracking ministry and spirituality, sometimes its hard to really define and measure what that is because some good things may not fit into an easily defined category. Tidd concluded, In todays finan cially strained environment, we have to make the best use possible of our resources, including chaplains and RPs, who are critical to the readiness and resilience of our people. We can only strengthen the force when we reach out in fellowship to our younger Sailors and Marines and their families.Chaplains discuss challenges, opportunities for naval ministry 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 7

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bad command because I feel commands are what you make of them and how you choose to seize the opportunities. The thing Im going to miss the most is, by far, the people and the energy and innovation of our Sailors and families. The engine that truly drives our Navy is our people. Our Sailors are what makes our Navy the best thats ever sailed the worlds oceans, said West. MCPON (AW/NAC) Mike Stevens took the helm of the enlisted force as the Navys 13th MCPON after receiving the ceremonial cutlass from MCPON West. I was honored to pick MCPON 13, said Greenert. It was not an easy task. MCPON Stevens is a proven and effec tive leader. This is a guy ready to lead our Navy and I look forward to your insight and per spective. Stevens, a native of Montana, joined the Navy in 1983 and most recently served as Fleet Master Chief for U.S. Fleet Forces Fleet Master Chief in Norfolk. His previ ous Command Master Chief tours included U.S. 2nd Fleet, Helicopter Sea Combat Wing Atlantic, Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron 14, and Naval Air Station Pensacola. MCPON Stevens thanked Adm. Greenert for his trust and faith in his selection as MCPON. I am both humbled and honored to have been provided this magnificent oppor tunity to lead and serve our Sailors, their families and our government civilians as Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy, said Stevens. He thanked West for his ser vice, leadership and friendship and spoke to the Navy, saying he is excited about the future and looking forward to serving the Navy as MCPON by work ing together to carry out the Navys mission. The MCPON serves as an advisor to the CNO and to the Chief of Naval Personnel in matters dealing with enlisted personnel and their families. The MCPON is also an advi sor to boards dealing with enlisted personnel issues; is the enlisted representative of the Department of the Navy at special events; may be called upon to testify on enlisted personnel issues before Congress; and maintains a liaison with enlisted spouse organizations. MCPON Fire Prevention Week scheduleFire Prevention Week commemorates the Great Chicago Fire when a two-day blaze killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless and destroyed more than 17,000 buildings Oct. 8-9, 1871. That tragedy inspired reform across America, spurring new fire safety codes and public awareness campaigns. In October, the National Fire Protection Association highlights the importance of fire safety education. This years theme, Have 2 Ways Out, focuses on estab lishing several evacuation routes for your family members if a fire should occur in the home. The following is the NAS Jax Fire Prevention Week schedule of events: Oct. 7 13, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Daily open house at base fire stations. Oct. 9-12 Unannounced fire evacuation drills. Oct. 9, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Fire Prevention table dis play with fire safety materials, red fire hats, fire appara tus, Pluggie the talking fire hydrant at the Navy Exchange Courtyard. Oct. 9, 4 p.m. Fire inspectors, Pluggie the talking fire hydrant and fire apparatus at the NAS Jax Youth Center, Building 2069. Oct. 10, 10-11 a.m. Fire inspectors and Pluggie the talking fire hydrant visit the Childrens Ward and Pediatrics Clinic at the Naval Hospital, Building H2080. Oct. 11, 9:30 a.m. Fire Inspectors and Pluggie the talking fire hydrant at the Child Development Center, Building 2070. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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The NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center introduced Domestic Violence Awareness month (October), with a conference for those working with domestic violence victims, at the Orange Park Holiday Inn on Sept. 27. Every year, we host a conference to conduct domestic violence awareness training for our staff members and the outside agencies we partner with to provide new information and share ideas on how to better serve our clients, said NAS Jax FFSC Director Myrna Wilson. The guest speaker was Dr. David Wexler who presented his pro gram, When Push Comes to Shove: Contemporary Research, Assessment, and Treatment Innovations for Partner Abuse. The event began with NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander welcoming the group. This is a very important topic and this is a great way to bring awareness of Domestic Violence Month, said Undersander, who then asked for a show of hands as to how many in the audience worked with military personnel. In the military, we continually look at family readiness because its not just the service member deploying, but the entire family making sacrifices. So we put a lot of emphasis on family health and well-being. Undersander then introduced Wexler, a clinical psychologist specializing in the treatment of relationships in con flict who has also worked quite exten sively with the military participating in several Navy research studies regarding domestic violence and the prevention of sexual violence. Wexlers presentation covered such topics as definitions and typologies of abusers, risk assessment, understand ing male psychology and engaging defensive men, female offenders, diver sity issues, accountability and disinhibitors and The Stop Program which offers innovative skills, technologies, options and plans for better relationships. Domestic violence prevention is a very complicated field and there are so many new aspects in the terms of understanding it that it is important for those individuals treating offend ers, victims or witnesses that they know who they are dealing with and who will benefit from interventions, said Wexler. When asked what he wanted his audience to get out of the workshop, Wexler stated, I want them to realize that one size does not fit all. They need to per ceive both the offenders and victims through their own specific lens and their own particular story. I want them to recognize that the treatment is not to put offenders in a room and say, youve been bad. Ive found that the way to stop the behavior is to find a way to connect with them, respect them and realize their complex issues, and offer tools to turn it around. Wexler also commented that the statistics of domestic violence within the military is not always higher than that of the civilian population. Sometimes, there is a spike in mili tary domestic violence incidents when the service members return home with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder but historically its not that different. What is different is that the military is much quicker to realize the issues, he said. In all of the military settings Ive worked in, they were able to identify cases of domestic violence and pro vide intervention treatment despite less actual evidence that would be required in a civilian court. So the military is definitely take a much greater preventative stance on the issue. It can always be done better, but overall, the military is doing a pretty good job, said Wexler. Domestic Violence Awareness Month is recognized every October to remem ber those who have died at the hands of a loved one, honor those who have survived domestic violence, recognize the progress made in reducing domes tic violence and recommit to end the abuse. If you or someone you know are in an abusive relationship, call (904) 354-3114. The hotline is manned 24/7. You never know, you just might save someones life. FFSC kicks off Domestic Violence Awareness month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 9

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While the Department of the Navy has long conducted energy awareness campaigns that promote the wise and efficient use of energy, Americans first set aside a time to think about saving energy in 1981 with American Energy Week. In 1991, President George Bush proclaimed October as Energy Awareness Month. Today, more than ever, our nation can benefit from the efficient use of energy at fed eral facilities. As the single largest domes tic user of energy, the federal government spends more than $9 billion to power its vehicles and operations at approximately 500,000 facilities throughout the United States. Efficient energy manage ment at federal facilities is important because it: emissions and natural resources security In addition, regulations like the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, Executive Orders 13423 and 13514, require federal agencies to meet a number of energy and water management goals. These goals range from reducing energy and water con sumption to designing more efficient facilities and reduc ing fossil fuel consumption and associated greenhouse gasses of fleet vehicles. Two critical goals that NAS Jacksonville is currently on track to meet are a 30 percent reduction in energy intensity by 2015 (from a 2003 baseline) and a 16 percent reduction in water consumption by 2015 (from a 2007 baseline). With so many global chal lenges tied to energy use including air pollution, reli ance on fossil fuels, volatile fuel costs and aging energy infrastructure it makes sense to choose energy efficiency as a basic work ethic and lifestyle. During Energy Awareness Month and throughout the year remember that saving energy should be an individual priority that helps safeguard Americas energy infrastruc ture by reducing carbon emissions. Learn more about energy efficiency by reading articles by the NAS Jax Energy Team in the October issues of Jax Air News Additionally, an Energy Awareness Month display will be located near the NEX food court Bldg. 987 on Oct. 12-13 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The NAS Jax energy team will be there to discuss energy saving oppor tunities and answer any ques tions you may have. A lighting comparison board, water saving showerhead dis play and solar photovoltaic demonstration will also be set up. For the kids, our energy conservation mascot, BRITE, will be available for pictures and plenty of non-verbal com munication. Be part of the solution: October is Energy Awareness Month 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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Sunny skies and calm winds drew an enthusiastic crowd to the second annual Mulberry Cove Marina Riverfest Sept. 29. Held on the banks of the St. Johns River, the event was open to active duty mem bers, Reservists, retirees and Department of Defense civil ians. The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary provided safe boating information and free inspections of boats, while members of the St. Johns Bass Anglers Club offered free cast ing clinics to patrons of all ages. Children enjoyed free face painting provided by the Fleet and Family Support Center. Fort George Surf Shop pro vided information on surfing lessons, surfboards and gear. Sunnyland Antique & Classic Boat Society showcased two vessels on the St. Johns River. Purcells Motorcycle and Marine World provided free T-shirts and an opportunity to check out the Ranger XP900. Mulberry Cove Marina Manager Phil Collins gave free paddleboard lessons through out the day. Additional activi ties included volleyball, bag toss, music, door prizes, kayaking, canoeing and a free cook out. This is a great event for the families and an excel lent opportunity to get youths involved in wholesome out door activities, said AO2 Garry Procter of VP-45. Misha Barton, assistant marina manager, stated, We are excited about this awesome turnout. We wanted to show appreciation to our patrons and showcase what the mari na has to offer. The weather is beautiful and everyone seems to be having a great time. NAS Jacksonville MWR thanks the many volunteers and sponsors that made this event a success: Fort George Island Surf Shop, Sunnyland Antique & Classic Boat Society, Purcells Motorcycle and Marine World and St. Johns Bass Anglers Club.Disclaimer: Neither NAS Jax, MWR, or the Jax Air News nor any part of the federal government officially endorses any company, spon sor or their products or services. Families flock to second annual Mulberry Cove Marina Riverfest JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 11

