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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02007
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 08-23-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02007

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VP-62 received the 2011 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Aviation Safety S Award during a presentation Aug. 13 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 511. This award represents the culmination of 32 years of accident-free flying and 100,000 hours of Class A mis hap-free flying, said VP-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Jerry Dearie, after accept ing the award from Capt. Eric Wiese, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11. Broad Arrows Safety Officer Lt. Cmdr. Mark Monturo said, During all of the 1,305 hours flown by VP-62 crews in 2011, the squadron sustained zero mishaps, zero injuries and zero loss of work days, fostering a command climate of safety. The award recognizes the performance related to qual ity contributions to the Naval Aviation Safety Program including control of aviationrelated mishaps, application of safety programs, timely reporting of hazards, and submission of suggestions for improve ments pertaining to all appro priate related issues, such as maintenance and various sub jective criteria. Squadrons that win this award receive engraved plaques and citations for per manent display. They are also entitled to paint a prominent green S on their aircraft until the next years selections are made. THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Capt. Bob Sanders, commanding officer of NAS Jacksonville, provided the opening address at the Greening in a Tough Economy environmen tal symposium hosted for the seventh year by the City of Jacksonville (COJ) Environmental Protection Board and University of North Florida. More than 200 environmental plan ners, engineers, health, safety and regulatory professionals gathered at the UNF University Center Aug. 17 to share the latest information concerning sus tainability resources, low-impact development, St. Johns River restoration and the River Accord Progress Report. Sanders began by recognizing staff of the COJ Environmental Quality Division, COJ Sustainability Team and Keep Jacksonville Beautiful Commission. Their long commitment to environ mental excellence and leadership has been of pivotal importance to our citys continued growth. Please dont spare your applause for them. He continued, My family is fortu nate to live on the riverfront at NAS Jacksonville, so we appreciate the vital role that the St. Johns plays in the growth and quality of life of our northeast Florida communities. Despite the environmental and economic challenges we face today, the proper use of our natural resources must move forward if we are to be successful. This past year was significant for NAS Jacksonville. We were recognized by the Department of Defense as the best naval installation in the world. We received energy and water management awards from Secretary of the Navy and the Environmental Protection Agency as well as the United Nations Earth Society Earth Trustee award that rec ognized our strong community envi ronmental partnerships. Sanders pointed to the bases long partnership with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, St. Johns River Water NAS Jax commanding officer kicks off symposiumBroad Arrows claim safety award

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Aug. 23 1864 Rear Adm. David Farraguts squadron captures Fort Morgan at Mobile Bay, Ala. 1958 In Taiwan Straits crisis, ships of 7th Fleet move into Taiwan area to support the nationalist Chinese island against Chinese communists. 1963 The first satellite communica tions ship, USNS Kingsport (T-AG-164) in Lagos, Nigeria, connected President John F. Kennedy with Nigerian Prime Minister Balewa, who was on board for the first satellite (Syncom II) relayed telephone conversation between heads of state. Aug. 24 1814 British invasion of Maryland and Washington, D.C. caused Washington Navy Yard and ships to be burned to prevent capture by the British. 1912 Launching of USS Jupiter (AC-3), a collier, later converted into the Navys first aircraft carrier and renamed USS Langley (CV-1) in 1920. 1942 U.S. carrier aircraft begin twoday Battle of Eastern Solomons, where Japanese task force is defeated and one Japanese carrier sunk, forcing the Japanese to recall their expedition to recapture Guadalcanal. 1960 Attack transport USS Bexar (APA237) deploys to Pangahan Province, Philippines in response to emergency request for aid from the provincial gov ernor. Aug. 25 1843 The side-wheel steam frigate USS Missouri arrives at Gibraltar completing the first trans-Atlantic crossing by U.S. steam powered ship. The next day she was accidentally set afire, exploded and sank fortunately without loss of life. 1942 Five Navy nurses who were POWs on Guam are repatriated. 1951 Because the target was beyond range of land-based fighters, 23 fight ers from USS Essex (CV-9) escort USAF heavy bombers attacking Najin, Korea. Aug. 26 1775 Rhode Island Resolve: Rhode Island delegates to the Continental Congress press for creation of Continental Navy to protect the colonies from the British. 1839 U.S. Brig Washington seizes Spanish slaver, Amistad, near Montauk Point, N.Y. The case was a defining moment in the struggle to abolish slav ery in the United States. 1861 Union amphibious force lands near Hatteras, N.C. 1865 Civil War ends with Naval strength of more than 58,500 men and 600 ships. Aug. 27 1917 Squadron of minesweepers departs U.S. for service off the coast of France. 1944 USS Stingray (SS-186) lands men and supplies on Luzon, Philippines to support guerilla operations against the Japanese. 1959 Off Cape Canaveral, Fla., USNS Observation Island (EAG-154) completes first shipboard launching of a Polaris missile. Aug. 28 1867 Capt. William Reynolds of the screw sloop-of-war Lackawanna raises U.S. flag over Midway Island to take pos session of the islands for the U.S. 1952 Units on aircraft carrier USS Boxer (CV-21) launch explosives-filled drones designed to explode against a railroad bridge near Hungnam, Korea. They were the first guided missiles launched from a ship during Korean Conflict. 1965 Cmdr. Scott Carpenter and nine aquanauts enter SeaLab II, secured 205 feet below Southern California waters to conduct underwater living and working tests. 1992 U.S. Marine Corps and Army personnel begin providing disaster relief in Florida after Hurricane Andrew. Aug. 29 1861 U.S. amphibious squadron cap tures forts at Hatteras Inlet, N.C. 1862 Union gunboat Pittsburgh sup ports Army troops in landing at Eunice, Arkansas 1915 Navy salvage divers raise F-4, the first U.S. submarine sunk by accident. 1964 Amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LPH 4) and two dock land ing ships arrive off coast of Hispaniola to deliver medical aid to Haiti and Dominican Republic, which were badly damaged by Hurricane Cleo. At the beginning of the summer, before I headed to Boston for the weekend, I posted on the Dinner with the Smileys Facebook page, Have baby sitter; will travel. Halfway across the world, my husband, Dustin, saw the post and sent me an e-mail. That sounds tacky, he wrote. Youre lucky to be able to take a babysitter with you. Most people could not. I removed the post, picked up my teenage babysitter, Kara, and thought about Dustins advice as we drove south with my three boys. For the record, I ended up doing two trips this summer with two different babysitters who are sisters, and I didnt pay either of them for it. I gave them a rollaway bed in the hotel room, and I bought them meals. But this isnt about money. And its not about me not being able to take care of the boys by myself, either. Its about being lonely. While the boys fought in the backseat or played tic-tac-toe at the restaurant, I had someone to talk to. Ordinarily, on family vacations past, that person would have been Dustin. This summer, it was first Kara, and then her older sister Becca. But the boys, who dont have cousins or extended family in the area, benefited as well. It was as if we were traveling with their aunt or sister or cousin someone willing to go to the hotel pool at 11 p.m. or stay up late watching movies when I was already ready for bed. In other words: Dustin didnt know what he was talking about! I highly recommend this setup to military spouses dealing with a deploy ment. Although, it need not be a babysitter; any traveling companion will do. Its a win-win situation. The babysit ter or friend gets a free vacation (plus another bonus keep reading), you are less lonely and the kids are happy. My trips this summer with Kara and Becca are ones I will never forget. I dont think they will, either. Before I get too far, however, I should stop and tell you that when my husband and I travel, he is the adult. Perhaps this is partly why he worried about my summer vacations with young babysitters. Kara, Becca and I were like puppies whose backyard gate had been left open. Using a GPS, we circled Bostons Back Bay more times than necessary, but our dilemma did not lead, as it does with Dustin, to an argument about whos better with directions. My sitters had a free vacation; of course they deferred to me. It was yet another lesson in community: who says family vacations have to be just fam ily? And throughout our trips, we all learned some valuable lessons about humanity, kindness and generosity. A hotel in Boston spontaneously upgraded our room and delighted in our responses: the boys dancing in the lobby, screaming Oh, yeah! Oh, yeah! A toll booth operator in New Hampshire patiently (never mind the traffic) gave us directions when we were headed the wrong way. At Aloft, in Lexington, Mass., an employee gave the boys Matchbox cars, then smiled at me and said, I see how hard youre work ing. The point is, had these been ordinary family vacations, I might have been in a Smiley bubble, hyper-focused on my husband and boys. But my family of five was not together this summer, so the boys and I took a trip with and among the community. We were open to the possibility that people around us even strangers could make our vacation better. And, they did. After so much generosity and kind ness, its only fair that I give some thing back. And, boy, did I! Free food and lodging werent the only things my young babysitters received this sum mer. They also got an education in traveling with three children. My gift to humanity: two less females at risk for unwed, teenage pregnancy. Have babysitters, will travel

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The Sun Seekers of VR-58 recently hosted a town hall meeting with the Master Chief of the Navy Reserve Force, FORCM Chris Wheeler. Wheeler was aboard NAS Jacksonville for the retirement of a VR-58 Sailor after which CMDCM Charles Slaton seized the opportunity to arrange for him speak to Sailors not only from VR-58, but also from other tenant commands such as VR-62, VP-62, and NOSC Jacksonville. This was their chance to meet and speak directly with one of the high est-ranking leaders in the enlisted chain of command and Wheeler welcomed the invitation. More than 200 NAS Jacksonville Full Time Support and Selected Reserve Sailors greeted Wheeler at an open forum held on the VR-58 han gar deck. He opened his brief with an overall view of the Navys Reserve Component from a Pentagon perspective. He touched on topics such as retention, advancement and the budgeting issues affecting all Sailors. Wheeler also spoke about Continuum Service, that focuses on areas such as the 21st Century Sailor and CNO ten ants to name a few. He touched on what role the Navy will play in the future specifically concern ing decreased mobilization opportunities. Another topic discussed was the implementation of Perform To Serve (PTS) for Selective Reserve Sailors. He explained that the system will utilize Fleet Ride just as Active Duty and Full Time Support. Finally, Wheeler talked about how the CNO and CNR are working diligently to break down the barriers and poli cies to get Selective Reserve back to active duty because they value the work we do. The vision and goal is to have a Reserve Component to Active Component continuum. Following his brief, Wheeler opened the floor, offering the opportunity to ask questions from members of area com mands. Questions posed to Wheeler ranged from selection boards to advancement quotas. After more than an hour of open dis cussion, he posed for photos with members in attendance and spoke one-on-one with many Sailors. VR-58 hosts Navy Reserve Force Master Chief JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 3

