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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02009
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 09-06-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02009

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Response team to help assess need from Isaacs destruction Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast sent 15 military and civilians to Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport and Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base (NAS JRB) New Orleans Aug. 30 as part of a Contingency Engineering Response Team (CERT). The team headed out from NAS Jacksonville. These engineers will work directly for our Public Works Departments in Gulfport and New Orleans, said NAVFAC Southeast Operations Officer Capt. Mark Edelson. They will perform assess ments of facilities and assets at both locations to help get these bases back to normal opera tions as soon as possible. The Public Works Departments currently manages the facilities, water, power, and sanitation for the bases, said Edelson. They will be working hard to assist any efforts from agen cies in the area and will sup port them with whatever they need to get the job done. A mobile command post (MCP) will provide workspace, a variety of communication technology, and the ability to provide electronic submis sion of damage assessments from hand held devices that hold the installations facility inventory. The MCP allows the CERT to communicate direct ly with NAVFAC Southeast in Jacksonville from where ever they are located. Sending engineers around the world is not new to NAVFAC. We always have a trained CERT ready to go at a moments notice, said Don Maconi, NAVFAC Southeast contingen cy engineer. Maconi explained that the CERT has DATs which consist of structural, electrical, and mechanical engineers, archi tects, roofing specialists, com munity planners and construc tion contract specialists that deploy to begin rapid damage assessments. It is during this phase that debris is removed and basic functions are restored such as opening roadways, sanitation, water, electricity and commu nications. Typically, these teams are deployed to assess hurricane or other storm damage to mili tary installations, but also are deployed for humanitarian efforts such as a tsunami or the earthquake in Haiti in 2010. Remembrance, renewal and resilienceDefense Secretary Leon Panetta delivered the following remarks at the 9/11 Tenth Anniversary Summit at the Newseum in Washington, D.C., Sept. 8, 2011. We have overcome wars, weve over come disasters, weve overcome eco nomic depressions, the secretary said. Weve overcome crises of every kind because of the fundamental American spirit that never, never gives up. Sept. 11, Panetta added, reminds all of us that this country is always at its best when it responds to crisis, because it is truly in the inherent spirit of the American people to pull together, to fight for our values, to protect what is dear to all of us. The tragic timeline Tower At 8:46 a.m. American Airlines Flight 11 crashed with a speed of rough ly 490 mph into the north side of the north tower of the World Trade Center, between floors 94 and 98. Tower At 9:02 a.m. United Airlines Flight 175 crashed with a speed of about 590 mph into the south side of the south tower, banked between floors 78 and 84. Killed: 2753. At 9:37 a.m. American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the western side of the Pentagon. All 59 passengers were killed, as were 125 Pentagon personnel. Killed: 184. At 10:03 a.m. United Airlines Flight 93 crashed in a field southeast of Pittsburgh in Somerset County, Pa. Killed: 40. NAS Jacksonville/Naval Hospital Jacksonville 9/11 remembrance event: 7 a.m. 5K run; 8 a.m. Colors and Ceremony. Both events take place at Naval Hospital flagpole near the Child Street/Pharmacy entrance. No registra tion needed for 5K. PT gear authorized for Colors. CERT deploys to Gulfport, New Orleans Commemorating 9/11 Road closure Sept. 10Just three months after unveiling the Navys MQ-4C Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) at Northrop Grummans Palmdale, Calif. manufactur ing plant, construction will begin for the BAMS Training Facility at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. The construction site will also house a new P-8A Maintenance Training Facility. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Project Manager Amy Hoffer said that Elkins Constructors Inc. of Jacksonville was awarded the $15,057,000 fixed-price con tract. Construction is slat ed to begin Sept. 10, with an estimated completion date of December 2013. NAS Jacksonville Deputy Public Works Director Dan Schickler said the two con struction projects are located on a common site to the west of the new P-8A Integrated Training Center on Yorktown Ave., which opened in spring of 2012. Parking and storm water areas will be located to the south of the new buildings and adjacent to the Fleet and Family Support Center. Officially called Triton, the MQ-4C BAMS UAS project con sists of an 8,938-sq.-ft. training facility to teach operators of the new MQ-4C Triton platform. The single-story, concrete tiltup panel/structural steel facil ity will include classrooms, mission control rooms and briefing rooms, along with sup port spaces for administrators and instructors. The P-8A Maintenance Training Facility project con sists of a 58,262sq.-ft. opera tional and maintenance train ing facility to support P-8A Poseidon. The two-story, concrete tiltup panel/structural steel facil ity will house spaces to support the following training devic es: Operational Load Trainer (OLT); Integrated Avionics Trainer (IAT); Maintenance Training for Fuel System, Flight Control/Hydraulics, Landing Gear, Engine, and Construction to begin two new training facilities

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Sept. 6 1918 Sailors fire first of the five railroad batteries at Tergnier, a German railhead in the Comeigne Forest. These 14-50 caliber guns were origi nally designed for battleships. 1939 Navy begins formation of Neutrality Patrol for Atlantic Ocean. 1940 First destroyers transferred to Great Britain at Halifax, Nova Scotia, under Destroyers-for-Bases agree ment. 1944 USS Independence (CVL-22) begins use of special ly trained air group for night work. First time that a fully equipped night carrier oper ates with fast carrier task force. 1945 U.S. troops begin returning to U.S. when Task Force 11 left Tokyo Bay for U.S. 1953 Exchange of prison ers of war from Korean War (Operations Big Switch) ends. Sept. 7 1775 The British supply ship, Unity, was the first prize captured by the Continental schooner, Hannah. 1776 David Bushnell attempts to destroy a British Ship of the Line, HMS Asia, in New York harbor with his sub marine Turtle. 1942 First air evacuation of casualties to hospital ships off shore occurs at Guadalcanal. Sept. 8 1923 In disaster at Point Honda, Calif., seven destroy ers run aground through faulty navigation. 1939 President Franklin Roosevelt proclaims lim ited national emergency and increases enlisted strength in the Navy and Marine Corps; also authorizes the recall to active duty of officer, men and nurses on the retired lists of the Navy and Marine Corps. 1954 U.S. signs Manila Treaty forming SEATO. 1958 Lt. R. H. Tabor, wear ing a Navy developed pressure suit, completes 72-hour simu lated flight at altitudes as high a 139,000 feet. It was another step in the development of the Navy spacesuit, which NASA accepted in 1959 for use by Mercury astronauts. Sept. 9 1825 USS Brandywine sails for France to carry the Marquis de Lafayette home after his year long visit to America. 1841 First iron ship autho rized by Congress. 1940 Navy awards contracts for 210 ships, including 12 car riers and 7 battleships. 1943 Operation Avalanche, Western Naval Task Force under Vice Adm. Hewitt lands Allied forces at Salerno, Italy. 1944 Fifth Fleet carrier air craft begin air strikes on Japanese shipping and facilities at Mindanao, Philippines. 1945 A computer bug is first identified and named by Lt. Grace Murray Hopper while she was on Navy active duty in 1945. It was found in the Mark II Aiken Relay Calculator at Harvard University. The operators affixed the moth to the computer log, where it still resides, with the entry: First actual case of bug being found. They debugged the computer, first introducing the term. Sept.10 1813 In Battle of Lake Erie, Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry, flying his Dont give up the ship flag, defeats British squadron and says: We have met the enemy and they are ours. 1925 Submarine R-4 res cues crew of PN-9, 10 miles from their destination of Hawaii (See also Sept.1) Sept. 11 1814 In Battle of Lake Champlain, Commodore Thomas MacDonough defeats a British Squadron. 1939 Bear (AG-29) is com missioned by the U.S. Navy for Antarctic operations under command of Rear Adm. Richard Byrd. 1941 President Franklin Roosevelt announces order to the Navy to shoot on sight vessels threatening U.S. ship ping or ships under U.S. escort. 1942 Pharmacists Mate First Class Wheeler Lipes per forms emergency appendec tomy on Seaman First Class Darrell Rector on board USS Seadragon on patrol in South China Sea. 1943 Italian Navy surren ders to Allies. 1945 Operation Magic Carpet, the return of troops to the U.S., begins. 2001 American Flight 77 hijacked by terrorists struck the Pentagon. Casualties include 33 sailors, six Department of the Navy civilians, and three Navy civilian contractors reported missing, at Arlington, Va. Two commercial airliners also struck the World Trade Center in New York City destroying both towers. 2002 The Dont Tread on Me first Navy Jack is flown by Navy ships marking the first anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the Pentagon and World Trade Center. Sept. 12 1916 First demonstration of automatic stabilization and direction gear in aircraft. 1944 Fifth Fleet carrier air craft begin three-day attack on Japanese shipping and facili ties in Visayas, Philippines. 1952 USS Coral Sea (CVB43) took Marshall Josip Tito for a one-day cruise in the Adriatic Sea where he was shown flight operations. 1961 Navy task force sails to aid the Galveston area after hurricane Carla hits Texas. 1966 Launch of Gemini 11, piloted by Cmdr. Charles Conrad Jr. and Lt. Cmdr. Richard Gordon Jr. Their mis sion lasted two days and 23 hours and included 44 orbits at an altitude of 1368.9 km. Recovery was by HS-3 helicop ter from USS Guam (LPH-9). 1967Operation Coronado V began in Mekong Delta. 1992 Joint Task Force Hawaii activated to pro vide humanitarian aid after Typhoon Iniki struck Hawaiian Islands Last year, a robin made her nest on a beam directly outside our kitchen win dow. It was a wonderful surprise for us the miracle of life happening with in view of our dinner table. But still, I couldnt help but marvel at the mothers bravery. Had she not seen the way my three boys behave outside? How they hit baseballs into the shrubbery and some times at the windows? During the few weeks the robin shared our back window, I felt a pecu liar connection with her. When she looked at me with her black, beady little bird eyes, I knew she was staring right into my soul, and, of course, judging me. What else do fellow mothers do? The mother bird flew back and forth, busily bringing fresh worms to her chil dren while I banged my head on the refrigerator door and wondered why my family had to eat dinner . again. The mother robin kept her nest tidy. I knew this because I had seen her receive and carry away her babies excrement. My kitchen had muddy floors and dishes piled several meals thick in the sink. Every morning, the first thing I did when I came downstairs was check on the mother and her family. Shed stare at me and then sit on her younglings sparsely feathered heads. I grew to love her, and when the babies finally flew away, I shared the mothers excitement and sadness. I missed the birds when the mother and her partner left the nest. Must have moved to The Villages, I thought. Then, a few weeks later, they built a new home on the same beam. This mother robin was just showing off now! Completely raising two broods in one summer? I mean, who has the energy for that? I watched a second set of fledgling birds get their wings and leave the nest. Fall came. Snow fell on the beam where the nest once sat. And by this June, the only thing to look at outside the kitchen window was the dripping water from the air conditioner. Then, one day in July, a new nest appeared. The mother was back! And I had terrible news for her: since last summer, we had gotten a dog. A bird dog. Sparky is a handsome liver and white hunter who loves nothing more than to chase ducks at the lake. He will swim for miles and never tire, so that I have to go in my kayak and fetch him. Over and over again, Sparky tries to get a duck, and he always fails. The ducks taunt him and lead him in circles, then they fly away, and Sparky and I are left in the middle of the lake. If Sparky could talk, I know hed espe cially curse when he goes after loons, massive fowl with red eyes and a haunt ing call. Sparky jumps in after them, and they calmly wait until he is a few feet away. Then they do their great dis appearing act, the most confounding of them all for Sparky: the loons go under water and dont come back up until they are many yards away. So you can imagine Sparkys per ceived good fortune when one day he found a nest of captive, chirping birds directly above our back porch. He whimpered and danced on his back feet, eager to catch a glimpse of the mother and her babies. The mother would peer down at him, and if I was a betting person, my money was on her. She glared at Sparky with the same soul-searing eyes with which she had glared at me. (And boy did she glare at me now that I was raising a bird dog!) I knew she would not think twice about dive-bombing our dog if he got legitimately close. The baby birds would soon fledge. I knew because they were making more noise, fighting for space in the nest, and requiring the mother to bring worms every half hour. I looked out the win dow often, hoping to see one of the babies fly. Last week, I was cooking dinner for a Dinner with the Smileys guests (Hint: he has the MLB career record for most pinch-hit home runs), when I heard frantic chirping outside. My heart raced because I knew: Sparky had gotten one of the baby birds. I ran outside and Sparky came to me, offering the catch like a good hunting dog should. The baby was still alive and not hurt, but she was playing dead. The mother bird flitted back and forth between the trees in our backyard, and she was making an awful, heartwrenching cry. Her baby was not safe; my dog and I were to blame. I shooed Sparky inside and shut the door. He looked at me through the glass like, Umm, I thought we were going to eat that? The baby bird flopped around on the porch, her wings beating errati cally, as if they were on springs. The mother bird continued to cry and swoop. I called out to her: Im going to help you. Then I picked up the quiver ing bird and set him on the other side of our fence. I went inside so the mother could tend to her baby. Within 20 min utes, they both were gone. The nest was empty. At dusk, I can still hear the mothers calls, tending to her babies in neighbor ing bushes. I know what shes saying to me: you traitor! I doubt she will nest on our porch again, and I am sad. But, well, Im especially sad for the ducks: yesterday, the chase was just a game. Today, Sparky has had the taste of . feathers.More Smiley wildlife fun: Sparky gets the (wrong) bird

