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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02011
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 09-20-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02011

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Hundreds of Sailors, civilians and firefighters gathered at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Sept. 11 in remem brance of the 11th anniversary of the terrorist attacks against the United States on Sept. 11, 2001. The event began with a 5K run and was immediately followed by a memo rial that was held in front of NH Jacksonville. The ceremony opened with a parad ing of the colors by the NH Jacksonville flag detail. Among those in attendance were members of the NAS Jacksonvilles Fire Department who proudly displayed the American flag from a fire engine. Were here to remember the fire fighters who lost their lives while fighting the fire on 9/11, said NAS Jacksonville Fire Chief Mark Brusoe. Its a privilege and an honor to be a part of this ceremony. After Taps was played and a 21-gun salute by NAS Jacksonvilles Honor Support Team, NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer welcomed those in attendance. This is a remembrance of all those who paid the ultimate sacrifice on 9/11, said Shaffer. We are also honoring the 6,500 men and women who have served honor ably in the military and have given their lives since 9/11. Many of the runners today had photos of fallen heroes and loved ones pinned to their shirts in their honor and memory. NCC(SW) (select) Rhonaka Williams elaborated on what Shaffer said about the importance of remembering those who lost their lives on 9/11. That was a day that I will never for get, said Williams. Each year I think that everyone should set aside some time, even if its just a couple of min utes, to remember what happened on that horrific day Sept. 11, 2001. Approximately 3,000 people lost their lives on that tragic day and almost 6,500 service members have fallen since that time as our nation and allies joined forces against terrorism. Although words cannot east the pain of these losses, we can recall how the NAS Jax pins new chiefsThe NAS Jacksonville CPO induction season came to a close Sept. 14 with several pinning ceremonies for new chief petty officers at Hangar 117, Naval Hospital Jacksonville and Hangar 1000. Ninety-six new chiefs were pinned by their family members and sponsors at Hangar 117. The event began NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM) (AW/SW) Brad Shepherd welcomed the guests and presented the 2012 chief petty officers selectees who proudly stood in formation singing Anchors Aweigh. After the national anthem was per formed by CSC Stephanie Canteen, and invocation was delivered by NAS Jax Command Chaplain Cmdr. Shannon Skidmore, VP-30 Command Master Chief (CMDCM) (AW/SW/NAC) Jerry Holloman welcomed the guests and stressed the importance of the ceremo ny. April 1, 1893 was when the Navy established the rank of chief petty offi cer. For 119 years there have been cere monies similar to what you will see here today, said Holloman. We are here today to honor, recog nize and witness the culmination of a lifelong goal for these 96 chief selectees. They have earned the right to be called the chief and bear the enormous responsibility that comes with that title. While it is true they all got here through their own personal hard work and sacrifice, I can say with 100 percent IC2(SW) Amber Thayer of the NAS Jax Ground Electronics Maintenance Division was presented the Gen. Chappie James Memorial Award during the Florida Junior Chamber (Jaycees) Outstanding Young Floridians & Pioneers Awards Ceremony Aug. 25 in Hollywood, Fla. Thayer, a native of Newport News, Va., was recognized for not only her achievements as a member of the U.S. Navy, but for her community support and educational aspirations. After joining the Navy and com pleting basic training in 2005, Thayer attended Interior Communication A School in 2006 followed by Stabilized Glide Slope Indicator System School in 2006. Her first duty station was on board USS Germantown (LSD-42), home ported in San Diego, where she com pleted a Western Pacific deploy ment. She later deployed for an addi tional eight months in 2008 in sup port of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. Thayer later completed a Hull Swap deployment in Sasebo, Japan for five months with USS Harpers Ferry (LSD-49) where she also provided humanitarian relief during Operation Tomodachi after the earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Thayer reported to NAS Jax in June 2011 where she is currently works as the assistant work center supervisor. She joined the Jacksonville Jaycees in June 2011. This was a way to get involved in my community and make some new friends, said Thayer. I was excited to meet other young profes sionals outside of the military. Since joining, Thayer participated in nearly every event available in 2011 NavHosp Jax remembers Sept. 11 NAS Jax Sailor wins Florida Jaycees award

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS It shocked me last week when footage of Sept. 11, 2001, sud denly looked . well, histori cal. Eleven years ago, I thought that day never would age, that the images would remain clear and vibrant. Yet, as I watched History Channel documenta ries on the 11th anniversary, the archived media reports seemed from a different time. Has it really been 11 years? What surprised me even more was having a conversa tion about 9/11 with my almost 12-year-old son, Ford, who had been just a baby when the World Trade Center collapsed. Back then, I was feeding him mashed sweet potatoes and singing Happy Birthday to our dog, Tanner, when my mom called and told me to turn on the news. Dustin was on his first deployment on board USS Enterprise, and he had been gone for five months already. At last report, the ship had begun its transatlantic trip back to the United States. Dustin was due home for my birthday in October. We were in the home stretch. But when I turned on the news that morning and saw the towers collapse, I knew the Enterprise wasnt coming home anytime soon. It was a selfish thought. Yet, even though I was thousands of miles away from New York City on the morning of 9/11, I (and other military spouses every where) knew what was unfold ing on television would affect our military life in innumerable ways. Ford chewed on his rubber baby spoon and gurgled while Tanners toe nails clicked on the linoleum kitchen floor. The neighborhood soon filled with husbands and wives rushing home to one another and racing to pick up their children from school. Ford and I were alone. I reflected on this as I drove him to school last Wednesday. He told me that he had gotten up at 5 a.m. and watched a TV documentary about 9/11. My first thought: who gets up at 5 a.m.? My second thought: my kid is old enough to watch the History Channel . voluntari ly? And what did you think? I asked. Its weird that all of it hap pened when I was a baby, he said. When did Dad finally come home again? My mind rushed back to those first few days in September 2001, when e-mails to Dustin werent going through, and I hadnt heard from him. The commanding officers wife confirmed that the ship had turned around and was no longer headed home. Do you know when theyll come home? we asked. No, not yet. Are they safe? Yes. When will e-mail work again? I dont know. There were so many unan swerable questions, and although Dustin ended up coming home before Thanksgiving, those extra six weeks of waiting and wonder ing, without a homecoming date, felt like an eternity. On my birthday that year which was the original home coming our military spouse group got together at one of the wifes houses. It was Fords 11-month birthday. At some point during the potluck din ner, Ford pulled himself up to stand next to a coffee table. His bottle hung from his mouth. When he smiled at me, the bottle fell. And the next thing I knew, he started to take his first step. About 20 military wives screamed, Oh no! Wait for your Dad! But Ford couldnt wait. He was a full-fledged walker by the time Dustin came home. I got a little emotional as I told Ford about this. And then, before we pulled up to his school, he said, Um, Mom, why were you so crazy about my first step and Dad not see ing it? Thats kind of weird. I mean, who cares about a first step? As I drove home, I laughed to myself. Ford was right. It had once seemed so unfair that Dustin had missed his sons first step. We get kind of jammed up about those things when its our first baby, dont we? The first tooth, first step, first word. In hindsight, it has never really mattered that Dustin didnt see Fords first step, especially when I consider that thousands of 9/11 babies never even saw their fathers. But its all relative. And that night, as I was going to sleep and thinking about what Ford said, Ill admit I was a little sad. I was sad that, once again, Dustin had missed something our preteen son doing his best to sort out a world that had already changed before he had even learned to walk. Sept. 20 1911 Navigational instruments first requested for naval aircraft. 1951 In Operation Summit, the first combat helicopter landing when U.S. Marines were landed in Korea. 1981 Ammunition ship USS Mount Hood (AE-29) and Navy helicopters rescue 18 crew members of Philippine Navy frigate Datu Kalantiaw. Sept. 21 1858 Sloop Niagara departs Charleston, S.C., for Liberia with African slaves rescued from slave ship. 1923 Asiatic Fleet completes mission of aiding earthquake victims in Japan. 1939 President Franklin Roosevelt asks Congress to repeal the arms embargo provision of the Neutrality Act. 1944 Aircraft from 12 carriers commence two-day attack against Japanese ships and airfields on Luzon, Philippines. 1984 Mideast Force begins escort of U.S. flagged vessels in Persian Gulf. Sept. 22 1776 John Paul Jones in Continental Navy ship Providence sails into Canso Bay, Nova Scotia, and attacks British fishing fleet. 1943 U.S. destroyers and land ing craft land Australian troops at Finschhafen, New Guinea. 1989 After Hurricane Hugo, Sailors and Marines provide assistance to Charleston, S.C., through Oct. 10. Sept. 23 1779 Capt. John Paul Jones in Continental Navy frigate Bonhomme Richard captures HMS Serapis. 1931 Lt. Alfred Pride pilots Navys first rotary wing aircraft, XOP-1 auto giro, in landings and takeoffs on board USS Langley while underway. 1944 Naval Task Group lands Army troops on Ulithi Atoll, Caroline Islands. 1944 USS West Virginia (BB-48) reaches Pearl Harbor and rejoins the Pacific Fleet, marking the end of the salvage and reconstruction of 18 ships damaged at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. 1947 James Forrestal, former SECNAV, takes office as first Secretary of Defense. 1990 Two Hospital ships (USNS Mercy and USNS Comfort) steam together for first time in Arabian Gulf. Sept. 24 1918 Ensign David Ingalls, USNR, flying a Sopwith Camel, shoots down his fifth enemy aircraft, becoming the first U.S. Navy ace, while flying with the British Royal Air Force. 1944 5th Fleet carrier aircraft attack Japanese in Visayas, Philippines. 1960 First nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, USS Enterprise (CVAN-65), launched at Newport News, Va. Sept. 25 1957 In project Stratoscope, Office of Naval Research obtains sharp pho tographs of suns corona from first bal loon-borne telescope camera. Sept. 26 1781 French fleet defeats British at Yorktown, Va. 1918 USCG Cutter Tampa lost with 118 men, probably by German subma rine. 1931 Keel laying at Newport News, Va., of USS Ranger (CV-4), the first ship designed and constructed as an aircraft carrier. 1963 First steam-eject launch of Polaris missile at sea off Cape Canaveral, Fla. (now Cape Kennedy) from USS Observation Island (EAG-154). 9/11 documentaries and a new generationSunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Catholic CCD 11 a.m. Protestant Worship Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study 6 p.m. in the Barracks Officer Christian Fellowship and Bible study Every Monday at 6 p.m. NAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051

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VP-5 participated in exer cise Costal Watch Station Capability Exercise (CWS CAPEX) at the Benito N Ebuen Air Base in Mactan, Philippines Sept. 3. Joined by representa tives from the Filipino Navy and Coast Guard, the Mad Foxes took part in exercises, training and briefs designed to enhance relations between the Filipino Armed Forces and the United States Navy. Combat Aircrew Ten (CAC10) represented the Mad Foxes, led by Mission Commander Lt. Allison Cameron and accom panied by a maintenance detachment which helped sup port flight operations. This was CAC-10s second exercise in Mactan this deploy ment. Tactical Coordinator Lt. Paul Reali said, Its great to be back. These experiences are very rewarding. The first day began with a mission to report all maritime activity to Filipino costal watch stations. The crew reported numerous cargo and fishing vessels and also participated in a search and rescue (SAR) exercise. By providing an eye in the sky for Filipino Navy and Coast Guard forces, CAC-10 helped the coastal watch sta tions train for the day when they must rely on an airborne asset to locate vessels in dis tress. Throughout the week, the Mad Foxes took members of the Filipino Navy and Coast Guard for several familiariza tion flights including maritime patrol, coordinated operations, and additional SAR profiles. The Filipino aircrewmen were able to develop a feel for what missions are like onboard a P-3C. The riders were able to observe how each element of the crew, from the flight station to the sensor operators, inter acted during all mission sets. During one sortie, they pro vided overwatch for a Filipino Navy vessel that conducted a boarding operation of a simu lated rogue vessel. The crew relayed the posi tion of the motor vessel to the Filipino Navy ship, which intercepted and boarded it. Lt. j.g. Wes Kang said, Thats some of the most exciting fly ing Ive done since on deploy ment. We were down low, above beautiful water and off the coast of gorgeous beach es. Theres nothing like fly ing close to the sea supporting maritime forces beneath you. The Mad Foxes were deeply grateful for the opportunity to participate in CWS CAPEX and for the chance to continue to foster relationships with their Filipino counterparts. Whether through presen tations, flights or sharing in the local culture, both the American and Filipino air crews came away with a better understanding and apprecia tion for each other. The VP-8 Fighting Tigers hosted 15 aviation officer candidates from the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) Fleet Air Wing Two (FAW-2) Odin squadron at Naval Air Facility Misawa, Aug. 31. VP-8 provided a static display of a P-3C Orion aircraft, briefed the candi dates on the squadrons history and pri mary missions, and discussed the typi cal career path for United States Navy aviators and naval flight officers. The visit concluded with a tour of Tactical Operations Center Misawa and lunch with the candidates. All personnel involved in the visit noted the benefit of interacting with their counterparts. I enjoyed discussing my career path from flight school to today, said VP-8 Pilot Lt. Brandon Clark, who led the visit for VP-8. The candidates were very interested in how we became P-3C pilots and naval flight officers and how U.S. Navy officers end up in other platforms. Lt.j.g. Patrick Frailey assisted with the static display and found the candidates were most impressed by the planes advanced imaging multispectral sensor camera. The Fighting Tigers have interacted with their FAW-2 Odin counterparts on several occasions this deployment both in-flight and on deck to advance bilateral training and partnerships. The squadron is currently on a six-month deployment to 7th Fleet. VP-8 Fighting Tigers host JMSDF FAW-2 aviation officer candidatesVP-5 trains with Filipino Navy JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 3

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Members of VP-45 flew a P-3C Orion to Cleveland over the Labor Day week end to participate as a static display in the Cleveland Navy Week festivities. Air shows are always a great oppor tunity for VP-45 members to educate the greater public on the P-3C, our primary anti-submarine warfare mis sion, as well as to be ambassadors for the Navy and the First Coast. So when the opportunity to send a plane to Cleveland arose we jumped on it, said VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mike Vitali. The Cleveland National Air Show is an annual event which has taken place on the shores of Lake Erie in down town Cleveland since 1964. The show includes a NASA exhibit, static displays, stunt airplanes, modern fighters, and alternates between the Blue Angels and Thunderbirds every other year. The Pelican aircrew enjoyed answer ing questions from the public at their static display during the show. We fielded an incredibly wide range of questions from, How long can you fly for? and, What material is your pro peller made of? to, Does that plane actually fly missions? and, Why is the airplane leaking? said Lt. Mike Dark, patrol plane captain of the air show P-3C. It was also really nice to educate the public on the P-3C as well as speak to former P-3 aircrew alumni. I spoke to a former P-3B pilot from the Vietnam War era for nearly an hour. Participating in the air show was also a great experience for Lt. j.g. Andrew Lavin. The Cleveland Air Show was some thing that I will never forget. It was great to see and experience the Midwest and the support for the military. It lifts my spirit to see our nations pride for the uniformed services. VP-5 Mad Fox aviators participated in the Vacation Bible School program Amazing Wonders Aviation conducted by the chaplain services and volunteers of Kadena Air Base, Japan Aug. 20. They arrived at the chapel on the morning of the opening ceremony with their flight helmets in an effort to give the children a good idea of what exact ly aviation entailed and the chance to wear an actual flight helmet. The volunteers began with a brief description of the sights they have seen, interesting things they have done, and finished by passing their helmets around to the children to handle and wear. Overall, the experience was exciting for the children and rewarding for the aviators. Lt. j.g. Jordan Holt remarked, Those children are our future and time spent with them is an investment in our nations future. VP-45 Pelicans participate in Cleveland Navy Week air show Mad Fox aviators visit Amazing Wonders Aviation The Navy is establishing a new aug mentation program that will offer enlisted Reservists opportunities to convert to permanent active duty careers, as outlined in NAVADMIN 274/12, released Sept. 9. The Reserve Component to Active Component (RC to AC) augmentation program seeks to place qualified enlisted reserve mem bers in specific rates and year groups to fill active community needs in the fleet. Once released from their Reserve obligations and assigned to their new billets, RC to AC participants will become active duty Sailors in every respect, including being eligible for AC advancement, permanent change of station orders, and selective reenlist ment bonus eligibility. The active Navy needs Sailors with talent and experience, and the Navy Reserve is a great place to find them, said Rear Adm. Anthony Kurta, director of military personnel plans and policy. Through this program, were aiming to leverage our Reserve Sailors skill sets and experience to place select reserve Sailors in needed billets in the Fleet. As part of the Navys Continuum of Service initiative, the RC to AC program is designed to streamline Sailors tran sition between Reserve and active ser vice. Additionally, the RC to AC pro gram complements the variety of ini tiatives Navy uses to fill needed operational billets, enabling Navy to manage its force so it is best prepared to meet current and future warfighting needs. To improve the efficiency of Reserve to active conversions, the RC to AC program changes the application process. Rather than meet with a recruiter to discuss active duty pros pects, interested Reservists can apply to Navy Personnel Command (PERS92) through his or her unit and Naval Reserve Activity commanding officer in response to advertised vacancies with specific proficiency, year-group and other requirements. Vacancies will be advertised via the GovDelivery system, and will specify available augmentation quotas by rate and year group. Reservists can sign up Navy announces RC to AC Program for Reservists to pursue active duty careers 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) held a change-of-com mand ceremony aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Sept. 14 in port at Naval Station Norfolk. Adm. Bill Gortney relieved Adm. John Harvey Jr., as USFF commander in the traditional ceremony in front of hundreds of distinguished guests, shipmates and crew members. Harvey, a surface war fare officer and a 1973 gradu ate of the United States Naval Academy, assumed command of U.S. Fleet Forces in July 2009. In his more than three-year tenure, he led the command with a strategic focus support ing the nations maritime strat egy through operational readi ness, training effectiveness, and professional and personal development. Todays not about me. Its about us who we are, what we do, and why we do it, said Harvey. The power of our Navy is in our people, not our platforms. Over the past three years, theres been no shortage of challenges, but because of your hard work and dedication, we had a positive influence on this fleet. Your work ensured we provided a unified voice to our CNO in partnership with our Pacific Fleet counterparts, and I am so proud to have had the privilege of serving with you. During his distinguished nearly 40 years of naval service, Harvey served in a variety of sea and shore billets. He was the Chief of Naval Personnel, and he commanded USS David R. Ray (DD 971), USS Cape St. George (CG 71) and CruiserDestroyer Group Eight as part of the USS Theodore Roosevelt Strike Group. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert served as the events guest speaker. Hes had a steady hand on the tiller for nearly four decades, said Greenert. He saw the opportunities, he took action, he got results. He made the Fleet tangibly bet ter during his tenure, and hes got us on the right track and speed. Harvey thanked everyone who supported the USFF pos ture to meet global mission requirements. I will certainly miss the Navy because of the people I got to work with in the sense of mission, said Harvey. I did this for 39 years because I loved it, not because I had to. Gortney, a naval aviator and 1977 graduate of Elon College in N.C., becomes the 32nd commander of USFF. He has served in a variety of com mand positions afloat and ashore, including most recently as Director, Joint Staff for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and as Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command; Commander, U.S. 5th Fleet and Combined Forces Maritime Component Commanders. He also com manded Carrier Strike Group10, on the Norfolk-based USS Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. I have spent all but six of my 35 years of service in the fleet. It is great to be back in the fleet, said Gortney. Here at Fleet Forces Command, our missions are few but they could not be more important to our nation. If executed correctly, the overall mission of the com mand will succeed and our Sailors and civilians deployed or stationed around the globe will succeed. Greenert also took the oppor tunity to discuss the impor tance of payloads in maintain ing an adaptable maritime force. Adaptability is the absolute essence of being a Sailor, and we get that adaptability when we think about payload before platform. Replacing platforms is expensive, but when we look at payloads first, payloads that support cutting edge technolo gy it can be a game changer. Greenert pointed to the Navys CVNs as an example of maximizing the platforms adaptability through the use of a variety of payloads. The CVN is our most adaptable platform, said Greenert. You pay once, and youve got a half century of service. Enterprise is 50 years old; shes seen everything from A-4s to F-14s to a variety of F/A-18s, and we can now launch an unmanned strike aircraft from that aircraft carrier. Thats the way we need to be thinking. U.S. Fleet Forces Command supports both the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) and combatant command ers worldwide by providing responsive, relevant, sustain able naval forces ready-fortasking. The command provides operational and planning sup port to combatant command ers and integrated warfighter capability requirements to the CNO. Additionally, USFF serves as the CNOs designated execu tive agent for anti-terrorism/ force protection (ATFP), indi vidual augmentees (IA), and sea-basing. In collaboration with U.S. Pacific Fleet, USFF organizes, mans, trains, maintains, and equips Navy forces, develops and submits budgets, and exe cutes readiness and person nel accounts to develop both required and sustainable levels of fleet readiness. Additionally, the command serves as the unified voice for fleet training requirements and policies to generate com bat-ready Navy forces. Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces changes leadership JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 VP-16 aircrew and main tainers are making steady progress as we continue our quest to become the Navys first combat certified P-8A squadron, said VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Molly Boron in a Sept. 12 inter view at the War Eagles space in Hangar 511 aboard NAS Jacksonville. VP-30 just accepted their third Poseidon from Boeing, which will positively impact our flight training schedule. At the P-8A Integrated Training Center, Lt. Cmdr. Mya Swartzlener, an instructor pilot with the VP-30 Fleet Integration Team (FIT), said, The War Eagles transition is going great. They came off deployment and showed up very well prepared, with lots of enthusiasm. Lt. Brett Eckert and Lt. David Hanson belong to one of 12 combat aircrews (CAC) of VP-16. A CAC consists of a patrol plane commander (pilot), a patrol plane pilot (copilot), tactical coordinator (TACCO), co-TACCO and five mission crew. Hanson and I do all our simulator and flight training together in order to build CAC team work, communication and coordination, explained Eckert. Hanson said pilot training is proceeding at a measured pace. Before our first flight in the Poseidon, we logged about 50 hours in the P-8 opera tional flight trainer (OFT). The remainder of our training will be a combination of simulator and actual flight operations. This week, for instance, we flew the OFT on Tuesday, flew a P-8 flight op on Wednesday, followed by another OFT simu lator flight on Thursday. Eckert said that in contrast to flying the P-3 Orion, Were more like pilot/managers, thanks to the P-8 flight auto mation and autopilot systems. We enter our flight plan into the flight management con trol (FMC) system, and after takeoff, we go to autopilot. The Poseidon isnt necessarily eas ier to fly than the P-3 its just different. Hanson said a big focus of simulator training is engine emergencies and singleengine flying. Even though the CFM56-7 turbofan engine is one of the worlds most reli able power plants, we need to train for every possibility. We also work a lot on our landings, making sure the plane is prop erly set up for approach. Eckert added, Each training flight is about five hours, so we usually split our time between the left and right seats. Now, after four flights and signifi cant simulator time, were refining our skills through rep etition. The P-8A TACCO manages the mission and the co-TAC CO handles communications among the displays available at the enlisted mission sensor operators. VP-16 Training Officer Lt. Cmdr. Will Toraason is also working on his P-8 TACCO cer tification. I liaison with the VP-30 FIT staff, which handles most of the CAT II transition scheduling. In my own train ing, I notice that a lot of the things on P-3 that required human interface are now auto mated in P-8 such as check ing weapons systems. Where the P-3 has lots of lights and VP-16 War Eagles move forward with Poseidon