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Commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris visited NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville headquarters Aug. 3. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Head and Executive Director Mitch Palmquist briefed Harris spotlighting the commands overall mission and organization. Head emphasized NAVSUP FLC Jacksonvilles integration with 4th Fleet speaking specifi cally about the programs that enhance fleet and warfighter logistics capabilities across the Southeast region and the 4th Fleet area of responsibility. During the briefing, Harris spoke about the importance of Naval Station Guantanamo Bay and lauded NAVSUP FLC Jacksonvilles exercise and expeditionary contract support, particularly for the PANAMAX 2012 exercise. Following the briefing, Head and Harris toured NAVSUP FLC Jacksonvilles workspaces. Harris took the time to speak with several of members of the staff. He even gave one of his personal coins to fellow Washington Redskins fan Prudence Howard after noticing a Redskins coffee mug in her office. It was a pleasure to host Admiral Harris and to brief him on FLCJs interface with the 4th Fleet staff, said Head. But the real highlight of the visit was having the opportunity to draw attention to our greatest asset our workforce. It was terrific to see the employees engage him. I think they really appre ciated that he took the time to walk around the spaces and say hello, Head added. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast recently heard the following cases: Martial convened aboard NAS Jacksonville, a Petty Officer Third Class pled guilty to mak ing a false official statement and was found guilty of engag ing in a sexual act with a per son substantially incapacitated. The court-martial sentenced the accused to two years of confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, and a Dishonorable Discharge. convened on board NAS Jacksonville, a Petty Officer Second Class was found guilty of improperly accessing medi cal records. The court-martial imposed no punishment in addition to the conviction itself. Martial convened aboard NAS Jacksonville, a Seaman Apprentice pled guilty to wrongfully using Spice, sending a lewd picture to a minor, and receiving and possessing child pornogra phy. The court-martial adjudged a sentence of 11 months con finement, reduction in rate to E-1, forfeiture of $994.00 per month for 11 months, and a Bad Conduct Discharge. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast are tried, with few exceptions, at NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, and NAS Pensacola. Therefore, the location of where a court-martial described above was convened does not necessarily correlate to the command that convened the courtmartial. 4th Fleet Commander visits NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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The commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command, U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) offi cially concluded the annual 2012 PANAMAX exercise Aug. 16 at Naval Station Mayport. Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, along with Brazilian Rear Adm. Wilson Pereira de Lima Filho, concluded the exercise in which more than 1,000 military personnel from 17 nations, including the United States, participated. Of that number, 269 participants were from partner nations. I would to thank our partners in the Americas and other observers for their critical contribution and outstanding participation in key leadership roles of this exercise. Every nation shared unique and invaluable skills and their real-world experiences make this the best exercise ever, Harris said. The main focus of PANAMAX 2012 was to exercise a variety of responses, in coordination with the gov ernments of Panama and Colombia, to protect and guarantee safe passage of commercial traffic through the Panama Canal, ensure its neutrality, and respect national sovereignty. This multinational exercise strengthens interoper ability and builds joint capabilities of the participating nations to plan and execute complex multinational operations. PANAMAX is a good opportunity to exchange knowledge and increase interoperability among the many partner nations that have a common interest in the safety and security of the Panama Canal, Lima Filho said. PANAMAX is a U.S.-sponsored, multination al annual exercise that includes participants from Belize, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, and the United States. As we complete this years PANAMAX exercise I know that each of us will take away many good lessons from each other. I encourage all our partners in the Americas to continue to value the professional and personal bonds that were developed here as they will last for many years to come, Harris said. COMUSNAVSO/C4F supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional secu rity and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. PANAMAX military exercise concludes JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 Nearly 90 children of Navy and DoD families, represent ing the Jacksonville-area navy bases, attended the NAS Jacksonville Drug Education for Youth (DEFY) summer camp Aug. 5-10 at YMCA Camp McConnell, in Micanopy, Fla. Crediting the summer camp for its large stake in the year long program, NAS Jacksonville DEFY Program Coordinator AWS1 Gerald Boysen said the 2012 camp was a tremendous success. More than an anti-drug program, DEFY produces 9-12 year olds who have character, leadership and confidence to engage in positive healthy lifestyles as drug-free citizens, he said. Started in 1993, the DEFY program is in its 19th year of providing mentorship, character development, drug education and essential life skills to mili tary kids. The NAS Jacksonville program, which began in 1996, offers a yearlong mentoring and support program that includes an annual learning and activ ity intensive five-day overnight camping experience, during which, time is split between outdoor activities and classroom lessons. The location of YMCA Camp McConnell is a perennial choice for camp organizers because it sits on 220 acres of picturesque hardwood forest, meadows and wetlands boasting excellent dining, berthing, recreation and learning facilities for the large group. Outdoors, the campers hike nature trails, ride horses, play at a low ropes course, swim, climb a rock wall and even attempt a high ropes course. Indoors, the campers follow a four-part cur riculum that includes: focus on solving conflict and building self esteem; and skills, that emphasize peerpressure resistance; building, group problem solving and assertive communication; exercise and nutrition basics and an introduction to the Presidents Challenge, a pro gram of the Presidents Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition aimed at promoting active life styles. There were 67 campers ages 9-12 and 22 junior mentors ages 14-18 that represented a marked decrease in camper attendance from the year prior, which numbered more than 120 campers and junior mentors. The decrease was intentional and budget minded according to Mentor Coordinator Alan LeFan, now in his seventh year in the position. We can offer the kids more NAS Jax hosts Navys largest DEFY summer camp

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 7 activities when there are fewer chil dren, said LeFan. There were things we couldnt do last year that the kids really benefit from. The decrease in numbers didnt affect the DEFY Chapters status as largest Navy DEFY program in the world. It also meant that the kids could have two days of horse riding and a chance to attempt a high-ropes course. IT2 Derek Saylor, of NRSE Reserve Component Command, in his third year as a mentor, appreciated the return of the two activities and noted the life lessons imparted by each of the outdoor activities. The horses were a real self-con fidence boost, the archery built patience... and the high ropes taught them goal setting and persistence, he said. We taught overcoming peer pressure at the pool, overcoming fear at the rock wall and teamwork at the low ropes course. Alan LeFan, said that of his seven years as mentor coordinator and despite last-minute command man ning issues that cost multiple mentors the 2012 summer camp was more successful than ever before. He credited the junior mentors pervasive and consistent leadership and the dedicated efforts of the volunteering Sailors in their roles as mentors. I dont remember camp ever going this smooth, said LeFan. The qual ity of our staff and mentors really made this one of our best years ever. There are DEFY programs near Navy and Air Force installations around the world. The NAS Jacksonville DEFY chapter will continue to host events throughout the year, leading up to the annual summer camp. Registering your children for DEFY 2013 is easy and early registration is encouraged. Go to: http://www.public. navy.mil/bupers-npc/support/nadap/ DEFY. DEFY

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Management District and the City of Jacksonville that facilitated expansion of the stations wastewater reuse project that will soon eliminate discharge of wastewater into the St. Johns River. We also partnered with the Florida Building Commission to modify the state building code to include prescriptive sound attenuation measures in new construction around civilian and military airfields. Florida is the first state in the nation to adopt this construction approach for improved quality of life, said Sanders. Other base environmental initiatives presented by Sanders included: tors to track conservation measures in more than 30 base facilities to reduce energy use by 21 percent and water consumption by 36 percent. projects are pre-certified as LEED Gold or Silver. features photovoltaic solar panels above the parking lot, high-efficiency mechanical equipment, and rain har vesting for toilets. Center installed 168 rooftop solar col lectors to produce hot water for the swimming pool, showers and rest rooms. ered and energy efficient commercial fleet to more than 80 green vehicles. The goal is to reduce commercial fleet petroleum use by 50 percent. NAS Jacksonville Environmental Director Kevin Gartland also addressed the symposium. He presented an update on the $4 million wastewater reuse project partnership with COJ and state to eliminate wastewater discharge to the St. Johns River (305 million gallons annually) by 2014. It will also eliminate the withdrawal of 48 million gallons of potable water from the Floridan aquifer every year. The Navy funded more than $2 milion to expand the distribution system and the state provided a matching $1.8 million grant to COJ to expand the project to the station golf course and antenna farm. Dr. Radha Pyati, director of the UNF Environmental Center, and Dr. Dan McCarthy, of Jacksonville University, presented the State of the River report. This is an easy to read scientific assessment of the St. Johns River eco systems health both biologically and chemically. Areas of interest include decreasing the amount of nitrogen into the river, improving overall water quality, monitoring changes in sedimenta tion and improving public access to the river, said Pyati. SYMPOSIUM 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 9

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The Center for Security Forces (CENSECFOR) announced Aug. 17 that two new apprenticeship trade opportunities are in the works for Navy Security Force (NSF) personnel. The apprentice ship will be open to all E-4 and above in select rates or those with select Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) codes. It will also be open to U.S. Marine Corps Military Occupational Specialty (USMC MOS) personnel as well as U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) personnel. The Armory Technician Apprenticeship (ATA) will be the first to emerge in the near future once Department of Labor approval is received, said Jose Bautista, CENSECFOR Master-At-Arms (MA) program manager. The ATA will focus on personnel who are respon sible for assigned arms, ammunition and explosives. This includes the skill areas of maintenance, inventory, safety, security, issuing and receiving of these items. The Criminal Investigator Apprenticeship (CIA) is CENSECFORs new est project with the United Services Military Apprenticeship Program (USMAP). This is a coordinated effort by CENSECFOR with the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS); the MA/ NSF Community Sponsor; Type Commanders; and fleet subject matter experts, said Bautista. The apprenticeship is designed for MA personnel having the military police investigator NEC 2002, as well as appropriate personnel in the USMC and USCG. We are in the process of soliciting industry sponsors, which could take between 4-6 months, said Bautista. That means we are looking at the CIA becoming available sometime in 2013. The forerunners to these two new apprenticeships have been highly successful since their debut. For example, the Security Specialist and the Police Officer I (Government Service) apprenticeships have some 1,600 active enrollments each to date. Sailors who earn these nationally recognized certifications will have had the opportunity to perform duties and gain experiences they may not other wise have had, said Bautista. The USMAP works closely with the DOL to provide nationally recognized apprenticeship programs that result in journeyman-level certificates of com pletion for members of the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. The Center for Security Forces pro vides specialized training to more than 22,000 students each year and has 14 training locations throughout the U.S. and around the world. New MA apprenticeships on the horizon While he works to protect the country,St. Jude works to save his daughter from a deadly disease.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.800-822-6344www.stjude.orgMatt Pasco, Chief Warrant Ofcer 2 and his daughter Delilah 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony Nov. 8 U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a member of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of special recognition in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. The registration deadline is Oct. 5. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in ter ritorial waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve recognition and thanks for put ting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans during my annual Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the highlights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veter ans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are strongly encouraged to contact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 598-0481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www. crenshaw.house.gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and documen tation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the certifi cate, veterans must complete an applica tion and submit a copy of their DD-214. Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this pro gram. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 11

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USS Constitution departed her berth from Charlestown, Mass. Aug. 19, to set sail for the first time since 1997, dur ing an underway demonstra tion commemorating Guerriere Day which honors the 200th anniversary of Constitutions decisive victory over the HMS Guerriere during the War of 1812. It marked the first time a United States frigate defeated a Royal Navy frigate at or nearly equal size. Its also the battle in which Constitution earned her famous nickname Old Ironsides. I cannot think of a bet ter way to honor those who fought in the war as well as celebrate Constitutions suc cesses during the War of 1812 than for the ship to be under sail, said Cmdr. Matt Bonner, Constitutions 72nd commanding officer. The event also ties our past and present by having the ship not only crewed by the outstanding young men and women who make up her crew, but also the 150 chief petty officer [CPO] selectees who join us for their Heritage Week. The CPO selectees and CPO mentor chiefs assisted Constitutions crew in setting sails. CPO selectees partici pated in Constitutions annual CPO Heritage Weeks, a week long training cycle divided by two weeks that teaches select ees time-honored maritime evolutions, such as gun drills, line handling and setting sails. The training is also designed to instill pride in naval heritage in the Navys senior enlisted leadership. Im a boatswains mate, said BMC(Select)(SW) Michael Zgoda, assigned to USS Ingraham (FFG 61). This is the foundation of my rate. Being able to learn from a variety of genuine chiefs and their different perspectives on leadership is overwhelming and impor tant to the chief petty officer transition. Im extremely hon ored to be a part of the group that can say they sailed the USS Constitution. The ship got underway at 9:57 a.m. with tugs attached to her sides and 285 people on board, including spe cial guests, such as the 58th, 59th, 62nd and 65th for mer commanding offi cers of Constitution; Rear Adm. Richard Breckenridge, Commander, Submarine Group Two; Rear Adm. Ted Branch, Commander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic; Vice Adm. William French, Commander, Navy Installations Command; retired Navy Capt. Thomas Hudner Jr., Medal of Honor recipient; and Dr. Phil Budden, Britains Consul General to New England. At 10:27 a.m., Budden and Bonner tossed a wreath into the ocean to honor and remember Constitutions battle with the HMS Guerriere. When the ship arrived at President Roads, a body of water of Boston Harbor, the crew then set three sails from Constitutions main, mizzen and fore masts, and at 12:25 p.m., she detached from her tugs and sailed west under her own power for 17 minutes. She sailed at a maximum speed of 3.1 knots, at an aver age of two knots, and at a dis tance of 1,100 yards. As the ships sail master, I felt a combination of pride and relief that the hundreds of man hours of training and planning over the past year all came together, and we were able to accomplish this goal, said BM1(SW) Conrad Hunt. Im really proud that I can say I was a part of this historic occasion. After tugs reattached to Constitutions sides, the ship headed to Fort Independence on Castle Island, where thou sands of spectators waited to watch Constitution fire a 21-gun salute toward the fort at 1:14 p.m. Fort Independence is a state park that served as a defense post for Boston Harbor at one time. The ship returned to her pier at 2:05 p.m. Constitution re-opened to the public for tours of the ships history at 4 p.m. For me, this underway is representative of an incred ible amount of work and ded ication by not only the crew, but Maintenance and Repair Facility, Naval History and Heritage Command, and all of the partners coming together to make this happen, said PR1(AW/SW) Jason Keith, who is the longest serving crew member currently assigned to Constitution. Keith reported to the ship April 13, 2009 and will depart Aug. 31. Ive given tours to thousands of people, shined brass for hundreds of hours, and Ive climbed the rigging to set and furl these sails over and over again. But sailing USS Constitution sails for first time since 1997 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 13