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National Suicide Prevention Week is Sept. 9-15. Suicide is a com plex, atypical behavioral response to stress. Risk factors include depression; mental, per sonality or substance abuse disorders; per sonal or family history of suicide; family violence; incarceration; or expo sure to influences that normalize suicide. Risk is also associated with changes in brain chemi cals. Warning signs include thoughts or comments about suicide, substance abuse problems, purposelessness, anxi ety, feeling trapped or hopeless, withdrawal, anger, recklessness and mood changes. Some facts to consider are that suicidal behavior is not specific to gender, race or age; but there are differences, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Women attempt suicide two to three times more often than men, but men fatal ly wound themselves at four times the rate that women do. This is related to meth odwomen more often use poison, while men more often use firearms. There is a peak of suicide incidence among teens and young adults, age 15 to 24, as well as in adults over age 85. In terms of ethnicity, suicide is twice as likely among non-Hispanic whites and American Indians as among Hispanics, AfricanAmericans and Asian Americans. Effective medical treat ments are available for depression and other health problems that are risk factors for suicide. So for those struggling, see a doctor to find out what the options are. Community resources are available for someone who might be thinking about suicide. Active duty, veterans and family and friends can contact the Veterans Crisis Line at 800-273TALK (8255), which offers a hotline, online chat and text. Help is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. For someone in imme diate danger, go to the closest emergency room or call 911. Remain with a suicidal person dont leave them alone until theyve reached help. Silence kills. Speak out and save a life. U.S. Fleet Forces announces new fleet master chiefU.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) announced the selection of the commands new fleet mas ter chief, the senior enlisted leader for the Navys Atlantic Fleet, Aug. 27. CMDCM Chuck Clarke, who is currently serving in the top enlisted job at U.S. 5th Fleet in Bahrain, will take over for Fleet Master Chief Mike Stevens, who is slated to become the 13th master chief petty officer of the Navy at the end of September. Master Chief Chuck Clarke is a tremendous lead er with a wealth of experience in a variety of assign ments, said Stevens. He has our Navys and our Sailors best inter ests in mind and can provide the commander with a unique perspective that will only help to increase mission readiness throughout the fleet. In his new assignment, Clarke will become the commands senior enlisted advisor for more than 100,000 active duty and Reserve personnel who serve on more than 120 ships and submarines and nearly 80 shore activities within the U.S. Fleet Forces Command area of responsibility. Clarke, who was born in Georgetown, Guyana (South America), enlisted in the Navy in 1987. His previous assignments include USS Dubuque (LPD 8), USS Mount Vernon (LSD 39), USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 40, Recruit Training Command and Personnel Support Detachment Point Loma in San Diego, Calif., Naval Support Activity, La Maddalena, Italy; and Helicopter Tactical Wing Atlantic Fleet, Norfolk, Va. Prior to U.S. 5th Fleet, he served as the command master chief aboard the carriers USS Kitty Hawk (CVN 63) and USS Nimitz (CVN 68). Clark is a graduate of the Navys Senior Enlisted Academy, the Command Master Chief/Chief of the Boat Course and the National Defense University Keystone Course. He holds an associate degree from National University, a bachelors degree from Excelsior College, and a masters in human rela tions from the University of Oklahoma. Suicide Prevention Week raises awareness JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012 Navy and Marine Corps members of the military aviation community know all too well that knowledge and execu tion of emergency procedures can mean the difference between life and death. NAS Jacksonvilles Aviation Survival Training Center (ASTC) is one of eight ASTCs around the country that are tasked to provide safe and effective sur vival training for aviators and aircrew. Training includes classroom lectures and simulator devices in a curriculum that emphasizes hands-on exposure to survival skills. New aviators and aircrew undergo their initial survival training at NAS Pensacola, after which they are required to attend an ASTC refresher course every four years. ASTC Jacksonville provides a modern facility and advanced training equip ment to keep aircrews certified in their survival skills. The detachments three training departments include: Aviation Physiology; Aviation Water Survival; and Bay Operations and Parachute Training. Training scenarios take place in a large swimming pool with an aircraft egress trainer for teaching basic water survival; in a low-pressure chamber that simulates the effects of high altitude; in an ejection seat and virtual reality parachute trainer; and in a parachute landing fall area where aircrews prac tice avoiding injury during a parachute landing. Water survival is an important com ponent of the refresher course, and ASTC Jax strives to provide the most realistic, yet safe, training possible. One of the things we simulate in the pool is a rescue situation in a nighttime storm, said Lt. Matt Shipman, aero space operations physiologist for ASTC Jax. Students are subjected to simulated rain, fog, waves, thunder and lightning in a pitch black environment. Their goal is to make it to a life raft and wait for rescue, utilizing the skills we reviewed for them in the classroom portion of this training. Also in the pool is the 9D6 underwater egress trainer commonly known as the dunker that simulates an air craft ditching into a body of water and sinking upside-down. It allows aircrew to practice escaping from a submerged fuselage. Seats, windows and hatches are configured to actual aircraft, such as the H-60 Seahawk helicopter. In addition, aircrews transitioning from the P-3 Orion to the P-8 Poseidon will find their specific refresher course changing in the near future. The P-8 is not equipped with para chutes, Shipman stated. The curricu lum for aircrews is currently being mod ified to reflect that. Until these updates are incorporated, we will treat all P-8 aircrews as though they were training for the survival in the P-3. According to Leading Petty Officer HM1 Edison Vargas, an instructor with Aircrew conquer survival refresher training at ASTC Jax

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012 5 ASTC Jax, the facility provides instruction to all branches of the U.S. military while also accommo dating civilian police forces, mem bers of NOAA, NASA and allied for eign services. We conduct two classes a week in two-day block periods, with average class sizes from 12-18 stu dents, commented Vargas. He stated during fiscal years 2010 and 2011, roughly 2,400 students had taken the refresher course. Even those students who struggle with portions of the survival train ing have the chance to remediate. The more training we can pro vide to aircrews, the better. Even if its a situation where we have to remediate a student, it only means more training for them, said Shipman. Our facility is very accommo dating. If a student is reaching their four-year mark and feel like they may struggle, especially with the swimming portion, they are more than welcome to give us a call to get extra training prior to the refresher course. ASTC Jacksonville is a detach ment of Navy Medicine Operational Training Center at NAS Pensacola, which serves as the training agent for aviation survival training and the subject matter experts on all military operational medicine, and the Navy Medicine Education and Training Command (NMETC) in San Antonio and NMETC Detachment Jacksonville aboard NAS Jacksonville. For more information on survival training or class schedules, contact ASTC Jax at 542-2595. ASTC Photos by Lt. j.g. Kevin Wendt

