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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02008
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 08-30-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02008

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk visited the NAS Jacksonville Aug. 23 to meet with base leadership and junior Sailors to discuss issues such as force manage ment, Enlisted Retention Board (ERB), Perform to Serve (PTS) program, Tuition Assistance (TA) program and other personnel issues. During the visit, Van Buskirk met with base command master chiefs for lunch at the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf conversing about the new CPO 365 pro gram and chief petty officer selectee induction training. Van Buskirk also held a leadership and all hands call at the VP-30 auditori um. Im here for two reasons to listen to your concerns so we can appropri ately address issues and to let you know whats going on within the fleet, said Van Buskirk. First, Id like to highlight just how relevant the U.S. Navy is. We are a globally deployed force while support ing two critical missions in Iraq and Afghanistan. That is a tremendous accomplishment, said the admiral. We continue to focus on war fight ing first, operating forward and being ready. This means our workforce must be deployable, assignable and distribut able to be ready to answer the call for our nation. Van Buskirk also stressed the impor tance of stabilizing the Navys work force by getting the right balance of skill sets and filling critical gaps at sea. In early August, the Navy introduced several voluntary and involuntary measures intended to reduce gaps at sea. These include changes to detail ing through the Career Management System Interactive Detailing, extension of the Voluntary Sea Duty program, Limited Directed Detailing program, the Chief Petty Officer Early Return to Sea program, and expansion of the rat ings eligible for sea duty incentive pay. These measures aim to man oper ational units with qualified Sailors with critical skill sets, ensuring fleet and operational readiness, said Van Buskirk. Our quality of workforce has never been better. The talent coming in has never been better. They have the skills and education and its impacting the Prospective Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON)(AW/NAC) Mike Stevens joined chief petty offi cers (CPO) and 114 CPO select ees from Naval Air Station Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport in the 5-mile Tijuana Flats Beach Run at Jacksonville Beach Aug. 25. I came to Jacksonville to take a look at the training for our new CPO selectees, inter act with them and meet with the leadership who are provid ing the opportunity for them to participate in this event. Im also here to run with the Jacksonville community and to have good time, said Stevens. This is a great commu nity event. We bring our chief selectees out here to run together as a team and to pro mote our Navy within the local community. It just doesnt get any better than this, added CNP holds all hands call at NAS Jax Prospective MCPON, CPO selectees tackle beach run

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Aug. 30 1913 Navy tests Sperry gyroscopic stabilizer (automatic pilot). 1929 Near New London, Conn., 26 officers and men test Momsen lung to exit submerged USS S-4. 1961 Two Cuban frigates fire on a Naval Reserve aircraft on a training mission over international waters. Aug. 31 1943 Commissioning of USS Harmon (DE-678), first Navy ship named for an African-American Sailor. 1944 Carrier task group begins three-day attack on Iwo Jima and Bonin Islands. 1962 Last flight of Navy airship at NAS Lakehurst, N.J. Sept. 1 1781 French fleet traps British fleet at Yorktown, Va. 1814 USS Wasp captures HMS Avon. 1925 Cmdr. John Rodgers and crew of four in PN-9 run out of fuel on first San Francisco-to-Hawaii flight. Landing at sea, they rigged a sail and set sail for Hawaii. 1941 U.S. assumes responsibility for trans-Atlantic convoys from Argentia, Canada to the meridian of Iceland. 1942 Establishment of Air Force, Pacific Fleet, under Vice Adm. Aubrey Fitch. 1942 First Seabee unit to serve in a combat area, 6th Naval Construction Battalion, arrives on Guadalcanal. 1945 USS Benevolence (AH-13) evacuates civilian internees from two internment camps near Tokyo, Japan Sept. 2 1918 Navy ships and crews assist earthquake victims of Yokohama and Tokyo, Japan. 1940 Destroyers-for-Bases agree ment between U.S. and United Kingdom. 1944 USS Finback (SS-230) rescues Lt. j.g. George Bush, USNR of VT-51, shot down while attacking Chichi Jima. 1945 Japan signs surrender docu ments on board USS Missouri (BB-63) at anchor in Tokyo Bay. Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz signs for the U.S. In different ceremonies, Japanese forces on Palau Islands, Truk, and on Pagan Island and Rota in the Marianas also surrender. Sept. 3 1782 As a token of gratitude for French aid during American Revolution, the U.S. gives America (first ship-of-the-line built by U.S.) to France to replace a French ship lost near Boston. 1783 Signing of Treaty of Paris ends American Revolution. 1885 First classes at U.S. Naval War College begin. 1925 Crash of rigid airship Shenandoah near Byesville, Ohio. 1943 American landings on Lae and Salamaua. 1944 First combat employment of a missile guided by radio and television takes place when Navy drone Liberator, controlled by Ensign James Simpson in a PV, flew to attack German submarine pens on Helgoland Island. 1945 Japanese surrender Wake Island in ceremony on board USS Levy (DE-162). Sept. 4 1941 German submarine U-652 attacks USS Greer, which was tracking the submarine southeast of Iceland. Greer is not damaged, but drops depth charges, damaging the submarine. 1954 Icebreakers USS Burton Island (AGB-1) and USCG Northwind com plete first transit of Northwest passage through McClure Strait. 1954 P2V Neptune from VP-19 is shot down by Soviet aircraft near Swatow, China. 1960 USS Bushnell and Penguin begin relief operations in Marathon, Fla. after Hurricane Donna. Sept. 5 1776 Adoption of first uniforms for Navy officers. 1813USS Enterprise captures HM brig Boxer off Portland, Maine. 1918 USS Mount Vernon torpedoed by German submarine off France. 1923 U.S. Asiatic Fleet arrives at Yokohama, Japan, to provide medical assistance and supplies after Kondo Plain earthquake. 1939 President Franklin Roosevelt orders Navy to form a Neutrality Patrol to report the presence of foreign war ships within 300 miles of eastern United States. 1946 USS Franklin Delano Roosevelt (CVB-42) and four escorts visit Greece to underscore U.S. support for the Greek Government which faced a Communist insurgency. 1990 USS Acadia (AD-42) departs San Diego for first war-time deployment of male and female crew on board a Navy combat vessel. Its our summer tradition to take the boys to the city fair and then regret it. I leave feeling like (1) I need to take a bath in hand sanitizer, and (2) I want those three hours of my life back. Yet, no trip to the fair was more regrettable than this years. Thats when we bought I mean, won a shark. Wait, did I say shark? I meant fish. Lindell and Owen tossed ping-pong balls into a bowl of colored water, so the carnival worker said they won fish. This was better than winning a stuffed banana. After all, we needed new fish because four in our tank had gone belly up. The two left were my beta fish, Aqua, and Dustins bottom feeder, Barnacle Boy. Lindell and Owen took home waterfilled plastic bags with one lone fish swimming at the bottom of each. Will these be okay with our beta fish, I asked, because I know that beta fish often dont like to share space. Will our beta fish hurt them? The carnie guy smiled. I wouldnt worry about these fish, he said. (In storytelling, this is what we call fore shadowing. In movies, this is where the music gets creepy.) Owen named his fish, Frisky. Lindell named his, Fred. One week later, Freds name was amended to Fred, the Killer Fish. They appeared excited when we dumped them into our tank. They flit ted around the No Fishing sign and in and out of the SpongeBob Squarepants pine apple house. As usual, Aqua kept her distance. Barnacle Boy hid under the tikki. As far as we could tell, they were a tolerable, if cautious, new family of four. A few days later, Owen came out of his room and solemnly said, Mom, a fish has died. Ford was close behind him. Mom, a fish didnt just die there was a massa cre in the tank. Oh, stop being dramatic, I said, set ting the newspaper on the kitchen table and going to take a look. Heres what I saw: Frisky caught in the upward bubbles of the filter, bob bing up and down, with his tail fin chewed completely off and one eyeball gone. Bits of skin trailed from him like streamers. I gasped. Lindell cried, Mommy, Im scared. I patted Lindells head as the words of the car nie guy echoed in my mind: I wouldnt worry about these fish. We flushed Frisky and scolded Aqua. Wow, beta fish really are aggressive. We should have known that Aqua wouldnt accept the new, innocent carnie fish. One week later, terror struck again. Mom, Aqua is dead! Lindell screamed. Its another massacre, Ford said. They were both running from the room. I sprinted to the tank, my socked-feet sliding across the wood floor as I came to a stop. Aquas head was half buried beneath the gravel rocks. Parts of her skin had been peeled away. You could see the bones in her head. My cheeks turned cold. Boys, we have a killer fish on our hands, I said. We have to kill him before he kills us, Ford said. Did they give us a shark? Owen asked. I silently regretted blaming Aqua for Friskys death. In the tank, Fred glided deliberately from one end of the tank to the other. How do we know Barnacle Boy isnt killing everyone? I asked. Mom, look at him, Ford said. He eats algae and sucks on the side of the glass. He didnt murder anyone. Ford looked at me seriously. Mom, we have to kill Fred, he said. No! I bristled at the idea, even as I secretly considered locking the aquar ium in the basement just in case. Im not killing a possibly innocent fish. Either Barnacle Boy and Fred will live peacefully together, or we will eventu ally know who the real killer is. We now have daily tank watches. When I told the boys that while I had the tank cover open to feed the fish, I heard Barnacle Boy say, Youre not going to leave me in here with that car nie, are you? they believed me. In hindsight, Im frightened for any body who won a stuffed clown or baby doll. Lock those things in the basement, please. Fred and Barnacle Boy still live, for now. Occasionally Lindell comes into my room at night because hes afraid of Fred. I open the covers and let him in, because, quite frankly, I dont blame him. We won a fish at the fair 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012

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On Aug. 3, VP-30s Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Weapons School Officer in Charge Cmdr. Michael Granger, awarded Naval Flight Officer (NFO) wings to the following officers: Lt. j.g. Jarrett Bibb, Ensign Andrew Brown, Ensign Andrew Burcham, Lt. j.g. Robert Council Jr., Ensign Michael Duch, Ensign Christopher Duenas, Lt. j.g.William Fitzgerald, Ensign Joseph Johannes, Ensign John Norris, Ensign Matthew Oates, Ensign Derrick Ransom, Ensign Felix Boehme, and Ensign Henning Cansier. Capt. Aaron Rondeau, Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft program office (PMA290) program manager for the P-8A Poseidon program, was the guest speaker. The recipients com pleted the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer syllabus at VP-30, earn ing their coveted Wings of Gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the CAT 1 Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT 1 syllabus, they will report to operational P-3C or EP-3 squadrons to begin their initial sea tours at either Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii; Whidbey Island, Wash.; or NAS Jacksonville. The Naval Flight Officer (NFO) train ing pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, Fla., where all aviation officers undergo a class room syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation that includes aerodynamics, meteo rology and principles of navigation. After com pleting API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10, colocated at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transition from a classroom learning envi ronment to initial air borne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3C training pipeline report to VP-30 for P-3C specific training. VP-30 wings Navys newest NFOs Jax Air News deadline changeDue to the upcoming Labor Day holiday (Sept. 3), the deadline for submissions to Jax Air News for the Sept. 6 issue is today, Aug. 30. The deadline for classified ads is Aug. 31. For more information, call 542-3531. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012 To support the fleets higher operational pace, along with accelerated wear and tear on Navy and Marine Corps air craft, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) is expand ing its manufacturing capabili ties by using technologically advanced equipment, such as vertical and high-speed grind ers and precision measuring machines, to ensure reliable power for the militarys highperformance aircraft. From shore-based aircraft like the P-3 Orion maritime patrol aircraft powered by four Allison T-56-A-14 engines with propellers to the carrier-based F/A-18 Super Hornet attack fighter powered by two internal F414-GE-400 turbofan engines the these power plants must be in tiptop shape to support any mission. Carl Finger, engine machine shop supervisor in the FRCSE Crinkley Engine Facility at NAS Jacksonville, said these power plants are staying on the air craft longer than ever before. He said the engines division has a dedicated machine shop to rework worn parts to like new condition. Our new equipment is pro ducing better engine perfor mance, saving time and giving Warfighters improved mission capability, said Finger. The high speed grinding technol ogy integrated with laser mea suring creates a more accurate final product in less time. FRCSE purchased two Reform High Speed Blade Tip Grinders, that each turn at 3,000 revolutions per minute. Finger said the high speed technology allows artisans to grind blade tips on the same axis of rotation that the rotors spin to simulate engine condi tions. The engine blades must rotate at high speeds to coun teract the force of the grinder. The high-speed feature allows the blades to extend fully dur ing the grinding process for better results. It is essential that engine blades be machined even ly. Unbalanced grinding can make a blade heavier on one side than on the other, which can lead to heavy vibration, the loosening of internal structural bolts, accelerated engine wear or even failure. The Reform grinder mea sures every blade at every stage of production with laser technology to ensure grinding accuracy. The machines grind high pressure compressor rotor blades from a TF34-GE-100 tur bofan engine thata powers the Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II and the Navys S-3 Viking air craft. In addition, the machine supports the F404-GE-402 engine that powers the F/A18A-D Hornet with 17,700 pounds of static thrust per engine, and the F414-GE-400 turbofan engine that pow ers the Super Hornet and the EA-18G Growler Airborne Electronic Attack aircraft. Each engine is capable of producing 22,000 pounds of static thrust FRCSE AI RCRAF T ENGIN E SHOP FRCSE POW ERS UP S OM E O F NA VYS MIGHTI ES T E NGIN ES

