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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02004
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 08-02-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02004

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The Swamp Foxes of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 74 Detachment 3 successfully completed the squadrons first MH-60R deployed detachment aboard USS Normandy (CG 60). HSM-74 embarked Normandy, a Norfolk-based, guidedmissile cruiser, in early May to provide helicopter assets in support of the 40th annual Baltic Operations (BALTOPS) and FRUKUS 2012 multination al exercises. BALTOPS is an annual event to promote mutual under standing and interoperabil ity among forces of partner ing nations. During BALTOPS, 27 ships from 12 NATO and Partnership for Peace (PFP) countries participated. Additionally, there were more than 20 aircraft from eight NATO and PFP nations partici pating in this large scale Baltic Sea exercise. The opportunity to work with foreign nations in plan ning and execution is an invaluable learning experi The Navy Region Southeast (NRSE) Regional Dispatch Center (RDC) received a Special Achievement in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Award at the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) International User Conference in San Diego July 25. The awards are given annully to orga nizations that demonstrate vision, lead ership, hard work and innovative use of GIS technology, ESRI President Jack Dangermond said. Each year, the awards highlight extraordinary achievements and efforts to improve our world. At ESRI, we are always deeply impressed with the inno vation of our users. This recognition is well deserved for how theyve applied geospatial technology to address the needs of their industries and communi ties, he said. In 2008, the RDC became one of the first dispatch centers in the Navy to use ESRI ArcGIS technology to facil itate effective and efficient dispatch ing of emergency first responders. With ArcGIS, emergency calls are received at the RDC, where a location-based GIS system pinpoints the location of the emergency, integrates it with the loca tions of first responders and filters out the closest units to ensure the timeliest response. During the past six months, the RDC team has collaborated with the Duval County and City of Jacksonville 911 teams to establish valid building addresses for Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville and Naval Station (NS) Mayport. These efforts will facilitate VR-62 Nomads detach to JapanNomad 348, a C-130T Hercules assigned to fleet logistics squadron VR-62, departed NAS Jacksonville July 27 to begin its normal detach ment cycle at Naval Air Facility (NAF) Atsugi, Japan in the Western Pacific. A cadre of 23 Nomad aircrew and maintainers packed their gear and headed out to handle the Navys air logistics needs in the 7th Fleet area of respon sibility. We already have a full card of missions lined up, so were going to be very busy dur ing this deployment, said Lt. Cmdr. Ryan Breed, VR-62 oper ations officer. He explained that there is a Navy C-130T forward deployed at NAF Atsugi for lift missions in the Western Pacific 365 days a year. The Navy has five C-130T squadrons that rotate through three detachments sites (NAF Atsugi, NAS Sigonella and Central Command), so there is coverage for heavy lift requests throughout the year in all loca tions. VR-62 is a Navy Reserve squadron based at NAS Jacksonville that operates four of the Navys 19 C-130T Hercules aircraft. Air logistics missions may include highpriority passengers, special parts and supplies as well as ammunition, ordnance and aircraft engines and mail, said Breed. The Nomads are an integral part of keeping the essential supply lines flowing to numer ous Navy and Marine Corps outposts in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility, he added. Swamp Foxes complete squadrons first MH-60R deployed detachment Regional Dispatch Center receives special achievment award

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Aug. 2 1943 PT-109, under command of Lt. j.g. John F. Kennedy, is cut in half by Japanese destroyer Amagiri. 1950 Amphibious force ships land Marine First Provisional Brigade at Pusan, Korea helping to save this last area of South Korea from capture. Aug. 3 1804 American Squadron, including USS Constitution, attacks Tripoli. 1812 Frigate Essex capture British brig Brothers. 1861 Construction of USS Monitor authorized. 1861 First manned ascent in a bal loon from a ship, gunboat USS Fanny, to observe Confederate artillery position at Hampton Roads, Va. 1942 Mildred McAffee (Horton) becomes the first woman officer com missioned into Naval Reserve. 1950 First Marine Corps aviation mission against North Korea by VMF214, from USS Sicily. 1958 USS Nautilus (SSN-571) is first ship to reach the geographic North Pole submerged. 1970 USS James Madison (SSBN-627) conducts first submerged launching of Poseidon nuclear missile off Cape Kennedy. Aug. 4 1846 Sailors and Marines from USS Congress capture Santa Barbara, Calif. 1858 First trans-Atlantic cable com pleted by USS Niagara and British ship Agamemnon. 1944 Fifth Fleet carrier task forces begin air attack against Iwo Jima and the Bonin Islands. 1947 Birth of the Medical Service Corps. 1964 The Navy and national intelligence sources report a North Vietnamese PT boat attack against the destroyers USS Turner Joy (DD-951) and USS Maddox (DD-731) in the Tokin Gulf prompting Congress to pass the Tonkin Gulf Resolution on Aug. 7, 1964. The attack was later debunked. Aug. 5 1832 Frigate Potomac is first U.S. Navy ship to entertain royalty the King and Queen of Sandwich Islands, Honolulu. 1864 Rear Adm. David Farragut wins Battle of Mobile Bay, sealing off last Confederate port on Gulf Coast. 1882 Congress authorizes the first steel warships to begin the modern Navy. 1915 First air spotting for shore bat teries at Fort Monroe, Va. 1921 Yangtze River Patrol Force established as command under Asiatic Fleet. 1953 Exchange of prisoners of war of Korean Conflict (Operation Big Switch) begins. 1967 Operation Coronado III begins in Rung Sat Zone, Vietnam. 1990 Navy and Marine Task Force (USS Saipan, USS Ponce, and USS Sumter) begins evacuation of U.S. citi zens and foreign nationals from Liberia during civil war. Aug. 6 1862 CSS Arkansas destroyed by her commanding officer to prevent capture by USS Essex. 1943 Battle of Vella Gulf begins. U.S. destroyers sink three of four Japanese destroyers. 1945 Atomic bomb detonated over Hiroshima, Japan. Navy weaponeer, Capt. W.S. Parsons, armed the atomic bomb on the B-29 bomber, Enola Gay. 1782 Badge of Military Merit (Purple Heart) established. 1942 Navy Amphibious Task Force lands Marines on Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands in first U.S. land offen sive of World War II. 1964 Gulf of Tonkin Resolution passed by Congress. Aug. 7 1990 President George Bush orders Operation Desert Shield, the largest overseas deployment since Vietnam, to protect Saudi Arabia after Iraqis inva sion of Kuwait. The first combat air craft on scene were the air wings of USS Independence (CV 62) and USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), followed close ly by two Air Force F-l5C squadrons that were flight-ferried directly to Saudi Arabia with the support of USAF tank ers. Aug. 8 1972 Chief of Naval Operations Elmo Zumwalt Jr. issued Z-Gram 116 that expanded opportunities for Navy women authorizing them for sea duty as regular ships company. I never had a master plan when we began Dinner with the Smileys in November 2011. In fact, the project didnt even have a name. Because it wasnt really a project. One night at din ner, the boys said it would be sad to see their fathers empty seat at the table, and I reflexively said, Then lets fill it! I didnt know it would become a thing. I just knew that instead of counting down the days of this deploy ment, I wanted to fill up the time with interesting and meaningful memories for the boys. I wrote about our first dinner, with Sen. Susan Collins, and I was shocked at the response. Yes, shes a U.S. sena tor and all that, but what readers really loved was the simple idea of our fam ily sitting at the dinner table with her. People were hungry (pardon the pun) for this return to the family dinner table. What seemed boring to me (invit ing people to dinner) was hugely inter esting to the public. Who knew? So the idea evolved and grew, and it took on a life of its own, mostly at the direction of you, the reader. Often I wondered, How will I keep this inter esting? I mean, its just dinner. But readers didnt care. The normalcy of it all was the greatest appeal. That, however, is only half the story. For 32 weeks, weve been on a journey together. Ive shared hints, photographs and anecdotes on Facebook and in my column. Ive received your ideas for guests, and many times, those sugges tions have taken us in new directions. Ive shared snippets of what our guests have taught us, and Ive stayed stub bornly mum about which is our favorite dinner. These were the public journeys. But there have been other, more pri vate journeys. Like, for instance, how my oldest son has gone from bitter and angry about his dad being gone, to helpful, considerate and mature. In the early months, he refused to attend a certain dinner and formed an alliance with his younger brother. It was going to be just two Smileys (me and Lindell) at the table that night. I thought I had lost Ford forever to the pre-teen years. There also has been Dustins side of the story: how he feels about the din ners and what he misses most. There have been countless insights into moth erhood and raising young boys alone. There have been painfully lonely times and happy moments as well. Our guests, as different as they all have been, share one connection: they have changed us in ways that are only recognizable in hindsight. As the months pass, the boys glean and share unexpected things from past dinners. Its hard to predict what the boys will treasure. One guest, for instance, is for ever known as the one who ripped his pants jumping across two buildings. And former Maine Gov. John Baldacci, after inspiring Lindell to be governor one day and then witnessing Lindells horrible faux pas at dinner, made a last ing impact with his top-secret advice: Remember not to do that when you are governor, he said. These moments, and Baldaccis advice, have been unintentionally left out of the picture. Youve seen the funny photograph of our dog, Sparky sniffing the camera and the poignant ones of Lindell hugging Congressman Michaud, but the stories behind these moments cannot be contained in an 800-word column. It doesnt do them justice. Taken out of contextout of the larger narrativethese stories are just that: stories. I havent been able to share with you how fascinating it is to see high-pro file politicians and people humbled by their participation in an ordinary fam ily meal. I havent been able to tell you why I cried all the way to basketball practice the day after a Dinner with the Smileys. I havent been able to tell you about the dinner that never was, and what it taught the boys. All of these stories would be lost and disjointed out side of the larger story, which is really a story about family and community and what can happen when you put people around the family dinner table. So I am thrilled to tell you that Ive signed a deal with Hyperion to pub lish a book about our year of dinners. It is due to be released in time for Fathers Day 2013. I hope that Dinner with the Smileys, the book, will inspire and encourage other families to invite someone unexpected to dinner. I also hope it will bring comfort and knowing nods from anyone who has ever raised children, lived alone, or wondered, How do I matter to this community? Its been a fascinating yearfull of surprises, insights, disappointments for my family. I cant