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While on detachment to Soto Cano Air Base in Honduras Aug. 20, Combat Air Crew (CAC) 8 of the VP-8 Fighting Tigers teamed up with the Armys 1-228th Winged Warriors to share their aviation experiences. CAC 8 was given the opportunity to experience a ride in the Army UH-60L Blackhawk helicopter and in return the Winged Warriors were given a tour of the P-3C Orion. Army helicopter pilots CWO2 Bonilla and CWO2 Edds took the crew on a low-level training flight across the mountains of Soto Cano. The flight consisted of a 40-minute roundtrip out to their working area where they practiced simple maneu vers and showed the Fighting Tigers breathtaking scenery. Wow, that was awesome! is all AWO1 Jared Larsen could muster after the flight. Such a great experience, I want to thank the Winged Warriors for allowing us to go on such a once in a lifetime ride In return, the Fighting Tigers took the Winged Warriors on a tour of their P-3C Orion. What an impressive aircraft said Bonilla. The coordination and skill that must go into execut ing a successful mission in the P-3C is more than impressive. I want to thank (Detachment OIC) Lt. Michael Hartline and all of VP-8 for affording us such a great experience. The 1-228th Winged Warriors are stationed at Soto Cano Air Base, Honduras. Their mission is primarily to conduct humanitarian assistance and disaster relief throughout Central America. They also conduct counterdrug operations, aero-medical evacu ation, limited search and rescue, and air movement of people, equipment and supplies. With similar missions to protect the country, and a passion for avia tion, both crews were excited to share their experiences of their missions to encourage each other in their ultimate mission; defending the country and the people they love Each crew agreed that there are many things the crews have in com mon. Each is blessed to have an excit ing job that makes such a difference in the lives of all Americans. Sergeant Estrada was asked what his favor ite part of flying the Blackhawk was. He replied without hesitation, The Blackhawk is a very maneuverable helicopter. It gives you the freedom to do whatever you need it to, when you want it to! VP-8 is currently on a six-month deployment to 4th Fleet. Their mission is providing humanitarian effort and assisting in the counter-drug effort. For more information, visit the official Patrol Squadron-8 Facebook page. VP-8 Sailors experience aviation from UH-60L Blackhawk perspective The indoor pool, located in the base gym, is closed until further notice due to the deterioration of the roof. Until the structural integrity of the roof is deter mined, the outdoor pool will be made available. The outdoor pool will be open during the week for lap swim as well as week ends until the water temperature drops below 70 degrees Fahrenheit. Unfortunately, fall swim lessons will be delayed until the indoor pool is repaired. Private individual lessons, however, are still available during hours of operation. The hours are as follows: MondayFriday from 5:30-8 a.m. (Adult lap swim); 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. (Adult lap swim); 4:30-8 p.m. (Open recreation swim) Starting Oct. 1, weekend hours will be: Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. For more information, call 542-3239. The annual Ombudsman Appreciation Luncheon will be held Sept. 19 at 11:30 a.m. at the NAS Jax Officers Club. Tickets are $10 per person and are available at the Fleet and Family Support Center (Bldg. 554 Child Street) from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Ticket sales end at 3 p.m. on Sept. 13. For more information, call 542-5745.Tickets available for Ombudsman Appreciation LuncheonIndoor pool closed until further notice WITH A STROKE, TIME LOST IS BRAIN LOST.Learn the warning signs atStrokeAssociation.orgor1-888-4-STROKE. American Heart Association Made possible in part by a generous grant from The Bugher Foundation. 211115A01NOTE TO PUB:DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW,FOR ID ONLY.NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAs.American Stroke Association Newspaper (3 3/4 x 3 1/2) B&W ASNYR2-N-01065-I Brain Lost85 line screendigital files at Schawk:(212) 689-8585 Ref#:211115 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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Chief selectees conquer challenges at Camp BlandingDuring the early morn ing hours of Aug. 26, the NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport chief petty officer (CPO) select ees participated in a unique and invaluable training session at Camp Blanding Aug. 24. The CPO selectees spent the day learning the concept of teambuilding as they faced numerous physical and men tal challenges on the Camp Blanding Joint Training Center obstacle course. This entailed crawling under live wires to rescue simulated injured war riors, climbing across cargo netting, scaling walls and swinging from ropes across obstacles. It was pretty hot and I had some apprehension but there was a lot of encouragement from my team members and I was proud of what we accom plished out there. It was a good training evolution and learn ing experience, said CSC(SW) (select) Patrick Faucette of Naval Hospital Jacksonville. Another highlight of the day was the rappelling tower where CPO selectees learned to trust their mentors and com bat fears of jumping off the side of a building as genuine CPOs guided them down the ropes. Im scared of heights and it was really difficult for me to climb the rappelling tower and go down the ropes. But every 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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CNRSE honors Senior, Junior Civilians of the Quarter Mike Hoff and Calvin Dixon were honored as Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Civilian of the Second Quarter 2012, respectively, during a ceremony on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville Aug. 27. Hoff is a labor relations specialist in the CNRSE total force management department. Throughout the past quarter, he stepped in to provide labor relations services to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay following the departure of a fellow labor relations special ist. His efforts resulted in the timely resolution of numerous labor relations cases. Mr. Hoff is a hardworking, conscientious employee who treats everyone fairly and with respect, said Jeff Carpenter, Hoffs super visor. He focuses on custom er service and is always willing to assist co-work ers, and hes a team play er who regularly volun teers for projects while continuing to provide outstanding service to our customers. Mr. Hoff is a valued asset to our team. Hoff said it was an honor to accept the award and it is something he doesnt take lightly. I must say this award was very unexpected and a tremendous sur prise. I am honored and humbled to be presented with this award given the many outstanding employees who were eligible to receive it, he said. I believe there are three reasons for my selection. One, I am very fortunate to work in a position where I can interact with personnel throughout the region. Two, I have taken that responsibility very seri ously and have strived to provide the best possible customer service that I can day in and day out. The third, and probably most important reason, is that I have an incredibly dedicated group of indi viduals supporting me and contributing greatly to my successes. Without them, none of this would have been possible. As a financial man agement analyst, Dixon works in the CNRSE comptroller depart ment, where he has been instrumental in the con version to the Enhanced Management Analyst Reporting System. He also oversees the depart ments intern program and volunteers as a member of the CNRSE Combined Federal Campaign. Many personnel in N8 do one thing many times and they do it well, but Mr. Dixon does many things well, said Mamie Parker, Dixons immedi ate supervisor. Hes the type of employee who needs little to no super vision because he takes guidance well, under stands the intent of the mission and makes it happen. Mr. Dixon is a professional, a great teammate and an excep tional asset to CNRSE and the Navy. According to Dixon, a number of different fac tors contributed to his selection for the award. I think some impor tant things were provid ing good customer ser vice, always believing I can find a solution to any problem, the ability to work on a team and the fact that Im always try ing to learn something new. Individual selection criteria for the awards was based upon exem plary performance of tasks, contributions that enhanced organization accomplishment of com mand objectives, mis sion, teamwork or public image, and ones profes sional attitude toward self and others. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012 9

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Environmental Control Systems. Other areas include shops for maintenance of training devices, electronic classrooms, plus, computer and administrative sup port. Due to construction activity for the new training facilities, the NAS Jax Public Works Department will close Saratoga Avenue to pedestrian and vehicle traffic from Keily to Child streets beginning Sept. 10. Drivers and pedestrians may detour via Yorktown, Enterprise or Birmingham avenues. BAMS Williams named Women of Color Technology All-Star Award winner CSCM Paulette Williams of the NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville, Navy Food Management Team was named the Women of Color (WOC) 2012 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Technology All-Star Award winner on July 26. Technology All-Stars are accomplished women of color with approximately 22 or more years in the workforce and who have demonstrated excellence in the workplace and in their communities. Williams is the senior instruc tor at Navy Food Management Team Mayport. She leads the training and development efforts for all of the Navy culinary specialists in the Southeastern Region, including afloat galleys on board 14 U.S. Navy ships and 21 shoreduty galleys, including Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. Williams education al and leadership efforts focus on the areas of food production, sanitation, food safety, training, technical manage ment, and administration. Additionally, Williams holds a Masters in Health Science from Trident University and is an avid volunteer involved with com munity events in Jacksonville. I am extremely honored and excit ed to be a recipient of the Women of Color STEM Technology All-Star Award. I couldnt have imagined that I would ever have the opportunity to receive this very prestigious award, said Williams, a 24-year veteran of the Navy. I am extremely thankful and grate ful to my chain of command for their complete support and nomination for this award. This is definitely one of the highest honors of my Navy career, she added. Williams will attend the Corporate Communications Group (CCG)sponsored WOC STEM Conference on Oct. 11-13 in Dallas where she will be presented with the Technology All-Star Award, along with award winners in various other STEM award categories. Williams is the only active duty Navy recipient in the All-Star category. CCG promotes significant minor ity achievement in STEM through such events as the WOC awards, the Black Engineer of the Year Awards (BEYA), and the Minorities in Research Science Awards. The Navy has maintained a relationship with CCG for the last 20 years. I applaud Master Chief Williams achievement and am extremely proud that she will represent this command and the Navy as a whole at the confer ence, said NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Head. She is a stand-out professional in her field, as evidenced by this award. We are fortu nate to have her here as part of our Navy Food Management Team at NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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Thanks to the Shipmates to Workmates program designed to help sepa rating Sailors find jobs, a Navy petty officer with 15 years of military service began his civilian career Aug. 6 aboard Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) at NAS Jacksonville. AD1 Terrence Roach landed a fed eral job as a materials engineer techni cian supporting the commands Navy Oil Analysis Program (NOAP), a posi tion he held for three years at FRCSE Detachment Mayport, prior to separat ing from active duty in July. The opportunity that they gave me is great, said Roach of the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) Shipmates to Workmates program. It has allowed me to stay in the area with my family, and I have a career working in aviation similar to what I did before. Because FRCSE operates aircraft and aeronautical-related equipment, the facility is required to participate in the NOAP. Roach is responsible for moni toring and diagnosing the condition of equipment or oil without the removal or extensive disassembly of the equipment using approved sampling techniques. His efforts support local squadrons and FRCSE operations. Roach was born in Guyana, South America. At the age of 10, he immi grated to the United States with his family in 1987. They settled in a poor neighborhood of Brooklyn, N.Y. where illegal drug use was rampant and driveby shootings a common occurrence. For a better life, he enlisted in the Navy in May 1997 and became a U.S. citizen while serving on active duty in Jacksonville. He credits his Navy experience for providing the specialized skills needed for the laboratory job. He served as the leading petty officer in a NOAP labora tory and prior to that on an Emergency Reclamation Team for two years when assigned with the Topcats of Sea Control Squadron (VS) 31 until its dises tablishment in 2008 at NAS Jacksonville. With four sea tours under his belt, two back-to-back on the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), Roach was track ing for advancement to chief when an Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) deci sion to reduce force strength in 2011 ended his Navy career. I knew about the ERB before November 2011 when we got our results, he said. I knew in April that they were going over records, everyone between 8 and 15 years of service. Roach learned his fate when the Phase II ERB reviewed the records of E-6 through E-8 Sailors from 31 over manned ratings. He said the ERB invol untarily separated about 2,900 Sailors. Facing unemployment, with a wife and two children to support and no immediate job prospects he was open to any transition assistance the Navy was offering. When a NAVAIR Shipmates to Workmates program rep resentative contacted him offering to provide employment assistance, he said, yes. They called me and said they saw my resume and wanted me to apply for jobs, said Roach. They shot me a list of about 10 federal and civilian jobs every day, a lot of them not in Florida. I didnt think I was going to get the FRCSE job, but I did. FRCSE Supervisory Chemist Gary Whitfield said he knew the laboratory was losing a chemist (a military spouse) and he urgently needed to fill the posi tion. Given Terrences experience and background, he is a drop-in fit for the position, said Whitfield. It is also a good opportunity to support our military folks. He has already done a lot to get us prepared for an Aviation Maintenance Inspection conducted for quality control. When people ask how he got the job, Roach gladly provides details about the Shipmates to Workmates program jointly managed by NAVAIR, along with several partnering commands and the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. He encourages his separating ship mates to pursue every opportunity, net work, utilize human resource special ists and be open to relocating. Tania Dawson, the NAVAIR recruiting and retention program manager, said the Shipmates to Workmates program is another means of getting diverse skill sets into NAVAIR. She said 41 Sailors who worked for the command at mul tiple sites were impacted by the ERB decision. It makes good business sense; they are our own, said Dawson. For more information on the Shipmates to Workmates program, visit: http://www.navair.navy.mil/jobs/ sm2wm/. Shipmates to Workmates program pays off for FRCSE Sailor JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012 11