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 7 switches, the new digital P-8 performs a self-diagnos tic and suggests solutions. Also, the workstations are modular and that expands our flexibility to meet changing mission sets. Of the five workstations, the TACCO and co-TACCO usually occupy the two center positions for improved communications. Lt. Meredith Trezise is in charge of the daily flight schedules. I coordinate with VP-30 and work within their training syllabus. Right now, the majority of P-8 flights involve VP-16 personnel working to get certi fied. Eventually, as we complete the transition, the squadron will assume the scheduling function. For our mission operators, P-8 brings a whole new set of digital systems. While a lot of tactics carry over from the P-3, were also developing new capabilities for the P-8. As aircrew and mission operators train at the ITC, War Eagles maintainers are working with VP-30 per sonnel to attain their safe for flight certification. AE1 Justin Parker said hes pleased to have com pleted his initial computer-based training classes so he can begin hands-on training. Right now, weve got VP-30s third P-8A (No. 430) in our space at Hangar 511. Some people are working on the aircrafts accep tance inspection, while others, like myself, are here to train for our various qualifications, such as ground handling. Whats really great is coming in everyday and working with a brand new aircraft. ATAN David Thomas also looks forward to handson learning with the Poseidon. Our shop works on radar, mission crew workstations and navigation sys tems among other things. Its cool to be part of the first squadron to transition to the P-8 platform, as well as the first P-8 squadron to deploy. Bill Senn is a Boeing mission system subject matter expert who works with squadron maintainers and Boeing field service representatives. Were aboard the Poseidon that just arrived at NAS Jax on Sept. 7. Were working together to troubleshoot a couple of prob lems. After we talk with Seattle this afternoon, the gripes should be resolved. When the War Eagles become NATOPS qualified, theyll return to Hangar 511 and begin their 12-month IDRC (Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle) to become combat-certified by CPRW-11. Like the P-3C Orion, P-8A Poseidon serves a wide range of missions. It can search for and destroy sub marines, monitor sea traffic, launch missile attacks on naval or land targets, and act as a flying communica tions relay. Its intelligence, surveillance and recon naissance capabilities also make it well suited for land-surveillance missions. VP-16

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Navy announced updates to the Selective Reenlistment Bonus award plan, Sept. 8, in NAVADMIN 273/12. The intent of the Selective Reenlistment Bonus (SRB) is to incentivize Sailors with critical skills and experience to stay Navy. SRB rewards Sailors who attain special training in skills most needed in the fleet, and helps meet critical skill reenlistment benchmarks and enhance Navys ability to size, shape and stabilize manning. Award levels are strategically adjusted as reenlistment requirements for specific ratings and skill sets are met. From the 100 skill/zone combinations detailed in NAVADMIN 143/12, this update includes reductions for three skills, one skill elimination, ten skills award level increases and 11 skills added to the list. The SRB program provides a retention incentive to our topperforming Sailors with critical skills needed in the fleet, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, direc tor, military personnel plans and policy. We will continue to monitor our bonus programs to maximize retention behav ior in our most critical skills within the constraints of our budget. Sailors should consult NAVADMIN 273/12 to deter mine their SRB eligibility and award level. The increased award levels are effective immediately and decreased levels are effective 30 days from the release of the NAVADMIN. This update also announces the upcoming change to annu al SRB installment payments from October to the anniver sary month of reenlistment date. This policy change will take effect for all Sailors reen listing for SRB on, or after, Oct. 1, 2012. For example, Sailors reen listing in December 2012 will receive their initial SRB pay ment upon reenlistment, and all subsequent install ment payments annually in December until the full bonus amount has been reached. Sailors under current SRB con tracts, as well as those reen listing prior to Oct. 1, 2012, will continue to receive anni versary payments annually in October until the full bonus amount has been reached. Additionally, NAVADMIN 273/12 temporarily lifts the restriction preventing Sailors with FY13 end of active obli gated service (EAOS) dates from reenlisting for SRB in FY12. With this change, all FY13 EAOS Sailors, regardless of SRB tier, are encouraged to apply for SRB and reenlist on, or before, Sept. 30, 2012. Sailors electing this temporary early reenlistment option must be otherwise eligible for SRB and have a valid PTS quota prior to their selected reenlistment date. As with Perform to Serve, eligible Sailors desiring SRB reenlistment are encouraged to work with their command career counselors, command master chiefs, and chain of command to discuss timing of reenlistment and procedures well before their EAOS. Sailors can read the complete list of SRB award levels and policy at http://www.public. navy.mil/bupers-npc/career/ enlistedcareeradmin/pages/ srb.aspx. Navy adjusts selective reenlistment bonus plan to retain skilled Sailors 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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worst terrorist attack in American histo ry brought out the best in the American people. The true legacy of 9/11 is that our spirit is stronger. From the firefight ers and first responders who charged up the World Trade Center 11 years ago, to our Sailors, Marines, Soldiers, Airman and Guardsman deployed around the world today, they all define courage and what it means to be an American, said Schaffer. I look around at my young Sailors and I know that many of them were deeply affected that day, and many of them chose to join the military because of the tragic events of 9/11. I think that speaks volumes about the type of Sailors we have and Im proud to serve with them every day. NAS Jacksonville Command Chaplain Cmdr. Shannon Skidmore closed the ceremony with a prayer. This is a day when we as a nation and the world, pauses, remembers and reflects upon the tragedy that befell our nation 11 years ago today. A day that witnessed terrible acts perpe trated against our land which result ed in the loss of thousands of innocent Americans in places such as New York City, Washington D. C. and Shanksville, Pennsylvania, stated Skidmore. As horrific as it was, it was also a day of extraordinary bravery and sacrifice which caused ordinary citizens to become heroes in seeking to rescue those who were injured in these terror ist attacks. We pray for the families of those who lost loved ones, and ask Lord that today they might sense your presence with them in a particularly close way. Flood their minds with the precious memories of those they lost that terrible September morning, he continued. We pray Lord, may this day inspire us to be ever vigilant in the defense of freedom and that we rededicate our selves to the cause of liberty here in our own land and around the world. We pray to bless our nation and may we continue to be a beacon of hope in this troubled world in which we live. To you Lord we look for strength and wisdom as we march boldly into the future, car rying with us always the memories of Sept. 11th. The 9/11 Remembrance was orga nized by the NH Jacksonvilles Chief Petty Officer Association in collaboration with NAS Jacksonville personnel and the base fire department. CEREMONY JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 9

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certainty that they could not have achieved none of it without the support, love, sacrifice and understand ing of their families. It is on your shoulders that these Sailors stand upon that has enabled their success and as a result has made our nation and Navy undefeat able. It was our intent that they never forget the past seven weeks of training, what it takes to become a chief petty officer or what is now expect ed of them, and I am quite sure they will not, said Holloman. Holloman also gave the selectees several challenges. I chal lenge you to be bet ter than the chief that you always looked up to, admired and respected. I challenge you to communicate verbally. I challenge you to never look the other way. I challenge you to hold yourself and those who work for you accountable. I challenge you to be active in the CPO Mess, be 110 percent committed to all three phases of CPO 365 and I challenge you to never forget where you came from. Remember, chiefs make chiefs, he continued. Holloman then declared, Youre the Navys future. Its now your time to anchor up! Shepherd then recognized some of the accomplish ments of the chief selectees during the induction sea son. These chief selectees have been tested and it is an honor to be here to celebrate their accomplishments. Over the past seven weeks, each selectee ran over 100 miles, did 1,893 push-ups and they had a total weight loss of 761 pounds said Shepherd, who also praised AWVCS(NAC/AW) Jason Reimer of VP-62 who coordi nated this years CPO induction season. As each selectee was officially pinned and covered by their family members and mentors, the new chiefs thanked them for helping make their dream come true. This is the greatest day of my life. Its something Ive been working towards for a long, long time and Ive finally achieved my goal. Its a lot more responsi bility, but Im just so excited to become a chief petty officer and happy for my shipmates here today, said AMC(AW) Miranda Davis of Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville. This event was very touching to me its the best day of my life. I joined the Navy Reserves in 2000 after being accepted into the United States through the Diversity Immigration Visa Program. Thats when the journey began and it still continues, said HMC(SW/ AW) Edjona Ehe of Navy Operational Support Command Jax. To close out the ceremony, the new chiefs were given a round of applause and then all current and former CPOs were asked to stand for the reading of the CPO Creed. A reception was held at the Fouled Anchor CPO Club following the event. CPO PINNING 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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and created a healthy competition during the Healthy Life Biggest Loser Project (HL/BL). At the time, she was strug gling to meet her physical qualifications at work. She had already lost 10 pounds when she decided to participate not only improve her health, but to encourage others to do the same. During the 12-week project, she not only met her weight goals, but won first place among the Jaycees by los ing more than 19 extra pounds. Thayer continues to maintain her healthy life style as a member of the 2012 Jacksonville Jaycee Soccer Team. Thayer also serves as the Jacksonville Jaycee Chapter director of com munity service organiz ing events and volunteer ing at Ronald McDonald House; Habitat for Humanity; Relay for Life; Special Olympics Duval County Games; Show and Shine Car, Truck, and Motorcycle Show to ben efit Wheelchair 4 Kids; St. Johns River Clean Up; Cornhole for a Cause benefiting the American Cancer Society; Catty Shack Ranch Volun-teer Day benefiting Catty Shack Wildlife Preserve; and the Jaycee Community Outreach booth at the Jacksonville Art Walk. The group also par ticipated in a Keep Jacksonville Beautiful Commission cleanup at Hogans Creek in down town Jacksonville. It was a huge honor to receive the award and I was extremely grate ful that Celeste Mitchell of the NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center nominated me for it. The Jaycees are a wonder ful group of people and Im so glad that I joined. Im extremely passion ate about community service and it has been a very humbling experi ence to be acknowledged for something I truly love doing, said Thayer. According to Jacksonville Jaycee Community Service Vice President Lindsey Clayton, Thayer has gone above and beyond sup porting the organization. Amber is an amazing example of a community service director. She has not only helped me with projects, but ran some of her own. Community is her passion and when you talk to her, you can see that. She is someone you can always count on with any degree of tasks, said Clayton. The Jaycees is an orga nization for young people ages 18-40 that teaches leadership develop ment and business skills through community development and indi vidual development proj ects. For more informa tion, go to www.jackson villejaycees.com AWARDfor GovDelivery noti fications through the Navy Reserve Forces Command homepage at www.navyreserve.navy. mil. Quotas and adver tised vacancies will be reviewed regularly and updated based on needs of the fleet. Selections are made by AC enlisted commu nity managers, who will consider each applicants performance history, experience, proficiency, and time in grade. Sailors must also meet the eli gibility criteria outlined in MILPERSMAN arti cle 1326-021, including in-rate proficiency and physical and medical readiness requirements. Additionally, Sailors must be within the advertised year group and not with in two years of their AC High Year Tenure dates based upon their active duty service date. Once selected, a Sailor will be given the opportunity to negotiate for a billet based on the needs of the Navy and his or her preferences. Orders to the new billet will include a projected rotation date and authorization for permanent change of sta tion expenses, if appro priate. To learn more about the RC to AC program, Sailors may speak with their chain of command, read the NAVADMIN and MILPERSMAN arti cle at www.npc.navy. mil, or call the NPC cus tomer service center at 1-866-U-ASK-NPC, (1-866-827-5672) or e-mail at CSCMailbox@ navy.mil. RESERVISTS The U.S. Navy recog nized ombudsmen and the 42 years of service supporting the Navy and Navy families Sept. 14. These individuals vol unteer their time, tal ents and energy to make a difference in the lives of Navy families, helping them during all phases of deployment, disasters or crisis. They are also there to assist with the everyday questions and challenges facing Navy families. I am proud to be asso ciated with the extraor dinary people volunteer ing as ombudsmen and prouder still of their ser vice at this critical time in our nations history, said Monika French, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) ombudsman-atlarge We owe it to all our Navy families to con tinue supporting the Ombudsman Program. The Ombudsman Program was introduced to the Navy on Sept. 14, 1970, by CNO Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, in Z-gram 24, as a means to address issues and concerns that are unique to Navy fami lies. While the date is sig nificant to the history of the program, commands are encouraged to cel ebrate the event at any time deemed appropri ate during the month of September. Most ombudsmen are the spouses of active duty or selected reserve members of the com mand. The Navy family ombudsman is a highlytrained volunteer who is able to offer support and guidance to command families and to act as an official liaison between the command and its families. The Navy ombuds man plays an important role in the success of a commands mission. Ombudsmen are the first step for family members to turn to during a crisis, guiding Navy families to the proper resources they need. That, in turn, helps their Sailors with assur ance that their families are being taken care of at home. When command members know that their family has a resource to go to for assistance, they can concentrate on the mission at hand, said French. It is the Navys goal to ensure that every Sailor and family member has access to the services of a command ombudsman. Family readiness is a primary factor to a Sailors personal and mission readiness. Ombudsmen continu ously demonstrate just how vital they are to helping our Navy fami lies maintain a state of constant readiness. Whether it is for deploy ments, disasters or crisis response, they keep the information moving. According to Lisa Johnson, Commander, Navy Installations Command Ombudsman program manager, the Ombudsman Program is in place to assist the Navy family member and give them an avenue to receive the support they may need in tough times. Ombudsmen are not meant to solve problems, but to direct the fam ily member to the people who can help them solve their problems, said Johnson. Ombudsmen are not meant to be the help, but to connect the family member to the help. Connecting Navy fam ilies to help is what the ombudsmen have been doing for 42 years. They volunteer their personal time to ensure the Navy is ready 100 percent of the time. It is a pleasure to serve along-side a group of dedicated, caring volun teers, said French. I want to thank the past, present and future Navy ombudsmen and wish them a very happy anniversary. I look for ward to working with you all.Navy observes 42 years of service for Ombudsman program Digital Vision/Getty ImagesDONT LET YOUR CHILD FEEL LIKE A FISH WITHOUT WATER. what can trigger an asthma attack may surprise youATTACK ASTHMA.ACT NOW.1-866-NO-ATTACKSWWW.NOATTACKS.ORG 204524A01NOTE TO PUB:DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR ID ONLY.NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAs. Asthma Newspaper B&W ASTYR1-N-03071-F Bear2 1/16 x 5 1/4 85 line screen film at Schawk: (212) 689-8585 Ref#:204524 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 11

