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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02006
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 08-16-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02006

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Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) completed painting its first T-34C Turbomentor Trainer aircraft for a California-based detachment aligned under Commander, Strike Fighter Wing Pacific (CSFWP) July 31. FRCSE painters completed the air crafts unique paint scheme by apply ing primer and a white topcoat with blue and black markings to protect the airframe from water intrusion and cor rosion. The un-pressurized two-seat, turbo prop trainer is used primarily to train student pilots; however, at CSFWP Detachment El Centro, Calif., the air craft provides logistical air observation support to visiting squadrons operating at the detachment. Artisans are currently performing an Aircraft Condition Inspection (ACI) due every five years between fleet tour cycles according to Steve Gibbs, an FRCSE aircraft planner and estimator. This particular T-34 entered Naval service in February 1981, he said. It served three tours with Training Air Wing Five at Naval Air Station Whiting Field in Florida from March 1983 to April 1994, followed by 6 years with NASA before being transferred in March 2002 to El Centro in a continuing support role. Each aircraft is flown between 1800 to 2200 flight hours before an ACI is due according to Gibbs. Artisans con duct nondestructive inspections on the primary structure points to detect cracks and corrosion. They remove and inspect the wings, as well as the vertical and horizontal stabilizers. In addition, artisans replace timecompliance components, such as the landing gear, large wing attachment bolts and most mechanical compo nents. They also update the aircraft to the latest configuration using mainte nance engineering directives and man uals. If our artisans run into a problem thats outside the maintenance manual, they submit a Request for Engineering Instruction, said Gibbs. The assigned engineering group will determine the appropriate repair action usually through stress analysis and then issue formal repair instructions. We aver age six to seven requests per aircraft not including any required lab work, such as paint removal by mechanical or chemical means. Prior to November 2011, the T-34 fleet was exclusively maintained by a defense contractor with a Federal THURSDAY, AUGUST 16, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com A P-3C Orion aircraft assigned to VP-5 participated in Operation Island Chief (OPIC) July 27-31 over the waters of the Federated States of Micronesia. The OPIC mission was to conduct sur veillance of the Pacific island nations Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ) in order to collect information on vessels conducting illegal fishing activity. The aircrew worked with the Federated States of Micronesia to help maintain maritime domain awareness and enforce compliance with fishery regulations. Operating from Andersen Air Force Base in Guam, the Mad Foxes worked with forces from Micronesia, Papua New Guinea, Palau, the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the Republic of Kiribati to accomplish the mission at hand. Utilizing radar, Advanced Imaging Multi-Spectral Sensor, and the Automatic Identification System, the aircrafts crew correlated surface con tacts with a listing of legal and preapproved fishing vessels. When com plete, they reported their findings to the Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA) based in Honiara, Solomon Islands. The FFA compiled reports from other platforms in the exercise to refresh a database of known vessels in the area. Through their hard work, the crew successfully cleared hundreds of miles of protected water space from illegal fishing activities and helped Micronesia enforce their EEZ. Lt. Timothy Clemens, officer in charge of the detachment, remarked, OPIC was a great opportunity to work with Pacific island nations and foster multinational cooperation with a focus on economic rights. The Mad Foxes appreciated the opportunity to participate in the opera tion and were proud to offer their ser vices to aid law enforcement in the region. The Mad Foxes of VP-5 are based out of NAS Jacksonville and are currently on a six-month deployment to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. According to the CIA World Fact Book, the Federated States of Micronesia, a UN Trust Territory under U.S. administration, adopted a constitu tion in 1979. Independence was attained in 1986 under a Compact of Free Association with the U.S. that was amended and renewed in 2004. Present concerns include unemployment, over-fishing and over-dependence on U.S. aid.Mad Foxes support Operation Island Chief The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 participated in bilateral train ing Aug. 2 with the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) squadron VP-2 Odin at Hachinohe Air Base 2. VP-8 flew a P-3C Orion air craft from Naval Air Facility Misawa to Hachinohe Air Base where they met with VP-2 to conduct training with an expendable mobile anti-sub marine warfare training target (EMATT) and data link-11 train ing. Ultimately, weather pre vented EMATT training, but the link-11 training was highly successful. The navigator/communica tors aboard each aircraft worked to establish secure voice and data communications between the two aircraft, said Lt. j.g. Michael Marschall, the VP-8 Combat Aircrew 9 Navigator/ Communicator. Having both operating con currently greatly improves com munication between allies and helps to overcome any language barrier. After completing their train ing, Japanese and American Sailors gathered for a social event hosted by the JMSDF. VP-2 Commanding Officer Capt. Seto presented a framed photo graph to Capt. Gregory Cozad, deputy commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force U.S. 7th Fleet, to commemorate the improvements between the JMSDF and U.S. Navy P-3 forces during his tenure. Cozad thanked Seto for his gift and acknowledged the improved communication and teamwork between the two organizations most notably in humanitarian assistance/ disaster relief missions during Operation Tomodachi in 2011. VP-8 and VP-2 have a strong history of working together. The squadrons trained togeth er when VP-8 was deployed to Japan in 2004/2005 and most recently in a highly successful EMATT Exercise in June. The NAS Jacksonville-based Fighting Tigers are on a sched uled six-month deployment in support of U.S. 7th Fleet. VP-8 and Japanese VP-2 squadrons conduct data-link training Turbomentor Trainer aircraft gets 5-year checkup/makeover at FRCSE

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August 16 1812 USS Constitution recaptures American merchant brig Adeline. 1954 Beginning of Operation Passage to Freedom, transport of refugees from Haiphong to Saigon, Vietnam. August 17 1812 Frigate USS President captures British schooner LAdeline in North Atlantic. 1942 Submarines USS Nautilus (SS-168) and USS Argonaut (SS-166) land 222 Marines on Makin Island, the first amphibious attack made from submarines. 1959 Adm. Arleigh Burke reappointed CNO for third, two-year term. 1962 Navys first hydrofoil patrol craft, USS High Point (PCH-1) launched at Seattle, Wash. August 18 1838 Expedition under Lt. Charles Wilkes embarks on world cruise. 1911 First Navy Nurse Corps superintendent, Esther Voorhees Hasson, appointed. 1965 First major amphibi ous assault in Vietnam, Operation Starlight captures 2,000 Viet Cong. 1966 First ship-to-shore satellite radio message sent from USS Annapolis in South China Sea to Pacific Fleet Headquarters at Pearl Harbor 1974 After flooding in Philippines, Navy helicopters begin six days of operations to rescue victims and deliver sup plies (244 flights). August 19 1812 USS Constitution cap tures HMS Guerriere. 1812Devastating hurricane strikes the Navys New Orleans station, delaying military prep arations in the War of 1812. 1818 Capt. James Biddle takes possession of Oregon Territory for U.S. 1967 Operation Coronado IV begins in Mekong Delta. 1981 During a routine combat air patrol over the Mediterranean, two VF-41 Black Aces flying F-14 Tomcats from USS Nimitz (CVN 68) were fired upon by two Libyan Su-22 Fighters. Quickly engaged by the pursu ing Black Aces both Libyan jets were shot down. These were the first recorded airto-air kills for the Navy since Vietnam, and the first ever for the F-14. August 20 1952 An inter-service (Navy, Marine and Air Force) air oper ation at Chang Pyong-ni, Korea destroys 80 percent of assigned target area. 1959 USS Thetis Bay (LPH6) completes six-day humani tarian operation after floods in Taiwan. 1969 Navy Seabees and Sailors from Helicopter Training Squadron Eight (HT-8) evacuate 820 people from Pass Christian, Miss. after Hurricane Camille. August 21 1800 U.S. Marine Corps Band performs its first concert in Washington, D.C. 1883 Installation of the first electric lighting on a Navy ship completed on USS Trenton, a wooden hull screw steamer. 1951 First contract for a nuclear-powered submarine, USS Nautilus (SSN-571), award ed to Electric Boat Company in Groton, Conn. 1965 Launch of Gemini 5, piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Charles Conrad Jr., completed 120 orbits in almost eight days at an altitude of 349.8 km. Recovery was by helicopter from USS Lake Champlain (CVS-39). 1980 USS Truxtun (CGN-35) rescues 42 Vietnamese refu gees and USS Merrill (DD-976) rescues 62 Vietnamese refu gees, over 200 miles southeast of Saigon. August 22 1912 Birthday of U.S. Navy Dental Corps 1945 First surrender of Japanese garrison at end of World War II; USS Levy receives surrender of Mille Atoll in Marshall Islands. 1980 Fleet replenishment oiler USS Passumpsic (AO-107) rescues 28 Vietnamese refu gees. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS There are many advantages to having children all of the same gender. One is hand-me-downs. Another is eventually they can all play on the same team (less driving!). The biggest advantage, however, is emotional equilibrium (also an Achilles heel, read on). In other words, I know what to expect. Sure, my three boys are unique in one word, Ford is focused, Owen is observant, and Lindell is . well, hes a wildcard but in a broader sense, they are very much alike. Or, at least, they handle things similarly. Ive learned to adapt. A typical fight at the Smiley house goes like this: Ford tells Lindell hes probably adopted. Lindell cries hysteri cally, then says, Yeah, well youre stu pid. Owen tells them both to be quiet. Lindell slaps Owen. Ford yells at both of them. They go outside and play base ball. When I try to intervene, they mock me. Me: Ford, youve hurt Lindells feel ings and made him wonder about his place in this family. Tell him youre sorry. Ford: Lindell, Im sorry you dont look like any of us. Me: No, thats not what I geez! Cant you just hug and make up? Lindell (smiling): Ford, Im sorry youre so stupid. Ford (smiling): Im sorry that both of you are losers. Owen (laughing uncontrollably): And Im sorry Im better than both of you. Me (confused, frustrated): Cant you guys have a conversation? Cant you help each other instead of hurting each other? Lindell: Okay. Owen, tell me, does this shirt make me look like a jerk? Ive often thought a girl would help balance things out, teach the boys a thing or two. Thankfully, earlier this month, the boys younger, female cous in arrived for a two-week vacation in Maine. What a difference a girl makes! Her hair smelled sweet, not sweaty. Her clothes matched. She had a baby doll instead of headless action figures. She sat and watched me put on makeup. Bonus: within eight hours, she had all three boys, plus Fords friend, cir cled around a stump by the lake, on which she was standing, her hands on her hips, giving directions. The boys followed, completely under the spell of her girlish powers. She said sit, and they sat, even though they were puzzled as to why. After a few days, however, other dif ferences between my boys and my niece became clearer. When the boys play, they make rigid rules and a plan. Sometimes, they chart this on a clip board. My beautiful niece has an elabo rate, wonderful imagination, and she likes to pretend. Her plan is more fluid, her interactions more one-on-one. This I could understand. My boys could not. One week into the visit, Lindell came running onto the back porch crying. I dont even understand what shes say ing, Lindell cried. She says Ive done things, but I dont even understand or remember. Im so confused! My other brother (not my nieces father) said, Well, Lindell, that certi fies her as being completely female. Get used to it. Meanwhile, my niece smiled up at us and said, Lindell, want to go outside and play again? Lindell shrugged his shoulders. Sure, he said. They would play quietly for a few minutes, and then another verbal argu ment would erupt: I didnt do it. Yes, you did. No, I didnt. Yes, you did. I dont even know what were talking about anymore! They played best when they played house. Lindell was the Daddy and worked at Wal-Mart, until it ran out of business. Then he stayed home and watched football all day. My niece (the Mommy) didnt like that. Lindell had to work. Lindell found a job catching bad guys. All was right in the world. An hour later, Lindell was his cousins dog, and she dropped him off at daycare. He didnt seem to mind. She was happy; therefore, he would be, too. So long as there was a plan, Lindell understood how to participate. As soon as too much conversation was involved, he came back frustrated and crying. His constant refrain: I get so confused. My brother and I would hold our breath as the kids played, and then it was something like rock, paper, scis sors for who would go settle the next fight. It seemed like the cousins were not playing well together. We all said, Just wait until next year; they will be older and more mature. Secretly, though, I thought, my boys need to learn how to be around girls. The day after my niece left, Lindell walked onto the spot of dirt where they had made sandcastles the week before. Gosh, I miss her, he said. I texted that to my brother and added, . . even though he fought with her the whole time. My brother wrote back: She says they didnt fight (smiley face). Exactly.Cousins visit brings lessons about girls No injuries in Strait of Hormuz collision No one was hurt early on Aug. 12 when a U.S. Navy guided missile destroyer and a large Japanese-owned merchant vessel collided near the Strait of Hormuz. The collision between USS Porter (DDG 78) and the Panamanian-flagged bulk oil tanker M/V Otowasan occurred at approximately 1 a.m. local time. Overall damage to Porter is being evaluated, but the ship is able to operate under its own power. No personnel on either vessel were injured. The incident is under investiga tion. The collision was not combat related. USS Porter is on a scheduled deploy ment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Military men and women who are transitioning from active duty to the civilian sector may find prom ising careers as teachers with the help of a federal pro gram called Troops to Teachers (TTT). Established in 1994 by the Department of Defense and managed by the Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support (DANTES), TTTs primary objective is to recruit quality teachers for K-12 schools that serve low-income families throughout the United States. TTT is a national program that covers all 50 states and includes Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, explained Albert Wynn, associate regional director for TTT. We provide a wide variety of assistance for those members seeking second careers as teachers, includ ing counseling, employment referrals and financial assistance. According to Wynn, TTT offers service members two types of support: funded and unfunded. Through the funded program, individuals who qualify will be provided with financial support through stipends and bonuses totaling up to $10,000. This financial assistance helps to cover costs incurred from the teacher certification process. The unfunded program offers counseling and advice in meeting certification requirements. Wynn recommends, as with anything, that service members first determine if they truly desire to pursue careers as teachers by getting involved with local pub lic schools and volunteering. Teaching isnt for everybody, said Wynn. Its important for individuals pursuing this path to rec ognize the challenges that teachers can have, but also the rewards. Teaching is definitely one of the most rewarding experiences of my life. More detailed information, including qualifica tion requirements and the registration process, can be found at the TTTs homepage www.proudtoserve again.com Troops to Teachers provides second careers New precision landing site increases flight deck capability on TrumanThe aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) conducted its first helicopter recovery on a newly added flight deck precision landing site July 22. The precision landing site is one of two that do not overlap the flight path for fixed-wing aircraft, add ing enhanced flight operation capability to Trumans embarked helicopter and fixed-wing aircraft squad rons. These landing sites do not foul the flight path for fixed-wing aircraft, said Lt. Larry Tarver, Trumans aircraft handling officer. The Navy has added these sites to other Nimitzclass aircraft carriers, but this is Trumans first landing using that site. It is a capability that makes Truman more versatile. Truman recovered an MH-60S Sea Hawk assigned to the Dusty Dogs of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7. Because of the new landing site, Truman wont have to stop fixed-wing flight operations to recover our helicopters, said Lt. Dan Didier, the HSC-7 pilot who completed the first precision site landing. During flight operations on previous deployments, HSC-7 waited for Truman to pause fixed-wing aircraft operations in order to land. Before, we would land, refuel, swap aircrew, and take off from a position on the flight deck that inter rupted fixed-wing flight operations, said Didier. It was necessary, but it interrupted the flow of the flight deck. According to Didier, helicopter recovery and launch took up to 30 minutes to complete, interrupting fixedwing flight operations for more than 40 minutes per helicopter landing. Now we can launch and recover fixed-wing aircraft while refueling or landing a helicopter, said Tarver. This capability helps HSC-7, it helps Truman, and it makes us a more ready team, said Didier. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012 3