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On Aug. 17, VP-16 hosted retired Navy Cmdr. James Bailey, a former prisoner of war in North Vietnam, who spoke to squadron members about his time in captivity and the lessons he learned about leadership there. Bailey is the father of Lt. j.g. John Bailey, a naval flight officer in VP-16. During the summer of 1967, Lt. j.g. James Bailey was deployed off the coast of Vietnam on board USS Constellation (CVA 64). Bailey was an F-4B Phantom II navigator attached to Fighter Squadron 143. On June 28, Bailey and his pilot, Cmdr. Bill Lawrence, were flying a combat sortie over North Vietnam when their F-4 was shot down by anti-aircraft artillery. The two managed to safely eject, however they were immediately captured and spent the next six years in the Hanoi prison system. Bailey was initially interrogated and then kept in solitary confinement for the first six months. When speaking to the War Eagles, he emphasized the importance of learning to communicate with the other prisoners as soon as possible. He also discussed how communica tion reinforced the command structure of the POWs within the camp. Bailey highlighted that although the senior prisoners endured the majority of the interrogations and mistreatment, they never backed down from their positions of responsibility and were always able to bounce back. It was amazing to have a real hero speak to us, says Lt. Ryan Burke. Its especially meaningful to me since this is my roommates dad. Bailey also spoke of the efforts of the POWs to keep each other mentally sharp, which included teaching each other foreign languages and mathematics. The lessons that Bailey taught were not just for those in captivity, rather for everyone who encounters challenges throughout their life. Baileys story serves as a constant reminder that any challenge can be overcome as long as people can trust one another and stick together. Baileys personal experience demon strated that humor is an effective way to overcome adversity, no matter how dire the circumstances. He told stories of fellow prisoners finding humor in their battles of wits with guards and small victories in resistance that helped the prisoners keep their sanity and hope. I think that my basic faith and trust in the system of government of the United States of America was the factor that gave me the courage to go on and face each day as it came. I felt that I had undertaken a tremendous respon sibility when I took the oath and accepted my commission as a United States naval officer. I felt proud to uphold this responsibility, said Bailey. The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 participated in Valiant Shield 2012 (VS12) exercise, Sept. 11-19. VS12 is a U.S.-only exercise with a focus on integration of joint training among U.S. forces in relation to current operational plans. Participating for the first time in Valiant Shield, the Fighting Tigers provided two combat aircrews, as well as supporting maintenance personnel, who worked with multiple P-3C crews from VP-40, VP-5, VP-47, and VP-69. Each unit brought with it different levels of pro ficiency with conducting operations in this type of environment, said Lt. Cmdr. Christopher Benjamin, VP-8 detachment officer in charge. The ability of all units to come together as one joint force, while overcoming different proficiency levels, directly enabled our success in the detection, locating, tracking and engagement of adversary units at sea. The 2011 Golden Wrench Award recipient, VP-8 maintenance team worked around the clock to keep the 50-year-old Orion ready to fly. Despite operating with minimal personnel and equipment maintainers, the squadron didnt miss a step throughout the exer cise, ensuring on time take offs on all flights. We had to overcome a few challenges, since we were on detachment, we cannot bring everything and everyone with us to the site, said AMC James Agner, VP-8 detachment maintenance control leading chief petty officer. But regardless of those issues, the job has to be done no matter what the challenges we faced. Our maintenance team always found the way to overcome adversity and kept our P-3s flying so our aircrew could complete their missions. By exercise end, VP-8 flew 72 hours on 10 missions, all leading to a successful finish with a 100-percent mission completion rate for the Fighting Tigers. VP-8 also utilized the exercise to hone their intel ligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance skills, and worked closely with various U.S. Navy surface vessels and U.S. Air Force aircraft. We had interaction in all four of my flights with the participating surface ships. I think everything went pretty well overall, the communications were suc cessful, and this allowed us to complete all of our missions smoothly with no delays, said Lt. Jeffrey Buck, Combat Aircrew 3 mission commander. We only had one interaction with the P-8A, but it also ended up being a success, we did a coordinated time on top harpoon shot working with both our aircraft controlling unit and the P-8. According to U.S. 7th Fleet, this high-level, joint training among U.S. military forces ensures the U.S. military remains the preeminent military in the VP-16 War Eagles host Vietnam POW VP-8 completes Operation Valiant Shield 2012 exercise 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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region, capable of honoring its security commitments to allies, partners and friends. VP-8 entered this exercise during month four of their 7th Fleet deployment. The Fighting Tigers were ready for the VS12 mission and made its contribu tion to the overall success of this joint exercise, said Benjamin. Other participants in VS12 were USS George Washington (CVN 73) with Carrier Air Wing 5; USS Cowpens (CG-63); USS John S. McCain (DDG-62); USS Fitzgerald (DDG-85); USS McCampbell (DDG-89); USS Mustin (DDG-89; USS Chafee (DDG-90); USS Chung Hoon (DDG-93); USNS Amelia Earhart (T-AKE-6); USNS John Ericcson (T-AO-194); USS Chicago (SSN721); USS Greenville (SSN-772); USS Michigan (SSBN727); and USNS Able (T-AGOS-20). Maritime air assets included: VP-5; VP-40; VP-69; VX-1; VPU-2, VQ-1; and VAQ-132. VP-8 DEWEYSCall 542-3521 Deweys Ribbon cutting and grand opening celebration Oct. 4, 39 p.m. Free food sampling, DJ, live band Cloud Nine, games, prizes, childrens activities and much more!Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. 10TH annual NAS Freedom Lanes PBA South Region Adult PRO-AM 9-PIN TAP Oct. 12, 6:30 p.m. & 8:30 p.m. $25 entry fee Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Fall Bowling Leagues now forming! Mixed league Monday 7 p.m. After-work league Wednesday 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thursday 9 a.m. Mixed league Thursday 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Friday 11:45 a.m. Friday night league 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Saturday 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. I.T.T. Events Call 542-3318. Entertainment Books $30 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23, 2013 Preferred seating $41, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Upcoming ITT Trips: Mt. Dora Oct. 27 Lakeridge Winery Nov. 10 New Armed Forces Disney Salute: $153.25 for 4 day ticket with hopper option $153.25 for 4 day ticket with water park fun & more $180.75 for 4 day ticket with both park hopper and water park fun &more Universal Studios Special 2 day 1 park each day w/ 3rd day free $101.75 2 day park to park w/ 3rd day free $120.50 Tickets valid through Dec. 14 Universal Studios Halloween Horror Nights $41.25 $71 Order Gator Bowl tickets now $35 Fl Classic $37.50 & $52.50 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Mall & Movie Trip Oct. 5 at 6 p.m. Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater Jaguars vs. Bears Oct. 7 at 2 p.m. Free admission and transportation Fall Barracks Bash Oct. 11, 49 p.m. Free food, entertainment, games & prizes! NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Oct. 9 & 23 for active duty Oct. 11 & 25 for retirees & DoD personnel Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. CFC Golf Tournament Oct. 25, 12:30 p.m. shotgun start $60 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Oct. 29 Dec. 10 $500 per person For more information, contact Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 13

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The NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville team prides itself on providing firstclass logistics support to the warfighter, the fleet, and stay ing ready to rise to meet any challenge on any occasion. In the areas of contracting and fuels services, FLCJ contingen cy support was put to the test when Hurricane Isaac struck the commands New Orleans site. Over the Labor Day week end, the approaching storm kept everyone guessing, as the various computer models couldnt agree just where the storm track make landfall. As weather forecasters tracked the storm, all across the Gulf Coast, military installations prepared personnel and facili ties to ride out the storm. Cmdr. Tyonia Burns, site director for FLCJs New Orleans Site assumed her role in the NAS JRB New Orleans installation Emergency Operation Center (EOC) and prepared her activ ity for the storms arrival. Back at Commander, Naval Region Southeast (CNRSE) headquarters aboard NAS Jacksonville, the Regional Operations Center (ROC) stood up. Cmdr. Luis Molina, direc tor of supply management at FLCJ, assumed the watch as ROC Crisis Action Team resources chief, attending Flag level briefings and instal lation updates. Information from the Fleet Weather Center in Norfolk, Va. and from the affected installation com manding officers (C) poured into the CAT. As the storm made landfall on Aug. 29, it promptly and unexpectedly stalled. The resultant rainfall and tidal surge inundated the main power station that services NAS JRB New Orleans knocking out power to the installation. Restoring power to the installations key facilities became priority one. Achieving this would require the use of portable generators, which would have to stay running until installation power was restored. The NAS JRB New Orleans emergency manager (EM) looked to Burns for a plan to fuel the growing list of emer gency generators that were to restore essential functions to the base. As the number of generators supplying tempo rary power grew, so did the requirement for diesel fuel. Burns communicated the everincreasing fuel requirements to FLCJs Regional Fuels Officer Lt. Cmdr. Michael Lorrain, so he could accelerate fuel deliv eries to keep the generators running without interruption. Simultaneously, Burns kept her workforce at-the-ready. Many in the workforce were coping with storms aftermath on an individual level, dealing with family situations and protecting their homes. Despite any personal issues caused by the storm, the FLCJ New Orleans fuels team had the installations fuels operation functioning at full capacity on Aug. 30, the day following the storms initial strike. Over the next five days, the team worked tirelessly to pro vide the essential fuel that kept NAS JRB New Orleans up and running. The New Orleans fuels team provided more than 148,000 gallons of diesel, automotive gasoline, and JP-8 aviation fuel to sup port generators, vehicles, air craft, Coast Guard tankers, and various other pieces of equip ment. The team also provided fuel to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Louisiana Air National Guard operations. The total amount of diesel fuel delivered was 22 times more than the normal monthly consumption for the installation. With one 7,000 gallon tank and one diesel truck, resup ply was the key to keeping the fuel flowing; and with parts of I-10 being closed, the resupply effort was especial ly challenging, said Burns. However, between our Code 700 [Regional Fuels] and Fuel Supervisor Jeff Eisenman, we kept the generators running. This was an enormous task, considering the circumstanc es. I am especially proud of the way that my fuel team stepped up to the challenge so soon after the storm, said Burns. The base CO, as well as the NAS JRB New Orleans Operations and Public Works Departments, echoed those sentiments recognizing the fuel teams timely response, dedication and persistence during the recovery phase. While the fueling support was essential, the FLCJ New Orleans supply team also sup ported efforts to provide water and ice to families living in base housing, more than 700 separate family housing units. With the disaster relief requirement confirmed and defined through the installa tion CO and EM, Burns worked with FLCJs Contracting Department to get the effort underway and provide fami lies living on base with water and ice. The Contracting Department quickly identified a vendor to fulfill the require ment with emergency funding provided by the region. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonvilles Contracting Department has a robust capability that annu ally awards over 24,000 con tracting actions, valued at well over $1.3 billion. The contract ing operation has three dedi cated contingency buyers that handle both regional and 4th Fleet contingency require ments. My staff goes out of their way in the early hours of a contingency, to understand the emergent requirement, and to ensure timely contracts are awarded to provide the neces sary supplies and service no small task, but one my staff takes great pride in doing very well, said Capt. (Select) Gary Hayman, director of contract ing at FLCJ. The FLCJ New Orleans sup ply team coordinated the receipt and distribution of approximately 60 pallets of bottled water and 41,000 pounds of ice to Navy families. The water and ice were distributed by the supply team at two pre-deter mined distribution sites. Residents were told to shel ter in place, so most base housing residents did not leave. With no electricity and no good news of its return for at least a week, base residents outlook was not great, said Burns. The provision of water and ice to the residents was pure relief, and their appreciation was evident as they lined up to receive their share. The installation CO was extremely proud of the way his team pulled together to pre pare for, endure, and recover from Hurricane Isaac. The FLCJ New Orleans supply team was a key contributor to that effort, managing the prodi gious fuel requirements and providing timely logistics assistance to the base. FLCJs Codes 200 [contract ing] and 700 were both huge contributors to our success. When you are part of a team, everyone steps up to help each other, said Burns. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville is one of seven strategi cally situated FLCs, under NAVSUP Global Logistics Support, that are aligned to geographic Fleet and regional Navy installation command ers. During times of crisis, NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville supports this alignment through its Operations, Contracting, and Supply Management Departments. These depart ments directly and coopera tively leverage their inherent capabilities to respond to a wide variety of mission sets, both in exercise scenarios and real-world contingency situa tions. NAVSUP FLC Jax provides contingency support to fleet, region 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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Flight Line Caf holds vendor dayThe NAS Jax Flight Line Caf held an event to allow vendors to provide sam ples to the troops during lunch Sept. 26 in an effort to determine what new types of food items they might like to see served in the galley. Were holding this event to introduce new nutritious products to the troops and get information on their likes and dislikes to different food items, said NAS Jax Food Service Officer CWO4 Kathy Wiseman. We brought in 12 different vendors today and if there are some new items that our customers like, we can incor porate them into our menus. Weve also invited food service officers from other bases so we can all get together because vendors sell on quantity. As military members headed into the galley for lunch, they were given the opportunity to sample items from vari ous vendors and fill out customer sur veys on the products. I really like this. Its kind of cool how they set this up for us to see what food items we might like to eat here, said AWOAN Joseph Gallegos of VP-30. I think this is really good because it gives us some new options of what we want to eat since we pay for our meals here. Its an opportunity for us tell them what we would like to see on the menu based on these surveys, added AWFAN Shannon Nunez of VP-30. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 15

