<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



Jax air news
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02005
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 08-09-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02005

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Today marks the long awaited return of HSL42 Detachment 3 Norsemen from their singleaircraft, seven-month Mediterranean deployment embarked on the guided missile cruiser USS Vella Gulf (CG 72). Initially led by Lt. Cmdr. James Thompson, Det. 3 and Vella Gulf were underway in late November and quickly integrated with the ships team. Close planning and support led to two successful multinational exercises, as well as Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) coverage over Europe and Israel. The Norsemen flew the venerable SH-60B Seahawk (Proud Warrior 22) for 540 flight hours in support of these missions. The ever-changing mix of flights ranged from the typical Recognized Maritime Picture (RMP), Vertical Replenishment (VERTREP) and Passenger Transfer (PAXFER) to the mission critical Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC), Undersea Warfare (USW), and Low Slow Flyer (LSF) Intercept. Through it all, Det.3 provided around-the-clock readiness for surface action group tasking with minimal delays in being fully mission capable. Vella Gulf and Det. 3 prepared for their indepen dent deployment in November by taking part in the fast-paced environment of Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). Following a short break for the holidays, Vella Gulf set sail to its first ports of call: Rota, Spain and Souda Bay, Crete. Next up were the Turkish Straits and the Black Sea to continue U.S. 6th Fleet efforts to enhance regional stability and maritime partnerships. In Constanta, Romania, the Black Sea Knights of the Romanian Navy welcomed the Norsemen. After careful planning, they conducted deck land ing qualifications in their PUMA helicopter, as well as special operations fast-roping exercises to the deck of Vella Gulf. The Norsemen also conducted bilateral in-port training with the Ukrainian Navy in Sevastopol, Ukraine. The planned visit to Odessa, Ukraine was ultimately called off due to record cold (-20 F) weather descending on Eastern Europe. Vella Gulf departed for warmer waters and sailed to Sicily for Proud Manta, the largest antisubmarine warfare (ASW) exercise in the world. Vella Gulf and Det. 3 trained with the Dutch, French, German, Greek, Italians and other U.S. forces to cover an array of tactical scenarios. The aircrew demonstrated Proud Warrior 422s multirole proficiency throughout 20 sorties, coordi nating with both U.S. and foreign ship and air assets. In addition to the exercise, Det. 3 con ducted an expedient MEDEVAC of a shipmate to NAS Sigonella, Italy where the sailor to received comprehensive medical attention. Following an extended port visit in Naples, Italy, Vella Gulf joined Hellenic and Israeli naval forces in Souda Bay to cement plans for exercise Noble Dina. Here, the Norsemen helped develop an air plan for their SH-60B, a Hellenic SH-70 helicopter and a U.S. P-3C flying from Souda Bay. Close coordination among the aircraft and ships allowed for early detection and precise target Every two years, Commander U.S. Pacific Fleet hosts the Rim of the Pacific Exercise (RIMPAC) in and around the Hawaiian Islands. Twenty-two nations, 40 surface ships, six submarines, and more than 200 aircraft makes RIMPAC ( June 29 to Aug. 3) the worlds largest international maritime warfare exercise. This unique training opportunity helps par ticipants foster the cooperative relationship that is critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the worlds oceans. Lt. Seth Eisenmenger, VP-45 tactical coordina tor and weapons and tactics instructor said, Its a great opportunity to train with many of the same Pacific nations that we could be deployed with in the future. VP-45 played an integral role in RIMPAC 2012, providing a P-3C detachment consisting of one aircraft and 13 Pelicans to join in several exer cises, including anti-submarine warfare mis sions involving multiple submarines. During the exercise, the detachment refined critical coordinated operational skills. RIMPAC 2012 was a fantastic opportunity for VP-45 to work side by side with allies and partners such as New Zealand, Australia, South Korea and Japan. Our combat aircrew was able to benefit from the collective experience of other P-3C forces, in addition to strengthening the bonds of fellowship with our allies, said Lt. j. g. Blake Herzinger of VP-45. And of course, a trip to Hawaii would not be complete without some well-earned liberty. I think we all benefited professionally from our RIMPAC experience and Im sure our tans did as well. We are eager to share our RIMPAC experiences with the rest of the VP-45 team, said Herzinger. VP-45 is scheduled to deploy to Kadena Air Base, Japan in December. A team of five environmental profession als recently surveyed the Pinecastle Range Complex to observe endangered or threat ened species of wildlife and plants and to assess the effects of military training and land management initiatives at the range. The current round of monitoring began in June 2011 and was extended into this year due to increased funding. Participating in the two-day effort were: VP-45 Pelicans participate in RIMPAC 2012Proud Warriors Detachment 3 comes home Protected species surveyed at Pinecastle Range Complex

PAGE 2

JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Aug. 9 1815 Capt. Stephen Decatur concludes treaty for U.S. with Tripoli. 1842 Signing of Webster-Ashburton Treaty under which U.S. and Great Britain agreed to cooperate in suppressing the slave trade. 1865 Return of Naval Academy to Annapolis after four years at Newport, R.I. 1919 Construction of rigid airship ZR-1 (Shenandoah) authorized. 1941 Atlantic Charter Conference is first meeting between President Roosevelt and Winston Churchill. 1942 Battle of Savo Island begins, the first of many sea battles near Guadalcanal. 1945 Atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki, Japan. Navy weaponeer arms the atomic bomb. 1949 First use of pilot ejection seat for emergency escape in U.S. made by Lt. Jack Fruin of VF-171 near Walterboro, S.C. Aug. 10 1916 First Naval aircraft production contract for N-9s. 1921 General Order establishes the Bureau of Aeronautics under Rear Adm. William Moffett. 1944 Guam secured by U.S. forces. 1964 Signing of Gulf of Tonkin Resolution which is used as the starting point of the Vietnam Conflict.Aug. 111812 USS Constitution captures and destroys British brig Lady Warren. 1921 Carrier arresting gear first tested at Hampton Roads, Va. 1960 USNS Longview, using Navy helicopters and frogmen, recovers a Discover satellite capsule after 17 orbits. This is first recovery of U.S. satellite from orbit. Aug. 12 1812 USS Constitution captures and destroys British brig Adeona. 1918 SecNav approves acceptance of women as yeo man (F) in U.S. Navy. 1942 USS Cleveland (CL-55) demonstrates effective ness of radio-proximity fuze (VT-fuze) against aircraft by successfully destroying three drones with proximity bursts fired by her five inch guns. 1944 Lt. Joseph Kennedy Jr., USNR, the older broth er of John F. Kennedy, was killed with his co-pilot in a mid-air explosion after taking off from England in a PB4Y from Special Attack Unit One (SAU-1). Following manual takeoff, they were supposed to parachute out over the English Channel while the radio-controlled explosive-filled drone proceeded to attack a German V-2 missile-launching site. 1957 In first test of Automatic Carrier Landing System, Lt. Cmdr. Don Walker landed on USS Antietam. 1958 USS Nautilus (SSN-571) arrives Portland, England completing first submerged under-ice cruise from Pacific to Atlantic Oceans. Aug. 13 1777 American explosive device made by David Bushnell explodes near British vessel off New London, Conn. 1846 Joint expedition led by Cmdr. Robert Stockton seizes Los Angeles, Calif. 1870 Armed tug USS Palos becomes first U.S. Navy ship to transit Suez Canal Aug. 14 1813 HMS Pelican captures USS Argus. 1886 SecNav establishes Naval Gun Factory at Washington Navy Yard. 1945 Japan agrees to surrender; last Japanese ships sunk during World War II. Aug. 15 1845 U.S. Naval Academy established at Annapolis, Md. on former site of Fort Severn. 1895 Commissioning of USS Texas, the first American steel-hulled battleship. Texas served off Cuba during the Spanish-American War and took part in the naval battle of Santiago. Under the name of San Marcos, she was sunk in weapon effects tests in Chesapeake Bay in 1911. Her hulk continued in use as a gunnery target through World War II. 1908 First Navy post offices established in Navy ships. 1944 Operation Dragoon, the allied invasion of Southern France. 1953 Adm. William Radford is first naval officer appointed Chairman, Joints Chiefs of Staff. He served until August 15, 1957. 1958 USS Lexington (CVA-16) arrives in vicinity of Taiwan. When something needs to be assembled, my dad always has a plan: read the directions all of them first. I also have a plan: look at a picture of the finished product on the outside of the box and try to work backwards. Our different philosophies make it difficult to work togeth er. Dad: Did you save the direc tions? Me: Nah, Ill just look them up online or look at the pic tures. Dad: It really helps to read the directions. Me: Over-rated. Recently its become clear that Ive rubbed off on my old est son, Ford, who is analyti cal (like his dad) but also impa tient (like me). Directions are a barrier to getting things done wrong the first time. Interestingly, Ford likes to make his own instructions. When hes playing a made-up game with kids in the neigh borhood, it takes him about 20 minutes to explain the rules but after two minutes, everyone gets bored and leaves. In other words, Ford can make the rules, but he cant always follow them. Then I bought the boys a tent for camping. When it was time to do a practice set-up in the backyard, Ford and I were won dering . who would read the directions? I heard my dads words in my head, It really helps to read the directions. Or maybe he was actually saying it, because he was a few feet away, working on his own project (with directions). I wanted to set a good exam ple for Ford, so I got out the directions. Ford unpacked the box and starting unwrapping poles while I read. Whats this? he asked. Where does this thing go? Hold on, we have to read the directions first. I knew what Ford was think ing: why read the directions when we can study the pho tograph on the box the one with the happy family roasting marshmallows outside their easily constructed tent? How are the directions, mom? Ford asked. I dont understand these words. Are you reading the English version? Supposedly. The instruction book let included pictures, which helped since to the words didnt make any sense. The black ink drawing of a nondescript hand unfolding and connecting the tent poles made it look decep tively easy. Now I remember why I often dont bother with directions. Even as I followed each step and pored over the black-andwhite drawings, I still didnt have a clue what I was doing. We put the poles in the wrong sleeve. We clipped the fabric to the poles too early. We ham mered the side stakes before the corner ones. We couldnt zip the front door closed. Alas, less than an hour later, we had a finished tent. Ford and I stood back and admired it. Why did you build it on that hill? dad asked as he walked past. I looked at Ford. The direc tions had not said anything about not building the tent on an incline. We pulled out the stakes and carried the tent above our heads to a new, flat ter section of the grass. Later that night, as I lay on the slippery nylon fabric listen ing to my boys make inappro priate noises with their arm pits, I thought about the happy family roasting marshmallows on the front of the box. Same tent, same directions, two very different outcomes. The happy familys mother looked rested and organized. I stared at the ceiling and realized Id just put myself in an enclosed net with my three sons and thought, camping kind of stinks. It wasnt in the instructions, but I realized that maybe we had just created a memory, that was really quite perfect.It (sometimes) helps to follow the directions 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012

PAGE 3

As a Navy leader and someone who lives in Navy housing I am committed to ensuring service members and their families have suitable, affordable and safe hous ing. Recent events pertaining to mold in Navy barracks, and government owned and family privatized hous ing have indicated a need to more clearly communicate assistance available on all issues, but particu larly when pertaining to health or safety issues. This is a personal issue for me. I am determined to ensure we are providing the very best housing throughout the fleet but I also need your help. If you help me by reporting your housing issues, we can help ensure you maintain a house or barracks room that you can feel proud to say is your home. Should a health or safety issue arise during a Sailors stay in Navy barracks, government owned, or privatized family housing, well work with the Sailor as an advocate for their needs until we find a solu tion. If the issue cannot be resolved, we will work with the Sailor to find alternate accommodations. Whether in a barracks room or home, if you live in Navy housing and suspect a health or safety con dition exists, please report it to the local Private-Public Venture office, the local Navy Housing Office or your barracks manager. Use your chain of command; talk to your leading petty officer, leading chief petty officer, division officer, ombudsman and even your commanding officer until you feel youre getting the right amount of attention on your issue. If you feel you are having health issues that may be related to con ditions in your home or barracks room, see your medical provider immediately and then report the issue to your command medical officer or representative and your chain of command. Taking personal responsibility to prevent issues like mold before it gets out of hand is essential. In many environments mold can grow no matter how well we main tain the home or condition the air quality. Be vigilant and ensure areas of your home or barracks room that tend to have more moisture, like kitchens and bathrooms, are kept clean on a regular basis. Often times, all it takes is a once week ly wipe down with mold/mildew cleaner. As a ready and resilient force, 21st Century Sailors and their families must feel confident they can report personal and housing concerns in order to stay safe and healthy in the places they live so we can all focus on our mission, our duties and those we care about.To report mold in NAS Jax bar racks, call 542-2296. To report mold in NAS Jax housing, call 908-0821.Navy Housing help us help youReport mold immediately Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. Beginner Rider Course Experienced Rider Course Military Sportbike Rider Course Call for class dates NAS Jax Safety Office 542-3082 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012 3

PAGE 4

4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012 In the spirit of the 2012 Summer Olympics, Naval Hospital Jacksonville staff went for the gold in the Command Master Chief (CMC) Challenge, with a series of competitions held July 23 to 27 to build team unity and physical fitness. CMDCM(AW/SW) Bennora Simmons kicked off the weeks festivities and remarked, CMC Challenge promotes staff readiness in a positive way. This is a great opportunity for Sailors, officers and civilians to compete together in a fun atmosphere that builds team spirit. The commands directorates fielded teams to com pete in multiple matches as they pursued the CMC Challenge Cup. Teams designed flags and t-shirts, and earned points by placing in competitions with extra points for bringing the team flag and participation by senior leaders. This years events included an obstacle course, 5K run, basketball, volleyball, softball, swim meet, pull ups, tug-of-war, relay run, blind canoe race, spades, ultimate Frisbee and Are you smarter than a recruit? For the third year, Clinical Support Services took first place. Simmons awarded the CMC Challenge Cup at NH Jacksonvilles command picnic on July 27 the culmination of the weeklong Challenge. Second place went to the Branch Health Clinics and Public Health team, and third place to the Command Suite and Administration team. Hoorah, Naval Hospital Jacksonville congratulations to all.