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NATIO N AL NIGHT OUT The NAS Jax Security and Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) depart ments hosted the 29th annual National Night Out event Aug. 7 at the Allegheny softball fields and outdoor pool. The event is held each year to heighten crime and drug prevention awareness, gener ate support for local anti-crime programs, strengthen neigh borhood and police partner ships and let criminals know that neighborhoods are fight ing back against crime. This event unites commu nity and law enforcement to combat crime. Back in 1984, when this event began there were 400 communities in 23 states participating. This year, there are 15,000 communities in all 50 states participating, said NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders as he welcomed the families to the event. Even though the rain may have put a damper on the event tonight, for those of you who came out, please enjoy the fun, food and hospital ity and remember when we come together as a commu nity neighborhoods and law enforcement we can combat crime even better, he contin ued. This is a great event to bring together the community and law enforcement agencies. We are here to help the commu nity learn about crime, illegal drugs, how to report issues both on and off base, said NAS Jax Physical Security Officer Richard Hunt, who coordinat ed the event with MWR. We coordinated the food and entertainment. Hopefully, we will continue to make this event even bigger next year as we partner with security per sonnel to promote crime pre vention awareness, said NAS Jax Youth Activities Center Director Aaron Long. Families and security per sonnel spent the evening inter acting as they feasted on free hamburgers, hotdogs and chips courtesy of MWR. The children were entertained by McGruff the Crime Dog, bouncy hous es, dancing to the DJs music and several contests such as a sack race, tug of war and hula hoops. Military dog handlers MA2 Erick Ortiz and MASN Drew Risley of the NAS Jax Security Department and Military Working Dog Doly demonstrat ed how the dog can apprehend a suspect and PR1 John Hall, FC1(SW Benjamin Dean and AWS2(NAC/AW) Evan Morrow of the Search and Rescue Swimmer School demonstrated a water rescue scenario in the pool. Members of the Florida Masonic Child ID Program and Navy Criminal Investigative Service, also fingerprinted and took photos of children to pro vide parents with CD identifi cation kits and discussed the importance of having the infor mation on hand updated to help authorities if a child ever goes missing. We brought the family out here tonight to have some fun in a safe environment. Weve heard a lot about this event its a great time, said AMCS(AW) Mike Lively of HSL60 at NS Mayport, who brought his family for a night of fun. We are out here to have some fun, enjoy the free food and get some information on crime prevention. I really appreciate security and MWR putting this all together, added AE2(AW) Jacob Ruelas of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. The first National Night Out began in early 1984 through the National Association of Town Watch (NATW). The event is held around the coun try on the first Tuesday in August. NATW is a nonprofit, crime prevention organization which works in cooperation with thousands of crime watch groups and law enforcement agencies throughout the coun try. Annual event heightens crime prevention awareness 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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PHOTOS BY KAYLEE LAROCQUE JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012 5

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CMSA&A ITC(IDW/SW) Kwasi Peters Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax ATC(AW/SW) Aaron Clifford ATC(AW/SW) Karl Fuller ASC(AW) Kathryn Kennon ATC(AW/SW) Justin Seibel YNC(SW/AW) Sean Summersill Commander, Navy Region Southeast NCC(SW) Jason Davis Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 AWOC(NAC/AW/SW) Michael Holdizsar AWOC(NAC/AW) Alain Carpentier ISC(SW/AW/IDW) Chris Emerson AWOC(NAC/AW) Lucious Mason AWOC(NAC/AW) Victor McClelland AWOC(NAC/AW) Steven Smith AWVC(NAC/AW) Terry Trayer AWOC(NAC/AW/IUSS) Ervin Maldonado ETC(SW/AW) Bryan Meyers Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jax AWOC(AW/IDW/EXW/SW) Jose Hernandez ACC(AW/SW) Racheal Garcia Fleet Logistics Center Jax AMC(AW) Miranda Davis Fleet Readiness Center Southeast ADC(AW) Roderick Dubose AMC(AW) Morgan Lemos ATC(AW) James Riner ATC(AW) Jeffery Sailors ATC(AW/SW) George Stevenson AOC(AW/SW) Matthew Vock HSC-28 AMC(AW) Brian Bailey HSL-42 PSC(AW/SW) Keleen Lynch HSM-70 AEC(AW/SW) Mark Barnhardt AMC(AW/SW) Marlon Chavez ATC(AW) Stephen Johnson PSC(AW/SW) Raemon McClinton ATC(AW) Kristian Thoresen HSM-74 ATC(AW/SW) William Jones ATC(AW) Angel Ortiz AWRC(NAC/AW/SW) Wade Payne NAS Jacksonville ITC(SW) Kevin Benedict ACC(AW/SW) Lee Carson ACC(AW/SW) John Jones ACC(AW/SW) Larry Rose NCC(SW) Rhonaka Williams Naval Hospital Jacksonville AEC(AW/SW) Jestun Davis CSC(SW) Patrick Faucette HMC(AW/SW) Heather McLean HMC(FMF) Wayne Nettles Navy Band MUC(SW) Jose Acosta Navy Cargo Handling Battalion 11 LSC(AW/SW) Joshua Nolan Navy Munitions Command Detachment Jacksonville AZC(AW) Jermaine Shavers AOC Michael Tune Navy Medical Education and Training Command LSC(AW/SW) Desiree Garner Region Legal Service Office Southeast LNC(SW/AW) Lucia Abreu Surface Rescue Swimmer School FCC(SW) Joshua Gaudin Transient Personnel Unit/Pre-Trial Confinement Facility Jax YNC(SW) Wicliffe Campbell VP-10 AWOC(NAC/AW) Michael Boyd YNC(AW/SW) Tasha Harris VP-16 AWOC(NAC/AW) Brian High AMC(AW) Tony Johnscott AZC(AW/SW) Natalia Luchetti PRC(AW) Joshua Martin AMC(AW) Greg Tucker VP-26 AOC(AW) Anthony Bond ATC(AW) Jason Gapusan ATC(AW) Michael Keef AWOC(NAC/AW) Michael Twining VP-30 ADC(AW) Neeshad Abdool AWVC(NAC/AW) Eric Adams ADC(AW) Blake Bundy LSC(AW/EXW) Luis Chavez AWFC(NAC/AW) Benjamin Dempsey ADC(AW) Christan Desiderio AWOC(NAC/AW) William Lewis AWFC(NAC/AW) Eric Nordstrom AWVC(NAC/AW) Daniel Oberg AWOC(NAC/AW) Ryan Whitney AOC(AW/SW) Jason Worek AWFC(NAC/AW) Daniel Zommer AWFC(NAC/AW) Matthew Lohse VP-45 YNC(AW/SW) Alisha Buchannon ADC(AW) Jesse Cobb AZC(AW) Carrie Finley AWFC(NAC/AW) Joshua Haley AMC(AW) Billy Kime ADC(AW) Keith Latshaw ATC(AW) Jason Manning PRC(AW) Fernando Morales VP-8 AWFC(NAC/AW) Jeffrey Adkins AWOC Adrian Vaughn AOC William Kenney ADC Reynaldo Abunduz YNC Shawn Croon LSC Nicola Canada VP-5 AWOC Sean Adams AMC Kendrick Gentle AWOC Kimberly Glach AZC Antonio Johnson AMC Christopher Licata LSC Terry Loeffelholz AWOC Brandon Russel ATC Chad Wellborn Fleet Support Unit AWOC Christopher Carman 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Happy 100th birthday, Navy Dental CorpsOne hundred years ago, on Aug. 22, 1912, the Navy Dental Corps was established at the second session of the 62nd Congress. President William Taft signed a bill passed by Congress that gave authorization to appoint no more than 30 acting assistant dental sur geons to the Medical Department of the U.S. Navy. Two months later, Emory Bryant and William Cogan were the first two dental officers to enter active duty in the Navy. The number of Navy dentists continued to increase with 107 active duty dentists in 1921. Today, there are 1,055 active duty dentists. Early in 1922, two significant milestones occurred: the establishment of the U.S. Naval Dental School and the creation of a dental division in the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. By June 1945, dental clinic ships were recommended by Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet and on April 2, 1948 the dental technician rating was established. Over the years, researchers at the Naval Dental School have revolutionized the field of dentistry by developing pioneering models of the dental air tur bine hand piece and ultrasonic vibrating instruments. These concepts were a tremendous leap forward for the dental profession. Today, these prototypes are dis played at the Smithsonian Institute. Naval Hospital Jacksonville celebrates with a cake cutting on Aug. 16 at noon and a Navy Dental Corps Centennial Celebration at the River Club in downtown Jacksonville Aug. 18. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville announces GS and WG Civilians of the Quarter NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) recently announced its GS and WG Civilians of the Quarter, Second Quarter 2012. Steve Silver, deputy site director at NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, Site NAS Jacksonville was selected GS Civilian of the Quarter and Romie Blackshear Jr. of NAVSUP FLC Jacksonvilles Mayport Bulk Fuel Division was chosen WG Civilian of the Quarter. Silvers knowledge of supply and leadership abili ties are demonstrated through his NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, Site NAS Jacksonvilles aviation sup ply support metrics, which are consistently the best among all Navy/Marine Corps Air Stations. As a matter of course, Silver works to develop and maintain great working relationships with the Aviation Support Detachment, NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville headquarters, NAS Jacksonville, CNAF staff, and personnel in customer commands. Throughout NERP Regional Go Live 3, Silver served as the primary point of contact for the NAS Jacksonville site working tirelessly to lead the imple mentation. As a result, NAS Jacksonville was the most pre pared site for NERP implementation. Blackshear expertly led operations of NAVSUP FLC Jacksonvilles Mayport Bulk Fuel Divisions receipt and issue of more than 11 million gallons of fuel and lubricants, including a 29,700-gallon defuel from a fleet unit, which resulted in a return for credit and saved the Navy $106,623. During Tropical Storms Beryl and Debbie, Blackshear went out of his way to meet Mayport home ported ships fueling needs. Instead of call ing by phone, he visited each unit personally; this is typical of his dedication and initiative. Through this action, Blackshear enabled NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville to meet its customers emergency fuel requirements. Additionally, Blackshear has quickly become an essential player in the newly established, customerrequested process of delivering fuel directly to U.S. Coast Guard ships. Navy commands have donated 402,315 pounds as of week eight of the campaign to the 2012 Feds Feed Families drive, topping the Navys goal of 396,000 pounds for the entire three-month campaign. Navy personnel have taken an incredible initiative so far with ensuring collection points are well identi fied and accessible across bases worldwide, collect ing those goods, and donating them to charities both locally and around the world. The generosity has been overwhelming in regard to the generous spirit of our personnel both here in our regions and installations in the United States, as well as abroad, said Cmdr. Glenda Jennings Harrison, Supervisory Chaplain for Operations at Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC). The Sailors are excited about being part of a cam paign that builds community and lets the communi ty at large know that they are caring and responsive to the struggles many are facing during these hard economic times. Navy chaplains emphasize that while meeting our goal is wonderful news, it is not the time to slow down donating just because our goal has been met. Boxes will be picked up again throughout all Navy regions and installations on each Friday during the month of August and donated to local food banks. The campaign will end on Aug. 31. Sailors at the grassroots level are doing the logis tics and organizing this campaign, said Harrison. The success of Feds Feed Families so far is a testa ment to the quality and work ethic of these Sailors. They are doing a great job and it speaks volumes to who they are. Navy Region Japan has the highest CNIC contri bution total so far, donating 220,500 pounds to food banks both in their region and across the United States, including Oregon Food Bank, Second Harvest Food Banks, Community Food Bank of New Jersey, Feeding South Dakota Food Bank, Food Bank for the Heartland, Food Bank of Alaska and Gods Pantry Food Bank. CNICs 11 regions and 70 installations have donated to more than 150 food banks world wide. Navy tops Feds Feed Families goal JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012 7