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A two-day Basic Rider Course will be offered Nov. 19-20 for female riders only (active duty have priority, dependents/ civilians will be accepted on standby status). Be the first to sign up for this groundbreaking class. If you have always wanted to ride a motorcycle, or have tried to learn from someone else, now is the time to get enrolled and learn from the Motorcycle Safety Foundation female instructors. Motorcycles, helmets, and gloves are provided, although you may bring your own if you wish; just ensure you wear long sleeve shirts, long pants and over the ankle footwear. We will teach this two-day class rain or shine so dress appropriately for the weather. You will have classroom and riding time each day with a written and riding exam to test your knowledge. There are only 12 seats so sign up now! To sign up for the class, contact your motorcycle safety representative, log onto ESAMS and self enroll or call Cindy at 542-2584. U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a mem ber of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of spe cial recognition in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. The registration deadline is Oct. 5. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in ter ritorial waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve recognition and thanks for putting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans during my annual Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the highlights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are strongly encouraged to contact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 598-0481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www. crenshaw.house.gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and docu mentation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the cer tificate, veterans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214.Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program. The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Oct. 7, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Chicago Bears (Tickets on sale now) Nov. 4, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Detroit Lions (Tickets on sale Oct. 22) Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jags vs. Indianapolis Colts (Tickets on sale Oct. 29) Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to purchase/use these tick ets. Retirees and Veterans/DoD employ ees are eligible to purchase tickets for New York Giants and Atlanta Falcons games. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but under no circum stances are dependent children autho rized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may pur chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No exceptions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or return ing during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tick ets for the entire season.Congressman sponsoring Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony on Nov. 8Jacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USOBasic Rider Course available for lady motorcyclists 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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Aims to fly againIt seems every other day you hear a story of someone overcoming great odds to succeed at the highest level. However, in society, countless untold stories exist; stories that run magni tudes deeper than dramas saturating the news. For the past two years, Navy pilot Lt. Mickey Williams of VP-8, has endured the absolute, most brutal emotional and physical pain possible during his personal battle against and recovery from a rare and deadly form of bone cancer. Williams enlisted in the Navy in 1996 as an aviation rescue swimmer. After completing the grueling training and serving over seven years in two differ ent helicopter squadrons, he decided to become a pilot. With the advice and assistance of his mentor, Cmdr. Donald Kennedy, he applied to the Navys Seaman to Admiral program. The pro gram would allow him to earn a com mission as an officer and hopefully one of those coveted spots among the cho sen few in Naval Flight School. Awarded a spot in October 2003, Williams trav eled to Newport, R.I. for training and then received orders to finish his col lege degree at the University of North Florida (UNF). Upon graduating from UNF in 2006, he received his commission and orders to in Pensacola, Fla. Williams, along with his wife, Amy, and their five chil dren, spent the next two years mov ing, studying, and flying as he strived to earn his wings of gold. With orders to his fleet squadron, flying the P-3C Orion as one of the Fighting Tigers of VP-8, he realized his dream. As the squadron began prepara tions for a seven-month deployment to the Middle East in November 2010, Williams began to notice pain in his left leg. Dismissing it as nothing more than remnants of shin splints from his time as a rescue swimmer, he dealt with the pain. As the deployment continued, with regular 18-hour days and 10-hour mis sions flying in support of troops in Iraq or combating piracy in the Arabian Sea, Williams continued working through the increasingly worsening pain and refused to let it get in the way of his dream. However, near the end of deployment, the pain turned into a lump, and the squadrons flight surgeon insisted on X-rays. Yet, due to his location, mission requirements, and scarcity of an X-ray machine, they decided to wait until after his return home in June 2011. As the lump grew into a ball and his limp grew more pronounced, he knew his body was telling him that something was seriously wrong. Tasked with flying one of the squad rons P-3C Orions home from deploy ment to NAS Jacksonville, he let the joy and anticipation of returning home to his family mask the pain in his leg. As the aircraft ladder lowered and he could see his family waiting, Williams slipped and landed on his injured leg. Thinking he had broken his leg, Williams mus tered all of his strength to walk tall across the tarmac. Over the next two days, the pain did not subside so Williams finally was able to visit a doctor who imme diately ordered a CAT scan and MRI after seeing the results of his X-rays. As the radiologist showed him the X-ray, and he saw the destruction the tumor caused in his bone, his heart dropped. The radiologist stated more tests were needed, but it showed all of the signs of aggressive bone cancer. The doctor ordered him to keep all weight off of the leg because delaying treatment had brought the bone precariously close to breaking, and if it broken, the tumor could rupture and spread the cancer to the rest of his body. On July 18, 2011, after weeks of pain ful tests, biopsies and scans, the doctors at Jacksonvilles Mayo Clinic diagnosed it as either Osteo-sarcoma, or Ewings Sarcoma, both very rare and deadly forms of bone cancer. When Williams inquired what stage the cancer had developed, his main specialist, Dr. Mary OConnor, explained that because of the nature of this cancer, they could not diagnose it in stages. This cancer often spreads so aggressively that by the time a diagnosis is reached, it has already metastasized and spread to other parts of the body. The reality finally began to take hold of Williams. His 8-year-old son, Matthew, had excitedly planned fishing and camping trips with his dad when they spoke on Skype during the deployment. He looked forward to summer rides in a new Chevy Camaro Amy had surprised him with upon his return home. He would have to cancel the planned family trip to Disney World. Yet, as the prognosis grew more and more grim, and the chemotherapy weakened his body and caused his hair to fall out, Williams resolution only grew stronger. His family depended on him as their rock; everyday he would look in their eyes and tell them they had only hit a rough patch, the worse had passed, and things would get better soon. Deep down, he simply could not let go of his dream. He had worked so hard and sacrificed so much, he knew he needed to fly again, to serve again. Months passed, and the treatment took its toll. The chemo coupled with frequent blood transfusions left him weak and unable to leave the house. Nevertheless, on some days, he would find the strength and would organize a trip to the mall, and soon it became a family joke as to who would ride with him on the wheelchair. By the fall of 2011, it became apparent he would need major surgery. The doctors gave him two options, amputation of his leg below the knee or attempt to salvage the limb. They explained that with the amputation, the cancer would not spread and with more chemo, they had a very good chance of eliminating the remaining cancer from his body. The option was to cut much of the dis eased bone, replacing it with the fibula from his other leg, and using skin, muscle, and nerve grafts from his abdomen. Agonizing over the decision, Amy reached out to the Wounded Warrior Project in Jacksonville and they put him in touch with an alumnus named Brian Wagner. Wagner suffered an injury while serving in Iraq and faced the same situation with his leg. He had decided to have it amputated, and eventually helped Williams realize amputation provided the best conduit for him to reach his goals. After deciding on the surgery, Williams was admitted to the hospital on Nov. 22, 2011. He awoke in a room surrounded by nurses and doctors, a dull ache emanating from just below his knee. As they transferred him from recovery room to a hospital bed, the pain became excruciating. Still, he knew he needed to begin physical therapy immediately if he wanted to step back in the cockpit. When the pathology reports returned, the doctors expected it to show that the months of chemotherapy had killed over 90 percent of the cancer; in reality, it had only killed 20 percent. Williams had to endure yet another devastating setback. He was then referred to the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. With the help of his TRICARE Case Manager Deana Falls, his new doctor, Dr. John Ludwig, coordinated a new treatment regimen with the doctors from the Mayo Clinic. Williams again had to endure anoth er six rounds of chemotherapy. Even after months of debilitating treatment, his determination never wavered. In between rounds of treatment, he was fitted with prostheses, and, by the end of March, he took his first steps without the aid of crutches since his return, and initial x-rays in June 2011. As he finished his last round of treatment in July, his mind never wandered far from the aircraft. Every time he put on that flight suit, he yearned to feel the rumble of the engines, the sensa tion of tearing down the runway and lifting off to fly. In his head, he con stantly replayed the words of his for mer Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Chris Flaherty. When learning of the severity of Williams condition, Flaherty told the squadron that he would fly again, and that he would muster every resource he had to ensure he would keep that promise. In August, Williams began the pro cess to receive a medical waiver to return to the cockpit. Although the process could take up to a year, on Aug. 9, he climbed back into the flight station and smoothly landed his aircraft in a training simulator. Although a huge accomplishment, Williams still faces a long road ahead. He recently received a special prosthetic allowing him to jump and swim so he can complete the water survival recer tification process. It will take at least until the beginning of 2013 to build up endurance before complete the waiver process and return to unrestricted duty. Throughout the whole process, he has remained a realist, understand ing he will need a lot of good fortune to become the first amputee naval pilot. And even if the Navy decides he will never fly again, Williams hopes to continue to serve. P-3 pilot overcomes cancer, loss of leg JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 17