wait to put all of it into context, to tell the entire story, and to share with you 52 weeks of Dinner with the Smileys. Air show promo package wins bigHaving one of the top air shows in the country isnt just a goal. Its a real ization. The 2011 NAS Jax Air Show promo tional materials, including the logo and program, coordinated by MWR Marketing Department and created by staff at The Florida Times-Union took first place in a national competi tion. On July 14, the Inland Press Foundation named the winners of the 2012 Newspaper Business Development Contest. Winners were selected from 130 entries, recognizing special sections, niche products and other publications that generated new revenue for their parent publications. Projects ranged from salutes to hometown heroes, anniversary cel ebrations, business directories and more. In todays business reality, gener ating new revenue sources is vital for newspapers, said Inland Executive Director Tom Slaughter. The winners in this years Inland News Business Development Contest represent a truly impressive collec tion of innovative and creative proj ects. Those efforts ranged from inpaper promotions, to specialty maga zines, and online packages. All the entrants reinforce their commitment to strengthening their brand in the communities they serve while work ing to sustain the newspaper in those cities and towns.Dinner with the Smileys the book coming June 2013 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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Awards will be presented at the 2012 Newspaper Business Development Conference Aug. 9-10 at The Citadel in Chicago. Dozens of pieces were submitted for the 2011 NAS Jax Air Show entry. The logo design was the work of Peter Mackey, Florida Times-Union Specialty Publications designer. The program and promotional materials were created by George Atchley, Florida Times-Union Military Publications production coor dinator. Ellen Rykert, publisher of Military Publications for the Florida Times-Union was proud of her depart ments accomplishments. This award is a wonderful recognition on a national stage of the quality work that Military Publications produces every day, said Rykert. AIR SHOW NECE teams up with Jax mosquito control to protect Navy familiesThe Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) and Jacksonville Mosquito Control Division (JMCD) have teamed up to enhance the monitoring of mosqui toes that are capable of transmitting diseases. These collaborative efforts involve sampling 10 different sites in Duval County from July through September. Mosquitoes collected from each site are identified by NECE staff and then counted before the resulting data is relayed to JMCD in order to help direct mosquito control efforts. Surveillance is an important aid in determining which mosquitoes are potentially transmitting dis ease or are general pests. said Marah Clark, JMCD entomologist. There are 47 different species in Jacksonville, Mosquito Control is primarily concerned with about 20 of these which are either capable of transmitting disease or are a huge pest. Information collected during this study is used to identify locations in which mosquito control mea sures are needed, ultimately protecting Jacksonville residents and Navy families. Collaborating with Jacksonville Mosquito Control on a variety of projects is a wonderful opportunity for us to build an effective working relationship with our colleagues, addressing public health issues of mutual interest that impact both Jacksonville residents and our sailors and their families. said Cmdr. Eric Hoffman, NECE officer in charge. Along with monitoring general mosquito popula tions the study also aims to determine possible envi ronmental factors that favor one particular mosquito species known as the Yellow Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti which is a globally important blood feeding insects that transmit human disease. Aedes aegypti is the primary vector for transmitting yellow fever, dengue and chikungunya. said Cmdr. Peter Obenauer, NECE assistant officer in charge. These viruses not only threaten Deployed forces, but potentially can cause outbreaks here in Florida as weve seen with dengue in Key West in 2009-10. During the summer increased rainfall results in flooding of low-lying areas, this in conjunction with warmer temperatures creates ideal habitats for mos quito breeding. Following Tropical Storm Debby in June, this study found elevated numbers of aggressive flood water mosquito species as well as increased numbers of sev eral species, including the Yellow Fever mosquito. Jacksonville Mosquito Control Division recom mends individuals empty containers filled with water found near their homes to remove additional breeding sites for mosquitoes. In past years, tech nicians would have to focus a large amount of time on requests resulting from water-filled containers around a requestors own home, preventing them from responding to other areas that needed attention such as ditches, swamps, storm drains, etc. said Clark. This study is not only allowing us to help the mem bers of the community by providing valuable informa tion on mosquito populations, but gives us pertinent information that can be utilized in the deployed set ting. said HM2 Michael Denson of NECE. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012 Friendly competitionCommands battle to take VP-10s previous titleThe NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department (MWR) hosted the 2012 Sports Day Challenge July 26-27, bringing out base personnel to compete in some friendly competition. Hundreds of Sailors came out from 11 com mands to proudly represent and show their spirit. We love to see everyone come out and participate in this event. Everyone has a good time and displays great sports manship, said NAS Jax Sports Coordinator Bill Bonser. He explained what it takes to coordinate the sports chal lenge. We start by getting the word out and get command rosters turned in so we know what types of competitions we will have. Then we put supplies together and get everyone out to the various locations to compete, he said. Its so rewarding to get everyone out to have fun. Thats what we are here to do to build the morale of the troops because we cer tainly appreciate what they do every day. Locations were set up around the base with MWR repre sentatives officiating and tallying up points to see who would be taking the Sports Day Challenge trophy home this year. The competition kicked off Thursday with a 1,500-meter relay at the base track. Other events includ ed dodge ball, 3-on-3 basketball, swimming relay and one-pitch softball. Our command likes to participate in a lot of sporting events its very important to us. We are participating in every event and those of us who arent in a specific event are here to cheer on our team mates. We won the tro phy a couple years and hope to take it back to our command this year, said AWF2(NAC/AW) Natisha Wallace of VR-58. Fridays events consisted of 3-on-3 volleyball, washers, a sack relay race, tug-o-war and everyones favorite, the CO canoe race, that featured command leadership paddling it out on the St. Johns River. The competition was fierce throughout the two-day event as the teams battled it out in the 90-plus temperatures. Were out here for some friendly competition and to have some fun. Our squadron won the trophy last year, but due to our military commitments, we cant participate in all the events this year, said IS2(SS) Michael Morrison of VP-10. Sports Challenge ended with the VR-58 Sunseekers being presented the trophy after earning 1,425 points. They were followed by Navy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command with 1,000 points and Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 with 900 points. This is all about camaraderie and taking some time out to participate in sporting competitions with other base commands. Im extremely proud of our team, said VR-58 Executive Officer Cmdr. Richard Shettler, as a group of VR-58 team members loudly chanted their command mantra in the background. Thats camaraderie and teamwork right there! I really appreciate all the commands support out here. The sportsmanship was tremendous and I think everyone enjoyed themselves, said Bonser. Were always looking to make this event bigger and better and welcome comments or ideas for upcoming events.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012 5 Photos by Kaylee LaRocque and Morgan Kehnert

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The VP-5 Mad Foxes participated in exercise Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT), July 2 10, at Mactan Air Base in the Philippines. In partner ship with the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP), as well as the Philippine Coast Guard, the Mad Foxes took part in CARAT 2012 exercises and briefs designed to enhance relations between the two gov ernments armed forces. The Mad Fox detachment was headed by Combat Aircrew (CAC) 10 Mission Commander Lt. Allison Cameron and Maintenance Detachment Team Leader AMC Greg Keller. When asked about the most rewarding part of the exer cise, Cameron responded, Introducing the Philippine riders to the crew resource management aspects involved in Search and Rescue (SAR) operations was very reward ing. Its nice knowing that some of the topics we covered could help them save lives one day. The first day began with a discussion with Philippine Navy pilots and the US Navy aircrew about safety and coor dination between AFP air, sea and land forces and the U.S. Navy P-3 Orion. Throughout the week, VP-5 took members of the Philippine Navy and Air Force for famil iarization flights to include maritime patrol, coordinated operations and a SAR profile. AFP personnel were able to develop their perspective of what missions are like on a P-3 Orion as they watched CAC-10 perform duties at their respec tive stations. The riders were able to observe how each mem ber of the crew from the flight station to the sensor opera tors interacted during vari ous mission sets. The CAC-10 Tactical Coordinator, Lt. Paul Reali, highlighted the crew resource management aspect of each flight by demonstrating how each CAC must work as a team to accomplish the mis sion at hand. During the SAR evolution, CAC-10 provided coastal overThe following is the new policy regarding the wearing of one-piece flight suits. mary flight suit worn in Conus. Green flight suit will be worn with either black or Navy working uniform type 1 blue undershirt with the exception of Blue Angels (retain signature blue flight suits/yellow undershirt) and Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center (retain light blue undershirt). Undershirts shall be 100 percent cotton, crew neck and plain front. Conus in hot weather as authorized by the type commander. Tan flight suits will be worn with brown, 100 percent cotton undershirts. Undershirts shall be crew neck and plain front. worn on flight suits as follows:the U.S. flag patch shall be worn on the left arm shoulder approximately 1 inch below the seam. A weapons school patch (if authorized) shall be worn on the right shoulder only, approximately 1 inch below the seam and officer rank on the shoulders. Enlisted personnel do not wear rank insignia on flight suits, but rank shall be indicated on the required nametag. Green Nomex jackets are only autho rized on base and afloat. officers and chiefs, black Garrison cap for E1-E6. Ballcaps are not authorized for off-base wear. uniform, consumption of alcohol while off base is not permitted.Changes in flight suit regulations announced Mad Foxes train with Armed Forces of Philippines 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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VP-8 Tigers beautify Misawa ParkSailors assigned to the Fighting Tigers of VP 8 took time from their busy schedules July 23 to help some citizens of Misawa, Japan to improve the Tonami Clan Memorial