PAGE 5

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012 5

PAGE 6

Missed the cut? Use Career Development Boards to improve advancementWith the release of Active Duty Chief Petty Officer Selection Board results July 31, approximately 4,400 Sailors have embarked upon a rigorous induction season. While it is a high point for those Sailors selected for CPO, the active and Reserve boards typically review records of more than 19,000 first class petty officers, which means a lot of Sailors were not be selected and that is very disappoint ing to Sailors, said Navy Personnel Command Force Master Chief (AW/SW/NAC) Jon Port. The chain of command must communicate with those Sailors who did not get selected. According to Port, command leadership should assist Sailors not selected by conducting a career development board (CDB). A CDB provides Sailors the opportunity to dis cuss their career progression, the health of their rating, and their short and long-term goals for the future. CDBs provide enlisted Sailors the opportunity for opti mal development of their professional skills, both military and technical, thereby enhancing unit readiness, job sat isfaction and ultimately the retention and advancement of our Sailors, said Port. Together, Sailors and their chain of command can review the Sailors record and identify ways to improve competi tiveness in the future. Leaders should look at what the Sailor can do to gain more authority and responsibility in their current position to become more competitive, discuss the health of their rat ing and of course make sure the Sailors accomplishments are properly documented in their record, Port said. He added that it is equally important to consider those qualifications or milestones a Sailor should possess but potentially did not attain. If we are straightforward yet supportive with our Sailors, they stand a much greater chance of following the advice given by their chain of command and ultimately attaining that next pay grade, he said. I was extremely disappointed when I didnt get selected last year, because I felt like I was doing all I could, said YN1 Shontay Bond, a Full Time Support Reservist assigned to Buckley Air Force Base, Colo. After, I had a CDB and listened to the advice my chiefs had to give. Bond, who is waiting for the results of the Reserve Chief Petty Officer Selection Board, has since gone on to finish her college degree. She sought additional ways to demonstrate leadership abilities by organizing community service projects for her command. She rotated her collateral duties and took orders to a joint service command to increase her career versatility. Bond, who recently volunteered for an individual aug mentee assignment, said she took the information from her CDB to heart. It gave me the extra pat on the back I needed to move ahead and to not give up, said Bond. CDB training and individual career development plan worksheets are avail able from the Navy Personnel Command Web site. 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012

PAGE 7

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012 7

PAGE 8

ing of the participating Israeli Dolphin class submarine. Det. 3 demonstrated its strong ASW capability, through coordinated operations with allied aircraft and surface forces. Vella Gulf next set sail to exe cute its BMD mission. The ship utilized the capabilities of Det. 3 as it maintained position to provide ballistic missile protection over Israel. Proud Warrior 422 patrolled the Eastern Mediterranean waters and provided over-thehorizon RMP, flying 40 percent of their hours at night. Utilizing forward looking infrared, electronic support measures and night vision gog gles, the aircrew consistently provided real-time intelligence to the ship in a heavily traveled sea. During underway Replenishments (UNREP) the aircrew demonstrated advanced profi ciency conducting VERTREPs and passenger transfers, dras tically decreasing the time required for the UNREP evolu tions. In May, the Norsemen said farewell to Lt. Cmdr. Thompson, Lt. Sullivan, AO1 Pichardo, and AM3 Tobin. Likewise, Det. 3 welcomed Lt. Cmdr. Peter Eudy as the new officer in charge. Without miss ing a beat, the Norsemen con tinued supporting the ships BMD mission. In June, Det. 3 conduct ed a life-saving MEDEVAC to Rambam Medical Center in Haifa, Israel. Close coordina tion between the aircrew, ship operations team and the U.S. Defense Affairs Office in Tel Aviv paved the way for a smooth flight into Israeli air space. July started with a port visit to Souda Bay followed by sur veillance missions in the Eastern Mediterranean. Vella Gulf then steamed west to meet the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) Carrier Strike Group. The Proud Warriors conducted parts runs and passenger trans fers while Vella Gulf exercised with F/A-18 Hornets from the strike group. In late July, Vella Gulf returned to Souda Bay for turn over and then proceeded west to Rota, Spain and ultimately back to NS Mayport. Det. 3 returns having achieved advancements and milestones across the board. Four sailors advanced to petty officer third-class: AZ3 Latrasha Allende, AD3 Alexis Tobar, AM3 Brandon Tobin, AE3 Gage Wilson. Two sailors advanced to petty officer second-class: AT2 Reuben Casas and AD2 Stephen Linde. Seven sailors qualified as Enlisted Air Warfare Specialists (EAWS) underway: AZ3 Latrasha Allende, AM2 Shane Henry, AMAN Katy Lallament, AD2 Stephen Linde, AWR3 Alex Mahs, AD3 Alexis Tobar and AE3 Gage Wilson. Lt. Ben Peterman passed 1,000 SH-60B Seahawk flight hours and AWR2 Michael Willems reached the acclaimed 2,000hour mark flying in the SH-60B. HSL-42 Six representatives of the VPU-1 Chiefs Mess visited the national headquarters of the Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) on Belfort Road in Jacksonville. Their July 18 mission was to continue providing assistance to wounded comrades return ing from the War on Terror by donating $1,100 that was raised at the CPOs sale of memora bilia, prior to the disestablish ment of the Old Buzzards squadron in August. We really liked the thought of giving back to those who sacrificed so much for our country, stated VPU-1 Command Senior Enlisted Leader AWVCS(NAC/AW) Mark Dietrich. The organizations prin ciples and values were really aligned with those that the Old Buzzards have fought to instill in our own Sailors. It was a nobrainer. For more than 40 years, the Old Buzzards have dedicat ed their efforts to protecting Americas Soldiers, Sailors, and Airmen on the field of battle. With the squadrons disestab lishment fast approaching, the VPU-1 CPO Mess held a silent auction to offer its members, past and present, the oppor tunity to obtain memorabilia from its CPO Mess. The sale of the commands historic items netted $1,100, and by a unanimous vote, the WWP was selected as the char itable organization to which the proceeds would be donat ed. After the donation presenta tion, Wounded Warrior Project Special Projects Director Dan McCarthy led Dietrich, ATCS(AW) Andrew Robertson, ATCS(AW) Eric Kinnaman, AWVC(NAC/AW) Daniel Correa, AMCV(AW) Scott Harris, and retired AFCM(AW/ NAC) Steven Berry on a tour of the WWP headquarters facility. He detailed the organiza tions mission and the vari ous programs they provide for Americas wounded veterans. The wide reach and scope of WWP astounded the squadron members and clearly reassured their commitment to the proj ect. WWP strives to honor and empower Wounded Warriors through programs aimed at the mind, body, economic empow erment and engagement, explained McCarthy. We never leave a warrior behind. The VPU-1 Old Buzzards Chiefs Mess encourages other CPOAs and CPO Messes to continue the Old Buzzards mission through donations to organizations such as this. To donate or get involved with the Wounded Warrior Project, email got@wounded warriorproject.org or visit their website at www.wounded warriorproject.org All WWP programs are free. To participate you must have incurred service-connected wounds, injuries, or illness es on or after September 11, 2001. Verification of service is required. VPU-1 Chiefs Mess pays respects to Wounded Warriors 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012

PAGE 9

PINECASTLELaura LaBella and Brian Hinton of Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Core; Christine Bauer, Tina Jackson and Bobby Simmons of NAS Jacksonville Environmental Department; and Chris Townsend and Lee Shults of Pinecastle Range Operations who provided escort, transportation and unexploded ordnance (UXO) support. The Navy has operated the Pinecastle Range Complex since the early 1950s to train aircrews and support personnel in ordnance delivery. The range is located in Marion County, Fla., within the boundaries of the Ocala National Forest. The United States Forest Service (USFS) manages the land and is the issu ing authority for use of the land. The range is under administrative and scheduling control of Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility at NAS Jacksonville. Since 1951, the Navy has been authorized to operate the range under an interagency agreement between the USFS and the Department of the Navy. The agree ment was extended through July 2001, at which time a draft Environmental Impact Study (EIS) was issued for authorization of military use of the range for 20 years through issuance of a Special Use Permit (SUP). On Oct. 29, 2001, a biological opinion (BO) was issued by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that required, as a mitigation measure for issuance of the SUP, the agreement to monitor c ertain plants and ani mals that were listed as threatened or endangered because they were considered to be at risk for extinction. Activities such as habitat destruction, poaching and the pet trade, along with climate change and disease, increase the probability of species loss. Under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the government pro tects endangered and threatened plants and animals (listed species) and the habitats upon which they depend. The ESA requires federal agencies to ensure that any action they authorize, fund or carry out, will not likely jeopardize the continued existence of these species, or adversely affect any critical habitat. The range BO requires monitoring surveys to be conducted every four years for the following species: Florida scrub jay (threatened); Wood stork (endan gered); Eastern indigo snake (threatened); Sand skink (threatened); Florida bonamia (threatened); Scrub buckwheat (treatened); and Scrub milkwort (endan gered). Monitoring surveys were conducted by USFS in 2001 and 2004, with the support of Pinecastle Range Operations personnel. In 2007, NAS Jacksonville and NAVFAC Southeast assisted the USFS with the surveys through funding from U.S. Fleet Forces Command. During the 2007 survey, 109 Florida scrub jays were observed. To call scrub jays out into the open, an iPod with speakers was used. A number of males, females and juveniles, as well as family groups were record ed. Although many jays responded, they were not as plentiful as in previous surveys. The extreme heat and impending thunder storms could account for the birds desire to stay deep in the trees. Survey personnel observed Florida bonamia plants and sand skink tracks at several data points along the survey route. Active gopher tortoise burrows were examined for the presence of eastern indigo snakes that frequently share the burrows. None were found. While it is known that eastern indigo snakes inhabit the range, they are very elusive and seldom seen. The survey route follows data points along fire breaks in and around the target impact area. These firebreaks consist of deep sand that even the NAS Jax 4x4 forestry truck could not power through. Several of the more adventurous surveyors piled into a surplus military Humvee with Bobby Simmons at the wheel. This vehicle proved to be a good choice for overcoming deep sand and obstacles such as fall en trees. The good news was that sand skink tracks and Florida bonamia plants were observed in several areas, and all indications are that the habitat is sup porting a healthy population of jays. The frequent fires ignited by range activity maintain the early scrub oak habitat that is preferred by the scrub jay, and also benefits other species including the gopher tortoise. The gopher tortoise is an ESA candidate species for listing as threatened due to loss of habitat. The Department of Defense is a partner in the Gopher Tortoise Candidate Conservation Agreement with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) and other state, federal and non-government agencies. Surveyors were able to find suitable sites that would accommodate gopher tortoises that must be relocated from the ranges live impact area. The products from this survey will be a monitoring report on the listed species and a gopher tortoise habi tat suitability study that will be coordinated with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the USFS. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012 9