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one was cheering me on and they wouldnt let me quit. If they hadnt been there, I would have gone back down the stairs. I overcame my fears it took me four times to rappel down, but I did it, stated LNC(SW/AW) Lucia Abreu of Region Legal Service Office Southeast. Along with the physical demands, the CPO select ees were challenged to complete several logistic and comprehensive scenarios designed to relate to the real-world challenges they would soon be fac ing as Navy chiefs. These exercises were designed to teach them to work together as a team, plan their strategies and lead by example. Overall, the training was pretty good. It taught us to communicate with one another during the leadership reaction course which tasked teams to come up with one solution to a problem. It was great that everyone encouraged one another to complete the tasks which enabled us to stick together and finish as a team, said ACC(AW/SW) (select) Lee Carson of NAS Jacksonville. With numerous genuine chiefs to cheer them on guide them through the process, the training ses sion, although extremely tiring, gave the selectees a better understanding of their leadership skills and the importance of working together as a team. BLANDING Carol Hall is NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonvilles Office of Small Business Programs Acquisition Advocate for the Third Quarter of Fiscal Year 2012. During the quarter, Hall awarded more than one million dollars to small business concerns help ing NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville achieve the mandatory Department of Defense/Navy Small Business contracting goals. Hall was recruited for the Federal Contracting Intern Program in August 2010. She is currently a contract spe cialist in the Inter-Service Supply Support Operations (ISSOP) Division and has received her Level II certifica tion in the Acquisition Career Field of Contracting. Hall pro vides contractual support for Commander, Naval Reserve Forces Command (CNRFC), NAVSUP FLCs San Diego and Pearl Harbor, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Naval Hospital Beaufort Branch Health Clinic Parris Island, and Naval Support Activity Panama City. As a buyer for less than two years, Hall has become an acclaimed contracting official at NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville. She is commonly singled out by con tractors desiring to do business with NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville requesting her by name. Hall has also been recognized by the North Florida Small Business Administration (SBA) Regional Office and the SBA procure ment center representative for her commitment to small busi ness concerns. She consistently makes every effort to encour age small business participa tion when performing market research to include award of several 8(a) sole source acqui sitions (direct small business awards) as authorized by the Assistant Secretary of the Navy. Hall is a former student recruiter for the Department of Defense Civilian Personnel Management Service (CPMS). She also previously worked at Dell Headquarters in Austin, Texas and Nissan Headquarters in Franklin, Tenn. She holds two Bachelor of Science degrees from Tennessee State University, one in economics and finance while holding another in busi ness administration with a con centration in marketing. Hall sees beyond customary practices and considers all pos sibilities when achieving the final product. Halls commit ment to awarding contracts to small business concerns is evi dent in her daily performance and in the attention to details. Hall has proven to be a dedi cated member of the NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville contracting team and is most deserving of being named NAVSUP FLC Jacksonvilles Office of Small Business Programs Acquisition Advocate for the Third Quarter of Fiscal Year 2012. ISSOP contract specialist named 3rd quarter small business advocate For more information about any sports, contact Bill Bonser at 5422930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR website at www.cnic. navy.mil or www.facebook.com nas jaxmwr Site captains will register volunteers and provide bags and gloves at the cleanup locations. Pre-registration is not required. Participants must be over 18 or accompanied by an adult. Service-hour certificates available for students.Free T-shirts for cleanup volun teers at Riverside Arts Market from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. (while supplies last). Site Locations Safety tips Wear sturdy, closed toe, footwear and gloves. Wear sun protection and bring water. Be alert for slip pery wet surfaces. Do not climb on rocks or get into water. Avoid over exertion and drink plenty of fluids. Wear safety vests or bright colors along roadsides. Do not handle or remove hazardous items or sub stances. This regional effort is part of the 27th annual International Coastal Cleanup coordinated by the Ocean Conservancy and supported local ly by Keep Jacksonville Beautiful. For information call 6303420/2489 or visit www.coj.net/ KJB .Local volunteers needed for Sept. 15 Florida Coastal Cleanup 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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The Zone Entertainment Com plexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m.Freedom Lanes Call 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included. Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling. Shoe rental included Fall Bowling Leagues now forming. Mixed league Mon. 7 p.m. After-work league Wed. 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thurs. 9 a.m. Mixed league Thurs. 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Friday 11:45 a.m. Friday night league 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Saturday 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 5423518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Open Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. until Oct. 1. Free for military and DOD civilians, $3 for guestsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. The Price is Right Times Union Center Sept. 25, 7:30 p.m., $47 Sesame Street Live Times Union Center Sept. 29, 2:30 p.m., $18 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23, 2013 Preferred seating $42, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day $29.50, 2 day $40 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Mall & Movie Trip Sept. 15 Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater Jaguars vs. Texans Game Sept. 16 at 11 a.m. Free admission and transpor tation The Price is Right Show Sept. 25 $10 per personNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Sept. 4 & 18 for active duty Sept. 6 & 20 for retirees & DoD personnel September is customer appreciation month Monday Friday play 18 holes for $18, includes cart and green fees. Not valid on holidays. Open to military, DOoD and guestsAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recre ation are available. Family Fitness Center hours are Mon. Fri., 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you. Register now for before & after school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household incomeFlying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Sept. 10 Oct. 17 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012 13

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Annual fair promotes diversity The thunderstorms held off long enough for NAS Jax per sonnel to enjoy the 12th annu al NAS Jacksonville MultiCultural Diversity Fair Aug. 30. Military and civilian person nel gathered under tents at the NAS Jax Commissary parking lot to learn about other cul tures as they enjoyed samples of delicious cuisines from around the world. The fair showcased numer ous cultures through enter tainment by Navy Band Southeasts TGIF Band, ABH1(AW/SW) Nnamdi Emenogu, who displayed his drumming talents, a disc jockey, command-sponsored booths and a car and motor cycle show. Displays featured informa tion about Native Americans, Argentina, Africa, Panama, Dominican Republic, Philippines and Tibet. Other organizations providing infor mation were Morale, Welfare and Recreation, Columbia College, Webster University and Southern Illinois University. The fair is sponsored by the NAS Jacksonville Multi-Cultural Awareness Committee, which is com prised of volunteers from dif ferent commands. The com mittee plans and coordinates all aspects of the event. It takes a lot of hard work and dedication from the MCAC but were just glad that in the end, everything turned out really well and everyone is having a good time because thats what its all about, said Emenogu. As guests sampled the dif ferent types of food items, they enjoyed spending time with friends and co-workers. Im here today to celebrate the diversity of the Navy. I was born in Africa. I really enjoyed looking at all the booths. Ive been to a lot of the places that were displayed here today such as Argentina because I was on deployment to South America. They did a really good job, said HMCS(SW) Tijani Abdulsalam of Reserve Component Command. Awards were also presented for those competing in the car and motorcycle show. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a mem ber of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of spe cial recognition in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. The registration deadline is Oct. 5. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in ter ritorial waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve recognition and thanks for putting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans during my annual Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the highlights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are strongly encouraged to contact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 598-0481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www. crenshaw.house.gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and documentation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the cer tificate, veterans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214.Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program.Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony Nov. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012 15

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Sailors from Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville made their presence felt in the local community recently by volunteering to assist in the construction of low-income family homes as part of Habitat for Humanity of Clay County. Members of Maintenance Training Units 1005 and 1011 spent dozens of hours over the past few months building and renovating homes in Clay County. Their most recent efforts included laying sod around a house that was near comple tion in Green Cove Springs, a house that many CNATTU vol unteers had previously helped build. The large number of highly motivated volunteers allowed them to not only com plete the entire yard, but also lay sod at an alternate location, as well as starting renovations on a house in Middleburg. Habitat for Humanity has been building houses for fami lies in Clay County since 1977. All houses, renovated or built, are offered to families that earn less than 60 percent of the median family income. These homes are not free or given away. All Habitat home owners must give 250 to 500 hours of sweat equity in which they help build their homes as well as others. They must also qualify for a zero percent interest mortgage, where payments are used to further the Habitat efforts. CNATTU JAX proudly assists in these efforts, and volunteer opportunities are available on a regular basis. CNATTU Jax builds better futures 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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MCPON names Gary Sinise honorary chief Actor, humanitarian and musician, Gary Sinise, was named an honorary chief petty officer during a ceremony held at the U.S. Navy Memorial and Naval Heritage Center on Aug. 24 in Washington, D.C. Sinise received the honor from Fleet Master Chief(AW/NAC) Michael Stevens on behalf of Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy(MCPON)(SS/SW) Rick West. Stevens was named as the next MCPON by Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Jonathan Greenert June 27. It is very interesting how things work out and I believe that all things happen for a reason, said Stevens. MCPON was going to honor Mr. Sinise at the Year of the Chief kickoff event in April, but unfortunately Mr. Sinise was slightly injured in a car accident here in D.C. and was unable to attend the event. Thankfully, he was not seriously injured and MCPON is on a trip overseas visiting Sailors, so now I have the opportu nity to preside over this event tonight. Sinise has been exposed to the military all of his life through his familys deep roots in military ser vice. His father served in the Navy in the 1950s, two of his uncles served in World War II, three brother-inlaws served in Vietnam, his sister-in-law served for 10 years, and his nephew served in Afghanistan and was recently accepted into the Green Berets. While not serving in the military himself, Sinise has raised millions of dollars for various charities dedi cated to helping the military and veterans through his Gary Sinise Foundation launched in 2010. He has also performed free concerts all over the world for service members with his Lt. Dan Band, named after his role in the 1994 Oscar-winning movie Forrest Gump. I am a big fan of your work as an actor, but I am an even bigger fan of the role you play in real life, said Stevens. And it is that body of work that we honor here today. Stevens presented Sinise with the honorary chief petty officer certificate signed by MCPON, while his daughter, Ella, pinned the chiefs anchor on his lapel. Stevens helped Sinise don a chiefs cover, which was followed by a salute to the crowd by honorary Chief Sinise, bringing the large crowd of chief petty officers, chief petty officer selectees, Sailors, families and the general public to their feet in a standing ovation. What a humbling day it is for me to receive this, said Sinise. Im truly touched by it. I dont take it for granted, and I dont take it lightly. The cornerstone of Sinises foundation was built upon his life-long principals and long standing commitment to be a citizen of action, and to help in any way that one can to serve the nation by honoring and helping the people who serve our country. Im always amazed and humbled at the skill and dedication of the men and women who serve in our Navy . God bless you all for doing what you do in defense of our freedom all around the world, said Sinise. Navy Exchange caters to CPO selecteesThe NAS Jacksonville Navy Exchange (NEX) closed its doors early to the general public Aug. 28 for the 12th annual Chief Petty Officer (CPO) Selectee NEX Night. The night has become a tradition, allowing a chance for fun and relaxation, during a very gruel ing training schedule. The event also gives newly selected CPOs the opportunity to purchase their new khaki uniforms and acces sories and to view a fashion show portraying how to properly wear their new uniforms. Tonight is all about the CPO selectees and their families. I want to thank the spouses and families for all they are doing because I know what you all are going through right now. But at the end of this invaluable train ing, its all worth it, said NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders. During the fashion show, sev eral chiefs modeled the many different types of uniforms that the CPO selectees would soon be wearing as NEX associates mod eled what type of clothing spouses could wear to such events as the Khaki Ball. The show was host ed by HMC Melissa Gomez and Miranda Shepherd. Its our duty to educate new chiefs on the uniforms they will be wearing so proudly. Just as their responsibilities increase and change, the uniforms and accessories also change. So its very important that they become familiar with the uniforms and their proper wear, said Gomez. After the show, the CPO select ees and their families were treat ed to appetizers and cake in the NEX Food Court. Numerous prizes were also given out such as gift cards to the NEX, com missary and Morale, Welfare and Recreation facilities and a variety of other items. LSC(AW/SW) (select) Desiree Garner of Naval Medical Education and Training Command attended the event with her family. This is really a great event and really makes us feel appreciated. Im honored to be here. I enjoyed the fashion show. Ive seen most of the uni forms before but it was fun to see the chiefs in their dinner dress uniforms. This is one of our favorite events each year. We get to recognize the CPO selectees, their families and sponsors so Id like to welcome and thank you all for what you do every day, said NEX General Manager Marsha Brooks. Id also like to thank the NEX management team and associates who put this event all together, the commissary and vendor part ners who provided the door prizes and food. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012 17