Museum and Park by building a safety fence around a pond, and also by removing weeds from the parks vast garden areas. This was a community relations (COMREL) event that directly affected the residents and tourists who visit these facilities, explained NC1 Deborah Spinner, VP-8 command career counselor. The fence we built is a much-needed safety deterrent to prevent small chil dren and animals from entering the water. The park did not have the manpower to do everything that needed to be done, so VP-8 was more than willing to lend a hand, She added, Its nice to know that we are directly affecting their safety, while also beautifying their land scape. The results are definitely noticeable. This COMREL project makes the fourth event of this kind for the squadron, which is currently deployed to Naval Air Facility (NAF) Misawa in northern Japan. Since their arrival, more than 80 Tigers have volun teered for COMREL projects on base and within the local community logging more than 1,300 hours of community service. LSC Rondey Harris, VP-8 COMREL program coor dinator, said, Upon our arrival, VP-8 leadership expressed their desire to help out the community while we are deployed here. We have our mission obligations, but we are capable of making an impact beyond just aboard the aircraft. I think today is a great example of what we can accomplish when we volunteer our time and effort in the community. In addition to the safety fence around the pond, vol unteers helped clean up a parking lot flowerbed that had been taken over by weeds. This is definitely a positive outlook that strength ens the relationship between the community and the Navy, said HM3 William Meyers. It was a learning experience, too. I mean I had a Japanese person trying to teach me her language. Harris added, The genuine appreciation we received from our Japanese hosts is truly priceless. Tonami Clan Memorial Tourist Village, located on the outskirts of Misawa City, commemorates use of the first Western-style farming methods in Japan. Home based at NAS Jacksonville, the VP-8 Fighting Tigers are on a scheduled six-month deployment in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012 7

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ence for our junior and more experi enced pilots alike, said Lt. Andrew Howerton, HSM-74 operations officer. More importantly, the ability to hone our skills and tactics in a new envi ronment against unfamiliar platforms provided unparalleled training oppor tunities and experience to all those involved. FRUKUS is an annual, multina tional training exercise involving the countries of France, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The Russian navy hosted this years five-day training mission that involved coordination between Normandy, French frigate De Grasse (D612), Russian naval vessel Yaroslav Mudriy (727), and royal navy destroyer HMS York (D98). Working so close ly with other sailors from around the world was my favorite part, said AM2 Brad Hill, a maintainer with HSM-74. Seeing how we work with other coun tries, seeing their ships up close, and training with different navies created a unique international camaraderie. HSM-74 demonstrated the versatility of their two MH-60R Seahawk helicop ters to allied nations by flying missions in support of surface surveillance coordination, low slow flyer inter cept, maritime intercept operations, photo exercises, VIP passenger trans fer flights into prepared landing zones in Lithuania, and cross-deck landings aboard Denmarks HDMS Absalon (L 16). In addition to supporting the events of BALTOPS and FRUKUS, HSM-74 conducted three short-notice medi cal evacuations into unfamiliar for eign airfields, ensuring fellow Sailors received urgent medical care.Embarking on Normandy has been a terrific opportunity for our detachment to operate at sea and gain invaluable deployed experience for future opera tions said Lt. Cmdr. Matt Baker, offi cer in charge of HSM-74 Detachment 3. HSM-74 is stationed at NAS Jacksonville, and is one of eight aircraft squadrons assigned to Carrier Air Wing 3. HSM-74 RDCthe use of the system at installations throughout the Southeast Region and were a major factor leading to the award, RDC Supervisor Tom Fasanello said. The NRSE NERMS (Navy Emergency Response Management System) proj ect exemplifies geospatial collabora tion and information sharing, he said. The award is really a result of the tre mendous collaboration that has exist ed between NRSE, the NAVFAC (Naval Facilities Engineering Command) GeoReadiness Center and the installa tion Public Works Department and fire and security programs. According to Jonathan King, a 911 emergency dispatcher at the RDC, GIS technology has become crucial to a timely emergency response. With GIS services, the dispatch ers are provided a service that can cut down first response times by seconds and possibly minutes, he said. It is critical for first responders to be pro vided with an accurate location, and GIS gives dispatchers and first respond ers an advantage by giving a visual of 911 callers locations within seconds of geographical verification. The NRSE team plans to implement the system on board 13 insallations by mid-2013, maximizing dispatch effi ciency and minimizing response time throughout the region, Fasanello said. The ultimate goal is to exploit tech nology and procedures for the protec tion of our installation personnel and their families, facilities and fleet assets, he said. In the end, its hoped that the street addressing and GIS work being pioneered in the Southeast Region will become the enterprise standard for installations Navywide. The RDC currently dispatches for five installations, including NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, Naval Support Activity Panama City, Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport and NAS Meridian. Residents at these locations will continue to dial 911 for emergency services after the 2013 implementation. For those installa tions yet to consolidate, instructions for emergency notification procedures will be distributed prior to any changes. watch stations with real-time informa tion to aid in the recovery of simulated ships in distress. During this scenario, the Philippine aircrew was able to operate the Orions sensor suit to locate the stranded ves sel. Once it was found, the AFP riders manned the aircraft observer windows as the P-3 did a fly-by over the vessel in distress. The VP-5 aircrew and maintenance team were grateful for the opportunity to participate in the Philippine CARAT 2012 exercise. The highlight of the exercise was the interaction between air and sea assets, with the P-3 serving as an eye in the sky for the Philippine Navy and Coastal Guard. Whether through presentations, flights or sharing in the local culture, both the American and Philippine ser vice members came away with a better understanding and appreciation for each other. VP-5 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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First Coasts only baby friendly hospital celebrates world breastfeeding week As the only World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Childrens Fund (UNICEF) certified Baby Friendly hospital in Northeast Florida, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville kicked off World Breastfeeding Week (Aug. 1-7) with a series of activities for its patients service members (active duty and retired) and their families. The weeks events include a Baby Boot Camp class on Aug. 1 and New Mom Orientation on Aug. 3, along with an educational display in the lobby near the pharmacy. We want to do all we can to improve the health of our nations youngest heroes the children of our military members and encourage the use of mothers milk for the 1,000 babies born in our hospital each year, said NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer. And our Baby Friendly certification and preand post-natal classes illustrate our commitment to supporting new mothers and reducing the risks of childhood illnesses. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics Journal, infant mortal ity is reduced by 21 percent among breastfed babies in the U.S. And of two to three babies born each day at NH Jacksonville, about 90 percent are breastfed when they leave much higher than the national average of about 75 percent. Other benefits for baby include less ear infections, diar rhea, respiratory infections, asthma, diabetes, obesity, childhood leukemia and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Benefits for mom include less breast and ovarian cancer, diabetes and post partum depression. Breastfeeding also saves time and money for families in both baby formula and medical care. Baby Friendly certification is all about reducing infant mortality, added Northeast Florida Breastfeeding Collaborative Chair Heather Huffman. Naval Hospital Jacksonville and other hospitals like it across the nation are doing their part to promote healthier babies. NH Jacksonville is one of only 143 (as of May 2012) Baby Friendly hospitals and birth centers in the U.S. The Baby Friendly designation is awarded after a rigorous on-site survey is completed, and maintained by continuing to practice 10 crucial program elements. The comprehensive program includes ini tiating breastfeeding in the first hour of life, rooming-in with moms and babies in the same room, educating staff and patients, and fostering breast feeding support groups. Along with its classes offered dur ing World Breastfeeding Week, (a World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action effort launched 20 years ago), NH Jacksonville offers a wide range of infant care classes free-of-charge to patients giving birth at its hospitalinclud ing baby boot camp, prenatal exer cise, Hypnobirthing, infant massage, breastfeeding, prepared childbirth and an orientation program. Plus, the hospitals new, private labor/delivery and maternal/infant suites offer cou plet care (with mom and baby rooming together), breast pumps, breastfeed ing counseling from lactation nurses, siesta for the fiesta daily quiet time to support feeding, newborn hearing screening, and an educational new born channel on television. Dads are welcome to stay the night and visiting hours are round-the-clock. NH Jacksonville patients can regis ter for free classes by calling 542-2229 (BABY). To learn more about the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (adminis tered in the U.S. by Baby Friendly USA), visit www.babyfriendlyusa.org. The Duval County Health Department (DCHD) and Florida Department of Health (DOH) encourage all parents and guardians to check the immuni zation status and school requirements for their children. As children and families across Florida prepare to start another school year, it is vital that all students have their required immu nizations. Immunization documenta tion on a DOH Form 680, Certification of Immunization, is required for all students in grades Pre-Kindergarten through 12. We encourage everyone to get your child up-to-date with their immuni zations and not wait for the school rush, said Section Administrator of Immunizations Charles Alexander. There is no time like the present to update childrens immunizations and provide them with the required docu mentation to attend school. DOH emphasizes the importance of parents scheduling an appointment with a healthcare provider or DCHD today, and not to wait until the last min ute to schedule their childrens back-toschool immunizations. Accordingly, the Bureau of Immunization launched their new website www.immunizeflorida.com to bring together the best resources on vaccines and provide consumers with easy-to-understand vaccination infor mation. Encourage your healthcare provider to give all age-appropriate shots to your child during each visit. Immunizations keep your child safe from disease and cut down on sick visits to your health care provider. Many healthcare providers and families have begun preparations for the new school year, said Alexander. Immunizations should be updated at all visits, including annual physicals, interim check-ups or sport physicals. Documentation for required immu nizations is mandatory for all students entering, attending, or transferring into a Florida school in grades PreKindergarten through 12. Act now for back-to-school immunizations JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012 9