PAGE 10

The Navy Systematic Biological Collection, housed at the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) at NAS Jacksonville, is a one-of-a kind reference tool within the Department of Defense (DoD). The 350,000-specimen col lection focuses mainly on mosquitoes, flies and gnats. Other insects along with plant, marine, arachnid, snake and fossil specimens are also repre sented. The collection started in 1949 as a repository for medically significant pest collected by the Malaria Control teams in the Pacific. According to Dr. Andrew Beck, NECE training depart ment head and curator of the collection, the biological col lection represents specimens from every continent, except Antarctica. This extensive, carefully cat alogued collection exemplifies NECEs wide range of unique capabilities and commitment to the success of our custom ers, said NECE Officer-inCharge Cmdr. Eric Hoffman. The collection is housed in three parts: the systematic col lection, training collection and public affairs collection. The systematic collection carries on the original goal of the collection, as a repository for specimens. This enhances our ability to accurately iden tify a diversity of specimens collected world wide, under stand their biology and apply this knowledge to effectively develop and implement control strategies against those that transmit human disease, said Hoffman. The training collection is used to teach service mem bers which pests are present in areas they are deploying to and how to distinguish them from similar insects. This allows preventive medicine techni cians and entomologists to have a better understanding of the pests they will face when deployed. The training collection is also used to teach courses at NECE and other commands, such as insect identification to civil ian employees and contractors during the Category 8 Pesticide Applicator Certification and Re-certification courses. This ensures that all pest manage ment professionals working on DoD facilities are able to pro vide effective pest control and safely apply pesticides in accor dance with DoD and EPA regu lations. According to Beck, identi fication is the cornerstone of pest management operations. Proper pest identification is needed to correctly prescribe control measures. The training collection is also used to provide specimens to the Joint Service Training School in San Antonio, Texas as well as the Independent Duty Corpsman School, said Beck. The public affairs collec tion consists of large, showy insects that are used for out reach activities. NECE has a strong connec tion to its local community. We present the public affairs collection when we visit local schools for presentations on entomology, said Beck. There are several different displays set up depending on the age group to which we are present ing. For more information about utilizing the biological collec tion or scheduling an outreach event, contact NECE at 5422424. For more information about medical entomology visit the NECE website at: http://www. nmcphc.med.navy.mil/Field_ Activities/nece_overview.aspx. The VR-62 Nomads participated in an event July 20 to thank local employers of Reserve and Guard personnel. The ESGR (Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve) Boss Lift event provided guests the opportunity to visit NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1000 and tour a Navy C-130T Hercules and a Navy C-40A Clipper aircraft. ESGR events are endorsed by the Department of Defense to promote cooperation and under standing between Reserve component members and their civilian employers. Americas Reserve components comprise approximately 48 percent of total available mili tary manpower and play a critical role in our countrys National Defense Strategy. Because of the current high operational tempo, Reserve forces are spending more time away from the workplace to defend the nation. As a result, civilian employers play a critical role by complying with existing employment laws protecting the rights of workers who serve in the Reserves or National Guard. VR-62 is a Navy Fleet Logistics Support Squadron stationed at NAS Jacksonville. The squadron is assigned four C-130T aircraft that fly missions around the globe in support of the United States Navy and Marine Corps. The Nomads are comprised of 125 active duty and 57 reserve members. VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Alex Ellermann commented, The ESGR events pro vide us the opportunity to show our apprecia tion to the employers of our Reserve personnel. Their sacrifice is vital to our mission and we truly appreciate their support. Navy Systematic Biological Collection: 350,000 specimens and growing Nomads thank local employers with ESGR Boss Lift event 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012

PAGE 11

VP-30 instructors join beautification teamA team of instructors from VP-30 joined a commu nity beautification event July 27 at Castaway Island Preserve, a nature park on Intracoastal Waterway off San Pablo Road between Beach and Atlantic Boulevards. The project involved spreading bales of pine straw in the landscaped gardens, installing some new plants around the education building, trimming back over grown vegetation, pulling weeds and removing trash. Natural Resource Recreation Specialist Brian Burket, with City of Jacksonville Parks and Recreation, said, Our Navy volunteers lead by example and are great to people to work with. Their effort has made Castaway Island Preserve a favorite destination along the Intracoastal Waterway. One of Jacksonvilles premier preservation proper ties, Castaway Island Preserve attracts visitors with its marshy banks and lush trails. The park is adjacent to an intricate salt marsh eco system that is ideal for watching marshland wildlife. Visitors may stroll along the wooden boardwalk, take in the view from an observation platform over looking the waterway or learn about the flora and fauna of Northeast Florida along the parks interactive nature trail. The park also has a floating canoe/kayak launch and theater-style education center. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012 11

PAGE 12

U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a mem ber of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of spe cial recognition in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. The registration deadline is Oct. 5. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in ter ritorial waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve recognition and thanks for putting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans during my annual Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the highlights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are strongly encouraged to contact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 598-0481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www. crenshaw.house.gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and documentation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the cer tificate, veterans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214.Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program. When first lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden started the Joining Forces campaign 15 months ago, they did so with the goal of creating impactful and lasting health, education and employment support for military families. The campaign had two sig nificant achievements this week that its director, Navy Capt. Brad Cooper said July 27, hit both of those marks. First, North Carolina became the 26th state to pass a law making it easier for military spouses to transfer their pro fessional licenses. South Carolina and Hawaii passed similar laws in recent weeks, potentially affecting tens of thousands of military spouses, Cooper said. With similar legislation pend ing in California, Ohio and New Jersey, the campaign is exceeding our expectations in getting laws passed in all 50 states by the end of 2014, he said. As I take a step back and look at this and my dad was an Army officer this signals a pretty remarkable cultural shift, Cooper said. I remember my mother as well as my wife, and spouses of my friends were reluctant even to indicate they were mili tary spouses to prospective employers, he said. Second, the National Association of Social Workers, at its annual convention in Washington D.C. this week, announced it is launching a free, online training course for all social workers to better understand the unique needs of military families. It also is providing a set of standards for working with veterans and military families, and is creat ing a professional Credential for Social Work with Veterans and Military Families. Social workers are con sidered the nations frontline mental health services provid ers, and they practice in every county in the country. Its pledge to Joining Forces follows that of the four larg est nursing associations, representing 3 million nurs es, and the Association of American Medical Colleges and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, with 105 and 25 schools, respectively, in train ing doctors to serve military families and veterans. The Association of Marriage and Therapy Therapists also has signed on, as well as asso ciations representing psychia trists, psychologists and sur geons. This really represents, to me, not just the impact ful piece, but the sustaining piece, Cooper said. Spouses and veterans employment also has made major strides, Cooper said. More than 2,000 companies have signed on already hir ing 25,000 spouses and 65,000 veterans, and pledging to hire another 175,000 in the next two years, helping bring down the veterans unemployment rate, he said. This really is the largest outreach and advocacy efforts weve had on behalf of veterans and their families for years, Cooper said. Joining Forces has been successful, he said, because weve been able to bring peo ple together and focus them on the effort. All they needed was leadership and direction, he added. People, generally, want to be helpful, Cooper said. They dont always know what they can do. Our objective is to steer them to meaningful action. Joining Forces initiative exceeds expectations Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony coming to NAS Jax on Nov. 8 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012

PAGE 13

Federal program helps Sailors serve again Sailors transitioning from the Navy who would like to pursue a career in teaching may be eligible for assis tance and monetary compensation from a federal pro gram called Troops to Teachers (TTT), officials said Aug. 2. Our classrooms are looking for leadership and service members bring that to the classroom, said Cliff Yager, TTT regional director for Tennessee and Northern Alabama. Service members understand lead ership, management, organizational skills and those are skills we need in the classroom today. Last year, TTT helped nearly 2,000 former service members begin new careers as teachers, but, Yager admits that just like the military teaching is not for everyone. The thing they need to ask themselves is whether they are passionate about teaching, being involved with parents, and making a difference in young childrens lives, Yager said. TTT provides counseling and referral services to eli gible service members and veterans interested in begin ning a second career in public education as a teacher. State TTT will help applicants identify teacher certifi cation requirements, programs leading to certification and employment opportunities in their state. According to Yager, TTT offers funded and unfunded assistance based on an individuals military service. Funded assistance provides financial support for both the certification process and for employment in a high need school. Unfunded assistance offers counseling and assistance regarding certification. Math, chemistry, physics, special education and foreign languages have the greatest demand for teachers according to Yager. There is a tremendous amount of opportunity avail able in those areas, especially for male teachers in ele mentary and middle school arenas. Yager suggests Sailors try volunteering with a local school or even work as a substitute teacher when their schedule permits in order to determine if teaching is right for them. Sailors may get more information and guidance by speaking with the TTT representative in the state where they would like to teach. TTT is managed by the Defense Activity for Non-traditional Education Support (DANTES). It was established in 1994 with the primary objective of helping qualified service members successfully transition into careers in teaching. Sailors can learn more about Troops to Teachers at their website: www.proudtoserveagain.com. Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced Aug. 2 $2.3 million in grants to train primary care physician assistants by help ing veterans transition from mili tary to civilian physician assistant careers when they return home. Funded under the Physician Assistant Training in Primary Care Program, the five-year grants aim to increase the number of physician assistant graduates who become primary care clini cians and teachers, officials said. Funding priority was given to grantees that have strong recruit ment, retention and education programs for veteran applicants and students including academ ic recognition of medical train ing and experience gained during military service. Administered by the Health Resources and Services Administration at HHS, the grants are part of the administrations ini tiative to increase the supply of primary care practitioners in the United States. If you can save a life on the bat tlefield in Afghanistan, you can save a life here at home, Sebelius said. These grants will help ensure veterans who served our coun try can use their military medical training and get good jobs serving patients. The grants, awarded to 12 insti tutions, support educational pro grams that train physician assis tants to practice in primary care settings, and help individuals who will teach primary care in physi cian assistant training programs, preparing trainees to enter prac tice in primary care settings. HHS to help veterans get jobs as physician assistants JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012 13

PAGE 14

In the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) 800 Division at NAS Jacksonville, Sailors ensure aircrew survival equipment is ready to perform properly when emergency conditions arise. About 40 Sailors inspect, maintain and repair a wide variety of survival equipment including parachutes, life rafts and personal flight gear to ensure the items are in proper working condi tion. If weve done our job right, youre going to make it home, said PR1 Matthew Olsen, the Aviation Life Support Systems (ALSS) production control leading petty officer. The 800 Division includes the Parachute Shop, also called the paraloft, the Flotation Shop, the Oxygen Shop, and ALSS Production Control where survival equipment is received and issued. Everything we work on in the Paraloft and the Flotation Shop is used only in an emergency; therefore, there are no functional tests that can be done, said Olsen. If that gear is used, it must work the first time, every time. We are very meticulous with our inspec tions. In the Parachute Shop, riggers pack, rig and repair parachutes. According to the PR manual, there are three basic types of Navy parachutes: the Navy back (NB), the Navy chest (NC), and the Navy ejection system (NES). Aircraft that do not have ejection seat systems utilize the NB and NC parachutes. Pilots use NES parachutes in ejection seat aircraft. When a pilot or aircrewmen must abandon an aircraft in a hurry, this life saving gear must work to ensure their survivability. Parachutes may also be the only means of delivering badly needed medicines, goods, and other supplies to isolated victims. The Flotation Shop is responsible for the proper inspection, maintenance and handling of life preservers worn by personnel on over-water flights. These lifesaving vests keep aircrew members afloat until a rescue team arrives. The shop also inspects, packs, and maintains life rafts and related equip ment carried in an aircraft. Naval air craft that make operational flights over water are required to carry enough life rafts to hold the crew and passengers. PRs assigned to the Oxygen Shop troubleshoot the specialized oxygen breathing systems used by pilots and aircrews for military aviation opera tions. They are critical life support sys tems that supplement oxygen during high altitude flights. We work on various oxygen sys tems, said Olsen. We repair and test oxygen regulators and manifolds, as well as liquid oxygen converters removed from aircraft. We also perform oxygen analysis. PRs routinely performs scheduled and unscheduled intermediate-level maintenance on survival equipment used on the P-3 Orion Maritime Patrol aircraft, the HH-60H Seahawk helicop ter and the C-130 Hercules logistics air craft. In addition, they maintain and repair protective equipment from other air craft undergoing depot-level repairs at the facility, such as the F/A-18 Hornet Strike Fighter and the EA-6B Prowler electronic warfare aircraft. Olsen said the PR rating motto is The last to let you down. Survival equip ment is something he hopes his ship mates will never have to use; however, if they do it must not fail. The Aircrew Survival Equipmentman was originally called a Parachute Rigger until the rating was formally changed to its current name in 1965. FRCSE Sailors keep survival equipment ready for any emergency 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012