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012 5 according to the Navy Fact File. Another technology solution FRCSE is utilizing is the DANOBAT Vertical Grinder to machine station ary engine components like stator cases. It replaces the Pope Grinding Spindle with its outmoded manual dial indicator and the Electronic Run-Out Machine (EROM) used to perform preand post-production measurements. I was happy to see that go, Finger said of the EROM. It did really good on the rotors, but when we converted to laser measurements it never really worked. It was touchy; it gave us problems. The high-precision DANOBAT integrates different machining options for a wide range of engine com ponents. The machine uses touch probes to provide induction measurements thus ensuring parts can be held to diametric tolerances that can be machined. FRCSE performs out-of-airframe testing on all jet engines repaired at the facility to ensure maximum reliability and performance to the Fleet. The computer-controlled test cells have a thrust capacity of 40,000 pounds and a bed capacity of 100,000 pounds. All engines are tested through their entire operating range in both automated and manual modes to ver ify oil pressure, exhaust, gas temperature, vibration, speed, and bearing-vent pressure. PHOTO S BY VI C TO R PITT S FRCSE

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Eleven Jacksonville-area employers visited the VP-62 Broadarrows as part of the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR) Boss Lift program Aug. 21. Boss lift educates employ ers about the military reserves by giving them a behind-thescenes glimpse of the efforts their employees put forth each time they put on a uniform to serve. Established in 1972, the ESGR promotes understand ing and cooperation between Reservists and their civilian employers and to assist in the resolution of conflicts that arise from an employees mili tary commitments. We have over 4,500 volun teers around the country to provide mediation between Reservists and their employ ers, said Army Sgt. Maj. (ret) Doug Corbett, executive direc tor of ESGR. In Many cases employ ers and Reservists dont completely understand the fed eral Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Right Act (USERRA). USERRA protects the job rights of people who leave a civilian job temporarily to perform military service, and also protects past and present members of the uniformed ser vices from discrimination by employers. This includes people who enlist in the military and leave their civilian jobs and Reservists who deploy. The group visited Hangar 1000 where they toured an operational P-3 Orion and learned about the conditions and capabilities of the aircraft to perform counter-narcotic operations as well as anti-sub marine warfare. Having the opportunity to experience the type of condi tions service members work in is eye opening, said Gena Jankowski, vice president of Human Resources for Brumos. Once employers see the dedication it takes to be a ser vice member they will under stand that hiring one onto their staff will always be a win/win situation. Every bit of insight helps to foster the understanding and acceptance that is required in the workplace when one of our members is called up to serve, said Donald Gauthier, assis tant vice president of legal for Deutsche Bank. After departing the hangar the group took turns flying a P-3 in a fully functional simu lator. Pilots will typically spend 10 or more hours weighted down with gear while on missions, explained VP-62 Instructor Pilot Lt. Cmdr. Jace Dasenbrock. It was a great opportunity to fly the P-3 and get a feel for what the flight crew does. I was not expecting the controls to be as tough as they were, said Noel Schoonmaker, the tech nical recruiter for Ring Power, who has many hours in the air piloting his own plane. Though the main goal of Boss Lift is to give employers a look at what their Reservist employees do while away from the job, just as important is the awards given to employers and the people who constantly sup port those ser vice members while they are away. For more information on ESGR or Patriot awards for employers visit www. Esrg.org or call 1-800 3364590 to speak to a representative. Broadarrows host ESGR boss lift 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012

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VP-30 aircrewmen classes graduate, Sailors promoted VP-30 Executive Officer Cmdr. David Gardella recognized graduates of the P-3C CAT I (initial training syllabus) Acoustic and NonAcoustic Operator Class 1204, Flight Engineer Class 1203, and In-flight Technician Class 1202 during a ceremony Aug. 17. The honor graduates for the classes were: AWF3 Christopher Stanley (Naval Aircrewman Mechanical Class 1203), AWV3 Aharon Pacholke (Naval Aircrewman Avionics Class 1202), AWO2 Lonnel Hudson (Naval Aircrewman Operator Class 1204-NonAcoustic), and AWO1(SW) Kyle Blackniak (Naval Aircrewman Operator Class 1204-Acoustic). All graduating Sailors were advanced at the ceremony to their listed rank by Gardella. These naval aircrewmen will now report to their assigned operational squadrons to begin their initial sea tour. VP-26 Tridents take in Suns baseballVP-26 Sailors took part in an All Khaki Social during a Jacksonville Suns baseball game Aug. 3. The group was warmly welcomed by the Suns as they took on the Montgomery Biscuits for an intense evening of minor league baseball. The get-together created a great opportunity for Trident officers and chief petty officers, as well as their families, to reconnect after a six-month dual site deployment to Bahrain and Qatar. Since chiefs and offi cers share leadership responsibilities, the camaraderie between them is paramount in keeping squadron opera tions running. When the officers and chiefs have a strong bond, the day goes by more smoothly and the workload seems lighter, said VP-26 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Erik Thors. Having time like this outside of work is a tried and true way to help build that bond. Thors threw the games first pitch as a crowd of his Sailors roared in support. The Pacifica, Calif. native took command of the squadron in late May, just before returning home from deployment. Thors wasnt the only Trident to play a starring role in the evenings festivities. Lt. Cmdr. John Dzialoski joined more than 60 members of the Music Ministries Group in singing the national anthem in the games opening ceremony. Singing the national anthem in front of a crowd of thousands was the experience of a lifetime, Dzialoski said. As the evening went on Lt. j.g. Sean Ublacker and Lt. j.g. Blair Volts provided some light entertainment for the crowd as the two flight officers battled it out in a burrito-eating contest during a break between innings. Ublacker, last years champ in the contest, reigned vic torious after devouring a whole burrito in a matter of seconds. The social also served as a great way for Tridents to welcome new additions to their Navy family, as five of them have celebrated new babies and four have gotten married since deploying and returning home. As the post-deployment phase is always a time of change within the squadrons, the chiefs and officers of VP-26 will continue to look for ways to strengthen their ties and enjoy time at home between deployments. Labor Day weekend is a time to enjoy barbecue and the season change from the dog days of summer to the start of autumn, and create fond memories of family gatherings. Its also time to raise awareness of the tenth leading cause of death in the United States suicide. National Suicide Prevention Week is Sept. 9 to 15. Suicide is a complex, atypical behavioral response to stress. Risk factors include depression; mental, per sonality or substance abuse disorders; personal or fam ily history of suicide; family violence; incarceration; or exposure to influences that normalize suicide. Risk is also associated with changes in brain chemicals. Warning signs include thoughts or comments about suicide, substance abuse problems, purposelessness, anxiety, feeling trapped or hopeless, withdrawal, anger, recklessness and mood changes. Some facts to consider are that suicidal behavior is not specific to gender, race or age; but there are differences, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Women attempt suicide two to three times more often than men, but men fatally wound themselves at four times the rate that women do. This is related to meth odwomen more often use poison, while men more often use firearms. There is a peak of suicide incidence among teens and young adults, age 15 to 24, as well as in adults over age 85. In terms of ethnicity, suicide is twice as likely among non-Hispanic whites and American Indians as among Hispanics, African-Americans and Asian Americans. Effective medical treatments are available for depres sion and other health problems that are risk factors for suicide. So for those struggling, see a doctor to find out what the options are. Community resources are available for anyone who might be thinking about suicide. Active duty, veterans and family and friends can contact the Veterans Crisis Line at 800-273-TALK (8255), which offers a hotline, online chat and texting. Take action for Suicide Prevention Week JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012 7

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fleet. And, retention remains historically high. Another issue the admiral discussed was resiliency of force. With our force in such high demand, there is a continuous increase of stress and sacrifice placed upon our Sailors and their families. Earlier this year, the SECNAV and CNO rolled out the 21st Century Sailor/Marines initia tive which focuses on readiness, safety, physical fitness, inclusion and continuum of service. We will continue to resource and support those pro grams, said Van Buskirk. He mentioned several top priorities including operational stress control, sexual assault pre vention and synthetic drug testing. Resiliency of our force is critical. We need to be more pro active in recognizing stress indicators, suicide ideations and increase awareness on sexual assault prevention, he stated. During a question and answer session, Sailors asked about changes to the PTS program, TA program, workforce quotas, high-year tenure, ERB, Individual Augmentee assignments and pay increases. Van Buskirk closed by thanking Sailors for what they do every day and for continuing to answer the call. CNP BEACH RUNNAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM) (AW/SW) Brad Shepherd. After a series of warm-up exercises and singing the national anthem, the runners took off down the beach, followed by the formation of CPO selectees proudly carrying flags and singing traditional Navy songs. They were cheered on by hundreds of family mem bers, friends and spectators who came out for the event. As they hit the halfway mark, the group turned around and headed back to the finish line, coming in at a little over one hour. Stevens praised the CPO selectees for completing the run. Im impressed that the group stayed together nice job! I guess the CPO 365 program is working out pretty well, he said. Its great to be an American and do something spe cial and then we join the U.S. Navy and become part of something even more special. Then, a chosen few get the opportunity to be called a chief petty officer. There are about 30,000 CPOs in the United States Navy, and when you compare that to the 300-plus mil lion population of our country, you are the chosen few and you should feel good about that, Stevens contin ued. Im so very, very proud of you all coming out here tonight and to see those who will soon wear the cov eted fouled anchors perform in such a magnificent manner in front of the great citizens of Jacksonville. What a great Navy town this is! said Stevens, who also recognized the spouses and families, thanking them for their support. Although the run proved a bit challenging for some of the selectees, most were thrilled to be part of the group crossing the finish line. This run was a bit easier than I thought it was going to be. Weve been training pretty hard for it and run five miles three times a week so we were ready for it. It was a really good time, said AWOC(NAC/AW/IUSS) (select) Ervin Maldonado of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11. I loved this run its been a great day! added ASC(AW) (select) Kathryn Kennon of the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax. After completing the run, the chief selectees gath ered in formation to show their pride by reciting the Sailors Creed, singing Anchors Aweigh and partici pating in some cool-down stretches. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012

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In June 2011, Australian Minister for Defense Stephen Smith announced his govern ments approval for the acqui sition of 24 MH-60R Seahawk helicopters at a cost of more than $3 billion. Today, a Royal Australian Navy (RAN) advance team is working with Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic to ensure RAN aircrews and maintainers are trained and ready when their first pair of production Seahawks land at NAS Jacksonville in December 2013. RAN Lt. Cmdr. Marcus Baxter of the Australian Defense Material Organization is the Resident Project Team (RPT) training lead for the Australian MH-60R Project Office. Our FMS (Foreign Military Sales) agreement with the U.S. government includes what they call the total package of train ing, systems, technical, sup ply and logistics support, said Baxter. The plan currently entails formal USN training courses for over 100 RAN personnel including aircrew, technicians and maintainers, with train ing commencing early 2013. A portion of these personnel will also receive three months con solidation/on-job-training with USN squadrons. During our training time at NAS Jacksonville, we will concurrently be building new helicopter hangars and flight/ mission simulators at our home base of HMAS Albatross in Nowra, New South Wales. Like the HSM squadrons here, a number of our new Romeos will deploy on board RAN frigates and destroyers, said Baxter. This is an off-the-shelf sale with the rationale that, as a close ally, we want to be com pletely inter-operable with the USN. The MH-60R and its robust suite of training and support systems represent the best value for our tax payers and one of the best weapons platforms for our navy, explained Baxter. The RAN orga nizational concept for the MH-60R includes a train ing squadron and an operational squadron that will provide at least eight helicopters to RAN frigates and destroyers on independent deployments. Those majority of aircraft not deployed will support both air crew and maintainer training activities with a remaining few undergoing scheduled mainte nance. RAN chief petty officers Robert McLean and Steven Rissman are liaisons with CNATTU Jacksonville and HSM-40 at NS Mayport. Im involved with review ing the MH-60R maintenance courseware for any specifica tions or instructions that are different for RAN versus USN. Much of it concerns USN aviation rates such as AD, AM, AE and AT and how they translate to RAN categories and branches, explained McLean. We expect to teach nine students per class at CNATTU. Rissman said, This new helicop ter is much more advanced that what were used to but our pilots, crews and maintainers will be up to the challenge. Were also pleased that the USN will inte grate us into their schedules for the flight, mission and mainte nance simulators. ATCS Edward Krueger is in charge of the H-60 train ing program at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) at NAS Jacksonville. Supporting this FMS pro gram will be a new experi ence for CNATTU, but we have a good initial train ing track established for the MH-60 Romeo. Right now, our CNATTU team is working with Lt. Cmdr. Baxter and Chief McLean to adapt the course ware to RAN specifications. Since English our common lan guage, theres not much trans lating involved its mostly acronyms, ratings clarifica tion and technical terms, said Krueger. The new Sikorsky-Lockheed MH-60R helicopters will replace the current inventory of 16 S-70B-2 Seahawks in the Australian Defense Force. Baxter observed, From the airframe and power plant point-of-view, there are many similarities between the two. The real difference is a quan tum leap forward in the cockpit displays and mission systems. Whether youre a structural mechanic, avionics techni cian, sensor operator or pilot everyone selected to come to NAS Jacksonville is particular ly enthusiastic about training with the USN. He concluded, We look forward to our first RAN atsea exercise by taking part in RIMPAC 2014 for our Operational Test and Evaluation. Our major operational milestone is scheduled for March 2015 when we stand up at our home base in New South Wales and embark our first RAN Flight. David Mims is a logistics specialist with the PMA-299 FMS team that is working with industry partners and the lead ership of Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic. Australia is a valued American ally in the Pacific Rim and the concept of naval interoperability is impor tant to both navies. This is the first FMS program involving the MH-60R, but most likely wont be the last. Royal Australian Navy to train here on MH-60R Seahawks JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012 11