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Members of the NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), along with several Seabees from Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU202) Detachment Jacksonville, placed 250 purple ribbons around the base Sept. 28 to help commemorate Domestic Violence Awareness Month at NAS Jacksonville. The purple ribbon recognizes and honors victims of domestic violence and celebrates survivors. The purple ribbon also celebrates that the silence previ ously facilitated domestic abuse and violence has been broken, said FFSC Victim Advocate LaTresa Henderson. For more than two decades, the purple ribbon has been the symbol that highlights the issue of domestic abuse and the commitment of survivors, fam ily members and other concerned persons deter mined to end domestic abuse, she continued. She appreci ated the time and equipment the Seabees contrib ute to the annual project. We simply couldnt accomplish this every year without their help. The Seabees do great work that always exceeds our expectations, said Henderson. USS Winston S. Churchill aids Belde Guided-missile destroyer USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) and HSL-42 Proud Warriors recently rendered medical assistance to Panamanian-flagged, bulk carrier M/V Belde, around 110 miles north of Socotra Island, Yemen. At approximately 1:10 p.m. local time, Churchill responded to a distress call fol lowing a cargo-handling accident aboard Belde. After arriving on scene, Churchill dis patched two rigid-hull inflatable boats, transporting the ships hospital corpsman, and the visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team to assess the injured person nel. One Belde crew member was killed in the accident and another required advanced medical care for injuries sus tained. Churchill conducted a medical evacua tion, transporting the injured crew mem ber by an SH-60B helicopter attached to HSL-42 Detachment 8, to an Oman medi cal facility for treatment. No further assis tance was required. There are a multitude of hazards in the maritime domain. As such, we are always ready to assist, said Cmdr. Christopher Stone, Churchill commanding officer. Our sympathies go out to those affect ed by this tragic incident. We, as partners in the maritime commons, are always ready and willing to help and are glad that we were in the right place at the right time to lend a hand. Stone added that he was proud of his crew for successfully completing a rescue mission in incredibly complex condi tions. The personal and professional satis faction of knowing that the outstanding efforts of this ship and this crew saved another mariners life is second to none. It is days like today that makes me proud to be a member of the United States Navy and this coalition. I am incredibly proud to be the commanding officer of Winston S. Churchill, said Stone. Churchill is assigned to Commander, Task Force 150, as part of Combined Maritime Forces, conducting counterterrorism and maritime security opera tions in the Gulf of Aden, Gulf of Oman, Arabian Sea, Red Sea and Indian Ocean. Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) (SS/ SW) Rick West gave his last Hoo-Yah during the changeof-office ceremony at the Washington Navy Yard, Sept. 28. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert was the guest speaker for the cere mony and highlighted MCPON Wests accomplishments dur ing his naval career while thanking him for his leader ship. MCPON West, you made the Navy better through your will ingness to listen and learn, said Greenert. I watched you firsthand in the Pacific Fleet, at U.S. Fleet Forces, as VCNO, and I had the honor to serve with you for one year as CNO. MCPON West had the heartbeat of the Navy. Sailors communicated with him. He challenged Sailors and they loved it. The ceremony marked the end of a nearly 32-year career for West, who had served as the 12th MCPON since Dec. 12, 2008. During his time as MCPON, West instituted the Senior Enlisted Continuation Board, introduced CPO 365, and implemented the manda tory enlisted warfare designa tion. MCPON West made a dif ference and led by example. He made a tangible improvement in our Navy, said Greenert. I say to you and Bobbi (wife), thank you very much and our nation and our Navy thanks you. West did not discuss per sonal accomplishments during his retirement remarks, instead focusing on thanking family, friends, shipmates and mentors who helped shape him into a leader and the memories hell take with him of his years of service. There is simply no way I can mention you all. Just know that if you are here today, you played some part in the success that I have enjoyed, said West. It has been an honor and privilege to serve our great Navy for nearly 32 years and especially to serve as MCPON for the last four. Thirty-two years is a long time, but when you are talking about the end of a fantastic journey, it was just a flash of time. Ive never had a THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jax to host World Military Golf ChampionshipNAS Jacksonville is hosting the seventh World Military Golf Championship, Conseil International du Sport Militaire (CISM) at the NAS Jax Golf Course Oct. 13-18. CISM began in 1948 with five participating nations. From those five founder nations CISM has grown to 126 mem ber nations. The United Stated joined the organiza tion in 1951. The aim of CISM is the encouragement of military sports and the development of friendly relations between the armed forces of the vari ous fields related to sport and physical readiness. The official CISM motto is: SPORT means peace. SPORT is the opposite of war. SPORT is a cure for war. SPORT is international. SPORT brings nations closer. Friendship through sport The following countries are planning to attend the 2012 CISM Golf Championships and registration is ongoing with a few more countries expected: Bahrain, Canada, Estonia, Germany, Italy, Namibia, Pakistan, Spain, Uganda, United States and Zambia. CISM schedule of events Opening ceremonies Oct. 13 at 9 a.m. Oct. 14 first round of play Oct. 15 second round of play Oct. 16 third round of play Oct. 17 fourth and final round of play Oct. 18 cultural day and closing ceremoniesFor more information, call 542-3111.Wests last Hoo-YahStevens takes helm as Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Proud Warriors provide air ambulance Purple ribbons bring domestic violence awareness

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Oct. 4 1821 Lt. Robert Stockton sails from Boston for Africa to help stop the interna tional slave trade. 1943 Aircraft from USS Ranger (CV-4) sink five German ships and damage three in Operation Leader, the only U.S. Navy carrier operation in northern European waters during World War II. 1952 Task Force 77 aircraft encounter MIG-15 aircraft for the first time. Oct. 5 1863 Confederate David seriously damages USS New Ironsides with a spar torpedo off Charleston, S.C. 1913 Trial of OWL, Navys first amphibian flying boat. 1957 Minitrack, a satellite tracking net developed by the Naval Research Laboratory, becomes operational. This network, with stations from Maine to Chile, tracked the Vangard satellite. Oct. 6 1884 Department of the Navy estab lishes the Naval War College at Newport, R.I. (General Order 325). 1940 Fourth group of eight U.S. destroyers involved in Destroyers for Bases deal are turned over to British authorities at Halifax, Canada. 1943 In night Battle of Vella Lavella, three U.S. destroyers attack nine Japanese destroyers to stop evacuation of Japanese troops from Vella Lavella, Solomon Islands. 1958 USS Seawolf (SSN-575) com pletes record submerged run of 60 days, logging over 13,700 nautical miles. 1962 Commissioning of USS Bainbridge (DLGN-25), first nuclear-pow ered frigate. 1997 NASA Astronaut and Navy Cmdr. Wendy Lawrence returns from mission of STS-86: Shuttle -Mir 7 when Atlantis docked with Mir Space Station. The mission began on 25 September. Oct. 7 1864 USS Washusett captures Confederate raider CSS Florida in harbor of Bahia, Brazil. 1924 Rigid airship Shenandoah com mences transcontinental flight. 1975 President Gerald Ford signs law allowing admission of women into ser vice academies. 2001 Operation Enduring Freedom begins with carrier air strikes, plus, ship and submarine Tomahawk strikes. Oct. 8 1812 Boat party under Lt. Jesse Elliott captures HMS Detroit and Caledonia on Niagara River. 1842 Commodore Lawrence Kearny in USS Constitution, addresses a letter to the Viceroy of China, urging that American merchants in China be granted the same treaty privileges as the British. His nego tiations are successful. 1950 1st Marine Division commences embarkation at Inchon for landings at Wonsan, Korea. Oct. 9 1873 Lt. Charles Belknap calls a meet ing at the Naval Academy to establish the U.S. Naval Institute for the purpose of disseminating scientific and professional knowledge throughout the Navy. 1942 First three schools for enlisted WAVES open at Stillwater, Okla. (Yeoman), Bloomington, Ind. (Storekeeper), and Madison, Wis. (Radioman). 1945 Parade in New York City honors Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz and 13 other Navy and Marine Corps Medal of Honor awardees. 1945 Typhoon hits Okinawa, damag ing many Navy ships. Oct. 10 1845 Naval School, later the Naval Academy, opens in Annapolis, Md., with 50 midshipmen and seven faculty. 1923 First American-built rigid air ship, Shenandoah, is christened. It used helium gas instead of hydrogen. 1944 Opening of Leyte campaign begins with attack of four Carrier Task Groups of Task Force 38 on Okinawa and Ryukyus. 1985 Fighters from USS Saratoga (CV-60) force Egyptian airliner, with the hijackers of the cruise ship Achille Lauro aboard, to Italy, where the hijackers were taken into custody. It was Saturday. Before I even opened my eyes, I knew the grass was covered in a blanket of shim mering, silver dew. Not frost yet, but cold and wet, just the same. The window panes beside my bed seemed suddenly thinner. A chill filled the bedroom. I heard a few lone, brave birds squawking, but their calls seemed to echo instead of clamor, as they do in the spring, when it sounds like there is a bird party in the backyard. Indeed, the squawks seemed only to come from crows. Also, it was dark. I opened my eyes and sat up in bed. I knew: winter is coming. Im not exaggerating when I say a cold sweat broke out on my forehead and my heart began to pound. Dont get me wrong, I love winter. And I especially love fall. But there seems to be an almost chemical reaction that happens when the sunlight moves sideways, casting long, cool shadows across the street, and the crows take over the landscape again. Its like my body just knows. Adjusting to climates and time changes can be considered an occu pational hazard for military fami lies. But the risks, so to speak, become even greater when you live in the farthest northern corners of the country. Here, its not just the clocks on the wall that get messed up, its the internal ones as well. When the military first moved us to Maine, I didnt understand the seasonal changes yet. Neither did my body, which leads me to believe that the process is at least as men tal as it is biological. Back then, I grew more sluggish in October, and eight months later, I had trouble fall ing asleep in sun-filled June, but my brain didnt understand the differ ences. There was no logical compo nent. Now that Ive been through sev eral winters now that Ive learned what happens when you dont rake your roof or water gets inside the keyhole in your car door a new dimension takes hold in the antici pation of snow: I dont want to be caught unprepared. Also: I dont want to be left behind. I used to think it was just the shortened days (by November, it will be dark by 4:15 p.m.) that affected me. When the shadows grew long and the sunlight more cool, my heart would quicken. But now I know that the squirrels and crows and even my forward-thinking friends are to blame. Beginning in September, the squirrels that live in the large tree in our front yard, start getting fat. Literally. Those animals that look almost rat-like in spring grow pudgy and hefty in the fall. They dig holes in the yard, and they suck on acorns, driving our dog, Sparky, insane. I liken this to the crowd mentality I experienced in Florida just before a hurricane. When jugs of water start flying off the shelf, you cant help but buy one (or twenty) your self. I mean, youre not going to be the schmuck whos caught with out water. Even if the shelves seem emptied of prunes (which you hate), a clear sign that the crowd knows something you do not, youll feel compelled to drive to another store to find some. This is how I feel when I see the squirrels getting ready for winter. As their rounded pre-winter bod ies scurry across the yard and dig in the flowerbeds, I wonder, Should I maybe be digging for acorns, too? Acorns are legitimate food, right? Can you burn acorns as firewood if the heater breaks? Would it work to use an acorn to break the ice on my windshield? When it comes to winter pre paredness, everyone probably has a better plan than I do. Especially my neighbors with the reflective sticks to show the plow guy where the edge of the yard is buried, or the A-frame protective tents for their shrubs. This feeling of being left behind and caught unprepared, Im con vinced, leads to the feeling of panic and despair of fall. Ive heard that light therapy boxes can help. Im giving it a try this year. My box arrived last week, and so far, what Ive learned is this: when the instructions say dont stare direct ly into the light they mean dont stare directly into the light. The light box hasnt yet shown me miracles (like feeling less tired at 6 a.m.), and, in fact, if I wasnt depressed before, I am now after putting on my make up with 10,000 lux of light illuminating every pore and blemish on my face. But I have great hopes for the box. Also, Im not above taunting those over-achieving squirrels with my preparedness. I wonder if theyve thought of a light box yet? Maybe I should show it to them through the glass front door: Hey, squirrels, can your acorns do this? Just knowing that I have some thing the squirrels dont makes me rest a little easier this winter. Waiting for winter with my new, handy light box FOD walkdown set for Oct. 10NAS Jax Air Operations announced an installation-wide foreign object damage (FOD) walkdown of the airfield Oct. 10, from 7:30 9 a.m. Operations Officer Cmdr. Mark McManus said, The entire flight line will be visual ly inspected for any small, loose items that could become Foreign Object Damage. Even a tiny screw sucked into a jet engine intake can cause disastrous results on takeoff or land ing.