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In helping to prepare families in the event of a hurricane, the American Red Cross has created a new app from the American Red Cross. Besides guiding members and families regarding preparedness, the first feature may be useful as means of accounting for fam ily members (AFPAS tracking) for those who have smart phones that are working. For example, you enter one message like Im safe and can send it to all your Facebook contacts with the push of a button. The American Red Cross hurri cane app features: that allows users to broadcast reassurance to family and friends via social media outlets that they are out of harms way. alerts. alized weather alerts where family and friends reside. shelters. people can use to create a family emergency plan. users instant access to critical action steps even without mobile connectivity light and audible alarm To download the app, go to www.redcross.org or from your mobile phone, call **REDCROSS (**73327677) and the Red Cross will send you a link to download the app to your phone or you can download them directly from the iTunes or Google Play app stores. Baby & Parent Infant Massage (Wed. 2 p.m., Mental Baby Boot Camp (1st Wed. 8a.m.-1p.m.); Breastfeeding (third Wednesday at 5:30 p.m., 2nd deck conference room, central tower); Hypnobirthing ; New OB ; Prepared Childbirth ; and Third Trimester to patients delivering at NH Jax Breast Cancer Support Ribbons & Roses, breast cancer sup port group, second Tuesday (except July/ August) at 7 p.m. in General Surgery Clinic; and Breastival on Oct. 17 (9 a.m. to 1 p.m., NH Jax quarterdeck area) brings together NH Jax Breast Care Center staff and com munity partners to enhance awareness of breast cancer. Contact: Nikki Levinson7857 Diabetes Center & Nutrition Clinic Classes & counseling with doctor refer 542-9786 Operational Deployment Transition Recalibrate after deployment to man age sleep, irritability, emotional numb ing, and relationships. Contact: Tracy Hejmanowski, Deployment Health Center TRICARE For Life For ages 65 and up. Fourth Thursday (Jan-Oct) or third Thursday (Nov-Dec) at 2 p.m., 2nd floor conference room, central tower. Contact: TRICARE Health Benefits Wellness Center Health Fitness Assessment (by appt.); Tobacco Cessation (Monday 9 a.m., Tuesday 2 p.m., Thursday 12 p.m.); Naval Operational Fueling Series (NOFS) per formance nutrition fundamentals. Call to register for Heart Health Ship Shape and My Plate Contact: Wellness Center (Bldg. 5292. NAS Jacksonville is current ly underway in replacing the Mulberry Cove Marina docks a set of old wooden piers that have undergone extensive damage due to harsh weather and natural deterioration. Floating concrete docks will be constructed in place of the wooden ones, providing more stable platforms that will more effectively withstand those ele ments. Hurricanes and tropical storms are two of the things that have been especially det rimental to the marina and the boats docked there. Over the past few years, rough weather has caused around $400,000 dollars worth of damage to these docks, commented Phil Collins, man ager at Mulberry Cove Marina. The positions of the docks themselves tend to aid in generating waves, forcing anchored boats to slam into them and cause damage. According to Collins, the floating concrete docks will rise and fall with the tides and be much more damage resis tant to rough weather. The 2.4 million dollar proj ect not only replaces the aging docks, but will also add addi tional spaces or slips for boats to anchor. Our plan is to increase the number of piers from three to six, commented Project Manager Lt. j.g. Jonathan Berube of NAS Jax Public Works Department. Six piers will give us 96 slips for boats to tie up at, 92 being for private use and four being reserved for the MWR. In addition to the improved durability and expanded space, the concrete piers will also fea ture two handicap-accessible walkways, as well as fuel sta tions and storage boxes. The current dock system is in the process of being demol ished by Dennis Chavez Architects Design and Construction, while Cant Be Beat Fence and Construction LLC will install the new con crete docks. Completion of this project should be by Feb. 2013, Collins stated. For more information, call 542-3260. Mulberry Cove Marina replaces aging dock system American Red Cross offers new hurricane app Naval Hospital Jax classes and support groups 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony Nov. 8U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a member of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of special recognition in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. The registration deadline is Oct. 5. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in territori al waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve recognition and thanks for putting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans during my annu al Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the high lights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are strongly encouraged to contact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 5980481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www.crenshaw.house.gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and documentation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the certificate, veterans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214.Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program. Navy Band Alumni invited to performNavy Band Southeast is inviting all Navy Band Alumni to perform at the Alumni Concert at Jacksonville Beach Band Shell Oct. 20 at 12:30 p.m., in con junction with the 2012 Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular. A rehearsal will take place at Navy Band Southeasts facility aboard NAS Jax on the evening of Oct.19. Anyone interested should contact Navy Band Southeasts Public Affairs Officer MU2 Scott Farquhar at scott.farquhar@navy.mil by Oct. 10. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 13

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Are you ready to be notified in the event of an emergency or base closure? A quick and easy sign up to the Wide Area Alert Notification (WAAN) system could save you in more ways than you can imagine. Deployed by the Navy in 2008, the WAAN system provides Navy installa tions (worldwide) with an effective and reliable mass notification system that can be used during a crisis to warn and direct affected personnel. As a civilian employee, I thought that my home phone or cell phone numbers were none of my commands business. And certainly they didnt need to know my kids personal information, says Marcher Castell, a civilian employee at Commander, Navy Installations Command Headquarters. Of course, that meant that they couldnt call me to tell me to evacuate, or include my children in the evacuation count. Heck, they couldnt even call me to tell me something simple like the power being out in my building and not to drive all the way in to the office. All military (active duty and Reserve), civil service, and contractor personnel with an NMCI or One Net user account are required to register their office email address and phone number, at minimum, in the WAAN. Registering personal emergency contact informa tion also is strongly encouraged. As Marcher discovered, the Navy cant alert you, if it cannot find you. Registration is not automatic, but by providing your personal contact infor mation, you take advantage of the fol lowing benefits: Registration enhances your safety and empowers you to react in times of crisis. Registration ensures that real-time alerts provide information to you and your family on what to do and where to go in an emergency. Registration allows you to find out about base closures due to weather or an emergency, before you show up. Registration permits you to be noti fied when it is clear/safe to return to the installation. Rest assured; your personal informa tion is safeguarded. How to register NMCI/One Net usersRight-click on the Purple Globe icon (bottom right corner on desktop). Select Access Self Service. Select the My Info tab and update your Last Name, First Name, and Display Name and save. Select the Devices tab and enter your work and personal contact infor mation in the appropriate mandatory and optional device fields. SAVE. Update your profile any time you have a change. If needed, use a workaroundto reg ister If you have trouble with registering through the Purple Globe, try the work around for your region. Links can be found under Mass Notification>Wide Area Alert Notification System on the Ready Navy website at www.ready.navy. mil. Click on (or copy and paste into your browsers address bar) the link for the workaround below for your region. Southeast Region https://waansecdap01. nmci.navy.mil/corp/atlaunch. asp?opt=uid&nextUrl=https://waans ecdap01.nmci.navy.mil/SelfService/ Entry.aspx?uid=%5bUID%5d I am. Are you?Be ready to receive notifications in an emergency or base closure 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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The mobile nature of our military service often leads service members to choose residential leases rather than homeowner ship. While renting has cer tain benefits, such as saving service members from paying appliance or maintenance costs, there is an area of caution when renting. The most common issue seen at the legal assistance office involves security deposits. Almost every property available for rent requires a tenant to pay a security deposit up front. This usually equals one months rent, but it can vary depend ing on the terms of the lease. The primary pur pose of this deposit is to cover any damages a tenant may cause to the property during his or her tenancy, but may also cover reasonable clean ing costs if the property is left unclean. In Florida, when a ten ant moves out at the end of his or her lease (or due to termination discussed later), the landlord has 15 days to return the money or 30 days to inform the tenant in writing why part or all of the deposit is being kept. The tenant may then respond with objections to the charges if war ranted. If the landlord and tenant cannot come to agreement, who ever is out the money (usu ally the tenant, unless the landlord is claiming damages beyond what the security deposit cov ers) will have to sue in small claims court. If the tenant sues the land lord, a judge will need evidence to determine whether the landlords claim is legitimate. So what can tenants do to protect their secu rity deposit? First and foremost, take pictures upon move in and move out. Most renters have probably seen a movein/move-out checklist. Although the move-in/ move-out checklist is important, pictures will do a far better job of prov ing the condition the property before and after your tenancy. It may feel unnecessary or meticu lous at the time of movein/out to take pictures, but it is the only way of protecting the hundreds or even thousands of your dollars held by your land lord. Friendly relation ships with the landlord can end when a dispute of the security deposit develops. Please keep all pictures and other docu mentation of the condi tion of the premises long after you move out so that you can defend against any claims for damages. Service members also need to know how to ter minate a lease. When a service member PCS moves, he or she (and dependants) are allowed to terminate their lease within 30 days of a writ ten notice. Additionally, service members may terminate a lease if they are deploying from their primary place of duty. In Florida, service members may also termi nate a lease if the mem ber becomes eligible for and moves into base housing. Landlords are not allowed to charge a service member any type of penalty or withhold any amount of the secu rity deposit for termina tion of a lease for these purposes. However, all service members must realize that these rights to ter minate leases are not automatic and must be preceded with proper written notice and sup porting documentation. Members must contact a Judge Advocate or other counsel for help with the required notices. There may be other valid rea sons for terminating a lease in Florida, such as broken utility services, mold, pest infestation, or other conditions which make the property unfit New family friendly complex featuring a full service restaurant & bar. Childrens Activities Menu Sampling Bag Toss Tournament 6 p.m. Door Prizes Live Entertainment Free give-a-ways and more! GOVERNMENT WARNING: Security deposits and lease terminations JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 15

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A new initiative to recycle more aluminum and plastic aboard NAS Jacksonville is under way at HSL-42, HSM-74, VP-30 and VP-45. Many sailors bring soda and water contain ers into their squadron work spaces so, thats where these new collec tion sites will be locat ed. Our goal is to make it more convenient to recycle at the squadron level, with one collec tion box for aluminum and another for plastic, said NAS Jacksonville Environmental Director Kevin Gartland. Each squadron shop supervisor will work with their hazmat coor dinator to transport the reclaimed materials to the recycling center on Birmingham Avenue. It will take just a small adjustment of each squadrons mindset when it comes to disposing of a soda can or water bottle. The test phase will be less than 60 days. After we review the test program and work out any kinks, the new containers will be offered to the stations remaining squadrons, said Gartland. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders said the program looks prom ising. This will expand our base recycling program as it reduces our solid waste stream a win-win situation no matter how you look at it. Gartland agreed, We can never be satisfied with where we are. We must always work to raise the bar for environmental achievement. For information on procuring aluminum and plastic recycling contain ers for your command, call NAS Jacksonville Hazardous Waste Manager Jane Beason at 542-5251. Flight line commands test new recycling program 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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to live in. The process for this type of lease termination is also not automatic and requires a seven-day written notice demanding the landlord fix the issues. After seven business days (not counting the day of notice), the tenant follows up with a final written notice of termina tion, along with returning the keys. The tenant must be moved out by that time. Again, contact a Judge Advocate or other counsel for assistance with the written notices. There is risk with this procedure, as the landlord may bring a lawsuit against the former tenant claim ing that the reason for terminating the lease was not sufficient and that the premises were in adequate condition. The Naval Legal Service Office Southeast has legal assistance offices at Jacksonville (904-542-2565 ext. 3006), Mayport (904-270-5445 ext. 3017), and Kings Bay (912-573-3935). If you are not close to any of these bases, to find the nearest U.S. Navy legal assistance office closest to you, access the Navy JAG web site: http://www.jag.navy.mil/legal_ser vices/nlso_map_global.htm. This article is not a substitute for indi vidual legal advice. Readers are advised to consult a lawyer to obtain proper advice for any legal issue. LEASES The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Monday Pizza Madness $5 for a 14 one topping pizza 2:30 9 p.m., dine in or carryout only Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skills Deweys Coming Soon! Ribbon cutting and grand opening celebration October 4, 3 9 p.m. Free food sampling, DJ, live band Cloud Nine, games, prizes, childrens activities and much more!Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages include bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Fall Bowling Leagues now forming! Mixed league Monday 7 p.m. After-work league Wednesday 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thursday 9 a.m. Mixed league Thursday 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Friday 11:45 a.m. Friday night league 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Saturday 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Open Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. until October 1. Free for military and DOD civilians, $3 for guestsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. The Price is Right Times Union Center Sept. 25, 7:30 p.m., $47 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam February 23, 2013 Preferred seating $42, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Legoland 1 day $45.50, 1 day w/water park $52.75, 2 day $54.50, 2 day w/water park $58.75 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day $29.50, 2 day $40 Disney World Orlando FL 4 day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Tampa Zoo $19 (Adult) $17.50 (Child) Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Blue Man Group in Orlando $59, includes City Walk venue Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Medieval Times Free royalty upgrade with dinner reserva tion Upcoming ITT Trips: Yalaha Country Bakery Sept. 29 Mt. Dora Oct. 27 Lakeridge Winery Nov. 10The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. The Price is Right Show September 25 $10 per person Dinner & a Movie September 26 7 p.m. at Liberty Kennedy Space Center Trip September 30 9 a.m. NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees October 9 & 23 for active duty September 20, October 11 & 25 for retirees & DoD personnel September is customer appre ciation month Monday Friday play 18 holes for $18, includes cart and green fees. Not valid on holidays. Open to military, DOD and guests Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! CFC Golf Tournament October 25, 12:30 p.m. shotgun start $60 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove Marina Mulberry Cove Marina Riverfest September 29, 11 a.m. 5 p.m. Free cookout, music, games & prizes, fishing clinics, Stand-up paddle board lessons and more!Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recre ation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more infor mation. Register now for before & after school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household incomeFlying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School October 29 December 10 $500 per person For more information about any sports, contact Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR Web site at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.face book.com nasjaxmwr. The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) announced Sept. 10 that NEX customers who make a purchase for $25 or less using a credit card will no longer need to sign a sales receipt. This option is available to custom ers who make a purchase using a Visa, MasterCard, Discover or Military Star Card. For those customers using an American Express card to pay for purchases, a signature will still be required. This change [makes] it easier and more efficient for customers to complete their NEX purchase, said Richard Dow, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) senior vice president, Store Operations. We know our customers, often times, run into their NEX to make a small purchase such as a cold bever age, snack or other convenience item, especially in our mini marts. This new procedure will make shopping at your NEX even more convenient. Customers will still receive a printed receipt for all purchases. Signature no longer needed for some NEX credit card purchases JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 17