PAGE 15

The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Monday Pizza Madness $5 for 14 one-topping pizza 2:30 9 p.m., dine in or carry out only Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m .1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Packages include bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more info, call Melissa Luehrs at 542-3518. New Extreme Boot Camp fitness class Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. behind the fitness center Outdoor Pool Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guests Learn-to-swim session two begins July 9, session three begins July 23 Lessons are available at the indoor and outdoor pool $40 military, $45 DoD Register for swim lessons at base gym I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23, 2013 Preferred seating $42, lower-level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Legoland 1 day $45.50, 1 day w/water park $52.75, 2 days $54.50, 2 days w/ water park $58.75 NFL Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day $29.50, 2 days $40 Disney World Orlando 4-day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135 $162 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Tampa Zoo $19 Adult $17.50 Child Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 MOSH $7 $12 Blue Man Group Orlando $59, includes City Walk venue Jax Suns Baseball $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Medieval Times Free royalty upgrade with dinner reservationThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Jax Suns Baseball August 9 at 6:30 p.m. Jacksonville Jaguars Game August 10 at 6 p.m. Free admission and transportation River Day at Mulberry Cove Marina August 11, 11 a.m. 4 p.m. Enjoy free tubing, wakeboarding, kaya king, stand-up paddle boarding, games and more! Dave & Busters Trip Free $10 game card and 20 percent off food & beverages August 16, 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees August 10 & 24 for active duty August 12 & 26 for retirees & DoD personnel Golf & Dine Special Play 18-holes with cart and choice of breakfast or lunch for $26! Not applicable on holidays. After-12:30 p.m. Special Play 18 holes for $17, cart and green fees included Valid 7 days a week including holidays Monday & Tuesday Play 18 holes for $20, cart and green fees included Open to military and DoD, not appli cable on holidaysMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Lessons $150 per person August 17, 18, 19, 25 & 26 Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE-certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation avail able Family Fitness Center open Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you Register now for before& after-school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household incomeFlying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School September 10 October 17 $500 per person Youth Flight Camps (ages 12 18) Advanced Aviation Course (basic course required) $150 per person August 22 25 register by August 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012 15

PAGE 16

The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 section, lower area in the north end zone. Aug. 10, 7:30 p.m. Jags vs. New York Giants (Tickets now on sale) Aug. 30, 6:30 p.m. Jags vs. Atlanta Falcons (Tickets now on sale) Sept. 16, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Houston Texans (Tickets on sale Sept. 4) Sept. 30, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Cincinnati Bengals (Tickets on sale Sept. 17) Oct. 7, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Chicago Bears (Tickets on sale Sept. 24) Nov. 4, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Detroit Lions (Tickets on sale Oct. 22) Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jags vs. Indianapolis Colts (Tickets on sale Oct. 29) Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule. Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family mem bers are eligible to pur chase/use these tickets. Retirees and Veterans/ DoD employees are eli gible to purchase tickets for New York Giants and Atlanta Falcons games. Military personnel with authorized depen dents may buy a maxi mum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military per sonnel, but under no cir cumstances are depen dent children authorized to represent the service member/spouse to pur chase tickets. Larger families desir ing to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may purchase a maxi mum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No exceptions. For deployable com mands, a request for a block of game day tick ets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive direc tor. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the sea son.Requests, with justi fication, must be sent to John Shockley at jshock ley@usojax.com If anyone is caught pur chasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. For more information, call 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil Jacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO A free wellness program that supports military moms before, during and after pregnancy. Created by the March of Dimes, with the VFW and the Ladies Auxiliary VFW. marchofdimes.com/vfwa CFC participant Provided as a public service healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012

PAGE 17

Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division (NAWCAD) highlighted recent progress in Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) July 31 as part of the unmanned aviation and strike weapons program at NAS Patuxent River, Md. Unmanned aircraft such as the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstrator (UCAS-D), MQ-8B Fire Scout and the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance System (BAMS) were among the systems displayed during the event. We focus ourselves on a vision, a vision to provide our joint naval and coalition warfighters that lethal, interoperable and affordable unmanned aviation and strike weap ons capabilities today and into the future, said Program Executive Officer for Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons, Rear Adm. Mathias Winter. He spoke about current and future operations of the program and how it supports the Chief of Naval Operations tenets of: Warfighting First, Operate Forward, and Be Ready. Were making sure we are focused on that warfighter, were not here because we have nothing else to do, said Winter. We are here to ensure that the national security of the United States of America is maintained through warf ighting capabilities in the hands of our warfighters. The highlighted aircraft are designed to support persistent, penetrating sur veillance and penetrating strike capa bility in high-threat-level areas. One of those capabilities Winter talked about is the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) demonstra tor. This aircraft utilizes the specialized testing capabilities and facilities avail able at Pax River in the near future to validate the X-47Bs ability to perform in an aircraft carrier environment. What we had to do to get an unmanned aircraft to operate in that area is take the entire aircraft carrier and digitize it, so we can get that situ ational awareness needed to blend that unmanned aircraft into manned opera tions without disrupting that critical flow said Cmdr. Jeff Dodge, carrier integration team lead. The Navy made history July 29, when it conducted NAS Pax Rivers first flight of the X-47B. It departed Pax River and flew for 35 minutes. The aircraft reached an altitude of 7,500 feet and an air speed of 180 knots during its flight. NAWCAD is comprised of 13,000 engineers, flight test engineers, scien tist and research development acquisi tion test and evaluation specialist. Four Community Clusters completed in Haiti The Resident Officer in Charge of Construction (ROICC) Haiti announced July 25 that they sent out beneficial occupancy date (BOD) let ters to the contractor announcing the completion of the construction of four Community Cluster projects, which are part of U.S. Southern Commands Humanitarian Assistance Program (HAP), in Haiti. A BOD letter typically provides notice that the construction phase is complete and the facility is available for occupancy. The completed Community Clusters are located in the communities of Les Cayes, Torbeck, Mandarin and Ecole Pont Gaudin, said ROICC Cmdr. Dewayne Roby. All four sites include 3,000 square foot community centers, wells, six-stall latrines and hand wash stations. The Les Cayes, Mandarin and Ecole Pont Gaudin sites also include 1,800 square foot medical clinics. The Les Cayes and Torbeck sites both include 4,800 square foot, eight-classroom schools, the Ecole Pont Gaudin site includes a 3,900 square foot six-classroom school and the Mandarin site includes a 3,300 square-foot five-classroom school. These facilities will increase the quality of life of the local population by providing the improved ability to educate the children of Haiti and care for each other, while giving the people a place to congregate and continue to build a strong sense of community, said Roby. Palgag Building Technologies, Ltd. was the contractor on these projects. Construction in Haiti is not an easy task, said Roby. The contractor kept the projects working to completion. These contracts, along with the remaining Humanitarian Assistance Program contracts throughout Haiti, were awarded by Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast in Jacksonville, Fla. and administered by ROICC Haiti with acquisition and engineering support provided from the Jacksonville office. These projects are part of U.S. Southern Commands HAP, which will provide a total of nine emergency operations centers and disaster relief warehouses, eight community clusters and fourteen fire stations in locations throughout Haiti. Roby explained that the HAP is designed to assist the people of Haiti in building and sustaining their capacity to prepare for and respond to disasters, while providing basic facilities to edu cate provide medical care and help the everyday community of the Haitian people. After the newly constructed facilities are outfitted, through the efforts of U.S. Southern Command and partnering with non-governmental organizations, the facilities will be turned over to the Haitian government for usage. The turnover is expected prior to the start of the new school year. Panetta: Ospreys grounded in Japan, pending investigationThe Marine Corps will deliver the MV-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft to Japan on time, but they will remain grounded for the short term, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta told report ers Aug. 3 during a joint Pentagon press conference with Japanese Defense Minister Satoshi Morimoto. Panetta said the Osprey will not fly in Japan until a full report into two recent incidents involving the aircraft is pre sented to the Japanese government and the safety of flight operations is reconfirmed. The Defense Department antici pates presenting this information to the Japanese govern ment sometime this month, he said. An Osprey crash in Morocco in April killed two people; another in Florida in June injured five. The Osprey is key to the defense departments plans for the Asia-Pacific region, Panetta said.It will enable Marines to fly faster and farther from Okinawa to remote islands in Japan. This is a one-of-a-kind platform. We have tremendous confidence in this plane, Panetta added. We fly it in combat operations, we fly it around the world [and] we fly it here in this country . this plane can safely implement its operational mission. Panetta also praised the defense partnership between the United States and Japan. This alliance has been the bedrock to peace and stability in the Asia-Pacific region for more than 50 years, he said. During their meeting, the defense leaders also discussed plans to realign the U.S. force structure and ways to mod ernize and advance the U.S.-Japan alliance, including joint operations, training and shared use of training ranges. Japans decision to purchase the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter is an important move that will help expand our bilateral cooperation, Panetta said. It will enhance the ability of our forces to operate together and it will ensure our dominance of the skies for decades to come. After the press conference, Panetta and Morimoto took part in a familiarization flight aboard an Osprey, flying from the Pentagon to Marine Corps Base Quantico in Virginia. Ryan and Arica Goulet are two of our fabulous volunteers at the NAS Jacksonville Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS). Since December, he has served as a Client Service Associate and looks forward to completing his casework training in the future. His goal is to provide active duty service members and their fami lies with financial planning assistance. He and Arica, also an NMCRS volunteer, were married last year (1-11-11). An active duty service member himself, Ryan graduated in 2008 from the University of Wyoming with a degree in mechanical engi neering. Currently a student at VP-30, he spends his free time volunteering at the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society. While there, he most enjoys engaging in a variety of finance discus sions with the staff members. Staying true to his engineering background, Ryan enjoys building model airplanes and constructing things with his extensive Lego col lection. Ryan admits to one hidden talent, bed making, a carryover from OCS. Want to learn more about NMCRS volunteer opportunities? Please contact our Chairman of Volunteers Amanda OConnell at 542-3515 or mandivoc@gmail.com NAWCAD showcases unmanned aircraft Meet the Goulets Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast awarded a $7.5 million contract July 26 to The R-A-M Professional Group, a small busi ness, out of Jacksonville, Fla., for pro fessional planning services throughout NAVFAC Southeasts area of responsi bility (AOR). Utilization of small business con cerns is a matter of national interest with both social and economic ben efits, said Nelson Smith, NAVFAC Southeast deputy for Small Business. Americas 27 million small businesses employ more that 58 percent of the pri vate work force, generate more than 51 percent of the nations gross domestic product, and are the principal source of new jobs. The first task order for $202,037 under the contract is for the mas ter plan update at Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base New Orleans, New Orleans, La. This project is expected to be completed by August 2013. This indefinite-delivery indefinitequantity contract is for the development and update of facility planning stud ies, project documentation for military construction and facility planning doc uments, regional planning products, master plans, recapitalization plans, capital improvement plans, and spe cial planning studies to include scoping studies. All work under this contract will be performed at various Navy and Marine Corps facilities and other gov ernment facilities within the NAVFAC Southeast AOR including, but not lim ited to Georgia (20 percent), Louisiana (20 percent), Texas (20 percent), South Carolina (20 percent), Mississippi (10 percent), and Alabama (10 percent). All work under this contract is expect ed to be completed by March 2015.NAVFAC awards $7.5 million contract to small business JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012 17

