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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02010
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 09-13-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02010

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Navy officials broke ground at NAS Jacksonville on Sept. 7 for a new training facil ity that will house both the MQ-4C Triton Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) unmanned aircraft sys tem operator training pro gram and the P-8A Poseidon maintenance program. Elkins Constructors Inc. of Jacksonville was awarded a $15,057,000 fixed-price con tract for the project that is scheduled for completion by Dec. 2013. Participants included: NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders; Capt. Chris Kiwus, commanding officer, Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast; Cmdr. Daryl Pierce, command ing officer, Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax; Cmdr. Andy Miller, officer-in-charge, P-8A and MQ-4C Fleet Integration Team; Cmdr. Anant Patel, NAS Jax Public Works Officer; Lt. Cmdr. Shannon Clark, assis tant officer-in-charge, P-8A and MQ-4C Fleet Integration Team; Joe Strickland, NAVAIR deputy lead P-8A and MQ-4C Fleet Integration Team; Steven Wetherell, Elkins director of government and defense ser vices group; and Jeff Kendall, Elkins site superintendent. The two construction proj ects are located on a common site to the west of the new P-8A Integrated Training Center on Yorktown Avenue. Parking and storm water management areas will be located to the south of the site and adjacent to the Fleet and Family Support Center. The P-8A Maintenance Training Facility project will provide 58,262sq.-ft. of opera tional and maintenance train ing support. The two-story, concrete and steel facility will support the following training devices: operational load trainer; inte grated avionics trainer; main tenance training for fuel sys tem, flight control/hydraulics, landing gear, engine, and envi ronmental control systems. Other areas include shops for maintenance of training devic es and electronic classrooms, plus, computer and adminis trative support. The MQ-4C Triton BAMS UAS project consists of an 8,938-sq.-ft. training facility to teach operators of the new plat form. The single-story, concrete and steel facility will include classrooms, mission control rooms and briefing rooms, along with support spaces for administrators and instructors. Triton will expand the Navys maritime patrol and recon naissance force mission to pro vide unmanned aircraft sys tems with persistent maritime intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance data collection and dissemination capability to the Fleet.WARNING: Due to construc tion of this new training facil ity, Saratoga Avenue is closed to pedestrian and vehicle traffic from Keily to Child streets. Drivers and pedestrians may detour via Yorktown, Enterprise or Birmingham avenues. Correspondents from a half-dozen defense industry publications visited NAS Jacksonville Aug. 31 as part of a Boeing media tour that included the P-8A Poseidon Integrated Training Center (ITC). VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens welcomed the group and briefed them on the P-3/P-8 transition thats taking place at various facilities aboard the installation. As the replacement platform for the P-3C Orion, the P-8A Poseidon is transforming how the Navys maritime patrol and reconnaissance force trains, operates and deploys, explained Stevens. The Poseidon will provide more combat capability from a smaller force and less infrastructure. It also increases interoperability with manned forces, as well as the Navys evolving unmanned aircraft systems, such as the Navys MQ-4C Broad Area A Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) employee and his wife were enjoying an NFL preseason game between the Jacksonville Jaguars and the New York Giants at EverBank Field when they were faced with a life-ordeath situation Aug. 10. FRCSE Engine Mechanic Steve Piffer and wife, Debbie, a registered nurse came to the rescue by performing twoman cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for a man who went into cardiac arrest while at a concession stand. New BAMS, P-8A facilities break ground Media get close look at P-8A training programFRCSE mechanic comes to the rescue on game day, everybody wins

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Sept. 13 1814 British bombardment of Baltimores Fort McHenry inspires Francis Scott Key to pen the Star Spangled Banner. 1847 Marine brigade leads U.S. forces that storm Chapultepec Castle near Mexico City, inspiring one line of the Marine Corps Hymn. 1906 Sailors and Marines from USS Denver land in Havana at the request of the Cuban government to preserve order during a revolution. 1939 Navy suspends trans fers to the Fleet Reserve after 20 years service and retains men on active duty. 1985 Commander, Middle East Force orders escort of Military Sealift Ships in Persian Gulf because of Iranian seizure of merchant vessels. Sept. 14 1899 Gunboat Concord and monitor Monterey capture two insurgent schooners at Aparri, Philippine Islands. 1939 Atlantic Squadron Neutrality Patrol ships deploy Sept. 15 1944 Invasion of Peleliu, Palau Islands, after several days of intensive carrier air craft bombing and ship bom bardment. 1950 U.S. forces under Vice Adm. Arthur Struble achieve an amphibious landing at Inchon, Korea. 1967 Operation Crimson Tide in Mekong Delta. Sept. 16 1854 Cmdr. David Farragut takes possession of Mare Island, the first U.S. Navy Yard on the Pacific. 1917 Navy Department authorizes establishment of 16 naval air stations abroad. 1922 Cmdr. Halsey Powell in USS Edsall (DD-219) became the senior officer directing the evacuation of 250,000 Greek refugees from Turkey after war between Greece and Turkey. 1940 President Roosevelt signs Selective Training and Service Act, the first peacetime draft. 1958 USS Grayback (SSG574) fires first operational launch of Regulus II surface-tosurface guided missile off Calif. coast; Missile carries first U.S. mail sent by guided missile. 1966 USS Oriskany (CV34) helicopters rescue 44-men crew of British merchant ship August Moon near Hong Kong. Sept. 17 1861 Union landing party from USS Massachusetts takes possession of Ship Island south of New Orleans, La. This was the headquarters for Adm. David Farraguts Gulf Coast Blockading Squadron. 1944 Navy task force lands Army troops on Angaur, Palau Islands supported by Navy car rier aircraft and shore bom bardment. Sept. 18 1926 Navy brings relief aid to Miami, Fla, after a severe hurricane. 1936 Squadron 40-T, based in the Mediterranean, estab lished to protect U.S. interests and citizens around Iberian peninsula throughout the Spanish Civil War. 1947 National Security Act becomes effective. Sept. 19 1915 Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels organizes the Naval Consulting Board to mobilize the scientific resourc es of the U.S. for national defense. 1958 Bathyscaph Trieste, in a dive sponsored by the Office of Naval Research in the Mediterranean, reaches record depth of two miles. 1992 Joint Task Force Marianas stands down after providing assistance to Guam after Typhoon Omar. All of my children are now in school: Lindell in kindergarten, Owen in fourth grade, and Ford in (gulp) junior high school. For the first time in 12 years, I will have days to myself. Ive been waiting for this. Except, if you want to know the truth of it about how conflicted and ambiv alent Im feeling just ask me how many times I wrote, erased and rewrote that first paragraph. Seven years ago, I put my oldest child on the school bus, headed for kinder garten. We lived in Florida, and I was standing in the prickly front lawn, in my bathrobe, as I watched the rum bling bus pull away. Fords head, just barely visible above the bottom frame of the window, bobbed up and down with the bumps and jerks of the engine. He stared at me with big, brown eyes, and he waved goodbye. I cried. Two years later, we had just moved to Maine, and basically the next day, I sent Owen to kindergarten. His school had a breakfast for mothers after the morning bell rang. I was suffering from my usual, late-August allergies, so my pockets were stuffed with tissues, and my eyes and nose were red. A new friend came up to me and said sympathetically, Oh, is this your first time sending someone to kindergarten? She thought I was crying. I blew my nose and laughed. No, I said. This is my second, and this [pointing to my eyes] is allergies. We shared a good, hearty, momlaugh: Two down, one more to go! That one more to go is now. Im excited, relieved, worried and sad all at the same time. The crux of my dilemma is that there is good news and bad news. The good news: All of us are embark ing on a new phase of our life. The bad news: All of us are embarking on new and different phases of our lives. This was never more apparent than during the three open houses we attended. Lindells was first. He was, of course, accompanied by his two older brotherstaller, wiser, less baby and more big kid. Ford and Owen showed Lindell around their old school. They helped him with his classroom scaven ger hunt. They cheered when he spotted his own name above his coat hook. I looked around the room and thought, This is where my baby will spend 80-percent (dont check my math) of his time the next nine months. This will be his home-away-from-home. He will know every cabinet, smell, and creak of the floor, just like he does at home. (Note: Heres where a paragraph about Owens open house should be. But Owen is the middle child. His open house was interrupted by an older brother who needed to get to the junior high school to meet his teacher, and a younger brother who made funny faces and caused Owens friends to laugh. He was greeted by teachers who said, You must be Fords brother. And, Oh, is this your cute little brother? Middle children everywhere can go sit in a corner and cry about this together, but we have to move on to Fords open house before I run out of my allotted 800 words.) Ford was also accompanied to open house by two brothers, only they were younger and silent. This was junior high. Big time. Scary. Owen and Lindell stood behind Ford and were glad they werent him. They listened carefully, their eyes wide and mouths open. They gasped simultane ously when, in front of the entire sixth grade, Fords name was announced as Henry Smiley. Fords home-away-from-home seemed a little less cozy then Lindells and Owens. They could sense it. And they had nothing no words of encouragement or advice. Ford was on his own. Eventually, however, Lindell warmed up to the idea of junior high. He munched on Cracker Jacks while Fords teacher went over details of the first day of school. He suggested out loud that Ford rent a combination lock from the school: Theyll give you five dollars at the end of the year, Ford! Ford stared straight ahead and pre tended not to notice. His new world and Lindells new world did not mesh. That 80-percent of their day would be spent quite differently. Indeed, all of us would have new and different days. (Well, except for middle-child-Owen, who, of course, will forever be Fords little brother or Lindells big brother to all his teachers and friends.) And, me? Well, I have a book to write. And Ill be teaching. And Ill be figur ing out a new schedule that does not involve holding a little hand and walk ing up to the school at 3 p.m. to get big brothers. Ill be shopping alone, without pudgy legs sticking out from the front of the cart. Ill be going to the bank and not asking for a lollypop. First day of school for everyone U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a member of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certifi cates of special recognition in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. The registration deadline is Oct. 5. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in territori al waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve rec ognition and thanks for putting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans during my annu al Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the high lights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are strongly encouraged to contact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 5980481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www.crenshaw.house.gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and documentation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the certificate, veterans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214.Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program.Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony to be held Nov. 8

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 3

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The NAS Jax Flight Line Caf staff celebrated the selection of NAS Jacksonville Food Services Division Officer CWO4 Kathy Wiseman to CWO5 on Aug. 17 with a special cake cutting ceremony. She will be officially promot ed in June 2013. This is the first year that female food service warrants have been selected to CWO5 and two of us were selected. Im really excited and shocked but its really not about me. Its about all the sup port and guidance I have received from various chain of commands, junior and senior enlisted, food service contractors and shipmates worldwide, Wiseman said humbly. It also means that I get to stay in the Navy longer to conduct more training and hopefully guide future food ser vice officers, continued Wiseman, who hits her 30-year mark in the Navy in October. The rank of CWO5 was established October 2002 to ensure the Navy retained the very best technical leader ship for a full 30-year career. Wiseman personifies excellence and aims to bring that out in everyone that she leads through her professionalism and pride in the day-to-day operations at the Flight Line Caf. She continually assists Sailors with their person al devel opment through finan cial sus tainabil ity, edu cation, tech nical train ing, in-rate knowledge, leadership skills, culinary competitions and career development. My advice to junior Sailors is to enjoy your job because if you are not enjoying it, you arent doing it right. Make it fun, create camaraderie, spend time with mentors and volunteer with your team, said Wiseman. The Navy has so much to offer and unbelievable opportunities are around every corner. If you fully support your chain of command and shipmates, you will never have to worry about being supported. A native of Rome, Ga., Wiseman enlisted in the Navy in December 1982 as a seaman recruit. After attending Mess Management A School, she served at Naval Station Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and deployed on board USS Jason (AR 8). She then transferred to Naval Station Mare Island, Calif. and then back to Hawaii with VP-4. In January 1984, Wiseman trans ferred to Fleet Hospital Training Command, Camp Pendleton, Calif. as a food service instructor where she was selected Sailor of the Year, qualified as a master training specialist and was pro moted to chief petty officer. After being promoted to warrant offi cer, Wiseman reported to USS Nimitz (CVN 68 as the leading mess manage ment specialist and attained the rank of senior chief mess management special ist. Her next duty station took her to Navy Recruiting District Montgomery, Ala. as recruiter in charge, assisting the sta tion in being named Large Station of the Year by Navy Recruiting Command. After being selected for the Food Service Warrant Officer Program in 2000, Wiseman completed Navy Supply Corps School and reported to USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) as the food service office. Under her leadership, her team earned two Capt. Edward F. Ney awards for food service excellence. After completing a tour as a quaran tine inspector in Iraq, Wiseman report ed to NS Mayport in June 2004 as the food service officer again leading her team to win the Capt. Edward F. Ney award. In December 2006, Wiseman trans ferred to Navy Region Southeast as the Galley Program deputy director and regional food service officer where she spearheaded the first regional Chef Certification Program, monitored 12 food service contracts and 14 galleys employing 600 military and civilian personnel. In 2009, Wiseman reported to NS Guantanamo Bay, Cuba where she managed four dining facilities and led her team to win two Capt. Edward F. Ney awards. In April 2010, she transferred to NAS Jacksonville as the food service officer where she led her team to attain its first Five-Star Accreditation in 2011. Wiseman is certifications include: master food service executive; exec utive chef; chef de cuisine; sous chef; food program manager and haz ard analysis critical control point manager. She has also completed an associates degree from Central Texas College; food service manager course and dietetic service supervisor from Palomar College; food service manag er course from the U.S. Department of Labor; and the operations management course through the National Restaurant Association. Making CWO5 is a dream come true. I plan to work hard to make my men tors proud and create future opportuni ties for my shipmates, said Wiseman, who will transfer to U.S. Naval Supply Systems Command in Mechanicsburg, Pa. in October. Four aircrews and more than 50 maintenance personnel from the Broadarrows of VP-62 and the Totems of VP-69 increased their warfighting skills during RIMPAC 2012. The 23rd biennial Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise ran in and around the Hawaiian Islands from June 29 to Aug. 3 and is the worlds largest international mari time exercise. The exercise involved 25,000 per sonnel from 22 nations, 40 ships and submarines, and more than 200 aircraft. RIMPAC is designed to foster and sustain the coopera tive relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the worlds oceans. Our goal in the exercise was to obtain advanced qualifications in our core readiness areas of antisubmarine warfare and anti-sur face warfare, said Cmdr. Jerry Dearie, commanding officer of VP-62. From where I stand, we could not have had a better exercise. The Broadarrows flew 10 coordinated operations sorties accruing more than 50 hours and were awarded 18 advanced crew qualifications. RIMPAC has always been a valuable source of multi-nation, combined operational training. I dont remember the last time we missed one, said Dearie, who joined the squadron in 2002 as a new lieutenant commander. It takes a great effort to get air crew and maintenance personnel out to a major fleet exercise, but the fantastic return on investment will keep us coming back for years to come. The theme of RIMPAC 2012 was Capable Adaptive Partners. The participating nations and forc es exercised a wide range of capa bilities that demonstrate the inher ent flexibility of maritime forces. NAS Jax food service officer selected for CWO5Broadarrows prepare for deployment during RIMPAC 2012 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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These capabilities range from disaster relief and maritime security opera tions to sea control and complex warfighting. The realistic and rel evant training syllabus at RIMPAC included exercises in a wide array of operational fields, including amphibious ops, missile and gun nery firing, anti-subma rine warfare, air defense, counter-piracy, mine clearance, explosive ord nance disposal, and div ing and salvage. During the next 12 months the VP-69 crews will expand their readi ness qualifications to be worldwide deploy able. The RIMPAC exer cise allowed our com bat aircrews to conduct missions and hone their warfighting skills in a challenging real-world environment, said Cmdr. Mike Mineo, com manding officer of VP-69. The Totems flew more than 50 hours and achieved 14 readi ness qualifications. Our crews and maintainers performed exceptionally well and were an out standing representation of the Navy Reserve. We successfully fired a live Maverick missile against a decommis sioned target ship as part of a large joint live-fire exercise, said Cmdr. Kris Moorhead, one of VP-62s mission commanders at RIMPAC. It is a very rare oppor tunity for us to get live ordnance in a training environment so this has been a fantastic training exercise for the aircrew and maintenance per sonnel. We also dropped a tor pedo on an undersea tar get sled, said Moorhead. Most of our events were focused on anti-subma rine warfare (ASW) and it was a great training. We coordinated our ASW efforts with P-3s from several countries, ASW helicopters, and the new est ASW patrol aircraft, the P-8. Broadarrow and Totem maintenance person nel also supported the maintenance depart ments of Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 2. AEC(AW/NAC) Brian Norman has been a member of the VP-69 Totems for 12 years, serv ing as both a P-3 flight engineer and mainte nance control supervisor. We really fit in well with our active duty counterparts in the maintenance depart ment. Keeping up with a very high operational tempo required a real team effort, Norman said. We assisted in opera tional and maintenance support of eight P-3C air craft participating in the monthlong multination al maritime operation, said AMC(AW) Tyson Anderson. My maintenance team worked on avionics sys tems, power plants, electronics systems as well as airframe related issues on eight P-3C aircraft. While it has always been a major exercise for the Broadarrows and Totems, RIMPAC 2012 was even more impor tant this year for the VP Reserve units. Next sum mer, both squadrons will deploy to forward loca tions to fill a void created by the transition from the P-3 Orion to the P-8 Poseidon. VP-69 was proud to demonstrate their Totem tenacity and experience throughout the exer cise, said Mineo, who has served as a full-time support officer in both squadrons. We flawlessly con ducted our opera tional readiness evalu ation flight events under the evaluation of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10 in prepare for their upcoming partial unit mobilization in June. RIMPAC JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 CHIEF SELE C TEES PUT THROUGH THE PA C ES