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From Aug. 14-23, the Naval Supply Systems Commands (NAVSUP) Inspector General (IG) team per formed an independent and objective analysis of operations at NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville. This inspection resulted in NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville receiving an over all grade of Satisfactory, the highest grade attainable in an IG inspection. The grade of Satisfactory was a ter rific accomplishment, but it doesnt capture the specific achievements of the NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville work force. In the final report, the IG team documented those achievements as 73 Noteworthy Accomplishments and six Best Business Practices across the Jacksonville enterprise. The diligence with which our team performs day-in and day-out is evidenced by the terrific results of the past ten days, said NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Head. NAVSUP Inspector General Capt. Glenn Lintz added to that observation. I was very impressed with the work force, their level of knowledge and their enthusiasm, said Lintz. The relationships [FLC Jacksonville] has with its customers was also impres sive, particularly [Commander, Navy Region Southeast] and [Commander, 4th Fleet] which gave glowing reports. This is a credit to Capt. Head and the entire FLC Jacksonville team. The IG team reviewed 21 functional areas, and all 21 were graded satisfactory. This workforce really did an amaz ing job. I am extremely pleased with the result, said Head. I am. Are you?Accept the challenge and find out more in September as the U.S. Navy launches Ready Navy, its emergency preparedness and public awareness cam paign. Be informed: Find out what disasters are most likely to happen in your area and the history of their occur rence, and learn about any specific instructions or information you may need to know regarding these specific disasters. Have a plan: Another important tool you and your family need to prepare for possible emergencies is a family preparedness plan. Everyone in the family should understand what to do, where to go, and what to take in the event of an emergency. Your emergency plan should include how your family will communi cate with each other, particularly if normal commu nication methods, such as phone lines or cell towers, are out. Have a contact person outside the area that each member of the family can notify that they are safe. Also, plan ahead for how you will evacuate the area and where your family will meet if you are evacu ated separately. Learn about the mustering require ments at your command and become familiar the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS) (https://navyfamily.navy.mil). If you are sta tioned overseas, learn about additional noncombatant evacuation orders procedures. Build a kit: The best way to prepare for the unex pected is to create one or more emergency kits that include enough supplies for at least three days. Keep a kit prepared at home, and consider having kits in your car, at work, and a portable version in your home ready to take with you. These kits will enable you and your family to respond to an emergency more effectively. Your various emergency kits will be use ful whether you have to shelter-in-place or evacuate. Be sure your kits address the needs of small children, individuals with special needs, and your pets. Ready Navy coming soon! Workforce preparations evident throughout IG inspection Ready Navy 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012

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A training detachment from the Greyhawks of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 120 concluded its 12-day field carrier landing practice (FCLP) at NAS Jacksonville and Outlying Landing Field (OLF) Whitehouse Aug. 27. The shore-based training will be followed by shipboard training on an underway aircraft carrier in the Atlantic. VAW-120 is the Navys fleet replacement squadron (FRS) for carrier airborne early warning squadrons flying the E-2C Hawkeye and fleet logistics support squadrons flying the C-2A Greyhound aircraft. Cmdr. Brad Stevens, operations officer of VAW-120, led the detachment of eight instructor pilots, 15 stu dent pilots and three landing signal officers (LSO). We detach to NAS Jacksonville four or five times a year so our student pilots can get their FCLP, which represents the near completion of their FRS training syllabi, explained Stevens. Pilot ball flying using the Optical Landing System at Whitehouse is the big gest part of our mission for this detachment because theres no greater challenge for a young pilot than landing an aircraft on a ship. Everything our LSOs work for serves a singular purpose accurate landings without mishaps, said Stevens. Thats why grading each touch-and-go land ing or bounce at Whitehouse is vital. Every bounce by every pilot is analyzed and graded and after flight ops, each pilot is debriefed by their LSO. He said the training goal is to achieve the same landing accuracy, whether it takes place during day or night operations. Night ops can be more beneficial because it reinforces the instrument scan in the pat tern. This encourages the student to focus on trusting his instruments for his turn to approach the ship. The runway at Whitehouse is the same width as an aircraft carrier flight deck. Because the Hawkeyes wingspan is so wide, our LSOs harp on hitting the pattern and flying the ball for a centerline landing. Drift five feet, one way or the other and there could be trouble. During their detachment to NAS Jax, pilots aver aged 170 to 190 passes at OLF Whitehouse. When they undergo carrier qualifications the following week, each Hawkeye pilot must accomplish at least 10 day time traps and six night traps. Stevens added that this was his final VAW-120 detachment to NAS Jax. He has orders to the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) where hell serve as the air operations officer. As the air boss, hell be responsible for every aspect of aircraft opera tions, including the hangar deck, the flight deck and airborne aircraft out to five nautical miles from the aircraft carrier. The FRS mission is to train pilots, naval flight offi cers and maintainers. Upon successful completion of their syllabi, they depart VAW-120 for assignment to one of the Navys operational E-2 or C-2 squadrons based at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. or Naval Base Ventura County at Point Mugu, Calif. According to the Naval Air Systems Command fact sheet, the E-2C Hawkeye provides allweather airborne early warning, airborne battle management and com mand and control func tions for the carrier strike group and joint force commander. Additional missions include surface surveillance coordina tion, air interdiction, offensive and defensive counter air control, close air support coordination, time criti cal strike coordination, search and rescue airborne coordination and communications relay. The C-2A Greyhound provides critical logistics sup port to carrier strike groups. Its primary mission is the transport of high-priority cargo, mail and passengers between carriers and shore bases. Priority cargo such as jet engines can be transported from shore to ship in a matter of hours. A cargo cage system or transport stand provides restraint for loads during launches and landings. Greyhawks practice carrier landings at OLF Whitehouse JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012 13

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included September Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of onelane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Fall Bowling Leagues now forming. Mixed league Monday 7 p.m. After-work league Wednesday 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thursday 9 a.m. Mixed league Thursday 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Friday 11:45 a.m. Friday night league 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Saturday 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Open Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. until October 1. Free for military and DoD civil ians, $3 for guestsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. The Price is Right Times Union Center Sept. 25, 7:30 p.m., $47 Sesame Street Live Times Union Center Sept. 29, 2:30 p.m., $18 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23, 2013 Preferred seating $42, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. NFL Jaguars vs. Atlanta Falcons Aug. 30 Free admission and transpor tation Paintball Trip Sept. 1 at 9 a.m. Mall & Movie Trip Sept. 15 Orange Park Mall & AMC TheaterNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Sept. 4 & 18 for active duty Sept. 6 & 20 for retirees & DoD personnel September is customer appre ciation month Monday Friday play 18 holes for $18, includes cart and green fees. Not valid on holidays. Open to military, DoD and guests Golf & Dine Special Play 18-holes with cart and choice of breakfast or lunch for $26! Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding. ASE certified mechanic onsite.Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recre ation are available. Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you. Call 778-9772 for more information. Register now for before & after school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household incomeFlying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Sept. 10 Oct. 17 $500 per person For more information about any sports, contact Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook. com nasjaxmwr 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012

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Pahl retires from Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility, JacksonvilleTeresa Pahl, Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility (FACSFAC) Jacksonville administration officer and command security manager retires Aug. 31 after more than 34 years of dedicated government service. Pahl, a native of Port Hueneme, Calif., grad uated from Hueneme High and attended Ventura Junior College for three years before joining the Civil Service. She has served the Navy honor ably around the globe, including Naval Stations in Guam, Argentina, Newfoundland, Washington, D.C., and, for the last 22 years, at FACSFAC Jacksonville. Pahl originally served as secre tary to the commanding officer, beginning in January 1990. During her 22 years supporting FACSFAC Jacksonvilles mission, she has received multiple awards for retention excellence and Bravo Zulus for administrative support from the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy. As editor for the command public affairs officer, she edited over 264 news articles covering topics ranging from Sailors achievements and retirements to other command events. FACSFAC Jacksonvilles mission in support of national defense is to provide preeminent control, coordination, and management of our airspace, sea space, and sub-sea space to our nations militaries, agencies and civilian users. This critical mission can only be accomplished through the hard work and dedication of individuals such as Pahl. She has played a vital part in the success of FACSFAC Jacksonville and to the successes of many Sailors that have worked with her over the past 34 years. In memoriamAOC Carl Creamer, USN (Ret.)Retired AOC Carl Ed Creamer, 91, passed away Aug. 23 in Jacksonville. Creamer was born Jan. 26, 1921 in Portis, Kansas. He joined the Navy in September 1940 completing boot camp and Ordnance A School in San Diego. His first tour was with VP-41 in Seattle, Wash. During this tour, Creamer deployed to Sitka and Kodiak, Alaska. On June 3, 1942 while on patrol in a PBY5A, the aircraft was shot down by Japanese fighters. Creamer was one of three survi vors of the nine-man crew who managed to stay afloat in the dark Bering Sea for four hours before being picked up by the Japanese cruiser Takao. As a prisoner of war (POW), Creamer was moved through seven Japanese POW camps during the war. Creamer was given a presiden tial appointment to chief petty officer in October, 1944 and later transferred to NAS Sand Point, Seattle, Wash as the assistant base master-at-arms, ordnance chief and chief of transportation. In October 1948, Creamer transferred to Fleet Composite Squadron Five at NAS Moffett Field, Calif. as special weapons chief. Three years later, he trans ferred to Heavy Attack Training Unit One in Norfolk, Va. as chief of ordnance in special weapons and ABC Handling Equipment. In January 1952, Creamer reported to Fleet Aircraft Service Squadron 51 at NAAS Sanford, Fla. A year later, he was given a temporary presidential appointment to gunner, war rant officer and transferred to USS Cabot (CVL-28) at Philadelphia Naval Ship Yard as the air craft ordnance and training officer. In 1954, his status was reversed back to aviation ordnance chief and Creamer transferred to Fleet Composite Squadron 62 at NAS Jacksonville. He then reported to Attack Squadron 106 at NAS Cecil Field as ordnance chief followed by tours at USNAAS Barin Field, Foley, Ala., and Attack Squadron 196 NAS Moffett Field, Calif. Creamer retired from the Navy on July 1, 1960 at NAS Alameda, Calif. Creamer maintained associa tion with shipmates while attend ing American Legion and American Ex-POW func tions immedi ately following his transfer to the Fleet Reserve. He also attended Patrol Wing 4 and VP-41s 50th and final squad ron reunion in 1999, where he met and shook the hand of the Japanese Zero pilot that shot him and the crew of his PBY5A from the sky on June 3, 1942. Several books have been written about his capture and interment in Japan including, We Stole to Live, by Joseph Rust Brown, The Thousand-Mile War: WWII in the Aleutians, by Brian Garfield and War Comes to Alaska: The Dutch Harbor Attack, by Norman Rouke. A letter to the USOMy name is Kimberly Janus and I am a Sailor in the United States Navy, currently stationed at NAS Jacksonville. I have been battling a health condition for a period of time that has resulted in me requiring an intrusive medical procedure. When my mother heard about my upcoming procedure, she really wanted to be there for me. She is from the Chicago, Ill., and I hadnt seen her in a very long time. We figured out we would have just enough money for the plane ticket, groceries and gas however, we wouldnt have enough money for a place to stay. The barracks does not allow visitors to sleep in the rooms. My mother and I were stranded. I really needed her to come down and help take care of me after my proce dure but we had nowhere to go. This is when I contacted the USO at NAS Jax. I explained the story and a day later a man by the name of Bob Ross (business direc tor of the NAS Jax USO) said that Comfort Inn in Orange Park would allow my mother and I to stay there, free of charge! Ross told me to contact the hotel manager, Paz Patel, who also serves on the board of the USO. I contacted Mr. Patel, who happens to be the nicest individual I have ever met. He wel comed my mother and I into his hotel. We were relieved and so thankful for this kind ness. My mother flew into the Jax airport on July 31, and we met at the airports USO. From the airport we drove to Comfort Inn to check in. Upon our arrival, I was given a blue gift bag with goodies and a postcard from Mr. Patel that said, Dear Janus Ladies, I trust you will have a wonderful stay. Welcome aboard. Catch up soon. Paz. This brought tears to my eyes. Not only did Mr. Patel allow us to stay in his hotel, but he also made me feel welcome and comfortable. He went the extra mile to give a Sailor the feeling of home and support. For the duration of our stay, Mr. Patel con tinued to check on us. He stopped by to shake my hand and to thank me for serving my country. The day of my surgery he called to make sure everything went well and to ask if we needed anything. We cannot thank Comfort Inn, Mr. Patel, and the USO enough. We had the most won derful stay and encourage more hotels to offer something like this to their troops in need. We will never forget this, thank you. Kimberly & Therese Janus JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012 15