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Aviation Administration (FAA) repair certification to perform organizational, intermediate and depot-level maintenance under a Contract Logistic Support (CLS) agreement. Depot-level repairs were subcontracted to a higher-level maintenance facility in the private sec tor. David Pfeffer, the primary/multi-engine team lead, said the material condition of the T-34 fleet had degraded over three decades due to the effects of pro longed wear and tear. Naval Air Systems Command Program Manager Air (PMA) 273 worked closely with the FRCSE Industrial Business Office to recapture the depot-level inspec tion, modifications, and repair work at the militarys organic depot in an effort to raise maintenance stan dards on these T-34C aircraft that are already at or near their predicted fatigue lives. We were seeing higher levels of spending for over and above repairs due to the material condition of these aging aircraft, said Pfeffer. PMA has been sup portive, providing the additional funding to perform the required work to bring these old airframes back into better shape. Corrosion on the wing spars has degraded the mate rial condition of the trainer aircraft. The spars must be replaced every three to five years, which is a costly and time-consuming process. The T-34 depot-level repairs and modifications will reduce future mainte nance costs and improve readiness of the trainer plat form. Repairs to the California-based T-34 trainer are scheduled for completion at the end of August. FRCSE It has been a worthwhile cause and our folks have really come to the forefront to lead the effort, dem onstrating the Navy truly is a Global Force for Good, said Harrison. In 2011, OPM asked the Department of Defense (DoD) to join the effort and theyve been stepping up to the plate to shatter each goal set over the course of the last two years. In 2011, OPM set a goal of 2 million pounds and DoDs goal was 733,800 pounds. Their final donation contributions totaled an astounding 5,793,446 pounds, with DoD having donated 2,004,613 pounds toward that total. That is equivalent to over 64,000 pounds per day. Due to the incredible success of last years campaign, OPM has set a goal of 5 million pounds, with DoD committing to donating 1.5 million pounds to help meet that goal. This years campaign motto is Beat Our Best. With the dedication and hard work being put forth by our service members and federal employees alike, we are on track to do just that. FEDS FEED FAMILIES 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012 9

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VP-5 participated in exercise Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Singapore July 17-27. This joint exercise between the U.S. Navy and the Republic of Singapore Navy took place at Paya Lebar Air Base and Changi Naval Base. It also included additional service members from the Republic of Singapore Air Force, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Coast Guard, and the U.S. Marine Corps. Led by Lt. Cmdr. Michael Cassidy, Combat Aircrews Six and Seven repre sented the Mad Foxes beginning with the opening ceremony held at Changi Naval Base on July 17. Throughout the exercise the crews participated in a symposium, training and tactical flights designed to promote profession al cooperation and relations between Singapore and the United States. In order to break the ice for all the participants, CARAT Singapore hosted a sports day. The event took place at the Changi Naval Base Sports Complex and started with an intense group kickbox ing workout, followed by a three-event competition. The Mad Foxes participated in a soccer game that ended in a thrilling pen alty kick shootout. Next, the partici pants enjoyed a great basketball game. In the tie-breaking event, VP-5 led their team to victory in the tug of war, an exciting culmination to a fun-filled day. Throughout the event, Mad Foxes enjoyed interacting with Singaporean service members as well as U.S. Sailors and Marines from duty stations all over the world. CARAT Singapore was a highlight of the squadrons detachment through its opportunity for physical fit ness, friendly competition and cultural exchange. On July 23, Combat Aircrew Seven (CAC-7) hosted two submariners from the Republic of Singapore Navy on a familiarization flight. The mission of the flight included coordinated oper ations and anti-submarine warfare (ASW) training. The riders had the opportunity to observe each station executing their duties while conducting an exercise with a friendly submarine. Lt. Charles Blackwell, CAC-7 tacti cal coordinator, led a demonstration on how each sensor was utilized to accom plish the ASW mission. The flight pro vided a unique and rewarding learning opportunity for both the submariners and the aircrew. On July 24, Lt. j.g. Wes Kang flew with Squadron 121 of the Republic of Singapore Air Force on a Fokker 50, a two-engine maritime patrol platform. On the flight, he experienced a typical reconnaissance mission, learned about the similarities in crew responsibilities and discussed the differences between the Fokker 50 and the P-3C Orion. It was a great experience interact ing with the Fokker 50 crew and fly ing with them on an actual patrol mis sion, remarked Kang. Im honored and thankful for the opportunity. While in Singapore, squadron mem bers dedicated two days to help chari ties serving the local community. St. Theresas Home for the Aged and Bo Tien Home for the Aged are voluntary welfare nursing homes that provide 24-hour care for low-income ailing senior citizens. Residents of the homes are 60 and older with no immediate rel atives, referred by doctors, social work ers and other welfare centers. The Mad Foxes teamed up with mem bers of the Republic of Singapore Navy, the U.S. Coast Guard, and fellow Navy Sailors from USS Sampson (DDG-102) to lend a hand to these hardworking charities. The volunteers split into groups and tackled various tasks throughout the homes. Some groups took on odd jobs like washing windows and cleaning the facility. Other volunteers spent their time with the elderly residents sharing stories, comparing cultures and playing games like Bingo. The exchange was a rewarding experience for all of the vol unteers, and the Mad Foxes were grate ful for this opportunity to give back to a great cause. VP-5s detachment to Singapore was a valuable experience for both coun tries. In the words of Cassidy, It was a great opportunity to work with our international partners in a demanding and realistic exercise. VP-5 trains in Singapore 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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The F-35 Lightning II accomplished a significant test milestone Aug. 8 when the aircraft successfully released a weapon in flight. BF-3, a short takeoff and vertical landing F-35 variant, executed an inert 1,000-pound GBU-32 Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) separation weapon over water in an Atlantic test range while traveling at 400 knots at an altitude of 4,200 feet. While this weapons separation test is just one event in a series of hundreds of flights and thousands of test points that we are executing this year, it does represent a significant entry into a new phase of testing for the F-35 program, said Navy Capt. Erik Etz, director of test for F-35 naval variants. Todays release of a JDAM was the result of extraordinary effort by our team of maintainers, engineers, pilots and others who consistently work long hours to deliver F-35 warfighting capa bility to the U.S. services and our inter national partners, said Etz. The release was the first time for any version of the F-35 to conduct an air borne weapon separation, as well as the first from an internal weapons bay for a fighter aircraft designated for the U.S. Marine Corps, the United Kingdom and Italy. The milestone marks the start of vali dating the F-35s capability to employ precision weapons and allow pilots to engage the enemy on the ground and in the air. [Using an internal weapons bay] speaks to how much capability the JSF is going to bring to the troops, said Dan Levin, Lockheed Martin test pilot for the mission. Stealth, fifth-generation avionics and precision weapons ... cou pled with the flexible mission capability of the short take-off and vertical land ing F-35B is going to be huge for our warfighters. An aerial weapons separation test checks for proper release of the weapon from its carriage system and trajectory away from the aircraft. It is the culmi nation of a significant number of pre requisite tests, including ground fit checks, ground pit drops and aerial cap tive carriage and environment flights to ensure the system is working properly before expanding the test envelope in the air. Aircraft and land-based test moni toring systems collected data from the successful separation, which is in review at the F-35 integrated test force at NAS Patuxent River, Md. The F-35B is the variant of the Joint Strike Fighter designed for use by U.S. Marine Corps, as well as F-35 international partners in the United Kingdom and Italy. The F-35B is capable of short take-offs and vertical landings to enable air power projection from amphibious ships, skijump aircraft carriers and expedition ary airfields. The F-35B is undergoing test and evaluation at NAS Patuxent River, Md. and Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., prior to delivery to the fleet. F-35 completes first airborne weapons separation 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included August Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowl ing, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Fall Bowling Leagues now forming! Mixed league Monday 7 p.m. After-work league Wednesday 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thursday 9 a.m. Mixed league Thursday 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Friday 11:45 a.m. Friday night league 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Saturday 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group train ing Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa Luehrs at 542-3518/4238. Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Beginning Aug. 18 the outdoor pool will be open Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. until Oct. 1. Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guestsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23, 2013 Preferred seating $42, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sec tions 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1-day $29.50, 2-day $40 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Dave & Busters Trip Free $10 game card and 20 percent off food & beverages Aug. 16, 6 p.m. Bush Gardens Weekend Trip Aug. 1719 $60 per person Ginnie Springs Trip Aug. 25 Free admissionNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Aug. 24 for active duty Aug. 26 for retirees & DoD personnel Golf & Dine Special Play 18-holes with cart and choice of breakfast or lunch for $26! Not applicable on holidays. After 12:30 p.m. Special Play 18 holes for $17, cart and green fees included Valid 7 days a week including holidays Monday & Tuesday Play 18 holes for $20, cart and green fees included Open to military and DoD, not appli cable on holidaysMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Register now for before & after school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household incomeFlying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Sept. 10 Oct. 17 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012 13