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Cmdr. James Miller relieved Cmdr. Joseph OBrien as com manding officer of HSM-74 Swamp Foxes Sept. 28 at Hangar 1122 aboard NAS Jacksonville. The guest speaker was Commander, Carrier Air Wing 3 Capt. Michael Wallace. Miller assumed the duties of executive officer of HSM-74 inJune of 2011.He has deployed with HSL-44 on board USS De Wert (FFG 45)and USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) as part of the Enterprise Battle Group. He also served on board USS George Washington (CVN 73) as helicopter element coordina tor for Carrier Air Wing 7 and deployed on board USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) as officer in charge with HSL-46. Ashore, Miller has served as an instructor at HSL-40, attended the Naval War College, and worked as integrated missile defense watch com mander at the United States Strategic Command Functional Component Command for Integrated Missile Defense in Colorado Springs, Colo. OBrien became the com manding officer in June 2011.His next assignment will be as navigation officer on board USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) home ported in Norfolk, Va. Coming in as executive officer is Cmdr. Matt Boren. He previ ously served with Headquarters, U.S. Special Operations Command. HSM-74 deploys people and helicopters to all corners of the globe in support of Carrier Air Wing 3. The Mad Foxes deploy aboard aircraft carriers, cruis ers, destroyers, and frigates. On Sept. 21, Commander, Naval Safety Center Rear Adm. Brian Prindle and VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to the following 10 officers: Ensign Nicholas Chappell, Lt. j.g. John Chatfield, Ensign Joshua Cochran, Ensign Robert Gammons, Ensign Dennis Haynes, Ensign John Jakes, Ensign Dennie Johnson Jr., CWO2 Jeffrey Moore, Ensign Taylor Stang and Ensign Marc Wallis. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer syllabus at VP-30, earning their coveted wings of gold. These newly winged avi ators will now enroll in the CAT 1 Fleet Replacement Squadron syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT 1 syllabus, they will report to operational P-3C or EP-3 squadrons to begin their initial sea tours in either Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, Whidbey Island, Wash., or NAS Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, where all avi ation officers undergo a classroom syl labus and are taught the basics of naval aviation which includes aerodynamics, meteorology and principles of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10 at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transition from a classroom learning environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of pri mary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3C or P-8A training pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. VP-30 wings Navys newest naval flight officers Miller takes the helm of HSM-74 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 Mobile Tactical Operations Center Three (MTOC-3) recent ly completed a two-week oper ational readiness evaluation (ORE) prior to its deployment in the 5th Fleet area of respon sibility. MTOC-3 is a rapidly deploy able mobile command and control, communications, computers and intelligence (C4I) unit supporting Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance/ Navy expeditionary operations worldwide. MTOC-3 is one of four MTOCs under Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 (CPRW-11) at NAS Jacksonville. ORE is an evaluation pro gram that is used to compre hensively test the capability of all MTOC equipment and per sonnel to accomplish all facets of their mission set, to ensure their ability to deploy when needed by a theater command er. MTOC Sailors deploy across the globe, supporting the P-3C Orion maritime patrol and surveillance aircraft. From the ground, they provide critical communication links between task force commanders and P-3C aircrews. They go wher ever the P-3C requires their support. MTOC Sailors are consid ered rapid deployers, pack ing their tactical gear in a P-3C, C-130 or C-17, depending on the scope of the mission they are needed to support, arriving on scene first and setting up within one to four days. Typically, the MTOCs set up support operations in a struc ture or building close to the airfield the aircraft are operat ing from, but they can also set up a self-sufficient expedition ary site, like they did during their most recent ORE at NAS Jax. The ORE consisted of writ ten examinations and a field exercise, that included the set up of a full expeditionary site with tents, generators and elec tronic C4I equipment. The only things missing were cots and showers. During the evalu ation, MTOC Sailors manned a highly capable Operations Control (OPCON) center around the clock supporting East Coast training flights, in support of Fleet exercises. During operations, MTOC personnel connect P-3 aircrews to the Internet for preflight mission planning, to include commanders tasking, radio frequencies and environmen tal data. While airborne, P-3C aircrews rely heavily on the critical communications paths provided by the MTOC for bidirectional flow of tasking and operational information. When a flight is over, MTOC mem bers utilize their specialized equipment to download data from the aircraft for analysis and quickly disseminate it to commanders. Although the exercise was just two weeks in length, the success was a result of exten sive training and planning over the last 12 months by all hands. Because the unit is so small, everyone has to learn each others jobs, said Lt. Ron Williams, the units officer in charge. I really didnt know what to expect to be honest. I see now why they say MTOCs are expe ditionary, stated AWO1(NAC/ AW) Josh Mounts, who just recently transferred from the CPRW-11 Weapons Tactics Unit Department. Theres nothing in the entire Navy like working in the MTOC, exclaimed OS2(AW/ SW) Jeffrey Maricic after run ning the last event in the OPCON as watch supervisor. He continued, As a shipgoing rate, I never imagined Id be setting up expedition ary tents, working on genera tors, driving a forklift and be fully operational in a matter of hours. Williams said, Its hard to find Sailors interested in going to an MTOC. Because its such a small community in the Navy, not many Sailors know about it. If youre interested in seeing the world, interested in learning about new equip ment, MTOC might be a place for you. When a billet comes up on CMS/ID for sea duty to an MTOC, many Sailors are left wondering what exactly an MTOC is and the scope of the job. There are four source ratings for Sailors interested in serving within an MTOC. Those ratings are Aviation Warfare Specialist Operator, Electronics Technician, Information Technology Technician, and Operations Specialist. Although this sea duty might not be on a ship, duty at a MTOC is in an expe ditionary setting and will have its fair share of deployments, labor-intensive work days, opportunities and rewards. MTOC-3 completes operational readiness evaluation

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 5 Photos by ET3 Justin Goss, ET1(SW/IDW) Justin Weakland and Lt. Craig Mueller