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 7 The chief petty officer (CPO) induction season at NAS Jacksonville is coming to a close this week as the new chiefs will be welcomed to the chiefs mess Sept. 14 during ceremonies throughout the sta tion. During the training they have learned the importance of the chiefs mess, how to work as a team and what is expected of a CPO. The selectees are guided by senior enlisted leaders through positive, challenging events to test their mental and physical skills on both a personal and professional level to ensure they know what is expected of them as a chief. It also provides the opportu nity to emphasize CPO history, heritage and naval traditions. Physical fitness is always a priority so the selectees spend many hours running, swim ming and doing calisthenics to build camaraderie and con fidence. They also participate in community service and fundraising events, classroom training and historical produc tions, explained AWVCS(NAC/ AW) Jason Reimer, NAS Jax CPO Selectee Induction coor dinator. I have seen drastic improve ment in the manner in which these Sailors conduct them selves. They have become more assertive and are will ing to take on tasks that they thought were too challeng ing before. They have been exposed to, and stepped up to leadership at the next level. Reimer said failure is not an option for chiefs. Promoting to chief petty officer is a once in a lifetime event that affects each Sailor differently. We apply a large amount of mental pres sure throughout the season so each individual can see what their actual breaking point is, instead of doing it in a real world scenario. The selectees are driven to find outlets and rely on one another to make the mission happen. For induction season, the selectees are divided into training teams named after ships from the War of 1812. This year, we chose ships that participated in the War of 1812, in honor of the 200th anni versary of the start of the war that lasted for three years to follow. The War of 1812 had no chief petty officers and we are trying to align our process with CPO 365 and pose the question as to who made the mission happen with no chiefs in those days, said Reimer. Most recently, the chief selectees participated in the annual CPO Pride Day in downtown Jacksonville, a chili cook-off at the Navy Exchange Food Court, the Great White Fleet Races and the Wounded Warrior 8K Run. CHIEFS INDU C TION SEASON ENDS THIS WEEK

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Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast (NRSE), signed a suicide prevention aware ness proclamation at NAS Jacksonville Sept. 6. The proclamation recognizes September as National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and is intended to raise suicide awareness prevention through out the Southeast Region. This proclamation brings to light an issue of paramount importance in our military today, Scorby said. Each year, we lose shipmates, co-workers and family mem bers to suicide and these losses can be prevented. It is our col lective responsibility to remain alert to the warning signs and to be prepared to take action with those in our lives who might be at risk. An actively engaged force, including every one in the Navy family, is key to the successful prevention of suicide. The proclamation emphasiz es the Navys Act, Care, Treat (ACT) training tool, which is designed to raise awareness of suicide warning signs and encourages people to intervene with those at risk. According to Dianne Parker, NRSE assistant suicide pre vention outreach coordinator, knowing the warning signs of suicide and being proactive is particularly important when it comes to Department of Defense (DoD) personnel. Suicide is a major issue right now throughout the DoD, she said. Our goal is to reduce the number of these tragedies through education and aware ness campaigns, and we hope this proclamation will go a long way in those efforts. Raising leadership aware ness about the issue has been a key theme in DoD efforts to lower suicide statistics. In a May 10 memorandum to DoD personnel, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta wrote, Leaders throughout the chain of com mand must actively promote a constructive command cli mate that fosters cohesion and encourages individuals to reach out for help when need ed. According to Parker, sui cide prevention efforts within the Southeast Region are in line with that statement. In September 2011, the region implemented an aggressive suicide prevention coordinator training program that utilizes Defense Connect Online. So far, it has resulted in more than 200 newly-qualified coordina tors throughout the region and more than 1,000 worldwide. The program has been instrumental in raising aware ness and getting the message out to leaders throughout the DoD. Leaders need to make Sailors understand that there is no shame in reaching out for help, she said. Each year, hundreds of DoD personnel commit suicide and many of these cases could be prevented if friends and coworkers only knew what to look for and took action, Parker said. The bottom line is if you suspect that someone may be thinking about suicide, you need to act, care and treat, she said. The key is to take action. The worst thing that you can possibly do is nothing. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) celebrated 170 years of naval history Aug. 31. The 13th Secretary of the Navy, Abel Upshur, officially established NAVFACs predecessor, the Bureau of Naval Yards and Docks in 1842, to execute the design, construction and maintenance of Navy yards and a few other shore stations around the eastern seaboard of the United States. Eventually the Bureau and its responsibilities would grow into the global enterprise known as NAVFAC, which was officially estab lished in May 1966. Our team of Civil Engineer Corps officers, civilian personnel and Seabees are testament to the remarkable contri butions of those who have given their all to this organization in the past 170 years, said Capt. Christopher Kiwus, NAVFAC Southeast commanding offi cer. I could not be more proud of what our NAVFAC team is doing for our sup ported commanders and the Sailors and Marines who live on the installa tions we support, along with their fami lies. NAVFAC is the naval systems com mand that delivers and maintains highquality, sustainable facilities, acquires and manages capabilities for the Navys expeditionary combat forces, enables energy security and environmental stewardship, and provides humani tarian and contingency engineering response. NAVFACs signature is visible on every Navy and Marine Corps instal lation around the globe. Nearly every pier, runway, building, gymnasium, barracks, road, utility plant, and other facilities on shore has been constructed or acquired by NAVFAC. NAVFAC Southeast employs 1,800 people at 22 installations throughout the southeastern United States and Cuba and delivers and maintains highquality, sustainable facilities, enables energy security and environmental stewardship, and provides humani tarian and contingency engineering response. In fiscal year 2011, NAVFAC Southeast delivered more than $1.3 billion in products and services to supported Navy and Marine Corps command ers, as well as other federal agencies. The commands regional team of plan ning, construction, facilities services, environmental and acquisition subject matter experts executed approximately 5,700 separate contract actions during the year. NAVFAC Southeasts Public Works Departments answered more than 40,000 in-house service calls in a demanding 24/7 environment. With half of the NAVFAC Southeast bases on a base operating service contract answering over 60,000 service calls. This critical work is a vital enabler for what takes place daily on bases around the world. NAVFAC experts provide engineer ing reach-back support to war fighters as well as response and recovery sup port for disasters like the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami, the 2010 Haiti earthquake, and Hurricanes Katrina and Gustav. In response to Hurricane Isaac, NAVFAC Southeast sent a contingency engineering response team composed of 15 military and civilian personnel to Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport and Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base New Orleans. Delivering sustainable and cost-effec tive solutions is increasingly important in the austere fiscal environment our nation is facing. Last year in support of the Secretary of the Navys ambitious goals to achieve energy security and efficiency, NAVFAC helped Supported Commanders reduce energy consump tion by 15 percent from a 2003 baseline. In addition, NAVFACs contributions to the Navys shore energy program dur ing the last 10 years has resulted in the Navy being awarded 24 percent of all Presidential and 29 percent of all fed eral energy awards. Scorby signs suicide prevention awareness proclamation NAVFAC proudly building on 170-year Navy heritage 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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Sailors and civilians from Commander, Navy Region Southeast participated in a Habitat for Humanity (H4H) construction project Aug. 29. During the project, volun teers helped put the finish ing touches on three Northside Jacksonville houses that will soon be homes for lowincome families. According to Mara Walker, vice presi dent of partner services with H4H Jacksonville, the volun teer effort helped strengthen an already firm relationship between the Navy and the local community. The Navy has been a very valued partner to us. I cant tell you how amazingly motivat ed and productive they have been, Walker said. Its huge when you have willing volunteers like that because they supply the labor, which means we dont have to contract it out and increase the cost of the home. H4Hs mission is to build affordable housing for lowincome families and individu als. Those who receive homes from the program work along side volunteers under trained supervision to build their home. Upon completion, H4H grants them a no-interest mort gage for the value of the home, making monthly payments affordable to those cannot afford a traditional mortgage payment. The organization has built more than 1,800 homes this year in Jacksonville alone. H4H is a great way for the Navy to increase its footprint in the local community, said Twilla Smith, Navy Region Southeast Community Service Program coordinator. Our primary mission is to support the fleet, the fighter, and the family and a good way to do that is through com munity events like this one. It gives our Sailors and civilians an opportunity to grow person ally and have a positive impact on the local community at the same time. H4H volunteer opportuni ties consist of various tasks, depending on what stage of construction the house is in. In this case, the volunteers had the opportunity to finish three houses in one day. Their efforts consisted of mowing and land scaping, as well as basic indoor and outdoor cleaning. Despite having to give up some leave time to participate, retired Army 1st Sgt. James Jennings said the rewards outweighed the cost. This was a chance to pro vide a face for the organiza tion and to let the community know that Naval Air Station Jacksonville and the Armed Forces do care about the com munity. According to Walker, the par ticipants should take a lot of pride in their efforts. She said volunteers dont always have the opportunity to meet the future owners of the houses they help build, but she can attest to the appreciation those owners have for the program and its volunteers. They are amazingly appre ciative of the work that goes into this because they would otherwise not qualify to have their own home, she said. In this case, the volunteers did not meet the future owners of any of the three houses, but did learn that one of the houses will go to a single mother with two young children. Knowing that makes you feel pretty good about what youre doing, said YN3 Christian Ediger, a volunteer. If what were doing means its easier for this woman to feed her children when she might have been struggling before, it means a lot to me. Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast (NRSE), signed a proclamation in support of the Navy Family Ombudsman Program (NFOP) at NAS Jacksonville Sept. 6. The proclamation sign ing commemorated the 42nd anniversary of the NFOP and declared Sept. 14 as Ombudsman Appreciation Day throughout the region. For more than four decades, the Navy ombudsman pro gram has been an invaluable resource in our efforts to sup port our warfighters and their families, Scorby said. I would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to all of our ombudsmen throughout the region for continued support. Our Sailors and their families would face a much more diffi cult task without you. The NFOP was launched Sept. 14, 1970, by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo Zumwalt to assist commands in maintaining the morale, health and welfare of Navy families. Ombudsmen act as liaisons between commanding officers and the families of ser vice members. They typically provide a variety of resources, such as providing family mem bers with official information and emergen cy assistance. Commander, Navy Installations Command reports that ombudsmen vol unteer efforts save the Navy more than $2 million annually. According to Dianne Parker, NRSE deployment support pro gram manager and ombuds man program coordinator, the proclamation is significant because it acknowledges the efforts of ombudsmen not only throughout the region, but throughout the Navy. Its important to recog nize the anniversary of the ombudsman program because our ombudsmen are a part of the command support team, they make sure families know what resources are available to them, and help them adjust to the military way of life, she said. If it werent for our Navy ombudsmen, our Sailors would carry a much heavier burden in the face of their military duties.For more information about the Navy Ombudsman Program, including how to contact your command ombudsman, visit http://www.cnic.navy.mil/ CNIC_HQ_Site/WhatWeDo/ FleetandFamilyReadiness/ FamilyReadiness/FleetAnd FamilySupportProgram/ OmbudsmanProgram/index.htm. CNRSE Sailors, civilians help build homes in local community Scorby signs ombudsman recognition proclamation JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 9

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NAVFAC also provides support ed commanders with environmental expertise, such as installation restora tion, environmental compliance, and National Environmental Policy Act planning and coordination. In 2011, NAVFAC exceeded all gov ernment-wide program goals and tar gets, with over 55 percent of the total dollars awarded and more than 25,000 contracts going to small businesses. NAVFAC Southeasts small business program was the only one in NAVFAC to achieve every individual program goal. Consequently, the Navys Office of Small Business Programs awarded the Secretarys Cup award to NAVFAC for promoting acquisition opportunities for small businesses during a ceremony held at the Pentagon June 15. NAVFAC has a proud history of deliv ering excellent products and services for supported commands since 1842. Building on 170 years of experience, NAVFAC continues to manage the plan ning, design, construction, contingency engineering, real estate, environmental and public works support for U.S. Navy shore facilities all over the world. NAVFAC NAS Jacksonville CDC earns NAEYC accreditation The NAS Jax Child Development Center (CDC) has earned accreditation from The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) the nations leading organization of early childhood professionals. Were proud to have earned the mark of quality from NAEYC, and to be recognized for our commit ment to reaching the highest profes sional standards, said NAS Jax Child and Youth Program Manager Mary Grenier. NAEYC accreditation lets families in our community know that children in our program are getting the best care and early learning experiences possible. To earn NAEYC Accreditation, the staff at NAS Jacksonville CDC went through an extensive self-study pro cess, measuring the program and its services against the 10 NAEYC Early Childhood Program standards and more than 400 related accreditation criteria. The program received NAEYC accreditation after an on-site visit by NAEYC assessors to ensure that the program met each of the 10 program standards. The overall percentage met in program standards was 98.7 per cent, the overall score for individual classrooms observed was 95.4 percent. NAEYC accredited programs are also subject to unannounced visits during their accreditation, which lasts for five years. CNATTU Jax holds family day picnicCenter for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville recently held their annu al family day picnic at Allegheny Park aboard NAS Jacksonville. AS1 (AW/SW) Dhovie Apoyan, president of CNATTU Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation Committee, and his team organized the family day picnic cooking hot dogs, hamburgers, and baked beans for command per sonnel and their families. The CNATTU Jax Chief Petty Officers Mess took part by donating all the food for the event. The picnic was a resounding success enjoyed by CNATTU Sailors and Marine Corps, as well as families. Navy Band Southeasts rock band Pride provided the entertainment playing various selections of songs. One Sailor commented, This is a good way to build morale at the command, and for everyone to get to know each other a little bet ter. CNATTU Jax Commanding Officer Cmdr. Daryl Pierce was also excited about the turnout at the pic nic. This is really a great event and gives our Sailors and civilians and their families the opportunity to spend time together build ing camaraderie outside the working environment and have a little fun, said Pierce. Site captains will register volunteers and provide bags and gloves at the cleanup locations. Pre-registration is not required. Participants must be over 18 or accompanied by an adult. Servicehour certificates available for students. Free T-shirts for cleanup volunteers at Riverside Arts Market from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. (while supplies last). Site Locations 7-9 a.m. Oceanfront at these loca tions: th Avenue South 8-10 a.m. Naval Station Mayport, Jetties Pavilion No. 3 Volunteers must have base access 9-11 a.m. Seawalk Pavilion, Jacksonville Go to the end of Beach Blvd, turn left on 1st Street. The pavilion is on the right. 9-11 a.m. Tillie K. Fowler Regional Park, 7000 Roosevelt Blvd. 9-11 a.m. Northbank Riverwalk, 221 Riverside Ave. Parking on Jackson Street behind YMCA 9-11 a.m. Yacht Basin Park, 2941 St. Johns Avenue 9-11 a.m. Helen Cooper Floyd Park, (Little Jetties) 3600 S.R. A1A 9-11 a.m. Hogan Creek Parking behind Jacksonville Historical Society, 314 Palmetto Street *Not recommended for children. 9-11 a.m. Blue Cypress Park, 4012 University Blvd. N. 9-11 a.m. Ft. Caroline National Memorial, 12713 Fort Caroline Road 9-11 a.m. Riverview Community/ Senior Center/Park, 9620 Water Street 9-11 a.m. Huguenot Memorial Park, 10980 Heckscher Drive 9-11 a.m. Joe Carlucci Boat Ramp, 8414 Heritage River Road Boat Ramp 1 mile off of Heckscher Drive 9-11 a.m. Intracoastal Waterway Boat Ramp-2510 2nd Avenue North. Not rec ommended for children. 9-11 a.m. County Dock Boat Ramp, County Dock Road and Scott Mill Road on the St. Johns River next to Walter Jones Memorial Park in Mandarin 9-11 a.m. Hollybrook Park (North Riverside) 213 Leland Street 9-11 a.m. Powers Park (Murray Hill) 3153 Green Street 9-11 a.m. Brooklyn Park (Brooklyn neighborhood) 1201 Jackson Street Safety tips Wear sturdy, closed toe, footwear and gloves. Wear sun protection and bring water. Be alert for slippery wet surfaces. Do not climb on rocks or get into water. Avoid overexertion and drink plenty of fluids. Wear safety vests or bright col ors along roadsides. Do not handle or remove hazardous items or substances. This regional effort is part of the 27th annual International Coastal Cleanup coordinated by the Ocean Conservancy and supported locally by Keep Jacksonville Beautiful. For information call 630-3420/2489 or visit www.coj.net/KJB .Volunteers needed for Sept. 15 Florida Coastal Cleanup 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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The U.S. Navy launches newly branded emergen cy preparedness program, READY NAVY! Formerly called Operation Prepare, Ready Navy adds new energy and tools to further empower Navy person nel and families in their role as an emergency preparedness partner, ready for any hazard. Website, factsheets, brochures, posters, and a new training course are a few of the pro grams highlights. Visit www. ready.navy.mil today. During 2011s record year of natural hazard incidents, thousands of members of the Navy Community were direct ly impacted and many were forced to evacuate their homes. News of earthquakes in Japan, New Zealand, and Virginia; tsunami waves that origi nated in Japan and reached California and Hawaii; vol canic activity in Indonesia, Guatemala, and Hawaii; and wildfires, hurricanes, ram pant tornadoes, and flooding throughout the US inundated media reports. Today, with wildfires raging in California and hurricanes at the forefront of the news, emergency pre paredness has never been more paramount. The move to READY NAVY strengthens the outreach of Navys already beneficial emer gency preparedness program by aligning it with other DOD and National Preparedness awareness campaigns, says Owen McIntyre, CNIC N37, program director. Navy personnel and fami lies will benefit from tips and tools that continue to empow er them to be ready for any emergency, now with a name with which they can identify one that communicates the strength of the Navy communi ty, ready for 21st Century chal lenges. Preparedness is indeed a partnership. Navy Region and Installation Emergency Managers are hard at work to ensure readiness for any emer gent incident, and every indi vidual plays a role. Individual preparedness reduces stress and saves lives, property, and time. Commander, Navy Installations Command asks, Are You Ready Navy? Be Informed: Find out what disasters are most likely to happen in your area and the history of their occurrence, and learn about any specific instructions or information you may need to know regarding these specific disasters. Have a Plan: Another impor tant tool you and your family need to prepare for possible emergencies is a family pre paredness plan. Everyone in the family should understand what to do, where to go, and what to take in the event of an emergency. Your emergency plan should include how your family will communicate with each other, particularly if normal com munication methods, such as phone lines or cell towers, are out. Have a contact person out side the area that each mem ber of the family can notify that they are safe. Also, plan ahead for how you will evacuate the area and where your family will meet if you are evacuated separately. Learn about the mustering requirements at your com mand and become famil iar with the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS) (https://navy family.navy.mil). If you are sta tioned overseas, learn about additional Noncombatant Evacuation Orders procedures. Build a Kit: The best way to prepare for the unexpected is to create one or more emer gency kits that include enough supplies for at least three days. Keep a kit prepared at home, and consider having kits in your car, at work, and a porta ble version in your home ready to take with you. These kits will enable you and your family to respond to an emergency more effectively. Your various emer gency kits will be useful wheth er you have to shelter-in-place or evacuate. Be sure your kits address the needs of small chil dren, individuals with special needs, and your pets. For information about Ready Navy and tips, forms, and guid ance to be prepared for and stay informed about all haz ards, visit www.ready.navy.mil Ready Navy is a CNIC spon sored emergency preparedness program.Operation Prepare is now READY NAVY!Empowering Navy personnel and families through emergency preparedness Power outages in Florida leave homes hot, dark and eeri ly quiet. Portable generators can provide temporary relief by powering up conveniences you count on everyday, such as refrigerators, microwave ovens, fans and other appliances. Purchase enough capac ity. When you decide to buy a generator, make sure its rated to provide for the amount of power you require. Look at the labels on lighting, appliances and equipment for the watt age that they consume. Motordriven appliances listed in horsepower must be converted to watts. Then add the total wattage for all the appliances. Shop for generators that produce more power than will be drawn by the combi nation of lighting, appliances and equipment you plan to operate,including the initial surge when power is turned on. Be sure to read instructions that come with the generator to make sure you operate it within its limitations for power out put. If your generator does not produce adequate power for your needs, stagger the operat ing times of various appliances. Operate safely. Residential use of portable generators is growing rapidly. Besides the comforts that portable power plants provide, never lose focus on the safe installation and operation of your unit. If you plan to hook up a gen erator to your home wiring, you must hire a licensed elec trician to ensure that the con nection complies with national and local building codesand that the generator is properly grounded, eliminating the pos sibility of electrocution. Never try to power house wiring by plugging the genera tor into a wall outlet, a prac tice known as back feeding. This is an extremely dangerous practice that presents an elec trocution risk to utility workers and neighbors served by the same utility transformer. It also bypasses some of the built-in household circuit protection devices. Locate the generator outside away from doors and windows. Provide a minimum of 3 to 4 feet of clear space on all sides to supply fresh air for proper cooling during operation. When connecting appli ances directly to the genera tor, always use heavy duty, outdoor-rated, 3-prong cords of correct size along with a surge-protected power strip. Overloaded cords can cause fires or equipment damage. Gasoline engines give off deadly carbon monoxide (CO), a colorless and odorless gas, so its a good idea to install battery operated CO alarms in your home. Under no circumstances is it safe to use portable generators indoors or in partially enclosed areas such as a garage or Florida room. Opening doors and windows or using fans will not prevent CO buildup in the home. The CO from generators can rapidly lead to incapacita tion and death. If you start to feel nauseous, dizzy or weak while using a generator, get outside for fresh air right away. Air-cooled engines run very hot and can start a fire when near flammable items. If gaso line spills onto a hot engine it could ignite, so before refuel ing, turn off the generator and let it cool. Use only approved safety containers to store fuel. When disaster strikes, be prepared with the right portable generator JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 11