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The Feds Feed Families program, now in its fourth year, is underway through Aug. 29, and military and civil ian employees across Navy Region Southeast are encour aged to donate nonperishable food. Food donations across the federal government during the 2011 campaign totaled 5.7 million pounds -nearly three times the goal of 2 mil lion pounds, according to Department of Defense (DoD) officials. D0D alone exceeded its goal of 733,800 pounds, offi cials said. Helping others who may be having difficulty buying basic necessities only makes sense, said OS1 Richard Scott, who heads the program for the Navy Region Southeast head quarters staff. If you are able to donate, why not? In the world we live in today, you never know when you, yourself, may need help, so why not look out for your fellow man? he said. Every bit counts and with the sup port of other commands, well collect a great deal of food. The goal for Navy Region Southeast is 98,000 pounds. RP1 Michael Hawthorne, regional coordinator for the Feds Feed Families program, believes that goal can be sur passed. NAVADMIN 210/12 set the goal for the Southeast Region at 33,600 pounds last year and the total collected was 162,496 pounds. I think that speaks for itself about the regions will ingness to exceed the goal, he said. Based on last years total collection, Ive set the unof ficial goal at 170,500 pounds. Last year, NAS Jacksonville not only led the region, but also set a Navy and a nation al record as the installation with the largest collection at 133,912 pounds. The Navys goal this year of 396,000 pounds, and DoD is striving for 1.5 million pounds of food donations for nationwide dis tribution. Hawthorne said programs like this one are a great way to give back to the local com munities. Each installation donates the items collected to a food bank within their community. NAS Jacksonville has donated to Second Harvest of North Florida in the past but other locations may also be consid ered, he explained. Hawthorne added, due to its location, Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, does not collect food but instead sends a cash donation to a food bank of their choosing in the Southeast Region. Recommended items to donate ranked by need include: canned fruits and vegetables, multigrain cereals, grains, canned proteins, soups, juic es, condiments, snacks, bak ing goods, hygiene items and paper products. For more information, call 542-1531/3923 or email michael.hawthorne@navy. mil. CNRSE Feds Feed Families program underway 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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Scouts learn about nature at NAS JaxThe NAS Jacksonville Environmental Department hosted the sixth annual Nature Day Camp at the Black Point Interpretive Center July 23-27. I have about 58 Cubs Scouts and 15 Boy Scouts and 20 adults who are volunteering, said Nature Day Camp Coordinator Kim Davis. The Boy Scouts are working as den leaders while earning their environ mental science merit badge. This camp is one of 18 Nature Day Camps the Boy Scouts of America North Florida Council held this summer. During the five-day camp, Cub Scouts from the Great Muskogee District focused on different aspects of nature, ecology and conservation. The boys learned how birds, animals and insects interact within the area, how to conserve natural resources and how they help make the environment better. Were not just a regular day camp thats all about having fun. Were a learning camp, said Jean Gwinnup, who also coordinated the activities for the week. The Nature Day Camp featured a variety of activi ties ranging from arts and crafts projects to sporting events. The campers were able to build morale through dif ferent den activities like making a den flag and singing songs by the campfire. We even have a slingshot range for the scouts to practice shooting lima beans at targets, said Gwinnup. The campers were given the opportunity meet Forest Ranger Jim Volkman and Smokey the Bear who taught them the importance of maintaining fire safety when hiking or camping. The NAS Jacksonville Security Department ser vice members also visited the campers and brought military working dogs to demonstrate their ability to detect illegal drugs and explosives. These activities are meant to support the Boy Scouts of Americas mission of helping the youth build char acter, make ethical and moral choices and develop personal fitness. Gwinnup said she hopes the Cub Scouts will learn these values and become Eagle Scouts one day. Gwinnups 14-year-old grandson, Star Scout David Williams, has been attending since he was a Cub Scout. He is now a den leader at the Nature Day Camp. I was the camp director for four years, and I have seen many Cub Scouts grow up to be den leaders of the camp later on, said Gwinnup. We hope they will continue to keep coming every year. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012 11

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Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) has found a proven way to conserve energy and save money through its Resident Energy Conservation Program (RECP) pilot in Hawaii. PPV residents on average are reducing their utility consumption and improving the sustainability of the PPV project by reducing operating costs. The success of RECP in Hawaii is directly related to our service members and their families becoming more aware of the amount of electricity they were con suming, said Vice Adm. William French, command er, Navy Installations Command. As their awareness increased, families made a conscious choice to curb their utility usage without affecting their quality of life. Hawaii residents, who have already begun live bill ing, will see their allowable bandwidth decrease from 20 percent to 10 percent above or below the average normal usage rate beginning on Oct. 1, 2012. RECP began as a pilot program for PPV housing in Navy Region Hawaii in Jan. 1, 2011. The program transfers the responsibility for payment of utilities from the PPV project to the residents whose homes are individually metered. Since Hawaiis launch of RECP, the Navy PPV project has saved: 7,775 Megawatt hours (MWH) of electricity approximately 10 percent savings $1,537,060 (dollar value of the saved electricity) Over 5,300 tons of greenhouse gases. The Navy could not have achieved these savings if it were not for the cooperation of our PPV residents my hats off to them, said Corky Vazquez, CNIC hous ing program manager. Our residents got onboard with RECP and realized that their quality life did not change while reducing consumption. The savings will be reinvested back into our PPV housing communities to improve the quality of homes and neighborhoods. The schedule for the RECP Navy-wide rollout will be in phases. All PPV projects will begin live billing in 2013. The tentative rollout schedule for live billing is shown by region (check with the local housing office for details): New Orleans: January 2013 Northwest, Midwest, Southeast: April 2013 Southwest: July 2013 Mid-Atlantic and Northeast: October 2013 The Navy RECP program was initiated in response to an Office of the Secretary of Defense established requirement for PPV projects to transfer responsibility for payment of utilities to the residents. The program will initially focus on electricity and gas usage. For specific information about RECP and specific information pertaining to an installation, contact your local Navy housing office. A master list of all Navy installation housing offices is available at www.cnic. navy.mil/housing Resident Energy Conversation Program succeeding 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included August Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowl ing, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session two begins July 9, session three begins July 23 Lessons are available at the indoor and outdoor pool $40 military, $45 DoD Register for swim lessons at the base gym I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23, 2013 Preferred seating $42, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Legoland 1 day $45.50, 1 day w/water park $52.75, 2 day $54.50, 2 day w/water park $58.75 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for informa tion. Paintball Trip Aug. 4 at 9 a.m. Jax Suns Baseball Trip Aug. 9 at 6:30 p.m. River Day at the Mulberry Cove Marina Enjoy free tubing, wakeboarding, kayaking, stand-up paddle boarding, games, prizes, food and more! Aug. 11, 11 a.m. 4 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Aug. 10 & 24 for active duty Aug. 12 & 26 for retirees & DoD personnel Junior Golf Clinic Session 3 (ages 11 17) Aug. 610 Monday Friday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. $110 per week long session Twilight Special Monday Friday Play 18 holes for $17 after 3 p.m. Not applicable on holidays Golf & Dine Special Play 18-holes with cart and choice of break fast or lunch for $26! Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Lessons $150 per person August 17, 18, 19, 25 & 26 Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Register now for before & after school programAges 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12Fees based on household income National Night Out Aug. 7, 69:30 p.m. Outdoor pool & Allegheny softball field Free cookout, pool games, bounce house, guest speakers, music, outdoor movie and more!Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Sept. 10 Oct. 17 $500 per person Youth Flight Camps (ages 12 18) Advanced Aviation Course (basic course required) $150 per person Aug. 22 25 register by Aug. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012 13

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Surface Rescue Swimmer School instructors at NAS Jacksonville trained 10 Sea Cadets from Georgia and Florida, July 22 to July 27. To join the program, each participant had to be at least an E2 Sea Cadet, 16 years old and a second-class swimmer in excellent physical condition. Theyre going to get challenged just by coming to a place like this with a curriculum that leaves some adults exhausted, said AWSC Billy Price. The six-day training course provides classroom instruction and hands-on experience. It teaches Sea Cadets tech niques and proper handling of lifesav ing equipment, as well as basic skills needed for search and rescue incidents. Were not just here to teach them how to be good swimmers, but also what it takes to be a rescue swimmer, said Price. By the third day of the program, Sea Cadets were taught how to clear their masks and use their fins. They also learned how to approach a survivor in the water and carry them to safety. We also put them through our physi cal training test comprised of pull-ups, sit-ups, push-ups, a run and a swim, said AWS2 Zachary Klesser. Yesterday, they were talking about how easy its going to be, and today, they realize its much harder, said Price. This program is one of several U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps (NSCC) summer training programs that introduce Sea Cadets to a variety of military jobs. Rescue swimmers are responsible for saving pilots of downed aircraft, people aboard stranded or capsized vessels at sea, and civilian survivors of natural disasters. The goal here is to teach them what to expect, said Price. Instead of it being a huge surprise, theyre going to get an idea this week of what being a rescue swimmer is all about. The mission of the NSCC is to help cadets who are interested in the mili tary develop leadership skills and main tain an environment free of drugs and gangs. Sea Cadets are youths between the ages of 13 and 17, many of whom volunteer to become service members in the future. About 75 percent of these guys tell me that they want to be aviation rescue swimmers, said Price. So, we must be doing something right. The NSCC Summer Training Search and Rescue Program ended with a grad uation ceremony July 27.Sea Cadets learn what it takes to be a rescue swimmer 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012 15 Mad Foxes pitch in to clean up Okinawa beaches The VP-5 Mad Foxes recently teamed with the VQ-1 World Watchers and the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) to clean debris washed up on the beaches of Senaga Island, Japan. The island is just south of Naha Airport in south west Okinawa,. It is home to numerous playgrounds for children, several baseball fields, small rec reational beaches, fishing piers and even Osprey watching. Periodically, the beau tiful beaches become cluttered with lit ter. On July 7, the Mad Foxes joined the World Watchers for some cama raderie and community relations service as they cleared the trash from the beaches, playground, roads and piers. VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Erin Osborne remarked, This is one of numerous events we have planned with our JMSDF sister squadron. Community service on the beaches of Okinawa was a perfect way to start our relationship this deployment. After more than four hours of work, the squad rons returned the beach es of Senaga Island to a pristine condition. After a morning meeting with the United Kingdoms top defense official, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta lauded an important milestone in the U.S.