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The VP-16 War Eagles joined fellow members of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance com munity along with members of the Jacksonville community to com memorate the late Travis Manion and raise money for the Travis Manion Foundation. Approximately five hundred people ran in the one-mile fam ily fun run and the five-kilometer race that began at the Veterans Memorial Wall Sept. 8. This year marked the second year that Jacksonville has hosted the 9/11 Heroes Run. Its really an honor to par ticipate in this run in support of the Travis Manion Foundation. Ultimately, its a small effort on our part compared to his sacrifice for our country, said VP-16 Executive Officer Cmdr. Bill Pennington. 1st Lt. Travis Manion, originally from Doylestown, Penn., was com missioned in the Marine Corps after attending the United States Naval Academy. He spent two tours in Iraq before he was killed on April 29, 2007 by sniper fire in Anbar Provence, Iraq. Manion was posthumously awarded the Silver Star and Bronze Star with Valor. Lt. Nick Rueda of VP-30, the race cirector, was a close friend of Manions at the Naval Academy. My son was born the day that Travis died, so I was unable to attend his funeral. Since then Ive tried to give back to the Manion family in any way that I can, he said. This year the Jacksonville 9/11 Heroes Run raised approximate ly $12,000 for the Travis Manion Foundation. The foundation uses this money to help support families of fallen service members as well as pro vide youth with scholarships that promote leadership and interest in government service. Wounded warriors discuss transitions to new livesCaregivers, National Guard, reserve support and sports for the wounded are the top Defense Department priorities for wounded warriors and their families, the deputy assistant secretary of defense for warrior care said Sept. 13, as wounded warriors dis cussed their experiences with recovery. John Campbell made the comments after listening to panelists at the annual Warrior-Family Symposium, sponsored by the Military Officers Association of America. The panel included four wounded warriors who spoke about their transitions to a new life after being wounded in battle. Retired Marine Corps Master Sgt. William Gibson moderated the panel, along with retired Marine Corps Col. Derek Donovan, vice president of the Fisher House Foundation. Gibson was a 35-year-old gunnery sergeant in Iraq in 2006 when he was shot through the knee. His left leg was amputated above the knee, but he started competing in triathlons while recuperating at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas and has competed in more than a dozen races. In 2008, he went back to Iraq as the first above-the-knee amputee to return to a ground combat area of opera tions. Gibsons determination showed up early in his recovery, when he proved he could get himself to the second floor of a Fisher House room the only one available rather than stay in the hospital. I went up and down those stairs for two hours, sweating pro fusely, just to prove I could do it, he said. Another panelist, retired Navy Petty Officer Benjamin Host, was with the Seabees in Iraq in 2004 when he suffered severe traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder after being in a Humvee convoy accident. Host said he received exquisite military medical care that included three brain sur geries and repairing his fractured skull. But, he said, its the in-between area where we get a drop-off meaning a lack of oversight in the recovery process. Although it took a legal battle, Host said, he was medically retired from the Navy earlier this year. Campbell and the audience also heard from Dr. Tara Dixon, a trauma and critical-care surgeon who deployed to Iraq as an Army reservist with a forwarddeployed unit in 2008 and 2010. Dixon recalled the stress of routine bombings on her camp, of treating the guy I had breakfast with that morning for critical injuries, and of having to make split-second decisions about whether to amputate a limb or risk transporting a soldier hours away to a Baghdad hospital. Then there were the abused Iraqi children brought in as decoys for insurgent attacks on the unit and the surprising number of female soldiers who needed treatment for sexual assaults crimes she was legally bound not to report at the victims request, she said. It messes with your mind a bit, Dixon said of her time in Iraq. She described through tears the toll her service took, which culminated in a suicide attempt six months after her redeployment. Among the many problems, Dixon said, was return ing to a city without a military base and no means of support. I was very much an outcast, and I felt very much alone, she said. The panel also included retired Air Force Tech. Sgt. Matthew Slaydon and his wife, Annette. Slaydon was an ordnance disposal technician on his third deployment in Iraq in October 2007 when a roadside bomb exploded in his face. Like Host, Slaydon said he received excellent medical treatment, but struggled after returning home from the hospital. Family mem bers didnt understand the symptoms of post-traumat ic stress, he said, and some relationships, including with his mother, ended. Slaydon, who lost his arm and was blinded by the bomb, said his symptoms worsened after he received a medical retirement from the service. He became para noid, he said, at noises in his house and would spend his days terrified and sitting with his guns. Slaydon said he has had a wonderful caregiver in his wife, an Air Force recovery care coordinator. Still, the ongoing stress of recovery and caregiving weighed on the couple, and they separated even though Slaydon said he still loved her, but that he needed to recover on his own. Theres no handbook that says when you should pull back as a caregiver and give them more indepen dence, Annette Slaydon said. There is no instruction booklet about how to move forward on this. Turning to Campbell, and with the preface of an apology, Mrs. Slaydon said, There are some really big holes that need to be filled either by the govern ment or the private sector or both to give our families a chance. Its okay, I need to hear this, replied Campbell, a former bank executive who started MyVetwork. He started the online social network to add meaning to his work. In doing so, he said, I heard the voice of my mother, who was his caretaker after he was injured twice as a platoon commander in the Vietnam War. Ive been worried and concerned for a while about caregivers, he said, adding that his office will host a conference early next year about how to help them. On the Guard and reserves, he said, They dont have a base, they dont have the community. Theyre alone and they need our help. Campbell said he wants to continue to explore the issues that most affect wounded warriors and their families and get them the help they need. He said he believes in public-private-nonprofit part nerships. Theres this mindset that [the government] can do it all, but it cant, he said. Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) announced Sept. 5, its customers will find pur chasing a mobile phone and mobile services easier thanks to its new NEX Mobile Centers. The centers will offer customers wireless products, accessories and services from a variety of service providers including AT&T, Boost Mobile, T-Mobile and Verizon Wireless. With hot new advanced mobile phones hitting the market every few weeks, customers can now turn to their NEX Mobile Center for great pricing on the latest mobile phones and service plans, said Mary More, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) Telecommunications Program Office. NEX Mobile Centers will be a one-stop shopping for all mobile phone and mobile phone service plans. NEX customers will find products and services from all the major brands in the mobile phone industry, as well as a highly-trained staff. The new centers will sell a wide variety of smart phones. Customers will also find mobile phone ser vice plans to meet the needs of their families. NEX Mobile Centers have value added in its pric ing, said Morse. They meet or beat the most competitive pricing in the area. They also offer a standard military dis count, so NEX customers can feel at ease when pur chasing their mobile phone or mobile service from an NEX Mobile Center. NEX Mobile Centers offer special programs for the military members, including suspension of service during a deployment and a release from their con tract due to an overseas transfer. It also offers a special order program where if a mobile phone is not in stock, the NEX Mobile Center will mail the phone directly to the customers house fully ready to use. NEXs scheduled to receive the NEX Mobile Center in September are: NEX Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; NEX North Island, San Diego, Calif.; NEX Aviation Plaza, Pensacola, Fla.; NEX Great Lakes, Ill., Student Store; and NEX Norfolk, Little Creek and Oceana Va. NEX Whidbey Island, Wash.; NEX Jacksonville and Mayport, Fla., will have the centers in October. NEX Bethesda, Md., will receive the NEX Mobile Center in time for its grand opening in November. NEX Port Hueneme, Lemoore, Calif.; NEX Memphis, Tenn.; NEX New London, Conn.; NEX Everett and Bangor, Wash.; NEX Charleston, S.C.; NEX Kings Bay, Ga.; NEX Gulfport, Miss., and NEX Great Lakes, Ill., Burkey Mall are all scheduled to have NEX Mobile Centers installed in 2013. The insider threat will not lessen the coalitions resolve to accom plish its objectives in Afghanistan, Army Gen. Martin Dempsey said today. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff spoke about the insider threat in Afghanistan dur ing an interview conducted after a visit to Turkey. We are absolutely resolute in our commitment to the objectives of our campaign, but on the path to achieving those objectives we will make adjustments as we go, he said. The insider threat attacks on coalition personnel by members of Afghanistans security forces or people wearing Afghan uni forms is serious, and coalition and NATO leaders are leaving no stone unturned in the efforts to reduce and eliminate the threat, Dempsey said. The chairman also takes lessons from history. He noted that the British also faced an insider threat when they were in Afghanistan in the 19th century. The threat is part of every war in which outside forces help build indigenous forces, he said. But building these indigenous forces is the right strategy for Afghanistan, he said. The roughly 340,000 trained members of the Afghan national security force today will grow to 352,000 shortly. These forces are taking the lead for operations, pro tecting roughly 75 percent of the Afghan population. At the end of 2014, NATO and coalition forces will end their combat mission and will remain only to train and assist local forces. Given the size of the Afghan forc es, those who turn their weapons on their coalition allies are a small, small number, the chairman point ed out. But the coalition and Afghan government must assess the situ ation where the attacks take place and find out how to stop the attacks from happening, he added. What we need to do is look at these places and understand why there is a greater propensity, and to arm ourselves against it and to continue to encourage our Afghan partners at every level of their lead ership to be engaged with us in this, Dempsey said. It should come as no surprise the coalition and Afghan forces are adapting operations to meet changing threat conditions, Dempsey said, and unrest over the portrayal of Islam in a YouTube video is part of the threat that coalition forces face. Its important to note that it is not just the threat condition of the insider threats that we are react ing to, but the heightened ten sion related to the reaction of the Islamic world to the video, he said. Training for Afghan forces has not been cut, the general said. Recruit and unit training contin ue at the bigger base camps and operating locations, but there have been changes in the way Afghan and coalition units partner. I expect that two weeks from now, [Marine Corps Gen. John Allen, commander of coalition forces in Afghanistan] will be look ing at the conditions as he con fronts them and making other assessments, Dempsey said. The insider threat is complex and must be seen in context, the chair man said. While the Taliban have infiltrated and conducted some attacks, other killings are not ideo logical. The Taliban have been calling for the Afghan security forces to turn against their American partners for years, the chairman said. Insider attacks have increased this year, he said, and Afghan and coalition officials will work togeth er to understand the root causes of these attacks. Coalition remains resolute despite insider threat Select NEXs to open mobile centers NAS Jax, NS Mayport to open in October War Eagles race to raise funds in 9/11 Heroes Run 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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The Defense Commissary Agency is making progress in its rollout of the Commissary Rewards Card that will soon allow customers to access and redeem digital coupons at all of its stores. Testing began Aug. 8 at the Fort Lee Commissary, Va., eventually moving to 30 stores by the end of the month. DeCA then began a gradual rollout to its commissaries in September, with deployment scheduled to be completed by early fall. Cards can only be used at commissaries where the card has been deployed. Customers are asked to check with their local commissary to see if the card is available at their store. Stores that are using the cards will be actively passing them out to authorized patrons and will have signs displayed pro moting the program. As an introductory offer, customers who pick up their cards by Oct. 24 will receive preloaded digi tal coupons on their cards that they can use in the commissary immediately. We are very excited about this new initiative, said DeCA Director and CEO Joseph H. Jeu. These cards will allow our cus tomers to reduce the number of paper coupons they have to clip and carry, he added. That saves our customers time, effort and money. The cards, which will only be available at commissaries, are easy to use. Once customers get their cards in the store, they will need to visit DeCAs website to register it and load digital cou pons to their account. Once the card is scanned at the register, the coupons will be matched to their purchases and the sav ings automatically deducted. Its that simple. Customers like retired Army Sgt. 1st Class Kelly Scherer said they are excited about what the program has to offer. I dont coupon enough, said Scherer, the first commissary customer to use the new card at the Fort Lee Commissary. But now that I have this, I dont have to I can just load them on the card at home and come shop ping. Customers will have the option of printing off a list of their coupons before making the trip to the commissary to help them keep track of their savings. New offers will typi cally be posted online every two to three weeks. As an incentive, custom ers who register their card by Oct. 24 can enter the 2012 Commissary Rewards Card Home for the Holidays Sweepstakes sponsored by Dr Pepper-7UP for a chance to win round-trip airline tick ets for four to anywhere in the states, lodging in a hotel room that accommodates four for six days and five nights, and $1,000 spending money. The sweep stakes entry form will appear at the end of the registration pro cess online. Digital coupons, just like their paper counterparts, have expiration dates and other terms and conditions that must be followed for redemp tion. However, digital coupons will not be accepted for up to six months after expiration overseas, as paper coupons are. Thats because the cou pons are distributed digitally and are instantly available to all customers worldwide, so overseas customers wont need extra time to use the coupons. Once a coupon expires, it will disappear from the customers account. Also, DeCAs coupon policy limits coupons to one per pur chase, so these digital coupons cannot be combined with man ufacturer coupons, including paper coupons and military or commissary coupons. Future enhancements to the card are expected to enable DeCAs industry partners to tar get savings based on the cus tomers specific usage, alert patrons to available sales pro motions at their local stores and reward consistent shoppers with specific incentives. Digital couponing is the first of many innovative programs that are part of our Commissary 2020 vision to deliver a 21st cen tury benefit, Jeu said. We are always working with our indus try partners to negotiate the lowest possible prices and iden tify new ways for our customers to save even more. For more information on this card, please visit www. commissaries.com/faq and click Commissary Rewards Card. Assistance is also avail able through the customer ser vice hotline at 855-829-6219 or through e-mail at commissary support@inmar.com. Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommo dations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. 13-16 (5:30-10 p.m.) (TAP) Separation Workshop Oct. 15-19, Nov. 5-9, Dec. 3-7. (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Sept. 24-28, Oct. 22-26, Nov. 26-30, Dec. 17-21. a.m.-noon) Oct. 12, Nov. 14. Workshop (8-9:30 a.m.) Nov. 19. Workshop (9:40 a.m.-noon) Nov. 19. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Nov. 20-21. Training (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Dec. 10-14. Management Workshop (8-11 a.m.) Oct. 3. Buying (9-10:30 a.m.) Nov. 13. Oct. 2, Dec. 4. (1:30-4 p.m.) Nov. 11, Nov. 13. Nov. 17 (10 a.m.-noon). Oct. 15, Nov. 19, Dec. 10. (9-10 a.m.) Oct. 3, Nov. 7, Dec. 5. a.m.-noon) Oct. 16, Nov. 20, Dec. 18. For more information or to register, call 542-5745. Halloween Horror NightsITT Vendor Day Oct. 5, 10 a.m. 2 p.m.*Win 2 admission tickets and a 1-night stay at CoCo Key Resort in Orlando, FL *Childrens costume contest win a universal plush Cat in the Hat or Shrek with Puss in Boots For more information call ITT at (904) 542-3318 DeCA begins rollout of Commissary Rewards CardImprove your life skills with free knowledge JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 19

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To assist Sailors, families and the Navy community with getting ahead of stress and fostering readiness before a crisis occurs, Navy Suicide Prevention and Operational Stress Control Programs, Navy Behavioral Health, have introduced Stress Navigation Plans. Sometimes finding a way to de-stress can be stressful itself if we dont know what to do or where to go. Readiness doesnt begin at the time of a crisis. Readiness starts by having the tools to help us respond to unforeseen circum stances swiftly and with clarity-and knowing where those tools are, accord ing to Capt. Kurt Scott, director, Navy Behavioral Health Program. We cant always plan for lifes chal lenges, said Scott. But we can be ready for the stress from these challenges by identifying our resources and practices for navigating these challenges while were still healthy. By personalizing a stress navigation plan, youll know where your life jack ets are in case of an emergency. It only took me fifteen minutes, and Ive got my stress plan here in my office for quick access. Stress is a part of everyday life, espe cially in the Navy, according to Scott. Having a plan ahead of time will help stop stress issues from becoming stress problems. Stress navigation plans are simple templates that can be personalized with practices for navigating stress while were still emotionally healthy, which be a life-saving drill if a crisis arises. The template is available on Navy Personnel Command web site and includes fields to personalize with names, contact numbers and personal practices for dealing with a variety of challenges in life, from work stress to relationship issues. Taking a moment to personalize a Stress Navigation Plan now may have a significant impact later by helping to prevent future obstacles from com pounding and leading to negative stress reactions. According to instructions on the Suicide Prevention website, Stress Navigation Plans do not have to be shared or revealed to anyone, but should be in a readily accessible place for personal use in times of crisis. Anyone can use a Stress Navigation Plan. Encourage your shipmates, peers, family and community members to per sonalize theirs and take the stress out of navigating stress. Life counts! To access the stress navigation plan template, visit http://www.public.navy. mil/bupers-npc/support/suicide_pre vention/HowToHelp/Documents/ Stress%20Navigation%20Plan.pdf. The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Sept. 30, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Cincinnati Bengals (Tickets on sale Sept. 17) Oct. 7, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Chicago Bears (Tickets on sale Sept. 24) Nov. 4, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Detroit Lions (Tickets on sale Oct. 22) Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jags vs. Indianapolis Colts (Tickets on sale Oct. 29) Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to pur chase/use these tickets. Retirees and Veterans/DoD employ ees are eligible to purchase tickets for New York Giants and Atlanta Falcons games. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for mili tary personnel, but under no circum stances are dependent children autho rized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger fami lies desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may pur chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No excep tions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the sea son.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@ usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tick ets for the entire season.Stress Navigation Plans help Sailors get controlJacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO Daniela Hines is one of the newest volunteers at the NAS Jacksonville Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society. For the past six months, she has served as a Budget for Baby counsel or and most recently as a caseworker and client service associate. Hines provides active duty ser vice members and their families with financial counseling and assistance. Born in Arizona, her family moved to Brazil when she was three months old. She lived there until she was 16 when she returned to the United States as a Rotary exchange student. She went on to attend the University of Mississippi, majoring in International Studies. After meeting her husband Marc, Hines switched gears and decided to focus on teaching. She earned her Masters Degree in 2006 in Secondary Education from the University of West Florida. In her free time, Daniela enjoys spending time with her husband and their two sons. She also enjoys cooking, bik ing and yoga. When she is looking for calm or inspiration, she heads out to spend some time on the beach. Want to learn more about volunteer oppor tunities at NMCRS? Please contact NMCRS Chairman of Volunteers Amanda OConnell at 542-3515 or mandivoc@ gmail.com. Meet Daniela Hines 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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The EP-3E (Aries II) Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) reconnaissance aircraft is a four-engine turboprop signals intelligence reconnaissance aircraft, based on the P-3 Orion airframe. The EP-3E ARIES II (Airborne Reconnaissance Integrated Electronic System II) is the Navys only land-based SIGINT reconnaissance aircraft. The 11 EP-3E aircraft in the Navys inventory provide fleet and theater commanders worldwide with near realtime tactical SIGINT. With sensitive receivers and high-gain dish antennas, the EP-3E exploits a wide range of electronic emissions from deep within tar geted territory. It is capable of a 12-hour endurance and a range of more than 3,000 nautical miles. The normal crew complement is 7 officers and 17 enlisted aircrew. During the 1990s, 12 P-3Cs were converted to EP3-E ARIES II to replace older versions of the aircraft. The original ARIES I aircraft were converted in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The last EP-3E ARIES II aircraft was delivered in 1997. EP-3Es were heavily engaged in reconnaissance in support of NATO forces in Bosnia, joint forces in Korea and in Operation Southern Watch, Northern Watch, and Allied Force. September, National Suicide Prevention and Awareness Month, is a reminder to everyone in the military community to watch out for each other, a senior defense official said. Jacqueline Garrick, acting direc tor of the Defense Suicide Prevention Office, told the Pentagon Channel and American Forces Press Service the Defense Departments theme for the months observance, Stand By Them, is a prompt to get involved when a friend or loved one seems distressed. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, she noted, has been adamant about encour aging people to seek help, and in stressing leaders responsibility to ensure their people get the counseling they need. I think the first key factor is to under stand the signs and symptoms of sui cide, and not to be afraid to ask the question, she said. Its a myth that if you ask somebody, Are you feeling sui cidal? that youll put a thought in their head. And thats just not going to hap pen. If somebodys really in distress . the first thing we want people to know to do is ask the questions, Do you feel like you could hurt yourself, Do you have a plan?, and How can I help? Garrick said relationship issues, legal or financial problems often are factors in the lives of people at risk for suicide. Anyone suspecting possible suicidal impulses in a friend, co-worker or loved one also should be sensitive to chang es in moods or behavior patterns, she added. Excessive risk-taking, substance abuse, giving away possessions and changes in life insurance arrangements are all possible indicators someone may be considering suicide, she said. Be mindful of those kinds of things, she advised. Garrick added that mood changes in both directions can indicate a person is considering suicide. Sometimes its a euphoria, or its a depression, she said. So just be mind ful. And leadership needs to know . what their service members are like, so that they can know when there have been those changes. Garrick said she encourages mili tary family members concerned about a loved ones state of mind to contact commands, chaplains offices, commu nity services, or any other means of help they can reach. One of the key features that were working on right now is with the Department of Veterans Affairs, she said. For several years, they have been working on the Veterans Crisis Line, and we have been working with them to rebrand [it] as the Military Crisis Line so that our men and women in uniform know that the Military Crisis Line the 1-800-273-TALK(8255) number, press 1 if youre military is for them as well. The Military Crisis Line is an over arching and confidential resource one number to call when youre expe riencing any kind of crisis, any kind of suicidal ideation, any thoughts, feel ings . that youre not sure how to deal with, Garrick said. The crisis line also has an online chat option at http://www.militarycrisisline. net, and a text component reachable by smartphone at 838255, she explained. You can access assistance any way, any time of the day, from anywhere in the world, Garrick said, adding other options are in place or in development for troops overseas. Any of the various means of approach to the crisis line will put military mem bers or their families in contact with a VA mental health provider, she said. Garrick noted family members often are the first to notice a loved ones strug gles, and she encourages them, as well, to reach out through the crisis line. We know that family members are usually the first ones to see if some body has had any changes in mood, personality and activity, Garrick said. Theyre the ones that need to hear the message first. We want to give them a way to get involved, she continued. If they call the crisis line, family members can be supported as well for their service member, and for their own issues. Garrick acknowledged there is a com mon belief among military members that seeking help for mental health issues can damage their careers. Not seeking help is going to harm your career even more, she said. So even if you have to take a medication, or you cant deploy, or you have to go for further testing, there are benefits to treatment. Treatment works. Mental health support that we know works is available across the services through military treatment facilities, community mental health services and chaplains offices, Garrick said. That will benefit your career in the long run, she added. And it will bene fit your life in the long run, because this isnt just about your military career its about your family well-being, its about your safety, and its about what your long-term plan is for your future. Someone who calls the crisis line, Garrick said, can expect to talk to somebody who is compassionate and competent. These are all trained clini cians [and] providers that are on the other end of the line. Military crisis line responders under stand military culture, and many are themselves veterans, she said. The VA works very closely with this department to make sure that our ser vice members are being cared for prop erly, she said. So they can expect to get the best possible assistance and competent care. UNITAS Atlantic phase kicks off in Key West Naval forces from Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Mexico, the United Kingdom and the United States kicked off the Atlantic Phase of UNITAS, an annual multi-national exercise, in Key West, Sept. 17 hosted by Commander, U.S. Fourth Fleet. Thirteen warships will conduct operations in the Western Caribbean through, Sept. 28. UNITAS is designed to train participating forces in a variety of maritime scenarios to test command and control of forces at sea, while operating as a multina tional force to provide the maximum opportunity to improve interoperability. Observers from France, Jamaica, Panama and Peru are also participating this year. UNITAS develops and sustains relationships to improve the capacity of our partners maritime forces. This annual exercise fosters friendly, mutual coopera tion and understanding between participating navies. While the overarching goal of the exercise is to develop and test command and control of forces at sea, training in this exercise will address the spectrum of maritime operations, Commander U.S. Fourth Fleet, Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris said. Specifically, there will be high end warfare scenarios addressing Electronic Warfare, Anti-Air Warfare and Air Defense, Anti-Submarine Warfare, Anti-Surface Warfare, and Maritime Interdiction Operations, he said. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spectrum military opera tions by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relation ships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance region al security and promote peace, stability, and prosper ity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. EP-3E (Aries II) Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) reconnaissance aircraft DoD: families, friends need to recognize signs of suicide The Navys newest Littoral Combat Ship, USS Fort Worth (LCS 3), sailed from Naval Station Mayport Sept. 13, beginning the final leg of its maiden voyage to its commissioning site in Galveston, Texas. Fort Worth is the third LCS delivered to the Navy and the second of the steel, semi-planing mono-hull Freedom variant. It will be commissioned Sept. 22. During its two-week stay at NS Mayport, the ship underwent a scheduled preventive main tenance availability and con ducted initial Combat Support Systems Onboard Testing, and TRS-3D RADAR Electronic Target Generator Testing in sup port of the Combat System Ship Qualification Test that will take place later this year after the ship arrives in its homeport of San Diego. The ship departed the Marinette Marine Corp. shipyard in Marinette, Wis., Aug. 6, sailing through the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway, before even tually making her way down the East Coast of the United States. The trip through the Seaway was particularly complex, as the ship transited 11 narrow locks that were, in many cases, only a few feet wider than the ship itself a feat few Navy vessels ever get the opportunity to experience. Fort Worth completed a chal lenging transit, and Im impressed with how well she handled, said Rear Adm. James Murdoch, pro gram executive officer for Littoral Combat Ships. Both the ship and crew performed superbly. LCS 3 has incorporated a num ber of design changes based on lessons learned from the first ship of class, USS Freedom (LCS 1). These changes are now part of the baseline design and will be incor porated into future ships of the class prior to construction. LCS is a high-speed, agile, shal low-draft, focused-mission sur face combatant designed for oper ation in near-shore environments yet fully capable of open-ocean operation. Fort Worth is designed to defeat asymmetric antiaccess threats such as mines, quiet diesel submarines and fast surface craft. The 387-foot Fort Worth will be outfitted with reconfigurable pay loads, called mission packages, which can be changed quickly, and focus on three mission areas: mine countermeasures, surface warfare and anti-submarine war fare. In addition to the three focused warfare missions it will conduct, the Littoral Combat Ships inher ent capabilities and suitability to conduct lower-end missions will free up our more expensive, multimission cruisers and destroyers to conduct higher-end missions.USS Fort Worth departs Mayport for commissioning JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 21