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Benefits of electronic recycling at NAS JaxNAS Jacksonville is heading up efforts to gather and prop erly recycle outdated electronic equipment, in turn protecting the environment and cutting costs for the base. The Electronic Recycling (E-Recycling) center located off Mustin Road in Building 1948, opens every Thursday from 9:3011:30 a.m. to accept all types of electronic equipment to be sorted and recycled. This project reflects todays fast paced information age, where Americans are increas ingly relying on high tech gadgets to assist them in their everyday lives. Advanced devices such as smart phones, laptops, iPods, and flat screen TVs make peoples lives easier and pro vides more access to the world around them than ever before. However, with technology getting more advanced at an exponential rate, older elec tronics are becoming obsolete and discarded as regular trash. This electronic waste, dubbed E-waste, can con tain hazardous materials such as lead, nickel, cadmium and mercury while also contain ing valuable minerals like gold, silver, platinum and copper. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), for every one million cell phones recycled, 35,274 pounds of copper, 772 pounds of silver, and 75 pounds of gold can be recovered. Recovery of these materials for reuse significantly reduces time, effort and pollution cre ated from the regular mining process, as well as preserving the earths natural resources. Federal, state and munici pal efforts to recycle E-waste is a growing priority. NAS Jax is just one example of mili tary and civilian organiza tions around the United States promoting the collection and management of E-waste. NAS Jax established its E-recycling program four years ago, and since then, it has seen a dramatic shift in what used to be considered common practice such as tossing outdated or broken electronics into the nearest dumpster. The center currently accepts all types of electrical and electronic devices.If its electronic, we will take it, commented Jody Smith, assistant hazardous waste manager at NAS Jax. It was amazing just how much electronic equipment was delivered here within the first few weeks of opening this center. The great thing was seeing how many storage areas around the base were cleared of outdated electronics that had just been sitting there unused for years. Creative Recycling in Tampa picks up the discarded elec tronics recovers the precious metals and melts the plastic for reuse. Even the plastic materials from a computer monitor or television are reclaimed, and its an amazing process. The best thing about E-recycling is that, first and foremost, it pro tects the environment, but also saves the government money because its a free service to us, Smith explained. For more information about E-recycling at NAS Jax, con tact Hazardous Waste Program Manager Jane Beason at 5425251, Jody Smith at 542-4283 or Billie Brownfield at 542-3492. Seabees from Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202 at NAS Jacksonville are spearheading efforts to complete work on four new restrooms at key locations around the base. This effort is part of the Navys plan for more efficient energy use that will cut over all costs and remain environ mentally friendly. Many of the portable restrooms around the base will also be replaced by this project. One key feature of these new facilities is that they uti lize photocell-based skylights, said Project Supervisor BU2 Michael Nordquest of CBMU 202. These skylights will have the ability to detect when the sun is up and when it sets, and the interior lights will power on or off accordingly. According to Nordquest, the restrooms are designed by Romtec, a company based out of Roseburg, Oregon. Romtec pre-builds the necessary com ponents and delivers them in lego type pieces for easy assembly. Typical construction time takes anywhere from two to five months, depending on the complexity of the inter nal structure and weather conditions, commented Construction Manager Ensign Blaine Henning of NAS Jax Public Works. We will have a total of four new facilities when this project is complete. Locations for these rest rooms include the Perimeter Road PRT area, golf course, Mulberry Cove Marina and Antenna Farm PT facility. Construction of new energy efficient restrooms underway 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 15

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Health professionals have long known the promise of electronic health records. For more than two decades, the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) have been working together to apply the benefits of this fast evolving technology. The departments already share more clinical health information than any two health care systems in the world, and together will com prise the largest integrated health network in the world, with more than 18 million total members worldwide. The new DoD/VA Interagency Program Office (IPO) is responsible for implementing an integrat ed Electronic Health Record (iEHR) for the DoD and VA. When operational, the iEHR will follow you from the first day of your military career, throughout your lifetime. It will be the single source for service members, vet erans, and beneficiaries to access their medical history. Additionally, it will ensure the seamless transition of care when service members go from active duty to veteran status. Your complete medical record will follow you when you move, switch medical providers or need emergency care while traveling. Your family medical history and medi cal allergies will be immedi ately available to every doctor or nurse who treats you within DoD and VA health systems. With the ability to view con sistent and comprehensive patient data, medical providers will be able to give you better care. Researchers will also be able to study trends, securely and privately, across the large population in the system. This can lead to new medical breakthroughs that benefit every one. For example, if we track data on patients with diabetes, we can minimize the number of amputation or instances of blindness. We can develop a registry of patients with simi lar injuries to measure the outcomes of current treatments to improve treatment protocols and quality of care now and for generations to come. The iEHR is a key compo nent of the Presidents Virtual Lifetime Electronic Record (VLER) initiative a ground breaking vision for the future of electronic data shar ing among federal agencies and the private sector. If you receive private sector health care, VLER Health is a way to send those requests for care out to the private sector and, most importantly, to bring that data back. This ensures you have a complete medical record that captures all information about all care you receive. We are committed to a fully operational iEHR, no later than 2017, with clinical capabilities deployed in Hampton Roads, Va. and San Antonio by 2014 a significant challenge, but one that is critical for our nations service members, veterans and beneficiaries. For more information about the DoD/VA IPO, visit www. tricare.mil/tma/ipo. To learn more about the role electronic health records play in medi cine today, go to www.healthit. hhs.gov. During National Immunization Awareness Month, its important to note there are 26 vaccine-preventable diseases, including Human Papilloma virus (HPV). According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), HPV is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States. At least 50 percent of sexually active men and women will be infected in their life times. What is HPV? It is a virus spread through sexual contact. There are approximately 40 different types of genital HPV. Some types can cause cervi cal, anal, penile, vaginal and mouth or throat cancer in women and men. Most people with HPV have no symptoms. Who should get the vaccine? The CDC advises all females and males ages 9 to 26 receive the full course of HPV vac cination. How is HPV passed from person to person? HPV is passed through skin-toskin contact. Condoms do not fully protect against transmitting this virus. It is possible to get the virus from a sexual partner who does not have any visible signs of infection, such as genital warts. Why should children and adults be vaccinated? The vaccination works to prevent the viruses from infecting the body and can greatly reduce the risk of developing HPV related cancers. Is the vaccine safe? Yes. The U.S. currently has the safest, most effective vaccine supply in history. Years of testing are required by law before a vaccine is licensed, and they are continually monitored for safety and effectiveness. It is impossible to contract HPV from the vaccine. According to the Vaccine Adverse Effects Reporting System, over 46 million doses of vaccine have been given in the U.S., and the risks of side effects are very low (less than 0.05 percent). Side effects include redness, swelling, or soreness in the area where the shot was given. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association also found that there is a very small risk of fainting or blood clots right after the shot is given. People who have fainted after receiving shots in the past should alert their doctors before getting the vaccine. Why vaccinate non-sexually active children/adults? The vaccine only prevents HPV if the person does not already have it. It does not cure an already infected person. So the best time to vaccinate is before sexual activity begins. For individuals who are already sexually active or those who already have genital warts, the vaccine is still recommended, as it can prevent infection from other strains of the HPV virus. What happens after getting the HPV vaccination? The vaccination series consists of three shots. Once the initial HPV vaccine has been administered, a second shot should be given two months later. The final shot is required six months after the first. Does the vaccine replace the need for a regular Pap test? No, the HPV vac cine only protects against the virus. Its important that all women have Pap test and pelvic exams as part of their rou tine heath care. Does TRICARE pay for the vaccina tion? Yes. TRICARE pays for HPV vaccine. Should pregnant women get the vaccine? No. Pregnant women should not get the vaccine. Once the baby is born, they can discuss with their healthcare provider the best time to schedule the vaccination. Patients should talk to their health care providers about the right vaccinations for them and their children. To learn more about immunizations, visit CDCs website: http://www.cdc.gov/ vaccines/parents/infants-toddlers.html or call 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-2324636). Ever thought about volunteering to help people with their tax returns? With more than 13,000 volunteer tax help sites nationwide, you can touch many lives as a volunteer. Volunteering in either the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) or Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) program can be rewarding, in addition to serving a vital role in your local community. The VITA and TCE programs generally offer free tax help to people with low-to-moderate income who need assistance in preparing their own tax returns. This includes people with disabili ties and those for whom English is a second lan guage. These programs are always looking for volunteers during the tax-filing season. Volunteering can be exciting, educational and enjoyable. Youll get to interact directly with people who need help preparing their own tax returns at no cost to them. Dont know that much about taxes? Dont worry youll get special ized training from IRScertified volunteers. You can also choose your volunteer duty. Duties include being a greeter, a reviewer, a tax prepar er and more. The hours are flexible, the training is free and the time commitment is minimal. Taxpayers rely on vol unteers for free qual ity tax return preparation and assistance each year. Last year, nearly 99,000 volunteers at thousands of sites nationwide helped more than three million taxpayers. To learn more about becoming a volunteer, complete and email the Form 14310 VITA/TCE Volunteer Sign Up to TaxVolunteer@irs.gov. Make sure to include all your contact informa tion along with the city and state where you want to volunteer. A local IRS representative will direct you to the nearest orga nizations offering free tax help. Become a volunteer and see what a difference it can make in your life and the lives of others.The doctor is in: Electronic health records and youNational Immunization Awareness Month: Vaccination can prevent cancer-causing HPVBecome a tax volunteer, touch many lives 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Monday Pizza Madness $5 for a 14 one-topping pizza 2:30 9 p.m., dine in or carry-out only Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included August Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 4 10 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of one-lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Fall Bowling Leagues now forming Mixed league Monday 7 p.m. After-work league Wednesday 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thursday 9 a.m. Mixed league Thursday 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Friday 11:45 a.m. Friday night league 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Saturday 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Contact Melissa Luehrs at 542-3518. Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Open Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. until Oct. 1. Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guestsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. The Price is Right Times Union Center Sept. 25, 7:30 p.m., $47 Sesame Street Live Times Union Center Sept. 29, 2:30 p.m., $18 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam February 23 Preferred seating $42, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Legoland 1 day $45.50, 1 day w/water park $52.75, 2 day $54.50, 2 day w/water park $58.75 NFL Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguars game shuttle $12 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day $29.50, 2 day $40 Disney World Orlando FL 4-day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135 $162 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Tampa Zoo $19 (Adult) $17.50 (Child) Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Blue Man Group in Orlando $59, includes City Walk venue Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Medieval Times Free royalty upgrade with dinner reservationThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Mall & Movie Trip Aug. 24 at 6 p.m. Orange Park mall & AMC Theater Ginnie Spring Trip Aug. 25 at 8 a.m. Free admission and tubing Jaguars vs. Atlanta Falcons Aug. 30 Free admission and transportationNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Aug. 24 for active duty Aug. 26 for retirees & DoD personnel Golf & Dine Special Play 18-holes with cart and choice of breakfast or lunch for $26! Not applicable on holidays. After 12:30 p.m. Special Play 18 holes for $17, cart and green fees included Valid 7 days a week including holidays Monday & Tuesday Play 18 holes for $20, cart and green fees included Open to military and DoD, not applicable on holidaysMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Register now for before & after school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household incomeFlying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Sept. 10 Oct. 17 $500 per person From Aug. to Sept. 11, Navy Exchange (NEX) customers will have no down payment, no interest and no payments for 180 days when using their Military Star Card to purchase any computer, television, home theater system or camera bundle valued at $699 or more. The Military Star Card offers many benefits, including 10 percent off the first days purchases (up to the cus tomers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24-hour customer ser vice, including online access. Military Star Card applications are available at your NEX. The application can be processed the same day at the NEX customer service desk. Become a Facebook fan and follow the NEX on Twitter.Military Star Card offers special savings on electronics JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 17