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Maritime Surveillance (BAMS). At the P-8A ITC on Yorktown Avenue, the group visited a classroom filled with flat screens where computer-based training (CBT) takes place for the P-8A pilots, naval flight officers (NFOs) and aircrew. There are three types of CBT classrooms: Management Computer System Desktop Trainer allows pilots to build proficiency in flight and route management; Mission Software Desktop Trainer allows mission operators to gain and maintain proficiency in a classroom setting; Part Task Trainer (PTT) is used for individual or sub-team learning, prac tice and refresher train ing. Instructor Lt. James Miller said that CBT is often combined with classroom lectures to increase aircrew proficiency, as well as the rate-specific knowledge of aircrew/sensor operators. Our job at the ITC is to employ effec tive learning practices that improve the performance of the Navys maritime patrol and reconnaissance force, said Miller. During the flight simulator tour, Lt. Cmdr. John Currie, a member of the P-8A Fleet Integration Team (FIT), said that while a flight simulator cant fully replace actual flight training, the visual and motion fidelity of the P-8A Operational Flight Trainer (OFT) is unparalleled in the industry. All the equipment in our simulators is identical to the real aircraft, said Currie. Boeings P-8 training system pro vides comprehensive and realistic air crew training at a fraction of the cost of live aircraft training. The ITC houses the two main P-8A simulator systems: the OFT for pilots and the Weapons Tactics Trainer (WTT) for naval flight officers and mission operators. The two devices can be elec tronically coupled to create fully inte grated flight and mission crew training. Instructor Lt. Ryan Baldwin wel comed the visitors to the WTT that is set up inside a realistic P-8A fuselage nick named, the tube. The WTT provides five mission-crew workstations inside the tube, along with five instructor stations next to the tube where they monitor and role-play with students. Here, mission crew learn to optimize the P-8A Poseidons sen sor and communications systems, as well as to tar get and deploy its weap ons, said Baldwin. Another simulator available to P-8A mission operators is the PTT suite. After students complete their desktop training, PTT is an intermediate step for those who may need more training on a particular P-8A mission skill before moving on to the WTT. At the PTT, one instructor can moni tor and mentor up to three students NFOs, acoustic operators or electronic warfare officers at the same time, said Joe Strickland, deputy lead of the NAVAIR P-8A FIT. Each console layout is identical to those in the P-8A. And each student can run a scenario as many times as they like in order to increase their profi ciencies before testing their skills in the WTT. Media attending the tour included: Lance Bacon, Army Times; Martin Kauchak, Military Simulation & Training Magazine; Michael Peck, Training & Simulation Journal; Ann Roosevelt, Defense Daily; Allan Warwick, Aviation Week; and Marcus Weisgerber, Defense News. The P-8A is a long-range anti-sub marine warfare, anti-surface warfare, intelligence, surveillance and recon naissance aircraft capable of broadarea, maritime and littoral operations. A derivative of the Boeing 737-800, the P-8A combines superior performance and reliability with an advanced mis sion system that ensures maximum interoperability in the future battle space. The U.S. Navy plans to purchase 117 P-8As to replace its fleet of P-3C Orion aircraft. ITC 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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The most common car purchase problem reported to Navy legal assistance providers by Sailors and dependents is the spot deliv ery or yo-yo car sale. Typically, problems include violations of State Unfair and Deceptive Trade Practice Acts and Federal consum er law violations under the Truth in Lending Act and the Federal Odometer Act. In a spot delivery or yo-yo car sale, a Sailor/Marine agrees to buy a used vehicle. They sign a pur chase contract and a retail install ment sales contract (RISC) and the dealer lets them leave the car lot with the vehicle before the RISC is actually approved by a bank. The Sailor/Marine mistakenly believes that they already own the vehicle despite the fact that in many states the sale is not complete until the bank approves the vehicle loan. Some Sailors/Marines, once informed that their loan has not been approved and they do not own the vehicle, sadly opt to sign a costly and dealer-friendly new RISC with higher interest rates and higher monthly payments. The dealer benefits from the ser vice members affection for their new car and calculates the Sailor/ Marine wont balk at paying more than they bargained for to keep it! So how can you avoid the trap of spot delivery or yo-yo car sales? Do your homework Fully research the vehicle you want to buy and make sure it meets your transportation and personal needs. Avoid any impulse buying. Arrive at the car lot youve selected with confidence in the car you want, and know what price you think you should pay. There are multiple web-based resources available to that address how much you should pay for a car and how many deal ers in your area have the car you want. Negotiate with them and be prepared to walk away for a better deal! Understand your credit Unless you are able to pay for your car outright, you will need somebody to finance a loan. That might be a bank, credit union, or even the dealer themselves. You should be particularly careful when the deal er is the financier! It is recommended you seek financing from a bank or credit union if possible as they generally offer better, more reliable terms for your loan. The terms of the loan offered to you by the bank or credit union will be based on your credit history and ability to pay. (It pays to have a good credit history of not assuming too much debt and pay ing your bills on time!) Many banks and credit unions will even pre-approve you for a car loan making your negotiations with the car dealer much easier. Discuss your car-buying strategy with your bank or credit union lender for tips on negotiating with dealers. If you are unable to secure a bank or credit union loan, you should still be aware of the general interest rates they charge for loans in your area. You should use these rates as your basis for any negotiation with a dealer financier and be Spot delivery car sales a common trap to be avoided JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 13

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wary of paying rates in excess of typical bank rates! Todays rates are at historic lows, and even Sailors and Marines with poor credit history should be able to avoid excessive interest rates. Bring a copy of your RISC to base legal for review before you sign it! As an adult, you are generally liable for any contact you sign. Any honest car dealer should have no problem with providing you a copy of your RISC for review by Navy Legal. Take advan tage of this free service, make an appointment, and talk to a Navy law yer before you sign on the dotted line! Navy lawyers and your local Fleet and Family Support Center can also provide guid ance regarding measures to improve your personal finances and perhaps a better deal, for a better car, sometime down the road. Finally, be wary of additional scams attempted by unscrupu lous car dealers: If youve provided a trade-in as part of your deal, a questionable dealer might advise you need to sign a new RISC at a higher interest rate because your trade-in has been sold but your loan wont be approved without that higher rate. Now you have no car & have to sign? Not true! Most states outlaw the transfer of ownership of your trade-in until the financing on your new car has been approved. If a dealer makes such a claim, ask them to put it in writing and immedi ately contact a Navy law yer! Some dealers may also claim, and even write in their contracts, that if your financing isnt approved by a lender and you must return your car, you will owe them a rental fee for the time you drove it. This is not true and do not agree to this provision. Bottom Line nobody can force you to sign a contract and with some effort you can set your self up for success with a fair deal for a vehicle you want. For further assistance on legal issues involving car purchases and other consumer issues, please consult your local legal assis tance office. The Naval Legal Service Office Southeast has offices at Jacksonville (904-542-2565 ext. 3006), Mayport (904-270-5445 ext. 3017), and Kings Bay (912-573-3935). This article is not a sub stitute for individual legal advice and readers are advised that they should consult a lawyer to obtain proper advice for any legal issue. With Election Day about two months away, absentee military and overseas citizen vot ers can enjoy a stream lined process to register, obtain a ballot and exer cise their right to vote, a Federal Voting Assistance Program official said in a Sept. 5 Pentagon news conference. We firmly believe that voting assistance for our absentee voters is abso lutely the best that its ever been, Mitchell said. There are a lot of tools in our arsenal to help those voters both register, get an absentee ballot and to exercise their right to vote. Pam Mitchell, the pro grams acting director, outlined new outreach initiatives designed to make voting assistance more innovative and user-friendly than ever before, with an empha sis on engaging junior military personnel, the largest segment of the Defense Department population. Mitchell explained that FVAP offers a variety of tools through its online wizard, which among other features, can even help users ready bal lot envelopes for posting by printing the correct address on them. FVAP has customized its tools, Mitchell said, focusing on the 18-to-25year-old demographic, given their familiarity and general preference for gleaning information from the Internet and communicating through social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. We have a mobile website we just unveiled last week so that using a smartphone or a tablet from anywhere you may be, you can obtain access to our information and our tools, Mitchell said. In January, Mitchell said, officials also took to email accounts to broaden outreach. We use email blasts to every member within a dot-mil email address to remind them how they can reg ister to vote and that its time to vote, Mitchell said. Outside of the electron ic domain, FVAP main tains a call center that operates five days a week from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. EDT and can be used by voters worldwide to get help on how to file an absentee ballot. For in-person interac tion, Mitchell said, vot ing assistance officers and installation voter assistance offices remain available as prescribed by the 2009 Military and Overseas Voter Empowerment Act. She acknowledged findings in a recently released DOD Inspector General report that indicated difficulties in reaching a number of IVA offices based on dated contact information. In a military environ ment, things change, Mitchell said, citing per sonnel movements and joint basing as factors. We agree with the IG that the most important thing we can do is to find the most effective way to maintain assistance for all of our absentee vot ers, and we are absolutely committed [to that]. In the IG report, FVAP officials said investing in intuitive, easy-to-use Web-based tools, supple mented by well-trained unit voting assistance officers -rather than installation voter assis tance offices -could substantially reduce cost and improve voting assis tance. By law, all states must offer electronic deliv ery of the ballot, but the voter, when applying for the ballot, can elect to receive it that way or may elect to receive it in the mail, Mitchell said. Over the last six months, we spent a lot of time reaching out to every single one of the 221 installation voting offices. Were confident that the information on our website today is accu rate and has the most upto-date contact [informa tion], she continued. Between now and the election, Mitchell said, FVAP officials will con tinue to make weekly calls to each of the instal lation voter assistance offices to ensure they are accurately able to capture changes that may occur. Our goal is to make sure that anyone who wants to vote has the resources and tools they need from anywhere in the world to success fully exercise that right, Mitchell said. Active-duty mem bers of the armed forces, Merchant Marine, Public Health Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, their family members and U.S. citizens who are living outside the United States for work, school or other reasons can use FVAP. Voting Assistance Program eases registration, ballot process Reenactors wantedThe Georgia Sharpshooters, a member unit of the Georgia Division Reenactors Association is looking for volunteers to participate in reen actments throughout Georgia and Mississippi. There are no member ship fees for active duty, Reservists or National Guardsman. For more information, contact Gene Harmon at hcove06@hotmail.com or go to www.georgiasharp shooters.org CAR SALES 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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We were getting food to take back to our chairs, said Piffer, When we turned to walk away, the guy fell out right beside us. I checked for a pulse in his neck and Debbie checked his wrist. He had no heartbeat; he wasnt breathing. From the time we started CPR to the time we finished in a couple of minutes, we had him back. The emergency medical technicians (EMTs) arrived and transported the patient to a local hos pital. During halftime, Piffer walked over to the EMT station to check on the man. The paramedics said their patient would likely recover and thanked Piffer for his lifesaving efforts. It was a win-win on that fateful day not only for the man with the defective heart but also for the Jaguars who triumphed over the New York Giants 32 to 31. Jacksonville Jaguars representative contacted the season ticket holders soon after to extend the teams thanks and to upgrade the Piffers seating to club seats for the home game against the Houston Texans Sept. 16. This was not Piffers first occasion to provide CPR to a down and out victim. His first was in 1985 when he revived a 19-year-old Sailor while serving on active duty. The second was in 1989 when he happened upon a car wreck on Christmas day. In spite of performing one-man CPR, his efforts could not save an 86-year-old man who was pronounced dead at the hospital. Piffer learned his lifesaving skills while work ing for the Jasonville Volunteer Fire Department and Rescue in Indiana. He maintained the skill set while serving for 20 years in the U.S. Navy before retiring in 2003. FRCSE CPR Meet Kim SeligmanKim Seligman has been a case worker and chairman of client ser vice associates at the NAS Jax Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society for the past year. Her job includes helping active duty service mem bers and their families with finan cial counseling and assistance. Born and raised in Florida, Seligman attended Florida State University where she received her degree in criminology and crimi nal justice. She is also a certified paralegal, although she is current ly working at her most important job as stay-at-home mom. Seligman loves spending time with her family and enjoys the out doors and being physically active whenever she gets a chance. She hopes to travel more in the future, locally and overseas. And she loves any music from the 70s and 80s! Want to learn more about volun teer opportunities? Please contact Chairman of Volunteers Amanda OConnell at 904-542-3515 or mandivoc@gmail.com. Beginner Rider Course Experienced Rider Course Military Sportbike Rider Course Call for class dates NAS Jax Safety Office 542-3082 New motorcycle safety class offered for advanced riders Cape Fox Professional Services is now offering a new motorcycle safe ty class the Advanced Rider Course at NAS Jacksonville. Designed by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation, this class is nearly identical to the Military Sport Bike Course (MSRC), but is open to all two-wheeled motorcycles. The course begins with classroom training where the student learns how to improve perception skills and hazard awareness in a open-group environ ment. The group will analyze their riding decisions and work towards under standing their risk skill levels. The range exer cises focus on enhancing performance capabili ties related to cornering, breaking and hazard avoidance skills. The course is eight hours and is a Level II training class. It is equiv alent to the Experienced Rider Course/Basic Rider Course 2 and MSRC. The prerequisite is completion of Level I training. Students will meet in the Auto Skills Center, second deck motorcycle training room. Bikes will need to be in proper working condition, have gas and proper personal protective equipment is required. For more information or to register, call Cindy at 542-2584 or Kristen at 542-8810.Tickets available for ombudsman lunch The annual Ombudsman Appreciation Luncheon will be held Sept. 19 at 11:30 a.m. at the NAS Jax Officers Club. Tickets are $10 per person and are available at the Fleet and Family Support Center (Bldg. 554 Child Street) from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Ticket sales end at 3 p.m. on Sept. 13. For more information, call 542-5745. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 15