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Hundreds of Sailors, civilians and firefighters gathered at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Sept. 11 in remem brance of the 11th anniversary of the terrorist attacks against the United States on Sept. 11, 2001. The event began with a 5K run and was immediately followed by a memo rial that was held in front of NH Jacksonville. The ceremony opened with a parad ing of the colors by the NH Jacksonville flag detail. Among those in attendance were members of the NAS Jacksonvilles Fire Department who proudly displayed the American flag from a fire engine. Were here to remember the fire fighters who lost their lives while fighting the fire on 9/11, said NAS Jacksonville Fire Chief Mark Brusoe. Its a privilege and an honor to be a part of this ceremony. After Taps was played and a 21-gun salute by NAS Jacksonvilles Honor Support Team, NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer welcomed those in attendance. This is a remembrance of all those who paid the ultimate sacrifice on 9/11, said Shaffer. We are also honoring the 6,500 men and women who have served honor ably in the military and have given their lives since 9/11. Many of the runners today had photos of fallen heroes and loved ones pinned to their shirts in their honor and memory. NCC(SW) (select) Rhonaka Williams elaborated on what Shaffer said about the importance of remembering those who lost their lives on 9/11. That was a day that I will never forget, said Williams. Each year I think that everyone should set aside some time, even if its just a couple of min utes, to remember what happened on that horrific day Sept. 11, 2001. Approximately 3,000 people lost their lives on that tragic day and almost 6,500 service members have fallen since that time as our nation and allies joined forces against terrorism. Although words cannot east the pain of these losses, we can recall how the NAS Jax pins new chiefsThe NAS Jacksonville CPO induction season came to a close Sept. 14 with several pinning ceremonies for new chief petty officers at Hangar 117, Naval Hospital Jacksonville and Hangar 1000. Ninety-six new chiefs were pinned by their family members and sponsors at Hangar 117. The event began NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM) (AW/SW) Brad Shepherd welcomed the guests and presented the 2012 chief petty officers selectees who proudly stood in formation singing Anchors Aweigh. After the national anthem was per formed by CSC Stephanie Canteen, and invocation was delivered by NAS Jax Command Chaplain Cmdr. Shannon Skidmore, VP-30 Command Master Chief (CMDCM) (AW/SW/NAC) Jerry Holloman welcomed the guests and stressed the importance of the ceremony. April 1, 1893 was when the Navy established the rank of chief petty offi cer. For 119 years there have been ceremonies similar to what you will see here today, said Holloman. We are here today to honor, recog nize and witness the culmination of a lifelong goal for these 96 chief selectees. They have earned the right to be called the chief and bear the enormous responsibility that comes with that title. While it is true they all got here through their own personal hard work and sacrifice, I can say with 100 percent IC2(SW) Amber Thayer of the NAS Jax Ground Electronics Maintenance Division was presented the Gen. Chappie James Memorial Award during the Florida Junior Chamber (Jaycees) Outstanding Young Floridians & Pioneers Awards Ceremony Aug. 25 in Hollywood, Fla. Thayer, a native of Newport News, Va., was recognized for not only her achievements as a member of the U.S. Navy, but for her community support and educational aspirations. After joining the Navy and com pleting basic training in 2005, Thayer attended Interior Communication A School in 2006 followed by Stabilized Glide Slope Indicator System School in 2006. Her first duty station was on board USS Germantown (LSD-42), home ported in San Diego, where she com pleted a Western Pacific deploy ment. She later deployed for an addi tional eight months in 2008 in sup port of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. Thayer later completed a Hull Swap deployment in Sasebo, Japan for five months with USS Harpers Ferry (LSD-49) where she also provided humanitarian relief during Operation Tomodachi after the earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Thayer reported to NAS Jax in June 2011 where she is currently works as the assistant work center supervisor. She joined the Jacksonville Jaycees in June 2011. This was a way to get involved in my community and make some new friends, said Thayer. I was excited to meet other young profes sionals outside of the military. Since joining, Thayer participated in nearly every event available in 2011 NavHosp Jax remembers Sept. 11 NAS Jax Sailor wins Florida Jaycees award

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS It shocked me last week when footage of Sept. 11, 2001, sud denly looked . well, histori cal. Eleven years ago, I thought that day never would age, that the images would remain clear and vibrant. Yet, as I watched History Channel documenta ries on the 11th anniversary, the archived media reports seemed from a different time. Has it really been 11 years? What surprised me even more was having a conversa tion about 9/11 with my almost 12-year-old son, Ford, who had been just a baby when the World Trade Center collapsed. Back then, I was feeding him mashed sweet potatoes and singing Happy Birthday to our dog, Tanner, when my mom called and told me to turn on the news. Dustin was on his first deployment on board USS Enterprise, and he had been gone for five months already. At last report, the ship had begun its transatlantic trip back to the United States. Dustin was due home for my birthday in October. We were in the home stretch. But when I turned on the news that morning and saw the towers collapse, I knew the Enterprise wasnt coming home anytime soon. It was a selfish thought. Yet, even though I was thousands of miles away from New York City on the morning of 9/11, I (and other military spouses every where) knew what was unfold ing on television would affect our military life in innumerable ways. Ford chewed on his rubber baby spoon and gurgled while Tanners toe nails clicked on the linoleum kitchen floor. The neighborhood soon filled with husbands and wives rushing home to one another and racing to pick up their children from school. Ford and I were alone. I reflected on this as I drove him to school last Wednesday. He told me that he had gotten up at 5 a.m. and watched a TV documentary about 9/11. My first thought: who gets up at 5 a.m.? My second thought: my kid is old enough to watch the History Channel . voluntari ly? And what did you think? I asked. Its weird that all of it hap pened when I was a baby, he said. When did Dad finally come home again? My mind rushed back to those first few days in September 2001, when e-mails to Dustin werent going through, and I hadnt heard from him. The commanding officers wife confirmed that the ship had turned around and was no longer headed home. Do you know when theyll come home? we asked. No, not yet. Are they safe? Yes. When will e-mail work again? I dont know. There were so many unan swerable questions, and although Dustin ended up coming home before Thanksgiving, those extra six weeks of waiting and wonder ing, without a homecoming date, felt like an eternity. On my birthday that year which was the original home coming our military spouse group got together at one of the wifes houses. It was Fords 11-month birthday. At some point during the potluck din ner, Ford pulled himself up to stand next to a coffee table. His bottle hung from his mouth. When he smiled at me, the bottle fell. And the next thing I knew, he started to take his first step. About 20 military wives screamed, Oh no! Wait for your Dad! But Ford couldnt wait. He was a full-fledged walker by the time Dustin came home. I got a little emotional as I told Ford about this. And then, before we pulled up to his school, he said, Um, Mom, why were you so crazy about my first step and Dad not see ing it? Thats kind of weird. I mean, who cares about a first step? As I drove home, I laughed to myself. Ford was right. It had once seemed so unfair that Dustin had missed his sons first step. We get kind of jammed up about those things when its our first baby, dont we? The first tooth, first step, first word. In hindsight, it has never really mattered that Dustin didnt see Fords first step, especially when I consider that thousands of 9/11 babies never even saw their fathers. But its all relative. And that night, as I was going to sleep and thinking about what Ford said, Ill admit I was a little sad. I was sad that, once again, Dustin had missed something our preteen son doing his best to sort out a world that had already changed before he had even learned to walk. Sept. 20 1911 Navigational instruments first requested for naval aircraft. 1951 In Operation Summit, the first combat helicopter landing when U.S. Marines were landed in Korea. 1981 Ammunition ship USS Mount Hood (AE-29) and Navy helicopters rescue 18 crew members of Philippine Navy frigate Datu Kalantiaw. Sept. 21 1858 Sloop Niagara departs Charleston, S.C., for Liberia with African slaves rescued from slave ship. 1923 Asiatic Fleet completes mission of aiding earthquake victims in Japan. 1939 President Franklin Roosevelt asks Congress to repeal the arms embargo provision of the Neutrality Act. 1944 Aircraft from 12 carriers commence two-day attack against Japanese ships and airfields on Luzon, Philippines. 1984 Mideast Force begins escort of U.S. flagged vessels in Persian Gulf. Sept. 22 1776 John Paul Jones in Continental Navy ship Providence sails into Canso Bay, Nova Scotia, and attacks British fishing fleet. 1943 U.S. destroyers and land ing craft land Australian troops at Finschhafen, New Guinea. 1989 After Hurricane Hugo, Sailors and Marines provide assistance to Charleston, S.C., through Oct. 10. Sept. 23 1779 Capt. John Paul Jones in Continental Navy frigate Bonhomme Richard captures HMS Serapis. 1931 Lt. Alfred Pride pilots Navys first rotary wing aircraft, XOP-1 auto giro, in landings and takeoffs on board USS Langley while underway. 1944 Naval Task Group lands Army troops on Ulithi Atoll, Caroline Islands. 1944 USS West Virginia (BB-48) reaches Pearl Harbor and rejoins the Pacific Fleet, marking the end of the salvage and reconstruction of 18 ships damaged at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. 1947 James Forrestal, former SECNAV, takes office as first Secretary of Defense. 1990 Two Hospital ships (USNS Mercy and USNS Comfort) steam together for first time in Arabian Gulf. Sept. 24 1918 Ensign David Ingalls, USNR, flying a Sopwith Camel, shoots down his fifth enemy aircraft, becoming the first U.S. Navy ace, while flying with the British Royal Air Force. 1944 5th Fleet carrier aircraft attack Japanese in Visayas, Philippines. 1960 First nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, USS Enterprise (CVAN-65), launched at Newport News, Va. Sept. 25 1957 In project Stratoscope, Office of Naval Research obtains sharp pho tographs of suns corona from first bal loon-borne telescope camera. Sept. 26 1781 French fleet defeats British at Yorktown, Va. 1918 USCG Cutter Tampa lost with 118 men, probably by German subma rine. 1931 Keel laying at Newport News, Va., of USS Ranger (CV-4), the first ship designed and constructed as an aircraft carrier. 1963 First steam-eject launch of Polaris missile at sea off Cape Canaveral, Fla. (now Cape Kennedy) from USS Observation Island (EAG-154). 9/11 documentaries and a new generationSunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Catholic CCD 11 a.m. Protestant Worship Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study 6 p.m. in the Barracks Officer Christian Fellowship and Bible study Every Monday at 6 p.m. NAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051

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VP-5 participated in exer cise Costal Watch Station Capability Exercise (CWS CAPEX) at the Benito N Ebuen Air Base in Mactan, Philippines Sept. 3. Joined by representa tives from the Filipino Navy and Coast Guard, the Mad Foxes took part in exercises, training and briefs designed to enhance relations between the Filipino Armed Forces and the United States Navy. Combat Aircrew Ten (CAC10) represented the Mad Foxes, led by Mission Commander Lt. Allison Cameron and accom panied by a maintenance detachment which helped support flight operations. This was CAC-10s second exercise in Mactan this deployment. Tactical Coordinator Lt. Paul Reali said, Its great to be back. These experiences are very rewarding. The first day began with a mission to report all maritime activity to Filipino costal watch stations. The crew reported numerous cargo and fishing vessels and also participated in a search and rescue (SAR) exercise. By providing an eye in the sky for Filipino Navy and Coast Guard forces, CAC-10 helped the coastal watch sta tions train for the day when they must rely on an airborne asset to locate vessels in dis tress. Throughout the week, the Mad Foxes took members of the Filipino Navy and Coast Guard for several familiariza tion flights including maritime patrol, coordinated operations, and additional SAR profiles. The Filipino aircrewmen were able to develop a feel for what missions are like onboard a P-3C. The riders were able to observe how each element of the crew, from the flight station to the sensor operators, inter acted during all mission sets. During one sortie, they pro vided overwatch for a Filipino Navy vessel that conducted a boarding operation of a simu lated rogue vessel. The crew relayed the posi tion of the motor vessel to the Filipino Navy ship, which intercepted and boarded it. Lt. j.g. Wes Kang said, Thats some of the most exciting fly ing Ive done since on deploy ment. We were down low, above beautiful water and off the coast of gorgeous beach es. Theres nothing like fly ing close to the sea supporting maritime forces beneath you. The Mad Foxes were deeply grateful for the opportunity to participate in CWS CAPEX and for the chance to continue to foster relationships with their Filipino counterparts. Whether through presen tations, flights or sharing in the local culture, both the American and Filipino air crews came away with a better understanding and apprecia tion for each other. The VP-8 Fighting Tigers hosted 15 aviation officer candidates from the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) Fleet Air Wing Two (FAW-2) Odin squadron at Naval Air Facility Misawa, Aug. 31. VP-8 provided a static display of a P-3C Orion aircraft, briefed the candi dates on the squadrons history and primary missions, and discussed the typi cal career path for United States Navy aviators and naval flight officers. The visit concluded with a tour of Tactical Operations Center Misawa and lunch with the candidates. All personnel involved in the visit noted the benefit of interacting with their counterparts. I enjoyed discussing my career path from flight school to today, said VP-8 Pilot Lt. Brandon Clark, who led the visit for VP-8. The candidates were very interested in how we became P-3C pilots and naval flight officers and how U.S. Navy officers end up in other platforms. Lt.j.g. Patrick Frailey assisted with the static display and found the candidates were most impressed by the planes advanced imaging multispectral sensor camera. The Fighting Tigers have interacted with their FAW-2 Odin counterparts on several occasions this deployment both in-flight and on deck to advance bilateral training and partnerships. The squadron is currently on a six-month deployment to 7th Fleet. VP-8 Fighting Tigers host JMSDF FAW-2 aviation officer candidatesVP-5 trains with Filipino Navy JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 3

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Members of VP-45 flew a P-3C Orion to Cleveland over the Labor Day weekend to participate as a static display in the Cleveland Navy Week festivities. Air shows are always a great oppor tunity for VP-45 members to educate the greater public on the P-3C, our primary anti-submarine warfare mis sion, as well as to be ambassadors for the Navy and the First Coast. So when the opportunity to send a plane to Cleveland arose we jumped on it, said VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mike Vitali. The Cleveland National Air Show is an annual event which has taken place on the shores of Lake Erie in down town Cleveland since 1964. The show includes a NASA exhibit, static displays, stunt airplanes, modern fighters, and alternates between the Blue Angels and Thunderbirds every other year. The Pelican aircrew enjoyed answering questions from the public at their static display during the show. We fielded an incredibly wide range of questions from, How long can you fly for? and, What material is your pro peller made of? to, Does that plane actually fly missions? and, Why is the airplane leaking? said Lt. Mike Dark, patrol plane captain of the air show P-3C. It was also really nice to educate the public on the P-3C as well as speak to former P-3 aircrew alumni. I spoke to a former P-3B pilot from the Vietnam War era for nearly an hour. Participating in the air show was also a great experience for Lt. j.g. Andrew Lavin. The Cleveland Air Show was some thing that I will never forget. It was great to see and experience the Midwest and the support for the military. It lifts my spirit to see our nations pride for the uniformed services. VP-5 Mad Fox aviators participated in the Vacation Bible School program Amazing Wonders Aviation conducted by the chaplain services and volunteers of Kadena Air Base, Japan Aug. 20. They arrived at the chapel on the morning of the opening ceremony with their flight helmets in an effort to give the children a good idea of what exact ly aviation entailed and the chance to wear an actual flight helmet. The volunteers began with a brief description of the sights they have seen, interesting things they have done, and finished by passing their helmets around to the children to handle and wear. Overall, the experience was exciting for the children and rewarding for the aviators. Lt. j.g. Jordan Holt remarked, Those children are our future and time spent with them is an investment in our nations future. VP-45 Pelicans participate in Cleveland Navy Week air show Mad Fox aviators visit Amazing Wonders Aviation The Navy is establishing a new aug mentation program that will offer enlisted Reservists opportunities to convert to permanent active duty careers, as outlined in NAVADMIN 274/12, released Sept. 9. The Reserve Component to Active Component (RC to AC) augmentation program seeks to place qualified enlisted reserve mem bers in specific rates and year groups to fill active community needs in the fleet. Once released from their Reserve obligations and assigned to their new billets, RC to AC participants will become active duty Sailors in every respect, including being eligible for AC advancement, permanent change of station orders, and selective reenlist ment bonus eligibility. The active Navy needs Sailors with talent and experience, and the Navy Reserve is a great place to find them, said Rear Adm. Anthony Kurta, director of military personnel plans and policy. Through this program, were aiming to leverage our Reserve Sailors skill sets and experience to place select reserve Sailors in needed billets in the Fleet. As part of the Navys Continuum of Service initiative, the RC to AC program is designed to streamline Sailors transition between Reserve and active ser vice. Additionally, the RC to AC pro gram complements the variety of ini tiatives Navy uses to fill needed operational billets, enabling Navy to manage its force so it is best prepared to meet current and future warfighting needs. To improve the efficiency of Reserve to active conversions, the RC to AC program changes the application process. Rather than meet with a recruiter to discuss active duty pros pects, interested Reservists can apply to Navy Personnel Command (PERS92) through his or her unit and Naval Reserve Activity commanding officer in response to advertised vacancies with specific proficiency, year-group and other requirements. Vacancies will be advertised via the GovDelivery system, and will specify available augmentation quotas by rate and year group. Reservists can sign up Navy announces RC to AC Program for Reservists to pursue active duty careers 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) held a change-of-com mand ceremony aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Sept. 14 in port at Naval Station Norfolk. Adm. Bill Gortney relieved Adm. John Harvey Jr., as USFF commander in the traditional ceremony in front of hundreds of distinguished guests, shipmates and crew members. Harvey, a surface war fare officer and a 1973 gradu ate of the United States Naval Academy, assumed command of U.S. Fleet Forces in July 2009. In his more than three-year tenure, he led the command with a strategic focus supporting the nations maritime strategy through operational readi ness, training effectiveness, and professional and personal development. Todays not about me. Its about us who we are, what we do, and why we do it, said Harvey. The power of our Navy is in our people, not our platforms. Over the past three years, theres been no shortage of challenges, but because of your hard work and dedication, we had a positive influence on this fleet. Your work ensured we provided a unified voice to our CNO in partnership with our Pacific Fleet counterparts, and I am so proud to have had the privilege of serving with you. During his distinguished nearly 40 years of naval service, Harvey served in a variety of sea and shore billets. He was the Chief of Naval Personnel, and he commanded USS David R. Ray (DD 971), USS Cape St. George (CG 71) and CruiserDestroyer Group Eight as part of the USS Theodore Roosevelt Strike Group. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert served as the events guest speaker. Hes had a steady hand on the tiller for nearly four decades, said Greenert. He saw the opportunities, he took action, he got results. He made the Fleet tangibly bet ter during his tenure, and hes got us on the right track and speed. Harvey thanked everyone who supported the USFF pos ture to meet global mission requirements. I will certainly miss the Navy because of the people I got to work with in the sense of mission, said Harvey. I did this for 39 years because I loved it, not because I had to. Gortney, a naval aviator and 1977 graduate of Elon College in N.C., becomes the 32nd commander of USFF. He has served in a variety of com mand positions afloat and ashore, including most recently as Director, Joint Staff for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and as Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command; Commander, U.S. 5th Fleet and Combined Forces Maritime Component Commanders. He also com manded Carrier Strike Group10, on the Norfolk-based USS Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. I have spent all but six of my 35 years of service in the fleet. It is great to be back in the fleet, said Gortney. Here at Fleet Forces Command, our missions are few but they could not be more important to our nation. If executed correctly, the overall mission of the command will succeed and our Sailors and civilians deployed or stationed around the globe will succeed. Greenert also took the opportunity to discuss the impor tance of payloads in maintain ing an adaptable maritime force. Adaptability is the absolute essence of being a Sailor, and we get that adaptability when we think about payload before platform. Replacing platforms is expensive, but when we look at payloads first, payloads that support cutting edge technology it can be a game changer. Greenert pointed to the Navys CVNs as an example of maximizing the platforms adaptability through the use of a variety of payloads. The CVN is our most adaptable platform, said Greenert. You pay once, and youve got a half century of service. Enterprise is 50 years old; shes seen everything from A-4s to F-14s to a variety of F/A-18s, and we can now launch an unmanned strike aircraft from that aircraft carrier. Thats the way we need to be thinking. U.S. Fleet Forces Command supports both the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) and combatant command ers worldwide by providing responsive, relevant, sustain able naval forces ready-fortasking. The command provides operational and planning sup port to combatant command ers and integrated warfighter capability requirements to the CNO. Additionally, USFF serves as the CNOs designated executive agent for anti-terrorism/ force protection (ATFP), indi vidual augmentees (IA), and sea-basing. In collaboration with U.S. Pacific Fleet, USFF organizes, mans, trains, maintains, and equips Navy forces, develops and submits budgets, and executes readiness and person nel accounts to develop both required and sustainable levels of fleet readiness. Additionally, the command serves as the unified voice for fleet training requirements and policies to generate com bat-ready Navy forces. Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces changes leadership JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 VP-16 aircrew and main tainers are making steady progress as we continue our quest to become the Navys first combat certified P-8A squadron, said VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Molly Boron in a Sept. 12 interview at the War Eagles space in Hangar 511 aboard NAS Jacksonville. VP-30 just accepted their third Poseidon from Boeing, which will positively impact our flight training schedule. At the P-8A Integrated Training Center, Lt. Cmdr. Mya Swartzlener, an instructor pilot with the VP-30 Fleet Integration Team (FIT), said, The War Eagles transition is going great. They came off deployment and showed up very well prepared, with lots of enthusiasm. Lt. Brett Eckert and Lt. David Hanson belong to one of 12 combat aircrews (CAC) of VP-16. A CAC consists of a patrol plane commander (pilot), a patrol plane pilot (copilot), tactical coordinator (TACCO), co-TACCO and five mission crew. Hanson and I do all our simulator and flight training together in order to build CAC team work, communication and coordination, explained Eckert. Hanson said pilot training is proceeding at a measured pace. Before our first flight in the Poseidon, we logged about 50 hours in the P-8 opera tional flight trainer (OFT). The remainder of our training will be a combination of simulator and actual flight operations. This week, for instance, we flew the OFT on Tuesday, flew a P-8 flight op on Wednesday, followed by another OFT simulator flight on Thursday. Eckert said that in contrast to flying the P-3 Orion, Were more like pilot/managers, thanks to the P-8 flight auto mation and autopilot systems. We enter our flight plan into the flight management con trol (FMC) system, and after takeoff, we go to autopilot. The Poseidon isnt necessarily eas ier to fly than the P-3 its just different. Hanson said a big focus of simulator training is engine emergencies and singleengine flying. Even though the CFM56-7 turbofan engine is one of the worlds most reli able power plants, we need to train for every possibility. We also work a lot on our landings, making sure the plane is properly set up for approach. Eckert added, Each training flight is about five hours, so we usually split our time between the left and right seats. Now, after four flights and signifi cant simulator time, were refining our skills through repetition. The P-8A TACCO manages the mission and the co-TAC CO handles communications among the displays available at the enlisted mission sensor operators. VP-16 Training Officer Lt. Cmdr. Will Toraason is also working on his P-8 TACCO certification. I liaison with the VP-30 FIT staff, which handles most of the CAT II transition scheduling. In my own train ing, I notice that a lot of the things on P-3 that required human interface are now automated in P-8 such as checking weapons systems. Where the P-3 has lots of lights and VP-16 War Eagles move forward with Poseidon