-U.K. defense relationship. On July 19, in Fort Worth, Texas, British Defense Secretary Philip Hammond will take the first international delivery of an F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, Panetta told reporters at a Pentagon news conference alongside his British counterpart. The United Kingdom was the first partner nation to join the F-35 program and has been a tremendous partner throughout the development, testing, and the initial production, the secretary added. The aircrafts multiyear system devel opment and demonstration period involves development and testing of the entire aircraft system, including its man ufacture. Along with the United States and the United Kingdom, other nations partner ing in this phase of F-35 development are Italy, the Netherlands, Turkey, Canada, Denmark, Norway and Australia. As partners, the countries can bid for work and participate in the aircrafts develop ment. Israel and Singapore agreed to join the program as security cooperation partici pants, entitled to delivery priorities, cer tain program information and countryspecific F-35 technical studies. The United Kingdom was the first partner nation to join the F-35 program and has been a tremendous partner throughout the development, testing and initial production, Panetta told report ers. Im pleased by the significant prog ress that the program has made across all the service variants, particularly in the past year, he said, adding that despite a long road still ahead, progress is being made in testing and stabilizing future F-35 production and sustainment plans. The F-35 represents, I believe, the future of tactical aviation for both of our armed services, Panetta said. This advanced aircrafts air superiority, its precision strike capability will help ensure our dominance of the skies for years to come. Hammond said the British armed forc es will continue close collaboration with the United States as its most important defense relationship, building on the shared experience of a decade fighting together in Iraq and Afghanistan. Our wide-ranging intelligence rela tionship, our joint work on the F-35B, regenerating the U.K.s carrier strike capability, and of course the work on the nuclear deterrent and the common missile compartment -all [are] crucial key stones of our relationship, he said. Hammond added that he has assur ances at the highest levels that the F-35 program is now on track and doing very well. It went through a period 18 months or so ago when it was placed on probation because of some technical difficulties [but] its come out of those, he said. The aircrafts B variant now has clocked more than 1,000 hours of flying time and the U.S. Marine Corps is suc cessfully flying it from ships, Hammond said. He said the U.S. Defense Department has been massively supportive of [the project] and is providing us with all sorts of facilities to maintain and regenerate our capabilities to operate a carrier flight deck and to maintain the skills in our pilots, many of whom are now flying with the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps to keep those skills alive. Panetta said hes made it clear that the F-35 fighter plane is critical to a future defense strategy that depends on agility, flexibility and the ability to stay on the cutting edge of technology. Were committed to all three [F-35] variants because we think each of the forces will be able to use that kind of weaponry for the future so that we can effectively control the skies as we con front the enemies of tomorrow, Panetta said. The secretary said hes confident that were going to be able, working with industry, working with Congress, to meet our full commitment with regards to the joint strike fighter. Panetta lauds first international F-35 delivery Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony coming Nov. 8U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a member of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of special recognition in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. The registration deadline is Oct. 5. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in territori al waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve recognition and thanks for putting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans during my annu al Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the high lights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are strongly encouraged to contact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 5980481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www.crenshaw.house.gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and documentation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the certificate, veterans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214.Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program.

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In an effort make a difference in their com munity, culinary special ists (CS) from the NAS Jacksonville Flight Line Caf helped serve break fast and issue clothing at the Clara White Mission in Jacksonville July 13 for more than 350 people. By volunteering, the CSs got a firsthand look at some of the simple things many take for granted. The opportunity proved fulfilling for the volun teers and helped them form social bonds and strengthen their commu nity. I felt empowered to be able to feel like I have made a difference, said CS2 Nikita Thompson. Clara White Mission was founded by a former slave and has existed for over 100 years. It has aided in supporting the Jacksonville commu nity by providing meals andtransitional hous ingfor the homeless. They offer boundless resources for the less for tunate by providing food, housing, and training in vocational programs. Their assistance with guiding people is instru mental for their journey to help restore their lives. Navy closer to landing UAV on aircraft carrierA team from the Navy Unmanned Combat Air System program office tested communication soft ware for the Unmanned Combat Air System Carrier Demonstration (UCAS-D) program aboard the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) during its sea trials, July 7-10. The UCAS-D program, based at the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) on NAS Paxutent River, Md., is designed to demonstrate the ability for the unmanned, autonomous X47-B unmanned air vehicle (UAV) to launch from and land safely on an aircraft carrier. Thirty-seven NAVAIR engineers and contract per sonnel were embarked on Truman to test UCAS-D unmanned aircraft and shipboard UCAS-D software. We are one of the first aircraft carriers in the fleet to have Navy UCAS-D equipment installed on board, said Lt. Cmdr. Chad Young, Trumans assistant air operations officer. Its purpose is to communicate with the UCAS-D flight software on their unmanned aircraft. The tests aboard Truman ensured shipboard UCAS-D software was interfacing properly with the unmanned aircrafts software using a surrogate air craft, which was a contracted King Air. They are looking for confirmation that our systems are properly monitoring the unmanned surrogate air craft, said Young. This testing will eventually lead to unmanned aircraft landing on and launching from U.S. Navy aircraft carriers. The software on board the King Air, an aircraft that is comparable to the Navys C-12 Huron, was modified to include an accurate representation of X-47B onboard systems. In June 2011, UCAS-D was tested aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) using an F/A-18D Hornet. Were refining the system, said Lt. James Reynolds, UCAS-D surrogate project officer with Air Test and Evaluation Squadron 23 of NAS Patuxent River. During last years tests on Ike, we found minor interfacing issues with the in-flight software aboard the Hornet, and have modified that software to be more similar to the software in the X-47B. The King Air has more room on board compared to the Hornet, so we were able to include a better model of UAV soft ware and more accurately test the software. The NAVAIR team also tested shipboard UCAS-D software integration with Trumans Carrier Air-Traffic Control Center and primary flight control. The testing went well, said Reynolds. We accom plished all of our objectives and it was a very successful detachment. [The UAV] is certainly much closer to ready for prime time than it has been in the past. Testing a new aircraft, especially one that is unmanned, is a slow process, said Reynolds. Initial UAV testing was completed in 2002, followed by more testing aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) in 2005. This is what developmental flight testing is all about, said Reynolds. Its the small steps that make the big evolutions happen. The UCAS-D program is scheduled to return to Truman for upcoming underway periods to conduct further tests. I think our effort makes the evolution ary steps necessary to arrive at a capability the Navy needs, said Reynolds. There are challenges, but we are doing what it takes to achieve our goal. Flight Line Caf Sailors volunteer to make a difference 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012 17 The NAS Jax Youth Activities Center (YAC) summer campers presented their annual Summer Camp Talent Show for family members and friends at the YAC Gymnasium July 27. The children showcased their talents by singing, dancing and performing skits as the audience cheered them on. The whole theme of the week has been based around talent giving the kids the opportunity to discover what they are talents they might have. Talent is not just singing and dancing so we try to give them different ideas of how they can use their talents. And by putting on this show each year, it gives them the chance to show off their skills. Every child is unique in their own way, said YAC Director Aaron Long. According to Long, the kids and their counselors start planning for the show several weeks before the event and spend quite a bit of time practicing their moves. They all come up with their own songs and routines. They are respon sible for doing all their own numbers, he added. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil Natasha Gascot, a civilian employee at NAS Jax Security, is thinking about buying a motorcycle. But before she goes shopping, she wants to develop her riding skills through a free basic rider course (BRC) offered on base by Cape Fox Professional Services (CFPS), a company contracted by the Navy to provide recreational, traffic and motorcycle safety training. Natasha was part of a beginners riding class on the practice range at NAS Jacksonville and she was hav ing a little difficulty coordinating the controls on her range motorcycle, said Connie Policastro, a motorcycle safety instructor with CFPS. So her instructor recommended that she come to Building One and put in some time on the simulator to become more comfortable with the controls. Gascot said, This simulator allows me to practice throttle-and-clutch coordination for smoother gear shifts, as well as proper braking. I want to build my confidence and be ready for the next BRC class. Policastro explained that the Honda SMART (Safe Motorcyclist Awareness and Recognition Trainer) helps new motorcycle riders develop defen sive riding skills. Its a traffic simu lator designed around the real-world challenge of riding in traffic on public roads. The key to the SMART is that it uti lizes a motorcycle-like cockpit, with a seat, handlebars fitted with active throttle, front brake and clutch, and foot pegs with rear brake and shift lever to fully imitate a motorcycle. Other technical skills taught dur ing SMART training include how to properly lean, turn, brake, accelerate, and take necessary emergency evasive actions. YAC kids display their talent Motorcycle trainer provides no-risk intro to street riding The Navy announced the annual recertification of Special Duty Assignment Pay (SDAP) for fiscal year 2012 in a mes sage released July 6. According to NAVADMIN 206/12, SDAP recertification is conducted annually to ensure commands are maintain ing an accurate account of members eligibility for SDAP. Recertification began with the release of the message and commands have until Aug. 31. SDAP is an incentive pay, ranging from $75 to $450 a month, used to entice qualified personnel to accept desig nated assignments and to sustain adequate manning levels. In order to qualify for SDAP, Sailors must be assigned to and working in a valid billet on the command Manpower Authorization Listing. This billet must be authorized by the Bureau of Naval Personnel as a Special Duty Assignment billet according to the latest SDAP NAVADMIN. Recertification is typically completed by a commands admin department or personnel officer with the com manding officer recertifying each member. Sailors can read OPNAVINST 1160.6B and talk with their command career counselor to learn more about SDAP. A complete list of authorized skills and pay levels can be found in NAVADMIN 356/11.Annual Special Duty Assignment Pay recertification underway



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THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The Swamp Foxes of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 74 Detachment 3 successfully completed the squadrons first MH-60R deployed detachment aboard USS Normandy (CG 60). HSM-74 embarked Normandy, a Norfolk-based, guidedmissile cruiser, in early May to provide helicopter assets in support of the 40th annual Baltic Operations (BALTOPS) and FRUKUS 2012 multinational exercises. BALTOPS is an annual event to promote mutual under standing and interoperabil ity among forces of partner ing nations. During BALTOPS, 27 ships from 12 NATO and Partnership for Peace (PFP) countries participated. Additionally, there were more than 20 aircraft from eight NATO and PFP nations participating in this large scale Baltic Sea exercise. The opportunity to work with foreign nations in plan ning and execution is an invaluable learning experi The Navy Region Southeast (NRSE) Regional Dispatch Center (RDC) received a Special Achievement in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Award at the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) International User Conference in San Diego July 25. The awards are given annully to organizations that demonstrate vision, leadership, hard work and innovative use of GIS technology, ESRI President Jack Dangermond said. Each year, the awards highlight extraordinary achievements and efforts to improve our world. At ESRI, we are always deeply impressed with the innovation of our users. This recognition is well deserved for how theyve applied geospatial technology to address the needs of their industries and communities, he said. In 2008, the RDC became one of the first dispatch centers in the Navy to use ESRI ArcGIS technology to facil itate effective and efficient dispatch ing of emergency first responders. With ArcGIS, emergency calls are received at the RDC, where a location-based GIS system pinpoints the location of the emergency, integrates it with the loca tions of first responders and filters out the closest units to ensure the timeliest response. During the past six months, the RDC team has collaborated with the Duval County and City of Jacksonville 911 teams to establish valid building addresses for Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville and Naval Station (NS) Mayport. These efforts will facilitate VR-62 Nomads detach to JapanNomad 348, a C-130T Hercules assigned to fleet logistics squadron VR-62, departed NAS Jacksonville July 27 to begin its normal detach ment cycle at Naval Air Facility (NAF) Atsugi, Japan in the Western Pacific. A cadre of 23 Nomad aircrew and maintainers packed their gear and headed out to handle the Navys air logistics needs in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility. We already have a full card of missions lined up, so were going to be very busy dur ing this deployment, said Lt. Cmdr. Ryan Breed, VR-62 operations officer. He explained that there is a Navy C-130T forward deployed at NAF Atsugi for lift missions in the Western Pacific 365 days a year. The Navy has five C-130T squadrons that rotate through three detachments sites (NAF Atsugi, NAS Sigonella and Central Command), so there is coverage for heavy lift requests throughout the year in all locations. VR-62 is a Navy Reserve squadron based at NAS Jacksonville that operates four of the Navys 19 C-130T Hercules aircraft. Air logistics missions may include highpriority passengers, special parts and supplies as well as ammunition, ordnance and aircraft engines and mail, said Breed. The Nomads are an integral part of keeping the essential supply lines flowing to numerous Navy and Marine Corps outposts in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility, he added. Swamp Foxes complete squadrons first MH-60R deployed detachment Regional Dispatch Center receives special achievment award

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Aug. 2 1943 PT-109, under command of Lt. j.g. John F. Kennedy, is cut in half by Japanese destroyer Amagiri. 1950 Amphibious force ships land Marine First Provisional Brigade at Pusan, Korea helping to save this last area of South Korea from capture. Aug. 3 1804 American Squadron, including USS Constitution, attacks Tripoli. 1812 Frigate Essex capture British brig Brothers. 1861 Construction of USS Monitor authorized. 1861 First manned ascent in a bal loon from a ship, gunboat USS Fanny, to observe Confederate artillery position at Hampton Roads, Va. 1942 Mildred McAffee (Horton) becomes the first woman officer com missioned into Naval Reserve. 1950 First Marine Corps aviation mission against North Korea by VMF214, from USS Sicily. 1958 USS Nautilus (SSN-571) is first ship to reach the geographic North Pole submerged. 1970 USS James Madison (SSBN-627) conducts first submerged launching of Poseidon nuclear missile off Cape Kennedy. Aug. 4 1846 Sailors and Marines from USS Congress capture Santa Barbara, Calif. 1858 First trans-Atlantic cable completed by USS Niagara and British ship Agamemnon. 1944 Fifth Fleet carrier task forces begin air attack against Iwo Jima and the Bonin Islands. 1947 Birth of the Medical Service Corps. 1964 The Navy and national intelligence sources report a North Vietnamese PT boat attack against the destroyers USS Turner Joy (DD-951) and USS Maddox (DD-731) in the Tokin Gulf prompting Congress to pass the Tonkin Gulf Resolution on Aug. 7, 1964. The attack was later debunked. Aug. 5 1832 Frigate Potomac is first U.S. Navy ship to entertain royalty the King and Queen of Sandwich Islands, Honolulu. 1864 Rear Adm. David Farragut wins Battle of Mobile Bay, sealing off last Confederate port on Gulf Coast. 1882 Congress authorizes the first steel warships to begin the modern Navy. 1915 First air spotting for shore batteries at Fort Monroe, Va. 1921 Yangtze River Patrol Force established as command under Asiatic Fleet. 1953 Exchange of prisoners of war of Korean Conflict (Operation Big Switch) begins. 1967 Operation Coronado III begins in Rung Sat Zone, Vietnam. 1990 Navy and Marine Task Force (USS Saipan, USS Ponce, and USS Sumter) begins evacuation of U.S. citi zens and foreign nationals from Liberia during civil war. Aug. 6 1862 CSS Arkansas destroyed by her commanding officer to prevent capture by USS Essex. 1943 Battle of Vella Gulf begins. U.S. destroyers sink three of four Japanese destroyers. 1945 Atomic bomb detonated over Hiroshima, Japan. Navy weaponeer, Capt. W.S. Parsons, armed the atomic bomb on the B-29 bomber, Enola Gay. 1782 Badge of Military Merit (Purple Heart) established. 1942 Navy Amphibious Task Force lands Marines on Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands in first U.S. land offensive of World War II. 1964 Gulf of Tonkin Resolution passed by Congress. Aug. 7 1990 President George Bush orders Operation Desert Shield, the largest overseas deployment since Vietnam, to protect Saudi Arabia after Iraqis inva sion of Kuwait. The first combat air craft on scene were the air wings of USS Independence (CV 62) and USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), followed closely by two Air Force F-l5C squadrons that were flight-ferried directly to Saudi Arabia with the support of USAF tank ers. Aug. 8 1972 Chief of Naval Operations Elmo Zumwalt Jr. issued Z-Gram 116 that expanded opportunities for Navy women authorizing them for sea duty as regular ships company. I never had a master plan when we began Dinner with the Smileys in November 2011. In fact, the project didnt even have a name. Because it wasnt really a project. One night at dinner, the boys said it would be sad to see their fathers empty seat at the table, and I reflexively said, Then lets fill it! I didnt know it would become a thing. I just knew that instead of counting down the days of this deployment, I wanted to fill up the time with interesting and meaningful memories for the boys. I wrote about our first dinner, with Sen. Susan Collins, and I was shocked at the response. Yes, shes a U.S. sena tor and all that, but what readers really loved was the simple idea of our fam ily sitting at the dinner table with her. People were hungry (pardon the pun) for this return to the family dinner table. What seemed boring to me (inviting people to dinner) was hugely inter esting to the public. Who knew? So the idea evolved and grew, and it took on a life of its own, mostly at the direction of you, the reader. Often I wondered, How will I keep this inter esting? I mean, its just dinner. But readers didnt care. The normalcy of it all was the greatest appeal. That, however, is only half the story. For 32 weeks, weve been on a journey together. Ive shared hints, photographs and anecdotes on Facebook and in my column. Ive received your ideas for guests, and many times, those sugges tions have taken us in new directions. Ive shared snippets of what our guests have taught us, and Ive stayed stub bornly mum about which is our favorite dinner. These were the public journeys. But there have been other, more private journeys. Like, for instance, how my oldest son has gone from bitter and angry about his dad