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The Naval Supply Systems Commands (NAVSUP) Postal Policy Division mail-by dates for pre-Dec. 25, delivery of holiday cards, letters, and packages were announced Sept. 5. The dates are as follows: Shore APO/FPO/DPO AE zips 090-098 (except 093); AA zips 340; AP zips 962966 Express Mail: Dec. 17 First-Class Mail (letters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 10 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov 26 Parcel Post: Nov. 13 Shore APO/ FPO/DPO AE ZIP 093 Express mail Military Service: N/A First-Class Letters/Cards/Priority Mail: Dec. 3 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 1 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Parcel Post: Nov. 13 For mail addressed from all shore FPOs (except 093) Express Mail Military Service: Dec. 17 First-Class Mail (Letters/cards, pri ority mail): Dec. 10 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Express Mail Military Service (EMMS) is available from selected mili tary post offices. If mailing to an APO/ FPO address, check with your local post office to determine if this service is available. Parcel Airlift Mail (PAL) is a service that provides air transportation for parcels on a space-available basis. It is available for Parcel Post items not exceeding 30 pounds in weight or 60 inches in length and girth combined. The applicable PAL fee must be paid in addition to the regular surface rate of postage for each addressed piece sent by PAL service. Space Available Mail (SAM) refers to parcels mailed to APO/FPO addresses at parcel post rates that are first trans ported domestically by surface and then to overseas destinations by air on a space available basis. The maximum weight and size limits are 15 pounds and 60 inches in length and girth com bined. From overseas locations, items mailed at Parcel Post rates are sent to CONUS by air on a space available basis. The maximum weight and size limit are 70 pounds and 130 inches in length and girth combined. It is also recommended that cus tomers check with their local civilian or military post office for informa tion on size restrictions and possible need for customs declaration forms. Additionally, customers are advised that certain mail restrictions apply and some items can not be mailed. Examples are: switchblade knives, por nography, controlled substances, and explosive or incendiary devices. If in doubt as to what can or cannot be sent through the mail, contact your local civilian or military post office. As a final note, customers are cau tioned that packages must not be mailed in boxes that have markings related to any type of hazardous mate rial, such as bleach, alcohol, or cleaning fluids. Parcels found by the U.S. Postal Service with such markings or labels on the outside of the box will not be pro cessed. The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Sept. 16, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Houston Texans (Tickets on sale Sept. 4) Sept. 30, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Cincinnati Bengals (Tickets on sale Sept. 17) Oct. 7, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Chicago Bears (Tickets on sale Sept. 24) Nov. 4, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Detroit Lions (Tickets on sale Oct. 22) Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jags vs. Indianapolis Colts (Tickets on sale Oct. 29) Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to purchase/use these tick ets. Retirees and Veterans/DoD employ ees are eligible to purchase tickets for New York Giants and Atlanta Falcons games. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for mil itary personnel, but under no circum stances are dependent children autho rized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger fami lies desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may pur chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No excep tions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the sea son.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@ usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tick ets for the entire season. Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or hand icapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. 13-16 (5:30-10 p.m.) (TAP) Separation Workshop Oct. 15-19, Nov. 5-9, Dec. 3-7. (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Sept. 24-28, Oct. 22-26, Nov. 26-30, Dec. 17-21. a.m.-noon) Oct. 12, Nov. 14. Workshop (8-9:30 a.m.) Nov. 19. Workshop (9:40 a.m.-noon) Nov. 19. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Nov. 20-21. Training (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Sept. 17-21, Dec. 10-14. Workshop (8-11 a.m.) Oct. 3. Buying (9-10:30 a.m.) Nov. 13. Oct. 2, Dec. 4. 4 p.m.) Sept. 13, Nov. 11, Nov. 13. Sept. 12 (5-7 p.m.), Nov. 17 (10 a.m.noon). Oct. 15, Nov. 19, Dec. 10. (9-10 a.m.) Oct. 3, Nov. 7, Dec. 5. a.m.-noon) Sept. 18, Oct. 16, Nov. 20, Dec. 18. For more information or to register, call 542-5745. Keeping its tradition of community out reach alive, members of the National Naval Officers Association (NNOA) Jacksonville Chapter donated 140backpacks filled with required school supplies to Brentwood and St. Clair Evans Elementary Schools in early August. An increase in fundraisers and donations allowed NNOA to double its backpack donations from the previous school year. NNOA understands that returning to school after a long summer break is always followed by a long list of school supplies. Families and schools throughout our communitycan find themselves hard-pressed to ensure that each child has the school sup plies needed for a successful school year. The principals and staff at both schools were extremely happy to receive the back pack donations. Having proper school sup plies are critical to educational success. NNOA is a strong advocate of education and is committed to education outreach. NNOA donates backpacks to local schools Improve your life skills with free knowledge NAVSUP announces 2012 holiday season mailing datesJacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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Select NEXs are now selling a Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) benefit coupon to customers for $5 for those individ uals who wish to voluntarily donate. When purchased, the benefit coupon will entitle cus tomers to specific percent-off discounts for a one-time pur chase on either Oct. 15 or 16. All donations made through the sale of the benefit coupon will go to the CFC General Fund as an undesignated donation. The benefit coupon entitles customers to 10 percent off merchandise storewide includ ing the furniture store as well as the entire stock of fine jew elry. There are some exclu sions including gift cards and prepaid cards, e-commerce, Autoport services & Exchange Catalog. The discount may not be applied to merchandise previously purchased, exist ing layaways, special orders, tobacco, alcoholic beverages, electronics, cameras, comput ers, video games and systems, uniforms, gas, DvDs, CDs and concession departments, home delivery, Keep it New and Tempurpedic, Rolex and Omega watches, Maui Divers, Pandora and clearance jewel ry. Customers will receive 20 percent off all apparel, shoes, watches and sunglasses and 30 percent off already reduced furniture with prices ending in $.94, $.96 and $.97. The maxi mum discount a customer can receive is $250 per coupon. NEXs participating in this event are NEX Norfolk, Little Creek, Portsmouth and Oceana, Va.; NEX Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; NEX Fallon, Nev.; NEX San Diego, North Island, Port Hueneme, Lemoore, Monterey, Calif.; NEX Jacksonville, Pensacola, Mayport, Orlando, Whiting Field and Key West, Fla.; NEX Memphis, Tenn.; NEX Kings Bay, Ga.; NEX Mitchel Field, N.Y.; NEX Whidbey Island, Bremerton, Bangor and Everett, Wash.; NEX Great Lakes, Ill.; NEX Corpus Christi, Texas; NEX New Orleans, La.; NEX Gulfport and Meridian, Miss.; NEX New London, Conn.; NEX Patuxent River and Annapolis, Md.; NEX Charleston, SC; NEX Newport, R.I.; NEX Yokosuka, Sasebo and Atsugi, Japan; NEX Naples and Sigonella, Italy; NEX Rota, Spain, NEX Guam; and NEX Bahrain. LATINAStyle Magazine has named the Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) as one of the 50 best companies for providing the best career opportunities for Hispanic women. Of NEXCOMs nearly 14,000 associates worldwide, over 11 percent are Hispanic and seven percent are Hispanic women. In acknowledging the award, Robert Bianchi, NEXCOMs chief executive officer said, NEXCOM is committed to sup porting the diversity policy of fostering an inclusive workforce, building an environment that respects the individual and offering opportunities for asso ciates to develop to their full potential. The LATINAStyle 50 Report acknowledges organizations that have a mission of diversi ty and inclusion that has been reflected in the way they recruit, promote, provide benefits, and create programs for the bet terment of their employees. Though the majority of the pro grams offered are available to all employees, the companies selected have shown an excep tional effort in their recruit ment and advancement of Latina professionals. This year, LATINAStyle Magazine also looked for corporations that have programs to recruit veter ans and military personnel. The title of a Top 50 employ er for NEXCOM is an incred ible achievement, said Rear Adm. Mark Heinrich, com mander, Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP), the command which oversees NEXCOM Operations. My pride for the accomplishments of Rob Bianchi and the entire NEXCOM team is boundless. Its this investment in quality of work that builds a foundation for good business, engenders a sense of trust, and defines our culture. Well done! According to Gwen Marlow, NEXCOMs director of work force diversity, hiring tal ented individuals is criti cal to NEXCOMs success. In order to hire the most talented, NEXCOM uses several sources from which to recruit Hispanic women and other ethnic minor ities. NEXCOMs best practices include recruiting at Hispanic serving educational institu tions; maximizing the Student Educational Employment Program and Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities internships; and participating in job fairs that are expected to attract a diverse audience. Hispanic women have a lot to offer our Navy, and we are proud of NEXCOMs efforts in ensur ing these talented women have an inclusive workplace to share that talent with our Navy, said Cmdr. Angela Katson, director of the Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion. It is through efforts like theirs that our Navy continues to make real, tangible progress in securing a diverse and imaginative talent pool both now and for our future. To support its diverse work force, NEXCOM encourages participation in career devel opment and tuition reimburse ment programs. NEXCOM senior leaders are also com mitted to providing associates substantive training and devel opmental opportunities as well as participation in a formal ized mentoring program, said Bianchi. NEXCOM will receive its award at the LATINAStyle 50 Awards and Leaders Diversity Conference in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 7.NEXCOM named in Top 50 best companies for LatinasSelect NEXs to sell Combined Federal Campaign benefit coupon JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 17

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If you are retiring or separating from active duty and need assistance with submitting your claim for disabil ity and compensation to the Veterans Administration (VA), you can start up to one year prior to retiring/separating with getting our medical information in order. AMVETS is the Veterans Service Organization advocate for separating or retiring service members and their families providing assistance with sub mission of claims to the VA for ben efits, disabilities and compensation. AMVETS is a national Veterans Service Organization authorized to submit claims to the VA and advocate for vet erans and their families with the VA nationwide. All assistance is free and you are not required to become a member of AMVETS to use their services. For more information and to make an appoint ment, call David Sanders at 542-2834 or email david.d.sanders@navy.mil VA disability assistance available 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skills Deweys Coming Soon! Ribbon cutting and grand opening cel ebration Oct. 4, 39 p.m. Free food sampling, DJ, live band Cloud Nine, games, prizes, childrens activities and much more!Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Fall Bowling Leagues now forming! Mixed league Monday 7 p.m. After-work league Wednesday 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thursday 9 a.m. Mixed league Thursday 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Friday 11:45 a.m. Friday night league 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Saturday 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym45-minute, high-intensity group trainingFamily Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Open Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. until Oct. 1. Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guestsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. The Price is Right Times Union Center Sept. 25, 7:30 p.m., $47 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Preferred seating $42, lower level seat ing $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sec tions 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day $29.50, 2 day $40 Disney World Orlando FL 4 day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Medieval Times Free royalty upgrade with dinner reservation Upcoming ITT Trips Yalaha Country Bakery Sept. 29 Mt. Dora Oct. 27 Lakeridge Winery Nov. 10The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Mall & Movie Trip Sept. 15 Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater Jaguars vs. Texans Game Sept. 16 at 11 a.m. Free admission and transportation The Price is Right Show Sept. 25 $10 per personNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Sept. 18 for active duty Sept. 20 for retirees & DoD personnel September is customer appreciation month Monday Friday play 18 holes for $18, includes cart and green fees. Not valid on holidays. Open to military, DoD and guests Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! CFC Golf Tournament Oct. 25, 12:30 p.m. shotgun start $60 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove Marina Mulberry Cove Marina Riverfest Sept. 29, 11 a.m. 5 p.m. Free cookout, music, games & prizes, fishing clinics, Stand-up paddle board lessons and more!Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Register now for before & after school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household incomeFlying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Oct. 29 Dec. 10 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 19

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The Clay County Animal Care and Control Adoption Center needs volun teers (18 years and older) to help with animal adoptions at the center located at 1805-4 East West Parkway in Fleming Island, Fla. Volunteers will help with setting up cages, cleaning cages, walking dogs, feeding and watering, grooming and adoptions of dogs, puppies, cats and kit tens Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m. Volunteers are needed to work several hours from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. All animals available for adoption have shots and are spayed or neutered. Animals that are three years or older, having special needs or have been at the adoption center longer than a year can be adopted out to a good home for free. For more information, contact Gail Arrowsmith at rogandgail4800@aol. com .Volunteers needed to help with adoption of animals For more information about any sports, contact Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR web site at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.face book.com nasjaxmwr. 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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The F-35 integrated test force announced the completion of a major prerequisite test for inflight performance on the short take-off and vertical landing variant of the F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter Sept. 4 at Edwards AFB, Calif. BF-2 completed the first air starts, which test the ability of the F-35s propulsion system to restart during flight. Verifying the restart capabil ity of the propulsion system is part of the initial flight test pro gram for the F-35 and a prereq uisite for high angle-of-attack testing, scheduled to start next year. High alpha, or angle-ofattack tests, are important for us to fully evaluate the air crafts handling characteristics and warfighting capability, said Marine Corps test pilot Lt. Col. Matthew Kelly. Maximizing the perfor mance of the airplane around the very slow edges of the flight envelope is probably some of the most challenging testing we will conduct. After we get through it, well know a lot more about how this aircraft will perform during combat within visual range. Using multiple restart meth ods during the tests, BF-2 suc cessfully completed a series of 27 air starts at various altitudes Aug. 15. To execute air start test ing, the F-35 Integrated Test Force (ITF) at Naval Air Station Patuxent River ferried BF-2 and an F/A-18 chase aircraft from Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 to the F-35A testing facility at Edwards AFB. At Edwards, we have a unique testing range, which provides ideal and controlled conditions for completing air start testing. The Edwards range is comprised of 20,000 square miles of airspace, and has 65 linear miles of use able landing area on Rogers and Rosamond Dry Lakes, if required during engine out testing, said Lt. Col. George N. Schwartz, commander of the 461st Flight Test Squadron and government site director. In addition, weve recent ly completed air start testing on the F-35A, so were able to share some of our expertise with the Pax team as well. The core of the F-35Bs pro pulsion system is the F135 engine, capable of more than 40,000 pounds of thrust. The F135 continues to power a successful flight test program, said Roy Hauck, Pratt & Whitney site lead at the F-35 Patuxent River ITF. The aircraft and its inte grated systems demonstrated intentional flameout and suc cessful recovery scenarios dur ing air start flight tests, and BF-2 and the team did a great job. A team of approximately 60 ITF and VX-23 personnel pro vided engineering and main tenance requirements for the events. The detachment to Edwards from NAS Patuxent River overlapped with a busy summer flight testing sched ule. In the past two months, weve sent detachments to Edwards and Lakehurst [N.J.], and maintained a full-tempo test schedule here, said Navy Capt. Erik Etz, director of test for F-35 naval variants at NAS Patuxent River. The team of military, gov ernment and industry per sonnel rallied to make all the events happen, and they can be proud of their accomplish ments. The F-35B is the vari ant of the Joint Strike Fighter designed for use by U.S. Marine Corps, as well as F-35 interna tional partners in the United Kingdom and Italy. The F-35B is capable of short take-offs and vertical land ings to provide air power from amphibious ships, ski jump aircraft carriers and expedi tionary airfields. The F-35B is undergoing test and evaluation at NAS Patuxent River prior to delivery to the fleet. F-35B completes first airborne engine start tests A free 4-H Expo will be held Sept. 15 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. for children 5-18 and their families at the Jacksonville Fairgrounds. Nearly 30 clubs across Duval County offer a wide range of experiences on a variety of subjects ranging from aero space studies to zoology top ics. Clubs leaders and members from around the county will be available to answer questions about 4-H, and help kids find just the right club. There will be free games and activities, free parking, and free hot dogs. Each year Duval County 4-H serves approximately 8,500 local youth through school enrichment, traditional clubs, and summer camp programs. Students, clubs, leaders and volunteers utilize 4-H academ ic study materials and com plete hands-on projects in sub jects such as: horticulture, ani mal sciences, technology, pub lic speaking, leadership, citi zenship, volunteerism, health, nutrition, home economics and much more. Many people still think of 4-H as a program just for farm ers kids, who want to make some extra cash by raising live stock to show and sell at the fair, says Duval County 4-H agent Andy Toelle. Certainly, some kids still focus on livestock in 4-H, and have a great time doing it. But now, 4-H offers opportunities to learn about so much more. Here are some of the current topics available for explora tion in 4-H: bicycling, butter flies, cats, child development, communications, computers, electricity, entomology, entre preneurship, environmental studies, fishing, food, forestry, gardening, geospatial, health and fitness, Latino cultural arts, outdoor adventures, pets, photography, rabbits, finan cial literacy, science discovery, small engines, theatre arts, veterinary science, visual arts, wind energy, woodworking, workforce readiness and film making. 4-H is a national organiza tion that helps young people develop knowledge and skills to become productive mem bers of society. 4-H helps youth to meet the diverse challenges of todays world by building self-confi dence, learning responsibility and making positive decisions. In a safe environment, 4-H brings youth and adults togeth er to learn everyday skills for living. To learn more, call (904) 2557450 or go to duval.ifas.ufl. edu/4-H.shtml or www.4-h.org.Free 4-H Expo comes to Jacksonville Fairgrounds Sept. 15 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 21