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 7 switches, the new digital P-8 performs a self-diagnostic and suggests solutions. Also, the workstations are modular and that expands our flexibility to meet changing mission sets. Of the five workstations, the TACCO and co-TACCO usually occupy the two center positions for improved communications. Lt. Meredith Trezise is in charge of the daily flight schedules. I coordinate with VP-30 and work within their training syllabus. Right now, the majority of P-8 flights involve VP-16 personnel working to get certi fied. Eventually, as we complete the transition, the squadron will assume the scheduling function. For our mission operators, P-8 brings a whole new set of digital systems. While a lot of tactics carry over from the P-3, were also developing new capabilities for the P-8. As aircrew and mission operators train at the ITC, War Eagles maintainers are working with VP-30 personnel to attain their safe for flight certification. AE1 Justin Parker said hes pleased to have com pleted his initial computer-based training classes so he can begin hands-on training. Right now, weve got VP-30s third P-8A (No. 430) in our space at Hangar 511. Some people are working on the aircrafts acceptance inspection, while others, like myself, are here to train for our various qualifications, such as ground handling. Whats really great is coming in everyday and working with a brand new aircraft. ATAN David Thomas also looks forward to handson learning with the Poseidon. Our shop works on radar, mission crew workstations and navigation sys tems among other things. Its cool to be part of the first squadron to transition to the P-8 platform, as well as the first P-8 squadron to deploy. Bill Senn is a Boeing mission system subject matter expert who works with squadron maintainers and Boeing field service representatives. Were aboard the Poseidon that just arrived at NAS Jax on Sept. 7. Were working together to troubleshoot a couple of prob lems. After we talk with Seattle this afternoon, the gripes should be resolved. When the War Eagles become NATOPS qualified, theyll return to Hangar 511 and begin their 12-month IDRC (Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle) to become combat-certified by CPRW-11. Like the P-3C Orion, P-8A Poseidon serves a wide range of missions. It can search for and destroy sub marines, monitor sea traffic, launch missile attacks on naval or land targets, and act as a flying communications relay. Its intelligence, surveillance and recon naissance capabilities also make it well suited for land-surveillance missions. VP-16

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Navy announced updates to the Selective Reenlistment Bonus award plan, Sept. 8, in NAVADMIN 273/12. The intent of the Selective Reenlistment Bonus (SRB) is to incentivize Sailors with critical skills and experience to stay Navy. SRB rewards Sailors who attain special training in skills most needed in the fleet, and helps meet critical skill reenlistment benchmarks and enhance Navys ability to size, shape and stabilize manning. Award levels are strategically adjusted as reenlistment requirements for specific ratings and skill sets are met. From the 100 skill/zone combinations detailed in NAVADMIN 143/12, this update includes reductions for three skills, one skill elimination, ten skills award level increases and 11 skills added to the list. The SRB program provides a retention incentive to our topperforming Sailors with critical skills needed in the fleet, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, direc tor, military personnel plans and policy. We will continue to monitor our bonus programs to maximize retention behav ior in our most critical skills within the constraints of our budget. Sailors should consult NAVADMIN 273/12 to deter mine their SRB eligibility and award level. The increased award levels are effective immediately and decreased levels are effective 30 days from the release of the NAVADMIN. This update also announces the upcoming change to annual SRB installment payments from October to the anniver sary month of reenlistment date. This policy change will take effect for all Sailors reen listing for SRB on, or after, Oct. 1, 2012. For example, Sailors reen listing in December 2012 will receive their initial SRB pay ment upon reenlistment, and all subsequent install ment payments annually in December until the full bonus amount has been reached. Sailors under current SRB contracts, as well as those reen listing prior to Oct. 1, 2012, will continue to receive anni versary payments annually in October until the full bonus amount has been reached. Additionally, NAVADMIN 273/12 temporarily lifts the restriction preventing Sailors with FY13 end of active obli gated service (EAOS) dates from reenlisting for SRB in FY12. With this change, all FY13 EAOS Sailors, regardless of SRB tier, are encouraged to apply for SRB and reenlist on, or before, Sept. 30, 2012. Sailors electing this temporary early reenlistment option must be otherwise eligible for SRB and have a valid PTS quota prior to their selected reenlistment date. As with Perform to Serve, eligible Sailors desiring SRB reenlistment are encouraged to work with their command career counselors, command master chiefs, and chain of command to discuss timing of reenlistment and procedures well before their EAOS. Sailors can read the complete list of SRB award levels and policy at http://www.public. navy.mil/bupers-npc/career/ enlistedcareeradmin/pages/ srb.aspx. Navy adjusts selective reenlistment bonus plan to retain skilled Sailors 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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worst terrorist attack in American history brought out the best in the American people. The true legacy of 9/11 is that our spirit is stronger. From the firefighters and first responders who charged up the World Trade Center 11 years ago, to our Sailors, Marines, Soldiers, Airman and Guardsman deployed around the world today, they all define courage and what it means to be an American, said Schaffer. I look around at my young Sailors and I know that many of them were deeply affected that day, and many of them chose to join the military because of the tragic events of 9/11. I think that speaks volumes about the type of Sailors we have and Im proud to serve with them every day. NAS Jacksonville Command Chaplain Cmdr. Shannon Skidmore closed the ceremony with a prayer. This is a day when we as a nation and the world, pauses, remembers and reflects upon the tragedy that befell our nation 11 years ago today. A day that witnessed terrible acts perpe trated against our land which result ed in the loss of thousands of innocent Americans in places such as New York City, Washington D. C. and Shanksville, Pennsylvania, stated Skidmore. As horrific as it was, it was also a day of extraordinary bravery and sacrifice which caused ordinary citizens to become heroes in seeking to rescue those who were injured in these terrorist attacks. We pray for the families of those who lost loved ones, and ask Lord that today they might sense your presence with them in a particularly close way. Flood their minds with the precious memories of those they lost that terrible September morning, he continued. We pray Lord, may this day inspire us to be ever vigilant in the defense of freedom and that we rededicate our selves to the cause of liberty here in our own land and around the world. We pray to bless our nation and may we continue to be a beacon of hope in this troubled world in which we live. To you Lord we look for strength and wisdom as we march boldly into the future, carrying with us always the memories of Sept. 11th. The 9/11 Remembrance was orga nized by the NH Jacksonvilles Chief Petty Officer Association in collaboration with NAS Jacksonville personnel and the base fire department. CEREMONY JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 9

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certainty that they could not have achieved none of it without the support, love, sacrifice and understand ing of their families. It is on your shoulders that these Sailors stand upon that has enabled their success and as a result has made our nation and Navy undefeat able. It was our intent that they never forget the past seven weeks of training, what it takes to become a chief petty officer or what is now expect ed of them, and I am quite sure they will not, said Holloman. Holloman also gave the selectees several challenges. I chal lenge you to be bet ter than the chief that you always looked up to, admired and respected. I challenge you to communicate verbally. I challenge you to never look the other way. I challenge you to hold yourself and those who work for you accountable. I challenge you to be active in the CPO Mess, be 110 percent committed to all three phases of CPO 365 and I challenge you to never forget where you came from. Remember, chiefs make chiefs, he continued. Holloman then declared, Youre the Navys future. Its now your time to anchor up! Shepherd then recognized some of the accomplishments of the chief selectees during the induction season. These chief selectees have been tested and it is an honor to be here to celebrate their accomplishments. Over the past seven weeks, each selectee ran over 100 miles, did 1,893 push-ups and they had a total weight loss of 761 pounds said Shepherd, who also praised AWVCS(NAC/AW) Jason Reimer of VP-62 who coordinated this years CPO induction season. As each selectee was officially pinned and covered by their family members and mentors, the new chiefs thanked them for helping make their dream come true. This is the greatest day of my life. Its something Ive been working towards for a long, long time and Ive finally achieved my goal. Its a lot more responsibility, but Im just so excited to become a chief petty officer and happy for my shipmates here today, said AMC(AW) Miranda Davis of Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville. This event was very touching to me its the best day of my life. I joined the Navy Reserves in 2000 after being accepted into the United States through the Diversity Immigration Visa Program. Thats when the journey began and it still continues, said HMC(SW/ AW) Edjona Ehe of Navy Operational Support Command Jax. To close out the ceremony, the new chiefs were given a round of applause and then all current and former CPOs were asked to stand for the reading of the CPO Creed. A reception was held at the Fouled Anchor CPO Club following the event. CPO PINNING 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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and created a healthy competition during the Healthy Life Biggest Loser Project (HL/BL). At the time, she was strug gling to meet her physical qualifications at work. She had already lost 10 pounds when she decided to participate not only improve her health, but to encourage others to do the same. During the 12-week project, she not only met her weight goals, but won first place among the Jaycees by losing more than 19 extra pounds. Thayer continues to maintain her healthy lifestyle as a member of the 2012 Jacksonville Jaycee Soccer Team. Thayer also serves as the Jacksonville Jaycee Chapter director of com munity service organiz ing events and volunteering at Ronald McDonald House; Habitat for Humanity; Relay for Life; Special Olympics Duval County Games; Show and Shine Car, Truck, and Motorcycle Show to ben efit Wheelchair 4 Kids; St. Johns River Clean Up; Cornhole for a Cause benefiting the American Cancer Society; Catty Shack Ranch Volun-teer Day benefiting Catty Shack Wildlife Preserve; and the Jaycee Community Outreach booth at the Jacksonville Art Walk. The group also par ticipated in a Keep Jacksonville Beautiful Commission cleanup at Hogans Creek in down town Jacksonville. It was a huge honor to receive the award and I was extremely grate ful that Celeste Mitchell of the NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center nominated me for it. The Jaycees are a wonder ful group of people and Im so glad that I joined. Im extremely passion ate about community service and it has been a very humbling experi ence to be acknowledged for something I truly love doing, said Thayer. According to Jacksonville Jaycee Community Service Vice President Lindsey Clayton, Thayer has gone above and beyond sup porting the organization. Amber is an amazing example of a community service director. She has not only helped me with projects, but ran some of her own. Community is her passion and when you talk to her, you can see that. She is someone you can always count on with any degree of tasks, said Clayton. The Jaycees is an orga nization for young people ages 18-40 that teaches leadership develop ment and business skills through community development and indi vidual development projects. For more informa tion, go to www.jackson villejaycees.com AWARDfor GovDelivery noti fications through the Navy Reserve Forces Command homepage at www.navyreserve.navy. mil. Quotas and adver tised vacancies will be reviewed regularly and updated based on needs of the fleet. Selections are made by AC enlisted commu nity managers, who will consider each applicants performance history, experience, proficiency, and time in grade. Sailors must also meet the eli gibility criteria outlined in MILPERSMAN arti cle 1326-021, including in-rate proficiency and physical and medical readiness requirements. Additionally, Sailors must be within the advertised year group and not with in two years of their AC High Year Tenure dates based upon their active duty service date. Once selected, a Sailor will be given the opportunity to negotiate for a billet based on the needs of the Navy and his or her preferences. Orders to the new billet will include a projected rotation date and authorization for permanent change of station expenses, if appro priate. To learn more about the RC to AC program, Sailors may speak with their chain of command, read the NAVADMIN and MILPERSMAN arti cle at www.npc.navy. mil, or call the NPC cus tomer service center at 1-866-U-ASK-NPC, (1-866-827-5672) or e-mail at CSCMailbox@ navy.mil. RESERVISTS The U.S. Navy recog nized ombudsmen and the 42 years of service supporting the Navy and Navy families Sept. 14. These individuals vol unteer their time, tal ents and energy to make a difference in the lives of Navy families, helping them during all phases of deployment, disasters or crisis. They are also there to assist with the everyday questions and challenges facing Navy families. I am proud to be associated with the extraor dinary people volunteer ing as ombudsmen and prouder still of their ser vice at this critical time in our nations history, said Monika French, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) ombudsman-atlarge We owe it to all our Navy families to con tinue supporting the Ombudsman Program. The Ombudsman Program was introduced to the Navy on Sept. 14, 1970, by CNO Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, in Z-gram 24, as a means to address issues and concerns that are unique to Navy families. While the date is sig nificant to the history of the program, commands are encouraged to cel ebrate the event at any time deemed appropri ate during the month of September. Most ombudsmen are the spouses of active duty or selected reserve members of the com mand. The Navy family ombudsman is a highlytrained volunteer who is able to offer support and guidance to command families and to act as an official liaison between the command and its families. The Navy ombuds man plays an important role in the success of a commands mission. Ombudsmen are the first step for family members to turn to during a crisis, guiding Navy families to the proper resources they need. That, in turn, helps their Sailors with assur ance that their families are being taken care of at home. When command members know that their family has a resource to go to for assistance, they can concentrate on the mission at hand, said French. It is the Navys goal to ensure that every Sailor and family member has access to the services of a command ombudsman. Family readiness is a primary factor to a Sailors personal and mission readiness. Ombudsmen continu ously demonstrate just how vital they are to helping our Navy fami lies maintain a state of constant readiness. Whether it is for deploy ments, disasters or crisis response, they keep the information moving. According to Lisa Johnson, Commander, Navy Installations Command Ombudsman program manager, the Ombudsman Program is in place to assist the Navy family member and give them an avenue to receive the support they may need in tough times. Ombudsmen are not meant to solve problems, but to direct the fam ily member to the people who can help them solve their problems, said Johnson. Ombudsmen are not meant to be the help, but to connect the family member to the help. Connecting Navy fam ilies to help is what the ombudsmen have been doing for 42 years. They volunteer their personal time to ensure the Navy is ready 100 percent of the time. It is a pleasure to serve along-side a group of dedicated, caring volun teers, said French. I want to thank the past, present and future Navy ombudsmen and wish them a very happy anniversary. I look for ward to working with you all.Navy observes 42 years of service for Ombudsman program Digital Vision/Getty ImagesDONT LET YOUR CHILD FEEL LIKE A FISH WITHOUT WATER. what can trigger an asthma attack may surprise youATTACK ASTHMA.ACT NOW.1-866-NO-ATTACKSWWW.NOATTACKS.ORG 204524A01NOTE TO PUB:DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR ID ONLY.NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAs. Asthma Newspaper B&W ASTYR1-N-03071-F Bear2 1/16 x 5 1/4 85 line screen film at Schawk: (212) 689-8585 Ref#:204524 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 11