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A gathering of regional chaplains and Chaplain Religious Enrichment Development Operation (CREDO) directors from around the globe, as well as large-installation command chap lains and senior enlisted advisors, took place at NAS Jacksonville Sept. 26 -28 to develop a strategic plan for ministry support from the shore to the fleet. Sponsored by Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC), the Religious Program Office Oversight Meeting attracted about 50 chaplains, enlisted and civilian personnel eager to share ideas and renew their spiritual energy. Kicking off the three-day event was Rear Adm. Mark Tidd, the Chief of Chaplains, who said he was pleased to meet with his Chaplain Corps col leagues. Tidd reminded the gathering that, The heart of the Navy is ships at sea but the heart of a Sailor is always with his or her family ashore. The job of our religious ministry teams made up of chaplains and religious program spe cialists is to serve the everyday spiri tual needs of these exceptional service members in the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. We help guide them through lifes trials and tribulations, as we do the same for their families back home. The chaplains and religious program specialists of CNIC are key people who provide and coordinate the religious ministry support program ashore. He added, Im here today to thank them for their commitment, dedica tion and sacrifice as well as encourage them to develop new types of minis try and spiritual support during these dynamic and changing times. Capt. Johnny Poole, the CNIC chap lain who helped organize the event, challenged the attendees to imagine how the ministries of base chapels will evolve in the future. What innovations can we bring aboard? What opportunities can we seize to better serve our Sailors, Marines and their families? Poole asked. We want our chaplains and RP teams to leave this conference with a clear vision of the challenges, but also of the ministry opportunities they plan to coordinate. Todays chaplains and RPs must be looking for creative ways to approach their ministries such as an expansion of their CREDO program and retreat ministries, Tidd agreed. At the NAS Jacksonville Chapel Center, Tidd also visited a training class on the new Naval Chaplaincy Ministry Support Tool (NCMST). Using commercial-off-the-shelf software, NCMST is a new way to more effectively manage the ministry that we provide, as well as collect information on the spiritual impact that we gener ate, explained Tidd. At NAS Jacksonville, for instance, NCMST gives Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore and his RP team an information system that pro vides both his base and region com manders with detailed information about ministry activities. But please note, that as we talk about tracking ministry and spirituality, sometimes its hard to really define and measure what that is because some good things may not fit into an easily defined category. Tidd concluded, In todays finan cially strained environment, we have to make the best use possible of our resources, including chaplains and RPs, who are critical to the readiness and resilience of our people. We can only strengthen the force when we reach out in fellowship to our younger Sailors and Marines and their families.Chaplains discuss challenges, opportunities for naval ministry 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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bad command because I feel commands are what you make of them and how you choose to seize the opportunities. The thing Im going to miss the most is, by far, the people and the energy and innovation of our Sailors and families. The engine that truly drives our Navy is our people. Our Sailors are what makes our Navy the best thats ever sailed the worlds oceans, said West. MCPON (AW/NAC) Mike Stevens took the helm of the enlisted force as the Navys 13th MCPON after receiving the ceremonial cutlass from MCPON West. I was honored to pick MCPON 13, said Greenert. It was not an easy task. MCPON Stevens is a proven and effec tive leader. This is a guy ready to lead our Navy and I look for ward to your insight and per spective. Stevens, a native of Montana, joined the Navy in 1983 and most recently served as Fleet Master Chief for U.S. Fleet Forces Fleet Master Chief in Norfolk. His previ ous Command Master Chief tours included U.S. 2nd Fleet, Helicopter Sea Combat Wing Atlantic, Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron 14, and Naval Air Station Pensacola. MCPON Stevens thanked Adm. Greenert for his trust and faith in his selection as MCPON. I am both humbled and honored to have been pro vided this magnificent oppor tunity to lead and serve our Sailors, their families and our government civilians as Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy, said Stevens. He thanked West for his ser vice, leadership and friendship and spoke to the Navy, saying he is excited about the future and looking forward to serving the Navy as MCPON by work ing together to carry out the Navys mission. The MCPON serves as an advisor to the CNO and to the Chief of Naval Personnel in matters dealing with enlisted personnel and their families. The MCPON is also an advi sor to boards dealing with enlisted personnel issues; is the enlisted representative of the Department of the Navy at special events; may be called upon to testify on enlisted per sonnel issues before Congress; and maintains a liaison with enlisted spouse organizations. MCPON Fire Prevention Week scheduleFire Prevention Week commemorates the Great Chicago Fire when a two-day blaze killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless and destroyed more than 17,000 buildings Oct. 8-9, 1871. That tragedy inspired reform across America, spurring new fire safety codes and public awareness campaigns. In October, the National Fire Protection Association highlights the importance of fire safety education. This years theme, Have 2 Ways Out, focuses on estab lishing several evacuation routes for your family members if a fire should occur in the home. The following is the NAS Jax Fire Prevention Week sched ule of events: Oct. 7 13, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Daily open house at base fire stations. Oct. 9-12 Unannounced fire evacuation drills. Oct. 9, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Fire Prevention table dis play with fire safety materials, red fire hats, fire appara tus, Pluggie the talking fire hydrant at the Navy Exchange Courtyard. Oct. 9, 4 p.m. Fire inspectors, Pluggie the talking fire hydrant and fire apparatus at the NAS Jax Youth Center, Building 2069. Oct. 10, 10-11 a.m. Fire inspectors and Pluggie the talk ing fire hydrant visit the Childrens Ward and Pediatrics Clinic at the Naval Hospital, Building H2080. Oct. 11, 9:30 a.m. Fire Inspectors and Pluggie the talking fire hydrant at the Child Development Center, Building 2070. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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The NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center introduced Domestic Violence Awareness month (October), with a conference for those working with domestic violence victims, at the Orange Park Holiday Inn on Sept. 27. Every year, we host a conference to conduct domestic violence awareness training for our staff members and the outside agencies we partner with to pro vide new information and share ideas on how to better serve our clients, said NAS Jax FFSC Director Myrna Wilson. The guest speaker was Dr. David Wexler who presented his pro gram, When Push Comes to Shove: Contemporary Research, Assessment, and Treatment Innovations for Partner Abuse. The event began with NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander welcoming the group. This is a very important topic and this is a great way to bring awareness of Domestic Violence Month, said Undersander, who then asked for a show of hands as to how many in the audience worked with military person nel. In the military, we continually look at family readiness because its not just the service member deploying, but the entire family making sacrifices. So we put a lot of emphasis on family health and well-being. Undersander then introduced Wexler, a clinical psychologist specializing in the treatment of relationships in con flict who has also worked quite exten sively with the military participating in several Navy research studies regarding domestic violence and the prevention of sexual violence. Wexlers presentation covered such topics as definitions and typologies of abusers, risk assessment, understand ing male psychology and engaging defensive men, female offenders, diver sity issues, accountability and disinhib itors and The Stop Program which offers innovative skills, technologies, options and plans for better relationships. Domestic violence prevention is a very complicated field and there are so many new aspects in the terms of understanding it that it is important for those individuals treating offend ers, victims or witnesses that they know who they are dealing with and who will benefit from interventions, said Wexler. When asked what he wanted his audi ence to get out of the workshop, Wexler stated, I want them to realize that one size does not fit all. They need to per ceive both the offenders and victims through their own specific lens and their own particular story. I want them to recognize that the treatment is not to put offenders in a room and say, youve been bad. Ive found that the way to stop the behavior is to find a way to con nect with them, respect them and real ize their complex issues, and offer tools to turn it around. Wexler also commented that the sta tistics of domestic violence within the military is not always higher than that of the civilian population. Sometimes, there is a spike in mili tary domestic violence incidents when the service members return home with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder but his torically its not that different. What is different is that the military is much quicker to realize the issues, he said. In all of the military settings Ive worked in, they were able to identify cases of domestic violence and pro vide intervention treatment despite less actual evidence that would be required in a civilian court. So the military is definitely take a much greater preventa tive stance on the issue. It can always be done better, but overall, the military is doing a pretty good job, said Wexler. Domestic Violence Awareness Month is recognized every October to remem ber those who have died at the hands of a loved one, honor those who have survived domestic violence, recognize the progress made in reducing domes tic violence and recommit to end the abuse. If you or someone you know are in an abusive relationship, call (904) 354-3114. The hotline is manned 24/7. You never know, you just might save someones life. FFSC kicks off Domestic Violence Awareness month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 9

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While the Department of the Navy has long conducted ener gy awareness campaigns that promote the wise and efficient use of energy, Americans first set aside a time to think about saving energy in 1981 with American Energy Week. In 1991, President George Bush proclaimed October as Energy Awareness Month. Today, more than ever, our nation can benefit from the efficient use of energy at fed eral facilities. As the single largest domes tic user of energy, the federal government spends more than $9 billion to power its vehicles and operations at approximate ly 500,000 facilities throughout the United States. Efficient energy manage ment at federal facilities is important because it: emissions and natural resources security In addition, regulations like the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, Executive Orders 13423 and 13514, require federal agencies to meet a number of energy and water management goals. These goals range from reduc ing energy and water con sumption to designing more efficient facilities and reduc ing fossil fuel consumption and associated greenhouse gasses of fleet vehicles. Two critical goals that NAS Jacksonville is currently on track to meet are a 30 percent reduction in energy intensity by 2015 (from a 2003 baseline) and a 16 percent reduction in water consumption by 2015 (from a 2007 baseline). With so many global chal lenges tied to energy use including air pollution, reli ance on fossil fuels, volatile fuel costs and aging energy infrastructure it makes sense to choose energy efficiency as a basic work ethic and lifestyle. During Energy Awareness Month and throughout the year remember that saving energy should be an individual priority that helps safeguard Americas energy infrastruc ture by reducing carbon emis sions. Learn more about energy efficiency by reading articles by the NAS Jax Energy Team in the October issues of Jax Air News Additionally, an Energy Awareness Month display will be located near the NEX food court Bldg. 987 on Oct. 12-13 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The NAS Jax energy team will be there to discuss energy saving oppor tunities and answer any ques tions you may have. A lighting comparison board, water saving showerhead dis play and solar photovoltaic demonstration will also be set up. For the kids, our energy conservation mascot, BRITE, will be available for pictures and plenty of non-verbal com munication. Be part of the solution: October is Energy Awareness Month 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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Sunny skies and calm winds drew an enthusiastic crowd to the second annual Mulberry Cove Marina Riverfest Sept. 29. Held on the banks of the St. Johns River, the event was open to active duty mem bers, Reservists, retirees and Department of Defense civil ians. The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary provided safe boating information and free inspections of boats, while members of the St. Johns Bass Anglers Club offered free cast ing clinics to patrons of all ages. Children enjoyed free face painting provided by the Fleet and Family Support Center. Fort George Surf Shop pro vided information on surfing lessons, surfboards and gear. Sunnyland Antique & Classic Boat Society showcased two vessels on the St. Johns River. Purcells Motorcycle and Marine World provided free T-shirts and an opportunity to check out the Ranger XP900. Mulberry Cove Marina Manager Phil Collins gave free paddleboard lessons through out the day. Additional activi ties included volleyball, bag toss, music, door prizes, kayak ing, canoeing and a free cook out. This is a great event for the families and an excel lent opportunity to get youths involved in wholesome out door activities, said AO2 Garry Procter of VP-45. Misha Barton, assistant marina manager, stated, We are excited about this awesome turnout. We wanted to show appreciation to our patrons and showcase what the mari na has to offer. The weather is beautiful and everyone seems to be having a great time. NAS Jacksonville MWR thanks the many volunteers and sponsors that made this event a success: Fort George Island Surf Shop, Sunnyland Antique & Classic Boat Society, Purcells Motorcycle and Marine World and St. Johns Bass Anglers Club.Disclaimer: Neither NAS Jax, MWR, or the Jax Air News nor any part of the federal government officially endorses any company, spon sor or their products or servic es. Families flock to second annual Mulberry Cove Marina Riverfest JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 11