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AWFCS Shane Waterman retired from VP-16 at the VP-30 auditorium Aug. 3 after serv ing 26 years of honorable naval service. The guest speaker was Lt. Kenneth VanHook, and the invocation and benedic tion were given by AWFC Rene Watson. AT3 Amanda Aselin sang the national anthem. Waterman, a native of Alta, Iowa, enlisted in the Navy through the delayed entry program in October 1986. After completing boot camp at Great Lakes, Ill., he reported for Aviation Electricians Mate A School at NATTC Millington, Tenn. His first shore tour began in 1987 with VT-7 in Meridian, Miss. Shortly thereafter, Waterman received orders to VP-11 in Brunswick, Maine. While there, he was advanced to petty officer second class and completed two deploy ments to Keflavik, Iceland and Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico. Waterman then enrolled in the Flight Engineer Program and attended school at VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville. He returned to VP-11 as an aircrewman and completed two more deploy ments to Roosevelt Roads and Sigonella, Italy, including exer cises in support of Operation Desert Storm. In 1993, Waterman returned to the VP-30 Pros Nest as an instructor. While there, he earned the rank of petty officer first class. In 1998, he transferred to VQ-2 in Rota, Spain. During his time with VQ-2, he participat ed in multiple detachments to Souda Bay, Crete in support of NATO operations in Kosovo. As a Sandeman, Waterman was promoted to chief petty officer (CPO). In 2001, he returned to VP-30 again for a second tour as an instructor flight engineer. While there, he was the flight engineer fleet instructor under training instructor CPO, fleet NATOPS evaluator and flight engineer training track CPO. In 2005, Waterman reported to VP-16 for his first tour with the War Eagles. He was promoted to senior chief petty officer and deployed to El Salvador and Al Udeid Air Base in Qatar. In March 2008, he returned to VP-30 again, this time as the fleet NATOPS senior evaluator. He acted as the Training Department MCPO for 13 months and attended the Senior Enlisted Academy in Newport, R.I. Waterman returned to VP-16 in August 2011 as the Operations Department leading CPO. He has spent the last year with the VP-16 War Eagles and greatly contributed to the squadrons successful deploy ment to Kadena AB, Japan this past year. Watermans last flight in the P-3 Orion was his return from VP-16s seventh fleet deploy ment by way of Anchorage, Alaska on June 6. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Business Director Ralph Kaneshiro retired Aug. 11 after 35 years of civil service to our nation. He said good-bye to co-workers and friends as he joined with his family at a retirement luncheon aboard NAS Jacksonville. You can tell that you are much loved, said NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus. There wouldnt be a better accomplishment than that. Many of the attendees spoke of Kaneshiros accomplishments and the numerous locations they have worked with him over the years. It honors me a lot to see your faces in the crowd, said Kaneshiro of those who attending his retirement luncheon. Kaneshiro spoke of his time with NAVFAC and told the new employees to volunteer for the hard jobs. He told everyone that you dont have to be a supervisor to be a leader, everyone can be a leader. The organization we are today is way more robust and capable then our pre decessor, said Kaneshiro. We always moved forward and worked together as a team. The business is a lot more complex then when I started 35 years ago. He went on to thank the entire workforce for all they have accomplished. Some of Kaneshiros accomplishments include meritorious service at Pacific Division, Engineering Field Activity, Mediterranean, and a deployment to Public Works Sector, Iraq. As the Business Director and Senior Command Civilian for NAVFAC Southeast since its standup in 2006, he demonstrated exceptional leadership. Throughout the multi-year effort to consolidate three former NAVFAC com mands, he tirelessly maintained focus on the vision of an efficient, effective and highly motivated workforce and was a key contributor to successful achievement of that vision, said Kiwus. Melding different organizational cultures into a functional team, he overcame the concurrent chal lenges of distance management, high attrition, record high workload and organiza tional changes. Waterman retires from VP-16 after 26 years service NAVFAC Southeast Senior Civilian retires after 35 years 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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The Defense and Interior depart ments are teaming up to strengthen energy security and reduce military utility costs. A goal of the partnership is to harness solar, wind, geothermal and biomass energy resources on or near DoD installations across the country, officials said. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and Interior Secretary Ken Salazar signed a memorandum of understanding Aug. 6 that encourages appropriate develop ment of renewable energy projects on public lands. The memo sets out the guiding concepts for the Renewable Energy Partnership Plan, the departments roles and responsibilities under the agreement, and how they will work together to carry out the initiative. Developing renewable energy is the right thing to do for national security, as well as for the environment and our economy, Panetta said. Renewable energy projects built on these lands will provide reliable, local sources of power for military installations; allow for a continued energy supply if the commercial power grid gets disrupted; and help lower utility costs. Salazar announced the agreement on the eve of the National Clean Energy Summit. Energy security is critical to our national security, he said. Under our Smart from the Start approach to spurring renewable energy development, we are making millions of acres of public lands and offshore areas available that have the greatest potential for utilityscale solar and wind projects and the fewest resource conflicts. Our nations military lands hold great renewable energy potential, he added, and this partnership will help ensure that were tapping into these resources with a smart and focused approach to power our military, reduce energy costs, and grow our nations energy independence. The Defense Department has been pursuing development of renewable energy on its installations to improve energy security and to reduce its $4 billion-a-year utility bill. Together with advanced microgrid technology, which DoD is testing, renewable energy will allow a base to maintain critical functions for weeks or months if the commercial grid goes down. Each of the military services has committed to deploy 1 gigawatt of renewable energy on or near its installations by 2025. Defense installations encom pass roughly 28 million acres in the United States, of which 16 mil lion acres previously managed by the Interior Departments Bureau of Land Management were withdrawn for military use by executive order, congressional legislation or departmental regulations. About 13 million acres of these withdrawn lands are in the West and are high in wind, solar and geothermal resources. Offshore wind also is an abundant renewable energy resource available to many coastal installations. Offshore Atlantic winds alone could produce an estimated 1,000 gigawatts of energy, Interior Department officials said. The memo of understanding estab lishes a framework for an offshore wind partnership in which the Defense and Interior departments will continue to work together to identity areas most appropriate for offshore wind develop ment. To encourage a dialogue with industry, the departments will co-chair a military/industry offshore wind forum this fall to initiate information sharing among the military, other federal agencies and industry. Under the agreement, the Defense Department will explore ways in which renewable energy could be provid ed directly to a single installation or may be transmitted across a network of installations. Some larger projects could involve the sale of excess power to the grid, provided appropriate mea sures ensure base security. Defense, Interior departments join forces on renewable energy Sunday Services8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Catholic CCD 11 a.m. Protestant Worship Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study 6 p.m. in the barracks Officer Christian Fellowship and Bible study every Monday at 6 p.m. The chapel is located on the corner of Birmingham Avenue and Mustin Road. For more information, call 5423051. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 19

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For more information about any sports, contact Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.face book.com nasjaxmwr. The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 section, lower area in the north end zone. Aug. 30, 6:30 p.m. Jags vs. Atlanta Falcons (Tickets now on sale) Sept. 16, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Houston Texans (Tickets on sale Sept. 4) Sept. 30, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Cincinnati Bengals (Tickets on sale Sept. 17) Oct. 7, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Chicago Bears (Tickets on sale Sept. 24) Nov. 4, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Detroit Lions (Tickets on sale Oct. 22) Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jags vs. Indianapolis Colts (Tickets on sale Oct. 29) Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. Retirees and Veterans/DoD employ ees are eligible to purchase tickets for New York Giants and Atlanta Falcons games. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but under no circum stances are dependent children autho rized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may pur chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No exceptions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@ usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tick ets for the entire season.Jacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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USS Constitution today is one of the greatest honors Ive had in my naval career, and Im truly proud to be a part of this history. The last time Constitution sailed under her own power was July 21, 1997 to honor the ships 200th birthday. It was the first time the ship sailed in 116 years. When we sailed the ship, it became clear it was a different experience that you cant have in port, said Lance Beebe, a crew member aboard Constitutions 1997 sail. Constitution is the worlds oldest commissioned warship afloat and welcomes more than 500,000 visitors per year. She defended the sea lanes against threat from 1797 to 1855, much like the mission of todays Navy. Americas Navy: Keeping the sea free for more than 200 years. Constitutions mission today is to offer community outreach and education about the ships history. CONSTITUTION He effectively oversaw historically high construction programs which exceeded $1 billion in value for several consecutive years, the establishment of the Asset Management Business Line, and consolidation of Public Works functions at NAVFAC Southeast Headquarters and 15 Public Works Departments. Kaneshiro was key in managing an annual operating budget of nearly $200 million, maintaining the opti mum balance of staffing and fund ing for both General Fund and Navy Working Capital Fund budgets, cor rection of the Net Operating Result after years of negative balance, and the extraordinary success of human resources programs that hired hun dreds of employees a year and ensured successful workload execution. Your enduring legacy at NAVFAC Southeast is the positive workplace and environment you fostered during the formative years of this young organization, said Kiwus. Kaneshiros entire civil service career was with NAVFAC. He start ed his career as a structural engi neer with the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard. Other positions included Construction Manager with Officer in Charge of Construction MidPacific; Master Planner, Public Works Section Head, Environmental Planning Branch Head, Facilities & Utilities Division Deputy Director, and Deputy Operations Officer with NAVFAC Pacific Division, a tour with the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq; and before relocating to Jacksonville, he was the Business Manager and Deputy Operations Officer in NAVFAC Europe. KANESHIRO August marks the third anniversa ry of the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and since it was implemented, the Department of Veterans Affairs has provided educa tional benefits to 773,000 veterans and their family members, according to a Department of Veterans Affairs Aug. 10 news release. This is one of the most impor tant programs helping our Iraq and Afghanistan veterans reach their edu cational goals, Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki said. The Post-9/11 GI Bill pays tuition and fees on behalf of veterans or eligible dependents to the school in which they are enrolled. Eligible participants also receive a monthly housing allowance and up to $1,000 annually for books and supplies. The program also allows eli gible service members to transfer their benefits to their spouses and children. The program provides a wide range of educational options, including under graduate and graduate degrees, voca tional/technical training, on-the-job training, flight training, correspon dence training, licensing and national testing programs, entrepreneurship training, and tutorial assistance. For over 68 years, GI Bill programs have shaped and changed the lives of service members, veterans, their fami lies and survivors by helping them reach their educational goals, said Allison A. Hickey, Veterans Affairs Undersecretary for Benefits. The Post-9/11 GI Bill is the most extensive educational assistance pro gram since the original GI Bill was signed into law in 1944. VA has since paid more than $20 billion in benefits to veterans and their family members. For the 2012-2013 academic year, 1,770 colleges and universities are supplement ing Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits by participating in the Yellow Ribbon Program. Under the Yellow Ribbon Program, degree-granting institutions make additional funds available for a veter ans educational program without an additional charge to their GI Bill enti tlement. To make up the difference for those students whose tuition and fees exceed what the Post-9/11 GI Bill cov ers, institutions can voluntarily enter into a Yellow Ribbon Agreement with VA to designate an additional amount of funding, and VA will match that amount. VA is seeking legal authority to trademark the term GI Bill. President Barack Obama signed an executive order on April 26, 2012, directing VA and the Department of Defense to undertake a number of measures to stop deceptive and misleading promotional efforts that target the GI Bill educational ben efits of service members, veterans, and eligible family members and survivors. In June, the attorneys general of several states gave VA the rights to the GIBill.com website after the original owners agreed to give up the internet site to settle a lawsuit by the states. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast awarded a $6.6 million contract Aug. 15 to TMG Services, Inc., a small business, out of Cleveland, Ohio for the Massey Avenue Corridor Improvements at NS Mayport. NAVFAC Southeast continues with its pledge to support small businesses, said Nelson Smith, NAVFAC Southeast deputy for small business. Americas 27 million small businesses employ more that 58 percent of the private work force, generate more than 51 percent of the nations gross domestic product, and are the principal source of new jobs. The work to be performed provides for construction of a boulevard-style roadway with two lanes each way divided with a turfed median along the Massey Avenue corridor. This project award, is once again a tangible demonstration of the strategic value and worldwide relevance of Naval Station Mayport, said NS Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Douglas Cochrane. As a practical matter, the improved traffic flow will enable the 2,000 new Sailors who will arrive with the USS Iwo Jima ARG, to safely and efficiently transit the installation. Construction includes turning lanes, curb and gutters and pedestrian side walks on the north side of Massey Avenue. It includes realignment of intersecting streets and all required signalization and intersection reconstruc tion and all incidental related work. This project also includes improve ments at the intersection of Maine Street and Moale Avenue and at the intersection of Baltimore Street and Moale Avenue to improve capaci ties and safety of these intersections. A round-about will be constructed at the Baltimore Street and Moale Avenue intersection. Site preparation includes site clear ing, excavation and preparation for construction. Paving and site improvements include a storm water drain age, sidewalks and curbing. Electrical utilities include traffic signals, roadway lights and utility relocations. The project is expected to be com pleted by February 2014.Post-9/11 GI Bill celebrates start of fourth yearNAVFAC awards $6.6 million contract to small business NNOA Jacksonville Chapter brings home awards from New Orleans At the 40th annual National Naval Officers Association (NNOA) Training Continuum this July in New Orleans, the NNOA Jacksonville Chapter was recognized for its outstanding commu nity service and leadership. During the continuum, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert, Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James Amos and Commandant of the Coast Guard Adm. Papp Jr. each pre sented their vision on building a diverse officer corps as we continue to strengthen our military sea services. Diversity makes us a better Navy. Organizations that are more diverse, out perform those that are not. Its been proven again and again, said Greenert. Diversity organizations bring us access so we can reach out and talk to people who may want to make the Navy a career, Greenert said. They also help us bring alignment to ourselves and bring diversity into our human resources psyche and make it second nature on bringing people in. The event concluded with a ban quet where retired Rear Adm. Stephen Rochon, USCG, was the keynote speak er. He spoke on the relevancy of NNOA over the past 40 years and challenged the leadership to press towards the future. At the awards ceremony, NNOA Jacksonville Chapter received the fol lowing recognition: President Award, Cmdr. Daryl Pierce Program Award Chapter Award, First Place Chapter Award, First Place Howard Milligan Awards: Cmdr. Daryl Pierce, Cmdr. Andrea Petrovanie, Lt. Cmdr. Jessica Beard, retired Lt. Cmdr. Anita Pierce, retired Lt. Cmdr. Herlena Washington, retired Lt. Cmdr. Brian Martin, Lt. Andrea Baker and CWO3 Lionel Jeffcoat, USCG. For information about the NNOA Jacksonville Chapter, call 594-6908. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 21