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In helping to prepare families in the event of a hurricane, the American Red Cross has created a new app from the American Red Cross. Besides guiding members and families regarding preparedness, the first feature may be useful as means of accounting for fam ily members (AFPAS tracking) for those who have smart phones that are working. For example, you enter one message like Im safe and can send it to all your Facebook contacts with the push of a button. The American Red Cross hurri cane app features: that allows users to broadcast reassurance to family and friends via social media outlets that they are out of harms way. alerts. alized weather alerts where family and friends reside. shelters. people can use to create a family emergency plan. users instant access to critical action steps even without mobile connectivity light and audible alarm To download the app, go to www.redcross.org or from your mobile phone, call **REDCROSS (**73327677) and the Red Cross will send you a link to download the app to your phone or you can download them directly from the iTunes or Google Play app stores. Baby & Parent Infant Massage (Wed. 2 p.m., Mental Baby Boot Camp (1st Wed. 8a.m.-1p.m.); Breastfeeding (third Wednesday at 5:30 p.m., 2nd deck conference room, central tower); Hypnobirthing ; New OB ; Prepared Childbirth ; and Third Trimester to patients delivering at NH Jax Breast Cancer Support Ribbons & Roses, breast cancer sup port group, second Tuesday (except July/ August) at 7 p.m. in General Surgery Clinic; and Breastival on Oct. 17 (9 a.m. to 1 p.m., NH Jax quarterdeck area) brings together NH Jax Breast Care Center staff and com munity partners to enhance awareness of breast cancer. Contact: Nikki Levinson7857 Diabetes Center & Nutrition Clinic Classes & counseling with doctor refer 542-9786 Operational Deployment Transition Recalibrate after deployment to man age sleep, irritability, emotional numb ing, and relationships. Contact: Tracy Hejmanowski, Deployment Health Center TRICARE For Life For ages 65 and up. Fourth Thursday (Jan-Oct) or third Thursday (Nov-Dec) at 2 p.m., 2nd floor conference room, central tower. Contact: TRICARE Health Benefits Wellness Center Health Fitness Assessment (by appt.); Tobacco Cessation (Monday 9 a.m., Tuesday 2 p.m., Thursday 12 p.m.); Naval Operational Fueling Series (NOFS) per formance nutrition fundamentals. Call to register for Heart Health Ship Shape and My Plate Contact: Wellness Center (Bldg. 5292. NAS Jacksonville is currently underway in replacing the Mulberry Cove Marina docks a set of old wooden piers that have undergone extensive damage due to harsh weather and natural deterioration. Floating concrete docks will be constructed in place of the wooden ones, providing more stable platforms that will more effectively withstand those elements. Hurricanes and tropical storms are two of the things that have been especially det rimental to the marina and the boats docked there. Over the past few years, rough weather has caused around $400,000 dollars worth of damage to these docks, commented Phil Collins, man ager at Mulberry Cove Marina. The positions of the docks themselves tend to aid in generating waves, forcing anchored boats to slam into them and cause damage. According to Collins, the floating concrete docks will rise and fall with the tides and be much more damage resis tant to rough weather. The 2.4 million dollar proj ect not only replaces the aging docks, but will also add addi tional spaces or slips for boats to anchor. Our plan is to increase the number of piers from three to six, commented Project Manager Lt. j.g. Jonathan Berube of NAS Jax Public Works Department. Six piers will give us 96 slips for boats to tie up at, 92 being for private use and four being reserved for the MWR. In addition to the improved durability and expanded space, the concrete piers will also feature two handicap-accessible walkways, as well as fuel sta tions and storage boxes. The current dock system is in the process of being demolished by Dennis Chavez Architects Design and Construction, while Cant Be Beat Fence and Construction LLC will install the new con crete docks. Completion of this project should be by Feb. 2013, Collins stated. For more information, call 542-3260. Mulberry Cove Marina replaces aging dock system American Red Cross offers new hurricane app Naval Hospital Jax classes and support groups 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony Nov. 8U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a member of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of special recognition in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. The registration deadline is Oct. 5. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in territorial waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve recognition and thanks for putting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans during my annu al Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the highlights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are strongly encouraged to contact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 5980481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www.crenshaw.house.gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and documentation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the certificate, veterans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214.Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program. Navy Band Alumni invited to performNavy Band Southeast is inviting all Navy Band Alumni to perform at the Alumni Concert at Jacksonville Beach Band Shell Oct. 20 at 12:30 p.m., in con junction with the 2012 Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular. A rehearsal will take place at Navy Band Southeasts facility aboard NAS Jax on the evening of Oct.19. Anyone interested should contact Navy Band Southeasts Public Affairs Officer MU2 Scott Farquhar at scott.farquhar@navy.mil by Oct. 10. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 13

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Are you ready to be notified in the event of an emergency or base closure? A quick and easy sign up to the Wide Area Alert Notification (WAAN) system could save you in more ways than you can imagine. Deployed by the Navy in 2008, the WAAN system provides Navy installa tions (worldwide) with an effective and reliable mass notification system that can be used during a crisis to warn and direct affected personnel. As a civilian employee, I thought that my home phone or cell phone numbers were none of my commands business. And certainly they didnt need to know my kids personal information, says Marcher Castell, a civilian employee at Commander, Navy Installations Command Headquarters. Of course, that meant that they couldnt call me to tell me to evacuate, or include my children in the evacuation count. Heck, they couldnt even call me to tell me something simple like the power being out in my building and not to drive all the way in to the office. All military (active duty and Reserve), civil service, and contractor personnel with an NMCI or One Net user account are required to register their office email address and phone number, at minimum, in the WAAN. Registering personal emergency contact informa tion also is strongly encouraged. As Marcher discovered, the Navy cant alert you, if it cannot find you. Registration is not automatic, but by providing your personal contact infor mation, you take advantage of the fol lowing benefits: Registration enhances your safety and empowers you to react in times of crisis. Registration ensures that real-time alerts provide information to you and your family on what to do and where to go in an emergency. Registration allows you to find out about base closures due to weather or an emergency, before you show up. Registration permits you to be noti fied when it is clear/safe to return to the installation. Rest assured; your personal informa tion is safeguarded. How to register NMCI/One Net usersRight-click on the Purple Globe icon (bottom right corner on desktop). Select Access Self Service. Select the My Info tab and update your Last Name, First Name, and Display Name and save. Select the Devices tab and enter your work and personal contact infor mation in the appropriate mandatory and optional device fields. SAVE. Update your profile any time you have a change. If needed, use a workaroundto reg ister If you have trouble with registering through the Purple Globe, try the workaround for your region. Links can be found under Mass Notification>Wide Area Alert Notification System on the Ready Navy website at www.ready.navy. mil. Click on (or copy and paste into your browsers address bar) the link for the workaround below for your region. Southeast Region https://waansecdap01. nmci.navy.mil/corp/atlaunch. asp?opt=uid&nextUrl=https://waans ecdap01.nmci.navy.mil/SelfService/ Entry.aspx?uid=%5bUID%5d I am. Are you?Be ready to receive notifications in an emergency or base closure 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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The mobile nature of our military service often leads service members to choose residential leases rather than homeowner ship. While renting has cer tain benefits, such as saving service members from paying appliance or maintenance costs, there is an area of caution when renting. The most common issue seen at the legal assistance office involves security deposits. Almost every property available for rent requires a tenant to pay a security deposit up front. This usually equals one months rent, but it can vary depend ing on the terms of the lease. The primary pur pose of this deposit is to cover any damages a tenant may cause to the property during his or her tenancy, but may also cover reasonable clean ing costs if the property is left unclean. In Florida, when a tenant moves out at the end of his or her lease (or due to termination discussed later), the landlord has 15 days to return the money or 30 days to inform the tenant in writing why part or all of the deposit is being kept. The tenant may then respond with objections to the charges if war ranted. If the landlord and tenant cannot come to agreement, who ever is out the money (usu ally the tenant, unless the landlord is claiming damages beyond what the security deposit cov ers) will have to sue in small claims court. If the tenant sues the landlord, a judge will need evidence to determine whether the landlords claim is legitimate. So what can tenants do to protect their secu rity deposit? First and foremost, take pictures upon move in and move out. Most renters have probably seen a movein/move-out checklist. Although the move-in/ move-out checklist is important, pictures will do a far better job of proving the condition the property before and after your tenancy. It may feel unnecessary or meticu lous at the time of movein/out to take pictures, but it is the only way of protecting the hundreds or even thousands of your dollars held by your landlord. Friendly relation ships with the landlord can end when a dispute of the security deposit develops. Please keep all pictures and other docu mentation of the condi tion of the premises long after you move out so that you can defend against any claims for damages. Service members also need to know how to ter minate a lease. When a service member PCS moves, he or she (and dependants) are allowed to terminate their lease within 30 days of a writ ten notice. Additionally, service members may terminate a lease if they are deploying from their primary place of duty. In Florida, service members may also terminate a lease if the mem ber becomes eligible for and moves into base housing. Landlords are not allowed to charge a service member any type of penalty or withhold any amount of the secu rity deposit for termina tion of a lease for these purposes. However, all service members must realize that these rights to ter minate leases are not automatic and must be preceded with proper written notice and sup porting documentation. Members must contact a Judge Advocate or other counsel for help with the required notices. There may be other valid rea sons for terminating a lease in Florida, such as broken utility services, mold, pest infestation, or other conditions which make the property unfit New family friendly complex featuring a full service restaurant & bar. Childrens Activities Menu Sampling Bag Toss Tournament 6 p.m. Door Prizes Live Entertainment Free give-a-ways and more! GOVERNMENT WARNING: Security deposits and lease terminations JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 15

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A new initiative to recycle more aluminum and plastic aboard NAS Jacksonville is under way at HSL-42, HSM-74, VP-30 and VP-45. Many sailors bring soda and water contain ers into their squadron work spaces so, thats where these new collec tion sites will be locat ed. Our goal is to make it more convenient to recycle at the squadron level, with one collec tion box for aluminum and another for plastic, said NAS Jacksonville Environmental Director Kevin Gartland. Each squadron shop supervisor will work with their hazmat coor dinator to transport the reclaimed materials to the recycling center on Birmingham Avenue. It will take just a small adjustment of each squadrons mindset when it comes to disposing of a soda can or water bottle. The test phase will be less than 60 days. After we review the test program and work out any kinks, the new containers will be offered to the stations remaining squadrons, said Gartland. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders said the program looks promising. This will expand our base recycling program as it reduces our solid waste stream a win-win situation no matter how you look at it. Gartland agreed, We can never be satisfied with where we are. We must always work to raise the bar for environmental achievement. For information on procuring aluminum and plastic recycling containers for your command, call NAS Jacksonville Hazardous Waste Manager Jane Beason at 542-5251. Flight line commands test new recycling program 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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to live in. The process for this type of lease termination is also not automatic and requires a seven-day written notice demanding the landlord fix the issues. After seven business days (not counting the day of notice), the tenant follows up with a final written notice of termina tion, along with returning the keys. The tenant must be moved out by that time. Again, contact a Judge Advocate or other counsel for assistance with the written notices. There is risk with this procedure, as the landlord may bring a lawsuit against the former tenant claiming that the reason for terminating the lease was not sufficient and that the premises were in adequate condition. The Naval Legal Service Office Southeast has legal assistance offices at Jacksonville (904-542-2565 ext. 3006), Mayport (904-270-5445 ext. 3017), and Kings Bay (912-573-3935). If you are not close to any of these bases, to find the nearest U.S. Navy legal assistance office closest to you, access the Navy JAG website: http://www.jag.navy.mil/legal_ser vices/nlso_map_global.htm. This article is not a substitute for indi vidual legal advice. Readers are advised to consult a lawyer to obtain proper advice for any legal issue. LEASES The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Monday Pizza Madness $5 for a 14 one topping pizza 2:30 9 p.m., dine in or carryout only Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skills Deweys Coming Soon! Ribbon cutting and grand opening celebration October 4, 3 9 p.m. Free food sampling, DJ, live band Cloud Nine, games, prizes, childrens activities and much more!Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages include bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Fall Bowling Leagues now forming! Mixed league Monday 7 p.m. After-work league Wednesday 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thursday 9 a.m. Mixed league Thursday 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Friday 11:45 a.m. Friday night league 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Saturday 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Open Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. until October 1. Free for military and DOD civilians, $3 for guestsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. The Price is Right Times Union Center Sept. 25, 7:30 p.m., $47 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam February 23, 2013 Preferred seating $42, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Legoland 1 day $45.50, 1 day w/water park $52.75, 2 day $54.50, 2 day w/water park $58.75 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day $29.50, 2 day $40 Disney World Orlando FL 4 day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Tampa Zoo $19 (Adult) $17.50 (Child) Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Blue Man Group in Orlando $59, includes City Walk venue Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Medieval Times Free royalty upgrade with dinner reservation Upcoming ITT Trips: Yalaha Country Bakery Sept. 29 Mt. Dora Oct. 27 Lakeridge Winery Nov. 10The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. The Price is Right Show September 25 $10 per person Dinner & a Movie September 26 7 p.m. at Liberty Kennedy Space Center Trip September 30 9 a.m. NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees October 9 & 23 for active duty September 20, October 11 & 25 for retirees & DoD personnel September is customer appreciation month Monday Friday play 18 holes for $18, includes cart and green fees. Not valid on holidays. Open to military, DOD and guests Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! CFC Golf Tournament October 25, 12:30 p.m. shotgun start $60 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove Marina Mulberry Cove Marina Riverfest September 29, 11 a.m. 5 p.m. Free cookout, music, games & prizes, fishing clinics, Stand-up paddle board lessons and more!Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Register now for before & after school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household incomeFlying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School October 29 December 10 $500 per person For more information about any sports, contact Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR Web site at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.face book.com nasjaxmwr. The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) announced Sept. 10 that NEX customers who make a purchase for $25 or less using a credit card will no longer need to sign a sales receipt. This option is available to custom ers who make a purchase using a Visa, MasterCard, Discover or Military Star Card. For those customers using an American Express card to pay for purchases, a signature will still be required. This change [makes] it easier and more efficient for customers to complete their NEX purchase, said Richard Dow, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) senior vice president, Store Operations. We know our customers, often times, run into their NEX to make a small purchase such as a cold bever age, snack or other convenience item, especially in our mini marts. This new procedure will make shopping at your NEX even more convenient. Customers will still receive a printed receipt for all purchases. Signature no longer needed for some NEX credit card purchases JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 17