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I often ride my bicycle home from work and usu ally race home looking up at the ominous clouds in the Florida sky. The rain has been a blessing this year, putting out swamp fires and keeping tomatoes grow ing. Unfortunately, the hot, wet summer months are also very dangerous for the development of several mosquito-borne and arthropod-borne diseases. These diseases are caused by arboviruses and are thought to be more common now as the weather becomes hotter and wetter, due to seasonal and global climate changes. Dengue, West Nile, St. Louis and Eastern Equine Virus are some of the illnesses that are becoming more common. Since theyre viruses, they cant be cured with anti biotics or medicines, and no vaccines are available. They can, however, be prevented using a few squirts of bug spray to keep the mosquitoes from biting. It is thought that only a minority of these infections lead to a diagnosed illness. The vast majority of cases remain undiagnosed and patients recover on their own after a brief period. Patients ill with fevers can be evaluated by a health care provider, appropriate diagnostic tests can be ordered, and supportive treatment provided. While the diseases can occur all year long in Florida, theyre more commonly seen from August to November due to weather conditions and the mosquito population. The Duval County Health Department (DCHD) issued a mosquito-borne illness alert for Duval County last week due to the rising incidence of mos quito-borne diseases. Human cases of West Nile virus have been confirmed and there is a heightened con cern that additional residents might become ill. Duval County had five confirmed cases of West Nile virus in 2012, and many more were suspected but not con firmed. Symptoms of West Nile virus may include head ache, fever, fatigue, dizziness, weakness and confu sion.Physicians should contact their county health department if they suspect an individual may meet the case definition for a mosquito-borne illness. Florida Department of Health (DOH) laboratories provide testing services for physicians treating patients with clinical signs of mosquito-borne disease. DCHD continues to advise the public to remain diligent in their personal mosquito pro tection efforts. These should include remembering Drain and Cover. multiplying. buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, flower pots or any other containers where sprinkler water or rain water has collected. pans, broken appliances and other items that arent being used. least once or twice a week. that dont accumulate water. appropriately chlorinated. Empty plastic swimming pools when not in use. Cover skin with clothing or repellent. sleeves.This type of clothing may be necessary for people who work in areas where mosquitoes are pres ent. ing. Repellents with DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyp tus and IR3535 are effective. than two months old. Cover doors and windows with screens to keep mos quitoes out of your house. and patios. Tips on repellent use approved use before you apply a repellent. Some repellents are not suitable for children. cent DEET are generally recommended.Other EPAapproved repellents contain picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus or IR3535.These products are generally available at local pharmacies. Look for active ingredi ents listed on the product label. clothing, but not under clothing. be sure the repellent is age-appropriate.According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, mosquito repellents containing oil of lemon euca lyptus should not be used on children under age three.DEET is not recommended on children younger than two months old. hands.Adults should apply repellent first to their own hands and then transfer it to the childs skin and clothing. methrin repellent directly to clothing.Again, always follow the manufacturers directions. The Florida DOH continues to conduct statewide surveillance for mosquito borne illnesses, includ ing West Nile, Eastern Equine encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, malaria and dengue. Florida residents are encouraged to report dead birds (which might have been killed by these viruses) via the website www.MyFWC.com/bird. For more information on mosquito-borne illnesses, visit the Florida DOHs Environmental Public Health website at http://www.doh.state.fl.us/Environment/ medicine/arboviral/index.html or call the DCHD at 904-253-1850. I keep a can of bug spray in my office to spray myself down before I get on my bike in the late afternoon. I like prevention and you should, too. Use bug spray to prevent mosquito-borne disease 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 section, lower area in the north end zone. Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to purchase/use these tick ets. Retirees and Veterans/DoD employ ees are eligible to purchase tickets for New York Giants and Atlanta Falcons games. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for mil itary personnel, but under no circum stances are dependent children autho rized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to pur chase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may pur chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No excep tions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or return ing during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tick ets for the entire season.Jacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012 15

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The Career Management SystemInteractive Detailing (CMS-ID) update was released Aug. 10 and incorporates 34 changes from Sailor, command career counselor, and command representative feedback. The updates will enhance a Sailors ability to take an active role in his or her professional development and career management. CMS-ID is absolutely vital to our distribution process, said Rear Adm. Michael White, assistant commander, Navy Personnel Command for Career Management. We must continue to improve the utility of the application for the Sailors in the Fleet considering their next assignment while ensuring it meets the business needs of Navy Personnel Command (NPC). The CMS-ID 5.3 release will provide both, and is a critical step in moving us toward our future bil let based distribution (BBD) capability. The BBD initiative is focused on enabling the Navy to better manage force structure and readiness by more accu rately matching Sailors and their unique skill sets to individual billets. This pro cess is also called Fit across the Navy. Additionally, BBD will upgrade aging software programs used in enlisted dis tribution and provide accurate and time ly manning information in a web-based environment to Fleet personnel manag ers. The recent CMS-ID release impacts 18 different user groups, more than 336,500 users and 278 Active component (AC) detailers who use CMS-ID to complete the first step in the order writing process. The majority of the changes are a result of a review of internal process es/systems that are used by enlisted distribution managers in NPC, said Scott Barbier, branch head, Enlisted Readiness. The changes create greater standardization of detailing processes, improved efficiency and tracking of assignment actions, and create data link ages between CMS-ID and legacy distri bution systems needed for BBD. Sailors accessing CMS-ID will notice new features to include: selected in CMS-ID. This is because when a Detailer chooses a Sailor for a job in CMS-ID, the Sailor will automatically be posted in the Enlisted Assignment Information System (EAIS). A posted Sailor means the Sailor has been select ed for that job. and Application History results in Microsoft Excel. provide Sailors additional points of con tact for researching jobs at future com mand. and RC Sailors that an approved applica tion is already in the system and prevent them from submitting additional appli cations without communicating with their detailer. All Sailor-facing changes have been made to improve the efficiency of the CMS-ID order negotiation process and ensures every application made by the Sailor is used by the detailers to sup port their ultimate assignment, said Barbier. A major focus of the upgrade is an improved, software interface between CMS-ID and the EAIS, expanding data validation and synchronization between the two systems. This data exchange between the two systems will streamline the assignment process by eliminating steps and making it more efficient. While some of the changes are behind the scenes, such as the CMS-ID and EAIS interface, all changes have been made to improve the efficiency of the orders negotiation process and command inter action with the system. Reserve component Sailors need to be aware that CMS-ID will no longer pro vide a mobilization function. To volun teer for mobilization, contact a com mand career counselor (CCC) or visit the Mobilization Volunteer Portal on the Navy Reserve Homeport. Additionally, RC Sailors will see a Projected Rotation Date (PRD) Gate to prevent them from submitting applica tions outside of the three-month PRD window. This ensures that those who need to find jobs within three months have first priority. The gate will not apply to those within the In Assignment Processing status. CMS-ID upgrade to support Sailors Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their fami lies. Preregistration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handi capped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. For more information or to register, call 542-5745.Improve your life skills with free knowledge 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus visited aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) in the Arabian Sea Aug. 6-7, as the carrier contin ued its 25th and final deploy ment. Enterprise Sailors and Marines, currently deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility, used this oppor tunity to welcome Mabus to the worlds first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. Following his arrival on the carriers flight deck, Mabus was greeted by Rear Adm. Walter Carter, commander, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group (ENTCSG) and Capt. William Hamilton Jr., Enterprises com manding officer. Mabus was then escorted to the ships navigation bridge and primary flight control before moving to the hangar bay where he addressed more than 3,000 Sailors and Marines gathered for an all-hands call. Im happy to be here with you all, said Mabus as he addressed Big Es crew. Im happy to be here on this historic ship, on its historic last voyage. During his address, Mabus thanked the crewmembers for their service and told them that he understands that what they do is not easy. The Navy and Marines are Americas away team, said Mabus. The people at home never know just how skilled you are. They never see what it takes to do what you do and put on that uniform on a daily basis. On their behalf, I want to say thank you. Mabus continued his expres sion of gratitude, saying, I know that this ship and all of our ships have had an incred ibly high operational tempo. I understand the stress that it puts on your families. The importance of what you all are doing for America cannot be overstated. He also spoke of how the Navys role in maritime combat operations will change in the future. Were going to build the fleet, said Mabus. We are going to begin to use ships differently. We are growing the fleet to meet the new responsibilities of the new national defense strategy that the president announced in January. During the event Mabus also presided over the reenlistment of 32 Sailors and Marines and presented awards to members of the Enterprise and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 team. The Navy and the Marine Corps are the finest expedi tionary fighting force that the world has ever known, Mabus told the crew. You are making part of the history of not only this Enterprise, but of all of the Enterprises that have sailed on behalf of our Navy and our nation. After concluding his remarks, Mabus answered questions from the crew of the Big E and CVW-1 and posed for photos with those gathered in the hangar bay before heading to dinner with members of the enlisted crew on the carriers mess decks. Following dinner, Mabus toured the legendary ship, vis iting medical department spac es, a weapons magazine, the combat direction center, car rier air traffic control center, a squadron ready room and the machinery repair shop. He was also able to observe flight operations from the flight deck, both in daylight and after sunset. Enterprise is currently deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conduct ing maritime security opera tions, theater security opera tion efforts and support missions as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Navy, Army and Air Force officials discussed renewable energy milestones, force structure changes and the impact on military and surrounding commu nities affected by base realignment and closure at an Aug. 7 Association of Defense Communities conference. Katherine Hammack, assistant secre tary of the Army for installations, ener gy and environment; Roger Natsuhara, acting assistant secretary of the Navy for energy, installations and environ ment; and Terry Yonkers, assistant sec retary of the Air Force for installations, environment and logistics, took part in a roundtable discussion. The service officials outlined strate gies to adapt to future force structure changes and reductions in supporting infrastructure at U.S. and overseas mili tary installations without compromis ing the nations defense capabilities. The U.S. is at a strategic turning point after weve had over a decade of war, Hammack said. We know as the end-strength comes down, force struc ture changes will be required under the Budget Control Act. The Army already has announced its end-strength reductions could total about 80,000 soldiers by fiscal 2017, she said. Base realignments and closures have proven to be effective and objective in reducing domestic infrastructure and reconfiguring what must remain, Hammack said. Four rounds of BRAC took place after the Cold War wound down and force structure was declin ing, she said, in contrast to the 2005 BRAC, which took place during a pro tracted war. The 88, 91, 93 and 95 rounds com bined produced 97 major base closures, 55 significant realignments and $22 bil lion in implementation costs resulting in . $8 billion in annual reoccurring savings, Hammack said. BRAC 2005 enabled the Army to reset its infrastructure to accommodate the return of forces from Europe and Korea while revitalizing the Army Reserve and National Guard, she added. In the last six years, we have closed 97 sites and returned 23,000 acres to host nations, she said. In the next four years, we plan to close another 23 sites and return 21,000 acres, primarily in Germany, Hammack said, citing simi lar progress in Korea during the same timeframe. There, the Army closed 34 sites, with 7,300 acres returned to the community and another 20 sites projected for closure, with 9,400 acres returned to the host nation. What remains in Korea and Germany, we believe, is necessary for the support of this nation, she said. The Army will continue to seek con gressional authorization for additional rounds of BRAC, Hammack said, noting property conveyance remains a priority. Putting excess property back into productive reuse facilitates job creation, and thats never more important than it is today, she said. We know that some of these properties have more extensive environmental remediation than oth ers, but we focus on those that can be transferred for beneficial economic use as a first priority. Hammack also underscored the Armys commitment to one of its larg est endeavors yet: the deployment of three gigawatts of renewable energy on Army, Navy and Air Force installa tions by 2025. The Army has partnered with local communities and the ser vices to ensure renewable, reliable ener gy through analysis of fuel, water and energy needs while reducing the load of power systems in a digital society, she said. Collectively, these advancements are changing both the technology we employ and the manner in which we plan and execute our operations, Hammock said. Yonkers said the Air Force has taken on similar measures and efficiencies to sustain and modernize its core systems, develop a scalable and responsive force, and preserve readiness while taking care of airmen and their families. He warned of paying for unneces sary infrastructure that eats up dol lars better directed to modernization, sustaining weapons systems and sup porting the quality-of-life improve ments for airmen. He also lamented the possibility another half-trillion dollars pared from the defense budget over the next 10 years that will be trig gered in January by a sequestration mechanism in the Budget Control Act if Congress fails to come up with an alter native. Sequestration, he said, would have serious impact on the Air Forces ability to conduct its assigned missions. But despite the new fiscal reality, Yonkers said, communities continue to demonstrate strong support and prom ising, innovative ideas in support of bases. We have 180 renewable energy proj ects in operation or under construction at 77 of our Air Force bases, Yonkers said, also noting 20 solar, wind, waste, geothermal, and biomass projects that will move the service closer to its goal of deploying one gigawatt of energy by 2016. In California alone, the Air Force already has solar energy projects at Edwards Air Force Base and Travis Air Force Base, he said. Combined, they will create 420 megawatts of power, he added. Similarly, the Navy will continue to pursue its energy goals through ongo ing community and industry partner ship, Natsuhara said. The big goals for us will be the 50 percent alternative energy for our bases, he said. We look forward to working with the communities as we look at renewable energy, microgrids and other [avenues] to meet all of our very aggressive goals. And while the BRAC process has reduced the Navys installations to from 150 to 70 in the United States, the Navy now is in more of a growth mode over seas, as the new defense policy pivots attention to the Asia-Pacific region, Natsuhara said. We have quite an extensive program that were going to have to implement very soon in Guam, Australia and Hawaii, he said. Were also moving a few ships to Singapore. A lot of these bases, said he added, are going be of a different and unprecedented model. There are going to be less of the tra ditional bases where we have our fami lies and modern support facilities, he said. Theres a lot of pressure on our facility side as we go overseas. With fleet concentrations primarily in the northwest and southwest regions of the United States, Natsuhara said, the Navy can benefit from being able to analyze how to make its bases more efficient as it further aligns its forces. Community collaboration has pro duced successes along the way, he said, including Virginias NAS Oceana, which was considered for closure in 2005, but through legislation and joint councils, has become more compatible with the community. To date, the Oceana area and the state have contributed about $63 mil lion in some of the land-use purchases to build more compatible lands, he said. At NAS Kingsville, Texas, the Navy worked with wind developers on pri vate lands to make turbine operations compatible with air training operations, Natsuhara said. Wind turbines are an important part of the renewable energy push for this country, he added, and were a strong supporter of that. SECNAV visits USS Enterprise in the Arabian Sea Service leaders weigh in on BRAC, renewable energy Check Us Out Online: www.jaxairnews.com JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012 17