being gone, to helpful, considerate and mature. In the early months, he refused to attend a certain dinner and formed an alliance with his younger brother. It was going to be just two Smileys (me and Lindell) at the table that night. I thought I had lost Ford forever to the pre-teen years. There also has been Dustins side of the story: how he feels about the din ners and what he misses most. There have been countless insights into motherhood and raising young boys alone. There have been painfully lonely times and happy moments as well. Our guests, as different as they all have been, share one connection: they have changed us in ways that are only recognizable in hindsight. As the months pass, the boys glean and share unexpected things from past dinners. Its hard to predict what the boys will treasure. One guest, for instance, is forever known as the one who ripped his pants jumping across two buildings. And former Maine Gov. John Baldacci, after inspiring Lindell to be governor one day and then witnessing Lindells horrible faux pas at dinner, made a lasting impact with his top-secret advice: Remember not to do that when you are governor, he said. These moments, and Baldaccis advice, have been unintentionally left out of the picture. Youve seen the funny photograph of our dog, Sparky sniffing the camera and the poignant ones of Lindell hugging Congressman Michaud, but the stories behind these moments cannot be contained in an 800-word column. It doesnt do them justice. Taken out of contextout of the larger narrativethese stories are just that: stories. I havent been able to share with you how fascinating it is to see high-pro file politicians and people humbled by their participation in an ordinary fam ily meal. I havent been able to tell you why I cried all the way to basketball practice the day after a Dinner with the Smileys. I havent been able to tell you about the dinner that never was, and what it taught the boys. All of these stories would be lost and disjointed outside of the larger story, which is really a story about family and community and what can happen when you put people around the family dinner table. So I am thrilled to tell you that Ive signed a deal with Hyperion to pub lish a book about our year of dinners. It is due to be released in time for Fathers Day 2013. I hope that Dinner with the Smileys, the book, will inspire and encourage other families to invite someone unexpected to dinner. I also hope it will bring comfort and knowing nods from anyone who has ever raised children, lived alone, or wondered, How do I matter to this community? Its been a fascinating yearfull of surprises, insights, disappointments for my family. I cant wait to put all of it into context, to tell the entire story, and to share with you 52 weeks of Dinner with the Smileys. Air show promo package wins bigHaving one of the top air shows in the country isnt just a goal. Its a realization. The 2011 NAS Jax Air Show promo tional materials, including the logo and program, coordinated by MWR Marketing Department and created by staff at The Florida Times-Union took first place in a national competition. On July 14, the Inland Press Foundation named the winners of the 2012 Newspaper Business Development Contest. Winners were selected from 130 entries, recognizing special sections, niche products and other publications that generated new revenue for their parent publications. Projects ranged from salutes to hometown heroes, anniversary cel ebrations, business directories and more. In todays business reality, gener ating new revenue sources is vital for newspapers, said Inland Executive Director Tom Slaughter. The winners in this years Inland News Business Development Contest represent a truly impressive collec tion of innovative and creative proj ects. Those efforts ranged from inpaper promotions, to specialty magazines, and online packages. All the entrants reinforce their commitment to strengthening their brand in the communities they serve while work ing to sustain the newspaper in those cities and towns.Dinner with the Smileys the book coming June 2013 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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Awards will be presented at the 2012 Newspaper Business Development Conference Aug. 9-10 at The Citadel in Chicago. Dozens of pieces were submitted for the 2011 NAS Jax Air Show entry. The logo design was the work of Peter Mackey, Florida Times-Union Specialty Publications designer. The program and promotional materials were created by George Atchley, Florida Times-Union Military Publications production coor dinator. Ellen Rykert, publisher of Military Publications for the Florida Times-Union was proud of her depart ments accomplishments. This award is a wonderful recognition on a national stage of the quality work that Military Publications produces every day, said Rykert. AIR SHOW NECE teams up with Jax mosquito control to protect Navy familiesThe Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) and Jacksonville Mosquito Control Division (JMCD) have teamed up to enhance the monitoring of mosquitoes that are capable of transmitting diseases. These collaborative efforts involve sampling 10 different sites in Duval County from July through September. Mosquitoes collected from each site are identified by NECE staff and then counted before the resulting data is relayed to JMCD in order to help direct mosquito control efforts. Surveillance is an important aid in determining which mosquitoes are potentially transmitting dis ease or are general pests. said Marah Clark, JMCD entomologist. There are 47 different species in Jacksonville, Mosquito Control is primarily concerned with about 20 of these which are either capable of transmitting disease or are a huge pest. Information collected during this study is used to identify locations in which mosquito control mea sures are needed, ultimately protecting Jacksonville residents and Navy families. Collaborating with Jacksonville Mosquito Control on a variety of projects is a wonderful opportunity for us to build an effective working relationship with our colleagues, addressing public health issues of mutual interest that impact both Jacksonville residents and our sailors and their families. said Cmdr. Eric Hoffman, NECE officer in charge. Along with monitoring general mosquito popula tions the study also aims to determine possible envi ronmental factors that favor one particular mosquito species known as the Yellow Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti which is a globally important blood feeding insects that transmit human disease. Aedes aegypti is the primary vector for transmitting yellow fever, dengue and chikungunya. said Cmdr. Peter Obenauer, NECE assistant officer in charge. These viruses not only threaten Deployed forces, but potentially can cause outbreaks here in Florida as weve seen with dengue in Key West in 2009-10. During the summer increased rainfall results in flooding of low-lying areas, this in conjunction with warmer temperatures creates ideal habitats for mos quito breeding. Following Tropical Storm Debby in June, this study found elevated numbers of aggressive flood water mosquito species as well as increased numbers of several species, including the Yellow Fever mosquito. Jacksonville Mosquito Control Division recom mends individuals empty containers filled with water found near their homes to remove additional breeding sites for mosquitoes. In past years, tech nicians would have to focus a large amount of time on requests resulting from water-filled containers around a requestors own home, preventing them from responding to other areas that needed attention such as ditches, swamps, storm drains, etc. said Clark. This study is not only allowing us to help the members of the community by providing valuable information on mosquito populations, but gives us pertinent information that can be utilized in the deployed setting. said HM2 Michael Denson of NECE. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012 Friendly competitionCommands battle to take VP-10s previous titleThe NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department (MWR) hosted the 2012 Sports Day Challenge July 26-27, bringing out base personnel to compete in some friendly competition. Hundreds of Sailors came out from 11 com mands to proudly represent and show their spirit. We love to see everyone come out and participate in this event. Everyone has a good time and displays great sports manship, said NAS Jax Sports Coordinator Bill Bonser. He explained what it takes to coordinate the sports challenge. We start by getting the word out and get command rosters turned in so we know what types of competitions we will have. Then we put supplies together and get everyone out to the various locations to compete, he said. Its so rewarding to get everyone out to have fun. Thats what we are here to do to build the morale of the troops because we certainly appreciate what they do every day. Locations were set up around the base with MWR representatives officiating and tallying up points to see who would be taking the Sports Day Challenge trophy home this year. The competition kicked off Thursday with a 1,500-meter relay at the base track. Other events includ ed dodge ball, 3-on-3 basketball, swimming relay and one-pitch softball. Our command likes to participate in a lot of sporting events its very important to us. We are participating in every event and those of us who arent in a specific event are here to cheer on our team mates. We won the trophy a couple years and hope to take it back to our command this year, said AWF2(NAC/AW) Natisha Wallace of VR-58. Fridays events consisted of 3-on-3 volleyball, washers, a sack relay race, tug-o-war and everyones favorite, the CO canoe race, that featured command leadership paddling it out on the St. Johns River. The competition was fierce throughout the two-day event as the teams battled it out in the 90-plus temperatures. Were out here for some friendly competition and to have some fun. Our squadron won the trophy last year, but due to our military commitments, we cant participate in all the events this year, said IS2(SS) Michael Morrison of VP-10. Sports Challenge ended with the VR-58 Sunseekers being presented the trophy after earning 1,425 points. They were followed by Navy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command with 1,000 points and Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 with 900 points. This is all about camaraderie and taking some time out to participate in sporting competitions with other base commands. Im extremely proud of our team, said VR-58 Executive Officer Cmdr. Richard Shettler, as a group of VR-58 team members loudly chanted their command mantra in the background. Thats camaraderie and teamwork right there! I really appreciate all the commands support out here. The sportsmanship was tremendous and I think everyone enjoyed themselves, said Bonser. Were always looking to make this event bigger and better and welcome comments or ideas for upcoming events.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012 5 Photos by Kaylee LaRocque and Morgan Kehnert