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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Navy officials broke ground at NAS Jacksonville on Sept. 7 for a new training facil ity that will house both the MQ-4C Triton Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) unmanned aircraft sys tem operator training pro gram and the P-8A Poseidon maintenance program. Elkins Constructors Inc. of Jacksonville was awarded a $15,057,000 fixed-price con tract for the project that is scheduled for completion by Dec. 2013. Participants included: NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders; Capt. Chris Kiwus, commanding officer, Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast; Cmdr. Daryl Pierce, command ing officer, Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax; Cmdr. Andy Miller, officer-in-charge, P-8A and MQ-4C Fleet Integration Team; Cmdr. Anant Patel, NAS Jax Public Works Officer; Lt. Cmdr. Shannon Clark, assis tant officer-in-charge, P-8A and MQ-4C Fleet Integration Team; Joe Strickland, NAVAIR deputy lead P-8A and MQ-4C Fleet Integration Team; Steven Wetherell, Elkins director of government and defense ser vices group; and Jeff Kendall, Elkins site superintendent. The two construction proj ects are located on a common site to the west of the new P-8A Integrated Training Center on Yorktown Avenue. Parking and storm water management areas will be located to the south of the site and adjacent to the Fleet and Family Support Center. The P-8A Maintenance Training Facility project will provide 58,262sq.-ft. of operational and maintenance train ing support. The two-story, concrete and steel facility will support the following training devices: operational load trainer; inte grated avionics trainer; main tenance training for fuel sys tem, flight control/hydraulics, landing gear, engine, and environmental control systems. Other areas include shops for maintenance of training devices and electronic classrooms, plus, computer and adminis trative support. The MQ-4C Triton BAMS UAS project consists of an 8,938-sq.-ft. training facility to teach operators of the new platform. The single-story, concrete and steel facility will include classrooms, mission control rooms and briefing rooms, along with support spaces for administrators and instructors. Triton will expand the Navys maritime patrol and recon naissance force mission to provide unmanned aircraft sys tems with persistent maritime intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance data collection and dissemination capability to the Fleet.WARNING: Due to construc tion of this new training facil ity, Saratoga Avenue is closed to pedestrian and vehicle traffic from Keily to Child streets. Drivers and pedestrians may detour via Yorktown, Enterprise or Birmingham avenues. Correspondents from a half-dozen defense industry publications visited NAS Jacksonville Aug. 31 as part of a Boeing media tour that included the P-8A Poseidon Integrated Training Center (ITC). VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens welcomed the group and briefed them on the P-3/P-8 transition thats taking place at various facilities aboard the installation. As the replacement platform for the P-3C Orion, the P-8A Poseidon is transforming how the Navys maritime patrol and reconnaissance force trains, operates and deploys, explained Stevens. The Poseidon will provide more combat capability from a smaller force and less infrastructure. It also increases interoperability with manned forces, as well as the Navys evolving unmanned aircraft systems, such as the Navys MQ-4C Broad Area A Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) employee and his wife were enjoying an NFL preseason game between the Jacksonville Jaguars and the New York Giants at EverBank Field when they were faced with a life-ordeath situation Aug. 10. FRCSE Engine Mechanic Steve Piffer and wife, Debbie, a registered nurse came to the rescue by performing twoman cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for a man who went into cardiac arrest while at a concession stand. New BAMS, P-8A facilities break ground Media get close look at P-8A training programFRCSE mechanic comes to the rescue on game day, everybody wins

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Sept. 13 1814 British bombardment of Baltimores Fort McHenry inspires Francis Scott Key to pen the Star Spangled Banner. 1847 Marine brigade leads U.S. forces that storm Chapultepec Castle near Mexico City, inspiring one line of the Marine Corps Hymn. 1906 Sailors and Marines from USS Denver land in Havana at the request of the Cuban government to preserve order during a revolution. 1939 Navy suspends trans fers to the Fleet Reserve after 20 years service and retains men on active duty. 1985 Commander, Middle East Force orders escort of Military Sealift Ships in Persian Gulf because of Iranian seizure of merchant vessels. Sept. 14 1899 Gunboat Concord and monitor Monterey capture two insurgent schooners at Aparri, Philippine Islands. 1939 Atlantic Squadron Neutrality Patrol ships deploy Sept. 15 1944 Invasion of Peleliu, Palau Islands, after several days of intensive carrier air craft bombing and ship bom bardment. 1950 U.S. forces under Vice Adm. Arthur Struble achieve an amphibious landing at Inchon, Korea. 1967 Operation Crimson Tide in Mekong Delta. Sept. 16 1854 Cmdr. David Farragut takes possession of Mare Island, the first U.S. Navy Yard on the Pacific. 1917 Navy Department authorizes establishment of 16 naval air stations abroad. 1922 Cmdr. Halsey Powell in USS Edsall (DD-219) became the senior officer directing the evacuation of 250,000 Greek refugees from Turkey after war between Greece and Turkey. 1940 President Roosevelt signs Selective Training and Service Act, the first peacetime draft. 1958 USS Grayback (SSG574) fires first operational launch of Regulus II surface-tosurface guided missile off Calif. coast; Missile carries first U.S. mail sent by guided missile. 1966 USS Oriskany (CV34) helicopters rescue 44-men crew of British merchant ship August Moon near Hong Kong. Sept. 17 1861 Union landing party from USS Massachusetts takes possession of Ship Island south of New Orleans, La. This was the headquarters for Adm. David Farraguts Gulf Coast Blockading Squadron. 1944 Navy task force lands Army troops on Angaur, Palau Islands supported by Navy carrier aircraft and shore bom bardment. Sept. 18 1926 Navy brings relief aid to Miami, Fla, after a severe hurricane. 1936 Squadron 40-T, based in the Mediterranean, estab lished to protect U.S. interests and citizens around Iberian peninsula throughout the Spanish Civil War. 1947 National Security Act becomes effective. Sept. 19 1915 Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels organizes the Naval Consulting Board to mobilize the scientific resourc es of the U.S. for national defense. 1958 Bathyscaph Trieste, in a dive sponsored by the Office of Naval Research in the Mediterranean, reaches record depth of two miles. 1992 Joint Task Force Marianas stands down after providing assistance to Guam after Typhoon Omar. All of my children are now in school: Lindell in kindergarten, Owen in fourth grade, and Ford in (gulp) junior high school. For the first time in 12 years, I will have days to myself. Ive been waiting for this. Except, if you want to know the truth of it about how conflicted and ambivalent Im feeling just ask me how many times I wrote, erased and rewrote that first paragraph. Seven years ago, I put my oldest child on the school bus, headed for kinder garten. We lived in Florida, and I was standing in the prickly front lawn, in my bathrobe, as I watched the rum bling bus pull away. Fords head, just barely visible above the bottom frame of the window, bobbed up and down with the bumps and jerks of the engine. He stared at me with big, brown eyes, and he waved goodbye. I cried. Two years later, we had just moved to Maine, and basically the next day, I sent Owen to kindergarten. His school had a breakfast for mothers after the morning bell rang. I was suffering from my usual, late-August allergies, so my pockets were stuffed with tissues, and my eyes and nose were red. A new friend came up to me and said sympathetically, Oh, is this your first time sending someone to kindergarten? She thought I was crying. I blew my nose and laughed. No, I said. This is my second, and this [pointing to my eyes] is allergies. We shared a good, hearty, momlaugh: Two down, one more to go! That one more to go is now. Im excited, relieved, worried and sad all at the same time. The crux of my dilemma is that there is good news and bad news. The good news: All of us are embarking on a new phase of our life. The bad news: All of us are embarking on new and different phases of our lives. This was never more apparent than during the three open houses we attended. Lindells was first. He was, of course, accompanied by his two older brotherstaller, wiser, less baby and more big kid. Ford and Owen showed Lindell around their old school. They helped him with his classroom scavenger hunt. They cheered when he spotted his own name above his coat hook. I looked around the room and thought, This is where my baby will spend 80-percent (dont check my math) of his time the next nine months. This will be his home-away-from-home. He will know every cabinet, smell, and creak of the floor, just like he does at home. (Note: Heres where a paragraph about Owens open house should be. But Owen is the middle child. His open house was interrupted by an older brother who needed to get to the junior high school to meet his teacher, and a younger brother who made funny faces and caused Owens friends to laugh. He was greeted by teachers who said, You must be Fords brother. And, Oh, is this your cute little brother? Middle children everywhere can go sit in a corner and cry about this together, but we have to move on to Fords open house before I run out of my allotted 800 words.) Ford was also accompanied to open house by two brothers, only they were younger and silent. This was junior high. Big time. Scary. Owen and Lindell stood behind Ford and were glad they werent him. They listened carefully, their eyes wide and mouths open. They gasped simultane ously when, in front of the entire sixth grade, Fords name was announced as Henry Smiley. Fords home-away-from-home seemed a little less cozy then Lindells and Owens. They could sense it. And they had nothing no words of encouragement or advice. Ford was on his own. Eventually, however, Lindell warmed up to the idea of junior high. He munched on Cracker Jacks while Fords teacher went over details of the first day of school. He suggested out loud that Ford rent a combination lock from the school: Theyll give you five dollars at the end of the year, Ford! Ford stared straight ahead and pre tended not to notice. His new world and Lindells new world did not mesh. That 80-percent of their day would be spent quite differently. Indeed, all of us would have new and different days. (Well, except for middle-child-Owen, who, of course, will forever be Fords little brother or Lindells big brother to all his teachers and friends.) And, me? Well, I have a book to write. And Ill be teaching. And Ill be figur ing out a new schedule that does not involve holding a little hand and walk ing up to the school at 3 p.m. to get big brothers. Ill be shopping alone, without pudgy legs sticking out from the front of the cart. Ill be going to the bank and not asking for a lollypop. First day of school for everyone U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a member of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certifi cates of special recognition in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. The registration deadline is Oct. 5. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in territorial waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve rec ognition and thanks for putting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans during my annu al Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the highlights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are strongly encouraged to contact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 5980481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www.crenshaw.house.gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and documentation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the certificate, veterans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214.Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program.Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony to be held Nov. 8

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The NAS Jax Flight Line Caf staff celebrated the selection of NAS Jacksonville Food Services Division Officer CWO4 Kathy Wiseman to CWO5 on Aug. 17 with a special cake cutting ceremony. She will be officially promoted in June 2013. This is the first year that female food service warrants have been selected to CWO5 and two of us were selected. Im really excited and shocked but its really not about me. Its about all the sup port and guidance I have received from various chain of commands, junior and senior enlisted, food service contractors and shipmates worldwide, Wiseman said humbly. It also means that I get to stay in the Navy longer to conduct more training and hopefully guide future food ser vice officers, continued Wiseman, who hits her 30-year mark in the Navy in October. The rank of CWO5 was established October 2002 to ensure the Navy retained the very best technical leadership for a full 30-year career. Wiseman personifies excellence and aims to bring that out in everyone that she leads through her professionalism and pride in the day-to-day operations at the Flight Line Caf. She continually assists Sailors with their person al development through finan cial sus tainabil ity, edu cation, tech nical train ing, in-rate knowledge, leadership skills, culinary competitions and career development. My advice to junior Sailors is to enjoy your job because if you are not enjoying it, you arent doing it right. Make it fun, create camaraderie, spend time with mentors and volunteer with your team, said Wiseman. The Navy has so much to offer and unbelievable opportunities are around every corner. If you fully support your chain of command and shipmates, you will never have to worry about being supported. A native of Rome, Ga., Wiseman enlisted in the Navy in December 1982 as a seaman recruit. After attending Mess Management A School, she served at Naval Station Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and deployed on board USS Jason (AR 8). She then transferred to Naval Station Mare Island, Calif. and then back to Hawaii with VP-4. In January 1984, Wiseman trans ferred to Fleet Hospital Training Command, Camp Pendleton, Calif. as a food service instructor where she was selected Sailor of the Year, qualified as a master training specialist and was promoted to chief petty officer. After being promoted to warrant officer, Wiseman reported to USS Nimitz (CVN 68 as the leading mess manage ment specialist and attained the rank of senior chief mess management specialist. Her next duty station took her to Navy Recruiting District Montgomery, Ala. as recruiter in charge, assisting the station in being named Large Station of the Year by Navy Recruiting Command. After being selected for the Food Service Warrant Officer Program in 2000, Wiseman completed Navy Supply Corps School and reported to USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) as the food service office. Under her leadership, her team earned two Capt. Edward F. Ney awards for food service excellence. After completing a tour as a quarantine inspector in Iraq, Wiseman reported to NS Mayport in June 2004 as the food service officer again leading her team to win the Capt. Edward F. Ney award. In December 2006, Wiseman trans ferred to Navy Region Southeast as the Galley Program deputy director and regional food service officer where she spearheaded the first regional Chef Certification Program, monitored 12 food service contracts and 14 galleys employing 600 military and civilian personnel. In 2009, Wiseman reported to NS Guantanamo Bay, Cuba where she managed four dining facilities and led her team to win two Capt. Edward F. Ney awards. In April 2010, she transferred to NAS Jacksonville as the food service officer where she led her team to attain its first Five-Star Accreditation in 2011. Wiseman is certifications include: master food service executive; exec utive chef; chef de cuisine; sous chef; food program manager and haz ard analysis critical control point manager. She has also completed an associates degree from Central Texas College; food service manager course and dietetic service supervisor from Palomar College; food service manag er course from the U.S. Department of Labor; and the operations management course through the National Restaurant Association. Making CWO5 is a dream come true. I plan to work hard to make my men tors proud and create future opportunities for my shipmates, said Wiseman, who will transfer to U.S. Naval Supply Systems Command in Mechanicsburg, Pa. in October. Four aircrews and more than 50 maintenance personnel from the Broadarrows of VP-62 and the Totems of VP-69 increased their warfighting skills during RIMPAC 2012. The 23rd biennial Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise ran in and around the Hawaiian Islands from June 29 to Aug. 3 and is the worlds largest international mari time exercise. The exercise involved 25,000 personnel from 22 nations, 40 ships and submarines, and more than 200 aircraft. RIMPAC is designed to foster and sustain the coopera tive relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the worlds oceans. Our goal in the exercise was to obtain advanced qualifications in our core readiness areas of antisubmarine warfare and anti-sur face warfare, said Cmdr. Jerry Dearie, commanding officer of VP-62. From where I stand, we could not have had a better exercise. The Broadarrows flew 10 coordinated operations sorties accruing more than 50 hours and were awarded 18 advanced crew qualifications. RIMPAC has always been a valuable source of multi-nation, combined operational training. I dont remember the last time we missed one, said Dearie, who joined the squadron in 2002 as a new lieutenant commander. It takes a great effort to get aircrew and maintenance personnel out to a major fleet exercise, but the fantastic return on investment will keep us coming back for years to come. The theme of RIMPAC 2012 was Capable Adaptive Partners. The participating nations and forces exercised a wide range of capa bilities that demonstrate the inherent flexibility of maritime forces. NAS Jax food service officer selected for CWO5Broadarrows prepare for deployment during RIMPAC 2012 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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These capabilities range from disaster relief and maritime security operations to sea control and complex warfighting. The realistic and rel evant training syllabus at RIMPAC included exercises in a wide array of operational fields, including amphibious ops, missile and gun nery firing, anti-subma rine warfare, air defense, counter-piracy, mine clearance, explosive ord nance disposal, and div ing and salvage. During the next 12 months the VP-69 crews will expand their readi ness qualifications to be worldwide deploy able. The RIMPAC exer cise allowed our com bat aircrews to conduct missions and hone their warfighting skills in a challenging real-world environment, said Cmdr. Mike Mineo, commanding officer of VP-69. The Totems flew more than 50 hours and achieved 14 readi ness qualifications. Our crews and maintainers performed exceptionally well and were an out standing representation of the Navy Reserve. We successfully fired a live Maverick missile against a decommis sioned target ship as part of a large joint live-fire exercise, said Cmdr. Kris Moorhead, one of VP-62s mission commanders at RIMPAC. It is a very rare opportunity for us to get live ordnance in a training environment so this has been a fantastic training exercise for the aircrew and maintenance per sonnel. We also dropped a torpedo on an undersea target sled, said Moorhead. Most of our events were focused on anti-subma rine warfare (ASW) and it was a great training. We coordinated our ASW efforts with P-3s from several countries, ASW helicopters, and the newest ASW patrol aircraft, the P-8. Broadarrow and Totem maintenance person nel also supported the maintenance depart ments of Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 2. AEC(AW/NAC) Brian Norman has been a member of the VP-69 Totems for 12 years, serving as both a P-3 flight engineer and mainte nance control supervisor. We really fit in well with our active duty counterparts in the maintenance depart ment. Keeping up with a very high operational tempo required a real team effort, Norman said. We assisted in opera tional and maintenance support of eight P-3C aircraft participating in the monthlong multination al maritime operation, said AMC(AW) Tyson Anderson. My maintenance team worked on avionics sys tems, power plants, electronics systems as well as airframe related issues on eight P-3C aircraft. While it has always been a major exercise for the Broadarrows and Totems, RIMPAC 2012 was even more impor tant this year for the VP Reserve units. Next summer, both squadrons will deploy to forward loca tions to fill a void created by the transition from the P-3 Orion to the P-8 Poseidon. VP-69 was proud to demonstrate their Totem tenacity and experience throughout the exer cise, said Mineo, who has served as a full-time support officer in both squadrons. We flawlessly con ducted our opera tional readiness evalu ation flight events under the evaluation of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10 in prepare for their upcoming partial unit mobilization in June. RIMPAC JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 CHIEF SELE C TEES PUT THROUGH THE PA C ES