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VP-62 received the 2011 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Aviation Safety S Award during a presentation Aug. 13 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 511. This award represents the culmination of 32 years of accident-free flying and 100,000 hours of Class A mis hap-free flying, said VP-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Jerry Dearie, after accept ing the award from Capt. Eric Wiese, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11. Broad Arrows Safety Officer Lt. Cmdr. Mark Monturo said, During all of the 1,305 hours flown by VP-62 crews in 2011, the squadron sustained zero mishaps, zero injuries and zero loss of work days, fostering a command cli mate of safety. The award recognizes the performance related to qual ity contributions to the Naval Aviation Safety Program including control of aviationrelated mishaps, application of safety programs, timely report ing of hazards, and submission of suggestions for improve ments pertaining to all appro priate related issues, such as maintenance and various sub jective criteria. Squadrons that win this award receive engraved plaques and citations for per manent display. They are also entitled to paint a prominent green S on their aircraft until the next years selections are made. THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Capt. Bob Sanders, commanding officer of NAS Jacksonville, provided the opening address at the Greening in a Tough Economy environmen tal symposium hosted for the seventh year by the City of Jacksonville (COJ) Environmental Protection Board and University of North Florida. More than 200 environmental plan ners, engineers, health, safety and reg ulatory professionals gathered at the UNF University Center Aug. 17 to share the latest information concerning sus tainability resources, low-impact devel opment, St. Johns River restoration and the River Accord Progress Report. Sanders began by recognizing staff of the COJ Environmental Quality Division, COJ Sustainability Team and Keep Jacksonville Beautiful Commission. Their long commitment to environ mental excellence and leadership has been of pivotal importance to our citys continued growth. Please dont spare your applause for them. He continued, My family is fortu nate to live on the riverfront at NAS Jacksonville, so we appreciate the vital role that the St. Johns plays in the growth and quality of life of our north east Florida communities. Despite the environmental and economic challeng es we face today, the proper use of our natural resources must move forward if we are to be successful. This past year was significant for NAS Jacksonville. We were recognized by the Department of Defense as the best naval installation in the world. We received energy and water management awards from Secretary of the Navy and the Environmental Protection Agency as well as the United Nations Earth Society Earth Trustee award that rec ognized our strong community envi ronmental partnerships. Sanders pointed to the bases long partnership with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, St. Johns River Water NAS Jax commanding officer kicks off symposiumBroad Arrows claim safety award

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Aug. 23 1864 Rear Adm. David Farraguts squadron captures Fort Morgan at Mobile Bay, Ala. 1958 In Taiwan Straits crisis, ships of 7th Fleet move into Taiwan area to support the nationalist Chinese island against Chinese communists. 1963 The first satellite communica tions ship, USNS Kingsport (T-AG-164) in Lagos, Nigeria, connected President John F. Kennedy with Nigerian Prime Minister Balewa, who was on board for the first satellite (Syncom II) relayed telephone conversation between heads of state. Aug. 24 1814 British invasion of Maryland and Washington, D.C. caused Washington Navy Yard and ships to be burned to prevent capture by the British. 1912 Launching of USS Jupiter (AC-3), a collier, later converted into the Navys first aircraft carrier and renamed USS Langley (CV-1) in 1920. 1942 U.S. carrier aircraft begin twoday Battle of Eastern Solomons, where Japanese task force is defeated and one Japanese carrier sunk, forcing the Japanese to recall their expedition to recapture Guadalcanal. 1960 Attack transport USS Bexar (APA237) deploys to Pangahan Province, Philippines in response to emergency request for aid from the provincial gov ernor. Aug. 25 1843 The side-wheel steam frigate USS Missouri arrives at Gibraltar completing the first trans-Atlantic crossing by U.S. steam powered ship. The next day she was accidentally set afire, exploded and sank fortunately without loss of life. 1942 Five Navy nurses who were POWs on Guam are repatriated. 1951 Because the target was beyond range of land-based fighters, 23 fight ers from USS Essex (CV-9) escort USAF heavy bombers attacking Najin, Korea. Aug. 26 1775 Rhode Island Resolve: Rhode Island delegates to the Continental Congress press for creation of Continental Navy to protect the colonies from the British. 1839 U.S. Brig Washington seizes Spanish slaver, Amistad, near Montauk Point, N.Y. The case was a defining moment in the struggle to abolish slav ery in the United States. 1861 Union amphibious force lands near Hatteras, N.C. 1865 Civil War ends with Naval strength of more than 58,500 men and 600 ships. Aug. 27 1917 Squadron of minesweepers departs U.S. for service off the coast of France. 1944 USS Stingray (SS-186) lands men and supplies on Luzon, Philippines to support guerilla operations against the Japanese. 1959 Off Cape Canaveral, Fla., USNS Observation Island (EAG-154) completes first shipboard launching of a Polaris missile. Aug. 28 1867 Capt. William Reynolds of the screw sloop-of-war Lackawanna raises U.S. flag over Midway Island to take pos session of the islands for the U.S. 1952 Units on aircraft carrier USS Boxer (CV-21) launch explosives-filled drones designed to explode against a railroad bridge near Hungnam, Korea. They were the first guided missiles launched from a ship during Korean Conflict. 1965 Cmdr. Scott Carpenter and nine aquanauts enter SeaLab II, secured 205 feet below Southern California waters to conduct underwater living and working tests. 1992 U.S. Marine Corps and Army per sonnel begin providing disaster relief in Florida after Hurricane Andrew. Aug. 29 1861 U.S. amphibious squadron cap tures forts at Hatteras Inlet, N.C. 1862 Union gunboat Pittsburgh sup ports Army troops in landing at Eunice, Arkansas 1915 Navy salvage divers raise F-4, the first U.S. submarine sunk by accident. 1964 Amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LPH 4) and two dock land ing ships arrive off coast of Hispaniola to deliver medical aid to Haiti and Dominican Republic, which were badly damaged by Hurricane Cleo. At the beginning of the summer, before I headed to Boston for the week end, I posted on the Dinner with the Smileys Facebook page, Have baby sitter; will travel. Halfway across the world, my husband, Dustin, saw the post and sent me an e-mail. That sounds tacky, he wrote. Youre lucky to be able to take a babysitter with you. Most people could not. I removed the post, picked up my teenage babysitter, Kara, and thought about Dustins advice as we drove south with my three boys. For the record, I ended up doing two trips this summer with two different babysitters who are sisters, and I didnt pay either of them for it. I gave them a rollaway bed in the hotel room, and I bought them meals. But this isnt about money. And its not about me not being able to take care of the boys by myself, either. Its about being lonely. While the boys fought in the backseat or played tic-tac-toe at the restaurant, I had someone to talk to. Ordinarily, on family vacations past, that person would have been Dustin. This summer, it was first Kara, and then her older sister Becca. But the boys, who dont have cousins or extended family in the area, benefit ed as well. It was as if we were traveling with their aunt or sister or cousin someone willing to go to the hotel pool at 11 p.m. or stay up late watching mov ies when I was already ready for bed. In other words: Dustin didnt know what he was talking about! I highly recommend this setup to mil itary spouses dealing with a deploy ment. Although, it need not be a baby sitter; any traveling companion will do. Its a win-win situation. The babysit ter or friend gets a free vacation (plus another bonus keep reading), you are less lonely and the kids are happy. My trips this summer with Kara and Becca are ones I will never forget. I dont think they will, either. Before I get too far, however, I should stop and tell you that when my husband and I travel, he is the adult. Perhaps this is partly why he worried about my summer vacations with young babysitters. Kara, Becca and I were like puppies whose backyard gate had been left open. Using a GPS, we circled Bostons Back Bay more times than necessary, but our dilemma did not lead, as it does with Dustin, to an argument about whos better with directions. My sitters had a free vacation; of course they deferred to me. It was yet another lesson in community: who says family vacations have to be just fam ily? And throughout our trips, we all learned some valuable lessons about humanity, kindness and generosity. A hotel in Boston spontaneously upgraded our room and delighted in our responses: the boys dancing in the lobby, screaming Oh, yeah! Oh, yeah! A toll booth operator in New Hampshire patiently (never mind the traffic) gave us directions when we were headed the wrong way. At Aloft, in Lexington, Mass., an employee gave the boys Matchbox cars, then smiled at me and said, I see how hard youre work ing. The point is, had these been ordinary family vacations, I might have been in a Smiley bubble, hyper-focused on my husband and boys. But my family of five was not together this summer, so the boys and I took a trip with and among the community. We were open to the possibility that people around us even strangers could make our vacation better. And, they did. After so much generosity and kind ness, its only fair that I give some thing back. And, boy, did I! Free food and lodging werent the only things my young babysitters received this sum mer. They also got an education in trav eling with three children. My gift to humanity: two less females at risk for unwed, teenage pregnancy. Have babysitters, will travel

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The Sun Seekers of VR-58 recently hosted a town hall meeting with the Master Chief of the Navy Reserve Force, FORCM Chris Wheeler. Wheeler was aboard NAS Jacksonville for the retirement of a VR-58 Sailor after which CMDCM Charles Slaton seized the opportunity to arrange for him speak to Sailors not only from VR-58, but also from other tenant commands such as VR-62, VP-62, and NOSC Jacksonville. This was their chance to meet and speak directly with one of the high est-ranking leaders in the enlisted chain of command and Wheeler welcomed the invitation. More than 200 NAS Jacksonville Full Time Support and Selected Reserve Sailors greeted Wheeler at an open forum held on the VR-58 han gar deck. He opened his brief with an overall view of the Navys Reserve Component from a Pentagon perspective. He touched on topics such as retention, advancement and the budgeting issues affecting all Sailors. Wheeler also spoke about Continuum Service, that focus es on areas such as the 21st Century Sailor and CNO ten ants to name a few. He touched on what role the Navy will play in the future specifically concern ing decreased mobilization opportunities. Another topic discussed was the implementa tion of Perform To Serve (PTS) for Selective Reserve Sailors. He explained that the system will utilize Fleet Ride just as Active Duty and Full Time Support. Finally, Wheeler talked about how the CNO and CNR are working diligently to break down the barriers and poli cies to get Selective Reserve back to active duty because they value the work we do. The vision and goal is to have a Reserve Component to Active Component continuum. Following his brief, Wheeler opened the floor, offering the opportunity to ask questions from members of area com mands. Questions posed to Wheeler ranged from selection boards to advancement quotas. After more than an hour of open dis cussion, he posed for photos with members in attendance and spoke one-on-one with many Sailors. VR-58 hosts Navy Reserve Force Master Chief JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 3