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Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) completed painting its first T-34C Turbomentor Trainer aircraft for a California-based detachment aligned under Commander, Strike Fighter Wing Pacific (CSFWP) July 31. FRCSE painters completed the air crafts unique paint scheme by apply ing primer and a white topcoat with blue and black markings to protect the airframe from water intrusion and cor rosion. The un-pressurized two-seat, turboprop trainer is used primarily to train student pilots; however, at CSFWP Detachment El Centro, Calif., the air craft provides logistical air observation support to visiting squadrons operating at the detachment. Artisans are currently performing an Aircraft Condition Inspection (ACI) due every five years between fleet tour cycles according to Steve Gibbs, an FRCSE aircraft planner and estimator. This particular T-34 entered Naval service in February 1981, he said. It served three tours with Training Air Wing Five at Naval Air Station Whiting Field in Florida from March 1983 to April 1994, followed by 6 years with NASA before being transferred in March 2002 to El Centro in a continuing support role. Each aircraft is flown between 1800 to 2200 flight hours before an ACI is due according to Gibbs. Artisans con duct nondestructive inspections on the primary structure points to detect cracks and corrosion. They remove and inspect the wings, as well as the vertical and horizontal stabilizers. In addition, artisans replace timecompliance components, such as the landing gear, large wing attachment bolts and most mechanical compo nents. They also update the aircraft to the latest configuration using mainte nance engineering directives and manuals. If our artisans run into a problem thats outside the maintenance manual, they submit a Request for Engineering Instruction, said Gibbs. The assigned engineering group will determine the appropriate repair action usually through stress analysis and then issue formal repair instructions. We aver age six to seven requests per aircraft not including any required lab work, such as paint removal by mechanical or chemical means. Prior to November 2011, the T-34 fleet was exclusively maintained by a defense contractor with a Federal THURSDAY, AUGUST 16, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com A P-3C Orion aircraft assigned to VP-5 participated in Operation Island Chief (OPIC) July 27-31 over the waters of the Federated States of Micronesia. The OPIC mission was to conduct surveillance of the Pacific island nations Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ) in order to collect information on vessels conducting illegal fishing activity. The aircrew worked with the Federated States of Micronesia to help maintain maritime domain awareness and enforce compliance with fishery regulations. Operating from Andersen Air Force Base in Guam, the Mad Foxes worked with forces from Micronesia, Papua New Guinea, Palau, the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the Republic of Kiribati to accomplish the mission at hand. Utilizing radar, Advanced Imaging Multi-Spectral Sensor, and the Automatic Identification System, the aircrafts crew correlated surface con tacts with a listing of legal and preapproved fishing vessels. When com plete, they reported their findings to the Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA) based in Honiara, Solomon Islands. The FFA compiled reports from other platforms in the exercise to refresh a database of known vessels in the area. Through their hard work, the crew successfully cleared hundreds of miles of protected water space from illegal fishing activities and helped Micronesia enforce their EEZ. Lt. Timothy Clemens, officer in charge of the detachment, remarked, OPIC was a great opportunity to work with Pacific island nations and foster multinational cooperation with a focus on economic rights. The Mad Foxes appreciated the opportunity to participate in the operation and were proud to offer their ser vices to aid law enforcement in the region. The Mad Foxes of VP-5 are based out of NAS Jacksonville and are currently on a six-month deployment to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. According to the CIA World Fact Book, the Federated States of Micronesia, a UN Trust Territory under U.S. administration, adopted a constitution in 1979. Independence was attained in 1986 under a Compact of Free Association with the U.S. that was amended and renewed in 2004. Present concerns include unemployment, over-fishing and over-dependence on U.S. aid.Mad Foxes support Operation Island Chief The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 participated in bilateral train ing Aug. 2 with the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) squadron VP-2 Odin at Hachinohe Air Base 2. VP-8 flew a P-3C Orion air craft from Naval Air Facility Misawa to Hachinohe Air Base where they met with VP-2 to conduct training with an expendable mobile anti-sub marine warfare training target (EMATT) and data link-11 training. Ultimately, weather pre vented EMATT training, but the link-11 training was highly successful. The navigator/communica tors aboard each aircraft worked to establish secure voice and data communications between the two aircraft, said Lt. j.g. Michael Marschall, the VP-8 Combat Aircrew 9 Navigator/ Communicator. Having both operating con currently greatly improves communication between allies and helps to overcome any language barrier. After completing their train ing, Japanese and American Sailors gathered for a social event hosted by the JMSDF. VP-2 Commanding Officer Capt. Seto presented a framed photo graph to Capt. Gregory Cozad, deputy commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force U.S. 7th Fleet, to commemorate the improvements between the JMSDF and U.S. Navy P-3 forces during his tenure. Cozad thanked Seto for his gift and acknowledged the improved communication and teamwork between the two organizations most notably in humanitarian assistance/ disaster relief missions during Operation Tomodachi in 2011. VP-8 and VP-2 have a strong history of working together. The squadrons trained togeth er when VP-8 was deployed to Japan in 2004/2005 and most recently in a highly successful EMATT Exercise in June. The NAS Jacksonville-based Fighting Tigers are on a sched uled six-month deployment in support of U.S. 7th Fleet. VP-8 and Japanese VP-2 squadrons conduct data-link training Turbomentor Trainer aircraft gets 5-year checkup/makeover at FRCSE

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August 16 1812 USS Constitution recaptures American merchant brig Adeline. 1954 Beginning of Operation Passage to Freedom, transport of refugees from Haiphong to Saigon, Vietnam. August 17 1812 Frigate USS President captures British schooner LAdeline in North Atlantic. 1942 Submarines USS Nautilus (SS-168) and USS Argonaut (SS-166) land 222 Marines on Makin Island, the first amphibious attack made from submarines. 1959 Adm. Arleigh Burke reappointed CNO for third, two-year term. 1962 Navys first hydrofoil patrol craft, USS High Point (PCH-1) launched at Seattle, Wash. August 18 1838 Expedition under Lt. Charles Wilkes embarks on world cruise. 1911 First Navy Nurse Corps superintendent, Esther Voorhees Hasson, appointed. 1965 First major amphibi ous assault in Vietnam, Operation Starlight captures 2,000 Viet Cong. 1966 First ship-to-shore satellite radio message sent from USS Annapolis in South China Sea to Pacific Fleet Headquarters at Pearl Harbor 1974 After flooding in Philippines, Navy helicopters begin six days of operations to rescue victims and deliver supplies (244 flights). August 19 1812 USS Constitution captures HMS Guerriere. 1812Devastating hurricane strikes the Navys New Orleans station, delaying military preparations in the War of 1812. 1818 Capt. James Biddle takes possession of Oregon Territory for U.S. 1967 Operation Coronado IV begins in Mekong Delta. 1981 During a routine combat air patrol over the Mediterranean, two VF-41 Black Aces flying F-14 Tomcats from USS Nimitz (CVN 68) were fired upon by two Libyan Su-22 Fighters. Quickly engaged by the pursu ing Black Aces both Libyan jets were shot down. These were the first recorded airto-air kills for the Navy since Vietnam, and the first ever for the F-14. August 20 1952 An inter-service (Navy, Marine and Air Force) air operation at Chang Pyong-ni, Korea destroys 80 percent of assigned target area. 1959 USS Thetis Bay (LPH6) completes six-day humani tarian operation after floods in Taiwan. 1969 Navy Seabees and Sailors from Helicopter Training Squadron Eight (HT-8) evacuate 820 people from Pass Christian, Miss. after Hurricane Camille. August 21 1800 U.S. Marine Corps Band performs its first concert in Washington, D.C. 1883 Installation of the first electric lighting on a Navy ship completed on USS Trenton, a wooden hull screw steamer. 1951 First contract for a nuclear-powered submarine, USS Nautilus (SSN-571), awarded to Electric Boat Company in Groton, Conn. 1965 Launch of Gemini 5, piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Charles Conrad Jr., completed 120 orbits in almost eight days at an altitude of 349.8 km. Recovery was by helicopter from USS Lake Champlain (CVS-39). 1980 USS Truxtun (CGN-35) rescues 42 Vietnamese refu gees and USS Merrill (DD-976) rescues 62 Vietnamese refu gees, over 200 miles southeast of Saigon. August 22 1912 Birthday of U.S. Navy Dental Corps 1945 First surrender of Japanese garrison at end of World War II; USS Levy receives surrender of Mille Atoll in Marshall Islands. 1980 Fleet replenishment oiler USS Passumpsic (AO-107) rescues 28 Vietnamese refu gees. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS There are many advantages to having children all of the same gender. One is hand-me-downs. Another is eventually they can all play on the same team (less driving!). The biggest advantage, however, is emotional equilibrium (also an Achilles heel, read on). In other words, I know what to expect. Sure, my three boys are unique in one word, Ford is focused, Owen is observant, and Lindell is . well, hes a wildcard but in a broader sense, they are very much alike. Or, at least, they handle things similarly. Ive learned to adapt. A typical fight at the Smiley house goes like this: Ford tells Lindell hes probably adopted. Lindell cries hysterically, then says, Yeah, well youre stu pid. Owen tells them both to be quiet. Lindell slaps Owen. Ford yells at both of them. They go outside and play baseball. When I try to intervene, they mock me. Me: Ford, youve hurt Lindells feel ings and made him wonder about his place in this family. Tell him youre sorry. Ford: Lindell, Im sorry you dont look like any of us. Me: No, thats not what I geez! Cant you just hug and make up? Lindell (smiling): Ford, Im sorry youre so stupid. Ford (smiling): Im sorry that both of you are losers. Owen (laughing uncontrollably): And Im sorry Im better than both of you. Me (confused, frustrated): Cant you guys have a conversation? Cant you help each other instead of hurting each other? Lindell: Okay. Owen, tell me, does this shirt make me look like a jerk? Ive often thought a girl would help balance things out, teach the boys a thing or two. Thankfully, earlier this month, the boys younger, female cousin arrived for a two-week vacation in Maine. What a difference a girl makes! Her hair smelled sweet, not sweaty. Her clothes matched. She had a baby doll instead of headless action figures. She sat and watched me put on makeup. Bonus: within eight hours, she had all three boys, plus Fords friend, cir cled around a stump by the lake, on which she was standing, her hands on her hips, giving directions. The boys followed, completely under the spell of her girlish powers. She said sit, and they sat, even though they were puzzled as to why. After a few days, however, other dif ferences between my boys and my niece became clearer. When the boys play, they make rigid rules and a plan. Sometimes, they chart this on a clip board. My beautiful niece has an elaborate, wonderful imagination, and she likes to pretend. Her plan is more fluid, her interactions more one-on-one. This I could understand. My boys could not. One week into the visit, Lindell came running onto the back porch crying. I dont even understand what shes say ing, Lindell cried. She says Ive done things, but I dont even understand or remember. Im so confused! My other brother (not my nieces father) said, Well, Lindell, that certi fies her as being completely female. Get used to it. Meanwhile, my niece smiled up at us and said, Lindell, want to go outside and play again? Lindell shrugged his shoulders. Sure, he said. They would play quietly for a few minutes, and then another verbal argument would erupt: I didnt do it. Yes, you did. No, I didnt. Yes, you did. I dont even know what were talking about anymore! They played best when they played house. Lindell was the Daddy and worked at Wal-Mart, until it ran out of business. Then he stayed home and watched football all day. My niece (the Mommy) didnt like that. Lindell had to work. Lindell found a job catching bad guys. All was right in the world. An hour later, Lindell was his cousins dog, and she dropped him off at daycare. He didnt seem to mind. She was happy; therefore, he would be, too. So long as there was a plan, Lindell understood how to participate. As soon as too much conversation was involved, he came back frustrated and crying. His constant refrain: I get so confused. My brother and I would hold our breath as the kids played, and then it was something like rock, paper, scis sors for who would go settle the next fight. It seemed like the cousins were not playing well together. We all said, Just wait until next year; they will be older and more mature. Secretly, though, I thought, my boys need to learn how to be around girls. The day after my niece left, Lindell walked onto the spot of dirt where they had made sandcastles the week before. Gosh, I miss her, he said. I texted that to my brother and added, . . even though he fought with her the whole time. My brother wrote back: She says they didnt fight (smiley face). Exactly.Cousins visit brings lessons about girls No injuries in Strait of Hormuz collision No one was hurt early on Aug. 12 when a U.S. Navy guided missile destroyer and a large Japanese-owned merchant vessel collided near the Strait of Hormuz. The collision between USS Porter (DDG 78) and the Panamanian-flagged bulk oil tanker M/V Otowasan occurred at approximately 1 a.m. local time. Overall damage to Porter is being evaluated, but the ship is able to operate under its own power. No personnel on either vessel were injured. The incident is under investiga tion. The collision was not combat related. USS Porter is on a scheduled deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Military men and women who are transitioning from active duty to the civilian sector may find promising careers as teachers with the help of a federal program called Troops to Teachers (TTT). Established in 1994 by the Department of Defense and managed by the Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support (DANTES), TTTs primary objective is to recruit quality teachers for K-12 schools that serve low-income families throughout the United States. TTT is a national program that covers all 50 states and includes Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, explained Albert Wynn, associate regional director for TTT. We provide a wide variety of assistance for those members seeking second careers as teachers, includ ing counseling, employment referrals and financial assistance. According to Wynn, TTT offers service members two types of support: funded and unfunded. Through the funded program, individuals who qualify will be provided with financial support through stipends and bonuses totaling up to $10,000. This financial assistance helps to cover costs incurred from the teacher certification process. The unfunded program offers counseling and advice in meeting certification requirements. Wynn recommends, as with anything, that service members first determine if they truly desire to pursue careers as teachers by getting involved with local public schools and volunteering. Teaching isnt for everybody, said Wynn. Its important for individuals pursuing this path to rec ognize the challenges that teachers can have, but also the rewards. Teaching is definitely one of the most rewarding experiences of my life. More detailed information, including qualifica tion requirements and the registration process, can be found at the TTTs homepage www.proudtoserve again.com Troops to Teachers provides second careers New precision landing site increases flight deck capability on TrumanThe aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) conducted its first helicopter recovery on a newly added flight deck precision landing site July 22. The precision landing site is one of two that do not overlap the flight path for fixed-wing aircraft, adding enhanced flight operation capability to Trumans embarked helicopter and fixed-wing aircraft squad rons. These landing sites do not foul the flight path for fixed-wing aircraft, said Lt. Larry Tarver, Trumans aircraft handling officer. The Navy has added these sites to other Nimitzclass aircraft carriers, but this is Trumans first landing using that site. It is a capability that makes Truman more versatile. Truman recovered an MH-60S Sea Hawk assigned to the Dusty Dogs of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7. Because of the new landing site, Truman wont have to stop fixed-wing flight operations to recover our helicopters, said Lt. Dan Didier, the HSC-7 pilot who completed the first precision site landing. During flight operations on previous deployments, HSC-7 waited for Truman to pause fixed-wing aircraft operations in order to land. Before, we would land, refuel, swap aircrew, and take off from a position on the flight deck that interrupted fixed-wing flight operations, said Didier. It was necessary, but it interrupted the flow of the flight deck. According to Didier, helicopter recovery and launch took up to 30 minutes to complete, interrupting fixedwing flight operations for more than 40 minutes per helicopter landing. Now we can launch and recover fixed-wing aircraft while refueling or landing a helicopter, said Tarver. This capability helps HSC-7, it helps Truman, and it makes us a more ready team, said Didier. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012 3