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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Response team to help assess need from Isaacs destruction Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast sent 15 military and civilians to Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport and Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base (NAS JRB) New Orleans Aug. 30 as part of a Contingency Engineering Response Team (CERT). The team headed out from NAS Jacksonville. These engineers will work directly for our Public Works Departments in Gulfport and New Orleans, said NAVFAC Southeast Operations Officer Capt. Mark Edelson. They will perform assess ments of facilities and assets at both locations to help get these bases back to normal opera tions as soon as possible. The Public Works Departments currently manages the facilities, water, power, and sanitation for the bases, said Edelson. They will be working hard to assist any efforts from agencies in the area and will sup port them with whatever they need to get the job done. A mobile command post (MCP) will provide workspace, a variety of communication technology, and the ability to provide electronic submis sion of damage assessments from hand held devices that hold the installations facility inventory. The MCP allows the CERT to communicate direct ly with NAVFAC Southeast in Jacksonville from where ever they are located. Sending engineers around the world is not new to NAVFAC. We always have a trained CERT ready to go at a moments notice, said Don Maconi, NAVFAC Southeast contingen cy engineer. Maconi explained that the CERT has DATs which consist of structural, electrical, and mechanical engineers, archi tects, roofing specialists, com munity planners and construction contract specialists that deploy to begin rapid damage assessments. It is during this phase that debris is removed and basic functions are restored such as opening roadways, sanitation, water, electricity and commu nications. Typically, these teams are deployed to assess hurricane or other storm damage to military installations, but also are deployed for humanitarian efforts such as a tsunami or the earthquake in Haiti in 2010. Remembrance, renewal and resilienceDefense Secretary Leon Panetta delivered the following remarks at the 9/11 Tenth Anniversary Summit at the Newseum in Washington, D.C., Sept. 8, 2011. We have overcome wars, weve overcome disasters, weve overcome eco nomic depressions, the secretary said. Weve overcome crises of every kind because of the fundamental American spirit that never, never gives up. Sept. 11, Panetta added, reminds all of us that this country is always at its best when it responds to crisis, because it is truly in the inherent spirit of the American people to pull together, to fight for our values, to protect what is dear to all of us. The tragic timeline Tower At 8:46 a.m. American Airlines Flight 11 crashed with a speed of rough ly 490 mph into the north side of the north tower of the World Trade Center, between floors 94 and 98. Tower At 9:02 a.m. United Airlines Flight 175 crashed with a speed of about 590 mph into the south side of the south tower, banked between floors 78 and 84. Killed: 2753. At 9:37 a.m. American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the western side of the Pentagon. All 59 passengers were killed, as were 125 Pentagon personnel. Killed: 184. At 10:03 a.m. United Airlines Flight 93 crashed in a field southeast of Pittsburgh in Somerset County, Pa. Killed: 40. NAS Jacksonville/Naval Hospital Jacksonville 9/11 remembrance event: 7 a.m. 5K run; 8 a.m. Colors and Ceremony. Both events take place at Naval Hospital flagpole near the Child Street/Pharmacy entrance. No registration needed for 5K. PT gear authorized for Colors. CERT deploys to Gulfport, New Orleans Commemorating 9/11 Road closure Sept. 10Just three months after unveiling the Navys MQ-4C Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) at Northrop Grummans Palmdale, Calif. manufactur ing plant, construction will begin for the BAMS Training Facility at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. The construction site will also house a new P-8A Maintenance Training Facility. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Project Manager Amy Hoffer said that Elkins Constructors Inc. of Jacksonville was awarded the $15,057,000 fixed-price con tract. Construction is slat ed to begin Sept. 10, with an estimated completion date of December 2013. NAS Jacksonville Deputy Public Works Director Dan Schickler said the two con struction projects are located on a common site to the west of the new P-8A Integrated Training Center on Yorktown Ave., which opened in spring of 2012. Parking and storm water areas will be located to the south of the new buildings and adjacent to the Fleet and Family Support Center. Officially called Triton, the MQ-4C BAMS UAS project consists of an 8,938-sq.-ft. training facility to teach operators of the new MQ-4C Triton platform. The single-story, concrete tiltup panel/structural steel facil ity will include classrooms, mission control rooms and briefing rooms, along with support spaces for administrators and instructors. The P-8A Maintenance Training Facility project con sists of a 58,262sq.-ft. opera tional and maintenance train ing facility to support P-8A Poseidon. The two-story, concrete tiltup panel/structural steel facil ity will house spaces to support the following training devic es: Operational Load Trainer (OLT); Integrated Avionics Trainer (IAT); Maintenance Training for Fuel System, Flight Control/Hydraulics, Landing Gear, Engine, and Construction to begin two new training facilities

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Sept. 6 1918 Sailors fire first of the five railroad batteries at Tergnier, a German railhead in the Comeigne Forest. These 14-50 caliber guns were origi nally designed for battleships. 1939 Navy begins formation of Neutrality Patrol for Atlantic Ocean. 1940 First destroyers transferred to Great Britain at Halifax, Nova Scotia, under Destroyers-for-Bases agree ment. 1944 USS Independence (CVL-22) begins use of specially trained air group for night work. First time that a fully equipped night carrier oper ates with fast carrier task force. 1945 U.S. troops begin returning to U.S. when Task Force 11 left Tokyo Bay for U.S. 1953 Exchange of prison ers of war from Korean War (Operations Big Switch) ends. Sept. 7 1775 The British supply ship, Unity, was the first prize captured by the Continental schooner, Hannah. 1776 David Bushnell attempts to destroy a British Ship of the Line, HMS Asia, in New York harbor with his submarine Turtle. 1942 First air evacuation of casualties to hospital ships off shore occurs at Guadalcanal. Sept. 8 1923 In disaster at Point Honda, Calif., seven destroy ers run aground through faulty navigation. 1939 President Franklin Roosevelt proclaims lim ited national emergency and increases enlisted strength in the Navy and Marine Corps; also authorizes the recall to active duty of officer, men and nurses on the retired lists of the Navy and Marine Corps. 1954 U.S. signs Manila Treaty forming SEATO. 1958 Lt. R. H. Tabor, wear ing a Navy developed pressure suit, completes 72-hour simu lated flight at altitudes as high a 139,000 feet. It was another step in the development of the Navy spacesuit, which NASA accepted in 1959 for use by Mercury astronauts. Sept. 9 1825 USS Brandywine sails for France to carry the Marquis de Lafayette home after his year long visit to America. 1841 First iron ship autho rized by Congress. 1940 Navy awards contracts for 210 ships, including 12 carriers and 7 battleships. 1943 Operation Avalanche, Western Naval Task Force under Vice Adm. Hewitt lands Allied forces at Salerno, Italy. 1944 Fifth Fleet carrier aircraft begin air strikes on Japanese shipping and facilities at Mindanao, Philippines. 1945 A computer bug is first identified and named by Lt. Grace Murray Hopper while she was on Navy active duty in 1945. It was found in the Mark II Aiken Relay Calculator at Harvard University. The operators affixed the moth to the computer log, where it still resides, with the entry: First actual case of bug being found. They debugged the computer, first introducing the term. Sept.10 1813 In Battle of Lake Erie, Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry, flying his Dont give up the ship flag, defeats British squadron and says: We have met the enemy and they are ours. 1925 Submarine R-4 res cues crew of PN-9, 10 miles from their destination of Hawaii (See also Sept.1) Sept. 11 1814 In Battle of Lake Champlain, Commodore Thomas MacDonough defeats a British Squadron. 1939 Bear (AG-29) is com missioned by the U.S. Navy for Antarctic operations under command of Rear Adm. Richard Byrd. 1941 President Franklin Roosevelt announces order to the Navy to shoot on sight vessels threatening U.S. ship ping or ships under U.S. escort. 1942 Pharmacists Mate First Class Wheeler Lipes per forms emergency appendec tomy on Seaman First Class Darrell Rector on board USS Seadragon on patrol in South China Sea. 1943 Italian Navy surren ders to Allies. 1945 Operation Magic Carpet, the return of troops to the U.S., begins. 2001 American Flight 77 hijacked by terrorists struck the Pentagon. Casualties include 33 sailors, six Department of the Navy civilians, and three Navy civilian contractors reported missing, at Arlington, Va. Two commercial airliners also struck the World Trade Center in New York City destroying both towers. 2002 The Dont Tread on Me first Navy Jack is flown by Navy ships marking the first anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the Pentagon and World Trade Center. Sept. 12 1916 First demonstration of automatic stabilization and direction gear in aircraft. 1944 Fifth Fleet carrier aircraft begin three-day attack on Japanese shipping and facili ties in Visayas, Philippines. 1952 USS Coral Sea (CVB43) took Marshall Josip Tito for a one-day cruise in the Adriatic Sea where he was shown flight operations. 1961 Navy task force sails to aid the Galveston area after hurricane Carla hits Texas. 1966 Launch of Gemini 11, piloted by Cmdr. Charles Conrad Jr. and Lt. Cmdr. Richard Gordon Jr. Their mission lasted two days and 23 hours and included 44 orbits at an altitude of 1368.9 km. Recovery was by HS-3 helicopter from USS Guam (LPH-9). 1967Operation Coronado V began in Mekong Delta. 1992 Joint Task Force Hawaii activated to pro vide humanitarian aid after Typhoon Iniki struck Hawaiian Islands Last year, a robin made her nest on a beam directly outside our kitchen window. It was a wonderful surprise for us the miracle of life happening with in view of our dinner table. But still, I couldnt help but marvel at the mothers bravery. Had she not seen the way my three boys behave outside? How they hit baseballs into the shrubbery and sometimes at the windows? During the few weeks the robin shared our back window, I felt a pecu liar connection with her. When she looked at me with her black, beady little bird eyes, I knew she was staring right into my soul, and, of course, judging me. What else do fellow mothers do? The mother bird flew back and forth, busily bringing fresh worms to her children while I banged my head on the refrigerator door and wondered why my family had to eat dinner . again. The mother robin kept her nest tidy. I knew this because I had seen her receive and carry away her babies excrement. My kitchen had muddy floors and dishes piled several meals thick in the sink. Every morning, the first thing I did when I came downstairs was check on the mother and her family. Shed stare at me and then sit on her younglings sparsely feathered heads. I grew to love her, and when the babies finally flew away, I shared the mothers excitement and sadness. I missed the birds when the mother and her partner left the nest. Must have moved to The Villages, I thought. Then, a few weeks later, they built a new home on the same beam. This mother robin was just showing off now! Completely raising two broods in one summer? I mean, who has the energy for that? I watched a second set of fledgling birds get their wings and leave the nest. Fall came. Snow fell on the beam where the nest once sat. And by this June, the only thing to look at outside the kitchen window was the dripping water from the air conditioner. Then, one day in July, a new nest appeared. The mother was back! And I had terrible news for her: since last summer, we had gotten a dog. A bird dog. Sparky is a handsome liver and white hunter who loves nothing more than to chase ducks at the lake. He will swim for miles and never tire, so that I have to go in my kayak and fetch him. Over and over again, Sparky tries to get a duck, and he always fails. The ducks taunt him and lead him in circles, then they fly away, and Sparky and I are left in the middle of the lake. If Sparky could talk, I know hed espe cially curse when he goes after loons, massive fowl with red eyes and a haunting call. Sparky jumps in after them, and they calmly wait until he is a few feet away. Then they do their great disappearing act, the most confounding of them all for Sparky: the loons go under water and dont come back up until they are many yards away. So you can imagine Sparkys per ceived good fortune when one day he found a nest of captive, chirping birds directly above our back porch. He whimpered and danced on his back feet, eager to catch a glimpse of the mother and her babies. The mother would peer down at him, and if I was a betting person, my money was on her. She glared at Sparky with the same soul-searing eyes with which she had glared at me. (And boy did she glare at me now that I was raising a bird dog!) I knew she would not think twice about dive-bombing our dog if he got legitimately close. The baby birds would soon fledge. I knew because they were making more noise, fighting for space in the nest, and requiring the mother to bring worms every half hour. I looked out the win dow often, hoping to see one of the babies fly. Last week, I was cooking dinner for a Dinner with the Smileys guests (Hint: he has the MLB career record for most pinch-hit home runs), when I heard frantic chirping outside. My heart raced because I knew: Sparky had gotten one of the baby birds. I ran outside and Sparky came to me, offering the catch like a good hunting dog should. The baby was still alive and not hurt, but she was playing dead. The mother bird flitted back and forth between the trees in our backyard, and she was making an awful, heartwrenching cry. Her baby was not safe; my dog and I were to blame. I shooed Sparky inside and shut the door. He looked at me through the glass like, Umm, I thought we were going to eat that? The baby bird flopped around on the porch, her wings beating erratically, as if they were on springs. The mother bird continued to cry and swoop. I called out to her: Im going to help you. Then I picked up the quivering bird and set him on the other side of our fence. I went inside so the mother could tend to her baby. Within 20 minutes, they both were gone. The nest was empty. At dusk, I can still hear the mothers calls, tending to her babies in neighboring bushes. I know what shes saying to me: you traitor! I doubt she will nest on our porch again, and I am sad. But, well, Im especially sad for the ducks: yesterday, the chase was just a game. Today, Sparky has had the taste of . feathers.More Smiley wildlife fun: Sparky gets the (wrong) bird