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CNATTU Jax announces second quarter awardsThe Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville announces their Sailor of the Quarter, Second Quarter, FY-12 and Instructors of the Quarter, Third Quarter, CY-12. was selected as the Instructor of the Quarter for Third Quarter FY-12. As Support Equipment A/S37A-3 Mobile Electric Power Plant lead instructor for Maintenance Training Unit (MTU) 3032, he provided over 120 hours of instruction to 11 Sailors. As MTU SARP advocate, he trained 64 students and 26 staff personnel on sexual assault pre vention and awareness. was selected as Sailor of the Quarter for Second Quarter CY-12. As Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) manager, Apoyan managed the Hazardous Material Certification pro gram granting graduates credentials endorsed by the EPA to safely manage Type I, II, and III refrigerants for air con ditioning and cooling systems for 63 students with a 100 percent graduation rate. selected as Junior Sailor of the Quarter for Second Quarter CY-12. As MTU 1005 H-60 Airframe and Related Systems Technician (Initial) and (Career) Course instructor, he demonstrated superior dedication, leadership and techni cal skills, providing 500 instructional hours. Hamilton recently qualified as a master training specialist. ed as Junior Instructor of the Quarter for Third Quarter FY-12. As MTU 1005 SH-60B LAMPS MK III Weapons System Technician (Initial) and (Career) Course instructor and Course Curriculum Model manager, he demonstrated supe rior dedication, leadership, and techni cal skills graduating 22 students with a 100 percent passing rate all while performing an intense course revi sion. As the MTU SARP advocate, he trained 102 students and 26 staff on sex ual assault prevention and awareness. Additionally, Delpivo recently qualified as a master training specialist. as Non-Commissioned Officer of the Quarter for Third Quarter CY-12. As MTU 3032s Instructional Systems Development representative, Wethy has been instrumental in preparing the MTU for the upcoming Training Management Assessment Program inspection, ensuring that all programs of instruction are updated, revised, and ready for inspection. Wethy has also vol unteered numerous hours to HabiClay building houses for those in need. NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville has named its Sailors of the Quarter for the Third Quarter of Fiscal Year 2012. MM1(SW) Benjamin Stanley is the Senior Sailor of the Quarter, ABF2 Jason Lawhorne is the Junior Sailor of the Quarter and LS3 Gustavo Chavez is the Blue Jacket of the Quarter. ics operations and maintenance at NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, Site NAS Kingsville, Texas was the key to the suc cessful repair and continued mainte nance of the sites mobile nitrogen gas generators over the quarter. When the generators broke down, his dedicated efforts returned them to full operational capability with no impact on the train ing mission. When it comes to cryogenics equip ment repair, Stanley is the go-to guy for NAS Kingsville as well as NAS Corpus Christi. Stanley is also involved with the local communitys children volun teering at the base Child Development Center and with other local projects that prepare children for academic suc cess. Additionally, Stanley is pursuing his Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering. MM1 Stanley is a truly exception al leader with impressive work ethics; an outstanding technician who distin guishes himself through superior per formance. He exhibits initiative, lead ership, and a highly professional and positive approach to all aspects of naval service. His personal traits of honesty, hard work, and unquestionable integri ty are evident in his daily performance, said Lt. Cmdr. Samuel Betancourt NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, Site NAS Kingsville. NAVSUP FLCJ, Site NAS Fort Worth JRB Fuels team. Over the quarter, Lawhorne provided professional support with the delivery of more than 2.2 million gal lons of JP-8 aviation fuel jet fuel and 17,866 gallons of ground fuels in sup port of NAS Fort Worth JRB flight opera tions. As the quality assurance evaluator, Lawhorne coordinates daily operations and preventive and corrective mainte nance of the fuels facilities and equip ment. During the absence of his chief and leading petty officer, Lawhorne took charge of the emergency inspec tion of one of the bulk fuels storage tanks. During this time, he performed superbly as the primary point of contact and ensured the close coordination and communication with contractors and Department of Defense fuel represen tatives in support of the safe and quick removal of all fuel products. In his off-duty time, Lawhorne dedi cates a great deal of time serving as an assistant coach for the Benbrook YMCA Little League Baseball Team where he mentors more than 37 youth, and serves as a positive representative of the Navy in regards to community relations. NAS Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base (JRB), Chavez has been vital to the suc cess of the Receiving Department. He processed more than 1,000 stock and direct turnover items that were back ordered during the Navy Enterprise Resource Planning (NERP) upgrade, ensuring 100 percent accountability for receipt and stowage of the material. Chavez, the most junior sailor in the command, took incredible initiative requesting additional NERP training to become a sought-out expert. The addi tional NERP training he provided to the commands two new civilian employees drastically improved receipt process ing turnaround time. Chavez helped prevent a backlog of mission critical items when he stepped up to assist the Packing and Crating Division with the packing of more than 100 outbound shipments. Additionally, he is involved with the local Meals on Wheels pro gram and devotes personal time to coaching a youth soccer group. Petty Officer Lawhorne continual ly leads by example volunteering for duties normally held by more senior personnel and executes those duties with tremendous ownership and pride. Petty Officer Chavezs positive and enthusiastic attitude directly infects those who work with and around him as he takes the initiative, sets the exam ple, and always producing a top quality product, said Cmdr. Dave Rudko, site director for NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, Site NAS Fort Worth JRB. I am extremely proud of both Petty Officer Lawhornes and Petty Officer Chavez noteworthy accomplishments. We had a difficult task this quarter choosing among the nominees, who were all worthy of selection in their respective categories, said NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Head. I congratulate Petty Officers Stanley, Lawhorne, and Chavez for standing out among their peers to be named FLCJs Senior, Junior, and Blue Jacket of the Quarter. Bravo Zulu! NAVSUP FLC Jax names Sailors of the Quarter 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012 17 The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) established a board known as the LCS Council Aug. 22 consisting of four Navy vice admirals to oversee continued fleet test ing and introduction of littoral combat ship (LCS) sea frames, mission modules and mission packages. Adm. Jonathan Greenert des ignated Vice Adm. Rick Hunt, director of the Navy staff, as the councils chairman. Other officers on the council include Vice Adm. Mark Skinner, prin cipal military deputy to the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development and Acquisition; Vice Adm. Tom Copeman, commander, Naval Surface Forces; and Vice Adm. Kevin McCoy, commander, Naval Sea Systems Command. The initial focus of the LCS Council will be to develop a class-wide plan of action to address the areas identi fied as needing improvement in recent assessments and reviews. The plan is expected to be implemented by Jan. 31, 2013. Addressing challenges iden tified by these studies, on the timeline we require, neces sitates the establishment of an empowered council to drive action across acquisi tion, requirements and fleet enterprises of the Navy, said Greenert. It is expected that issues will arise in any first-of-class ship building program. Navy ships are designed with test and trial periods to ensure everything is working correctly, and repairs can be made, if required. That approach also allows for the incorporation of lessons learned into the follow-on ships before theyre delivered. I am confident we are on a path of success for LCS, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. This council will continue to unify our efforts to imple ment operational lessons learned from our research and development ships to further ensure successful fleet integra tion. As first-of-class research and development (R&D) ships, LCS 1 and LCS 2 have provided sig nificant lessons learned in the test and evaluation process. Those lessons learned have led to design and production improvements on follow-on ships. All Navy combat ships, even test and evaluation platforms, must be ready to meet assigned missions starting with the first day of active service LCS is no exception, said Greenert. Navy efforts are now focused on transitioning from testing initial R&D ships to operation ally employing LCS and ensur ing the Navy is prepared to man, train and equip the class in the most efficient and effec tive manner. Still, it is expected that LCS 1 and LCS 2 will continue to provide lessons learned well into the future. The LCS coun cil will use a comprehensive review process to critically examine areas that need to be addressed before an LCS deploys to Singapore next spring. In June, the Singapore mili tary agreed in-principle to allow the U.S. Navy to deploy up to four littoral combat ships to the city-state on a rotational basis. U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta stated that the LCS will not be based or homeported in Singapore, and that crews will live on board the ships for the duration of their deployment. Vice Adm. Michelle Janine Howard has been a trailblazer throughout her entire career. She was the first AfricanAmerican woman to command a U.S. Navy warship, the first female gradu ate of the Naval Academy to achieve the rank of rear admiral, and the first African-American woman to command an Expeditionary Strike Group at sea. Howard reached another milestone Aug. 24, when she became the first African-American woman promoted to three-star rank in the U.S. Armed Forces with the assumption of her new job as deputy commander, U.S. Fleet Forces. With a career highlighted by firsts, the path to Howards current assign ment as a Navy vice admiral initially began with an obstacle. It is an obstacle that taught her to embrace change, find strength in the challenges she faced, and to not be afraid to lean on others. Howard said her Navy career began as a chance encounter while watching television. It was a documentary about one of the military service academies that opened Howards eyes to a pos sible future career as an officer in the military. At 17, Howard applied and was accepted into the U.S. Naval Academy. In 1978, she entered the Naval Academy as a freshman. She was in only the third class to accept women. At that time women made up only five percent of the Navy. With more than 200 years of naval history and traditions, there was some resistance to change. With a self-deprecating laugh, Howard said that the Academy wasnt easy. In retrospect, she realized that expecting a smooth sail wouldnt have been very realistic. When you look at where society was at the time, this was before there was even a woman on the Supreme Court, before Sally Ride was an astronaut, and it was also only five or six years after we became an all volunteer force in the military, so our society was still going through a lot of changes. She says the one person who was incredibly helpful in putting her expe riences in context was Wesley Brown, the first black Naval Academy graduate, Class of 1949. He talked about how great this coun try is and how much it has changed; that as the country changed, peo ple changed. What I really learned from him was that he was a man who could forgive and go on with his life. There is a lot of strength in that, said Howard. Change is inevitable, and Howard rode a wave of it as she moved through her career. In the 1980s when the Navy opened the logistics ships to women, that was huge, because it allowed a lot of oppor tunities for women to serve at sea. Then it was just a few years later that we were engaged in Operation Desert Storm. So even though women werent serving on warships, women were still serving in a combat arena, and that started a national conversation. What is a wom ans role in the military? Coming out of that time frame, the combat exclusion law was repealed and that meant women were going to serve on combat ships and fly combat air craft, said Howard. After serving sea tours aboard several ships, in 1999, Howard fulfilled her dream of com manding a Navy warship at sea. She took command of the amphibious dock landing ship USS Rushmore (LSD 47), becoming the first African-American woman in such a role. The crew was wonderful. To this day thats what I think about. When you are going into command you think its going to be challenging, you believe its going to be fun, and it definitely was fun, but there are always challenges you dont expect. At the same time you go in with the expectation that Sailors can do anything, and that was the ship that proved it. We are so lucky that we have the people who not only have the talent, but who care and want to get it right. Howard was selected for the rank of rear admiral lower half in 2006, making her the first admiral selected from the U.S. Naval Academy Class of 1982 and the first woman graduate selected for flag rank. In 2009, Howard put on her sec ond star and assumed command of Expeditionary Strike Group 2 and deployed in the Gulf of Aden to con duct anti-piracy operations. Within one week of checking aboard her flag ship, amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4), she was immersed in the rescue of Capt. Richard Phillips, commanding officer of the MV Maersk Alabama. Thats an eye-opening way to start a new job. Very quickly we had sever al ships, special forces, aircraft and it seemed like everyone in the world was focused on one American and trying to make sure he didnt end up on shore in Somalia. Synchronizing that kind of might and capability was pretty amazing. Not including the 3,000 Sailors and Marines in her task force, Howard said they also had support from reconnais sance aircraft out of Djibouti, intelli gence support from the United States, ass well as communication with the staff at U.S. 5th Fleet in Bahrain. When you think about it thats a lot of people, and Im going to say thats the right call. The Department of Defense is there to protect Americas interest, Americas property and Americas citi zens. And in the end there is a deter rence factor. You want the average pirate to look at an American ship and say, well just let that one go by. For the women following in her foot steps, Howard has this advice. You have to keep your sense of humor. You have to develop stamina and you need to be adaptable. Finally, you need to stay connected to women. Its important to be able to share experiences and to be able to tap into those shared experi ences. During her career, Howard has seen dramatic changes in the Navy and the nation, but there is one more change shed like to witness. I would like to see our nation appre ciate the importance of the Navy. We are blessed to live in a time where the average citizen really appreciates their Sailors when we walk anywhere in a uniform we get thanked. If I could change anything Id like Americans to understand who they are thanking and why. How do you convince a nation this big that they are a maritime nation? Our founding fathers got it; they under stood the importance of international commerce and that is why they said to maintain a Navy in the Constitution. And ironically enough, we are even more dependent on maintaining safe waterways now than they were then. Howard may get her wish. As the newest vice admiral in the Navy and deputy commander of U.S. Fleet Forces, she will have the opportunity to reach a much larger audience than ever before. As she has proven time and again, there is a first for everything. The flagship of the John C. Stennis Strike Group (JCSSG), aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), departed Aug. 27, to begin an eightmonth deployment to the western Pacific Ocean and the Persian Gulf. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta visited with the ships crew Aug. 22 to thank them for the extraordinary effort to pre pare for this upcoming deploy ment. I understand that it is tough, said Panetta. We are asking an awful lot of each of you, but frankly you are the best I have and when the world calls we have to respond. You are the heart and soul of our national defense. You are the heart and soul of what makes America strong. Thats why Im here. To thank you for what you do to help keep America the strongest military power in the world. JCSSG is returning to the U.S. 7th and 5th Fleet areas of operation four months ahead of schedule in order to main tain combatant commander requirements for the presence in the region. Stennis returned in March from its most recent deployment. JCSSG is comprised of the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 9, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 21 and USS Mobile Bay (CG53). CVW-9 consists of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 8, Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 71, and Fleet Logistics Combat Support Squadron (VRC) 30 from Naval Air Station (NAS) North Island, Calif.; Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 14, VFA-41, VFA-97, and VFA-192, from NAS Lemoore, Calif.; and Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 133 from NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. CNO establishes LCS Council Navy promotes first African-American female Three-Star OfficerStennis strike group departs early for 8-month deployment