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NATIO N AL NIGHT OUT The NAS Jax Security and Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) depart ments hosted the 29th annual National Night Out event Aug. 7 at the Allegheny softball fields and outdoor pool. The event is held each year to heighten crime and drug prevention awareness, gener ate support for local anti-crime programs, strengthen neigh borhood and police partner ships and let criminals know that neighborhoods are fight ing back against crime. This event unites commu nity and law enforcement to combat crime. Back in 1984, when this event began there were 400 communities in 23 states participating. This year, there are 15,000 communities in all 50 states participating, said NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders as he welcomed the families to the event. Even though the rain may have put a damper on the event tonight, for those of you who came out, please enjoy the fun, food and hospital ity and remember when we come together as a commu nity neighborhoods and law enforcement we can combat crime even better, he contin ued. This is a great event to bring together the community and law enforcement agencies. We are here to help the commu nity learn about crime, illegal drugs, how to report issues both on and off base, said NAS Jax Physical Security Officer Richard Hunt, who coordinated the event with MWR. We coordinated the food and entertainment. Hopefully, we will continue to make this event even bigger next year as we partner with security per sonnel to promote crime pre vention awareness, said NAS Jax Youth Activities Center Director Aaron Long. Families and security per sonnel spent the evening interacting as they feasted on free hamburgers, hotdogs and chips courtesy of MWR. The children were entertained by McGruff the Crime Dog, bouncy hous es, dancing to the DJs music and several contests such as a sack race, tug of war and hula hoops. Military dog handlers MA2 Erick Ortiz and MASN Drew Risley of the NAS Jax Security Department and Military Working Dog Doly demonstrated how the dog can apprehend a suspect and PR1 John Hall, FC1(SW Benjamin Dean and AWS2(NAC/AW) Evan Morrow of the Search and Rescue Swimmer School demonstrated a water rescue scenario in the pool. Members of the Florida Masonic Child ID Program and Navy Criminal Investigative Service, also fingerprinted and took photos of children to pro vide parents with CD identifi cation kits and discussed the importance of having the infor mation on hand updated to help authorities if a child ever goes missing. We brought the family out here tonight to have some fun in a safe environment. Weve heard a lot about this event its a great time, said AMCS(AW) Mike Lively of HSL60 at NS Mayport, who brought his family for a night of fun. We are out here to have some fun, enjoy the free food and get some information on crime prevention. I really appreciate security and MWR putting this all together, added AE2(AW) Jacob Ruelas of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. The first National Night Out began in early 1984 through the National Association of Town Watch (NATW). The event is held around the country on the first Tuesday in August. NATW is a nonprofit, crime prevention organization which works in cooperation with thousands of crime watch groups and law enforcement agencies throughout the coun try. Annual event heightens crime prevention awareness 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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PHOTOS BY KAYLEE LAROCQUE JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012 5

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CMSA&A ITC(IDW/SW) Kwasi Peters Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax ATC(AW/SW) Aaron Clifford ATC(AW/SW) Karl Fuller ASC(AW) Kathryn Kennon ATC(AW/SW) Justin Seibel YNC(SW/AW) Sean Summersill Commander, Navy Region Southeast NCC(SW) Jason Davis Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 AWOC(NAC/AW/SW) Michael Holdizsar AWOC(NAC/AW) Alain Carpentier ISC(SW/AW/IDW) Chris Emerson AWOC(NAC/AW) Lucious Mason AWOC(NAC/AW) Victor McClelland AWOC(NAC/AW) Steven Smith AWVC(NAC/AW) Terry Trayer AWOC(NAC/AW/IUSS) Ervin Maldonado ETC(SW/AW) Bryan Meyers Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jax AWOC(AW/IDW/EXW/SW) Jose Hernandez ACC(AW/SW) Racheal Garcia Fleet Logistics Center Jax AMC(AW) Miranda Davis Fleet Readiness Center Southeast ADC(AW) Roderick Dubose AMC(AW) Morgan Lemos ATC(AW) James Riner ATC(AW) Jeffery Sailors ATC(AW/SW) George Stevenson AOC(AW/SW) Matthew Vock HSC-28 AMC(AW) Brian Bailey HSL-42 PSC(AW/SW) Keleen Lynch HSM-70 AEC(AW/SW) Mark Barnhardt AMC(AW/SW) Marlon Chavez ATC(AW) Stephen Johnson PSC(AW/SW) Raemon McClinton ATC(AW) Kristian Thoresen HSM-74 ATC(AW/SW) William Jones ATC(AW) Angel Ortiz AWRC(NAC/AW/SW) Wade Payne NAS Jacksonville ITC(SW) Kevin Benedict ACC(AW/SW) Lee Carson ACC(AW/SW) John Jones ACC(AW/SW) Larry Rose NCC(SW) Rhonaka Williams Naval Hospital Jacksonville AEC(AW/SW) Jestun Davis CSC(SW) Patrick Faucette HMC(AW/SW) Heather McLean HMC(FMF) Wayne Nettles Navy Band MUC(SW) Jose Acosta Navy Cargo Handling Battalion 11 LSC(AW/SW) Joshua Nolan Navy Munitions Command Detachment Jacksonville AZC(AW) Jermaine Shavers AOC Michael Tune Navy Medical Education and Training Command LSC(AW/SW) Desiree Garner Region Legal Service Office Southeast LNC(SW/AW) Lucia Abreu Surface Rescue Swimmer School FCC(SW) Joshua Gaudin Transient Personnel Unit/Pre-Trial Confinement Facility Jax YNC(SW) Wicliffe Campbell VP-10 AWOC(NAC/AW) Michael Boyd YNC(AW/SW) Tasha Harris VP-16 AWOC(NAC/AW) Brian High AMC(AW) Tony Johnscott AZC(AW/SW) Natalia Luchetti PRC(AW) Joshua Martin AMC(AW) Greg Tucker VP-26 AOC(AW) Anthony Bond ATC(AW) Jason Gapusan ATC(AW) Michael Keef AWOC(NAC/AW) Michael Twining VP-30 ADC(AW) Neeshad Abdool AWVC(NAC/AW) Eric Adams ADC(AW) Blake Bundy LSC(AW/EXW) Luis Chavez AWFC(NAC/AW) Benjamin Dempsey ADC(AW) Christan Desiderio AWOC(NAC/AW) William Lewis AWFC(NAC/AW) Eric Nordstrom AWVC(NAC/AW) Daniel Oberg AWOC(NAC/AW) Ryan Whitney AOC(AW/SW) Jason Worek AWFC(NAC/AW) Daniel Zommer AWFC(NAC/AW) Matthew Lohse VP-45 YNC(AW/SW) Alisha Buchannon ADC(AW) Jesse Cobb AZC(AW) Carrie Finley AWFC(NAC/AW) Joshua Haley AMC(AW) Billy Kime ADC(AW) Keith Latshaw ATC(AW) Jason Manning PRC(AW) Fernando Morales VP-8 AWFC(NAC/AW) Jeffrey Adkins AWOC Adrian Vaughn AOC William Kenney ADC Reynaldo Abunduz YNC Shawn Croon LSC Nicola Canada VP-5 AWOC Sean Adams AMC Kendrick Gentle AWOC Kimberly Glach AZC Antonio Johnson AMC Christopher Licata LSC Terry Loeffelholz AWOC Brandon Russel ATC Chad Wellborn Fleet Support Unit AWOC Christopher Carman 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Happy 100th birthday, Navy Dental CorpsOne hundred years ago, on Aug. 22, 1912, the Navy Dental Corps was established at the second session of the 62nd Congress. President William Taft signed a bill passed by Congress that gave authorization to appoint no more than 30 acting assistant dental surgeons to the Medical Department of the U.S. Navy. Two months later, Emory Bryant and William Cogan were the first two dental officers to enter active duty in the Navy. The number of Navy dentists continued to increase with 107 active duty dentists in 1921. Today, there are 1,055 active duty dentists. Early in 1922, two significant milestones occurred: the establishment of the U.S. Naval Dental School and the creation of a dental division in the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. By June 1945, dental clinic ships were recommended by Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet and on April 2, 1948 the dental technician rating was established. Over the years, researchers at the Naval Dental School have revolutionized the field of dentistry by developing pioneering models of the dental air tur bine hand piece and ultrasonic vibrating instruments. These concepts were a tremendous leap forward for the dental profession. Today, these prototypes are displayed at the Smithsonian Institute. Naval Hospital Jacksonville celebrates with a cake cutting on Aug. 16 at noon and a Navy Dental Corps Centennial Celebration at the River Club in downtown Jacksonville Aug. 18. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville announces GS and WG Civilians of the Quarter NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) recently announced its GS and WG Civilians of the Quarter, Second Quarter 2012. Steve Silver, deputy site director at NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, Site NAS Jacksonville was selected GS Civilian of the Quarter and Romie Blackshear Jr. of NAVSUP FLC Jacksonvilles Mayport Bulk Fuel Division was chosen WG Civilian of the Quarter. Silvers knowledge of supply and leadership abilities are demonstrated through his NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, Site NAS Jacksonvilles aviation sup ply support metrics, which are consistently the best among all Navy/Marine Corps Air Stations. As a matter of course, Silver works to develop and maintain great working relationships with the Aviation Support Detachment, NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville headquarters, NAS Jacksonville, CNAF staff, and personnel in customer commands. Throughout NERP Regional Go Live 3, Silver served as the primary point of contact for the NAS Jacksonville site working tirelessly to lead the implementation. As a result, NAS Jacksonville was the most pre pared site for NERP implementation. Blackshear expertly led operations of NAVSUP FLC Jacksonvilles Mayport Bulk Fuel Divisions receipt and issue of more than 11 million gallons of fuel and lubricants, including a 29,700-gallon defuel from a fleet unit, which resulted in a return for credit and saved the Navy $106,623. During Tropical Storms Beryl and Debbie, Blackshear went out of his way to meet Mayport home ported ships fueling needs. Instead of call ing by phone, he visited each unit personally; this is typical of his dedication and initiative. Through this action, Blackshear enabled NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville to meet its customers emergency fuel requirements. Additionally, Blackshear has quickly become an essential player in the newly established, customerrequested process of delivering fuel directly to U.S. Coast Guard ships. Navy commands have donated 402,315 pounds as of week eight of the campaign to the 2012 Feds Feed Families drive, topping the Navys goal of 396,000 pounds for the entire three-month campaign. Navy personnel have taken an incredible initiative so far with ensuring collection points are well identified and accessible across bases worldwide, collecting those goods, and donating them to charities both locally and around the world. The generosity has been overwhelming in regard to the generous spirit of our personnel both here in our regions and installations in the United States, as well as abroad, said Cmdr. Glenda Jennings Harrison, Supervisory Chaplain for Operations at Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC). The Sailors are excited about being part of a campaign that builds community and lets the community at large know that they are caring and responsive to the struggles many are facing during these hard economic times. Navy chaplains emphasize that while meeting our goal is wonderful news, it is not the time to slow down donating just because our goal has been met. Boxes will be picked up again throughout all Navy regions and installations on each Friday during the month of August and donated to local food banks. The campaign will end on Aug. 31. Sailors at the grassroots level are doing the logistics and organizing this campaign, said Harrison. The success of Feds Feed Families so far is a testament to the quality and work ethic of these Sailors. They are doing a great job and it speaks volumes to who they are. Navy Region Japan has the highest CNIC contri bution total so far, donating 220,500 pounds to food banks both in their region and across the United States, including Oregon Food Bank, Second Harvest Food Banks, Community Food Bank of New Jersey, Feeding South Dakota Food Bank, Food Bank for the Heartland, Food Bank of Alaska and Gods Pantry Food Bank. CNICs 11 regions and 70 installations have donated to more than 150 food banks worldwide. Navy tops Feds Feed Families goal JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012 7