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 7 The chief petty officer (CPO) induction season at NAS Jacksonville is coming to a close this week as the new chiefs will be welcomed to the chiefs mess Sept. 14 during ceremonies throughout the station. During the training they have learned the importance of the chiefs mess, how to work as a team and what is expected of a CPO. The selectees are guided by senior enlisted leaders through positive, challenging events to test their mental and physical skills on both a personal and professional level to ensure they know what is expected of them as a chief. It also provides the opportunity to emphasize CPO history, heritage and naval traditions. Physical fitness is always a priority so the selectees spend many hours running, swim ming and doing calisthenics to build camaraderie and confidence. They also participate in community service and fundraising events, classroom training and historical productions, explained AWVCS(NAC/ AW) Jason Reimer, NAS Jax CPO Selectee Induction coor dinator. I have seen drastic improvement in the manner in which these Sailors conduct them selves. They have become more assertive and are will ing to take on tasks that they thought were too challeng ing before. They have been exposed to, and stepped up to leadership at the next level. Reimer said failure is not an option for chiefs. Promoting to chief petty officer is a once in a lifetime event that affects each Sailor differently. We apply a large amount of mental pres sure throughout the season so each individual can see what their actual breaking point is, instead of doing it in a real world scenario. The selectees are driven to find outlets and rely on one another to make the mission happen. For induction season, the selectees are divided into training teams named after ships from the War of 1812. This year, we chose ships that participated in the War of 1812, in honor of the 200th anni versary of the start of the war that lasted for three years to follow. The War of 1812 had no chief petty officers and we are trying to align our process with CPO 365 and pose the question as to who made the mission happen with no chiefs in those days, said Reimer. Most recently, the chief selectees participated in the annual CPO Pride Day in downtown Jacksonville, a chili cook-off at the Navy Exchange Food Court, the Great White Fleet Races and the Wounded Warrior 8K Run. CHIEFS INDU C TION SEASON ENDS THIS WEEK

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Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast (NRSE), signed a suicide prevention aware ness proclamation at NAS Jacksonville Sept. 6. The proclamation recognizes September as National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and is intended to raise suicide awareness prevention throughout the Southeast Region. This proclamation brings to light an issue of paramount importance in our military today, Scorby said. Each year, we lose shipmates, co-workers and family mem bers to suicide and these losses can be prevented. It is our col lective responsibility to remain alert to the warning signs and to be prepared to take action with those in our lives who might be at risk. An actively engaged force, including everyone in the Navy family, is key to the successful prevention of suicide. The proclamation emphasiz es the Navys Act, Care, Treat (ACT) training tool, which is designed to raise awareness of suicide warning signs and encourages people to intervene with those at risk. According to Dianne Parker, NRSE assistant suicide pre vention outreach coordinator, knowing the warning signs of suicide and being proactive is particularly important when it comes to Department of Defense (DoD) personnel. Suicide is a major issue right now throughout the DoD, she said. Our goal is to reduce the number of these tragedies through education and awareness campaigns, and we hope this proclamation will go a long way in those efforts. Raising leadership aware ness about the issue has been a key theme in DoD efforts to lower suicide statistics. In a May 10 memorandum to DoD personnel, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta wrote, Leaders throughout the chain of com mand must actively promote a constructive command cli mate that fosters cohesion and encourages individuals to reach out for help when need ed. According to Parker, sui cide prevention efforts within the Southeast Region are in line with that statement. In September 2011, the region implemented an aggressive suicide prevention coordinator training program that utilizes Defense Connect Online. So far, it has resulted in more than 200 newly-qualified coordina tors throughout the region and more than 1,000 worldwide. The program has been instrumental in raising aware ness and getting the message out to leaders throughout the DoD. Leaders need to make Sailors understand that there is no shame in reaching out for help, she said. Each year, hundreds of DoD personnel commit suicide and many of these cases could be prevented if friends and coworkers only knew what to look for and took action, Parker said. The bottom line is if you suspect that someone may be thinking about suicide, you need to act, care and treat, she said. The key is to take action. The worst thing that you can possibly do is nothing. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) celebrated 170 years of naval history Aug. 31. The 13th Secretary of the Navy, Abel Upshur, officially established NAVFACs predecessor, the Bureau of Naval Yards and Docks in 1842, to execute the design, construction and maintenance of Navy yards and a few other shore stations around the eastern seaboard of the United States. Eventually the Bureau and its responsibilities would grow into the global enterprise known as NAVFAC, which was officially estab lished in May 1966. Our team of Civil Engineer Corps officers, civilian personnel and Seabees are testament to the remarkable contributions of those who have given their all to this organization in the past 170 years, said Capt. Christopher Kiwus, NAVFAC Southeast commanding offi cer. I could not be more proud of what our NAVFAC team is doing for our supported commanders and the Sailors and Marines who live on the installa tions we support, along with their families. NAVFAC is the naval systems com mand that delivers and maintains highquality, sustainable facilities, acquires and manages capabilities for the Navys expeditionary combat forces, enables energy security and environmental stewardship, and provides humani tarian and contingency engineering response. NAVFACs signature is visible on every Navy and Marine Corps instal lation around the globe. Nearly every pier, runway, building, gymnasium, barracks, road, utility plant, and other facilities on shore has been constructed or acquired by NAVFAC. NAVFAC Southeast employs 1,800 people at 22 installations throughout the southeastern United States and Cuba and delivers and maintains highquality, sustainable facilities, enables energy security and environmental stewardship, and provides humani tarian and contingency engineering response. In fiscal year 2011, NAVFAC Southeast delivered more than $1.3 billion in products and services to supported Navy and Marine Corps command ers, as well as other federal agencies. The commands regional team of planning, construction, facilities services, environmental and acquisition subject matter experts executed approximately 5,700 separate contract actions during the year. NAVFAC Southeasts Public Works Departments answered more than 40,000 in-house service calls in a demanding 24/7 environment. With half of the NAVFAC Southeast bases on a base operating service contract answering over 60,000 service calls. This critical work is a vital enabler for what takes place daily on bases around the world. NAVFAC experts provide engineer ing reach-back support to war fighters as well as response and recovery sup port for disasters like the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami, the 2010 Haiti earthquake, and Hurricanes Katrina and Gustav. In response to Hurricane Isaac, NAVFAC Southeast sent a contingency engineering response team composed of 15 military and civilian personnel to Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport and Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base New Orleans. Delivering sustainable and cost-effective solutions is increasingly important in the austere fiscal environment our nation is facing. Last year in support of the Secretary of the Navys ambitious goals to achieve energy security and efficiency, NAVFAC helped Supported Commanders reduce energy consump tion by 15 percent from a 2003 baseline. In addition, NAVFACs contributions to the Navys shore energy program dur ing the last 10 years has resulted in the Navy being awarded 24 percent of all Presidential and 29 percent of all fed eral energy awards. Scorby signs suicide prevention awareness proclamation NAVFAC proudly building on 170-year Navy heritage 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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Sailors and civilians from Commander, Navy Region Southeast participated in a Habitat for Humanity (H4H) construction project Aug. 29. During the project, volun teers helped put the finish ing touches on three Northside Jacksonville houses that will soon be homes for lowincome families. According to Mara Walker, vice presi dent of partner services with H4H Jacksonville, the volun teer effort helped strengthen an already firm relationship between the Navy and the local community. The Navy has been a very valued partner to us. I cant tell you how amazingly motivat ed and productive they have been, Walker said. Its huge when you have willing volunteers like that because they supply the labor, which means we dont have to contract it out and increase the cost of the home. H4Hs mission is to build affordable housing for lowincome families and individu als. Those who receive homes from the program work along side volunteers under trained supervision to build their home. Upon completion, H4H grants them a no-interest mortgage for the value of the home, making monthly payments affordable to those cannot afford a traditional mortgage payment. The organization has built more than 1,800 homes this year in Jacksonville alone. H4H is a great way for the Navy to increase its footprint in the local community, said Twilla Smith, Navy Region Southeast Community Service Program coordinator. Our primary mission is to support the fleet, the fighter, and the family and a good way to do that is through com munity events like this one. It gives our Sailors and civilians an opportunity to grow personally and have a positive impact on the local community at the same time. H4H volunteer opportuni ties consist of various tasks, depending on what stage of construction the house is in. In this case, the volunteers had the opportunity to finish three houses in one day. Their efforts consisted of mowing and landscaping, as well as basic indoor and outdoor cleaning. Despite having to give up some leave time to participate, retired Army 1st Sgt. James Jennings said the rewards outweighed the cost. This was a chance to pro vide a face for the organiza tion and to let the community know that Naval Air Station Jacksonville and the Armed Forces do care about the community. According to Walker, the participants should take a lot of pride in their efforts. She said volunteers dont always have the opportunity to meet the future owners of the houses they help build, but she can attest to the appreciation those owners have for the program and its volunteers. They are amazingly appre ciative of the work that goes into this because they would otherwise not qualify to have their own home, she said. In this case, the volunteers did not meet the future owners of any of the three houses, but did learn that one of the houses will go to a single mother with two young children. Knowing that makes you feel pretty good about what youre doing, said YN3 Christian Ediger, a volunteer. If what were doing means its easier for this woman to feed her children when she might have been struggling before, it means a lot to me. Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast (NRSE), signed a proclamation in support of the Navy Family Ombudsman Program (NFOP) at NAS Jacksonville Sept. 6. The proclamation sign ing commemorated the 42nd anniversary of the NFOP and declared Sept. 14 as Ombudsman Appreciation Day throughout the region. For more than four decades, the Navy ombudsman pro gram has been an invaluable resource in our efforts to sup port our warfighters and their families, Scorby said. I would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to all of our ombudsmen throughout the region for continued support. Our Sailors and their families would face a much more diffi cult task without you. The NFOP was launched Sept. 14, 1970, by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo Zumwalt to assist commands in maintaining the morale, health and welfare of Navy families. Ombudsmen act as liaisons between commanding officers and the families of service members. They typically provide a variety of resources, such as providing family members with official information and emergen cy assistance. Commander, Navy Installations Command reports that ombudsmen vol unteer efforts save the Navy more than $2 million annually. According to Dianne Parker, NRSE deployment support program manager and ombuds man program coordinator, the proclamation is significant because it acknowledges the efforts of ombudsmen not only throughout the region, but throughout the Navy. Its important to recog nize the anniversary of the ombudsman program because our ombudsmen are a part of the command support team, they make sure families know what resources are available to them, and help them adjust to the military way of life, she said. If it werent for our Navy ombudsmen, our Sailors would carry a much heavier burden in the face of their military duties.For more information about the Navy Ombudsman Program, including how to contact your command ombudsman, visit http://www.cnic.navy.mil/ CNIC_HQ_Site/WhatWeDo/ FleetandFamilyReadiness/ FamilyReadiness/FleetAnd FamilySupportProgram/ OmbudsmanProgram/index.htm. CNRSE Sailors, civilians help build homes in local community Scorby signs ombudsman recognition proclamation JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 9

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NAVFAC also provides support ed commanders with environmental expertise, such as installation restora tion, environmental compliance, and National Environmental Policy Act planning and coordination. In 2011, NAVFAC exceeded all gov ernment-wide program goals and targets, with over 55 percent of the total dollars awarded and more than 25,000 contracts going to small businesses. NAVFAC Southeasts small business program was the only one in NAVFAC to achieve every individual program goal. Consequently, the Navys Office of Small Business Programs awarded the Secretarys Cup award to NAVFAC for promoting acquisition opportunities for small businesses during a ceremony held at the Pentagon June 15. NAVFAC has a proud history of delivering excellent products and services for supported commands since 1842. Building on 170 years of experience, NAVFAC continues to manage the planning, design, construction, contingency engineering, real estate, environmental and public works support for U.S. Navy shore facilities all over the world. NAVFAC NAS Jacksonville CDC earns NAEYC accreditation The NAS Jax Child Development Center (CDC) has earned accreditation from The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) the nations leading organization of early childhood professionals. Were proud to have earned the mark of quality from NAEYC, and to be recognized for our commit ment to reaching the highest profes sional standards, said NAS Jax Child and Youth Program Manager Mary Grenier. NAEYC accreditation lets families in our community know that children in our program are getting the best care and early learning experiences possible. To earn NAEYC Accreditation, the staff at NAS Jacksonville CDC went through an extensive self-study pro cess, measuring the program and its services against the 10 NAEYC Early Childhood Program standards and more than 400 related accreditation criteria. The program received NAEYC accreditation after an on-site visit by NAEYC assessors to ensure that the program met each of the 10 program standards. The overall percentage met in program standards was 98.7 per cent, the overall score for individual classrooms observed was 95.4 percent. NAEYC accredited programs are also subject to unannounced visits during their accreditation, which lasts for five years. CNATTU Jax holds family day picnicCenter for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville recently held their annu al family day picnic at Allegheny Park aboard NAS Jacksonville. AS1 (AW/SW) Dhovie Apoyan, president of CNATTU Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation Committee, and his team organized the family day picnic cooking hot dogs, hamburgers, and baked beans for command per sonnel and their families. The CNATTU Jax Chief Petty Officers Mess took part by donating all the food for the event. The picnic was a resounding success enjoyed by CNATTU Sailors and Marine Corps, as well as families. Navy Band Southeasts rock band Pride provided the entertainment playing various selections of songs. One Sailor commented, This is a good way to build morale at the command, and for everyone to get to know each other a little better. CNATTU Jax Commanding Officer Cmdr. Daryl Pierce was also excited about the turnout at the pic nic. This is really a great event and gives our Sailors and civilians and their families the opportunity to spend time together build ing camaraderie outside the working environment and have a little fun, said Pierce. Site captains will register volunteers and provide bags and gloves at the cleanup locations. Pre-registration is not required. Participants must be over 18 or accompanied by an adult. Servicehour certificates available for students. Free T-shirts for cleanup volunteers at Riverside Arts Market from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. (while supplies last). Site Locations 7-9 a.m. Oceanfront at these loca tions: th Avenue South 8-10 a.m. Naval Station Mayport, Jetties Pavilion No. 3 Volunteers must have base access 9-11 a.m. Seawalk Pavilion, Jacksonville Go to the end of Beach Blvd, turn left on 1st Street. The pavilion is on the right. 9-11 a.m. Tillie K. Fowler Regional Park, 7000 Roosevelt Blvd. 9-11 a.m. Northbank Riverwalk, 221 Riverside Ave. Parking on Jackson Street behind YMCA 9-11 a.m. Yacht Basin Park, 2941 St. Johns Avenue 9-11 a.m. Helen Cooper Floyd Park, (Little Jetties) 3600 S.R. A1A 9-11 a.m. Hogan Creek Parking behind Jacksonville Historical Society, 314 Palmetto Street *Not recommended for children. 9-11 a.m. Blue Cypress Park, 4012 University Blvd. N. 9-11 a.m. Ft. Caroline National Memorial, 12713 Fort Caroline Road 9-11 a.m. Riverview Community/ Senior Center/Park, 9620 Water Street 9-11 a.m. Huguenot Memorial Park, 10980 Heckscher Drive 9-11 a.m. Joe Carlucci Boat Ramp, 8414 Heritage River Road Boat Ramp 1 mile off of Heckscher Drive 9-11 a.m. Intracoastal Waterway Boat Ramp-2510 2nd Avenue North. Not rec ommended for children. 9-11 a.m. County Dock Boat Ramp, County Dock Road and Scott Mill Road on the St. Johns River next to Walter Jones Memorial Park in Mandarin 9-11 a.m. Hollybrook Park (North Riverside) 213 Leland Street 9-11 a.m. Powers Park (Murray Hill) 3153 Green Street 9-11 a.m. Brooklyn Park (Brooklyn neighborhood) 1201 Jackson Street Safety tips Wear sturdy, closed toe, footwear and gloves. Wear sun protection and bring water. Be alert for slippery wet surfaces. Do not climb on rocks or get into water. Avoid overexertion and drink plenty of fluids. Wear safety vests or bright col ors along roadsides. Do not handle or remove hazardous items or substances. This regional effort is part of the 27th annual International Coastal Cleanup coordinated by the Ocean Conservancy and supported locally by Keep Jacksonville Beautiful. For information call 630-3420/2489 or visit www.coj.net/KJB .Volunteers needed for Sept. 15 Florida Coastal Cleanup 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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The U.S. Navy launches newly branded emergen cy preparedness program, READY NAVY! Formerly called Operation Prepare, Ready Navy adds new energy and tools to further empower Navy person nel and families in their role as an emergency preparedness partner, ready for any hazard. Website, factsheets, brochures, posters, and a new training course are a few of the pro grams highlights. Visit www. ready.navy.mil today. During 2011s record year of natural hazard incidents, thousands of members of the Navy Community were direct ly impacted and many were forced to evacuate their homes. News of earthquakes in Japan, New Zealand, and Virginia; tsunami waves that origi nated in Japan and reached California and Hawaii; vol canic activity in Indonesia, Guatemala, and Hawaii; and wildfires, hurricanes, ram pant tornadoes, and flooding throughout the US inundated media reports. Today, with wildfires raging in California and hurricanes at the forefront of the news, emergency pre paredness has never been more paramount. The move to READY NAVY strengthens the outreach of Navys already beneficial emergency preparedness program by aligning it with other DOD and National Preparedness awareness campaigns, says Owen McIntyre, CNIC N37, program director. Navy personnel and fami lies will benefit from tips and tools that continue to empow er them to be ready for any emergency, now with a name with which they can identify one that communicates the strength of the Navy community, ready for 21st Century chal lenges. Preparedness is indeed a partnership. Navy Region and Installation Emergency Managers are hard at work to ensure readiness for any emergent incident, and every indi vidual plays a role. Individual preparedness reduces stress and saves lives, property, and time. Commander, Navy Installations Command asks, Are You Ready Navy? Be Informed: Find out what disasters are most likely to happen in your area and the history of their occurrence, and learn about any specific instructions or information you may need to know regarding these specific disasters. Have a Plan: Another impor tant tool you and your family need to prepare for possible emergencies is a family pre paredness plan. Everyone in the family should understand what to do, where to go, and what to take in the event of an emergency. Your emergency plan should include how your family will communicate with each other, particularly if normal com munication methods, such as phone lines or cell towers, are out. Have a contact person outside the area that each mem ber of the family can notify that they are safe. Also, plan ahead for how you will evacuate the area and where your family will meet if you are evacuated separately. Learn about the mustering requirements at your com mand and become famil iar with the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS) (https://navy family.navy.mil). If you are stationed overseas, learn about additional Noncombatant Evacuation Orders procedures. Build a Kit: The best way to prepare for the unexpected is to create one or more emer gency kits that include enough supplies for at least three days. Keep a kit prepared at home, and consider having kits in your car, at work, and a porta ble version in your home ready to take with you. These kits will enable you and your family to respond to an emergency more effectively. Your various emer gency kits will be useful wheth er you have to shelter-in-place or evacuate. Be sure your kits address the needs of small children, individuals with special needs, and your pets. For information about Ready Navy and tips, forms, and guidance to be prepared for and stay informed about all haz ards, visit www.ready.navy.mil Ready Navy is a CNIC spon sored emergency preparedness program.Operation Prepare is now READY NAVY!Empowering Navy personnel and families through emergency preparedness Power outages in Florida leave homes hot, dark and eerily quiet. Portable generators can provide temporary relief by powering up conveniences you count on everyday, such as refrigerators, microwave ovens, fans and other appliances. Purchase enough capac ity. When you decide to buy a generator, make sure its rated to provide for the amount of power you require. Look at the labels on lighting, appliances and equipment for the watt age that they consume. Motordriven appliances listed in horsepower must be converted to watts. Then add the total wattage for all the appliances. Shop for generators that produce more power than will be drawn by the combi nation of lighting, appliances and equipment you plan to operate,including the initial surge when power is turned on. Be sure to read instructions that come with the generator to make sure you operate it within its limitations for power out put. If your generator does not produce adequate power for your needs, stagger the operating times of various appliances. Operate safely. Residential use of portable generators is growing rapidly. Besides the comforts that portable power plants provide, never lose focus on the safe installation and operation of your unit. If you plan to hook up a generator to your home wiring, you must hire a licensed elec trician to ensure that the con nection complies with national and local building codesand that the generator is properly grounded, eliminating the possibility of electrocution. Never try to power house wiring by plugging the generator into a wall outlet, a prac tice known as back feeding. This is an extremely dangerous practice that presents an elec trocution risk to utility workers and neighbors served by the same utility transformer. It also bypasses some of the built-in household circuit protection devices. Locate the generator outside away from doors and windows. Provide a minimum of 3 to 4 feet of clear space on all sides to supply fresh air for proper cooling during operation. When connecting appli ances directly to the genera tor, always use heavy duty, outdoor-rated, 3-prong cords of correct size along with a surge-protected power strip. Overloaded cords can cause fires or equipment damage. Gasoline engines give off deadly carbon monoxide (CO), a colorless and odorless gas, so its a good idea to install battery operated CO alarms in your home. Under no circumstances is it safe to use portable generators indoors or in partially enclosed areas such as a garage or Florida room. Opening doors and windows or using fans will not prevent CO buildup in the home. The CO from generators can rapidly lead to incapacita tion and death. If you start to feel nauseous, dizzy or weak while using a generator, get outside for fresh air right away. Air-cooled engines run very hot and can start a fire when near flammable items. If gaso line spills onto a hot engine it could ignite, so before refuel ing, turn off the generator and let it cool. Use only approved safety containers to store fuel. When disaster strikes, be prepared with the right portable generator JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 11