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk visited the NAS Jacksonville Aug. 23 to meet with base leadership and junior Sailors to discuss issues such as force manage ment, Enlisted Retention Board (ERB), Perform to Serve (PTS) program, Tuition Assistance (TA) program and other personnel issues. During the visit, Van Buskirk met with base command master chiefs for lunch at the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf conversing about the new CPO 365 program and chief petty officer selectee induction training. Van Buskirk also held a leadership and all hands call at the VP-30 auditorium. Im here for two reasons to listen to your concerns so we can appropri ately address issues and to let you know whats going on within the fleet, said Van Buskirk. First, Id like to highlight just how relevant the U.S. Navy is. We are a globally deployed force while support ing two critical missions in Iraq and Afghanistan. That is a tremendous accomplishment, said the admiral. We continue to focus on war fight ing first, operating forward and being ready. This means our workforce must be deployable, assignable and distributable to be ready to answer the call for our nation. Van Buskirk also stressed the importance of stabilizing the Navys work force by getting the right balance of skill sets and filling critical gaps at sea. In early August, the Navy introduced several voluntary and involuntary measures intended to reduce gaps at sea. These include changes to detail ing through the Career Management System Interactive Detailing, extension of the Voluntary Sea Duty program, Limited Directed Detailing program, the Chief Petty Officer Early Return to Sea program, and expansion of the ratings eligible for sea duty incentive pay. These measures aim to man oper ational units with qualified Sailors with critical skill sets, ensuring fleet and operational readiness, said Van Buskirk. Our quality of workforce has never been better. The talent coming in has never been better. They have the skills and education and its impacting the Prospective Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON)(AW/NAC) Mike Stevens joined chief petty officers (CPO) and 114 CPO selectees from Naval Air Station Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport in the 5-mile Tijuana Flats Beach Run at Jacksonville Beach Aug. 25. I came to Jacksonville to take a look at the training for our new CPO selectees, inter act with them and meet with the leadership who are providing the opportunity for them to participate in this event. Im also here to run with the Jacksonville community and to have good time, said Stevens. This is a great commu nity event. We bring our chief selectees out here to run together as a team and to pro mote our Navy within the local community. It just doesnt get any better than this, added CNP holds all hands call at NAS Jax Prospective MCPON, CPO selectees tackle beach run

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Aug. 30 1913 Navy tests Sperry gyroscopic stabilizer (automatic pilot). 1929 Near New London, Conn., 26 officers and men test Momsen lung to exit submerged USS S-4. 1961 Two Cuban frigates fire on a Naval Reserve aircraft on a training mission over international waters. Aug. 31 1943 Commissioning of USS Harmon (DE-678), first Navy ship named for an African-American Sailor. 1944 Carrier task group begins three-day attack on Iwo Jima and Bonin Islands. 1962 Last flight of Navy airship at NAS Lakehurst, N.J. Sept. 1 1781 French fleet traps British fleet at Yorktown, Va. 1814 USS Wasp captures HMS Avon. 1925 Cmdr. John Rodgers and crew of four in PN-9 run out of fuel on first San Francisco-to-Hawaii flight. Landing at sea, they rigged a sail and set sail for Hawaii. 1941 U.S. assumes responsibility for trans-Atlantic convoys from Argentia, Canada to the meridian of Iceland. 1942 Establishment of Air Force, Pacific Fleet, under Vice Adm. Aubrey Fitch. 1942 First Seabee unit to serve in a combat area, 6th Naval Construction Battalion, arrives on Guadalcanal. 1945 USS Benevolence (AH-13) evacuates civilian internees from two internment camps near Tokyo, Japan Sept. 2 1918 Navy ships and crews assist earthquake victims of Yokohama and Tokyo, Japan. 1940 Destroyers-for-Bases agree ment between U.S. and United Kingdom. 1944 USS Finback (SS-230) rescues Lt. j.g. George Bush, USNR of VT-51, shot down while attacking Chichi Jima. 1945 Japan signs surrender docu ments on board USS Missouri (BB-63) at anchor in Tokyo Bay. Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz signs for the U.S. In different ceremonies, Japanese forces on Palau Islands, Truk, and on Pagan Island and Rota in the Marianas also surrender. Sept. 3 1782 As a token of gratitude for French aid during American Revolution, the U.S. gives America (first ship-of-the-line built by U.S.) to France to replace a French ship lost near Boston. 1783 Signing of Treaty of Paris ends American Revolution. 1885 First classes at U.S. Naval War College begin. 1925 Crash of rigid airship Shenandoah near Byesville, Ohio. 1943 American landings on Lae and Salamaua. 1944 First combat employment of a missile guided by radio and television takes place when Navy drone Liberator, controlled by Ensign James Simpson in a PV, flew to attack German submarine pens on Helgoland Island. 1945 Japanese surrender Wake Island in ceremony on board USS Levy (DE-162). Sept. 4 1941 German submarine U-652 attacks USS Greer, which was tracking the submarine southeast of Iceland. Greer is not damaged, but drops depth charges, damaging the submarine. 1954 Icebreakers USS Burton Island (AGB-1) and USCG Northwind com plete first transit of Northwest passage through McClure Strait. 1954 P2V Neptune from VP-19 is shot down by Soviet aircraft near Swatow, China. 1960 USS Bushnell and Penguin begin relief operations in Marathon, Fla. after Hurricane Donna. Sept. 5 1776 Adoption of first uniforms for Navy officers. 1813USS Enterprise captures HM brig Boxer off Portland, Maine. 1918 USS Mount Vernon torpedoed by German submarine off France. 1923 U.S. Asiatic Fleet arrives at Yokohama, Japan, to provide medical assistance and supplies after Kondo Plain earthquake. 1939 President Franklin Roosevelt orders Navy to form a Neutrality Patrol to report the presence of foreign war ships within 300 miles of eastern United States. 1946 USS Franklin Delano Roosevelt (CVB-42) and four escorts visit Greece to underscore U.S. support for the Greek Government which faced a Communist insurgency. 1990 USS Acadia (AD-42) departs San Diego for first war-time deployment of male and female crew on board a Navy combat vessel. Its our summer tradition to take the boys to the city fair and then regret it. I leave feeling like (1) I need to take a bath in hand sanitizer, and (2) I want those three hours of my life back. Yet, no trip to the fair was more regrettable than this years. Thats when we bought I mean, won a shark. Wait, did I say shark? I meant fish. Lindell and Owen tossed ping-pong balls into a bowl of colored water, so the carnival worker said they won fish. This was better than winning a stuffed banana. After all, we needed new fish because four in our tank had gone belly up. The two left were my beta fish, Aqua, and Dustins bottom feeder, Barnacle Boy. Lindell and Owen took home waterfilled plastic bags with one lone fish swimming at the bottom of each. Will these be okay with our beta fish, I asked, because I know that beta fish often dont like to share space. Will our beta fish hurt them? The carnie guy smiled. I wouldnt worry about these fish, he said. (In storytelling, this is what we call fore shadowing. In movies, this is where the music gets creepy.) Owen named his fish, Frisky. Lindell named his, Fred. One week later, Freds name was amended to Fred, the Killer Fish. They appeared excited when we dumped them into our tank. They flit ted around the No Fishing sign and in and out of the SpongeBob Squarepants pine apple house. As usual, Aqua kept her distance. Barnacle Boy hid under the tikki. As far as we could tell, they were a tolerable, if cautious, new family of four. A few days later, Owen came out of his room and solemnly said, Mom, a fish has died. Ford was close behind him. Mom, a fish didnt just die there was a massacre in the tank. Oh, stop being dramatic, I said, setting the newspaper on the kitchen table and going to take a look. Heres what I saw: Frisky caught in the upward bubbles of the filter, bob bing up and down, with his tail fin chewed completely off and one eyeball gone. Bits of skin trailed from him like streamers. I gasped. Lindell cried, Mommy, Im scared. I patted Lindells head as the words of the car nie guy echoed in my mind: I wouldnt worry about these fish. We flushed Frisky and scolded Aqua. Wow, beta fish really are aggressive. We should have known that Aqua wouldnt accept the new, innocent carnie fish. One week later, terror struck again. Mom, Aqua is dead! Lindell screamed. Its another massacre, Ford said. They were both running from the room. I sprinted to the tank, my socked-feet sliding across the wood floor as I came to a stop. Aquas head was half buried beneath the gravel rocks. Parts of her skin had been peeled away. You could see the bones in her head. My cheeks turned cold. Boys, we have a killer fish on our hands, I said. We have to kill him before he kills us, Ford said. Did they give us a shark? Owen asked. I silently regretted blaming Aqua for Friskys death. In the tank, Fred glided deliberately from one end of the tank to the other. How do we know Barnacle Boy isnt killing everyone? I asked. Mom, look at him, Ford said. He eats algae and sucks on the side of the glass. He didnt murder anyone. Ford looked at me seriously. Mom, we have to kill Fred, he said. No! I bristled at the idea, even as I secretly considered locking the aquar ium in the basement just in case. Im not killing a possibly innocent fish. Either Barnacle Boy and Fred will live peacefully together, or we will eventu ally know who the real killer is. We now have daily tank watches. When I told the boys that while I had the tank cover open to feed the fish, I heard Barnacle Boy say, Youre not going to leave me in here with that carnie, are you? they believed me. In hindsight, Im frightened for any body who won a stuffed clown or baby doll. Lock those things in the basement, please. Fred and Barnacle Boy still live, for now. Occasionally Lindell comes into my room at night because hes afraid of Fred. I open the covers and let him in, because, quite frankly, I dont blame him. We won a fish at the fair 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012

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On Aug. 3, VP-30s Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Weapons School Officer in Charge Cmdr. Michael Granger, awarded Naval Flight Officer (NFO) wings to the following officers: Lt. j.g. Jarrett Bibb, Ensign Andrew Brown, Ensign Andrew Burcham, Lt. j.g. Robert Council Jr., Ensign Michael Duch, Ensign Christopher Duenas, Lt. j.g.William Fitzgerald, Ensign Joseph Johannes, Ensign John Norris, Ensign Matthew Oates, Ensign Derrick Ransom, Ensign Felix Boehme, and Ensign Henning Cansier. Capt. Aaron Rondeau, Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft program office (PMA290) program manager for the P-8A Poseidon program, was the guest speaker. The recipients com pleted the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer syllabus at VP-30, earn ing their coveted Wings of Gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the CAT 1 Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT 1 syllabus, they will report to operational P-3C or EP-3 squadrons to begin their initial sea tours at either Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii; Whidbey Island, Wash.; or NAS Jacksonville. The Naval Flight Officer (NFO) train ing pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, Fla., where all aviation officers undergo a class room syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation that includes aerodynamics, meteo rology and principles of navigation. After com pleting API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10, colocated at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transition from a classroom learning envi ronment to initial air borne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3C training pipeline report to VP-30 for P-3C specific training. VP-30 wings Navys newest NFOs Jax Air News deadline changeDue to the upcoming Labor Day holiday (Sept. 3), the deadline for submissions to Jax Air News for the Sept. 6 issue is today, Aug. 30. The deadline for classified ads is Aug. 31. For more information, call 542-3531. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012 To support the fleets higher operational pace, along with accelerated wear and tear on Navy and Marine Corps air craft, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) is expand ing its manufacturing capabilities by using technologically advanced equipment, such as vertical and high-speed grind ers and precision measuring machines, to ensure reliable power for the militarys highperformance aircraft. From shore-based aircraft like the P-3 Orion maritime patrol aircraft powered by four Allison T-56-A-14 engines with propellers to the carrier-based F/A-18 Super Hornet attack fighter powered by two internal F414-GE-400 turbofan engines the these power plants must be in tiptop shape to support any mission. Carl Finger, engine machine shop supervisor in the FRCSE Crinkley Engine Facility at NAS Jacksonville, said these power plants are staying on the air craft longer than ever before. He said the engines division has a dedicated machine shop to rework worn parts to like new condition. Our new equipment is pro ducing better engine perfor mance, saving time and giving Warfighters improved mission capability, said Finger. The high speed grinding technol ogy integrated with laser measuring creates a more accurate final product in less time. FRCSE purchased two Reform High Speed Blade Tip Grinders, that each turn at 3,000 revolutions per minute. Finger said the high speed technology allows artisans to grind blade tips on the same axis of rotation that the rotors spin to simulate engine condi tions. The engine blades must rotate at high speeds to coun teract the force of the grinder. The high-speed feature allows the blades to extend fully dur ing the grinding process for better results. It is essential that engine blades be machined even ly. Unbalanced grinding can make a blade heavier on one side than on the other, which can lead to heavy vibration, the loosening of internal structural bolts, accelerated engine wear or even failure. The Reform grinder mea sures every blade at every stage of production with laser technology to ensure grinding accuracy. The machines grind high pressure compressor rotor blades from a TF34-GE-100 turbofan engine thata powers the Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II and the Navys S-3 Viking air craft. In addition, the machine supports the F404-GE-402 engine that powers the F/A18A-D Hornet with 17,700 pounds of static thrust per engine, and the F414-GE-400 turbofan engine that pow ers the Super Hornet and the EA-18G Growler Airborne Electronic Attack aircraft. Each engine is capable of producing 22,000 pounds of static thrust FRCSE AI RCRAF T ENGIN E SHOP FRCSE POW ERS UP S OM E OF NA VYS MIGHTI ES T E NGIN ES