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Aviation Administration (FAA) repair certification to perform organizational, intermediate and depot-level maintenance under a Contract Logistic Support (CLS) agreement. Depot-level repairs were subcontracted to a higher-level maintenance facility in the private sector. David Pfeffer, the primary/multi-engine team lead, said the material condition of the T-34 fleet had degraded over three decades due to the effects of prolonged wear and tear. Naval Air Systems Command Program Manager Air (PMA) 273 worked closely with the FRCSE Industrial Business Office to recapture the depot-level inspec tion, modifications, and repair work at the militarys organic depot in an effort to raise maintenance standards on these T-34C aircraft that are already at or near their predicted fatigue lives. We were seeing higher levels of spending for over and above repairs due to the material condition of these aging aircraft, said Pfeffer. PMA has been supportive, providing the additional funding to perform the required work to bring these old airframes back into better shape. Corrosion on the wing spars has degraded the material condition of the trainer aircraft. The spars must be replaced every three to five years, which is a costly and time-consuming process. The T-34 depot-level repairs and modifications will reduce future maintenance costs and improve readiness of the trainer platform. Repairs to the California-based T-34 trainer are scheduled for completion at the end of August. FRCSE It has been a worthwhile cause and our folks have really come to the forefront to lead the effort, dem onstrating the Navy truly is a Global Force for Good, said Harrison. In 2011, OPM asked the Department of Defense (DoD) to join the effort and theyve been stepping up to the plate to shatter each goal set over the course of the last two years. In 2011, OPM set a goal of 2 million pounds and DoDs goal was 733,800 pounds. Their final donation contributions totaled an astounding 5,793,446 pounds, with DoD having donated 2,004,613 pounds toward that total. That is equivalent to over 64,000 pounds per day. Due to the incredible success of last years campaign, OPM has set a goal of 5 million pounds, with DoD committing to donating 1.5 million pounds to help meet that goal. This years campaign motto is Beat Our Best. With the dedication and hard work being put forth by our service members and federal employees alike, we are on track to do just that. FEDS FEED FAMILIES 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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VP-5 participated in exercise Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Singapore July 17-27. This joint exercise between the U.S. Navy and the Republic of Singapore Navy took place at Paya Lebar Air Base and Changi Naval Base. It also included additional service members from the Republic of Singapore Air Force, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Coast Guard, and the U.S. Marine Corps. Led by Lt. Cmdr. Michael Cassidy, Combat Aircrews Six and Seven repre sented the Mad Foxes beginning with the opening ceremony held at Changi Naval Base on July 17. Throughout the exercise the crews participated in a symposium, training and tactical flights designed to promote profession al cooperation and relations between Singapore and the United States. In order to break the ice for all the participants, CARAT Singapore hosted a sports day. The event took place at the Changi Naval Base Sports Complex and started with an intense group kickbox ing workout, followed by a three-event competition. The Mad Foxes participated in a soccer game that ended in a thrilling penalty kick shootout. Next, the partici pants enjoyed a great basketball game. In the tie-breaking event, VP-5 led their team to victory in the tug of war, an exciting culmination to a fun-filled day. Throughout the event, Mad Foxes enjoyed interacting with Singaporean service members as well as U.S. Sailors and Marines from duty stations all over the world. CARAT Singapore was a highlight of the squadrons detachment through its opportunity for physical fitness, friendly competition and cultural exchange. On July 23, Combat Aircrew Seven (CAC-7) hosted two submariners from the Republic of Singapore Navy on a familiarization flight. The mission of the flight included coordinated oper ations and anti-submarine warfare (ASW) training. The riders had the opportunity to observe each station executing their duties while conducting an exercise with a friendly submarine. Lt. Charles Blackwell, CAC-7 tacti cal coordinator, led a demonstration on how each sensor was utilized to accomplish the ASW mission. The flight pro vided a unique and rewarding learning opportunity for both the submariners and the aircrew. On July 24, Lt. j.g. Wes Kang flew with Squadron 121 of the Republic of Singapore Air Force on a Fokker 50, a two-engine maritime patrol platform. On the flight, he experienced a typical reconnaissance mission, learned about the similarities in crew responsibilities and discussed the differences between the Fokker 50 and the P-3C Orion. It was a great experience interact ing with the Fokker 50 crew and fly ing with them on an actual patrol mis sion, remarked Kang. Im honored and thankful for the opportunity. While in Singapore, squadron mem bers dedicated two days to help chari ties serving the local community. St. Theresas Home for the Aged and Bo Tien Home for the Aged are voluntary welfare nursing homes that provide 24-hour care for low-income ailing senior citizens. Residents of the homes are 60 and older with no immediate relatives, referred by doctors, social workers and other welfare centers. The Mad Foxes teamed up with members of the Republic of Singapore Navy, the U.S. Coast Guard, and fellow Navy Sailors from USS Sampson (DDG-102) to lend a hand to these hardworking charities. The volunteers split into groups and tackled various tasks throughout the homes. Some groups took on odd jobs like washing windows and cleaning the facility. Other volunteers spent their time with the elderly residents sharing stories, comparing cultures and playing games like Bingo. The exchange was a rewarding experience for all of the vol unteers, and the Mad Foxes were grateful for this opportunity to give back to a great cause. VP-5s detachment to Singapore was a valuable experience for both coun tries. In the words of Cassidy, It was a great opportunity to work with our international partners in a demanding and realistic exercise. VP-5 trains in Singapore 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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The F-35 Lightning II accomplished a significant test milestone Aug. 8 when the aircraft successfully released a weapon in flight. BF-3, a short takeoff and vertical landing F-35 variant, executed an inert 1,000-pound GBU-32 Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) separation weapon over water in an Atlantic test range while traveling at 400 knots at an altitude of 4,200 feet. While this weapons separation test is just one event in a series of hundreds of flights and thousands of test points that we are executing this year, it does represent a significant entry into a new phase of testing for the F-35 program, said Navy Capt. Erik Etz, director of test for F-35 naval variants. Todays release of a JDAM was the result of extraordinary effort by our team of maintainers, engineers, pilots and others who consistently work long hours to deliver F-35 warfighting capa bility to the U.S. services and our international partners, said Etz. The release was the first time for any version of the F-35 to conduct an air borne weapon separation, as well as the first from an internal weapons bay for a fighter aircraft designated for the U.S. Marine Corps, the United Kingdom and Italy. The milestone marks the start of validating the F-35s capability to employ precision weapons and allow pilots to engage the enemy on the ground and in the air. [Using an internal weapons bay] speaks to how much capability the JSF is going to bring to the troops, said Dan Levin, Lockheed Martin test pilot for the mission. Stealth, fifth-generation avionics and precision weapons ... coupled with the flexible mission capability of the short take-off and vertical land ing F-35B is going to be huge for our warfighters. An aerial weapons separation test checks for proper release of the weapon from its carriage system and trajectory away from the aircraft. It is the culmi nation of a significant number of pre requisite tests, including ground fit checks, ground pit drops and aerial captive carriage and environment flights to ensure the system is working properly before expanding the test envelope in the air. Aircraft and land-based test moni toring systems collected data from the successful separation, which is in review at the F-35 integrated test force at NAS Patuxent River, Md. The F-35B is the variant of the Joint Strike Fighter designed for use by U.S. Marine Corps, as well as F-35 international partners in the United Kingdom and Italy. The F-35B is capable of short take-offs and vertical landings to enable air power projection from amphibious ships, skijump aircraft carriers and expedition ary airfields. The F-35B is undergoing test and evaluation at NAS Patuxent River, Md. and Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., prior to delivery to the fleet. F-35 completes first airborne weapons separation 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included August Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Fall Bowling Leagues now forming! Mixed league Monday 7 p.m. After-work league Wednesday 4:30 p.m. Seniors league Thursday 9 a.m. Mixed league Thursday 6:30 p.m. Intramural (Captains Cup) league Friday 11:45 a.m. Friday night league 7:30 p.m. Rising Stars youth league Saturday 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa Luehrs at 542-3518/4238. Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Beginning Aug. 18 the outdoor pool will be open Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. until Oct. 1. Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guestsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23, 2013 Preferred seating $42, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1-day $29.50, 2-day $40 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Dave & Busters Trip Free $10 game card and 20 percent off food & beverages Aug. 16, 6 p.m. Bush Gardens Weekend Trip Aug. 1719 $60 per person Ginnie Springs Trip Aug. 25 Free admissionNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Aug. 24 for active duty Aug. 26 for retirees & DoD personnel Golf & Dine Special Play 18-holes with cart and choice of breakfast or lunch for $26! Not applicable on holidays. After 12:30 p.m. Special Play 18 holes for $17, cart and green fees included Valid 7 days a week including holidays Monday & Tuesday Play 18 holes for $20, cart and green fees included Open to military and DoD, not applicable on holidaysMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Register now for before & after school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household incomeFlying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Sept. 10 Oct. 17 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012 13