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Maritime Surveillance (BAMS). At the P-8A ITC on Yorktown Avenue, the group visited a classroom filled with flat screens where computer-based training (CBT) takes place for the P-8A pilots, naval flight officers (NFOs) and aircrew. There are three types of CBT classrooms: Management Computer System Desktop Trainer allows pilots to build proficiency in flight and route management; Mission Software Desktop Trainer allows mission operators to gain and maintain proficiency in a classroom setting; Part Task Trainer (PTT) is used for individual or sub-team learning, prac tice and refresher train ing. Instructor Lt. James Miller said that CBT is often combined with classroom lectures to increase aircrew proficiency, as well as the rate-specific knowledge of aircrew/sensor operators. Our job at the ITC is to employ effective learning practices that improve the performance of the Navys maritime patrol and reconnaissance force, said Miller. During the flight simulator tour, Lt. Cmdr. John Currie, a member of the P-8A Fleet Integration Team (FIT), said that while a flight simulator cant fully replace actual flight training, the visual and motion fidelity of the P-8A Operational Flight Trainer (OFT) is unparalleled in the industry. All the equipment in our simulators is identical to the real aircraft, said Currie. Boeings P-8 training system pro vides comprehensive and realistic air crew training at a fraction of the cost of live aircraft training. The ITC houses the two main P-8A simulator systems: the OFT for pilots and the Weapons Tactics Trainer (WTT) for naval flight officers and mission operators. The two devices can be electronically coupled to create fully inte grated flight and mission crew training. Instructor Lt. Ryan Baldwin wel comed the visitors to the WTT that is set up inside a realistic P-8A fuselage nicknamed, the tube. The WTT provides five mission-crew workstations inside the tube, along with five instructor stations next to the tube where they monitor and role-play with students. Here, mission crew learn to optimize the P-8A Poseidons sen sor and communications systems, as well as to target and deploy its weap ons, said Baldwin. Another simulator available to P-8A mission operators is the PTT suite. After students complete their desktop training, PTT is an intermediate step for those who may need more training on a particular P-8A mission skill before moving on to the WTT. At the PTT, one instructor can moni tor and mentor up to three students NFOs, acoustic operators or electronic warfare officers at the same time, said Joe Strickland, deputy lead of the NAVAIR P-8A FIT. Each console layout is identical to those in the P-8A. And each student can run a scenario as many times as they like in order to increase their proficiencies before testing their skills in the WTT. Media attending the tour included: Lance Bacon, Army Times; Martin Kauchak, Military Simulation & Training Magazine; Michael Peck, Training & Simulation Journal; Ann Roosevelt, Defense Daily; Allan Warwick, Aviation Week; and Marcus Weisgerber, Defense News. The P-8A is a long-range anti-sub marine warfare, anti-surface warfare, intelligence, surveillance and recon naissance aircraft capable of broadarea, maritime and littoral operations. A derivative of the Boeing 737-800, the P-8A combines superior performance and reliability with an advanced mis sion system that ensures maximum interoperability in the future battle space. The U.S. Navy plans to purchase 117 P-8As to replace its fleet of P-3C Orion aircraft. ITC 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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The most common car purchase problem reported to Navy legal assistance providers by Sailors and dependents is the spot delivery or yo-yo car sale. Typically, problems include violations of State Unfair and Deceptive Trade Practice Acts and Federal consumer law violations under the Truth in Lending Act and the Federal Odometer Act. In a spot delivery or yo-yo car sale, a Sailor/Marine agrees to buy a used vehicle. They sign a pur chase contract and a retail install ment sales contract (RISC) and the dealer lets them leave the car lot with the vehicle before the RISC is actually approved by a bank. The Sailor/Marine mistakenly believes that they already own the vehicle despite the fact that in many states the sale is not complete until the bank approves the vehicle loan. Some Sailors/Marines, once informed that their loan has not been approved and they do not own the vehicle, sadly opt to sign a costly and dealer-friendly new RISC with higher interest rates and higher monthly payments. The dealer benefits from the ser vice members affection for their new car and calculates the Sailor/ Marine wont balk at paying more than they bargained for to keep it! So how can you avoid the trap of spot delivery or yo-yo car sales? Do your homework Fully research the vehicle you want to buy and make sure it meets your transportation and personal needs. Avoid any impulse buying. Arrive at the car lot youve selected with confidence in the car you want, and know what price you think you should pay. There are multiple web-based resources available to that address how much you should pay for a car and how many deal ers in your area have the car you want. Negotiate with them and be prepared to walk away for a better deal! Understand your credit Unless you are able to pay for your car outright, you will need somebody to finance a loan. That might be a bank, credit union, or even the dealer themselves. You should be particularly careful when the dealer is the financier! It is recommended you seek financing from a bank or credit union if possible as they generally offer better, more reliable terms for your loan. The terms of the loan offered to you by the bank or credit union will be based on your credit history and ability to pay. (It pays to have a good credit history of not assuming too much debt and paying your bills on time!) Many banks and credit unions will even pre-approve you for a car loan making your negotiations with the car dealer much easier. Discuss your car-buying strategy with your bank or credit union lender for tips on negotiating with dealers. If you are unable to secure a bank or credit union loan, you should still be aware of the general interest rates they charge for loans in your area. You should use these rates as your basis for any negotiation with a dealer financier and be Spot delivery car sales a common trap to be avoided JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 13

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wary of paying rates in excess of typical bank rates! Todays rates are at historic lows, and even Sailors and Marines with poor credit history should be able to avoid excessive interest rates. Bring a copy of your RISC to base legal for review before you sign it! As an adult, you are generally liable for any contact you sign. Any honest car dealer should have no problem with providing you a copy of your RISC for review by Navy Legal. Take advantage of this free service, make an appointment, and talk to a Navy law yer before you sign on the dotted line! Navy lawyers and your local Fleet and Family Support Center can also provide guid ance regarding measures to improve your personal finances and perhaps a better deal, for a better car, sometime down the road. Finally, be wary of additional scams attempted by unscrupu lous car dealers: If youve provided a trade-in as part of your deal, a questionable dealer might advise you need to sign a new RISC at a higher interest rate because your trade-in has been sold but your loan wont be approved without that higher rate. Now you have no car & have to sign? Not true! Most states outlaw the transfer of ownership of your trade-in until the financing on your new car has been approved. If a dealer makes such a claim, ask them to put it in writing and immedi ately contact a Navy lawyer! Some dealers may also claim, and even write in their contracts, that if your financing isnt approved by a lender and you must return your car, you will owe them a rental fee for the time you drove it. This is not true and do not agree to this provision. Bottom Line nobody can force you to sign a contract and with some effort you can set your self up for success with a fair deal for a vehicle you want. For further assistance on legal issues involving car purchases and other consumer issues, please consult your local legal assis tance office. The Naval Legal Service Office Southeast has offices at Jacksonville (904-542-2565 ext. 3006), Mayport (904-270-5445 ext. 3017), and Kings Bay (912-573-3935). This article is not a sub stitute for individual legal advice and readers are advised that they should consult a lawyer to obtain proper advice for any legal issue. With Election Day about two months away, absentee military and overseas citizen vot ers can enjoy a stream lined process to register, obtain a ballot and exer cise their right to vote, a Federal Voting Assistance Program official said in a Sept. 5 Pentagon news conference. We firmly believe that voting assistance for our absentee voters is abso lutely the best that its ever been, Mitchell said. There are a lot of tools in our arsenal to help those voters both register, get an absentee ballot and to exercise their right to vote. Pam Mitchell, the pro grams acting director, outlined new outreach initiatives designed to make voting assistance more innovative and user-friendly than ever before, with an empha sis on engaging junior military personnel, the largest segment of the Defense Department population. Mitchell explained that FVAP offers a variety of tools through its online wizard, which among other features, can even help users ready bal lot envelopes for posting by printing the correct address on them. FVAP has customized its tools, Mitchell said, focusing on the 18-to-25year-old demographic, given their familiarity and general preference for gleaning information from the Internet and communicating through social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. We have a mobile website we just unveiled last week so that using a smartphone or a tablet from anywhere you may be, you can obtain access to our information and our tools, Mitchell said. In January, Mitchell said, officials also took to email accounts to broaden outreach. We use email blasts to every member within a dot-mil email address to remind them how they can reg ister to vote and that its time to vote, Mitchell said. Outside of the electron ic domain, FVAP main tains a call center that operates five days a week from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. EDT and can be used by voters worldwide to get help on how to file an absentee ballot. For in-person interac tion, Mitchell said, vot ing assistance officers and installation voter assistance offices remain available as prescribed by the 2009 Military and Overseas Voter Empowerment Act. She acknowledged findings in a recently released DOD Inspector General report that indicated difficulties in reaching a number of IVA offices based on dated contact information. In a military environ ment, things change, Mitchell said, citing per sonnel movements and joint basing as factors. We agree with the IG that the most important thing we can do is to find the most effective way to maintain assistance for all of our absentee vot ers, and we are absolutely committed [to that]. In the IG report, FVAP officials said investing in intuitive, easy-to-use Web-based tools, supplemented by well-trained unit voting assistance officers -rather than installation voter assis tance offices -could substantially reduce cost and improve voting assistance. By law, all states must offer electronic deliv ery of the ballot, but the voter, when applying for the ballot, can elect to receive it that way or may elect to receive it in the mail, Mitchell said. Over the last six months, we spent a lot of time reaching out to every single one of the 221 installation voting offices. Were confident that the information on our website today is accurate and has the most upto-date contact [informa tion], she continued. Between now and the election, Mitchell said, FVAP officials will con tinue to make weekly calls to each of the installation voter assistance offices to ensure they are accurately able to capture changes that may occur. Our goal is to make sure that anyone who wants to vote has the resources and tools they need from anywhere in the world to success fully exercise that right, Mitchell said. Active-duty mem bers of the armed forces, Merchant Marine, Public Health Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, their family members and U.S. citizens who are living outside the United States for work, school or other reasons can use FVAP. Voting Assistance Program eases registration, ballot process Reenactors wantedThe Georgia Sharpshooters, a member unit of the Georgia Division Reenactors Association is looking for volunteers to participate in reen actments throughout Georgia and Mississippi. There are no member ship fees for active duty, Reservists or National Guardsman. For more information, contact Gene Harmon at hcove06@hotmail.com or go to www.georgiasharp shooters.org CAR SALES 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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We were getting food to take back to our chairs, said Piffer, When we turned to walk away, the guy fell out right beside us. I checked for a pulse in his neck and Debbie checked his wrist. He had no heartbeat; he wasnt breathing. From the time we started CPR to the time we finished in a couple of minutes, we had him back. The emergency medical technicians (EMTs) arrived and transported the patient to a local hos pital. During halftime, Piffer walked over to the EMT station to check on the man. The paramedics said their patient would likely recover and thanked Piffer for his lifesaving efforts. It was a win-win on that fateful day not only for the man with the defective heart but also for the Jaguars who triumphed over the New York Giants 32 to 31. Jacksonville Jaguars representative contacted the season ticket holders soon after to extend the teams thanks and to upgrade the Piffers seating to club seats for the home game against the Houston Texans Sept. 16. This was not Piffers first occasion to provide CPR to a down and out victim. His first was in 1985 when he revived a 19-year-old Sailor while serving on active duty. The second was in 1989 when he happened upon a car wreck on Christmas day. In spite of performing one-man CPR, his efforts could not save an 86-year-old man who was pronounced dead at the hospital. Piffer learned his lifesaving skills while work ing for the Jasonville Volunteer Fire Department and Rescue in Indiana. He maintained the skill set while serving for 20 years in the U.S. Navy before retiring in 2003. FRCSE CPR Meet Kim SeligmanKim Seligman has been a case worker and chairman of client service associates at the NAS Jax Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society for the past year. Her job includes helping active duty service mem bers and their families with financial counseling and assistance. Born and raised in Florida, Seligman attended Florida State University where she received her degree in criminology and crimi nal justice. She is also a certified paralegal, although she is current ly working at her most important job as stay-at-home mom. Seligman loves spending time with her family and enjoys the outdoors and being physically active whenever she gets a chance. She hopes to travel more in the future, locally and overseas. And she loves any music from the 70s and 80s! Want to learn more about volunteer opportunities? Please contact Chairman of Volunteers Amanda OConnell at 904-542-3515 or mandivoc@gmail.com. Beginner Rider Course Experienced Rider Course Military Sportbike Rider Course Call for class dates NAS Jax Safety Office 542-3082 New motorcycle safety class offered for advanced riders Cape Fox Professional Services is now offering a new motorcycle safe ty class the Advanced Rider Course at NAS Jacksonville. Designed by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation, this class is nearly identical to the Military Sport Bike Course (MSRC), but is open to all two-wheeled motorcycles. The course begins with classroom training where the student learns how to improve perception skills and hazard awareness in a open-group environ ment. The group will analyze their riding decisions and work towards under standing their risk skill levels. The range exer cises focus on enhancing performance capabili ties related to cornering, breaking and hazard avoidance skills. The course is eight hours and is a Level II training class. It is equivalent to the Experienced Rider Course/Basic Rider Course 2 and MSRC. The prerequisite is completion of Level I training. Students will meet in the Auto Skills Center, second deck motorcycle training room. Bikes will need to be in proper working condition, have gas and proper personal protective equipment is required. For more information or to register, call Cindy at 542-2584 or Kristen at 542-8810.Tickets available for ombudsman lunch The annual Ombudsman Appreciation Luncheon will be held Sept. 19 at 11:30 a.m. at the NAS Jax Officers Club. Tickets are $10 per person and are available at the Fleet and Family Support Center (Bldg. 554 Child Street) from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Ticket sales end at 3 p.m. on Sept. 13. For more information, call 542-5745. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 15