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012 5 according to the Navy Fact File. Another technology solution FRCSE is utilizing is the DANOBAT Vertical Grinder to machine station ary engine components like stator cases. It replaces the Pope Grinding Spindle with its outmoded manual dial indicator and the Electronic Run-Out Machine (EROM) used to perform preand post-production measurements. I was happy to see that go, Finger said of the EROM. It did really good on the rotors, but when we converted to laser measurements it never really worked. It was touchy; it gave us problems. The high-precision DANOBAT integrates different machining options for a wide range of engine com ponents. The machine uses touch probes to provide induction measurements thus ensuring parts can be held to diametric tolerances that can be machined. FRCSE performs out-of-airframe testing on all jet engines repaired at the facility to ensure maximum reliability and performance to the Fleet. The computer-controlled test cells have a thrust capacity of 40,000 pounds and a bed capacity of 100,000 pounds. All engines are tested through their entire operating range in both automated and manual modes to ver ify oil pressure, exhaust, gas temperature, vibration, speed, and bearing-vent pressure. PHOTO S BY VIC TO R PITT S FRCSE

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Eleven Jacksonville-area employers visited the VP-62 Broadarrows as part of the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR) Boss Lift program Aug. 21. Boss lift educates employ ers about the military reserves by giving them a behind-thescenes glimpse of the efforts their employees put forth each time they put on a uniform to serve. Established in 1972, the ESGR promotes understand ing and cooperation between Reservists and their civilian employers and to assist in the resolution of conflicts that arise from an employees military commitments. We have over 4,500 volun teers around the country to provide mediation between Reservists and their employ ers, said Army Sgt. Maj. (ret) Doug Corbett, executive direc tor of ESGR. In Many cases employ ers and Reservists dont completely understand the fed eral Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Right Act (USERRA). USERRA protects the job rights of people who leave a civilian job temporarily to perform military service, and also protects past and present members of the uniformed services from discrimination by employers. This includes people who enlist in the military and leave their civilian jobs and Reservists who deploy. The group visited Hangar 1000 where they toured an operational P-3 Orion and learned about the conditions and capabilities of the aircraft to perform counter-narcotic operations as well as anti-submarine warfare. Having the opportunity to experience the type of condi tions service members work in is eye opening, said Gena Jankowski, vice president of Human Resources for Brumos. Once employers see the dedication it takes to be a ser vice member they will under stand that hiring one onto their staff will always be a win/win situation. Every bit of insight helps to foster the understanding and acceptance that is required in the workplace when one of our members is called up to serve, said Donald Gauthier, assis tant vice president of legal for Deutsche Bank. After departing the hangar the group took turns flying a P-3 in a fully functional simu lator. Pilots will typically spend 10 or more hours weighted down with gear while on missions, explained VP-62 Instructor Pilot Lt. Cmdr. Jace Dasenbrock. It was a great opportunity to fly the P-3 and get a feel for what the flight crew does. I was not expecting the controls to be as tough as they were, said Noel Schoonmaker, the tech nical recruiter for Ring Power, who has many hours in the air piloting his own plane. Though the main goal of Boss Lift is to give employers a look at what their Reservist employees do while away from the job, just as important is the awards given to employers and the people who constantly support those ser vice members while they are away. For more information on ESGR or Patriot awards for employers visit www. Esrg.org or call 1-800 3364590 to speak to a representative. Broadarrows host ESGR boss lift 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012

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VP-30 aircrewmen classes graduate, Sailors promoted VP-30 Executive Officer Cmdr. David Gardella recognized graduates of the P-3C CAT I (initial training syllabus) Acoustic and NonAcoustic Operator Class 1204, Flight Engineer Class 1203, and In-flight Technician Class 1202 during a ceremony Aug. 17. The honor graduates for the classes were: AWF3 Christopher Stanley (Naval Aircrewman Mechanical Class 1203), AWV3 Aharon Pacholke (Naval Aircrewman Avionics Class 1202), AWO2 Lonnel Hudson (Naval Aircrewman Operator Class 1204-NonAcoustic), and AWO1(SW) Kyle Blackniak (Naval Aircrewman Operator Class 1204-Acoustic). All graduating Sailors were advanced at the ceremony to their listed rank by Gardella. These naval aircrewmen will now report to their assigned operational squadrons to begin their initial sea tour. VP-26 Tridents take in Suns baseballVP-26 Sailors took part in an All Khaki Social during a Jacksonville Suns baseball game Aug. 3. The group was warmly welcomed by the Suns as they took on the Montgomery Biscuits for an intense evening of minor league baseball. The get-together created a great opportunity for Trident officers and chief petty officers, as well as their families, to reconnect after a six-month dual site deployment to Bahrain and Qatar. Since chiefs and officers share leadership responsibilities, the camaraderie between them is paramount in keeping squadron operations running. When the officers and chiefs have a strong bond, the day goes by more smoothly and the workload seems lighter, said VP-26 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Erik Thors. Having time like this outside of work is a tried and true way to help build that bond. Thors threw the games first pitch as a crowd of his Sailors roared in support. The Pacifica, Calif. native took command of the squadron in late May, just before returning home from deployment. Thors wasnt the only Trident to play a starring role in the evenings festivities. Lt. Cmdr. John Dzialoski joined more than 60 members of the Music Ministries Group in singing the national anthem in the games opening ceremony. Singing the national anthem in front of a crowd of thousands was the experience of a lifetime, Dzialoski said. As the evening went on Lt. j.g. Sean Ublacker and Lt. j.g. Blair Volts provided some light entertainment for the crowd as the two flight officers battled it out in a burrito-eating contest during a break between innings. Ublacker, last years champ in the contest, reigned vic torious after devouring a whole burrito in a matter of seconds. The social also served as a great way for Tridents to welcome new additions to their Navy family, as five of them have celebrated new babies and four have gotten married since deploying and returning home. As the post-deployment phase is always a time of change within the squadrons, the chiefs and officers of VP-26 will continue to look for ways to strengthen their ties and enjoy time at home between deployments. Labor Day weekend is a time to enjoy barbecue and the season change from the dog days of summer to the start of autumn, and create fond memories of family gatherings. Its also time to raise awareness of the tenth leading cause of death in the United States suicide. National Suicide Prevention Week is Sept. 9 to 15. Suicide is a complex, atypical behavioral response to stress. Risk factors include depression; mental, per sonality or substance abuse disorders; personal or family history of suicide; family violence; incarceration; or exposure to influences that normalize suicide. Risk is also associated with changes in brain chemicals. Warning signs include thoughts or comments about suicide, substance abuse problems, purposelessness, anxiety, feeling trapped or hopeless, withdrawal, anger, recklessness and mood changes. Some facts to consider are that suicidal behavior is not specific to gender, race or age; but there are differences, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Women attempt suicide two to three times more often than men, but men fatally wound themselves at four times the rate that women do. This is related to meth odwomen more often use poison, while men more often use firearms. There is a peak of suicide incidence among teens and young adults, age 15 to 24, as well as in adults over age 85. In terms of ethnicity, suicide is twice as likely among non-Hispanic whites and American Indians as among Hispanics, African-Americans and Asian Americans. Effective medical treatments are available for depression and other health problems that are risk factors for suicide. So for those struggling, see a doctor to find out what the options are. Community resources are available for anyone who might be thinking about suicide. Active duty, veterans and family and friends can contact the Veterans Crisis Line at 800-273-TALK (8255), which offers a hotline, online chat and texting. Take action for Suicide Prevention Week JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012 7

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fleet. And, retention remains historically high. Another issue the admiral discussed was resiliency of force. With our force in such high demand, there is a continuous increase of stress and sacrifice placed upon our Sailors and their families. Earlier this year, the SECNAV and CNO rolled out the 21st Century Sailor/Marines initiative which focuses on readiness, safety, physical fitness, inclusion and continuum of service. We will continue to resource and support those programs, said Van Buskirk. He mentioned several top priorities including operational stress control, sexual assault pre vention and synthetic drug testing. Resiliency of our force is critical. We need to be more proactive in recognizing stress indicators, suicide ideations and increase awareness on sexual assault prevention, he stated. During a question and answer session, Sailors asked about changes to the PTS program, TA program, workforce quotas, high-year tenure, ERB, Individual Augmentee assignments and pay increases. Van Buskirk closed by thanking Sailors for what they do every day and for continuing to answer the call. CNP BEACH RUNNAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM) (AW/SW) Brad Shepherd. After a series of warm-up exercises and singing the national anthem, the runners took off down the beach, followed by the formation of CPO selectees proudly carrying flags and singing traditional Navy songs. They were cheered on by hundreds of family members, friends and spectators who came out for the event. As they hit the halfway mark, the group turned around and headed back to the finish line, coming in at a little over one hour. Stevens praised the CPO selectees for completing the run. Im impressed that the group stayed together nice job! I guess the CPO 365 program is working out pretty well, he said. Its great to be an American and do something special and then we join the U.S. Navy and become part of something even more special. Then, a chosen few get the opportunity to be called a chief petty officer. There are about 30,000 CPOs in the United States Navy, and when you compare that to the 300-plus million population of our country, you are the chosen few and you should feel good about that, Stevens continued. Im so very, very proud of you all coming out here tonight and to see those who will soon wear the coveted fouled anchors perform in such a magnificent manner in front of the great citizens of Jacksonville. What a great Navy town this is! said Stevens, who also recognized the spouses and families, thanking them for their support. Although the run proved a bit challenging for some of the selectees, most were thrilled to be part of the group crossing the finish line. This run was a bit easier than I thought it was going to be. Weve been training pretty hard for it and run five miles three times a week so we were ready for it. It was a really good time, said AWOC(NAC/AW/IUSS) (select) Ervin Maldonado of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11. I loved this run its been a great day! added ASC(AW) (select) Kathryn Kennon of the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax. After completing the run, the chief selectees gath ered in formation to show their pride by reciting the Sailors Creed, singing Anchors Aweigh and participating in some cool-down stretches. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012

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In June 2011, Australian Minister for Defense Stephen Smith announced his govern ments approval for the acqui sition of 24 MH-60R Seahawk helicopters at a cost of more than $3 billion. Today, a Royal Australian Navy (RAN) advance team is working with Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic to ensure RAN aircrews and maintainers are trained and ready when their first pair of production Seahawks land at NAS Jacksonville in December 2013. RAN Lt. Cmdr. Marcus Baxter of the Australian Defense Material Organization is the Resident Project Team (RPT) training lead for the Australian MH-60R Project Office. Our FMS (Foreign Military Sales) agreement with the U.S. government includes what they call the total package of training, systems, technical, sup ply and logistics support, said Baxter. The plan currently entails formal USN training courses for over 100 RAN personnel including aircrew, technicians and maintainers, with train ing commencing early 2013. A portion of these personnel will also receive three months consolidation/on-job-training with USN squadrons. During our training time at NAS Jacksonville, we will concurrently be building new helicopter hangars and flight/ mission simulators at our home base of HMAS Albatross in Nowra, New South Wales. Like the HSM squadrons here, a number of our new Romeos will deploy on board RAN frigates and destroyers, said Baxter. This is an off-the-shelf sale with the rationale that, as a close ally, we want to be com pletely inter-operable with the USN. The MH-60R and its robust suite of training and support systems represent the best value for our tax payers and one of the best weapons platforms for our navy, explained Baxter. The RAN orga nizational concept for the MH-60R includes a train ing squadron and an operational squadron that will provide at least eight helicopters to RAN frigates and destroyers on independent deployments. Those majority of aircraft not deployed will support both aircrew and maintainer training activities with a remaining few undergoing scheduled mainte nance. RAN chief petty officers Robert McLean and Steven Rissman are liaisons with CNATTU Jacksonville and HSM-40 at NS Mayport. Im involved with review ing the MH-60R maintenance courseware for any specifica tions or instructions that are different for RAN versus USN. Much of it concerns USN aviation rates such as AD, AM, AE and AT and how they translate to RAN categories and branches, explained McLean. We expect to teach nine students per class at CNATTU. Rissman said, This new helicop ter is much more advanced that what were used to but our pilots, crews and maintainers will be up to the challenge. Were also pleased that the USN will inte grate us into their schedules for the flight, mission and mainte nance simulators. ATCS Edward Krueger is in charge of the H-60 train ing program at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) at NAS Jacksonville. Supporting this FMS pro gram will be a new experi ence for CNATTU, but we have a good initial train ing track established for the MH-60 Romeo. Right now, our CNATTU team is working with Lt. Cmdr. Baxter and Chief McLean to adapt the course ware to RAN specifications. Since English our common language, theres not much trans lating involved its mostly acronyms, ratings clarifica tion and technical terms, said Krueger. The new Sikorsky-Lockheed MH-60R helicopters will replace the current inventory of 16 S-70B-2 Seahawks in the Australian Defense Force. Baxter observed, From the airframe and power plant point-of-view, there are many similarities between the two. The real difference is a quan tum leap forward in the cockpit displays and mission systems. Whether youre a structural mechanic, avionics techni cian, sensor operator or pilot everyone selected to come to NAS Jacksonville is particular ly enthusiastic about training with the USN. He concluded, We look forward to our first RAN atsea exercise by taking part in RIMPAC 2014 for our Operational Test and Evaluation. Our major operational milestone is scheduled for March 2015 when we stand up at our home base in New South Wales and embark our first RAN Flight. David Mims is a logistics specialist with the PMA-299 FMS team that is working with industry partners and the leadership of Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic. Australia is a valued American ally in the Pacific Rim and the concept of naval interoperability is important to both navies. This is the first FMS program involving the MH-60R, but most likely wont be the last. Royal Australian Navy to train here on MH-60R Seahawks JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012 11