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I often ride my bicycle home from work and usu ally race home looking up at the ominous clouds in the Florida sky. The rain has been a blessing this year, putting out swamp fires and keeping tomatoes growing. Unfortunately, the hot, wet summer months are also very dangerous for the development of several mosquito-borne and arthropod-borne diseases. These diseases are caused by arboviruses and are thought to be more common now as the weather becomes hotter and wetter, due to seasonal and global climate changes. Dengue, West Nile, St. Louis and Eastern Equine Virus are some of the illnesses that are becoming more common. Since theyre viruses, they cant be cured with antibiotics or medicines, and no vaccines are available. They can, however, be prevented using a few squirts of bug spray to keep the mosquitoes from biting. It is thought that only a minority of these infections lead to a diagnosed illness. The vast majority of cases remain undiagnosed and patients recover on their own after a brief period. Patients ill with fevers can be evaluated by a healthcare provider, appropriate diagnostic tests can be ordered, and supportive treatment provided. While the diseases can occur all year long in Florida, theyre more commonly seen from August to November due to weather conditions and the mosquito population. The Duval County Health Department (DCHD) issued a mosquito-borne illness alert for Duval County last week due to the rising incidence of mosquito-borne diseases. Human cases of West Nile virus have been confirmed and there is a heightened con cern that additional residents might become ill. Duval County had five confirmed cases of West Nile virus in 2012, and many more were suspected but not confirmed. Symptoms of West Nile virus may include head ache, fever, fatigue, dizziness, weakness and confu sion.Physicians should contact their county health department if they suspect an individual may meet the case definition for a mosquito-borne illness. Florida Department of Health (DOH) laboratories provide testing services for physicians treating patients with clinical signs of mosquito-borne disease. DCHD continues to advise the public to remain diligent in their personal mosquito pro tection efforts. These should include remembering Drain and Cover. multiplying. buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, flower pots or any other containers where sprinkler water or rain water has collected. pans, broken appliances and other items that arent being used. least once or twice a week. that dont accumulate water. appropriately chlorinated. Empty plastic swimming pools when not in use. Cover skin with clothing or repellent. sleeves.This type of clothing may be necessary for people who work in areas where mosquitoes are present. ing. Repellents with DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus and IR3535 are effective. than two months old. Cover doors and windows with screens to keep mosquitoes out of your house. and patios. Tips on repellent use approved use before you apply a repellent. Some repellents are not suitable for children. cent DEET are generally recommended.Other EPAapproved repellents contain picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus or IR3535.These products are generally available at local pharmacies. Look for active ingredients listed on the product label. clothing, but not under clothing. be sure the repellent is age-appropriate.According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, mosquito repellents containing oil of lemon euca lyptus should not be used on children under age three.DEET is not recommended on children younger than two months old. hands.Adults should apply repellent first to their own hands and then transfer it to the childs skin and clothing. methrin repellent directly to clothing.Again, always follow the manufacturers directions. The Florida DOH continues to conduct statewide surveillance for mosquito borne illnesses, includ ing West Nile, Eastern Equine encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, malaria and dengue. Florida residents are encouraged to report dead birds (which might have been killed by these viruses) via the website www.MyFWC.com/bird. For more information on mosquito-borne illnesses, visit the Florida DOHs Environmental Public Health website at http://www.doh.state.fl.us/Environment/ medicine/arboviral/index.html or call the DCHD at 904-253-1850. I keep a can of bug spray in my office to spray myself down before I get on my bike in the late afternoon. I like prevention and you should, too. Use bug spray to prevent mosquito-borne disease 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 section, lower area in the north end zone. Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule.Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family members are eligible to purchase/use these tick ets. Retirees and Veterans/DoD employ ees are eligible to purchase tickets for New York Giants and Atlanta Falcons games. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but under no circum stances are dependent children autho rized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to pur chase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may pur chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No exceptions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or return ing during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshockley@usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tick ets for the entire season.Jacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012 15

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The Career Management SystemInteractive Detailing (CMS-ID) update was released Aug. 10 and incorporates 34 changes from Sailor, command career counselor, and command representative feedback. The updates will enhance a Sailors ability to take an active role in his or her professional development and career management. CMS-ID is absolutely vital to our distribution process, said Rear Adm. Michael White, assistant commander, Navy Personnel Command for Career Management. We must continue to improve the utility of the application for the Sailors in the Fleet considering their next assignment while ensuring it meets the business needs of Navy Personnel Command (NPC). The CMS-ID 5.3 release will provide both, and is a critical step in moving us toward our future billet based distribution (BBD) capability. The BBD initiative is focused on enabling the Navy to better manage force structure and readiness by more accu rately matching Sailors and their unique skill sets to individual billets. This pro cess is also called Fit across the Navy. Additionally, BBD will upgrade aging software programs used in enlisted dis tribution and provide accurate and timely manning information in a web-based environment to Fleet personnel manag ers. The recent CMS-ID release impacts 18 different user groups, more than 336,500 users and 278 Active component (AC) detailers who use CMS-ID to complete the first step in the order writing process. The majority of the changes are a result of a review of internal process es/systems that are used by enlisted distribution managers in NPC, said Scott Barbier, branch head, Enlisted Readiness. The changes create greater standardization of detailing processes, improved efficiency and tracking of assignment actions, and create data link ages between CMS-ID and legacy distri bution systems needed for BBD. Sailors accessing CMS-ID will notice new features to include: selected in CMS-ID. This is because when a Detailer chooses a Sailor for a job in CMS-ID, the Sailor will automatically be posted in the Enlisted Assignment Information System (EAIS). A posted Sailor means the Sailor has been selected for that job. and Application History results in Microsoft Excel. provide Sailors additional points of con tact for researching jobs at future com mand. and RC Sailors that an approved application is already in the system and prevent them from submitting additional appli cations without communicating with their detailer. All Sailor-facing changes have been made to improve the efficiency of the CMS-ID order negotiation process and ensures every application made by the Sailor is used by the detailers to sup port their ultimate assignment, said Barbier. A major focus of the upgrade is an improved, software interface between CMS-ID and the EAIS, expanding data validation and synchronization between the two systems. This data exchange between the two systems will streamline the assignment process by eliminating steps and making it more efficient. While some of the changes are behind the scenes, such as the CMS-ID and EAIS interface, all changes have been made to improve the efficiency of the orders negotiation process and command inter action with the system. Reserve component Sailors need to be aware that CMS-ID will no longer pro vide a mobilization function. To volun teer for mobilization, contact a com mand career counselor (CCC) or visit the Mobilization Volunteer Portal on the Navy Reserve Homeport. Additionally, RC Sailors will see a Projected Rotation Date (PRD) Gate to prevent them from submitting applica tions outside of the three-month PRD window. This ensures that those who need to find jobs within three months have first priority. The gate will not apply to those within the In Assignment Processing status. CMS-ID upgrade to support Sailors Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handi capped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. For more information or to register, call 542-5745.Improve your life skills with free knowledge 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus visited aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) in the Arabian Sea Aug. 6-7, as the carrier continued its 25th and final deploy ment. Enterprise Sailors and Marines, currently deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility, used this opportunity to welcome Mabus to the worlds first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. Following his arrival on the carriers flight deck, Mabus was greeted by Rear Adm. Walter Carter, commander, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group (ENTCSG) and Capt. William Hamilton Jr., Enterprises commanding officer. Mabus was then escorted to the ships navigation bridge and primary flight control before moving to the hangar bay where he addressed more than 3,000 Sailors and Marines gathered for an all-hands call. Im happy to be here with you all, said Mabus as he addressed Big Es crew. Im happy to be here on this historic ship, on its historic last voyage. During his address, Mabus thanked the crewmembers for their service and told them that he understands that what they do is not easy. The Navy and Marines are Americas away team, said Mabus. The people at home never know just how skilled you are. They never see what it takes to do what you do and put on that uniform on a daily basis. On their behalf, I want to say thank you. Mabus continued his expression of gratitude, saying, I know that this ship and all of our ships have had an incred ibly high operational tempo. I understand the stress that it puts on your families. The importance of what you all are doing for America cannot be overstated. He also spoke of how the Navys role in maritime combat operations will change in the future. Were going to build the fleet, said Mabus. We are going to begin to use ships differently. We are growing the fleet to meet the new responsibilities of the new national defense strategy that the president announced in January. During the event Mabus also presided over the reenlistment of 32 Sailors and Marines and presented awards to members of the Enterprise and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 team. The Navy and the Marine Corps are the finest expedi tionary fighting force that the world has ever known, Mabus told the crew. You are making part of the history of not only this Enterprise, but of all of the Enterprises that have sailed on behalf of our Navy and our nation. After concluding his remarks, Mabus answered questions from the crew of the Big E and CVW-1 and posed for photos with those gathered in the hangar bay before heading to dinner with members of the enlisted crew on the carriers mess decks. Following dinner, Mabus toured the legendary ship, vis iting medical department spaces, a weapons magazine, the combat direction center, car rier air traffic control center, a squadron ready room and the machinery repair shop. He was also able to observe flight operations from the flight deck, both in daylight and after sunset. Enterprise is currently deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conduct ing maritime security opera tions, theater security opera tion efforts and support missions as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Navy, Army and Air Force officials discussed renewable energy milestones, force structure changes and the impact on military and surrounding commu nities affected by base realignment and closure at an Aug. 7 Association of Defense Communities conference. Katherine Hammack, assistant secretary of the Army for installations, energy and environment; Roger Natsuhara, acting assistant secretary of the Navy for energy, installations and environ ment; and Terry Yonkers, assistant sec retary of the Air Force for installations, environment and logistics, took part in a roundtable discussion. The service officials outlined strate gies to adapt to future force structure changes and reductions in supporting infrastructure at U.S. and overseas military installations without compromis ing the nations defense capabilities. The U.S. is at a strategic turning point after weve had over a decade of war, Hammack said. We know as the end-strength comes down, force struc ture changes will be required under the Budget Control Act. The Army already has announced its end-strength reductions could total about 80,000 soldiers by fiscal 2017, she said. Base realignments and closures have proven to be effective and objective in reducing domestic infrastructure and reconfiguring what must remain, Hammack said. Four rounds of BRAC took place after the Cold War wound down and force structure was declin ing, she said, in contrast to the 2005 BRAC, which took place during a pro tracted war. The 88, 91, 93 and 95 rounds combined produced 97 major base closures, 55 significant realignments and $22 billion in implementation costs resulting in . $8 billion in annual reoccurring savings, Hammack said. BRAC 2005 enabled the Army to reset its infrastructure to accommodate the return of forces from Europe and Korea while revitalizing the Army Reserve and National Guard, she added. In the last six years, we have closed 97 sites and returned 23,000 acres to host nations, she said. In the next four years, we plan to close another 23 sites and return 21,000 acres, primarily in Germany, Hammack said, citing simi lar progress in Korea during the same timeframe. There, the Army closed 34 sites, with 7,300 acres returned to the community and another 20 sites projected for closure, with 9,400 acres returned to the host nation. What remains in Korea and Germany, we believe, is necessary for the support of this nation, she said. The Army will continue to seek congressional authorization for additional rounds of BRAC, Hammack said, noting property conveyance remains a priority. Putting excess property back into productive reuse facilitates job creation, and thats never more important than it is today, she said. We know that some of these properties have more extensive environmental remediation than oth ers, but we focus on those that can be transferred for beneficial economic use as a first priority. Hammack also underscored the Armys commitment to one of its larg est endeavors yet: the deployment of three gigawatts of renewable energy on Army, Navy and Air Force installa tions by 2025. The Army has partnered with local communities and the ser vices to ensure renewable, reliable energy through analysis of fuel, water and energy needs while reducing the load of power systems in a digital society, she said. Collectively, these advancements are changing both the technology we employ and the manner in which we plan and execute our operations, Hammock said. Yonkers said the Air Force has taken on similar measures and efficiencies to sustain and modernize its core systems, develop a scalable and responsive force, and preserve readiness while taking care of airmen and their families. He warned of paying for unneces sary infrastructure that eats up dol lars better directed to modernization, sustaining weapons systems and sup porting the quality-of-life improve ments for airmen. He also lamented the possibility another half-trillion dollars pared from the defense budget over the next 10 years that will be trig gered in January by a sequestration mechanism in the Budget Control Act if Congress fails to come up with an alternative. Sequestration, he said, would have serious impact on the Air Forces ability to conduct its assigned missions. But despite the new fiscal reality, Yonkers said, communities continue to demonstrate strong support and promising, innovative ideas in support of bases. We have 180 renewable energy proj ects in operation or under construction at 77 of our Air Force bases, Yonkers said, also noting 20 solar, wind, waste, geothermal, and biomass projects that will move the service closer to its goal of deploying one gigawatt of energy by 2016. In California alone, the Air Force already has solar energy projects at Edwards Air Force Base and Travis Air Force Base, he said. Combined, they will create 420 megawatts of power, he added. Similarly, the Navy will continue to pursue its energy goals through ongo ing community and industry partner ship, Natsuhara said. The big goals for us will be the 50 percent alternative energy for our bases, he said. We look forward to working with the communities as we look at renewable energy, microgrids and other [avenues] to meet all of our very aggressive goals. And while the BRAC process has reduced the Navys installations to from 150 to 70 in the United States, the Navy now is in more of a growth mode overseas, as the new defense policy pivots attention to the Asia-Pacific region, Natsuhara said. We have quite an extensive program that were going to have to implement very soon in Guam, Australia and Hawaii, he said. Were also moving a few ships to Singapore. A lot of these bases, said he added, are going be of a different and unprecedented model. There are going to be less of the traditional bases where we have our families and modern support facilities, he said. Theres a lot of pressure on our facility side as we go overseas. With fleet concentrations primarily in the northwest and southwest regions of the United States, Natsuhara said, the Navy can benefit from being able to analyze how to make its bases more efficient as it further aligns its forces. Community collaboration has pro duced successes along the way, he said, including Virginias NAS Oceana, which was considered for closure in 2005, but through legislation and joint councils, has become more compatible with the community. To date, the Oceana area and the state have contributed about $63 mil lion in some of the land-use purchases to build more compatible lands, he said. At NAS Kingsville, Texas, the Navy worked with wind developers on pri vate lands to make turbine operations compatible with air training operations, Natsuhara said. Wind turbines are an important part of the renewable energy push for this country, he added, and were a strong supporter of that. SECNAV visits USS Enterprise in the Arabian Sea Service leaders weigh in on BRAC, renewable energy Check Us Out Online: www.jaxairnews.com JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 16, 2012 17