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On Aug. 17, VP-16 hosted retired Navy Cmdr. James Bailey, a former prisoner of war in North Vietnam, who spoke to squadron members about his time in captivity and the lessons he learned about leadership there. Bailey is the father of Lt. j.g. John Bailey, a naval flight officer in VP-16. During the summer of 1967, Lt. j.g. James Bailey was deployed off the coast of Vietnam on board USS Constellation (CVA 64). Bailey was an F-4B Phantom II navigator attached to Fighter Squadron 143. On June 28, Bailey and his pilot, Cmdr. Bill Lawrence, were flying a com bat sortie over North Vietnam when their F-4 was shot down by anti-aircraft artillery. The two managed to safely eject, however they were immediately captured and spent the next six years in the Hanoi prison system. Bailey was initially interrogated and then kept in solitary confinement for the first six months. When speaking to the War Eagles, he emphasized the importance of learning to communicate with the other prisoners as soon as pos sible. He also discussed how communica tion reinforced the command structure of the POWs within the camp. Bailey highlighted that although the senior prisoners endured the majority of the interrogations and mistreatment, they never backed down from their positions of responsibility and were always able to bounce back. It was amazing to have a real hero speak to us, says Lt. Ryan Burke. Its especially meaningful to me since this is my roommates dad. Bailey also spoke of the efforts of the POWs to keep each other mentally sharp, which included teaching each other foreign languages and mathemat ics. The lessons that Bailey taught were not just for those in captivity, rather for everyone who encounters challenges throughout their life. Baileys story serves as a constant reminder that any challenge can be overcome as long as people can trust one another and stick together. Baileys personal experience demon strated that humor is an effective way to overcome adversity, no matter how dire the circumstances. He told stories of fellow prisoners finding humor in their battles of wits with guards and small victories in resistance that helped the prisoners keep their sanity and hope. I think that my basic faith and trust in the system of government of the United States of America was the factor that gave me the courage to go on and face each day as it came. I felt that I had undertaken a tremendous respon sibility when I took the oath and accept ed my commission as a United States naval officer. I felt proud to uphold this responsibility, said Bailey. The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 participated in Valiant Shield 2012 (VS12) exercise, Sept. 11-19. VS12 is a U.S.-only exercise with a focus on integra tion of joint training among U.S. forces in relation to current operational plans. Participating for the first time in Valiant Shield, the Fighting Tigers provided two combat aircrews, as well as supporting maintenance personnel, who worked with multiple P-3C crews from VP-40, VP-5, VP-47, and VP-69. Each unit brought with it different levels of pro ficiency with conducting operations in this type of environment, said Lt. Cmdr. Christopher Benjamin, VP-8 detachment officer in charge. The ability of all units to come together as one joint force, while over coming different proficiency levels, directly enabled our success in the detection, locating, tracking and engagement of adversary units at sea. The 2011 Golden Wrench Award recipient, VP-8 maintenance team worked around the clock to keep the 50-year-old Orion ready to fly. Despite operating with minimal personnel and equipment maintainers, the squadron didnt miss a step throughout the exer cise, ensuring on time take offs on all flights. We had to overcome a few challenges, since we were on detachment, we cannot bring everything and everyone with us to the site, said AMC James Agner, VP-8 detachment maintenance control leading chief petty officer. But regardless of those issues, the job has to be done no matter what the challenges we faced. Our maintenance team always found the way to overcome adversity and kept our P-3s flying so our aircrew could complete their missions. By exercise end, VP-8 flew 72 hours on 10 missions, all leading to a successful finish with a 100-percent mission completion rate for the Fighting Tigers. VP-8 also utilized the exercise to hone their intel ligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance skills, and worked closely with various U.S. Navy surface vessels and U.S. Air Force aircraft. We had interaction in all four of my flights with the participating surface ships. I think everything went pretty well overall, the communications were suc cessful, and this allowed us to complete all of our mis sions smoothly with no delays, said Lt. Jeffrey Buck, Combat Aircrew 3 mission commander. We only had one interaction with the P-8A, but it also ended up being a success, we did a coordinated time on top har poon shot working with both our aircraft controlling unit and the P-8. According to U.S. 7th Fleet, this high-level, joint training among U.S. military forces ensures the U.S. military remains the preeminent military in the VP-16 War Eagles host Vietnam POW VP-8 completes Operation Valiant Shield 2012 exercise 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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region, capable of honoring its security commitments to allies, partners and friends. VP-8 entered this exercise during month four of their 7th Fleet deployment. The Fighting Tigers were ready for the VS12 mission and made its contribu tion to the overall success of this joint exercise, said Benjamin. Other participants in VS12 were USS George Washington (CVN 73) with Carrier Air Wing 5; USS Cowpens (CG-63); USS John S. McCain (DDG-62); USS Fitzgerald (DDG-85); USS McCampbell (DDG-89); USS Mustin (DDG-89; USS Chafee (DDG-90); USS Chung Hoon (DDG-93); USNS Amelia Earhart (T-AKE-6); USNS John Ericcson (T-AO-194); USS Chicago (SSN721); USS Greenville (SSN-772); USS Michigan (SSBN727); and USNS Able (T-AGOS-20). Maritime air assets included: VP-5; VP-40; VP-69; VX-1; VPU-2, VQ-1; and VAQ-132. VP-8 DEWEYSCall 542-3521 Deweys Ribbon cutting and grand opening cel ebration Oct. 4, 39 p.m. Free food sampling, DJ, live band Cloud Nine, games, prizes, childrens activities and much more!Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. 10TH annual NAS Freedom Lanes PBA South Region Adult PRO-AM 9-PIN TAP Oct. 12, 6:30 p.m. & 8:30 p.m. $25 entry fee Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Fall Bowling Leagues now forming! Mixed league Monday 7 p.m. After-work league Wednesday 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thursday 9 a.m. Mixed league Thursday 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Friday 11:45 a.m. Friday night league 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Saturday 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. I.T.T. Events Call 542-3318. Entertainment Books $30 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23, 2013 Preferred seating $41, lower level seat ing $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sec tions 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Upcoming ITT Trips: Mt. Dora Oct. 27 Lakeridge Winery Nov. 10 New Armed Forces Disney Salute: $153.25 for 4 day ticket with hopper option $153.25 for 4 day ticket with water park fun & more $180.75 for 4 day ticket with both park hopper and water park fun &more Universal Studios Special 2 day 1 park each day w/ 3rd day free $101.75 2 day park to park w/ 3rd day free $120.50 Tickets valid through Dec. 14 Universal Studios Halloween Horror Nights $41.25 $71 Order Gator Bowl tickets now $35 Fl Classic $37.50 & $52.50 Capital One Bowl $85 Russell Athletic Bowl $70The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Mall & Movie Trip Oct. 5 at 6 p.m. Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater Jaguars vs. Bears Oct. 7 at 2 p.m. Free admission and transportation Fall Barracks Bash Oct. 11, 49 p.m. Free food, entertainment, games & prizes! NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Oct. 9 & 23 for active duty Oct. 11 & 25 for retirees & DoD person nel Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. CFC Golf Tournament Oct. 25, 12:30 p.m. shotgun start $60 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Oct. 29 Dec. 10 $500 per person For more information, contact Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 13

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The NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville team prides itself on providing firstclass logistics support to the warfighter, the fleet, and stay ing ready to rise to meet any challenge on any occasion. In the areas of contracting and fuels services, FLCJ contingen cy support was put to the test when Hurricane Isaac struck the commands New Orleans site. Over the Labor Day week end, the approaching storm kept everyone guessing, as the various computer models couldnt agree just where the storm track make landfall. As weather forecasters tracked the storm, all across the Gulf Coast, military installations prepared personnel and facili ties to ride out the storm. Cmdr. Tyonia Burns, site direc tor for FLCJs New Orleans Site assumed her role in the NAS JRB New Orleans installation Emergency Operation Center (EOC) and prepared her activ ity for the storms arrival. Back at Commander, Naval Region Southeast (CNRSE) headquarters aboard NAS Jacksonville, the Regional Operations Center (ROC) stood up. Cmdr. Luis Molina, direc tor of supply management at FLCJ, assumed the watch as ROC Crisis Action Team resources chief, attending Flag level briefings and instal lation updates. Information from the Fleet Weather Center in Norfolk, Va. and from the affected installation com manding officers (C) poured into the CAT. As the storm made landfall on Aug. 29, it promptly and unexpectedly stalled. The resultant rainfall and tidal surge inundated the main power station that services NAS JRB New Orleans knocking out power to the installation. Restoring power to the installa tions key facilities became pri ority one. Achieving this would require the use of portable gen erators, which would have to stay running until installation power was restored. The NAS JRB New Orleans emergency manager (EM) looked to Burns for a plan to fuel the growing list of emer gency generators that were to restore essential functions to the base. As the number of generators supplying tempo rary power grew, so did the requirement for diesel fuel. Burns communicated the everincreasing fuel requirements to FLCJs Regional Fuels Officer Lt. Cmdr. Michael Lorrain, so he could accelerate fuel deliv eries to keep the generators running without interruption. Simultaneously, Burns kept her workforce at-the-ready. Many in the workforce were coping with storms aftermath on an individual level, dealing with family situations and pro tecting their homes. Despite any personal issues caused by the storm, the FLCJ New Orleans fuels team had the installations fuels operation functioning at full capacity on Aug. 30, the day following the storms initial strike. Over the next five days, the team worked tirelessly to pro vide the essential fuel that kept NAS JRB New Orleans up and running. The New Orleans fuels team provided more than 148,000 gallons of diesel, automotive gasoline, and JP-8 aviation fuel to sup port generators, vehicles, air craft, Coast Guard tankers, and various other pieces of equip ment. The team also provided fuel to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Louisiana Air National Guard operations. The total amount of diesel fuel delivered was 22 times more than the normal monthly consumption for the installation. With one 7,000 gallon tank and one diesel truck, resup ply was the key to keeping the fuel flowing; and with parts of I-10 being closed, the resupply effort was especial ly challenging, said Burns. However, between our Code 700 [Regional Fuels] and Fuel Supervisor Jeff Eisenman, we kept the generators running. This was an enormous task, considering the circumstanc es. I am especially proud of the way that my fuel team stepped up to the challenge so soon after the storm, said Burns. The base CO, as well as the NAS JRB New Orleans Operations and Public Works Departments, echoed those sentiments recognizing the fuel teams timely response, dedication and persistence during the recovery phase. While the fueling support was essential, the FLCJ New Orleans supply team also sup ported efforts to provide water and ice to families living in base housing, more than 700 separate family housing units. With the disaster relief requirement confirmed and defined through the installa tion CO and EM, Burns worked with FLCJs Contracting Department to get the effort underway and provide fami lies living on base with water and ice. The Contracting Department quickly identified a vendor to fulfill the require ment with emergency funding provided by the region. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonvilles Contracting Department has a robust capability that annu ally awards over 24,000 con tracting actions, valued at well over $1.3 billion. The contract ing operation has three dedi cated contingency buyers that handle both regional and 4th Fleet contingency require ments. My staff goes out of their way in the early hours of a contingency, to understand the emergent requirement, and to ensure timely contracts are awarded to provide the neces sary supplies and service no small task, but one my staff takes great pride in doing very well, said Capt. (Select) Gary Hayman, director of contract ing at FLCJ. The FLCJ New Orleans sup ply team coordinated the receipt and distribution of approximately 60 pallets of bot tled water and 41,000 pounds of ice to Navy families. The water and ice were distributed by the supply team at two pre-deter mined distribution sites. Residents were told to shel ter in place, so most base hous ing residents did not leave. With no electricity and no good news of its return for at least a week, base residents outlook was not great, said Burns. The provision of water and ice to the residents was pure relief, and their appreciation was evi dent as they lined up to receive their share. The installation CO was extremely proud of the way his team pulled together to pre pare for, endure, and recover from Hurricane Isaac. The FLCJ New Orleans supply team was a key contributor to that effort, managing the prodi gious fuel requirements and providing timely logistics assis tance to the base. FLCJs Codes 200 [contract ing] and 700 were both huge contributors to our success. When you are part of a team, everyone steps up to help each other, said Burns. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville is one of seven strategi cally situated FLCs, under NAVSUP Global Logistics Support, that are aligned to geographic Fleet and regional Navy installation command ers. During times of crisis, NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville sup ports this alignment through its Operations, Contracting, and Supply Management Departments. These depart ments directly and coopera tively leverage their inherent capabilities to respond to a wide variety of mission sets, both in exercise scenarios and real-world contingency situa tions. NAVSUP FLC Jax provides contingency support to fleet, region 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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Flight Line Caf holds vendor dayThe NAS Jax Flight Line Caf held an event to allow vendors to provide sam ples to the troops during lunch Sept. 26 in an effort to determine what new types of food items they might like to see served in the galley. Were holding this event to introduce new nutritious products to the troops and get information on their likes and dislikes to different food items, said NAS Jax Food Service Officer CWO4 Kathy Wiseman. We brought in 12 different vendors today and if there are some new items that our customers like, we can incor porate them into our menus. Weve also invited food service officers from other bases so we can all get together because vendors sell on quantity. As military members headed into the galley for lunch, they were given the opportunity to sample items from vari ous vendors and fill out customer sur veys on the products. I really like this. Its kind of cool how they set this up for us to see what food items we might like to eat here, said AWOAN Joseph Gallegos of VP-30. I think this is really good because it gives us some new options of what we want to eat since we pay for our meals here. Its an opportunity for us tell them what we would like to see on the menu based on these surveys, added AWFAN Shannon Nunez of VP-30. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 15