PAGE 20

20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012



PAGE 1

THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Today marks the long awaited return of HSL42 Detachment 3 Norsemen from their singleaircraft, seven-month Mediterranean deployment embarked on the guided missile cruiser USS Vella Gulf (CG 72). Initially led by Lt. Cmdr. James Thompson, Det. 3 and Vella Gulf were underway in late November and quickly integrated with the ships team. Close planning and support led to two successful multinational exercises, as well as Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) coverage over Europe and Israel. The Norsemen flew the venerable SH-60B Seahawk (Proud Warrior 22) for 540 flight hours in support of these missions. The ever-changing mix of flights ranged from the typical Recognized Maritime Picture (RMP), Vertical Replenishment (VERTREP) and Passenger Transfer (PAXFER) to the mission critical Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC), Undersea Warfare (USW), and Low Slow Flyer (LSF) Intercept. Through it all, Det.3 provided around-the-clock readiness for surface action group tasking with minimal delays in being fully mission capable. Vella Gulf and Det. 3 prepared for their independent deployment in November by taking part in the fast-paced environment of Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). Following a short break for the holidays, Vella Gulf set sail to its first ports of call: Rota, Spain and Souda Bay, Crete. Next up were the Turkish Straits and the Black Sea to continue U.S. 6th Fleet efforts to enhance regional stability and maritime partnerships. In Constanta, Romania, the Black Sea Knights of the Romanian Navy welcomed the Norsemen. After careful planning, they conducted deck landing qualifications in their PUMA helicopter, as well as special operations fast-roping exercises to the deck of Vella Gulf. The Norsemen also conducted bilateral in-port training with the Ukrainian Navy in Sevastopol, Ukraine. The planned visit to Odessa, Ukraine was ultimately called off due to record cold (-20 F) weather descending on Eastern Europe. Vella Gulf departed for warmer waters and sailed to Sicily for Proud Manta, the largest antisubmarine warfare (ASW) exercise in the world. Vella Gulf and Det. 3 trained with the Dutch, French, German, Greek, Italians and other U.S. forces to cover an array of tactical scenarios. The aircrew demonstrated Proud Warrior 422s multirole proficiency throughout 20 sorties, coordi nating with both U.S. and foreign ship and air assets. In addition to the exercise, Det. 3 con ducted an expedient MEDEVAC of a shipmate to NAS Sigonella, Italy where the sailor to received comprehensive medical attention. Following an extended port visit in Naples, Italy, Vella Gulf joined Hellenic and Israeli naval forces in Souda Bay to cement plans for exercise Noble Dina. Here, the Norsemen helped develop an air plan for their SH-60B, a Hellenic SH-70 helicopter and a U.S. P-3C flying from Souda Bay. Close coordination among the aircraft and ships allowed for early detection and precise target Every two years, Commander U.S. Pacific Fleet hosts the Rim of the Pacific Exercise (RIMPAC) in and around the Hawaiian Islands. Twenty-two nations, 40 surface ships, six submarines, and more than 200 aircraft makes RIMPAC ( June 29 to Aug. 3) the worlds largest international maritime warfare exercise. This unique training opportunity helps par ticipants foster the cooperative relationship that is critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the worlds oceans. Lt. Seth Eisenmenger, VP-45 tactical coordinator and weapons and tactics instructor said, Its a great opportunity to train with many of the same Pacific nations that we could be deployed with in the future. VP-45 played an integral role in RIMPAC 2012, providing a P-3C detachment consisting of one aircraft and 13 Pelicans to join in several exer cises, including anti-submarine warfare mis sions involving multiple submarines. During the exercise, the detachment refined critical coordinated operational skills. RIMPAC 2012 was a fantastic opportunity for VP-45 to work side by side with allies and partners such as New Zealand, Australia, South Korea and Japan. Our combat aircrew was able to benefit from the collective experience of other P-3C forces, in addition to strengthening the bonds of fellowship with our allies, said Lt. j. g. Blake Herzinger of VP-45. And of course, a trip to Hawaii would not be complete without some well-earned liberty. I think we all benefited professionally from our RIMPAC experience and Im sure our tans did as well. We are eager to share our RIMPAC experiences with the rest of the VP-45 team, said Herzinger. VP-45 is scheduled to deploy to Kadena Air Base, Japan in December. A team of five environmental profession als recently surveyed the Pinecastle Range Complex to observe endangered or threat ened species of wildlife and plants and to assess the effects of military training and land management initiatives at the range. The current round of monitoring began in June 2011 and was extended into this year due to increased funding. Participating in the two-day effort were: VP-45 Pelicans participate in RIMPAC 2012Proud Warriors Detachment 3 comes home Protected species surveyed at Pinecastle Range Complex

PAGE 2

JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Aug. 9 1815 Capt. Stephen Decatur concludes treaty for U.S. with Tripoli. 1842 Signing of Webster-Ashburton Treaty under which U.S. and Great Britain agreed to cooperate in suppressing the slave trade. 1865 Return of Naval Academy to Annapolis after four years at Newport, R.I. 1919 Construction of rigid airship ZR-1 (Shenandoah) authorized. 1941 Atlantic Charter Conference is first meeting between President Roosevelt and Winston Churchill. 1942 Battle of Savo Island begins, the first of many sea battles near Guadalcanal. 1945 Atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki, Japan. Navy weaponeer arms the atomic bomb. 1949 First use of pilot ejection seat for emergency escape in U.S. made by Lt. Jack Fruin of VF-171 near Walterboro, S.C. Aug. 10 1916 First Naval aircraft production contract for N-9s. 1921 General Order establishes the Bureau of Aeronautics under Rear Adm. William Moffett. 1944 Guam secured by U.S. forces. 1964 Signing of Gulf of Tonkin Resolution which is used as the starting point of the Vietnam Conflict.Aug. 111812 USS Constitution captures and destroys British brig Lady Warren. 1921 Carrier arresting gear first tested at Hampton Roads, Va. 1960 USNS Longview, using Navy helicopters and frogmen, recovers a Discover satellite capsule after 17 orbits. This is first recovery of U.S. satellite from orbit. Aug. 12 1812 USS Constitution captures and destroys British brig Adeona. 1918 SecNav approves acceptance of women as yeoman (F) in U.S. Navy. 1942 USS Cleveland (CL-55) demonstrates effectiveness of radio-proximity fuze (VT-fuze) against aircraft by successfully destroying three drones with proximity bursts fired by her five inch guns. 1944 Lt. Joseph Kennedy Jr., USNR, the older brother of John F. Kennedy, was killed with his co-pilot in a mid-air explosion after taking off from England in a PB4Y from Special Attack Unit One (SAU-1). Following manual takeoff, they were supposed to parachute out over the English Channel while the radio-controlled explosive-filled drone proceeded to attack a German V-2 missile-launching site. 1957 In first test of Automatic Carrier Landing System, Lt. Cmdr. Don Walker landed on USS Antietam. 1958 USS Nautilus (SSN-571) arrives Portland, England completing first submerged under-ice cruise from Pacific to Atlantic Oceans. Aug. 13 1777 American explosive device made by David Bushnell explodes near British vessel off New London, Conn. 1846 Joint expedition led by Cmdr. Robert Stockton seizes Los Angeles, Calif. 1870 Armed tug USS Palos becomes first U.S. Navy ship to transit Suez Canal Aug. 14 1813 HMS Pelican captures USS Argus. 1886 SecNav establishes Naval Gun Factory at Washington Navy Yard. 1945 Japan agrees to surrender; last Japanese ships sunk during World War II. Aug. 15 1845 U.S. Naval Academy established at Annapolis, Md. on former site of Fort Severn. 1895 Commissioning of USS Texas, the first American steel-hulled battleship. Texas served off Cuba during the Spanish-American War and took part in the naval battle of Santiago. Under the name of San Marcos, she was sunk in weapon effects tests in Chesapeake Bay in 1911. Her hulk continued in use as a gunnery target through World War II. 1908 First Navy post offices established in Navy ships. 1944 Operation Dragoon, the allied invasion of Southern France. 1953 Adm. William Radford is first naval officer appointed Chairman, Joints Chiefs of Staff. He served until August 15, 1957. 1958 USS Lexington (CVA-16) arrives in vicinity of Taiwan. When something needs to be assembled, my dad always has a plan: read the directions all of them first. I also have a plan: look at a picture of the finished product on the outside of the box and try to work backwards. Our different philosophies make it difficult to work together. Dad: Did you save the direc tions? Me: Nah, Ill just look them up online or look at the pic tures. Dad: It really helps to read the directions. Me: Over-rated. Recently its become clear that Ive rubbed off on my old est son, Ford, who is analyti cal (like his dad) but also impatient (like me). Directions are a barrier to getting things done wrong the first time. Interestingly, Ford likes to make his own instructions. When hes playing a made-up game with kids in the neigh borhood, it takes him about 20 minutes to explain the rules but after two minutes, everyone gets bored and leaves. In other words, Ford can make the rules, but he cant always follow them. Then I bought the boys a tent for camping. When it was time to do a practice set-up in the backyard, Ford and I were wondering . who would read the directions? I heard my dads words in my head, It really helps to read the directions. Or maybe he was actually saying it, because he was a few feet away, working on his own project (with directions). I wanted to set a good exam ple for Ford, so I got out the directions. Ford unpacked the box and starting unwrapping poles while I read. Whats this? he asked. Where does this thing go? Hold on, we have to read the directions first. I knew what Ford was think ing: why read the directions when we can study the pho tograph on the box the one with the happy family roasting marshmallows outside their easily constructed tent? How are the directions, mom? Ford asked. I dont understand these words. Are you reading the English version? Supposedly. The instruction book let included pictures, which helped since to the words didnt make any sense. The black ink drawing of a nondescript hand unfolding and connecting the tent poles made it look decep tively easy. Now I remember why I often dont bother with directions. Even as I followed each step and pored over the black-andwhite drawings, I still didnt have a clue what I was doing. We put the poles in the wrong sleeve. We clipped the fabric to the poles too early. We ham mered the side stakes before the corner ones. We couldnt zip the front door closed. Alas, less than an hour later, we had a finished tent. Ford and I stood back and admired it. Why did you build it on that hill? dad asked as he walked past. I looked at Ford. The direc tions had not said anything about not building the tent on an incline. We pulled out the stakes and carried the tent above our heads to a new, flat ter section of the grass. Later that night, as I lay on the slippery nylon fabric listening to my boys make inappro priate noises with their arm pits, I thought about the happy family roasting marshmallows on the front of the box. Same tent, same directions, two very different outcomes. The happy familys mother looked rested and organized. I stared at the ceiling and realized Id just put myself in an enclosed net with my three sons and thought, camping kind of stinks. It wasnt in the instructions, but I realized that maybe we had just created a memory, that was really quite perfect.It (sometimes) helps to follow the directions 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012

PAGE 3

As a Navy leader and someone who lives in Navy housing I am committed to ensuring service members and their families have suitable, affordable and safe hous ing. Recent events pertaining to mold in Navy barracks, and government owned and family privatized housing have indicated a need to more clearly communicate assistance available on all issues, but particularly when pertaining to health or safety issues. This is a personal issue for me. I am determined to ensure we are providing the very best housing throughout the fleet but I also need your help. If you help me by reporting your housing issues, we can help ensure you maintain a house or barracks room that you can feel proud to say is your home. Should a health or safety issue arise during a Sailors stay in Navy barracks, government owned, or privatized family housing, well work with the Sailor as an advocate for their needs until we find a solution. If the issue cannot be resolved, we will work with the Sailor to find alternate accommodations. Whether in a barracks room or home, if you live in Navy housing and suspect a health or safety condition exists, please report it to the local Private-Public Venture office, the local Navy Housing Office or your barracks manager. Use your chain of command; talk to your leading petty officer, leading chief petty officer, division officer, ombudsman and even your commanding officer until you feel youre getting the right amount of attention on your issue. If you feel you are having health issues that may be related to con ditions in your home or barracks room, see your medical provider immediately and then report the issue to your command medical officer or representative and your chain of command. Taking personal responsibility to prevent issues like mold before it gets out of hand is essential. In many environments mold can grow no matter how well we maintain the home or condition the air quality. Be vigilant and ensure areas of your home or barracks room that tend to have more moisture, like kitchens and bathrooms, are kept clean on a regular basis. Often times, all it takes is a once week ly wipe down with mold/mildew cleaner. As a ready and resilient force, 21st Century Sailors and their families must feel confident they can report personal and housing concerns in order to stay safe and healthy in the places they live so we can all focus on our mission, our duties and those we care about.To report mold in NAS Jax bar racks, call 542-2296. To report mold in NAS Jax housing, call 908-0821.Navy Housing help us help youReport mold immediately Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. Beginner Rider Course Experienced Rider Course Military Sportbike Rider Course Call for class dates NAS Jax Safety Office 542-3082 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012 3

PAGE 4

4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012 In the spirit of the 2012 Summer Olympics, Naval Hospital Jacksonville staff went for the gold in the Command Master Chief (CMC) Challenge, with a series of competitions held July 23 to 27 to build team unity and physical fitness. CMDCM(AW/SW) Bennora Simmons kicked off the weeks festivities and remarked, CMC Challenge promotes staff readiness in a positive way. This is a great opportunity for Sailors, officers and civilians to compete together in a fun atmosphere that builds team spirit. The commands directorates fielded teams to compete in multiple matches as they pursued the CMC Challenge Cup. Teams designed flags and t-shirts, and earned points by placing in competitions with extra points for bringing the team flag and participation by senior leaders. This years events included an obstacle course, 5K run, basketball, volleyball, softball, swim meet, pull ups, tug-of-war, relay run, blind canoe race, spades, ultimate Frisbee and Are you smarter than a recruit? For the third year, Clinical Support Services took first place. Simmons awarded the CMC Challenge Cup at NH Jacksonvilles command picnic on July 27 the culmination of the weeklong Challenge. Second place went to the Branch Health Clinics and Public Health team, and third place to the Command Suite and Administration team. Hoorah, Naval Hospital Jacksonville congratulations to all.