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National Suicide Prevention Week is Sept. 9-15. Suicide is a com plex, atypical behavioral response to stress. Risk factors include depression; mental, per sonality or substance abuse disorders; per sonal or family history of suicide; family violence; incarceration; or expo sure to influences that normalize suicide. Risk is also associated with changes in brain chemi cals. Warning signs include thoughts or comments about suicide, substance abuse problems, purposelessness, anxi ety, feeling trapped or hopeless, withdrawal, anger, recklessness and mood changes. Some facts to consider are that suicidal behavior is not specific to gender, race or age; but there are differences, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Women attempt suicide two to three times more often than men, but men fatal ly wound themselves at four times the rate that women do. This is related to methodwomen more often use poison, while men more often use firearms. There is a peak of suicide incidence among teens and young adults, age 15 to 24, as well as in adults over age 85. In terms of ethnicity, suicide is twice as likely among non-Hispanic whites and American Indians as among Hispanics, AfricanAmericans and Asian Americans. Effective medical treatments are available for depression and other health problems that are risk factors for suicide. So for those struggling, see a doctor to find out what the options are. Community resources are available for someone who might be thinking about suicide. Active duty, veterans and family and friends can contact the Veterans Crisis Line at 800-273TALK (8255), which offers a hotline, online chat and text. Help is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. For someone in imme diate danger, go to the closest emergency room or call 911. Remain with a suicidal person dont leave them alone until theyve reached help. Silence kills. Speak out and save a life. U.S. Fleet Forces announces new fleet master chiefU.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) announced the selection of the commands new fleet mas ter chief, the senior enlisted leader for the Navys Atlantic Fleet, Aug. 27. CMDCM Chuck Clarke, who is currently serving in the top enlisted job at U.S. 5th Fleet in Bahrain, will take over for Fleet Master Chief Mike Stevens, who is slated to become the 13th master chief petty officer of the Navy at the end of September. Master Chief Chuck Clarke is a tremendous lead er with a wealth of experience in a variety of assign ments, said Stevens. He has our Navys and our Sailors best inter ests in mind and can provide the commander with a unique perspective that will only help to increase mission readiness throughout the fleet. In his new assignment, Clarke will become the commands senior enlisted advisor for more than 100,000 active duty and Reserve personnel who serve on more than 120 ships and submarines and nearly 80 shore activities within the U.S. Fleet Forces Command area of responsibility. Clarke, who was born in Georgetown, Guyana (South America), enlisted in the Navy in 1987. His previous assignments include USS Dubuque (LPD 8), USS Mount Vernon (LSD 39), USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 40, Recruit Training Command and Personnel Support Detachment Point Loma in San Diego, Calif., Naval Support Activity, La Maddalena, Italy; and Helicopter Tactical Wing Atlantic Fleet, Norfolk, Va. Prior to U.S. 5th Fleet, he served as the command master chief aboard the carriers USS Kitty Hawk (CVN 63) and USS Nimitz (CVN 68). Clark is a graduate of the Navys Senior Enlisted Academy, the Command Master Chief/Chief of the Boat Course and the National Defense University Keystone Course. He holds an associate degree from National University, a bachelors degree from Excelsior College, and a masters in human rela tions from the University of Oklahoma. Suicide Prevention Week raises awareness JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012 Navy and Marine Corps members of the military aviation community know all too well that knowledge and execu tion of emergency procedures can mean the difference between life and death. NAS Jacksonvilles Aviation Survival Training Center (ASTC) is one of eight ASTCs around the country that are tasked to provide safe and effective survival training for aviators and aircrew. Training includes classroom lectures and simulator devices in a curriculum that emphasizes hands-on exposure to survival skills. New aviators and aircrew undergo their initial survival training at NAS Pensacola, after which they are required to attend an ASTC refresher course every four years. ASTC Jacksonville provides a modern facility and advanced training equip ment to keep aircrews certified in their survival skills. The detachments three training departments include: Aviation Physiology; Aviation Water Survival; and Bay Operations and Parachute Training. Training scenarios take place in a large swimming pool with an aircraft egress trainer for teaching basic water survival; in a low-pressure chamber that simulates the effects of high altitude; in an ejection seat and virtual reality parachute trainer; and in a parachute landing fall area where aircrews prac tice avoiding injury during a parachute landing. Water survival is an important com ponent of the refresher course, and ASTC Jax strives to provide the most realistic, yet safe, training possible. One of the things we simulate in the pool is a rescue situation in a nighttime storm, said Lt. Matt Shipman, aero space operations physiologist for ASTC Jax. Students are subjected to simulated rain, fog, waves, thunder and lightning in a pitch black environment. Their goal is to make it to a life raft and wait for rescue, utilizing the skills we reviewed for them in the classroom portion of this training. Also in the pool is the 9D6 underwater egress trainer commonly known as the dunker that simulates an air craft ditching into a body of water and sinking upside-down. It allows aircrew to practice escaping from a submerged fuselage. Seats, windows and hatches are configured to actual aircraft, such as the H-60 Seahawk helicopter. In addition, aircrews transitioning from the P-3 Orion to the P-8 Poseidon will find their specific refresher course changing in the near future. The P-8 is not equipped with para chutes, Shipman stated. The curricu lum for aircrews is currently being modified to reflect that. Until these updates are incorporated, we will treat all P-8 aircrews as though they were training for the survival in the P-3. According to Leading Petty Officer HM1 Edison Vargas, an instructor with Aircrew conquer survival refresher training at ASTC Jax

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012 5 ASTC Jax, the facility provides instruction to all branches of the U.S. military while also accommo dating civilian police forces, mem bers of NOAA, NASA and allied foreign services. We conduct two classes a week in two-day block periods, with average class sizes from 12-18 stu dents, commented Vargas. He stated during fiscal years 2010 and 2011, roughly 2,400 students had taken the refresher course. Even those students who struggle with portions of the survival training have the chance to remediate. The more training we can pro vide to aircrews, the better. Even if its a situation where we have to remediate a student, it only means more training for them, said Shipman. Our facility is very accommo dating. If a student is reaching their four-year mark and feel like they may struggle, especially with the swimming portion, they are more than welcome to give us a call to get extra training prior to the refresher course. ASTC Jacksonville is a detach ment of Navy Medicine Operational Training Center at NAS Pensacola, which serves as the training agent for aviation survival training and the subject matter experts on all military operational medicine, and the Navy Medicine Education and Training Command (NMETC) in San Antonio and NMETC Detachment Jacksonville aboard NAS Jacksonville. For more information on survival training or class schedules, contact ASTC Jax at 542-2595. ASTC Photos by Lt. j.g. Kevin Wendt