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The VP-16 War Eagles joined fellow members of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance com munity along with members of the Jacksonville community to com memorate the late Travis Manion and raise money for the Travis Manion Foundation. Approximately five hundred people ran in the one-mile fam ily fun run and the five-kilometer race that began at the Veterans Memorial Wall Sept. 8. This year marked the second year that Jacksonville has hosted the 9/11 Heroes Run. Its really an honor to par ticipate in this run in support of the Travis Manion Foundation. Ultimately, its a small effort on our part compared to his sacrifice for our country, said VP-16 Executive Officer Cmdr. Bill Pennington. 1st Lt. Travis Manion, originally from Doylestown, Penn., was commissioned in the Marine Corps after attending the United States Naval Academy. He spent two tours in Iraq before he was killed on April 29, 2007 by sniper fire in Anbar Provence, Iraq. Manion was posthumously awarded the Silver Star and Bronze Star with Valor. Lt. Nick Rueda of VP-30, the race cirector, was a close friend of Manions at the Naval Academy. My son was born the day that Travis died, so I was unable to attend his funeral. Since then Ive tried to give back to the Manion family in any way that I can, he said. This year the Jacksonville 9/11 Heroes Run raised approximate ly $12,000 for the Travis Manion Foundation. The foundation uses this money to help support families of fallen service members as well as pro vide youth with scholarships that promote leadership and interest in government service. Wounded warriors discuss transitions to new livesCaregivers, National Guard, reserve support and sports for the wounded are the top Defense Department priorities for wounded warriors and their families, the deputy assistant secretary of defense for warrior care said Sept. 13, as wounded warriors dis cussed their experiences with recovery. John Campbell made the comments after listening to panelists at the annual Warrior-Family Symposium, sponsored by the Military Officers Association of America. The panel included four wounded warriors who spoke about their transitions to a new life after being wounded in battle. Retired Marine Corps Master Sgt. William Gibson moderated the panel, along with retired Marine Corps Col. Derek Donovan, vice president of the Fisher House Foundation. Gibson was a 35-year-old gunnery sergeant in Iraq in 2006 when he was shot through the knee. His left leg was amputated above the knee, but he started competing in triathlons while recuperating at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas and has competed in more than a dozen races. In 2008, he went back to Iraq as the first above-the-knee amputee to return to a ground combat area of operations. Gibsons determination showed up early in his recovery, when he proved he could get himself to the second floor of a Fisher House room the only one available rather than stay in the hospital. I went up and down those stairs for two hours, sweating pro fusely, just to prove I could do it, he said. Another panelist, retired Navy Petty Officer Benjamin Host, was with the Seabees in Iraq in 2004 when he suffered severe traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder after being in a Humvee convoy accident. Host said he received exquisite military medical care that included three brain sur geries and repairing his fractured skull. But, he said, its the in-between area where we get a drop-off meaning a lack of oversight in the recovery process. Although it took a legal battle, Host said, he was medically retired from the Navy earlier this year. Campbell and the audience also heard from Dr. Tara Dixon, a trauma and critical-care surgeon who deployed to Iraq as an Army reservist with a forwarddeployed unit in 2008 and 2010. Dixon recalled the stress of routine bombings on her camp, of treating the guy I had breakfast with that morning for critical injuries, and of having to make split-second decisions about whether to amputate a limb or risk transporting a soldier hours away to a Baghdad hospital. Then there were the abused Iraqi children brought in as decoys for insurgent attacks on the unit and the surprising number of female soldiers who needed treatment for sexual assaults crimes she was legally bound not to report at the victims request, she said. It messes with your mind a bit, Dixon said of her time in Iraq. She described through tears the toll her service took, which culminated in a suicide attempt six months after her redeployment. Among the many problems, Dixon said, was returning to a city without a military base and no means of support. I was very much an outcast, and I felt very much alone, she said. The panel also included retired Air Force Tech. Sgt. Matthew Slaydon and his wife, Annette. Slaydon was an ordnance disposal technician on his third deployment in Iraq in October 2007 when a roadside bomb exploded in his face. Like Host, Slaydon said he received excellent medical treatment, but struggled after returning home from the hospital. Family members didnt understand the symptoms of post-traumatic stress, he said, and some relationships, including with his mother, ended. Slaydon, who lost his arm and was blinded by the bomb, said his symptoms worsened after he received a medical retirement from the service. He became paranoid, he said, at noises in his house and would spend his days terrified and sitting with his guns. Slaydon said he has had a wonderful caregiver in his wife, an Air Force recovery care coordinator. Still, the ongoing stress of recovery and caregiving weighed on the couple, and they separated even though Slaydon said he still loved her, but that he needed to recover on his own. Theres no handbook that says when you should pull back as a caregiver and give them more independence, Annette Slaydon said. There is no instruction booklet about how to move forward on this. Turning to Campbell, and with the preface of an apology, Mrs. Slaydon said, There are some really big holes that need to be filled either by the govern ment or the private sector or both to give our families a chance. Its okay, I need to hear this, replied Campbell, a former bank executive who started MyVetwork. He started the online social network to add meaning to his work. In doing so, he said, I heard the voice of my mother, who was his caretaker after he was injured twice as a platoon commander in the Vietnam War. Ive been worried and concerned for a while about caregivers, he said, adding that his office will host a conference early next year about how to help them. On the Guard and reserves, he said, They dont have a base, they dont have the community. Theyre alone and they need our help. Campbell said he wants to continue to explore the issues that most affect wounded warriors and their families and get them the help they need. He said he believes in public-private-nonprofit partnerships. Theres this mindset that [the government] can do it all, but it cant, he said. Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) announced Sept. 5, its customers will find pur chasing a mobile phone and mobile services easier thanks to its new NEX Mobile Centers. The centers will offer customers wireless products, accessories and services from a variety of service providers including AT&T, Boost Mobile, T-Mobile and Verizon Wireless. With hot new advanced mobile phones hitting the market every few weeks, customers can now turn to their NEX Mobile Center for great pricing on the latest mobile phones and service plans, said Mary More, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) Telecommunications Program Office. NEX Mobile Centers will be a one-stop shopping for all mobile phone and mobile phone service plans. NEX customers will find products and services from all the major brands in the mobile phone industry, as well as a highly-trained staff. The new centers will sell a wide variety of smart phones. Customers will also find mobile phone ser vice plans to meet the needs of their families. NEX Mobile Centers have value added in its pricing, said Morse. They meet or beat the most competitive pricing in the area. They also offer a standard military discount, so NEX customers can feel at ease when purchasing their mobile phone or mobile service from an NEX Mobile Center. NEX Mobile Centers offer special programs for the military members, including suspension of service during a deployment and a release from their con tract due to an overseas transfer. It also offers a special order program where if a mobile phone is not in stock, the NEX Mobile Center will mail the phone directly to the customers house fully ready to use. NEXs scheduled to receive the NEX Mobile Center in September are: NEX Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; NEX North Island, San Diego, Calif.; NEX Aviation Plaza, Pensacola, Fla.; NEX Great Lakes, Ill., Student Store; and NEX Norfolk, Little Creek and Oceana Va. NEX Whidbey Island, Wash.; NEX Jacksonville and Mayport, Fla., will have the centers in October. NEX Bethesda, Md., will receive the NEX Mobile Center in time for its grand opening in November. NEX Port Hueneme, Lemoore, Calif.; NEX Memphis, Tenn.; NEX New London, Conn.; NEX Everett and Bangor, Wash.; NEX Charleston, S.C.; NEX Kings Bay, Ga.; NEX Gulfport, Miss., and NEX Great Lakes, Ill., Burkey Mall are all scheduled to have NEX Mobile Centers installed in 2013. The insider threat will not lessen the coalitions resolve to accom plish its objectives in Afghanistan, Army Gen. Martin Dempsey said today. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff spoke about the insider threat in Afghanistan dur ing an interview conducted after a visit to Turkey. We are absolutely resolute in our commitment to the objectives of our campaign, but on the path to achieving those objectives we will make adjustments as we go, he said. The insider threat attacks on coalition personnel by members of Afghanistans security forces or people wearing Afghan uni forms is serious, and coalition and NATO leaders are leaving no stone unturned in the efforts to reduce and eliminate the threat, Dempsey said. The chairman also takes lessons from history. He noted that the British also faced an insider threat when they were in Afghanistan in the 19th century. The threat is part of every war in which outside forces help build indigenous forces, he said. But building these indigenous forces is the right strategy for Afghanistan, he said. The roughly 340,000 trained members of the Afghan national security force today will grow to 352,000 shortly. These forces are taking the lead for operations, protecting roughly 75 percent of the Afghan population. At the end of 2014, NATO and coalition forces will end their combat mission and will remain only to train and assist local forces. Given the size of the Afghan forces, those who turn their weapons on their coalition allies are a small, small number, the chairman pointed out. But the coalition and Afghan government must assess the situ ation where the attacks take place and find out how to stop the attacks from happening, he added. What we need to do is look at these places and understand why there is a greater propensity, and to arm ourselves against it and to continue to encourage our Afghan partners at every level of their leadership to be engaged with us in this, Dempsey said. It should come as no surprise the coalition and Afghan forces are adapting operations to meet changing threat conditions, Dempsey said, and unrest over the portrayal of Islam in a YouTube video is part of the threat that coalition forces face. Its important to note that it is not just the threat condition of the insider threats that we are react ing to, but the heightened ten sion related to the reaction of the Islamic world to the video, he said. Training for Afghan forces has not been cut, the general said. Recruit and unit training contin ue at the bigger base camps and operating locations, but there have been changes in the way Afghan and coalition units partner. I expect that two weeks from now, [Marine Corps Gen. John Allen, commander of coalition forces in Afghanistan] will be looking at the conditions as he con fronts them and making other assessments, Dempsey said. The insider threat is complex and must be seen in context, the chairman said. While the Taliban have infiltrated and conducted some attacks, other killings are not ideological. The Taliban have been calling for the Afghan security forces to turn against their American partners for years, the chairman said. Insider attacks have increased this year, he said, and Afghan and coalition officials will work together to understand the root causes of these attacks. Coalition remains resolute despite insider threat Select NEXs to open mobile centers NAS Jax, NS Mayport to open in October War Eagles race to raise funds in 9/11 Heroes Run 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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The Defense Commissary Agency is making progress in its rollout of the Commissary Rewards Card that will soon allow customers to access and redeem digital coupons at all of its stores. Testing began Aug. 8 at the Fort Lee Commissary, Va., eventually moving to 30 stores by the end of the month. DeCA then began a gradual rollout to its commissaries in September, with deployment scheduled to be completed by early fall. Cards can only be used at commissaries where the card has been deployed. Customers are asked to check with their local commissary to see if the card is available at their store. Stores that are using the cards will be actively passing them out to authorized patrons and will have signs displayed pro moting the program. As an introductory offer, customers who pick up their cards by Oct. 24 will receive preloaded digi tal coupons on their cards that they can use in the commissary immediately. We are very excited about this new initiative, said DeCA Director and CEO Joseph H. Jeu. These cards will allow our customers to reduce the number of paper coupons they have to clip and carry, he added. That saves our customers time, effort and money. The cards, which will only be available at commissaries, are easy to use. Once customers get their cards in the store, they will need to visit DeCAs website to register it and load digital cou pons to their account. Once the card is scanned at the register, the coupons will be matched to their purchases and the sav ings automatically deducted. Its that simple. Customers like retired Army Sgt. 1st Class Kelly Scherer said they are excited about what the program has to offer. I dont coupon enough, said Scherer, the first commissary customer to use the new card at the Fort Lee Commissary. But now that I have this, I dont have to I can just load them on the card at home and come shop ping. Customers will have the option of printing off a list of their coupons before making the trip to the commissary to help them keep track of their savings. New offers will typi cally be posted online every two to three weeks. As an incentive, custom ers who register their card by Oct. 24 can enter the 2012 Commissary Rewards Card Home for the Holidays Sweepstakes sponsored by Dr Pepper-7UP for a chance to win round-trip airline tick ets for four to anywhere in the states, lodging in a hotel room that accommodates four for six days and five nights, and $1,000 spending money. The sweep stakes entry form will appear at the end of the registration pro cess online. Digital coupons, just like their paper counterparts, have expiration dates and other terms and conditions that must be followed for redemp tion. However, digital coupons will not be accepted for up to six months after expiration overseas, as paper coupons are. Thats because the cou pons are distributed digitally and are instantly available to all customers worldwide, so overseas customers wont need extra time to use the coupons. Once a coupon expires, it will disappear from the customers account. Also, DeCAs coupon policy limits coupons to one per pur chase, so these digital coupons cannot be combined with manufacturer coupons, including paper coupons and military or commissary coupons. Future enhancements to the card are expected to enable DeCAs industry partners to target savings based on the cus tomers specific usage, alert patrons to available sales pro motions at their local stores and reward consistent shoppers with specific incentives. Digital couponing is the first of many innovative programs that are part of our Commissary 2020 vision to deliver a 21st century benefit, Jeu said. We are always working with our industry partners to negotiate the lowest possible prices and identify new ways for our customers to save even more. For more information on this card, please visit www. commissaries.com/faq and click Commissary Rewards Card. Assistance is also avail able through the customer ser vice hotline at 855-829-6219 or through e-mail at commissary support@inmar.com. Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommo dations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. 13-16 (5:30-10 p.m.) (TAP) Separation Workshop Oct. 15-19, Nov. 5-9, Dec. 3-7. (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Sept. 24-28, Oct. 22-26, Nov. 26-30, Dec. 17-21. a.m.-noon) Oct. 12, Nov. 14. Workshop (8-9:30 a.m.) Nov. 19. Workshop (9:40 a.m.-noon) Nov. 19. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Nov. 20-21. Training (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Dec. 10-14. Management Workshop (8-11 a.m.) Oct. 3. Buying (9-10:30 a.m.) Nov. 13. Oct. 2, Dec. 4. (1:30-4 p.m.) Nov. 11, Nov. 13. Nov. 17 (10 a.m.-noon). Oct. 15, Nov. 19, Dec. 10. (9-10 a.m.) Oct. 3, Nov. 7, Dec. 5. a.m.-noon) Oct. 16, Nov. 20, Dec. 18. For more information or to register, call 542-5745. Halloween Horror NightsITT Vendor Day Oct. 5, 10 a.m. 2 p.m.*Win 2 admission tickets and a 1-night stay at CoCo Key Resort in Orlando, FL *Childrens costume contest win a universal plush Cat in the Hat or Shrek with Puss in Boots For more information call ITT at (904) 542-3318 DeCA begins rollout of Commissary Rewards CardImprove your life skills with free knowledge JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 19

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To assist Sailors, families and the Navy community with getting ahead of stress and fostering readiness before a crisis occurs, Navy Suicide Prevention and Operational Stress Control Programs, Navy Behavioral Health, have introduced Stress Navigation Plans. Sometimes finding a way to de-stress can be stressful itself if we dont know what to do or where to go. Readiness doesnt begin at the time of a crisis. Readiness starts by having the tools to help us respond to unforeseen circumstances swiftly and with clarity-and knowing where those tools are, according to Capt. Kurt Scott, director, Navy Behavioral Health Program. We cant always plan for lifes chal lenges, said Scott. But we can be ready for the stress from these challenges by identifying our resources and practices for navigating these challenges while were still healthy. By personalizing a stress navigation plan, youll know where your life jackets are in case of an emergency. It only took me fifteen minutes, and Ive got my stress plan here in my office for quick access. Stress is a part of everyday life, especially in the Navy, according to Scott. Having a plan ahead of time will help stop stress issues from becoming stress problems. Stress navigation plans are simple templates that can be personalized with practices for navigating stress while were still emotionally healthy, which be a life-saving drill if a crisis arises. The template is available on Navy Personnel Command web site and includes fields to personalize with names, contact numbers and personal practices for dealing with a variety of challenges in life, from work stress to relationship issues. Taking a moment to personalize a Stress Navigation Plan now may have a significant impact later by helping to prevent future obstacles from com pounding and leading to negative stress reactions. According to instructions on the Suicide Prevention website, Stress Navigation Plans do not have to be shared or revealed to anyone, but should be in a readily accessible place for personal use in times of crisis. Anyone can use a Stress Navigation Plan. Encourage your shipmates, peers, family and community members to personalize theirs and take the stress out of navigating stress. Life counts! To access the stress navigation plan template, visit http://www.public.navy. mil/bupers-npc/support/suicide_pre vention/HowToHelp/Documents/ Stress%20Navigation%20Plan.pdf. The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Sept. 30, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Cincinnati Bengals (Tickets on sale Sept. 17) Oct. 7, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Chicago Bears (Tickets on sale Sept. 24) Nov. 4, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Detroit Lions (Tickets on sale Oct. 22) Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jags vs. Indianapolis Colts (Tickets on sale Oct. 29) Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. Retirees and Veterans/DoD employ ees are eligible to purchase tickets for New York Giants and Atlanta Falcons games. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but under no circum stances are dependent children autho rized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may pur chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No exceptions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@ usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tick ets for the entire season.Stress Navigation Plans help Sailors get controlJacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO Daniela Hines is one of the newest volunteers at the NAS Jacksonville Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society. For the past six months, she has served as a Budget for Baby counselor and most recently as a caseworker and client service associate. Hines provides active duty ser vice members and their families with financial counseling and assistance. Born in Arizona, her family moved to Brazil when she was three months old. She lived there until she was 16 when she returned to the United States as a Rotary exchange student. She went on to attend the University of Mississippi, majoring in International Studies. After meeting her husband Marc, Hines switched gears and decided to focus on teaching. She earned her Masters Degree in 2006 in Secondary Education from the University of West Florida. In her free time, Daniela enjoys spending time with her husband and their two sons. She also enjoys cooking, bik ing and yoga. When she is looking for calm or inspiration, she heads out to spend some time on the beach. Want to learn more about volunteer oppor tunities at NMCRS? Please contact NMCRS Chairman of Volunteers Amanda OConnell at 542-3515 or mandivoc@ gmail.com. Meet Daniela Hines 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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The EP-3E (Aries II) Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) reconnaissance aircraft is a four-engine turboprop signals intelligence reconnaissance aircraft, based on the P-3 Orion airframe. The EP-3E ARIES II (Airborne Reconnaissance Integrated Electronic System II) is the Navys only land-based SIGINT reconnaissance aircraft. The 11 EP-3E aircraft in the Navys inventory provide fleet and theater commanders worldwide with near realtime tactical SIGINT. With sensitive receivers and high-gain dish antennas, the EP-3E exploits a wide range of electronic emissions from deep within tar geted territory. It is capable of a 12-hour endurance and a range of more than 3,000 nautical miles. The normal crew complement is 7 officers and 17 enlisted aircrew. During the 1990s, 12 P-3Cs were converted to EP3-E ARIES II to replace older versions of the aircraft. The original ARIES I aircraft were converted in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The last EP-3E ARIES II aircraft was delivered in 1997. EP-3Es were heavily engaged in reconnaissance in support of NATO forces in Bosnia, joint forces in Korea and in Operation Southern Watch, Northern Watch, and Allied Force. September, National Suicide Prevention and Awareness Month, is a reminder to everyone in the military community to watch out for each other, a senior defense official said. Jacqueline Garrick, acting direc tor of the Defense Suicide Prevention Office, told the Pentagon Channel and American Forces Press Service the Defense Departments theme for the months observance, Stand By Them, is a prompt to get involved when a friend or loved one seems distressed. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, she noted, has been adamant about encouraging people to seek help, and in stressing leaders responsibility to ensure their people get the counseling they need. I think the first key factor is to understand the signs and symptoms of sui cide, and not to be afraid to ask the question, she said. Its a myth that if you ask somebody, Are you feeling suicidal? that youll put a thought in their head. And thats just not going to hap pen. If somebodys really in distress . the first thing we want people to know to do is ask the questions, Do you feel like you could hurt yourself, Do you have a plan?, and How can I help? Garrick said relationship issues, legal or financial problems often are factors in the lives of people at risk for suicide. Anyone suspecting possible suicidal impulses in a friend, co-worker or loved one also should be sensitive to chang es in moods or behavior patterns, she added. Excessive risk-taking, substance abuse, giving away possessions and changes in life insurance arrangements are all possible indicators someone may be considering suicide, she said. Be mindful of those kinds of things, she advised. Garrick added that mood changes in both directions can indicate a person is considering suicide. Sometimes its a euphoria, or its a depression, she said. So just be mindful. And leadership needs to know . what their service members are like, so that they can know when there have been those changes. Garrick said she encourages mili tary family members concerned about a loved ones state of mind to contact commands, chaplains offices, community services, or any other means of help they can reach. One of the key features that were working on right now is with the Department of Veterans Affairs, she said. For several years, they have been working on the Veterans Crisis Line, and we have been working with them to rebrand [it] as the Military Crisis Line so that our men and women in uniform know that the Military Crisis Line the 1-800-273-TALK(8255) number, press 1 if youre military is for them as well. The Military Crisis Line is an over arching and confidential resource one number to call when youre experiencing any kind of crisis, any kind of suicidal ideation, any thoughts, feel ings . that youre not sure how to deal with, Garrick said. The crisis line also has an online chat option at http://www.militarycrisisline. net, and a text component reachable by smartphone at 838255, she explained. You can access assistance any way, any time of the day, from anywhere in the world, Garrick said, adding other options are in place or in development for troops overseas. Any of the various means of approach to the crisis line will put military members or their families in contact with a VA mental health provider, she said. Garrick noted family members often are the first to notice a loved ones strug gles, and she encourages them, as well, to reach out through the crisis line. We know that family members are usually the first ones to see if some body has had any changes in mood, personality and activity, Garrick said. Theyre the ones that need to hear the message first. We want to give them a way to get involved, she continued. If they call the crisis line, family members can be supported as well for their service member, and for their own issues. Garrick acknowledged there is a common belief among military members that seeking help for mental health issues can damage their careers. Not seeking help is going to harm your career even more, she said. So even if you have to take a medication, or you cant deploy, or you have to go for further testing, there are benefits to treatment. Treatment works. Mental health support that we know works is available across the services through military treatment facilities, community mental health services and chaplains offices, Garrick said. That will benefit your career in the long run, she added. And it will benefit your life in the long run, because this isnt just about your military career its about your family well-being, its about your safety, and its about what your long-term plan is for your future. Someone who calls the crisis line, Garrick said, can expect to talk to somebody who is compassionate and competent. These are all trained clini cians [and] providers that are on the other end of the line. Military crisis line responders understand military culture, and many are themselves veterans, she said. The VA works very closely with this department to make sure that our ser vice members are being cared for properly, she said. So they can expect to get the best possible assistance and competent care. UNITAS Atlantic phase kicks off in Key West Naval forces from Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Mexico, the United Kingdom and the United States kicked off the Atlantic Phase of UNITAS, an annual multi-national exercise, in Key West, Sept. 17 hosted by Commander, U.S. Fourth Fleet. Thirteen warships will conduct operations in the Western Caribbean through, Sept. 28. UNITAS is designed to train participating forces in a variety of maritime scenarios to test command and control of forces at sea, while operating as a multina tional force to provide the maximum opportunity to improve interoperability. Observers from France, Jamaica, Panama and Peru are also participating this year. UNITAS develops and sustains relationships to improve the capacity of our partners maritime forces. This annual exercise fosters friendly, mutual cooperation and understanding between participating navies. While the overarching goal of the exercise is to develop and test command and control of forces at sea, training in this exercise will address the spectrum of maritime operations, Commander U.S. Fourth Fleet, Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris said. Specifically, there will be high end warfare scenarios addressing Electronic Warfare, Anti-Air Warfare and Air Defense, Anti-Submarine Warfare, Anti-Surface Warfare, and Maritime Interdiction Operations, he said. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spectrum military opera tions by providing principally sea-based, forward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relation ships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance region al security and promote peace, stability, and prosper ity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. EP-3E (Aries II) Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) reconnaissance aircraft DoD: families, friends need to recognize signs of suicide The Navys newest Littoral Combat Ship, USS Fort Worth (LCS 3), sailed from Naval Station Mayport Sept. 13, beginning the final leg of its maiden voyage to its commissioning site in Galveston, Texas. Fort Worth is the third LCS delivered to the Navy and the second of the steel, semi-planing mono-hull Freedom variant. It will be commissioned Sept. 22. During its two-week stay at NS Mayport, the ship underwent a scheduled preventive main tenance availability and con ducted initial Combat Support Systems Onboard Testing, and TRS-3D RADAR Electronic Target Generator Testing in sup port of the Combat System Ship Qualification Test that will take place later this year after the ship arrives in its homeport of San Diego. The ship departed the Marinette Marine Corp. shipyard in Marinette, Wis., Aug. 6, sailing through the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway, before even tually making her way down the East Coast of the United States. The trip through the Seaway was particularly complex, as the ship transited 11 narrow locks that were, in many cases, only a few feet wider than the ship itself a feat few Navy vessels ever get the opportunity to experience. Fort Worth completed a chal lenging transit, and Im impressed with how well she handled, said Rear Adm. James Murdoch, pro gram executive officer for Littoral Combat Ships. Both the ship and crew performed superbly. LCS 3 has incorporated a num ber of design changes based on lessons learned from the first ship of class, USS Freedom (LCS 1). These changes are now part of the baseline design and will be incorporated into future ships of the class prior to construction. LCS is a high-speed, agile, shallow-draft, focused-mission sur face combatant designed for operation in near-shore environments yet fully capable of open-ocean operation. Fort Worth is designed to defeat asymmetric antiaccess threats such as mines, quiet diesel submarines and fast surface craft. The 387-foot Fort Worth will be outfitted with reconfigurable payloads, called mission packages, which can be changed quickly, and focus on three mission areas: mine countermeasures, surface warfare and anti-submarine war fare. In addition to the three focused warfare missions it will conduct, the Littoral Combat Ships inher ent capabilities and suitability to conduct lower-end missions will free up our more expensive, multimission cruisers and destroyers to conduct higher-end missions.USS Fort Worth departs Mayport for commissioning JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 20, 2012 21

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