PAGE 5

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012 5

PAGE 6

Missed the cut? Use Career Development Boards to improve advancementWith the release of Active Duty Chief Petty Officer Selection Board results July 31, approximately 4,400 Sailors have embarked upon a rigorous induction season. While it is a high point for those Sailors selected for CPO, the active and Reserve boards typically review records of more than 19,000 first class petty officers, which means a lot of Sailors were not be selected and that is very disappointing to Sailors, said Navy Personnel Command Force Master Chief (AW/SW/NAC) Jon Port. The chain of command must communicate with those Sailors who did not get selected. According to Port, command leadership should assist Sailors not selected by conducting a career development board (CDB). A CDB provides Sailors the opportunity to discuss their career progression, the health of their rating, and their short and long-term goals for the future. CDBs provide enlisted Sailors the opportunity for opti mal development of their professional skills, both military and technical, thereby enhancing unit readiness, job sat isfaction and ultimately the retention and advancement of our Sailors, said Port. Together, Sailors and their chain of command can review the Sailors record and identify ways to improve competi tiveness in the future. Leaders should look at what the Sailor can do to gain more authority and responsibility in their current position to become more competitive, discuss the health of their rating and of course make sure the Sailors accomplishments are properly documented in their record, Port said. He added that it is equally important to consider those qualifications or milestones a Sailor should possess but potentially did not attain. If we are straightforward yet supportive with our Sailors, they stand a much greater chance of following the advice given by their chain of command and ultimately attaining that next pay grade, he said. I was extremely disappointed when I didnt get selected last year, because I felt like I was doing all I could, said YN1 Shontay Bond, a Full Time Support Reservist assigned to Buckley Air Force Base, Colo. After, I had a CDB and listened to the advice my chiefs had to give. Bond, who is waiting for the results of the Reserve Chief Petty Officer Selection Board, has since gone on to finish her college degree. She sought additional ways to demonstrate leadership abilities by organizing community service projects for her command. She rotated her collateral duties and took orders to a joint service command to increase her career versatility. Bond, who recently volunteered for an individual aug mentee assignment, said she took the information from her CDB to heart. It gave me the extra pat on the back I needed to move ahead and to not give up, said Bond. CDB training and individual career development plan worksheets are avail able from the Navy Personnel Command Web site. 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012

PAGE 7

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012 7

PAGE 8

ing of the participating Israeli Dolphin class submarine. Det. 3 demonstrated its strong ASW capability, through coordinated operations with allied aircraft and surface forces. Vella Gulf next set sail to execute its BMD mission. The ship utilized the capabilities of Det. 3 as it maintained position to provide ballistic missile protection over Israel. Proud Warrior 422 patrolled the Eastern Mediterranean waters and provided over-thehorizon RMP, flying 40 percent of their hours at night. Utilizing forward looking infrared, electronic support measures and night vision goggles, the aircrew consistently provided real-time intelligence to the ship in a heavily traveled sea. During underway Replenishments (UNREP) the aircrew demonstrated advanced profi ciency conducting VERTREPs and passenger transfers, dras tically decreasing the time required for the UNREP evolu tions. In May, the Norsemen said farewell to Lt. Cmdr. Thompson, Lt. Sullivan, AO1 Pichardo, and AM3 Tobin. Likewise, Det. 3 welcomed Lt. Cmdr. Peter Eudy as the new officer in charge. Without missing a beat, the Norsemen con tinued supporting the ships BMD mission. In June, Det. 3 conduct ed a life-saving MEDEVAC to Rambam Medical Center in Haifa, Israel. Close coordina tion between the aircrew, ship operations team and the U.S. Defense Affairs Office in Tel Aviv paved the way for a smooth flight into Israeli air space. July started with a port visit to Souda Bay followed by sur veillance missions in the Eastern Mediterranean. Vella Gulf then steamed west to meet the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) Carrier Strike Group. The Proud Warriors conducted parts runs and passenger transfers while Vella Gulf exercised with F/A-18 Hornets from the strike group. In late July, Vella Gulf returned to Souda Bay for turnover and then proceeded west to Rota, Spain and ultimately back to NS Mayport. Det. 3 returns having achieved advancements and milestones across the board. Four sailors advanced to petty officer third-class: AZ3 Latrasha Allende, AD3 Alexis Tobar, AM3 Brandon Tobin, AE3 Gage Wilson. Two sailors advanced to petty officer second-class: AT2 Reuben Casas and AD2 Stephen Linde. Seven sailors qualified as Enlisted Air Warfare Specialists (EAWS) underway: AZ3 Latrasha Allende, AM2 Shane Henry, AMAN Katy Lallament, AD2 Stephen Linde, AWR3 Alex Mahs, AD3 Alexis Tobar and AE3 Gage Wilson. Lt. Ben Peterman passed 1,000 SH-60B Seahawk flight hours and AWR2 Michael Willems reached the acclaimed 2,000hour mark flying in the SH-60B. HSL-42 Six representatives of the VPU-1 Chiefs Mess visited the national headquarters of the Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) on Belfort Road in Jacksonville. Their July 18 mission was to continue providing assistance to wounded comrades return ing from the War on Terror by donating $1,100 that was raised at the CPOs sale of memora bilia, prior to the disestablish ment of the Old Buzzards squadron in August. We really liked the thought of giving back to those who sacrificed so much for our country, stated VPU-1 Command Senior Enlisted Leader AWVCS(NAC/AW) Mark Dietrich. The organizations prin ciples and values were really aligned with those that the Old Buzzards have fought to instill in our own Sailors. It was a nobrainer. For more than 40 years, the Old Buzzards have dedicat ed their efforts to protecting Americas Soldiers, Sailors, and Airmen on the field of battle. With the squadrons disestab lishment fast approaching, the VPU-1 CPO Mess held a silent auction to offer its members, past and present, the oppor tunity to obtain memorabilia from its CPO Mess. The sale of the commands historic items netted $1,100, and by a unanimous vote, the WWP was selected as the charitable organization to which the proceeds would be donat ed. After the donation presenta tion, Wounded Warrior Project Special Projects Director Dan McCarthy led Dietrich, ATCS(AW) Andrew Robertson, ATCS(AW) Eric Kinnaman, AWVC(NAC/AW) Daniel Correa, AMCV(AW) Scott Harris, and retired AFCM(AW/ NAC) Steven Berry on a tour of the WWP headquarters facility. He detailed the organiza tions mission and the vari ous programs they provide for Americas wounded veterans. The wide reach and scope of WWP astounded the squadron members and clearly reassured their commitment to the proj ect. WWP strives to honor and empower Wounded Warriors through programs aimed at the mind, body, economic empowerment and engagement, explained McCarthy. We never leave a warrior behind. The VPU-1 Old Buzzards Chiefs Mess encourages other CPOAs and CPO Messes to continue the Old Buzzards mission through donations to organizations such as this. To donate or get involved with the Wounded Warrior Project, email got@wounded warriorproject.org or visit their website at www.wounded warriorproject.org All WWP programs are free. To participate you must have incurred service-connected wounds, injuries, or illness es on or after September 11, 2001. Verification of service is required. VPU-1 Chiefs Mess pays respects to Wounded Warriors 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012

PAGE 9

PINECASTLELaura LaBella and Brian Hinton of Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Core; Christine Bauer, Tina Jackson and Bobby Simmons of NAS Jacksonville Environmental Department; and Chris Townsend and Lee Shults of Pinecastle Range Operations who provided escort, transportation and unexploded ordnance (UXO) support. The Navy has operated the Pinecastle Range Complex since the early 1950s to train aircrews and support personnel in ordnance delivery. The range is located in Marion County, Fla., within the boundaries of the Ocala National Forest. The United States Forest Service (USFS) manages the land and is the issu ing authority for use of the land. The range is under administrative and scheduling control of Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility at NAS Jacksonville. Since 1951, the Navy has been authorized to operate the range under an interagency agreement between the USFS and the Department of the Navy. The agreement was extended through July 2001, at which time a draft Environmental Impact Study (EIS) was issued for authorization of military use of the range for 20 years through issuance of a Special Use Permit (SUP). On Oct. 29, 2001, a biological opinion (BO) was issued by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that required, as a mitigation measure for issuance of the SUP, the agreement to monitor c ertain plants and animals that were listed as threatened or endangered because they were considered to be at risk for extinction. Activities such as habitat destruction, poaching and the pet trade, along with climate change and disease, increase the probability of species loss. Under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the government pro tects endangered and threatened plants and animals (listed species) and the habitats upon which they depend. The ESA requires federal agencies to ensure that any action they authorize, fund or carry out, will not likely jeopardize the continued existence of these species, or adversely affect any critical habitat. The range BO requires monitoring surveys to be conducted every four years for the following species: Florida scrub jay (threatened); Wood stork (endan gered); Eastern indigo snake (threatened); Sand skink (threatened); Florida bonamia (threatened); Scrub buckwheat (treatened); and Scrub milkwort (endan gered). Monitoring surveys were conducted by USFS in 2001 and 2004, with the support of Pinecastle Range Operations personnel. In 2007, NAS Jacksonville and NAVFAC Southeast assisted the USFS with the surveys through funding from U.S. Fleet Forces Command. During the 2007 survey, 109 Florida scrub jays were observed. To call scrub jays out into the open, an iPod with speakers was used. A number of males, females and juveniles, as well as family groups were record ed. Although many jays responded, they were not as plentiful as in previous surveys. The extreme heat and impending thunder storms could account for the birds desire to stay deep in the trees. Survey personnel observed Florida bonamia plants and sand skink tracks at several data points along the survey route. Active gopher tortoise burrows were examined for the presence of eastern indigo snakes that frequently share the burrows. None were found. While it is known that eastern indigo snakes inhabit the range, they are very elusive and seldom seen. The survey route follows data points along fire breaks in and around the target impact area. These firebreaks consist of deep sand that even the NAS Jax 4x4 forestry truck could not power through. Several of the more adventurous surveyors piled into a surplus military Humvee with Bobby Simmons at the wheel. This vehicle proved to be a good choice for overcoming deep sand and obstacles such as fall en trees. The good news was that sand skink tracks and Florida bonamia plants were observed in several areas, and all indications are that the habitat is supporting a healthy population of jays. The frequent fires ignited by range activity maintain the early scrub oak habitat that is preferred by the scrub jay, and also benefits other species including the gopher tortoise. The gopher tortoise is an ESA candidate species for listing as threatened due to loss of habitat. The Department of Defense is a partner in the Gopher Tortoise Candidate Conservation Agreement with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) and other state, federal and non-government agencies. Surveyors were able to find suitable sites that would accommodate gopher tortoises that must be relocated from the ranges live impact area. The products from this survey will be a monitoring report on the listed species and a gopher tortoise habitat suitability study that will be coordinated with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the USFS. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012 9