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A two-day Basic Rider Course will be offered Nov. 19-20 for female riders only (active duty have priority, dependents/ civilians will be accepted on standby status). Be the first to sign up for this groundbreaking class. If you have always wanted to ride a motorcycle, or have tried to learn from someone else, now is the time to get enrolled and learn from the Motorcycle Safety Foundation female instructors. Motorcycles, helmets, and gloves are provided, although you may bring your own if you wish; just ensure you wear long sleeve shirts, long pants and over the ankle footwear. We will teach this two-day class rain or shine so dress appropriately for the weather. You will have classroom and riding time each day with a written and riding exam to test your knowledge. There are only 12 seats so sign up now! To sign up for the class, contact your motorcycle safety representative, log onto ESAMS and self enroll or call Cindy at 542-2584. U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a mem ber of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of spe cial recognition in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. The registration deadline is Oct. 5. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in ter ritorial waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve recognition and thanks for put ting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans during my annual Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the highlights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are strongly encouraged to contact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 598-0481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www. crenshaw.house.gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and docu mentation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the cer tificate, veterans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214.Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program. The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Oct. 7, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Chicago Bears (Tickets on sale now) Nov. 4, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Detroit Lions (Tickets on sale Oct. 22) Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jags vs. Indianapolis Colts (Tickets on sale Oct. 29) Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to purchase/use these tick ets. Retirees and Veterans/DoD employ ees are eligible to purchase tickets for New York Giants and Atlanta Falcons games. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for mil itary personnel, but under no circum stances are dependent children autho rized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger fami lies desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may pur chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No excep tions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or return ing during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tick ets for the entire season.Congressman sponsoring Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony on Nov. 8Jacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USOBasic Rider Course available for lady motorcyclists 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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Aims to fly againIt seems every other day you hear a story of someone overcoming great odds to succeed at the highest level. However, in society, countless untold stories exist; stories that run magni tudes deeper than dramas saturating the news. For the past two years, Navy pilot Lt. Mickey Williams of VP-8, has endured the absolute, most brutal emo tional and physical pain possible during his personal battle against and recovery from a rare and deadly form of bone cancer. Williams enlisted in the Navy in 1996 as an aviation rescue swimmer. After completing the grueling training and serving over seven years in two differ ent helicopter squadrons, he decided to become a pilot. With the advice and assistance of his mentor, Cmdr. Donald Kennedy, he applied to the Navys Seaman to Admiral program. The pro gram would allow him to earn a com mission as an officer and hopefully one of those coveted spots among the cho sen few in Naval Flight School. Awarded a spot in October 2003, Williams trav eled to Newport, R.I. for training and then received orders to finish his col lege degree at the University of North Florida (UNF). Upon graduating from UNF in 2006, he received his commission and orders to in Pensacola, Fla. Williams, along with his wife, Amy, and their five chil dren, spent the next two years mov ing, studying, and flying as he strived to earn his wings of gold. With orders to his fleet squadron, flying the P-3C Orion as one of the Fighting Tigers of VP-8, he realized his dream. As the squadron began prepara tions for a seven-month deployment to the Middle East in November 2010, Williams began to notice pain in his left leg. Dismissing it as nothing more than remnants of shin splints from his time as a rescue swimmer, he dealt with the pain. As the deployment continued, with regular 18-hour days and 10-hour mis sions flying in support of troops in Iraq or combating piracy in the Arabian Sea, Williams continued working through the increasingly worsening pain and refused to let it get in the way of his dream. However, near the end of deployment, the pain turned into a lump, and the squadrons flight surgeon insisted on X-rays. Yet, due to his location, mission requirements, and scarcity of an X-ray machine, they decided to wait until after his return home in June 2011. As the lump grew into a ball and his limp grew more pronounced, he knew his body was telling him that something was seriously wrong. Tasked with flying one of the squad rons P-3C Orions home from deploy ment to NAS Jacksonville, he let the joy and anticipation of returning home to his family mask the pain in his leg. As the aircraft ladder lowered and he could see his family waiting, Williams slipped and landed on his injured leg. Thinking he had broken his leg, Williams mus tered all of his strength to walk tall across the tarmac. Over the next two days, the pain did not subside so Williams finally was able to visit a doctor who imme diately ordered a CAT scan and MRI after seeing the results of his X-rays. As the radiologist showed him the X-ray, and he saw the destruction the tumor caused in his bone, his heart dropped. The radiologist stated more tests were needed, but it showed all of the signs of aggressive bone cancer. The doctor ordered him to keep all weight off of the leg because delaying treatment had brought the bone precariously close to breaking, and if it broken, the tumor could rupture and spread the cancer to the rest of his body. On July 18, 2011, after weeks of pain ful tests, biopsies and scans, the doctors at Jacksonvilles Mayo Clinic diagnosed it as either Osteo-sarcoma, or Ewings Sarcoma, both very rare and deadly forms of bone cancer. When Williams inquired what stage the cancer had developed, his main specialist, Dr. Mary OConnor, explained that because of the nature of this cancer, they could not diagnose it in stages. This cancer often spreads so aggressively that by the time a diagnosis is reached, it has already metastasized and spread to other parts of the body. The reality finally began to take hold of Williams. His 8-year-old son, Matthew, had excitedly planned fishing and camping trips with his dad when they spoke on Skype during the deploy ment. He looked forward to summer rides in a new Chevy Camaro Amy had surprised him with upon his return home. He would have to cancel the planned family trip to Disney World. Yet, as the prognosis grew more and more grim, and the chemotherapy weakened his body and caused his hair to fall out, Williams resolution only grew stronger. His family depended on him as their rock; everyday he would look in their eyes and tell them they had only hit a rough patch, the worse had passed, and things would get better soon. Deep down, he simply could not let go of his dream. He had worked so hard and sacrificed so much, he knew he needed to fly again, to serve again. Months passed, and the treatment took its toll. The chemo coupled with frequent blood transfusions left him weak and unable to leave the house. Nevertheless, on some days, he would find the strength and would organize a trip to the mall, and soon it became a family joke as to who would ride with him on the wheelchair. By the fall of 2011, it became apparent he would need major surgery. The doc tors gave him two options, amputation of his leg below the knee or attempt to salvage the limb. They explained that with the amputation, the cancer would not spread and with more chemo, they had a very good chance of eliminating the remaining cancer from his body. The option was to cut much of the dis eased bone, replacing it with the fibula from his other leg, and using skin, mus cle, and nerve grafts from his abdomen. Agonizing over the decision, Amy reached out to the Wounded Warrior Project in Jacksonville and they put him in touch with an alumnus named Brian Wagner. Wagner suffered an injury while serving in Iraq and faced the same situation with his leg. He had decided to have it amputated, and even tually helped Williams realize amputa tion provided the best conduit for him to reach his goals. After deciding on the surgery, Williams was admitted to the hospital on Nov. 22, 2011. He awoke in a room surrounded by nurses and doctors, a dull ache emanating from just below his knee. As they transferred him from recovery room to a hospital bed, the pain became excruciating. Still, he knew he needed to begin physical ther apy immediately if he wanted to step back in the cockpit. When the pathology reports returned, the doctors expected it to show that the months of chemotherapy had killed over 90 percent of the cancer; in reality, it had only killed 20 percent. Williams had to endure yet another devastating setback. He was then referred to the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. With the help of his TRICARE Case Manager Deana Falls, his new doctor, Dr. John Ludwig, coordinated a new treatment regimen with the doctors from the Mayo Clinic. Williams again had to endure anoth er six rounds of chemotherapy. Even after months of debilitating treatment, his determination never wavered. In between rounds of treatment, he was fitted with prostheses, and, by the end of March, he took his first steps without the aid of crutches since his return, and initial x-rays in June 2011. As he finished his last round of treat ment in July, his mind never wandered far from the aircraft. Every time he put on that flight suit, he yearned to feel the rumble of the engines, the sensa tion of tearing down the runway and lifting off to fly. In his head, he con stantly replayed the words of his for mer Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Chris Flaherty. When learning of the severity of Williams condition, Flaherty told the squadron that he would fly again, and that he would muster every resource he had to ensure he would keep that promise. In August, Williams began the pro cess to receive a medical waiver to return to the cockpit. Although the pro cess could take up to a year, on Aug. 9, he climbed back into the flight station and smoothly landed his aircraft in a training simulator. Although a huge accomplishment, Williams still faces a long road ahead. He recently received a special prosthet ic allowing him to jump and swim so he can complete the water survival recer tification process. It will take at least until the beginning of 2013 to build up endurance before complete the waiver process and return to unrestricted duty. Throughout the whole process, he has remained a realist, understand ing he will need a lot of good fortune to become the first amputee naval pilot. And even if the Navy decides he will never fly again, Williams hopes to con tinue to serve. P-3 pilot overcomes cancer, loss of leg JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 4, 2012 17

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