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Commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris visited NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville headquarters Aug. 3. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Head and Executive Director Mitch Palmquist briefed Harris spotlighting the commands overall mission and organization. Head emphasized NAVSUP FLC Jacksonvilles integration with 4th Fleet speaking specifi cally about the programs that enhance fleet and warfighter logistics capabilities across the Southeast region and the 4th Fleet area of responsibility. During the briefing, Harris spoke about the importance of Naval Station Guantanamo Bay and lauded NAVSUP FLC Jacksonvilles exercise and expe ditionary contract support, par ticularly for the PANAMAX 2012 exercise. Following the briefing, Head and Harris toured NAVSUP FLC Jacksonvilles workspaces. Harris took the time to speak with several of members of the staff. He even gave one of his personal coins to fellow Washington Redskins fan Prudence Howard after noticing a Redskins coffee mug in her office. It was a pleasure to host Admiral Harris and to brief him on FLCJs interface with the 4th Fleet staff, said Head. But the real highlight of the visit was having the opportunity to draw attention to our greatest asset our workforce. It was ter rific to see the employees engage him. I think they really appre ciated that he took the time to walk around the spaces and say hello, Head added. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast recently heard the following cases: Martial convened aboard NAS Jacksonville, a Petty Officer Third Class pled guilty to mak ing a false official statement and was found guilty of engag ing in a sexual act with a per son substantially incapacitated. The court-martial sentenced the accused to two years of confine ment, reduction in rate to E-1, and a Dishonorable Discharge. convened on board NAS Jacksonville, a Petty Officer Second Class was found guilty of improperly accessing medi cal records. The court-martial imposed no punishment in addition to the conviction itself. Martial convened aboard NAS Jacksonville, a Seaman Apprentice pled guilty to wrong fully using Spice, sending a lewd picture to a minor, and receiving and possessing child pornogra phy. The court-martial adjudged a sentence of 11 months con finement, reduction in rate to E-1, forfeiture of $994.00 per month for 11 months, and a Bad Conduct Discharge. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast are tried, with few exceptions, at NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, and NAS Pensacola. Therefore, the location of where a court-martial described above was convened does not necessarily correlate to the com mand that convened the courtmartial. 4th Fleet Commander visits NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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The commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command, U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) offi cially concluded the annual 2012 PANAMAX exercise Aug. 16 at Naval Station Mayport. Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, along with Brazilian Rear Adm. Wilson Pereira de Lima Filho, concluded the exercise in which more than 1,000 military personnel from 17 nations, includ ing the United States, participated. Of that number, 269 participants were from partner nations. I would to thank our partners in the Americas and other observers for their critical contribution and out standing participation in key leadership roles of this exercise. Every nation shared unique and invaluable skills and their real-world experiences make this the best exercise ever, Harris said. The main focus of PANAMAX 2012 was to exercise a variety of responses, in coordination with the gov ernments of Panama and Colombia, to protect and guarantee safe passage of commercial traffic through the Panama Canal, ensure its neutrality, and respect national sovereignty. This multinational exercise strengthens interoper ability and builds joint capabilities of the participating nations to plan and execute complex multinational operations. PANAMAX is a good opportunity to exchange knowledge and increase interoperability among the many partner nations that have a common interest in the safety and security of the Panama Canal, Lima Filho said. PANAMAX is a U.S.-sponsored, multination al annual exercise that includes participants from Belize, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, and the United States. As we complete this years PANAMAX exercise I know that each of us will take away many good lessons from each other. I encourage all our partners in the Americas to continue to value the professional and personal bonds that were developed here as they will last for many years to come, Harris said. COMUSNAVSO/C4F supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional secu rity and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. PANAMAX military exercise concludes JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 Nearly 90 children of Navy and DoD families, represent ing the Jacksonville-area navy bases, attended the NAS Jacksonville Drug Education for Youth (DEFY) summer camp Aug. 5-10 at YMCA Camp McConnell, in Micanopy, Fla. Crediting the summer camp for its large stake in the year long program, NAS Jacksonville DEFY Program Coordinator AWS1 Gerald Boysen said the 2012 camp was a tremendous success. More than an anti-drug pro gram, DEFY produces 9-12 year olds who have character, leader ship and confidence to engage in positive healthy lifestyles as drug-free citizens, he said. Started in 1993, the DEFY pro gram is in its 19th year of pro viding mentorship, character development, drug education and essential life skills to mili tary kids. The NAS Jacksonville program, which began in 1996, offers a yearlong mentoring and support program that includes an annual learning and activ ity intensive five-day overnight camping experience, during which, time is split between out door activities and classroom lessons. The location of YMCA Camp McConnell is a perennial choice for camp organizers because it sits on 220 acres of picturesque hardwood forest, meadows and wetlands boasting excellent dining, berthing, recreation and learning facilities for the large group. Outdoors, the campers hike nature trails, ride horses, play at a low ropes course, swim, climb a rock wall and even attempt a high ropes course. Indoors, the campers follow a four-part cur riculum that includes: focus on solving conflict and building self esteem; and skills, that emphasize peerpressure resistance; building, group problem solving and assertive communication; exercise and nutrition basics and an introduction to the Presidents Challenge, a pro gram of the Presidents Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition aimed at promoting active life styles. There were 67 campers ages 9-12 and 22 junior mentors ages 14-18 that represented a marked decrease in camper attendance from the year prior, which numbered more than 120 campers and junior mentors. The decrease was intentional and budget minded according to Mentor Coordinator Alan LeFan, now in his seventh year in the position. We can offer the kids more NAS Jax hosts Navys largest DEFY summer camp

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 7 activities when there are fewer chil dren, said LeFan. There were things we couldnt do last year that the kids really benefit from. The decrease in numbers didnt affect the DEFY Chapters status as largest Navy DEFY program in the world. It also meant that the kids could have two days of horse riding and a chance to attempt a high-ropes course. IT2 Derek Saylor, of NRSE Reserve Component Command, in his third year as a mentor, appreciated the return of the two activities and noted the life les sons imparted by each of the outdoor activities. The horses were a real self-con fidence boost, the archery built patience... and the high ropes taught them goal setting and persistence, he said. We taught overcoming peer pres sure at the pool, overcoming fear at the rock wall and teamwork at the low ropes course. Alan LeFan, said that of his seven years as mentor coordinator and despite last-minute command man ning issues that cost multiple mentors the 2012 summer camp was more suc cessful than ever before. He credited the junior mentors pervasive and con sistent leadership and the dedicated efforts of the volunteering Sailors in their roles as mentors. I dont remember camp ever going this smooth, said LeFan. The qual ity of our staff and mentors really made this one of our best years ever. There are DEFY programs near Navy and Air Force installations around the world. The NAS Jacksonville DEFY chapter will continue to host events throughout the year, leading up to the annual summer camp. Registering your children for DEFY 2013 is easy and early registration is encouraged. Go to: http://www.public. navy.mil/bupers-npc/support/nadap/ DEFY. DEFY

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Management District and the City of Jacksonville that facilitated expansion of the stations wastewater reuse project that will soon eliminate discharge of wastewater into the St. Johns River. We also partnered with the Florida Building Commission to modify the state building code to include prescrip tive sound attenuation measures in new construction around civilian and mili tary airfields. Florida is the first state in the nation to adopt this construction approach for improved quality of life, said Sanders. Other base environmental initiatives presented by Sanders included: tors to track conservation measures in more than 30 base facilities to reduce energy use by 21 percent and water con sumption by 36 percent. projects are pre-certified as LEED Gold or Silver. features photovoltaic solar panels above the parking lot, high-efficiency mechanical equipment, and rain har vesting for toilets. Center installed 168 rooftop solar col lectors to produce hot water for the swimming pool, showers and rest rooms. ered and energy efficient commercial fleet to more than 80 green vehicles. The goal is to reduce commercial fleet petroleum use by 50 percent. NAS Jacksonville Environmental Director Kevin Gartland also addressed the symposium. He presented an update on the $4 million wastewater reuse project partnership with COJ and state to eliminate wastewater discharge to the St. Johns River (305 million gallons annually) by 2014. It will also eliminate the withdrawal of 48 million gallons of potable water from the Floridan aquifer every year. The Navy funded more than $2 milion to expand the distribution system and the state provided a matching $1.8 mil lion grant to COJ to expand the project to the station golf course and antenna farm. Dr. Radha Pyati, director of the UNF Environmental Center, and Dr. Dan McCarthy, of Jacksonville University, presented the State of the River report. This is an easy to read scientific assessment of the St. Johns River eco systems health both biologically and chemically. Areas of interest include decreasing the amount of nitrogen into the river, improving overall water qual ity, monitoring changes in sedimenta tion and improving public access to the river, said Pyati. SYMPOSIUM 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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The Center for Security Forces (CENSECFOR) announced Aug. 17 that two new apprenticeship trade opportu nities are in the works for Navy Security Force (NSF) personnel. The apprentice ship will be open to all E-4 and above in select rates or those with select Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) codes. It will also be open to U.S. Marine Corps Military Occupational Specialty (USMC MOS) personnel as well as U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) personnel. The Armory Technician Apprenticeship (ATA) will be the first to emerge in the near future once Department of Labor approval is received, said Jose Bautista, CENSECFOR Master-At-Arms (MA) program manager. The ATA will focus on personnel who are respon sible for assigned arms, ammunition and explosives. This includes the skill areas of maintenance, inventory, safety, security, issuing and receiving of these items. The Criminal Investigator Apprenticeship (CIA) is CENSECFORs new est project with the United Services Military Apprenticeship Program (USMAP). This is a coordinated effort by CENSECFOR with the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS); the MA/ NSF Community Sponsor; Type Commanders; and fleet subject matter experts, said Bautista. The apprenticeship is designed for MA personnel having the military police investigator NEC 2002, as well as appropriate personnel in the USMC and USCG. We are in the process of soliciting industry sponsors, which could take between 4-6 months, said Bautista. That means we are looking at the CIA becoming available sometime in 2013. The forerunners to these two new apprenticeships have been highly successful since their debut. For example, the Security Specialist and the Police Officer I (Government Service) appren ticeships have some 1,600 active enroll ments each to date. Sailors who earn these nationally recognized certifications will have had the opportunity to perform duties and gain experiences they may not other wise have had, said Bautista. The USMAP works closely with the DOL to provide nationally recognized apprenticeship programs that result in journeyman-level certificates of com pletion for members of the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. The Center for Security Forces pro vides specialized training to more than 22,000 students each year and has 14 training locations throughout the U.S. and around the world. New MA apprenticeships on the horizon While he works to protect the country,St. Jude works to save his daughter from a deadly disease.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.800-822-6344www.stjude.orgMatt Pasco, Chief Warrant Ofcer 2 and his daughter Delilah 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony Nov. 8 U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a member of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of special recognition in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. The registration deadline is Oct. 5. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in ter ritorial waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve recognition and thanks for put ting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans during my annual Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the highlights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veter ans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are strongly encouraged to contact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 598-0481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www. crenshaw.house.gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and documen tation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the certifi cate, veterans must complete an applica tion and submit a copy of their DD-214. Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this pro gram. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 11

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USS Constitution departed her berth from Charlestown, Mass. Aug. 19, to set sail for the first time since 1997, dur ing an underway demonstra tion commemorating Guerriere Day which honors the 200th anniversary of Constitutions decisive victory over the HMS Guerriere during the War of 1812. It marked the first time a United States frigate defeated a Royal Navy frigate at or nearly equal size. Its also the battle in which Constitution earned her famous nickname Old Ironsides. I cannot think of a bet ter way to honor those who fought in the war as well as celebrate Constitutions suc cesses during the War of 1812 than for the ship to be under sail, said Cmdr. Matt Bonner, Constitutions 72nd command ing officer. The event also ties our past and present by having the ship not only crewed by the outstanding young men and women who make up her crew, but also the 150 chief petty offi cer [CPO] selectees who join us for their Heritage Week. The CPO selectees and CPO mentor chiefs assisted Constitutions crew in setting sails. CPO selectees partici pated in Constitutions annual CPO Heritage Weeks, a week long training cycle divided by two weeks that teaches select ees time-honored maritime evolutions, such as gun drills, line handling and setting sails. The training is also designed to instill pride in naval heritage in the Navys senior enlisted leadership. Im a boatswains mate, said BMC(Select)(SW) Michael Zgoda, assigned to USS Ingraham (FFG 61). This is the foundation of my rate. Being able to learn from a variety of genuine chiefs and their differ ent perspectives on leadership is overwhelming and impor tant to the chief petty officer transition. Im extremely hon ored to be a part of the group that can say they sailed the USS Constitution. The ship got underway at 9:57 a.m. with tugs attached to her sides and 285 people on board, including spe cial guests, such as the 58th, 59th, 62nd and 65th for mer commanding offi cers of Constitution; Rear Adm. Richard Breckenridge, Commander, Submarine Group Two; Rear Adm. Ted Branch, Commander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic; Vice Adm. William French, Commander, Navy Installations Command; retired Navy Capt. Thomas Hudner Jr., Medal of Honor recipient; and Dr. Phil Budden, Britains Consul General to New England. At 10:27 a.m., Budden and Bonner tossed a wreath into the ocean to honor and remember Constitutions battle with the HMS Guerriere. When the ship arrived at President Roads, a body of water of Boston Harbor, the crew then set three sails from Constitutions main, mizzen and fore masts, and at 12:25 p.m., she detached from her tugs and sailed west under her own power for 17 minutes. She sailed at a maximum speed of 3.1 knots, at an aver age of two knots, and at a dis tance of 1,100 yards. As the ships sail master, I felt a combination of pride and relief that the hundreds of man hours of training and planning over the past year all came together, and we were able to accomplish this goal, said BM1(SW) Conrad Hunt. Im really proud that I can say I was a part of this historic occasion. After tugs reattached to Constitutions sides, the ship headed to Fort Independence on Castle Island, where thou sands of spectators waited to watch Constitution fire a 21-gun salute toward the fort at 1:14 p.m. Fort Independence is a state park that served as a defense post for Boston Harbor at one time. The ship returned to her pier at 2:05 p.m. Constitution re-opened to the public for tours of the ships history at 4 p.m. For me, this underway is representative of an incred ible amount of work and ded ication by not only the crew, but Maintenance and Repair Facility, Naval History and Heritage Command, and all of the partners coming together to make this happen, said PR1(AW/SW) Jason Keith, who is the longest serving crew member currently assigned to Constitution. Keith reported to the ship April 13, 2009 and will depart Aug. 31. Ive given tours to thousands of people, shined brass for hundreds of hours, and Ive climbed the rig ging to set and furl these sails over and over again. But sailing USS Constitution sails for first time since 1997 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 13