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From Aug. 14-23, the Naval Supply Systems Commands (NAVSUP) Inspector General (IG) team per formed an independent and objective analysis of operations at NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville. This inspection resulted in NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville receiving an over all grade of Satisfactory, the highest grade attainable in an IG inspection. The grade of Satisfactory was a terrific accomplishment, but it doesnt capture the specific achievements of the NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville work force. In the final report, the IG team documented those achievements as 73 Noteworthy Accomplishments and six Best Business Practices across the Jacksonville enterprise. The diligence with which our team performs day-in and day-out is evidenced by the terrific results of the past ten days, said NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Head. NAVSUP Inspector General Capt. Glenn Lintz added to that observation. I was very impressed with the workforce, their level of knowledge and their enthusiasm, said Lintz. The relationships [FLC Jacksonville] has with its customers was also impressive, particularly [Commander, Navy Region Southeast] and [Commander, 4th Fleet] which gave glowing reports. This is a credit to Capt. Head and the entire FLC Jacksonville team. The IG team reviewed 21 functional areas, and all 21 were graded satisfactory. This workforce really did an amazing job. I am extremely pleased with the result, said Head. I am. Are you?Accept the challenge and find out more in September as the U.S. Navy launches Ready Navy, its emergency preparedness and public awareness campaign. Be informed: Find out what disasters are most likely to happen in your area and the history of their occurrence, and learn about any specific instructions or information you may need to know regarding these specific disasters. Have a plan: Another important tool you and your family need to prepare for possible emergencies is a family preparedness plan. Everyone in the family should understand what to do, where to go, and what to take in the event of an emergency. Your emergency plan should include how your family will communi cate with each other, particularly if normal commu nication methods, such as phone lines or cell towers, are out. Have a contact person outside the area that each member of the family can notify that they are safe. Also, plan ahead for how you will evacuate the area and where your family will meet if you are evacuated separately. Learn about the mustering require ments at your command and become familiar the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS) (https://navyfamily.navy.mil). If you are stationed overseas, learn about additional noncombatant evacuation orders procedures. Build a kit: The best way to prepare for the unex pected is to create one or more emergency kits that include enough supplies for at least three days. Keep a kit prepared at home, and consider having kits in your car, at work, and a portable version in your home ready to take with you. These kits will enable you and your family to respond to an emergency more effectively. Your various emergency kits will be use ful whether you have to shelter-in-place or evacuate. Be sure your kits address the needs of small children, individuals with special needs, and your pets. Ready Navy coming soon! Workforce preparations evident throughout IG inspection Ready Navy 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012

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A training detachment from the Greyhawks of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 120 concluded its 12-day field carrier landing practice (FCLP) at NAS Jacksonville and Outlying Landing Field (OLF) Whitehouse Aug. 27. The shore-based training will be followed by shipboard training on an underway aircraft carrier in the Atlantic. VAW-120 is the Navys fleet replacement squadron (FRS) for carrier airborne early warning squadrons flying the E-2C Hawkeye and fleet logistics support squadrons flying the C-2A Greyhound aircraft. Cmdr. Brad Stevens, operations officer of VAW-120, led the detachment of eight instructor pilots, 15 stu dent pilots and three landing signal officers (LSO). We detach to NAS Jacksonville four or five times a year so our student pilots can get their FCLP, which represents the near completion of their FRS training syllabi, explained Stevens. Pilot ball flying using the Optical Landing System at Whitehouse is the biggest part of our mission for this detachment because theres no greater challenge for a young pilot than landing an aircraft on a ship. Everything our LSOs work for serves a singular purpose accurate landings without mishaps, said Stevens. Thats why grading each touch-and-go landing or bounce at Whitehouse is vital. Every bounce by every pilot is analyzed and graded and after flight ops, each pilot is debriefed by their LSO. He said the training goal is to achieve the same landing accuracy, whether it takes place during day or night operations. Night ops can be more beneficial because it reinforces the instrument scan in the pattern. This encourages the student to focus on trusting his instruments for his turn to approach the ship. The runway at Whitehouse is the same width as an aircraft carrier flight deck. Because the Hawkeyes wingspan is so wide, our LSOs harp on hitting the pattern and flying the ball for a centerline landing. Drift five feet, one way or the other and there could be trouble. During their detachment to NAS Jax, pilots aver aged 170 to 190 passes at OLF Whitehouse. When they undergo carrier qualifications the following week, each Hawkeye pilot must accomplish at least 10 day time traps and six night traps. Stevens added that this was his final VAW-120 detachment to NAS Jax. He has orders to the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) where hell serve as the air operations officer. As the air boss, hell be responsible for every aspect of aircraft operations, including the hangar deck, the flight deck and airborne aircraft out to five nautical miles from the aircraft carrier. The FRS mission is to train pilots, naval flight offi cers and maintainers. Upon successful completion of their syllabi, they depart VAW-120 for assignment to one of the Navys operational E-2 or C-2 squadrons based at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. or Naval Base Ventura County at Point Mugu, Calif. According to the Naval Air Systems Command fact sheet, the E-2C Hawkeye provides allweather airborne early warning, airborne battle management and com mand and control func tions for the carrier strike group and joint force commander. Additional missions include surface surveillance coordina tion, air interdiction, offensive and defensive counter air control, close air support coordination, time critical strike coordination, search and rescue airborne coordination and communications relay. The C-2A Greyhound provides critical logistics support to carrier strike groups. Its primary mission is the transport of high-priority cargo, mail and passengers between carriers and shore bases. Priority cargo such as jet engines can be transported from shore to ship in a matter of hours. A cargo cage system or transport stand provides restraint for loads during launches and landings. Greyhawks practice carrier landings at OLF Whitehouse JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012 13

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included September Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of onelane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Fall Bowling Leagues now forming. Mixed league Monday 7 p.m. After-work league Wednesday 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thursday 9 a.m. Mixed league Thursday 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Friday 11:45 a.m. Friday night league 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Saturday 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Open Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. until October 1. Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guestsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. The Price is Right Times Union Center Sept. 25, 7:30 p.m., $47 Sesame Street Live Times Union Center Sept. 29, 2:30 p.m., $18 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23, 2013 Preferred seating $42, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. NFL Jaguars vs. Atlanta Falcons Aug. 30 Free admission and transportation Paintball Trip Sept. 1 at 9 a.m. Mall & Movie Trip Sept. 15 Orange Park Mall & AMC TheaterNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Sept. 4 & 18 for active duty Sept. 6 & 20 for retirees & DoD personnel September is customer appreciation month Monday Friday play 18 holes for $18, includes cart and green fees. Not valid on holidays. Open to military, DoD and guests Golf & Dine Special Play 18-holes with cart and choice of breakfast or lunch for $26! Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding. ASE certified mechanic onsite.Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available. Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you. Call 778-9772 for more information. Register now for before & after school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household incomeFlying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Sept. 10 Oct. 17 $500 per person For more information about any sports, contact Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook. com nasjaxmwr 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012

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Pahl retires from Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility, JacksonvilleTeresa Pahl, Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility (FACSFAC) Jacksonville administration officer and command security manager retires Aug. 31 after more than 34 years of dedicated government service. Pahl, a native of Port Hueneme, Calif., graduated from Hueneme High and attended Ventura Junior College for three years before joining the Civil Service. She has served the Navy honor ably around the globe, including Naval Stations in Guam, Argentina, Newfoundland, Washington, D.C., and, for the last 22 years, at FACSFAC Jacksonville. Pahl originally served as secretary to the commanding officer, beginning in January 1990. During her 22 years supporting FACSFAC Jacksonvilles mission, she has received multiple awards for retention excellence and Bravo Zulus for administrative support from the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy. As editor for the command public affairs officer, she edited over 264 news articles covering topics ranging from Sailors achievements and retirements to other command events. FACSFAC Jacksonvilles mission in support of national defense is to provide preeminent control, coordination, and management of our airspace, sea space, and sub-sea space to our nations militaries, agencies and civilian users. This critical mission can only be accomplished through the hard work and dedication of individuals such as Pahl. She has played a vital part in the success of FACSFAC Jacksonville and to the successes of many Sailors that have worked with her over the past 34 years. In memoriamAOC Carl Creamer, USN (Ret.)Retired AOC Carl Ed Creamer, 91, passed away Aug. 23 in Jacksonville. Creamer was born Jan. 26, 1921 in Portis, Kansas. He joined the Navy in September 1940 completing boot camp and Ordnance A School in San Diego. His first tour was with VP-41 in Seattle, Wash. During this tour, Creamer deployed to Sitka and Kodiak, Alaska. On June 3, 1942 while on patrol in a PBY5A, the aircraft was shot down by Japanese fighters. Creamer was one of three survi vors of the nine-man crew who managed to stay afloat in the dark Bering Sea for four hours before being picked up by the Japanese cruiser Takao. As a prisoner of war (POW), Creamer was moved through seven Japanese POW camps during the war. Creamer was given a presiden tial appointment to chief petty officer in October, 1944 and later transferred to NAS Sand Point, Seattle, Wash as the assistant base master-at-arms, ordnance chief and chief of transportation. In October 1948, Creamer transferred to Fleet Composite Squadron Five at NAS Moffett Field, Calif. as special weapons chief. Three years later, he trans ferred to Heavy Attack Training Unit One in Norfolk, Va. as chief of ordnance in special weapons and ABC Handling Equipment. In January 1952, Creamer reported to Fleet Aircraft Service Squadron 51 at NAAS Sanford, Fla. A year later, he was given a temporary presidential appointment to gunner, war rant officer and transferred to USS Cabot (CVL-28) at Philadelphia Naval Ship Yard as the aircraft ordnance and training officer. In 1954, his status was reversed back to aviation ordnance chief and Creamer transferred to Fleet Composite Squadron 62 at NAS Jacksonville. He then reported to Attack Squadron 106 at NAS Cecil Field as ordnance chief followed by tours at USNAAS Barin Field, Foley, Ala., and Attack Squadron 196 NAS Moffett Field, Calif. Creamer retired from the Navy on July 1, 1960 at NAS Alameda, Calif. Creamer maintained associa tion with shipmates while attending American Legion and American Ex-POW func tions immedi ately following his transfer to the Fleet Reserve. He also attended Patrol Wing 4 and VP-41s 50th and final squad ron reunion in 1999, where he met and shook the hand of the Japanese Zero pilot that shot him and the crew of his PBY5A from the sky on June 3, 1942. Several books have been written about his capture and interment in Japan including, We Stole to Live, by Joseph Rust Brown, The Thousand-Mile War: WWII in the Aleutians, by Brian Garfield and War Comes to Alaska: The Dutch Harbor Attack, by Norman Rouke. A letter to the USOMy name is Kimberly Janus and I am a Sailor in the United States Navy, currently stationed at NAS Jacksonville. I have been battling a health condition for a period of time that has resulted in me requiring an intrusive medical procedure. When my mother heard about my upcoming procedure, she really wanted to be there for me. She is from the Chicago, Ill., and I hadnt seen her in a very long time. We figured out we would have just enough money for the plane ticket, groceries and gas however, we wouldnt have enough money for a place to stay. The barracks does not allow visitors to sleep in the rooms. My mother and I were stranded. I really needed her to come down and help take care of me after my proce dure but we had nowhere to go. This is when I contacted the USO at NAS Jax. I explained the story and a day later a man by the name of Bob Ross (business direc tor of the NAS Jax USO) said that Comfort Inn in Orange Park would allow my mother and I to stay there, free of charge! Ross told me to contact the hotel manager, Paz Patel, who also serves on the board of the USO. I contacted Mr. Patel, who happens to be the nicest individual I have ever met. He welcomed my mother and I into his hotel. We were relieved and so thankful for this kind ness. My mother flew into the Jax airport on July 31, and we met at the airports USO. From the airport we drove to Comfort Inn to check in. Upon our arrival, I was given a blue gift bag with goodies and a postcard from Mr. Patel that said, Dear Janus Ladies, I trust you will have a wonderful stay. Welcome aboard. Catch up soon. Paz. This brought tears to my eyes. Not only did Mr. Patel allow us to stay in his hotel, but he also made me feel welcome and comfortable. He went the extra mile to give a Sailor the feeling of home and support. For the duration of our stay, Mr. Patel con tinued to check on us. He stopped by to shake my hand and to thank me for serving my country. The day of my surgery he called to make sure everything went well and to ask if we needed anything. We cannot thank Comfort Inn, Mr. Patel, and the USO enough. We had the most won derful stay and encourage more hotels to offer something like this to their troops in need. We will never forget this, thank you. Kimberly & Therese Janus JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012 15