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While on detachment to Soto Cano Air Base in Honduras Aug. 20, Combat Air Crew (CAC) 8 of the VP-8 Fighting Tigers teamed up with the Armys 1-228th Winged Warriors to share their aviation experiences. CAC 8 was given the opportunity to experience a ride in the Army UH-60L Blackhawk helicopter and in return the Winged Warriors were given a tour of the P-3C Orion. Army helicopter pilots CWO2 Bonilla and CWO2 Edds took the crew on a low-level training flight across the mountains of Soto Cano. The flight consisted of a 40-minute roundtrip out to their working area where they practiced simple maneu vers and showed the Fighting Tigers breathtaking scenery. Wow, that was awesome! is all AWO1 Jared Larsen could muster after the flight. Such a great experience, I want to thank the Winged Warriors for allowing us to go on such a once in a lifetime ride In return, the Fighting Tigers took the Winged Warriors on a tour of their P-3C Orion. What an impressive aircraft said Bonilla. The coordination and skill that must go into execut ing a successful mission in the P-3C is more than impressive. I want to thank (Detachment OIC) Lt. Michael Hartline and all of VP-8 for affording us such a great experience. The 1-228th Winged Warriors are stationed at Soto Cano Air Base, Honduras. Their mission is primarily to conduct humanitarian assistance and disaster relief throughout Central America. They also conduct counterdrug operations, aero-medical evacuation, limited search and rescue, and air movement of people, equipment and supplies. With similar missions to protect the country, and a passion for avia tion, both crews were excited to share their experiences of their missions to encourage each other in their ultimate mission; defending the country and the people they love Each crew agreed that there are many things the crews have in com mon. Each is blessed to have an exciting job that makes such a difference in the lives of all Americans. Sergeant Estrada was asked what his favor ite part of flying the Blackhawk was. He replied without hesitation, The Blackhawk is a very maneuverable helicopter. It gives you the freedom to do whatever you need it to, when you want it to! VP-8 is currently on a six-month deployment to 4th Fleet. Their mission is providing humanitarian effort and assisting in the counter-drug effort. For more information, visit the official Patrol Squadron-8 Facebook page. VP-8 Sailors experience aviation from UH-60L Blackhawk perspective The indoor pool, located in the base gym, is closed until further notice due to the deterioration of the roof. Until the structural integrity of the roof is deter mined, the outdoor pool will be made available. The outdoor pool will be open during the week for lap swim as well as week ends until the water temperature drops below 70 degrees Fahrenheit. Unfortunately, fall swim lessons will be delayed until the indoor pool is repaired. Private individual lessons, however, are still available during hours of operation. The hours are as follows: MondayFriday from 5:30-8 a.m. (Adult lap swim); 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. (Adult lap swim); 4:30-8 p.m. (Open recreation swim) Starting Oct. 1, weekend hours will be: Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. For more information, call 542-3239. The annual Ombudsman Appreciation Luncheon will be held Sept. 19 at 11:30 a.m. at the NAS Jax Officers Club. Tickets are $10 per person and are available at the Fleet and Family Support Center (Bldg. 554 Child Street) from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Ticket sales end at 3 p.m. on Sept. 13. For more information, call 542-5745.Tickets available for Ombudsman Appreciation LuncheonIndoor pool closed until further notice WITH A STROKE, TIME LOST IS BRAIN LOST.Learn the warning signs atStrokeAssociation.orgor1-888-4-STROKE. American Heart Association Made possible in part by a generous grant from The Bugher Foundation. 211115A01NOTE TO PUB:DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW,FOR ID ONLY.NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAs.American Stroke Association Newspaper (3 3/4 x 3 1/2) B&W ASNYR2-N-01065-I Brain Lost85 line screendigital files at Schawk:(212) 689-8585 Ref#:211115 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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Chief selectees conquer challenges at Camp BlandingDuring the early morn ing hours of Aug. 26, the NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport chief petty officer (CPO) selectees participated in a unique and invaluable training session at Camp Blanding Aug. 24. The CPO selectees spent the day learning the concept of teambuilding as they faced numerous physical and men tal challenges on the Camp Blanding Joint Training Center obstacle course. This entailed crawling under live wires to rescue simulated injured war riors, climbing across cargo netting, scaling walls and swinging from ropes across obstacles. It was pretty hot and I had some apprehension but there was a lot of encouragement from my team members and I was proud of what we accom plished out there. It was a good training evolution and learn ing experience, said CSC(SW) (select) Patrick Faucette of Naval Hospital Jacksonville. Another highlight of the day was the rappelling tower where CPO selectees learned to trust their mentors and combat fears of jumping off the side of a building as genuine CPOs guided them down the ropes. Im scared of heights and it was really difficult for me to climb the rappelling tower and go down the ropes. But every 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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CNRSE honors Senior, Junior Civilians of the Quarter Mike Hoff and Calvin Dixon were honored as Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Civilian of the Second Quarter 2012, respectively, during a ceremony on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville Aug. 27. Hoff is a labor relations specialist in the CNRSE total force management department. Throughout the past quarter, he stepped in to provide labor relations services to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay following the departure of a fellow labor relations special ist. His efforts resulted in the timely resolution of numerous labor relations cases. Mr. Hoff is a hardworking, conscientious employee who treats everyone fairly and with respect, said Jeff Carpenter, Hoffs super visor. He focuses on customer service and is always willing to assist co-work ers, and hes a team player who regularly volun teers for projects while continuing to provide outstanding service to our customers. Mr. Hoff is a valued asset to our team. Hoff said it was an honor to accept the award and it is something he doesnt take lightly. I must say this award was very unexpected and a tremendous sur prise. I am honored and humbled to be presented with this award given the many outstanding employees who were eligible to receive it, he said. I believe there are three reasons for my selection. One, I am very fortunate to work in a position where I can interact with personnel throughout the region. Two, I have taken that responsibility very seri ously and have strived to provide the best possible customer service that I can day in and day out. The third, and probably most important reason, is that I have an incredibly dedicated group of indi viduals supporting me and contributing greatly to my successes. Without them, none of this would have been possible. As a financial man agement analyst, Dixon works in the CNRSE comptroller depart ment, where he has been instrumental in the con version to the Enhanced Management Analyst Reporting System. He also oversees the depart ments intern program and volunteers as a member of the CNRSE Combined Federal Campaign. Many personnel in N8 do one thing many times and they do it well, but Mr. Dixon does many things well, said Mamie Parker, Dixons immedi ate supervisor. Hes the type of employee who needs little to no super vision because he takes guidance well, under stands the intent of the mission and makes it happen. Mr. Dixon is a professional, a great teammate and an excep tional asset to CNRSE and the Navy. According to Dixon, a number of different fac tors contributed to his selection for the award. I think some impor tant things were provid ing good customer ser vice, always believing I can find a solution to any problem, the ability to work on a team and the fact that Im always try ing to learn something new. Individual selection criteria for the awards was based upon exem plary performance of tasks, contributions that enhanced organization accomplishment of com mand objectives, mis sion, teamwork or public image, and ones profes sional attitude toward self and others. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012 9

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Environmental Control Systems. Other areas include shops for maintenance of training devices, electronic classrooms, plus, computer and administrative support. Due to construction activity for the new training facilities, the NAS Jax Public Works Department will close Saratoga Avenue to pedestrian and vehicle traffic from Keily to Child streets beginning Sept. 10. Drivers and pedestrians may detour via Yorktown, Enterprise or Birmingham avenues. BAMS Williams named Women of Color Technology All-Star Award winner CSCM Paulette Williams of the NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville, Navy Food Management Team was named the Women of Color (WOC) 2012 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Technology All-Star Award winner on July 26. Technology All-Stars are accomplished women of color with approximately 22 or more years in the workforce and who have demonstrated excellence in the workplace and in their communities. Williams is the senior instruc tor at Navy Food Management Team Mayport. She leads the training and development efforts for all of the Navy culinary specialists in the Southeastern Region, including afloat galleys on board 14 U.S. Navy ships and 21 shoreduty galleys, including Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. Williams educational and leadership efforts focus on the areas of food production, sanitation, food safety, training, technical management, and administration. Additionally, Williams holds a Masters in Health Science from Trident University and is an avid volunteer involved with com munity events in Jacksonville. I am extremely honored and excit ed to be a recipient of the Women of Color STEM Technology All-Star Award. I couldnt have imagined that I would ever have the opportunity to receive this very prestigious award, said Williams, a 24-year veteran of the Navy. I am extremely thankful and grate ful to my chain of command for their complete support and nomination for this award. This is definitely one of the highest honors of my Navy career, she added. Williams will attend the Corporate Communications Group (CCG)sponsored WOC STEM Conference on Oct. 11-13 in Dallas where she will be presented with the Technology All-Star Award, along with award winners in various other STEM award categories. Williams is the only active duty Navy recipient in the All-Star category. CCG promotes significant minor ity achievement in STEM through such events as the WOC awards, the Black Engineer of the Year Awards (BEYA), and the Minorities in Research Science Awards. The Navy has maintained a relationship with CCG for the last 20 years. I applaud Master Chief Williams achievement and am extremely proud that she will represent this command and the Navy as a whole at the confer ence, said NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Head. She is a stand-out professional in her field, as evidenced by this award. We are fortu nate to have her here as part of our Navy Food Management Team at NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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Thanks to the Shipmates to Workmates program designed to help separating Sailors find jobs, a Navy petty officer with 15 years of military service began his civilian career Aug. 6 aboard Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) at NAS Jacksonville. AD1 Terrence Roach landed a fed eral job as a materials engineer technician supporting the commands Navy Oil Analysis Program (NOAP), a posi tion he held for three years at FRCSE Detachment Mayport, prior to separating from active duty in July. The opportunity that they gave me is great, said Roach of the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) Shipmates to Workmates program. It has allowed me to stay in the area with my family, and I have a career working in aviation similar to what I did before. Because FRCSE operates aircraft and aeronautical-related equipment, the facility is required to participate in the NOAP. Roach is responsible for moni toring and diagnosing the condition of equipment or oil without the removal or extensive disassembly of the equipment using approved sampling techniques. His efforts support local squadrons and FRCSE operations. Roach was born in Guyana, South America. At the age of 10, he immi grated to the United States with his family in 1987. They settled in a poor neighborhood of Brooklyn, N.Y. where illegal drug use was rampant and driveby shootings a common occurrence. For a better life, he enlisted in the Navy in May 1997 and became a U.S. citizen while serving on active duty in Jacksonville. He credits his Navy experience for providing the specialized skills needed for the laboratory job. He served as the leading petty officer in a NOAP labora tory and prior to that on an Emergency Reclamation Team for two years when assigned with the Topcats of Sea Control Squadron (VS) 31 until its disestablishment in 2008 at NAS Jacksonville. With four sea tours under his belt, two back-to-back on the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), Roach was tracking for advancement to chief when an Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) deci sion to reduce force strength in 2011 ended his Navy career. I knew about the ERB before November 2011 when we got our results, he said. I knew in April that they were going over records, everyone between 8 and 15 years of service. Roach learned his fate when the Phase II ERB reviewed the records of E-6 through E-8 Sailors from 31 over manned ratings. He said the ERB involuntarily separated about 2,900 Sailors. Facing unemployment, with a wife and two children to support and no immediate job prospects he was open to any transition assistance the Navy was offering. When a NAVAIR Shipmates to Workmates program representative contacted him offering to provide employment assistance, he said, yes. They called me and said they saw my resume and wanted me to apply for jobs, said Roach. They shot me a list of about 10 federal and civilian jobs every day, a lot of them not in Florida. I didnt think I was going to get the FRCSE job, but I did. FRCSE Supervisory Chemist Gary Whitfield said he knew the laboratory was losing a chemist (a military spouse) and he urgently needed to fill the position. Given Terrences experience and background, he is a drop-in fit for the position, said Whitfield. It is also a good opportunity to support our military folks. He has already done a lot to get us prepared for an Aviation Maintenance Inspection conducted for quality control. When people ask how he got the job, Roach gladly provides details about the Shipmates to Workmates program jointly managed by NAVAIR, along with several partnering commands and the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. He encourages his separating ship mates to pursue every opportunity, network, utilize human resource special ists and be open to relocating. Tania Dawson, the NAVAIR recruiting and retention program manager, said the Shipmates to Workmates program is another means of getting diverse skill sets into NAVAIR. She said 41 Sailors who worked for the command at mul tiple sites were impacted by the ERB decision. It makes good business sense; they are our own, said Dawson. For more information on the Shipmates to Workmates program, visit: http://www.navair.navy.mil/jobs/ sm2wm/. Shipmates to Workmates program pays off for FRCSE Sailor JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012 11