PAGE 10

The Navy Systematic Biological Collection, housed at the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) at NAS Jacksonville, is a one-of-a kind reference tool within the Department of Defense (DoD). The 350,000-specimen col lection focuses mainly on mosquitoes, flies and gnats. Other insects along with plant, marine, arachnid, snake and fossil specimens are also represented. The collection started in 1949 as a repository for medically significant pest collected by the Malaria Control teams in the Pacific. According to Dr. Andrew Beck, NECE training depart ment head and curator of the collection, the biological col lection represents specimens from every continent, except Antarctica. This extensive, carefully cat alogued collection exemplifies NECEs wide range of unique capabilities and commitment to the success of our custom ers, said NECE Officer-inCharge Cmdr. Eric Hoffman. The collection is housed in three parts: the systematic col lection, training collection and public affairs collection. The systematic collection carries on the original goal of the collection, as a repository for specimens. This enhances our ability to accurately iden tify a diversity of specimens collected world wide, under stand their biology and apply this knowledge to effectively develop and implement control strategies against those that transmit human disease, said Hoffman. The training collection is used to teach service mem bers which pests are present in areas they are deploying to and how to distinguish them from similar insects. This allows preventive medicine techni cians and entomologists to have a better understanding of the pests they will face when deployed. The training collection is also used to teach courses at NECE and other commands, such as insect identification to civil ian employees and contractors during the Category 8 Pesticide Applicator Certification and Re-certification courses. This ensures that all pest manage ment professionals working on DoD facilities are able to pro vide effective pest control and safely apply pesticides in accordance with DoD and EPA regulations. According to Beck, identi fication is the cornerstone of pest management operations. Proper pest identification is needed to correctly prescribe control measures. The training collection is also used to provide specimens to the Joint Service Training School in San Antonio, Texas as well as the Independent Duty Corpsman School, said Beck. The public affairs collec tion consists of large, showy insects that are used for out reach activities. NECE has a strong connec tion to its local community. We present the public affairs collection when we visit local schools for presentations on entomology, said Beck. There are several different displays set up depending on the age group to which we are presenting. For more information about utilizing the biological collec tion or scheduling an outreach event, contact NECE at 5422424. For more information about medical entomology visit the NECE website at: http://www. nmcphc.med.navy.mil/Field_ Activities/nece_overview.aspx. The VR-62 Nomads participated in an event July 20 to thank local employers of Reserve and Guard personnel. The ESGR (Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve) Boss Lift event provided guests the opportunity to visit NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1000 and tour a Navy C-130T Hercules and a Navy C-40A Clipper aircraft. ESGR events are endorsed by the Department of Defense to promote cooperation and under standing between Reserve component members and their civilian employers. Americas Reserve components comprise approximately 48 percent of total available military manpower and play a critical role in our countrys National Defense Strategy. Because of the current high operational tempo, Reserve forces are spending more time away from the workplace to defend the nation. As a result, civilian employers play a critical role by complying with existing employment laws protecting the rights of workers who serve in the Reserves or National Guard. VR-62 is a Navy Fleet Logistics Support Squadron stationed at NAS Jacksonville. The squadron is assigned four C-130T aircraft that fly missions around the globe in support of the United States Navy and Marine Corps. The Nomads are comprised of 125 active duty and 57 reserve members. VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Alex Ellermann commented, The ESGR events provide us the opportunity to show our apprecia tion to the employers of our Reserve personnel. Their sacrifice is vital to our mission and we truly appreciate their support. Navy Systematic Biological Collection: 350,000 specimens and growing Nomads thank local employers with ESGR Boss Lift event 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012

PAGE 11

VP-30 instructors join beautification teamA team of instructors from VP-30 joined a commu nity beautification event July 27 at Castaway Island Preserve, a nature park on Intracoastal Waterway off San Pablo Road between Beach and Atlantic Boulevards. The project involved spreading bales of pine straw in the landscaped gardens, installing some new plants around the education building, trimming back overgrown vegetation, pulling weeds and removing trash. Natural Resource Recreation Specialist Brian Burket, with City of Jacksonville Parks and Recreation, said, Our Navy volunteers lead by example and are great to people to work with. Their effort has made Castaway Island Preserve a favorite destination along the Intracoastal Waterway. One of Jacksonvilles premier preservation proper ties, Castaway Island Preserve attracts visitors with its marshy banks and lush trails. The park is adjacent to an intricate salt marsh ecosystem that is ideal for watching marshland wildlife. Visitors may stroll along the wooden boardwalk, take in the view from an observation platform over looking the waterway or learn about the flora and fauna of Northeast Florida along the parks interactive nature trail. The park also has a floating canoe/kayak launch and theater-style education center. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012 11

PAGE 12

U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a mem ber of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of spe cial recognition in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. The registration deadline is Oct. 5. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in ter ritorial waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve recognition and thanks for putting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans during my annual Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the highlights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are strongly encouraged to contact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 598-0481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www. crenshaw.house.gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and documentation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the cer tificate, veterans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214.Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program. When first lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden started the Joining Forces campaign 15 months ago, they did so with the goal of creating impactful and lasting health, education and employment support for military families. The campaign had two sig nificant achievements this week that its director, Navy Capt. Brad Cooper said July 27, hit both of those marks. First, North Carolina became the 26th state to pass a law making it easier for military spouses to transfer their pro fessional licenses. South Carolina and Hawaii passed similar laws in recent weeks, potentially affecting tens of thousands of military spouses, Cooper said. With similar legislation pend ing in California, Ohio and New Jersey, the campaign is exceeding our expectations in getting laws passed in all 50 states by the end of 2014, he said. As I take a step back and look at this and my dad was an Army officer this signals a pretty remarkable cultural shift, Cooper said. I remember my mother as well as my wife, and spouses of my friends were reluctant even to indicate they were military spouses to prospective employers, he said. Second, the National Association of Social Workers, at its annual convention in Washington D.C. this week, announced it is launching a free, online training course for all social workers to better understand the unique needs of military families. It also is providing a set of standards for working with veterans and military families, and is creat ing a professional Credential for Social Work with Veterans and Military Families. Social workers are con sidered the nations frontline mental health services provid ers, and they practice in every county in the country. Its pledge to Joining Forces follows that of the four larg est nursing associations, representing 3 million nurs es, and the Association of American Medical Colleges and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, with 105 and 25 schools, respectively, in train ing doctors to serve military families and veterans. The Association of Marriage and Therapy Therapists also has signed on, as well as associations representing psychia trists, psychologists and sur geons. This really represents, to me, not just the impact ful piece, but the sustaining piece, Cooper said. Spouses and veterans employment also has made major strides, Cooper said. More than 2,000 companies have signed on already hir ing 25,000 spouses and 65,000 veterans, and pledging to hire another 175,000 in the next two years, helping bring down the veterans unemployment rate, he said. This really is the largest outreach and advocacy efforts weve had on behalf of veterans and their families for years, Cooper said. Joining Forces has been successful, he said, because weve been able to bring peo ple together and focus them on the effort. All they needed was leadership and direction, he added. People, generally, want to be helpful, Cooper said. They dont always know what they can do. Our objective is to steer them to meaningful action. Joining Forces initiative exceeds expectations Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony coming to NAS Jax on Nov. 8 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012

PAGE 13

Federal program helps Sailors serve again Sailors transitioning from the Navy who would like to pursue a career in teaching may be eligible for assistance and monetary compensation from a federal pro gram called Troops to Teachers (TTT), officials said Aug. 2. Our classrooms are looking for leadership and service members bring that to the classroom, said Cliff Yager, TTT regional director for Tennessee and Northern Alabama. Service members understand lead ership, management, organizational skills and those are skills we need in the classroom today. Last year, TTT helped nearly 2,000 former service members begin new careers as teachers, but, Yager admits that just like the military teaching is not for everyone. The thing they need to ask themselves is whether they are passionate about teaching, being involved with parents, and making a difference in young childrens lives, Yager said. TTT provides counseling and referral services to eli gible service members and veterans interested in beginning a second career in public education as a teacher. State TTT will help applicants identify teacher certifi cation requirements, programs leading to certification and employment opportunities in their state. According to Yager, TTT offers funded and unfunded assistance based on an individuals military service. Funded assistance provides financial support for both the certification process and for employment in a high need school. Unfunded assistance offers counseling and assistance regarding certification. Math, chemistry, physics, special education and foreign languages have the greatest demand for teachers according to Yager. There is a tremendous amount of opportunity available in those areas, especially for male teachers in elementary and middle school arenas. Yager suggests Sailors try volunteering with a local school or even work as a substitute teacher when their schedule permits in order to determine if teaching is right for them. Sailors may get more information and guidance by speaking with the TTT representative in the state where they would like to teach. TTT is managed by the Defense Activity for Non-traditional Education Support (DANTES). It was established in 1994 with the primary objective of helping qualified service members successfully transition into careers in teaching. Sailors can learn more about Troops to Teachers at their website: www.proudtoserveagain.com. Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced Aug. 2 $2.3 million in grants to train primary care physician assistants by helping veterans transition from military to civilian physician assistant careers when they return home. Funded under the Physician Assistant Training in Primary Care Program, the five-year grants aim to increase the number of physician assistant graduates who become primary care clini cians and teachers, officials said. Funding priority was given to grantees that have strong recruitment, retention and education programs for veteran applicants and students including academic recognition of medical train ing and experience gained during military service. Administered by the Health Resources and Services Administration at HHS, the grants are part of the administrations ini tiative to increase the supply of primary care practitioners in the United States. If you can save a life on the battlefield in Afghanistan, you can save a life here at home, Sebelius said. These grants will help ensure veterans who served our coun try can use their military medical training and get good jobs serving patients. The grants, awarded to 12 institutions, support educational pro grams that train physician assis tants to practice in primary care settings, and help individuals who will teach primary care in physi cian assistant training programs, preparing trainees to enter prac tice in primary care settings. HHS to help veterans get jobs as physician assistants JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012 13

PAGE 14

In the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) 800 Division at NAS Jacksonville, Sailors ensure aircrew survival equipment is ready to perform properly when emergency conditions arise. About 40 Sailors inspect, maintain and repair a wide variety of survival equipment including parachutes, life rafts and personal flight gear to ensure the items are in proper working condition. If weve done our job right, youre going to make it home, said PR1 Matthew Olsen, the Aviation Life Support Systems (ALSS) production control leading petty officer. The 800 Division includes the Parachute Shop, also called the paraloft, the Flotation Shop, the Oxygen Shop, and ALSS Production Control where survival equipment is received and issued. Everything we work on in the Paraloft and the Flotation Shop is used only in an emergency; therefore, there are no functional tests that can be done, said Olsen. If that gear is used, it must work the first time, every time. We are very meticulous with our inspec tions. In the Parachute Shop, riggers pack, rig and repair parachutes. According to the PR manual, there are three basic types of Navy parachutes: the Navy back (NB), the Navy chest (NC), and the Navy ejection system (NES). Aircraft that do not have ejection seat systems utilize the NB and NC parachutes. Pilots use NES parachutes in ejection seat aircraft. When a pilot or aircrewmen must abandon an aircraft in a hurry, this lifesaving gear must work to ensure their survivability. Parachutes may also be the only means of delivering badly needed medicines, goods, and other supplies to isolated victims. The Flotation Shop is responsible for the proper inspection, maintenance and handling of life preservers worn by personnel on over-water flights. These lifesaving vests keep aircrew members afloat until a rescue team arrives. The shop also inspects, packs, and maintains life rafts and related equip ment carried in an aircraft. Naval air craft that make operational flights over water are required to carry enough life rafts to hold the crew and passengers. PRs assigned to the Oxygen Shop troubleshoot the specialized oxygen breathing systems used by pilots and aircrews for military aviation opera tions. They are critical life support systems that supplement oxygen during high altitude flights. We work on various oxygen sys tems, said Olsen. We repair and test oxygen regulators and manifolds, as well as liquid oxygen converters removed from aircraft. We also perform oxygen analysis. PRs routinely performs scheduled and unscheduled intermediate-level maintenance on survival equipment used on the P-3 Orion Maritime Patrol aircraft, the HH-60H Seahawk helicop ter and the C-130 Hercules logistics aircraft. In addition, they maintain and repair protective equipment from other air craft undergoing depot-level repairs at the facility, such as the F/A-18 Hornet Strike Fighter and the EA-6B Prowler electronic warfare aircraft. Olsen said the PR rating motto is The last to let you down. Survival equip ment is something he hopes his ship mates will never have to use; however, if they do it must not fail. The Aircrew Survival Equipmentman was originally called a Parachute Rigger until the rating was formally changed to its current name in 1965. FRCSE Sailors keep survival equipment ready for any emergency 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012