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Benefits of electronic recycling at NAS JaxNAS Jacksonville is heading up efforts to gather and prop erly recycle outdated electronic equipment, in turn protecting the environment and cutting costs for the base. The Electronic Recycling (E-Recycling) center located off Mustin Road in Building 1948, opens every Thursday from 9:3011:30 a.m. to accept all types of electronic equipment to be sorted and recycled. This project reflects todays fast paced information age, where Americans are increas ingly relying on high tech gadgets to assist them in their everyday lives. Advanced devices such as smart phones, laptops, iPods, and flat screen TVs make peoples lives easier and pro vides more access to the world around them than ever before. However, with technology getting more advanced at an exponential rate, older elec tronics are becoming obsolete and discarded as regular trash. This electronic waste, dubbed E-waste, can con tain hazardous materials such as lead, nickel, cadmium and mercury while also contain ing valuable minerals like gold, silver, platinum and copper. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), for every one million cell phones recycled, 35,274 pounds of copper, 772 pounds of silver, and 75 pounds of gold can be recovered. Recovery of these materials for reuse significantly reduces time, effort and pollution cre ated from the regular mining process, as well as preserving the earths natural resources. Federal, state and munici pal efforts to recycle E-waste is a growing priority. NAS Jax is just one example of mili tary and civilian organiza tions around the United States promoting the collection and management of E-waste. NAS Jax established its E-recycling program four years ago, and since then, it has seen a dramatic shift in what used to be considered common practice such as tossing outdated or bro ken electronics into the nearest dumpster. The center currently accepts all types of electrical and electronic devices.If its electronic, we will take it, commented Jody Smith, assistant hazardous waste manager at NAS Jax. It was amazing just how much electronic equipment was delivered here within the first few weeks of opening this center. The great thing was see ing how many storage areas around the base were cleared of outdated electronics that had just been sitting there unused for years. Creative Recycling in Tampa picks up the discarded elec tronics recovers the precious metals and melts the plastic for reuse. Even the plastic materials from a computer monitor or television are reclaimed, and its an amazing process. The best thing about E-recycling is that, first and foremost, it pro tects the environment, but also saves the government money because its a free service to us, Smith explained. For more information about E-recycling at NAS Jax, con tact Hazardous Waste Program Manager Jane Beason at 5425251, Jody Smith at 542-4283 or Billie Brownfield at 542-3492. Seabees from Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202 at NAS Jacksonville are spearheading efforts to complete work on four new restrooms at key loca tions around the base. This effort is part of the Navys plan for more efficient energy use that will cut over all costs and remain environ mentally friendly. Many of the portable restrooms around the base will also be replaced by this project. One key feature of these new facilities is that they uti lize photocell-based skylights, said Project Supervisor BU2 Michael Nordquest of CBMU 202. These skylights will have the ability to detect when the sun is up and when it sets, and the interior lights will power on or off accordingly. According to Nordquest, the restrooms are designed by Romtec, a company based out of Roseburg, Oregon. Romtec pre-builds the necessary com ponents and delivers them in lego type pieces for easy assembly. Typical construction time takes anywhere from two to five months, depending on the complexity of the inter nal structure and weather conditions, commented Construction Manager Ensign Blaine Henning of NAS Jax Public Works. We will have a total of four new facilities when this project is complete. Locations for these rest rooms include the Perimeter Road PRT area, golf course, Mulberry Cove Marina and Antenna Farm PT facility. Construction of new energy efficient restrooms underway 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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Health professionals have long known the promise of electronic health records. For more than two decades, the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) have been working together to apply the benefits of this fast evolving technology. The departments already share more clinical health information than any two health care systems in the world, and together will com prise the largest integrated health network in the world, with more than 18 million total members worldwide. The new DoD/VA Interagency Program Office (IPO) is responsible for implementing an integrat ed Electronic Health Record (iEHR) for the DoD and VA. When operational, the iEHR will follow you from the first day of your military career, throughout your lifetime. It will be the single source for service members, vet erans, and beneficiaries to access their medical history. Additionally, it will ensure the seamless transition of care when service members go from active duty to veteran status. Your complete medical record will follow you when you move, switch medical providers or need emergency care while traveling. Your fam ily medical history and medi cal allergies will be immedi ately available to every doctor or nurse who treats you within DoD and VA health systems. With the ability to view con sistent and comprehensive patient data, medical providers will be able to give you better care. Researchers will also be able to study trends, securely and privately, across the large population in the system. This can lead to new medical break throughs that benefit every one. For example, if we track data on patients with diabetes, we can minimize the number of amputation or instances of blindness. We can develop a registry of patients with simi lar injuries to measure the out comes of current treatments to improve treatment protocols and quality of care now and for generations to come. The iEHR is a key compo nent of the Presidents Virtual Lifetime Electronic Record (VLER) initiative a ground breaking vision for the future of electronic data shar ing among federal agencies and the private sector. If you receive private sector health care, VLER Health is a way to send those requests for care out to the private sector and, most importantly, to bring that data back. This ensures you have a complete medical record that captures all information about all care you receive. We are committed to a fully operational iEHR, no later than 2017, with clinical capabilities deployed in Hampton Roads, Va. and San Antonio by 2014 a significant challenge, but one that is critical for our nations service members, veterans and beneficiaries. For more information about the DoD/VA IPO, visit www. tricare.mil/tma/ipo. To learn more about the role electronic health records play in medi cine today, go to www.healthit. hhs.gov. During National Immunization Awareness Month, its important to note there are 26 vaccine-preventable diseases, including Human Papilloma virus (HPV). According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), HPV is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States. At least 50 percent of sexually active men and women will be infected in their life times. What is HPV? It is a virus spread through sexual contact. There are approximately 40 different types of gen ital HPV. Some types can cause cervi cal, anal, penile, vaginal and mouth or throat cancer in women and men. Most people with HPV have no symptoms. Who should get the vaccine? The CDC advises all females and males ages 9 to 26 receive the full course of HPV vac cination. How is HPV passed from person to person? HPV is passed through skin-toskin contact. Condoms do not fully protect against transmitting this virus. It is possible to get the virus from a sexual partner who does not have any visible signs of infec tion, such as genital warts. Why should children and adults be vaccinated? The vaccination works to prevent the viruses from infecting the body and can greatly reduce the risk of developing HPV related cancers. Is the vaccine safe? Yes. The U.S. cur rently has the safest, most effective vaccine supply in history. Years of testing are required by law before a vaccine is licensed, and they are continually monitored for safety and effectiveness. It is impossible to contract HPV from the vaccine. According to the Vaccine Adverse Effects Reporting System, over 46 million doses of vaccine have been given in the U.S., and the risks of side effects are very low (less than 0.05 per cent). Side effects include redness, swelling, or soreness in the area where the shot was given. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association also found that there is a very small risk of fainting or blood clots right after the shot is given. People who have fainted after receiving shots in the past should alert their doctors before getting the vaccine. Why vaccinate non-sexually active children/adults? The vaccine only prevents HPV if the person does not already have it. It does not cure an already infected person. So the best time to vaccinate is before sexual activ ity begins. For individuals who are already sexually active or those who already have genital warts, the vaccine is still recommended, as it can prevent infection from other strains of the HPV virus. What happens after getting the HPV vaccination? The vaccination series consists of three shots. Once the initial HPV vaccine has been administered, a second shot should be given two months later. The final shot is required six months after the first. Does the vaccine replace the need for a regular Pap test? No, the HPV vac cine only protects against the virus. Its important that all women have Pap test and pelvic exams as part of their rou tine heath care. Does TRICARE pay for the vaccina tion? Yes. TRICARE pays for HPV vac cine. Should pregnant women get the vac cine? No. Pregnant women should not get the vaccine. Once the baby is born, they can discuss with their healthcare provider the best time to schedule the vaccination. Patients should talk to their health care providers about the right vaccina tions for them and their children. To learn more about immunizations, visit CDCs website: http://www.cdc.gov/ vaccines/parents/infants-toddlers.html or call 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-2324636). Ever thought about vol unteering to help people with their tax returns? With more than 13,000 volunteer tax help sites nationwide, you can touch many lives as a volunteer. Volunteering in either the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) or Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) pro gram can be rewarding, in addition to serving a vital role in your local community. The VITA and TCE pro grams generally offer free tax help to people with low-to-moderate income who need assistance in preparing their own tax returns. This includes people with disabili ties and those for whom English is a second lan guage. These programs are always looking for volunteers during the tax-filing season. Volunteering can be exciting, educational and enjoyable. Youll get to interact directly with people who need help preparing their own tax returns at no cost to them. Dont know that much about taxes? Dont worry youll get special ized training from IRScertified volunteers. You can also choose your volunteer duty. Duties include being a greeter, a reviewer, a tax prepar er and more. The hours are flexible, the training is free and the time com mitment is minimal. Taxpayers rely on vol unteers for free qual ity tax return preparation and assistance each year. Last year, nearly 99,000 volunteers at thousands of sites nationwide helped more than three million taxpayers. To learn more about becoming a volunteer, complete and email the Form 14310 VITA/TCE Volunteer Sign Up to TaxVolunteer@irs.gov. Make sure to include all your contact informa tion along with the city and state where you want to volunteer. A local IRS representative will direct you to the nearest orga nizations offering free tax help. Become a volunteer and see what a difference it can make in your life and the lives of others.The doctor is in: Electronic health records and youNational Immunization Awareness Month: Vaccination can prevent cancer-causing HPVBecome a tax volunteer, touch many lives 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Monday Pizza Madness $5 for a 14 one-topping pizza 2:30 9 p.m., dine in or carry-out only Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included August Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 4 10 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of one-lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Fall Bowling Leagues now forming Mixed league Monday 7 p.m. After-work league Wednesday 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thursday 9 a.m. Mixed league Thursday 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Friday 11:45 a.m. Friday night league 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Saturday 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group train ing Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Contact Melissa Luehrs at 542-3518. Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Open Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. until Oct. 1. Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guestsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. The Price is Right Times Union Center Sept. 25, 7:30 p.m., $47 Sesame Street Live Times Union Center Sept. 29, 2:30 p.m., $18 Spanish Military Hospital Museum in St Augustine Adult $4.50, Child $3 Victory Casino Cruise in Port Canaveral Meal/slot play $25 Monster Truck Jam February 23 Preferred seating $42, lower level seat ing $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Legoland 1 day $45.50, 1 day w/water park $52.75, 2 day $54.50, 2 day w/water park $58.75 NFL Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguars game shuttle $12 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day $29.50, 2 day $40 Disney World Orlando FL 4-day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135 $162 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Tampa Zoo $19 (Adult) $17.50 (Child) Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Blue Man Group in Orlando $59, includes City Walk venue Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Medieval Times Free royalty upgrade with dinner reservationThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Mall & Movie Trip Aug. 24 at 6 p.m. Orange Park mall & AMC Theater Ginnie Spring Trip Aug. 25 at 8 a.m. Free admission and tubing Jaguars vs. Atlanta Falcons Aug. 30 Free admission and transportationNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Aug. 24 for active duty Aug. 26 for retirees & DoD personnel Golf & Dine Special Play 18-holes with cart and choice of breakfast or lunch for $26! Not applicable on holidays. After 12:30 p.m. Special Play 18 holes for $17, cart and green fees included Valid 7 days a week including holidays Monday & Tuesday Play 18 holes for $20, cart and green fees included Open to military and DoD, not appli cable on holidaysMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Register now for before & after school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household incomeFlying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Sept. 10 Oct. 17 $500 per person From Aug. to Sept. 11, Navy Exchange (NEX) customers will have no down payment, no interest and no payments for 180 days when using their Military Star Card to purchase any computer, television, home theater system or cam era bundle valued at $699 or more. The Military Star Card offers many benefits, including 10 percent off the first days purchases (up to the cus tomers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24-hour customer ser vice, including online access. Military Star Card applications are available at your NEX. The application can be processed the same day at the NEX customer service desk. Become a Facebook fan and follow the NEX on Twitter.Military Star Card offers special savings on electronics JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 17