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The Naval Supply Systems Commands (NAVSUP) Postal Policy Division mail-by dates for pre-Dec. 25, delivery of holiday cards, letters, and packages were announced Sept. 5. The dates are as follows: Shore APO/FPO/DPO AE zips 090-098 (except 093); AA zips 340; AP zips 962966 Express Mail: Dec. 17 First-Class Mail (letters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 10 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov 26 Parcel Post: Nov. 13 Shore APO/ FPO/DPO AE ZIP 093 Express mail Military Service: N/A First-Class Letters/Cards/Priority Mail: Dec. 3 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 1 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Parcel Post: Nov. 13 For mail addressed from all shore FPOs (except 093) Express Mail Military Service: Dec. 17 First-Class Mail (Letters/cards, pri ority mail): Dec. 10 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Express Mail Military Service (EMMS) is available from selected military post offices. If mailing to an APO/ FPO address, check with your local post office to determine if this service is available. Parcel Airlift Mail (PAL) is a service that provides air transportation for parcels on a space-available basis. It is available for Parcel Post items not exceeding 30 pounds in weight or 60 inches in length and girth combined. The applicable PAL fee must be paid in addition to the regular surface rate of postage for each addressed piece sent by PAL service. Space Available Mail (SAM) refers to parcels mailed to APO/FPO addresses at parcel post rates that are first trans ported domestically by surface and then to overseas destinations by air on a space available basis. The maximum weight and size limits are 15 pounds and 60 inches in length and girth combined. From overseas locations, items mailed at Parcel Post rates are sent to CONUS by air on a space available basis. The maximum weight and size limit are 70 pounds and 130 inches in length and girth combined. It is also recommended that cus tomers check with their local civilian or military post office for informa tion on size restrictions and possible need for customs declaration forms. Additionally, customers are advised that certain mail restrictions apply and some items can not be mailed. Examples are: switchblade knives, pornography, controlled substances, and explosive or incendiary devices. If in doubt as to what can or cannot be sent through the mail, contact your local civilian or military post office. As a final note, customers are cau tioned that packages must not be mailed in boxes that have markings related to any type of hazardous mate rial, such as bleach, alcohol, or cleaning fluids. Parcels found by the U.S. Postal Service with such markings or labels on the outside of the box will not be pro cessed. The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 Section, lower area in the north end zone. Sept. 16, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Houston Texans (Tickets on sale Sept. 4) Sept. 30, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Cincinnati Bengals (Tickets on sale Sept. 17) Oct. 7, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Chicago Bears (Tickets on sale Sept. 24) Nov. 4, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Detroit Lions (Tickets on sale Oct. 22) Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jags vs. Indianapolis Colts (Tickets on sale Oct. 29) Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to purchase/use these tick ets. Retirees and Veterans/DoD employ ees are eligible to purchase tickets for New York Giants and Atlanta Falcons games. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but under no circum stances are dependent children autho rized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may pur chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No exceptions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@ usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tick ets for the entire season. Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. 13-16 (5:30-10 p.m.) (TAP) Separation Workshop Oct. 15-19, Nov. 5-9, Dec. 3-7. (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Sept. 24-28, Oct. 22-26, Nov. 26-30, Dec. 17-21. a.m.-noon) Oct. 12, Nov. 14. Workshop (8-9:30 a.m.) Nov. 19. Workshop (9:40 a.m.-noon) Nov. 19. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Nov. 20-21. Training (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Sept. 17-21, Dec. 10-14. Workshop (8-11 a.m.) Oct. 3. Buying (9-10:30 a.m.) Nov. 13. Oct. 2, Dec. 4. 4 p.m.) Sept. 13, Nov. 11, Nov. 13. Sept. 12 (5-7 p.m.), Nov. 17 (10 a.m.noon). Oct. 15, Nov. 19, Dec. 10. (9-10 a.m.) Oct. 3, Nov. 7, Dec. 5. a.m.-noon) Sept. 18, Oct. 16, Nov. 20, Dec. 18. For more information or to register, call 542-5745. Keeping its tradition of community out reach alive, members of the National Naval Officers Association (NNOA) Jacksonville Chapter donated 140backpacks filled with required school supplies to Brentwood and St. Clair Evans Elementary Schools in early August. An increase in fundraisers and donations allowed NNOA to double its backpack donations from the previous school year. NNOA understands that returning to school after a long summer break is always followed by a long list of school supplies. Families and schools throughout our communitycan find themselves hard-pressed to ensure that each child has the school sup plies needed for a successful school year. The principals and staff at both schools were extremely happy to receive the back pack donations. Having proper school sup plies are critical to educational success. NNOA is a strong advocate of education and is committed to education outreach. NNOA donates backpacks to local schools Improve your life skills with free knowledge NAVSUP announces 2012 holiday season mailing datesJacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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Select NEXs are now selling a Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) benefit coupon to customers for $5 for those individuals who wish to voluntarily donate. When purchased, the benefit coupon will entitle customers to specific percent-off discounts for a one-time pur chase on either Oct. 15 or 16. All donations made through the sale of the benefit coupon will go to the CFC General Fund as an undesignated donation. The benefit coupon entitles customers to 10 percent off merchandise storewide includ ing the furniture store as well as the entire stock of fine jew elry. There are some exclu sions including gift cards and prepaid cards, e-commerce, Autoport services & Exchange Catalog. The discount may not be applied to merchandise previously purchased, exist ing layaways, special orders, tobacco, alcoholic beverages, electronics, cameras, comput ers, video games and systems, uniforms, gas, DvDs, CDs and concession departments, home delivery, Keep it New and Tempurpedic, Rolex and Omega watches, Maui Divers, Pandora and clearance jewel ry. Customers will receive 20 percent off all apparel, shoes, watches and sunglasses and 30 percent off already reduced furniture with prices ending in $.94, $.96 and $.97. The maxi mum discount a customer can receive is $250 per coupon. NEXs participating in this event are NEX Norfolk, Little Creek, Portsmouth and Oceana, Va.; NEX Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; NEX Fallon, Nev.; NEX San Diego, North Island, Port Hueneme, Lemoore, Monterey, Calif.; NEX Jacksonville, Pensacola, Mayport, Orlando, Whiting Field and Key West, Fla.; NEX Memphis, Tenn.; NEX Kings Bay, Ga.; NEX Mitchel Field, N.Y.; NEX Whidbey Island, Bremerton, Bangor and Everett, Wash.; NEX Great Lakes, Ill.; NEX Corpus Christi, Texas; NEX New Orleans, La.; NEX Gulfport and Meridian, Miss.; NEX New London, Conn.; NEX Patuxent River and Annapolis, Md.; NEX Charleston, SC; NEX Newport, R.I.; NEX Yokosuka, Sasebo and Atsugi, Japan; NEX Naples and Sigonella, Italy; NEX Rota, Spain, NEX Guam; and NEX Bahrain. LATINAStyle Magazine has named the Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) as one of the 50 best companies for providing the best career opportunities for Hispanic women. Of NEXCOMs nearly 14,000 associates worldwide, over 11 percent are Hispanic and seven percent are Hispanic women. In acknowledging the award, Robert Bianchi, NEXCOMs chief executive officer said, NEXCOM is committed to supporting the diversity policy of fostering an inclusive workforce, building an environment that respects the individual and offering opportunities for asso ciates to develop to their full potential. The LATINAStyle 50 Report acknowledges organizations that have a mission of diversi ty and inclusion that has been reflected in the way they recruit, promote, provide benefits, and create programs for the bet terment of their employees. Though the majority of the programs offered are available to all employees, the companies selected have shown an excep tional effort in their recruit ment and advancement of Latina professionals. This year, LATINAStyle Magazine also looked for corporations that have programs to recruit veter ans and military personnel. The title of a Top 50 employer for NEXCOM is an incred ible achievement, said Rear Adm. Mark Heinrich, com mander, Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP), the command which oversees NEXCOM Operations. My pride for the accomplishments of Rob Bianchi and the entire NEXCOM team is boundless. Its this investment in quality of work that builds a foundation for good business, engenders a sense of trust, and defines our culture. Well done! According to Gwen Marlow, NEXCOMs director of work force diversity, hiring tal ented individuals is criti cal to NEXCOMs success. In order to hire the most talented, NEXCOM uses several sources from which to recruit Hispanic women and other ethnic minorities. NEXCOMs best practices include recruiting at Hispanic serving educational institu tions; maximizing the Student Educational Employment Program and Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities internships; and participating in job fairs that are expected to attract a diverse audience. Hispanic women have a lot to offer our Navy, and we are proud of NEXCOMs efforts in ensur ing these talented women have an inclusive workplace to share that talent with our Navy, said Cmdr. Angela Katson, director of the Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion. It is through efforts like theirs that our Navy continues to make real, tangible progress in securing a diverse and imaginative talent pool both now and for our future. To support its diverse work force, NEXCOM encourages participation in career devel opment and tuition reimburse ment programs. NEXCOM senior leaders are also com mitted to providing associates substantive training and devel opmental opportunities as well as participation in a formal ized mentoring program, said Bianchi. NEXCOM will receive its award at the LATINAStyle 50 Awards and Leaders Diversity Conference in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 7.NEXCOM named in Top 50 best companies for LatinasSelect NEXs to sell Combined Federal Campaign benefit coupon JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 17

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If you are retiring or separating from active duty and need assistance with submitting your claim for disabil ity and compensation to the Veterans Administration (VA), you can start up to one year prior to retiring/separating with getting our medical information in order. AMVETS is the Veterans Service Organization advocate for separating or retiring service members and their families providing assistance with submission of claims to the VA for ben efits, disabilities and compensation. AMVETS is a national Veterans Service Organization authorized to submit claims to the VA and advocate for vet erans and their families with the VA nationwide. All assistance is free and you are not required to become a member of AMVETS to use their services. For more information and to make an appoint ment, call David Sanders at 542-2834 or email david.d.sanders@navy.mil VA disability assistance available 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skills Deweys Coming Soon! Ribbon cutting and grand opening celebration Oct. 4, 39 p.m. Free food sampling, DJ, live band Cloud Nine, games, prizes, childrens activities and much more!Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Fall Bowling Leagues now forming! Mixed league Monday 7 p.m. After-work league Wednesday 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thursday 9 a.m. Mixed league Thursday 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Friday 11:45 a.m. Friday night league 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Saturday 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym45-minute, high-intensity group trainingFamily Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Open Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. until Oct. 1. Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guestsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. The Price is Right Times Union Center Sept. 25, 7:30 p.m., $47 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Preferred seating $42, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day $29.50, 2 day $40 Disney World Orlando FL 4 day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Medieval Times Free royalty upgrade with dinner reservation Upcoming ITT Trips Yalaha Country Bakery Sept. 29 Mt. Dora Oct. 27 Lakeridge Winery Nov. 10The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Mall & Movie Trip Sept. 15 Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater Jaguars vs. Texans Game Sept. 16 at 11 a.m. Free admission and transportation The Price is Right Show Sept. 25 $10 per personNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Sept. 18 for active duty Sept. 20 for retirees & DoD personnel September is customer appreciation month Monday Friday play 18 holes for $18, includes cart and green fees. Not valid on holidays. Open to military, DoD and guests Twilight Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 2 p.m. every day! CFC Golf Tournament Oct. 25, 12:30 p.m. shotgun start $60 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove Marina Mulberry Cove Marina Riverfest Sept. 29, 11 a.m. 5 p.m. Free cookout, music, games & prizes, fishing clinics, Stand-up paddle board lessons and more!Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Register now for before & after school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household incomeFlying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Oct. 29 Dec. 10 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 19

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The Clay County Animal Care and Control Adoption Center needs volun teers (18 years and older) to help with animal adoptions at the center located at 1805-4 East West Parkway in Fleming Island, Fla. Volunteers will help with setting up cages, cleaning cages, walking dogs, feeding and watering, grooming and adoptions of dogs, puppies, cats and kittens Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m. Volunteers are needed to work several hours from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. All animals available for adoption have shots and are spayed or neutered. Animals that are three years or older, having special needs or have been at the adoption center longer than a year can be adopted out to a good home for free. For more information, contact Gail Arrowsmith at rogandgail4800@aol. com .Volunteers needed to help with adoption of animals For more information about any sports, contact Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.face book.com nasjaxmwr. 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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The F-35 integrated test force announced the completion of a major prerequisite test for inflight performance on the short take-off and vertical landing variant of the F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter Sept. 4 at Edwards AFB, Calif. BF-2 completed the first air starts, which test the ability of the F-35s propulsion system to restart during flight. Verifying the restart capability of the propulsion system is part of the initial flight test program for the F-35 and a prerequisite for high angle-of-attack testing, scheduled to start next year. High alpha, or angle-ofattack tests, are important for us to fully evaluate the air crafts handling characteristics and warfighting capability, said Marine Corps test pilot Lt. Col. Matthew Kelly. Maximizing the perfor mance of the airplane around the very slow edges of the flight envelope is probably some of the most challenging testing we will conduct. After we get through it, well know a lot more about how this aircraft will perform during combat within visual range. Using multiple restart meth ods during the tests, BF-2 suc cessfully completed a series of 27 air starts at various altitudes Aug. 15. To execute air start test ing, the F-35 Integrated Test Force (ITF) at Naval Air Station Patuxent River ferried BF-2 and an F/A-18 chase aircraft from Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 to the F-35A testing facility at Edwards AFB. At Edwards, we have a unique testing range, which provides ideal and controlled conditions for completing air start testing. The Edwards range is comprised of 20,000 square miles of airspace, and has 65 linear miles of use able landing area on Rogers and Rosamond Dry Lakes, if required during engine out testing, said Lt. Col. George N. Schwartz, commander of the 461st Flight Test Squadron and government site director. In addition, weve recent ly completed air start testing on the F-35A, so were able to share some of our expertise with the Pax team as well. The core of the F-35Bs pro pulsion system is the F135 engine, capable of more than 40,000 pounds of thrust. The F135 continues to power a successful flight test program, said Roy Hauck, Pratt & Whitney site lead at the F-35 Patuxent River ITF. The aircraft and its inte grated systems demonstrated intentional flameout and suc cessful recovery scenarios during air start flight tests, and BF-2 and the team did a great job. A team of approximately 60 ITF and VX-23 personnel pro vided engineering and main tenance requirements for the events. The detachment to Edwards from NAS Patuxent River overlapped with a busy summer flight testing sched ule. In the past two months, weve sent detachments to Edwards and Lakehurst [N.J.], and maintained a full-tempo test schedule here, said Navy Capt. Erik Etz, director of test for F-35 naval variants at NAS Patuxent River. The team of military, gov ernment and industry per sonnel rallied to make all the events happen, and they can be proud of their accomplish ments. The F-35B is the vari ant of the Joint Strike Fighter designed for use by U.S. Marine Corps, as well as F-35 interna tional partners in the United Kingdom and Italy. The F-35B is capable of short take-offs and vertical land ings to provide air power from amphibious ships, ski jump aircraft carriers and expedi tionary airfields. The F-35B is undergoing test and evaluation at NAS Patuxent River prior to delivery to the fleet. F-35B completes first airborne engine start tests A free 4-H Expo will be held Sept. 15 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. for children 5-18 and their families at the Jacksonville Fairgrounds. Nearly 30 clubs across Duval County offer a wide range of experiences on a variety of subjects ranging from aero space studies to zoology top ics. Clubs leaders and members from around the county will be available to answer questions about 4-H, and help kids find just the right club. There will be free games and activities, free parking, and free hot dogs. Each year Duval County 4-H serves approximately 8,500 local youth through school enrichment, traditional clubs, and summer camp programs. Students, clubs, leaders and volunteers utilize 4-H academic study materials and com plete hands-on projects in subjects such as: horticulture, animal sciences, technology, pub lic speaking, leadership, citi zenship, volunteerism, health, nutrition, home economics and much more. Many people still think of 4-H as a program just for farmers kids, who want to make some extra cash by raising livestock to show and sell at the fair, says Duval County 4-H agent Andy Toelle. Certainly, some kids still focus on livestock in 4-H, and have a great time doing it. But now, 4-H offers opportunities to learn about so much more. Here are some of the current topics available for explora tion in 4-H: bicycling, butter flies, cats, child development, communications, computers, electricity, entomology, entre preneurship, environmental studies, fishing, food, forestry, gardening, geospatial, health and fitness, Latino cultural arts, outdoor adventures, pets, photography, rabbits, finan cial literacy, science discovery, small engines, theatre arts, veterinary science, visual arts, wind energy, woodworking, workforce readiness and film making. 4-H is a national organiza tion that helps young people develop knowledge and skills to become productive mem bers of society. 4-H helps youth to meet the diverse challenges of todays world by building self-confi dence, learning responsibility and making positive decisions. In a safe environment, 4-H brings youth and adults together to learn everyday skills for living. To learn more, call (904) 2557450 or go to duval.ifas.ufl. edu/4-H.shtml or www.4-h.org.Free 4-H Expo comes to Jacksonville Fairgrounds Sept. 15 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 13, 2012 21