PAGE 15

The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Monday Pizza Madness $5 for 14 one-topping pizza 2:30 9 p.m., dine in or carry out only Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m .1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Book your birthday party with us! Packages include bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more info, call Melissa Luehrs at 542-3518. New Extreme Boot Camp fitness class Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. behind the fitness center Outdoor Pool Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guests Learn-to-swim session two begins July 9, session three begins July 23 Lessons are available at the indoor and outdoor pool $40 military, $45 DoD Register for swim lessons at base gym I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23, 2013 Preferred seating $42, lower-level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Legoland 1 day $45.50, 1 day w/water park $52.75, 2 days $54.50, 2 days w/ water park $58.75 NFL Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day $29.50, 2 days $40 Disney World Orlando 4-day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135 $162 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Tampa Zoo $19 Adult $17.50 Child Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 MOSH $7 $12 Blue Man Group Orlando $59, includes City Walk venue Jax Suns Baseball $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Medieval Times Free royalty upgrade with dinner reservationThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Jax Suns Baseball August 9 at 6:30 p.m. Jacksonville Jaguars Game August 10 at 6 p.m. Free admission and transportation River Day at Mulberry Cove Marina August 11, 11 a.m. 4 p.m. Enjoy free tubing, wakeboarding, kayaking, stand-up paddle boarding, games and more! Dave & Busters Trip Free $10 game card and 20 percent off food & beverages August 16, 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees August 10 & 24 for active duty August 12 & 26 for retirees & DoD personnel Golf & Dine Special Play 18-holes with cart and choice of breakfast or lunch for $26! Not applicable on holidays. After-12:30 p.m. Special Play 18 holes for $17, cart and green fees included Valid 7 days a week including holidays Monday & Tuesday Play 18 holes for $20, cart and green fees included Open to military and DoD, not applicable on holidaysMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Lessons $150 per person August 17, 18, 19, 25 & 26 Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE-certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation available Family Fitness Center open Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you Register now for before& after-school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household incomeFlying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School September 10 October 17 $500 per person Youth Flight Camps (ages 12 18) Advanced Aviation Course (basic course required) $150 per person August 22 25 register by August 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012 15

PAGE 16

The NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay USO offices are now selling tickets to all Jacksonville Jaguars home games. All tickets are located in the 200 section, lower area in the north end zone. Aug. 10, 7:30 p.m. Jags vs. New York Giants (Tickets now on sale) Aug. 30, 6:30 p.m. Jags vs. Atlanta Falcons (Tickets now on sale) Sept. 16, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Houston Texans (Tickets on sale Sept. 4) Sept. 30, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Cincinnati Bengals (Tickets on sale Sept. 17) Oct. 7, 4:05 p.m. Jags vs. Chicago Bears (Tickets on sale Sept. 24) Nov. 4, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Detroit Lions (Tickets on sale Oct. 22) Nov. 8, 8:20 p.m. Jags vs. Indianapolis Colts (Tickets on sale Oct. 29) Nov. 25, 1 p.m. Jags vs. Tennessee Titans(Tickets on sale Nov. 12) Dec. 9, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New York Jets(Tickets on sale Nov. 26) Dec. 23, 1 p.m. Jags vs. New England Patriots (Tickets on sale Dec. 10) Jaguars ticket sales will begin at noon per the above schedule. Tickets are first come, first served. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty members including Florida National Guard, Reservists on active duty orders and family mem bers are eligible to pur chase/use these tickets. Retirees and Veterans/ DoD employees are eli gible to purchase tickets for New York Giants and Atlanta Falcons games. Military personnel with authorized depen dents may buy a maxi mum of four tickets if member and dependents equal four. If you have less than four, you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military per sonnel, but under no cir cumstances are depen dent children authorized to represent the service member/spouse to pur chase tickets. Larger families desir ing to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO Center director. Single service members may purchase a maxi mum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest.No exceptions. For deployable com mands, a request for a block of game day tick ets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive direc tor. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to John Shockley at jshock ley@usojax.com If anyone is caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets he/she will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. For more information, call 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil Jacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO A free wellness program that supports military moms before, during and after pregnancy. Created by the March of Dimes, with the VFW and the Ladies Auxiliary VFW. marchofdimes.com/vfwa CFC participant Provided as a public service healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012

PAGE 17

Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division (NAWCAD) highlighted recent progress in Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) July 31 as part of the unmanned aviation and strike weapons program at NAS Patuxent River, Md. Unmanned aircraft such as the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstrator (UCAS-D), MQ-8B Fire Scout and the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance System (BAMS) were among the systems displayed during the event. We focus ourselves on a vision, a vision to provide our joint naval and coalition warfighters that lethal, interoperable and affordable unmanned aviation and strike weap ons capabilities today and into the future, said Program Executive Officer for Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons, Rear Adm. Mathias Winter. He spoke about current and future operations of the program and how it supports the Chief of Naval Operations tenets of: Warfighting First, Operate Forward, and Be Ready. Were making sure we are focused on that warfighter, were not here because we have nothing else to do, said Winter. We are here to ensure that the national security of the United States of America is maintained through warf ighting capabilities in the hands of our warfighters. The highlighted aircraft are designed to support persistent, penetrating sur veillance and penetrating strike capa bility in high-threat-level areas. One of those capabilities Winter talked about is the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) demonstrator. This aircraft utilizes the specialized testing capabilities and facilities avail able at Pax River in the near future to validate the X-47Bs ability to perform in an aircraft carrier environment. What we had to do to get an unmanned aircraft to operate in that area is take the entire aircraft carrier and digitize it, so we can get that situ ational awareness needed to blend that unmanned aircraft into manned operations without disrupting that critical flow said Cmdr. Jeff Dodge, carrier integration team lead. The Navy made history July 29, when it conducted NAS Pax Rivers first flight of the X-47B. It departed Pax River and flew for 35 minutes. The aircraft reached an altitude of 7,500 feet and an air speed of 180 knots during its flight. NAWCAD is comprised of 13,000 engineers, flight test engineers, scien tist and research development acquisi tion test and evaluation specialist. Four Community Clusters completed in Haiti The Resident Officer in Charge of Construction (ROICC) Haiti announced July 25 that they sent out beneficial occupancy date (BOD) let ters to the contractor announcing the completion of the construction of four Community Cluster projects, which are part of U.S. Southern Commands Humanitarian Assistance Program (HAP), in Haiti. A BOD letter typically provides notice that the construction phase is complete and the facility is available for occupancy. The completed Community Clusters are located in the communities of Les Cayes, Torbeck, Mandarin and Ecole Pont Gaudin, said ROICC Cmdr. Dewayne Roby. All four sites include 3,000 square foot community centers, wells, six-stall latrines and hand wash stations. The Les Cayes, Mandarin and Ecole Pont Gaudin sites also include 1,800 square foot medical clinics. The Les Cayes and Torbeck sites both include 4,800 square foot, eight-classroom schools, the Ecole Pont Gaudin site includes a 3,900 square foot six-classroom school and the Mandarin site includes a 3,300 square-foot five-classroom school. These facilities will increase the quality of life of the local population by providing the improved ability to educate the children of Haiti and care for each other, while giving the people a place to congregate and continue to build a strong sense of community, said Roby. Palgag Building Technologies, Ltd. was the contractor on these projects. Construction in Haiti is not an easy task, said Roby. The contractor kept the projects working to completion. These contracts, along with the remaining Humanitarian Assistance Program contracts throughout Haiti, were awarded by Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast in Jacksonville, Fla. and administered by ROICC Haiti with acquisition and engineering support provided from the Jacksonville office. These projects are part of U.S. Southern Commands HAP, which will provide a total of nine emergency operations centers and disaster relief warehouses, eight community clusters and fourteen fire stations in locations throughout Haiti. Roby explained that the HAP is designed to assist the people of Haiti in building and sustaining their capacity to prepare for and respond to disasters, while providing basic facilities to educate provide medical care and help the everyday community of the Haitian people. After the newly constructed facilities are outfitted, through the efforts of U.S. Southern Command and partnering with non-governmental organizations, the facilities will be turned over to the Haitian government for usage. The turnover is expected prior to the start of the new school year. Panetta: Ospreys grounded in Japan, pending investigationThe Marine Corps will deliver the MV-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft to Japan on time, but they will remain grounded for the short term, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta told reporters Aug. 3 during a joint Pentagon press conference with Japanese Defense Minister Satoshi Morimoto. Panetta said the Osprey will not fly in Japan until a full report into two recent incidents involving the aircraft is presented to the Japanese government and the safety of flight operations is reconfirmed. The Defense Department anticipates presenting this information to the Japanese govern ment sometime this month, he said. An Osprey crash in Morocco in April killed two people; another in Florida in June injured five. The Osprey is key to the defense departments plans for the Asia-Pacific region, Panetta said.It will enable Marines to fly faster and farther from Okinawa to remote islands in Japan. This is a one-of-a-kind platform. We have tremendous confidence in this plane, Panetta added. We fly it in combat operations, we fly it around the world [and] we fly it here in this country . this plane can safely implement its operational mission. Panetta also praised the defense partnership between the United States and Japan. This alliance has been the bedrock to peace and stability in the Asia-Pacific region for more than 50 years, he said. During their meeting, the defense leaders also discussed plans to realign the U.S. force structure and ways to mod ernize and advance the U.S.-Japan alliance, including joint operations, training and shared use of training ranges. Japans decision to purchase the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter is an important move that will help expand our bilateral cooperation, Panetta said. It will enhance the ability of our forces to operate together and it will ensure our dominance of the skies for decades to come. After the press conference, Panetta and Morimoto took part in a familiarization flight aboard an Osprey, flying from the Pentagon to Marine Corps Base Quantico in Virginia. Ryan and Arica Goulet are two of our fabulous volunteers at the NAS Jacksonville Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS). Since December, he has served as a Client Service Associate and looks forward to completing his casework training in the future. His goal is to provide active duty service members and their families with financial planning assistance. He and Arica, also an NMCRS volunteer, were married last year (1-11-11). An active duty service member himself, Ryan graduated in 2008 from the University of Wyoming with a degree in mechanical engi neering. Currently a student at VP-30, he spends his free time volunteering at the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society. While there, he most enjoys engaging in a variety of finance discussions with the staff members. Staying true to his engineering background, Ryan enjoys building model airplanes and constructing things with his extensive Lego collection. Ryan admits to one hidden talent, bed making, a carryover from OCS. Want to learn more about NMCRS volunteer opportunities? Please contact our Chairman of Volunteers Amanda OConnell at 542-3515 or mandivoc@gmail.com NAWCAD showcases unmanned aircraft Meet the Goulets Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast awarded a $7.5 million contract July 26 to The R-A-M Professional Group, a small business, out of Jacksonville, Fla., for pro fessional planning services throughout NAVFAC Southeasts area of responsi bility (AOR). Utilization of small business con cerns is a matter of national interest with both social and economic ben efits, said Nelson Smith, NAVFAC Southeast deputy for Small Business. Americas 27 million small businesses employ more that 58 percent of the private work force, generate more than 51 percent of the nations gross domestic product, and are the principal source of new jobs. The first task order for $202,037 under the contract is for the mas ter plan update at Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base New Orleans, New Orleans, La. This project is expected to be completed by August 2013. This indefinite-delivery indefinitequantity contract is for the development and update of facility planning stud ies, project documentation for military construction and facility planning doc uments, regional planning products, master plans, recapitalization plans, capital improvement plans, and spe cial planning studies to include scoping studies. All work under this contract will be performed at various Navy and Marine Corps facilities and other gov ernment facilities within the NAVFAC Southeast AOR including, but not lim ited to Georgia (20 percent), Louisiana (20 percent), Texas (20 percent), South Carolina (20 percent), Mississippi (10 percent), and Alabama (10 percent). All work under this contract is expect ed to be completed by March 2015.NAVFAC awards $7.5 million contract to small business JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012 17

PAGE 20

20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 9, 2012