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CNATTU Jax announces second quarter awardsThe Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville announces their Sailor of the Quarter, Second Quarter, FY-12 and Instructors of the Quarter, Third Quarter, CY-12. was selected as the Instructor of the Quarter for Third Quarter FY-12. As Support Equipment A/S37A-3 Mobile Electric Power Plant lead instructor for Maintenance Training Unit (MTU) 3032, he provided over 120 hours of instruction to 11 Sailors. As MTU SARP advocate, he trained 64 students and 26 staff personnel on sexual assault pre vention and awareness. was selected as Sailor of the Quarter for Second Quarter CY-12. As Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) manager, Apoyan managed the Hazardous Material Certification pro gram granting graduates credentials endorsed by the EPA to safely manage Type I, II, and III refrigerants for air con ditioning and cooling systems for 63 students with a 100 percent graduation rate. selected as Junior Sailor of the Quarter for Second Quarter CY-12. As MTU 1005 H-60 Airframe and Related Systems Technician (Initial) and (Career) Course instructor, he demonstrated superior dedication, leadership and techni cal skills, providing 500 instructional hours. Hamilton recently qualified as a master training specialist. ed as Junior Instructor of the Quarter for Third Quarter FY-12. As MTU 1005 SH-60B LAMPS MK III Weapons System Technician (Initial) and (Career) Course instructor and Course Curriculum Model manager, he demonstrated superior dedication, leadership, and techni cal skills graduating 22 students with a 100 percent passing rate all while performing an intense course revi sion. As the MTU SARP advocate, he trained 102 students and 26 staff on sexual assault prevention and awareness. Additionally, Delpivo recently qualified as a master training specialist. as Non-Commissioned Officer of the Quarter for Third Quarter CY-12. As MTU 3032s Instructional Systems Development representative, Wethy has been instrumental in preparing the MTU for the upcoming Training Management Assessment Program inspection, ensuring that all programs of instruction are updated, revised, and ready for inspection. Wethy has also volunteered numerous hours to HabiClay building houses for those in need. NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville has named its Sailors of the Quarter for the Third Quarter of Fiscal Year 2012. MM1(SW) Benjamin Stanley is the Senior Sailor of the Quarter, ABF2 Jason Lawhorne is the Junior Sailor of the Quarter and LS3 Gustavo Chavez is the Blue Jacket of the Quarter. ics operations and maintenance at NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, Site NAS Kingsville, Texas was the key to the successful repair and continued mainte nance of the sites mobile nitrogen gas generators over the quarter. When the generators broke down, his dedicated efforts returned them to full operational capability with no impact on the train ing mission. When it comes to cryogenics equip ment repair, Stanley is the go-to guy for NAS Kingsville as well as NAS Corpus Christi. Stanley is also involved with the local communitys children volun teering at the base Child Development Center and with other local projects that prepare children for academic success. Additionally, Stanley is pursuing his Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering. MM1 Stanley is a truly exception al leader with impressive work ethics; an outstanding technician who distin guishes himself through superior per formance. He exhibits initiative, lead ership, and a highly professional and positive approach to all aspects of naval service. His personal traits of honesty, hard work, and unquestionable integrity are evident in his daily performance, said Lt. Cmdr. Samuel Betancourt NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, Site NAS Kingsville. NAVSUP FLCJ, Site NAS Fort Worth JRB Fuels team. Over the quarter, Lawhorne provided professional support with the delivery of more than 2.2 million gal lons of JP-8 aviation fuel jet fuel and 17,866 gallons of ground fuels in sup port of NAS Fort Worth JRB flight operations. As the quality assurance evaluator, Lawhorne coordinates daily operations and preventive and corrective mainte nance of the fuels facilities and equip ment. During the absence of his chief and leading petty officer, Lawhorne took charge of the emergency inspec tion of one of the bulk fuels storage tanks. During this time, he performed superbly as the primary point of contact and ensured the close coordination and communication with contractors and Department of Defense fuel represen tatives in support of the safe and quick removal of all fuel products. In his off-duty time, Lawhorne dedi cates a great deal of time serving as an assistant coach for the Benbrook YMCA Little League Baseball Team where he mentors more than 37 youth, and serves as a positive representative of the Navy in regards to community relations. NAS Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base (JRB), Chavez has been vital to the success of the Receiving Department. He processed more than 1,000 stock and direct turnover items that were back ordered during the Navy Enterprise Resource Planning (NERP) upgrade, ensuring 100 percent accountability for receipt and stowage of the material. Chavez, the most junior sailor in the command, took incredible initiative requesting additional NERP training to become a sought-out expert. The additional NERP training he provided to the commands two new civilian employees drastically improved receipt process ing turnaround time. Chavez helped prevent a backlog of mission critical items when he stepped up to assist the Packing and Crating Division with the packing of more than 100 outbound shipments. Additionally, he is involved with the local Meals on Wheels pro gram and devotes personal time to coaching a youth soccer group. Petty Officer Lawhorne continual ly leads by example volunteering for duties normally held by more senior personnel and executes those duties with tremendous ownership and pride. Petty Officer Chavezs positive and enthusiastic attitude directly infects those who work with and around him as he takes the initiative, sets the example, and always producing a top quality product, said Cmdr. Dave Rudko, site director for NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, Site NAS Fort Worth JRB. I am extremely proud of both Petty Officer Lawhornes and Petty Officer Chavez noteworthy accomplishments. We had a difficult task this quarter choosing among the nominees, who were all worthy of selection in their respective categories, said NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Head. I congratulate Petty Officers Stanley, Lawhorne, and Chavez for standing out among their peers to be named FLCJs Senior, Junior, and Blue Jacket of the Quarter. Bravo Zulu! NAVSUP FLC Jax names Sailors of the Quarter 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 30, 2012 17 The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) established a board known as the LCS Council Aug. 22 consisting of four Navy vice admirals to oversee continued fleet test ing and introduction of littoral combat ship (LCS) sea frames, mission modules and mission packages. Adm. Jonathan Greenert designated Vice Adm. Rick Hunt, director of the Navy staff, as the councils chairman. Other officers on the council include Vice Adm. Mark Skinner, prin cipal military deputy to the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development and Acquisition; Vice Adm. Tom Copeman, commander, Naval Surface Forces; and Vice Adm. Kevin McCoy, commander, Naval Sea Systems Command. The initial focus of the LCS Council will be to develop a class-wide plan of action to address the areas identi fied as needing improvement in recent assessments and reviews. The plan is expected to be implemented by Jan. 31, 2013. Addressing challenges identified by these studies, on the timeline we require, neces sitates the establishment of an empowered council to drive action across acquisi tion, requirements and fleet enterprises of the Navy, said Greenert. It is expected that issues will arise in any first-of-class ship building program. Navy ships are designed with test and trial periods to ensure everything is working correctly, and repairs can be made, if required. That approach also allows for the incorporation of lessons learned into the follow-on ships before theyre delivered. I am confident we are on a path of success for LCS, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. This council will continue to unify our efforts to imple ment operational lessons learned from our research and development ships to further ensure successful fleet integration. As first-of-class research and development (R&D) ships, LCS 1 and LCS 2 have provided significant lessons learned in the test and evaluation process. Those lessons learned have led to design and production improvements on follow-on ships. All Navy combat ships, even test and evaluation platforms, must be ready to meet assigned missions starting with the first day of active service LCS is no exception, said Greenert. Navy efforts are now focused on transitioning from testing initial R&D ships to operationally employing LCS and ensuring the Navy is prepared to man, train and equip the class in the most efficient and effective manner. Still, it is expected that LCS 1 and LCS 2 will continue to provide lessons learned well into the future. The LCS council will use a comprehensive review process to critically examine areas that need to be addressed before an LCS deploys to Singapore next spring. In June, the Singapore mili tary agreed in-principle to allow the U.S. Navy to deploy up to four littoral combat ships to the city-state on a rotational basis. U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta stated that the LCS will not be based or homeported in Singapore, and that crews will live on board the ships for the duration of their deployment. Vice Adm. Michelle Janine Howard has been a trailblazer throughout her entire career. She was the first AfricanAmerican woman to command a U.S. Navy warship, the first female gradu ate of the Naval Academy to achieve the rank of rear admiral, and the first African-American woman to command an Expeditionary Strike Group at sea. Howard reached another milestone Aug. 24, when she became the first African-American woman promoted to three-star rank in the U.S. Armed Forces with the assumption of her new job as deputy commander, U.S. Fleet Forces. With a career highlighted by firsts, the path to Howards current assign ment as a Navy vice admiral initially began with an obstacle. It is an obstacle that taught her to embrace change, find strength in the challenges she faced, and to not be afraid to lean on others. Howard said her Navy career began as a chance encounter while watching television. It was a documentary about one of the military service academies that opened Howards eyes to a pos sible future career as an officer in the military. At 17, Howard applied and was accepted into the U.S. Naval Academy. In 1978, she entered the Naval Academy as a freshman. She was in only the third class to accept women. At that time women made up only five percent of the Navy. With more than 200 years of naval history and traditions, there was some resistance to change. With a self-deprecating laugh, Howard said that the Academy wasnt easy. In retrospect, she realized that expecting a smooth sail wouldnt have been very realistic. When you look at where society was at the time, this was before there was even a woman on the Supreme Court, before Sally Ride was an astronaut, and it was also only five or six years after we became an all volunteer force in the military, so our society was still going through a lot of changes. She says the one person who was incredibly helpful in putting her expe riences in context was Wesley Brown, the first black Naval Academy graduate, Class of 1949. He talked about how great this country is and how much it has changed; that as the country changed, peo ple changed. What I really learned from him was that he was a man who could forgive and go on with his life. There is a lot of strength in that, said Howard. Change is inevitable, and Howard rode a wave of it as she moved through her career. In the 1980s when the Navy opened the logistics ships to women, that was huge, because it allowed a lot of opportunities for women to serve at sea. Then it was just a few years later that we were engaged in Operation Desert Storm. So even though women werent serving on warships, women were still serving in a combat arena, and that started a national conversation. What is a womans role in the military? Coming out of that time frame, the combat exclusion law was repealed and that meant women were going to serve on combat ships and fly combat air craft, said Howard. After serving sea tours aboard several ships, in 1999, Howard fulfilled her dream of com manding a Navy warship at sea. She took command of the amphibious dock landing ship USS Rushmore (LSD 47), becoming the first African-American woman in such a role. The crew was wonderful. To this day thats what I think about. When you are going into command you think its going to be challenging, you believe its going to be fun, and it definitely was fun, but there are always challenges you dont expect. At the same time you go in with the expectation that Sailors can do anything, and that was the ship that proved it. We are so lucky that we have the people who not only have the talent, but who care and want to get it right. Howard was selected for the rank of rear admiral lower half in 2006, making her the first admiral selected from the U.S. Naval Academy Class of 1982 and the first woman graduate selected for flag rank. In 2009, Howard put on her sec ond star and assumed command of Expeditionary Strike Group 2 and deployed in the Gulf of Aden to con duct anti-piracy operations. Within one week of checking aboard her flag ship, amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4), she was immersed in the rescue of Capt. Richard Phillips, commanding officer of the MV Maersk Alabama. Thats an eye-opening way to start a new job. Very quickly we had sever al ships, special forces, aircraft and it seemed like everyone in the world was focused on one American and trying to make sure he didnt end up on shore in Somalia. Synchronizing that kind of might and capability was pretty amazing. Not including the 3,000 Sailors and Marines in her task force, Howard said they also had support from reconnais sance aircraft out of Djibouti, intelli gence support from the United States, ass well as communication with the staff at U.S. 5th Fleet in Bahrain. When you think about it thats a lot of people, and Im going to say thats the right call. The Department of Defense is there to protect Americas interest, Americas property and Americas citi zens. And in the end there is a deter rence factor. You want the average pirate to look at an American ship and say, well just let that one go by. For the women following in her foot steps, Howard has this advice. You have to keep your sense of humor. You have to develop stamina and you need to be adaptable. Finally, you need to stay connected to women. Its important to be able to share experiences and to be able to tap into those shared experiences. During her career, Howard has seen dramatic changes in the Navy and the nation, but there is one more change shed like to witness. I would like to see our nation appreciate the importance of the Navy. We are blessed to live in a time where the average citizen really appreciates their Sailors when we walk anywhere in a uniform we get thanked. If I could change anything Id like Americans to understand who they are thanking and why. How do you convince a nation this big that they are a maritime nation? Our founding fathers got it; they understood the importance of international commerce and that is why they said to maintain a Navy in the Constitution. And ironically enough, we are even more dependent on maintaining safe waterways now than they were then. Howard may get her wish. As the newest vice admiral in the Navy and deputy commander of U.S. Fleet Forces, she will have the opportunity to reach a much larger audience than ever before. As she has proven time and again, there is a first for everything. The flagship of the John C. Stennis Strike Group (JCSSG), aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), departed Aug. 27, to begin an eightmonth deployment to the western Pacific Ocean and the Persian Gulf. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta visited with the ships crew Aug. 22 to thank them for the extraordinary effort to prepare for this upcoming deployment. I understand that it is tough, said Panetta. We are asking an awful lot of each of you, but frankly you are the best I have and when the world calls we have to respond. You are the heart and soul of our national defense. You are the heart and soul of what makes America strong. Thats why Im here. To thank you for what you do to help keep America the strongest military power in the world. JCSSG is returning to the U.S. 7th and 5th Fleet areas of operation four months ahead of schedule in order to main tain combatant commander requirements for the presence in the region. Stennis returned in March from its most recent deployment. JCSSG is comprised of the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 9, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 21 and USS Mobile Bay (CG53). CVW-9 consists of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 8, Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 71, and Fleet Logistics Combat Support Squadron (VRC) 30 from Naval Air Station (NAS) North Island, Calif.; Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 14, VFA-41, VFA-97, and VFA-192, from NAS Lemoore, Calif.; and Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 133 from NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. CNO establishes LCS Council Navy promotes first African-American female Three-Star OfficerStennis strike group departs early for 8-month deployment

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