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one was cheering me on and they wouldnt let me quit. If they hadnt been there, I would have gone back down the stairs. I overcame my fears it took me four times to rappel down, but I did it, stated LNC(SW/AW) Lucia Abreu of Region Legal Service Office Southeast. Along with the physical demands, the CPO selectees were challenged to complete several logistic and comprehensive scenarios designed to relate to the real-world challenges they would soon be fac ing as Navy chiefs. These exercises were designed to teach them to work together as a team, plan their strategies and lead by example. Overall, the training was pretty good. It taught us to communicate with one another during the leadership reaction course which tasked teams to come up with one solution to a problem. It was great that everyone encouraged one another to complete the tasks which enabled us to stick together and finish as a team, said ACC(AW/SW) (select) Lee Carson of NAS Jacksonville. With numerous genuine chiefs to cheer them on guide them through the process, the training ses sion, although extremely tiring, gave the selectees a better understanding of their leadership skills and the importance of working together as a team. BLANDING Carol Hall is NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonvilles Office of Small Business Programs Acquisition Advocate for the Third Quarter of Fiscal Year 2012. During the quarter, Hall awarded more than one million dollars to small business concerns help ing NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville achieve the mandatory Department of Defense/Navy Small Business contracting goals. Hall was recruited for the Federal Contracting Intern Program in August 2010. She is currently a contract spe cialist in the Inter-Service Supply Support Operations (ISSOP) Division and has received her Level II certifica tion in the Acquisition Career Field of Contracting. Hall pro vides contractual support for Commander, Naval Reserve Forces Command (CNRFC), NAVSUP FLCs San Diego and Pearl Harbor, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Naval Hospital Beaufort Branch Health Clinic Parris Island, and Naval Support Activity Panama City. As a buyer for less than two years, Hall has become an acclaimed contracting official at NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville. She is commonly singled out by contractors desiring to do business with NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville requesting her by name. Hall has also been recognized by the North Florida Small Business Administration (SBA) Regional Office and the SBA procure ment center representative for her commitment to small busi ness concerns. She consistently makes every effort to encour age small business participa tion when performing market research to include award of several 8(a) sole source acqui sitions (direct small business awards) as authorized by the Assistant Secretary of the Navy. Hall is a former student recruiter for the Department of Defense Civilian Personnel Management Service (CPMS). She also previously worked at Dell Headquarters in Austin, Texas and Nissan Headquarters in Franklin, Tenn. She holds two Bachelor of Science degrees from Tennessee State University, one in economics and finance while holding another in busi ness administration with a concentration in marketing. Hall sees beyond customary practices and considers all pos sibilities when achieving the final product. Halls commit ment to awarding contracts to small business concerns is evi dent in her daily performance and in the attention to details. Hall has proven to be a dedi cated member of the NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville contracting team and is most deserving of being named NAVSUP FLC Jacksonvilles Office of Small Business Programs Acquisition Advocate for the Third Quarter of Fiscal Year 2012. ISSOP contract specialist named 3rd quarter small business advocate For more information about any sports, contact Bill Bonser at 5422930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR website at www.cnic. navy.mil or www.facebook.com nas jaxmwr Site captains will register volunteers and provide bags and gloves at the cleanup locations. Pre-registration is not required. Participants must be over 18 or accompanied by an adult. Service-hour certificates available for students.Free T-shirts for cleanup volun teers at Riverside Arts Market from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. (while supplies last). Site Locations Safety tips Wear sturdy, closed toe, footwear and gloves. Wear sun protection and bring water. Be alert for slip pery wet surfaces. Do not climb on rocks or get into water. Avoid overexertion and drink plenty of fluids. Wear safety vests or bright colors along roadsides. Do not handle or remove hazardous items or sub stances. This regional effort is part of the 27th annual International Coastal Cleanup coordinated by the Ocean Conservancy and supported locally by Keep Jacksonville Beautiful. For information call 6303420/2489 or visit www.coj.net/ KJB .Local volunteers needed for Sept. 15 Florida Coastal Cleanup 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m.Freedom Lanes Call 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included. Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling. Shoe rental included Fall Bowling Leagues now forming. Mixed league Mon. 7 p.m. After-work league Wed. 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thurs. 9 a.m. Mixed league Thurs. 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Friday 11:45 a.m. Friday night league 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Saturday 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 5423518/4238 Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Open Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. until Oct. 1. Free for military and DOD civilians, $3 for guestsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. The Price is Right Times Union Center Sept. 25, 7:30 p.m., $47 Sesame Street Live Times Union Center Sept. 29, 2:30 p.m., $18 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23, 2013 Preferred seating $42, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day $29.50, 2 day $40 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Mall & Movie Trip Sept. 15 Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater Jaguars vs. Texans Game Sept. 16 at 11 a.m. Free admission and transportation The Price is Right Show Sept. 25 $10 per personNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Sept. 4 & 18 for active duty Sept. 6 & 20 for retirees & DoD personnel September is customer appreciation month Monday Friday play 18 holes for $18, includes cart and green fees. Not valid on holidays. Open to military, DOoD and guestsAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available. Family Fitness Center hours are Mon. Fri., 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you. Register now for before & after school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household incomeFlying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Sept. 10 Oct. 17 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012 13

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Annual fair promotes diversity The thunderstorms held off long enough for NAS Jax per sonnel to enjoy the 12th annual NAS Jacksonville MultiCultural Diversity Fair Aug. 30. Military and civilian person nel gathered under tents at the NAS Jax Commissary parking lot to learn about other cul tures as they enjoyed samples of delicious cuisines from around the world. The fair showcased numer ous cultures through enter tainment by Navy Band Southeasts TGIF Band, ABH1(AW/SW) Nnamdi Emenogu, who displayed his drumming talents, a disc jockey, command-sponsored booths and a car and motor cycle show. Displays featured informa tion about Native Americans, Argentina, Africa, Panama, Dominican Republic, Philippines and Tibet. Other organizations providing infor mation were Morale, Welfare and Recreation, Columbia College, Webster University and Southern Illinois University. The fair is sponsored by the NAS Jacksonville Multi-Cultural Awareness Committee, which is com prised of volunteers from dif ferent commands. The com mittee plans and coordinates all aspects of the event. It takes a lot of hard work and dedication from the MCAC but were just glad that in the end, everything turned out really well and everyone is having a good time because thats what its all about, said Emenogu. As guests sampled the dif ferent types of food items, they enjoyed spending time with friends and co-workers. Im here today to celebrate the diversity of the Navy. I was born in Africa. I really enjoyed looking at all the booths. Ive been to a lot of the places that were displayed here today such as Argentina because I was on deployment to South America. They did a really good job, said HMCS(SW) Tijani Abdulsalam of Reserve Component Command. Awards were also presented for those competing in the car and motorcycle show. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a mem ber of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of spe cial recognition in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. The registration deadline is Oct. 5. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in ter ritorial waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve recognition and thanks for putting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans during my annual Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the highlights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are strongly encouraged to contact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 598-0481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www. crenshaw.house.gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and documentation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the cer tificate, veterans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214.Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program.Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony Nov. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012 15

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Sailors from Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville made their presence felt in the local community recently by volunteering to assist in the construction of low-income family homes as part of Habitat for Humanity of Clay County. Members of Maintenance Training Units 1005 and 1011 spent dozens of hours over the past few months building and renovating homes in Clay County. Their most recent efforts included laying sod around a house that was near comple tion in Green Cove Springs, a house that many CNATTU volunteers had previously helped build. The large number of highly motivated volunteers allowed them to not only complete the entire yard, but also lay sod at an alternate location, as well as starting renovations on a house in Middleburg. Habitat for Humanity has been building houses for families in Clay County since 1977. All houses, renovated or built, are offered to families that earn less than 60 percent of the median family income. These homes are not free or given away. All Habitat home owners must give 250 to 500 hours of sweat equity in which they help build their homes as well as others. They must also qualify for a zero percent interest mortgage, where payments are used to further the Habitat efforts. CNATTU JAX proudly assists in these efforts, and volunteer opportunities are available on a regular basis. CNATTU Jax builds better futures 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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MCPON names Gary Sinise honorary chief Actor, humanitarian and musician, Gary Sinise, was named an honorary chief petty officer during a ceremony held at the U.S. Navy Memorial and Naval Heritage Center on Aug. 24 in Washington, D.C. Sinise received the honor from Fleet Master Chief(AW/NAC) Michael Stevens on behalf of Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy(MCPON)(SS/SW) Rick West. Stevens was named as the next MCPON by Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Jonathan Greenert June 27. It is very interesting how things work out and I believe that all things happen for a reason, said Stevens. MCPON was going to honor Mr. Sinise at the Year of the Chief kickoff event in April, but unfortunately Mr. Sinise was slightly injured in a car accident here in D.C. and was unable to attend the event. Thankfully, he was not seriously injured and MCPON is on a trip overseas visiting Sailors, so now I have the opportu nity to preside over this event tonight. Sinise has been exposed to the military all of his life through his familys deep roots in military ser vice. His father served in the Navy in the 1950s, two of his uncles served in World War II, three brother-inlaws served in Vietnam, his sister-in-law served for 10 years, and his nephew served in Afghanistan and was recently accepted into the Green Berets. While not serving in the military himself, Sinise has raised millions of dollars for various charities dedi cated to helping the military and veterans through his Gary Sinise Foundation launched in 2010. He has also performed free concerts all over the world for service members with his Lt. Dan Band, named after his role in the 1994 Oscar-winning movie Forrest Gump. I am a big fan of your work as an actor, but I am an even bigger fan of the role you play in real life, said Stevens. And it is that body of work that we honor here today. Stevens presented Sinise with the honorary chief petty officer certificate signed by MCPON, while his daughter, Ella, pinned the chiefs anchor on his lapel. Stevens helped Sinise don a chiefs cover, which was followed by a salute to the crowd by honorary Chief Sinise, bringing the large crowd of chief petty officers, chief petty officer selectees, Sailors, families and the general public to their feet in a standing ovation. What a humbling day it is for me to receive this, said Sinise. Im truly touched by it. I dont take it for granted, and I dont take it lightly. The cornerstone of Sinises foundation was built upon his life-long principals and long standing commitment to be a citizen of action, and to help in any way that one can to serve the nation by honoring and helping the people who serve our country. Im always amazed and humbled at the skill and dedication of the men and women who serve in our Navy . God bless you all for doing what you do in defense of our freedom all around the world, said Sinise. Navy Exchange caters to CPO selecteesThe NAS Jacksonville Navy Exchange (NEX) closed its doors early to the general public Aug. 28 for the 12th annual Chief Petty Officer (CPO) Selectee NEX Night. The night has become a tradition, allowing a chance for fun and relaxation, during a very gruel ing training schedule. The event also gives newly selected CPOs the opportunity to purchase their new khaki uniforms and acces sories and to view a fashion show portraying how to properly wear their new uniforms. Tonight is all about the CPO selectees and their families. I want to thank the spouses and families for all they are doing because I know what you all are going through right now. But at the end of this invaluable train ing, its all worth it, said NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders. During the fashion show, sev eral chiefs modeled the many different types of uniforms that the CPO selectees would soon be wearing as NEX associates mod eled what type of clothing spouses could wear to such events as the Khaki Ball. The show was host ed by HMC Melissa Gomez and Miranda Shepherd. Its our duty to educate new chiefs on the uniforms they will be wearing so proudly. Just as their responsibilities increase and change, the uniforms and accessories also change. So its very important that they become familiar with the uniforms and their proper wear, said Gomez. After the show, the CPO select ees and their families were treat ed to appetizers and cake in the NEX Food Court. Numerous prizes were also given out such as gift cards to the NEX, com missary and Morale, Welfare and Recreation facilities and a variety of other items. LSC(AW/SW) (select) Desiree Garner of Naval Medical Education and Training Command attended the event with her family. This is really a great event and really makes us feel appreciated. Im honored to be here. I enjoyed the fashion show. Ive seen most of the uni forms before but it was fun to see the chiefs in their dinner dress uniforms. This is one of our favorite events each year. We get to recognize the CPO selectees, their families and sponsors so Id like to welcome and thank you all for what you do every day, said NEX General Manager Marsha Brooks. Id also like to thank the NEX management team and associates who put this event all together, the commissary and vendor part ners who provided the door prizes and food. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 6, 2012 17