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AWFCS Shane Waterman retired from VP-16 at the VP-30 auditorium Aug. 3 after serv ing 26 years of honorable naval service. The guest speaker was Lt. Kenneth VanHook, and the invocation and benedic tion were given by AWFC Rene Watson. AT3 Amanda Aselin sang the national anthem. Waterman, a native of Alta, Iowa, enlisted in the Navy through the delayed entry pro gram in October 1986. After completing boot camp at Great Lakes, Ill., he reported for Aviation Electricians Mate A School at NATTC Millington, Tenn. His first shore tour began in 1987 with VT-7 in Meridian, Miss. Shortly thereafter, Waterman received orders to VP-11 in Brunswick, Maine. While there, he was advanced to petty officer second class and completed two deploy ments to Keflavik, Iceland and Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico. Waterman then enrolled in the Flight Engineer Program and attended school at VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville. He returned to VP-11 as an aircrewman and completed two more deploy ments to Roosevelt Roads and Sigonella, Italy, including exer cises in support of Operation Desert Storm. In 1993, Waterman returned to the VP-30 Pros Nest as an instructor. While there, he earned the rank of petty officer first class. In 1998, he transferred to VQ-2 in Rota, Spain. During his time with VQ-2, he participat ed in multiple detachments to Souda Bay, Crete in support of NATO operations in Kosovo. As a Sandeman, Waterman was promoted to chief petty officer (CPO). In 2001, he returned to VP-30 again for a second tour as an instructor flight engineer. While there, he was the flight engineer fleet instructor under training instructor CPO, fleet NATOPS evaluator and flight engineer training track CPO. In 2005, Waterman reported to VP-16 for his first tour with the War Eagles. He was promoted to senior chief petty officer and deployed to El Salvador and Al Udeid Air Base in Qatar. In March 2008, he returned to VP-30 again, this time as the fleet NATOPS senior evaluator. He acted as the Training Department MCPO for 13 months and attended the Senior Enlisted Academy in Newport, R.I. Waterman returned to VP-16 in August 2011 as the Operations Department leading CPO. He has spent the last year with the VP-16 War Eagles and greatly contributed to the squadrons successful deploy ment to Kadena AB, Japan this past year. Watermans last flight in the P-3 Orion was his return from VP-16s seventh fleet deploy ment by way of Anchorage, Alaska on June 6. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Business Director Ralph Kaneshiro retired Aug. 11 after 35 years of civil service to our nation. He said good-bye to co-workers and friends as he joined with his family at a retirement lun cheon aboard NAS Jacksonville. You can tell that you are much loved, said NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus. There wouldnt be a better accomplishment than that. Many of the attendees spoke of Kaneshiros accomplishments and the numerous locations they have worked with him over the years. It honors me a lot to see your faces in the crowd, said Kaneshiro of those who attending his retirement luncheon. Kaneshiro spoke of his time with NAVFAC and told the new employees to volunteer for the hard jobs. He told every one that you dont have to be a supervisor to be a leader, everyone can be a leader. The organization we are today is way more robust and capable then our pre decessor, said Kaneshiro. We always moved forward and worked together as a team. The business is a lot more complex then when I started 35 years ago. He went on to thank the entire workforce for all they have accomplished. Some of Kaneshiros accomplishments include meritorious service at Pacific Division, Engineering Field Activity, Mediterranean, and a deployment to Public Works Sector, Iraq. As the Business Director and Senior Command Civilian for NAVFAC Southeast since its standup in 2006, he demonstrated exceptional leader ship. Throughout the multi-year effort to consolidate three former NAVFAC com mands, he tirelessly maintained focus on the vision of an efficient, effective and highly motivated workforce and was a key contributor to successful achievement of that vision, said Kiwus. Melding different organizational cultures into a functional team, he overcame the concurrent chal lenges of distance management, high attri tion, record high workload and organiza tional changes. Waterman retires from VP-16 after 26 years service NAVFAC Southeast Senior Civilian retires after 35 years 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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The Defense and Interior depart ments are teaming up to strengthen energy security and reduce military utility costs. A goal of the partnership is to harness solar, wind, geothermal and biomass energy resources on or near DoD installations across the country, officials said. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and Interior Secretary Ken Salazar signed a memorandum of understanding Aug. 6 that encourages appropriate develop ment of renewable energy projects on public lands. The memo sets out the guiding concepts for the Renewable Energy Partnership Plan, the departments roles and responsibilities under the agreement, and how they will work together to carry out the initiative. Developing renewable energy is the right thing to do for national security, as well as for the environment and our economy, Panetta said. Renewable energy projects built on these lands will provide reliable, local sources of power for military installations; allow for a continued energy supply if the commer cial power grid gets disrupted; and help lower utility costs. Salazar announced the agreement on the eve of the National Clean Energy Summit. Energy security is critical to our national security, he said. Under our Smart from the Start approach to spur ring renewable energy development, we are making millions of acres of public lands and offshore areas available that have the greatest potential for utilityscale solar and wind projects and the fewest resource conflicts. Our nations military lands hold great renewable energy potential, he added, and this partnership will help ensure that were tapping into these resources with a smart and focused approach to power our military, reduce energy costs, and grow our nations energy independence. The Defense Department has been pursuing development of renewable energy on its installations to improve energy security and to reduce its $4 billion-a-year utility bill. Together with advanced microgrid technology, which DoD is testing, renewable energy will allow a base to maintain critical functions for weeks or months if the commercial grid goes down. Each of the military services has committed to deploy 1 gigawatt of renewable energy on or near its installations by 2025. Defense installations encom pass roughly 28 million acres in the United States, of which 16 mil lion acres previously managed by the Interior Departments Bureau of Land Management were withdrawn for mili tary use by executive order, congressio nal legislation or departmental regula tions. About 13 million acres of these withdrawn lands are in the West and are high in wind, solar and geothermal resources. Offshore wind also is an abundant renewable energy resource available to many coastal installations. Offshore Atlantic winds alone could produce an estimated 1,000 gigawatts of energy, Interior Department officials said. The memo of understanding estab lishes a framework for an offshore wind partnership in which the Defense and Interior departments will continue to work together to identity areas most appropriate for offshore wind develop ment. To encourage a dialogue with indus try, the departments will co-chair a military/industry offshore wind forum this fall to initiate information sharing among the military, other federal agen cies and industry. Under the agreement, the Defense Department will explore ways in which renewable energy could be provid ed directly to a single installation or may be transmitted across a network of installations. Some larger projects could involve the sale of excess power to the grid, provided appropriate mea sures ensure base security. Defense, Interior departments join forces on renewable energy Sunday Services8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Catholic CCD 11 a.m. Protestant Worship Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study 6 p.m. in the barracks Officer Christian Fellowship and Bible study every Monday at 6 p.m. The chapel is located on the corner of Birmingham Avenue and Mustin Road. For more information, call 5423051. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 19

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For more information about any sports, contact Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR web site at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.face book.com nasjaxmwr. The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 section, lower area in the north end zone. Aug. 30, 6:30 p.m. Jags vs. Atlanta Falcons (Tickets now on sale) Sept. 16, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Houston Texans (Tickets on sale Sept. 4) Sept. 30, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Cincinnati Bengals (Tickets on sale Sept. 17) Oct. 7, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Chicago Bears (Tickets on sale Sept. 24) Nov. 4, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Detroit Lions (Tickets on sale Oct. 22) Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jags vs. Indianapolis Colts (Tickets on sale Oct. 29) Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to pur chase/use these tickets. Retirees and Veterans/DoD employ ees are eligible to purchase tickets for New York Giants and Atlanta Falcons games. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for mili tary personnel, but under no circum stances are dependent children autho rized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger fami lies desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may pur chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No excep tions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the sea son.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@ usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tick ets for the entire season.Jacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012

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USS Constitution today is one of the greatest honors Ive had in my naval career, and Im truly proud to be a part of this history. The last time Constitution sailed under her own power was July 21, 1997 to honor the ships 200th birthday. It was the first time the ship sailed in 116 years. When we sailed the ship, it became clear it was a different experience that you cant have in port, said Lance Beebe, a crew member aboard Constitutions 1997 sail. Constitution is the worlds oldest commissioned warship afloat and welcomes more than 500,000 visitors per year. She defended the sea lanes against threat from 1797 to 1855, much like the mission of todays Navy. Americas Navy: Keeping the sea free for more than 200 years. Constitutions mission today is to offer community outreach and educa tion about the ships history. CONSTITUTION He effectively oversaw historically high construction programs which exceeded $1 billion in value for several consecutive years, the establishment of the Asset Management Business Line, and consolidation of Public Works functions at NAVFAC Southeast Headquarters and 15 Public Works Departments. Kaneshiro was key in managing an annual operating budget of nearly $200 million, maintaining the opti mum balance of staffing and fund ing for both General Fund and Navy Working Capital Fund budgets, cor rection of the Net Operating Result after years of negative balance, and the extraordinary success of human resources programs that hired hun dreds of employees a year and ensured successful workload execution. Your enduring legacy at NAVFAC Southeast is the positive workplace and environment you fostered during the formative years of this young orga nization, said Kiwus. Kaneshiros entire civil service career was with NAVFAC. He start ed his career as a structural engi neer with the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard. Other positions included Construction Manager with Officer in Charge of Construction MidPacific; Master Planner, Public Works Section Head, Environmental Planning Branch Head, Facilities & Utilities Division Deputy Director, and Deputy Operations Officer with NAVFAC Pacific Division, a tour with the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq; and before relocating to Jacksonville, he was the Business Manager and Deputy Operations Officer in NAVFAC Europe. KANESHIRO August marks the third anniversa ry of the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and since it was implemented, the Department of Veterans Affairs has provided educa tional benefits to 773,000 veterans and their family members, according to a Department of Veterans Affairs Aug. 10 news release. This is one of the most impor tant programs helping our Iraq and Afghanistan veterans reach their edu cational goals, Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki said. The Post-9/11 GI Bill pays tuition and fees on behalf of veterans or eligible dependents to the school in which they are enrolled. Eligible participants also receive a monthly housing allowance and up to $1,000 annually for books and supplies. The program also allows eli gible service members to transfer their benefits to their spouses and children. The program provides a wide range of educational options, including under graduate and graduate degrees, voca tional/technical training, on-the-job training, flight training, correspon dence training, licensing and national testing programs, entrepreneurship training, and tutorial assistance. For over 68 years, GI Bill programs have shaped and changed the lives of service members, veterans, their fami lies and survivors by helping them reach their educational goals, said Allison A. Hickey, Veterans Affairs Undersecretary for Benefits. The Post-9/11 GI Bill is the most extensive educational assistance pro gram since the original GI Bill was signed into law in 1944. VA has since paid more than $20 billion in benefits to veterans and their family members. For the 2012-2013 academic year, 1,770 col leges and universities are supplement ing Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits by partici pating in the Yellow Ribbon Program. Under the Yellow Ribbon Program, degree-granting institutions make additional funds available for a veter ans educational program without an additional charge to their GI Bill enti tlement. To make up the difference for those students whose tuition and fees exceed what the Post-9/11 GI Bill cov ers, institutions can voluntarily enter into a Yellow Ribbon Agreement with VA to designate an additional amount of funding, and VA will match that amount. VA is seeking legal authority to trade mark the term GI Bill. President Barack Obama signed an executive order on April 26, 2012, directing VA and the Department of Defense to undertake a number of measures to stop deceptive and misleading promotional efforts that target the GI Bill educational ben efits of service members, veterans, and eligible family members and survivors. In June, the attorneys general of sev eral states gave VA the rights to the GIBill.com website after the original owners agreed to give up the internet site to settle a lawsuit by the states. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast award ed a $6.6 million contract Aug. 15 to TMG Services, Inc., a small business, out of Cleveland, Ohio for the Massey Avenue Corridor Improvements at NS Mayport. NAVFAC Southeast continues with its pledge to support small businesses, said Nelson Smith, NAVFAC Southeast deputy for small business. Americas 27 million small businesses employ more that 58 percent of the private work force, generate more than 51 percent of the nations gross domestic product, and are the principal source of new jobs. The work to be performed provides for construction of a boulevard-style roadway with two lanes each way divided with a turfed median along the Massey Avenue corridor. This project award, is once again a tangible demonstration of the strategic value and worldwide relevance of Naval Station Mayport, said NS Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Douglas Cochrane. As a practical matter, the improved traffic flow will enable the 2,000 new Sailors who will arrive with the USS Iwo Jima ARG, to safely and efficiently tran sit the installation. Construction includes turning lanes, curb and gutters and pedestrian side walks on the north side of Massey Avenue. It includes realignment of intersecting streets and all required sig nalization and intersection reconstruc tion and all incidental related work. This project also includes improve ments at the intersection of Maine Street and Moale Avenue and at the intersection of Baltimore Street and Moale Avenue to improve capaci ties and safety of these intersections. A round-about will be constructed at the Baltimore Street and Moale Avenue intersection. Site preparation includes site clear ing, excavation and preparation for construction. Paving and site improve ments include a storm water drain age, sidewalks and curbing. Electrical utilities include traffic signals, roadway lights and utility relocations. The project is expected to be com pleted by February 2014.Post-9/11 GI Bill celebrates start of fourth yearNAVFAC awards $6.6 million contract to small business NNOA Jacksonville Chapter brings home awards from New Orleans At the 40th annual National Naval Officers Association (NNOA) Training Continuum this July in New Orleans, the NNOA Jacksonville Chapter was recognized for its outstanding commu nity service and leadership. During the continuum, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert, Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James Amos and Commandant of the Coast Guard Adm. Papp Jr. each pre sented their vision on building a diverse officer corps as we continue to strength en our military sea services. Diversity makes us a better Navy. Organizations that are more diverse, out perform those that are not. Its been proven again and again, said Greenert. Diversity organizations bring us access so we can reach out and talk to people who may want to make the Navy a career, Greenert said. They also help us bring alignment to ourselves and bring diversity into our human resources psyche and make it second nature on bringing people in. The event concluded with a ban quet where retired Rear Adm. Stephen Rochon, USCG, was the keynote speak er. He spoke on the relevancy of NNOA over the past 40 years and challenged the leadership to press towards the future. At the awards ceremony, NNOA Jacksonville Chapter received the fol lowing recognition: President Award, Cmdr. Daryl Pierce Program Award Chapter Award, First Place Chapter Award, First Place Howard Milligan Awards: Cmdr. Daryl Pierce, Cmdr. Andrea Petrovanie, Lt. Cmdr. Jessica Beard, retired Lt. Cmdr. Anita Pierce, retired Lt. Cmdr. Herlena Washington, retired Lt. Cmdr. Brian Martin, Lt. Andrea Baker and CWO3 Lionel Jeffcoat, USCG. For information about the NNOA Jacksonville Chapter, call 594-6908. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 23, 2012 21

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