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The VP-5 Mad Foxes participated in exercise Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT), July 2 10, at Mactan Air Base in the Philippines. In partner ship with the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP), as well as the Philippine Coast Guard, the Mad Foxes took part in CARAT 2012 exercises and briefs designed to enhance relations between the two governments armed forces. The Mad Fox detachment was headed by Combat Aircrew (CAC) 10 Mission Commander Lt. Allison Cameron and Maintenance Detachment Team Leader AMC Greg Keller. When asked about the most rewarding part of the exer cise, Cameron responded, Introducing the Philippine riders to the crew resource management aspects involved in Search and Rescue (SAR) operations was very reward ing. Its nice knowing that some of the topics we covered could help them save lives one day. The first day began with a discussion with Philippine Navy pilots and the US Navy aircrew about safety and coordination between AFP air, sea and land forces and the U.S. Navy P-3 Orion. Throughout the week, VP-5 took members of the Philippine Navy and Air Force for famil iarization flights to include maritime patrol, coordinated operations and a SAR profile. AFP personnel were able to develop their perspective of what missions are like on a P-3 Orion as they watched CAC-10 perform duties at their respective stations. The riders were able to observe how each member of the crew from the flight station to the sensor opera tors interacted during vari ous mission sets. The CAC-10 Tactical Coordinator, Lt. Paul Reali, highlighted the crew resource management aspect of each flight by demonstrating how each CAC must work as a team to accomplish the mis sion at hand. During the SAR evolution, CAC-10 provided coastal overThe following is the new policy regarding the wearing of one-piece flight suits. mary flight suit worn in Conus. Green flight suit will be worn with either black or Navy working uniform type 1 blue undershirt with the exception of Blue Angels (retain signature blue flight suits/yellow undershirt) and Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center (retain light blue undershirt). Undershirts shall be 100 percent cotton, crew neck and plain front. Conus in hot weather as authorized by the type commander. Tan flight suits will be worn with brown, 100 percent cotton undershirts. Undershirts shall be crew neck and plain front. worn on flight suits as follows:the U.S. flag patch shall be worn on the left arm shoulder approximately 1 inch below the seam. A weapons school patch (if authorized) shall be worn on the right shoulder only, approximately 1 inch below the seam and officer rank on the shoulders. Enlisted personnel do not wear rank insignia on flight suits, but rank shall be indicated on the required nametag. Green Nomex jackets are only autho rized on base and afloat. officers and chiefs, black Garrison cap for E1-E6. Ballcaps are not authorized for off-base wear. uniform, consumption of alcohol while off base is not permitted.Changes in flight suit regulations announced Mad Foxes train with Armed Forces of Philippines 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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VP-8 Tigers beautify Misawa ParkSailors assigned to the Fighting Tigers of VP 8 took time from their busy schedules July 23 to help some citizens of Misawa, Japan to improve the Tonami Clan Memorial Museum and Park by building a safety fence around a pond, and also by removing weeds from the parks vast garden areas. This was a community relations (COMREL) event that directly affected the residents and tourists who visit these facilities, explained NC1 Deborah Spinner, VP-8 command career counselor. The fence we built is a much-needed safety deterrent to prevent small chil dren and animals from entering the water. The park did not have the manpower to do everything that needed to be done, so VP-8 was more than willing to lend a hand, She added, Its nice to know that we are directly affecting their safety, while also beautifying their landscape. The results are definitely noticeable. This COMREL project makes the fourth event of this kind for the squadron, which is currently deployed to Naval Air Facility (NAF) Misawa in northern Japan. Since their arrival, more than 80 Tigers have volun teered for COMREL projects on base and within the local community logging more than 1,300 hours of community service. LSC Rondey Harris, VP-8 COMREL program coor dinator, said, Upon our arrival, VP-8 leadership expressed their desire to help out the community while we are deployed here. We have our mission obligations, but we are capable of making an impact beyond just aboard the aircraft. I think today is a great example of what we can accomplish when we volunteer our time and effort in the community. In addition to the safety fence around the pond, volunteers helped clean up a parking lot flowerbed that had been taken over by weeds. This is definitely a positive outlook that strength ens the relationship between the community and the Navy, said HM3 William Meyers. It was a learning experience, too. I mean I had a Japanese person trying to teach me her language. Harris added, The genuine appreciation we received from our Japanese hosts is truly priceless. Tonami Clan Memorial Tourist Village, located on the outskirts of Misawa City, commemorates use of the first Western-style farming methods in Japan. Home based at NAS Jacksonville, the VP-8 Fighting Tigers are on a scheduled six-month deployment in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012 7

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ence for our junior and more experi enced pilots alike, said Lt. Andrew Howerton, HSM-74 operations officer. More importantly, the ability to hone our skills and tactics in a new envi ronment against unfamiliar platforms provided unparalleled training opportunities and experience to all those involved. FRUKUS is an annual, multina tional training exercise involving the countries of France, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The Russian navy hosted this years five-day training mission that involved coordination between Normandy, French frigate De Grasse (D612), Russian naval vessel Yaroslav Mudriy (727), and royal navy destroyer HMS York (D98). Working so close ly with other sailors from around the world was my favorite part, said AM2 Brad Hill, a maintainer with HSM-74. Seeing how we work with other countries, seeing their ships up close, and training with different navies created a unique international camaraderie. HSM-74 demonstrated the versatility of their two MH-60R Seahawk helicopters to allied nations by flying missions in support of surface surveillance coordination, low slow flyer inter cept, maritime intercept operations, photo exercises, VIP passenger trans fer flights into prepared landing zones in Lithuania, and cross-deck landings aboard Denmarks HDMS Absalon (L 16). In addition to supporting the events of BALTOPS and FRUKUS, HSM-74 conducted three short-notice medi cal evacuations into unfamiliar for eign airfields, ensuring fellow Sailors received urgent medical care.Embarking on Normandy has been a terrific opportunity for our detachment to operate at sea and gain invaluable deployed experience for future opera tions said Lt. Cmdr. Matt Baker, offi cer in charge of HSM-74 Detachment 3. HSM-74 is stationed at NAS Jacksonville, and is one of eight aircraft squadrons assigned to Carrier Air Wing 3. HSM-74 RDCthe use of the system at installations throughout the Southeast Region and were a major factor leading to the award, RDC Supervisor Tom Fasanello said. The NRSE NERMS (Navy Emergency Response Management System) proj ect exemplifies geospatial collabora tion and information sharing, he said. The award is really a result of the tre mendous collaboration that has exist ed between NRSE, the NAVFAC (Naval Facilities Engineering Command) GeoReadiness Center and the installation Public Works Department and fire and security programs. According to Jonathan King, a 911 emergency dispatcher at the RDC, GIS technology has become crucial to a timely emergency response. With GIS services, the dispatch ers are provided a service that can cut down first response times by seconds and possibly minutes, he said. It is critical for first responders to be pro vided with an accurate location, and GIS gives dispatchers and first responders an advantage by giving a visual of 911 callers locations within seconds of geographical verification. The NRSE team plans to implement the system on board 13 insallations by mid-2013, maximizing dispatch effi ciency and minimizing response time throughout the region, Fasanello said. The ultimate goal is to exploit tech nology and procedures for the protec tion of our installation personnel and their families, facilities and fleet assets, he said. In the end, its hoped that the street addressing and GIS work being pioneered in the Southeast Region will become the enterprise standard for installations Navywide. The RDC currently dispatches for five installations, including NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, Naval Support Activity Panama City, Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport and NAS Meridian. Residents at these locations will continue to dial 911 for emergency services after the 2013 implementation. For those installa tions yet to consolidate, instructions for emergency notification procedures will be distributed prior to any changes. watch stations with real-time information to aid in the recovery of simulated ships in distress. During this scenario, the Philippine aircrew was able to operate the Orions sensor suit to locate the stranded vessel. Once it was found, the AFP riders manned the aircraft observer windows as the P-3 did a fly-by over the vessel in distress. The VP-5 aircrew and maintenance team were grateful for the opportunity to participate in the Philippine CARAT 2012 exercise. The highlight of the exercise was the interaction between air and sea assets, with the P-3 serving as an eye in the sky for the Philippine Navy and Coastal Guard. Whether through presentations, flights or sharing in the local culture, both the American and Philippine service members came away with a better understanding and appreciation for each other. VP-5 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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First Coasts only baby friendly hospital celebrates world breastfeeding week As the only World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Childrens Fund (UNICEF) certified Baby Friendly hospital in Northeast Florida, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville kicked off World Breastfeeding Week (Aug. 1-7) with a series of activities for its patients service members (active duty and retired) and their families. The weeks events include a Baby Boot Camp class on Aug. 1 and New Mom Orientation on Aug. 3, along with an educational display in the lobby near the pharmacy. We want to do all we can to improve the health of our nations youngest heroes the children of our military members and encourage the use of mothers milk for the 1,000 babies born in our hospital each year, said NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer. And our Baby Friendly certification and preand post-natal classes illustrate our commitment to supporting new mothers and reducing the risks of childhood illnesses. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics Journal, infant mortal ity is reduced by 21 percent among breastfed babies in the U.S. And of two to three babies born each day at NH Jacksonville, about 90 percent are breastfed when they leave much higher than the national average of about 75 percent. Other benefits for baby include less ear infections, diar rhea, respiratory infections, asthma, diabetes, obesity, childhood leukemia and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Benefits for mom include less breast and ovarian cancer, diabetes and post partum depression. Breastfeeding also saves time and money for families in both baby formula and medical care. Baby Friendly certification is all about reducing infant mortality, added Northeast Florida Breastfeeding Collaborative Chair Heather Huffman. Naval Hospital Jacksonville and other hospitals like it across the nation are doing their part to promote healthier babies. NH Jacksonville is one of only 143 (as of May 2012) Baby Friendly hospitals and birth centers in the U.S. The Baby Friendly designation is awarded after a rigorous on-site survey is completed, and maintained by continuing to practice 10 crucial program elements. The comprehensive program includes ini tiating breastfeeding in the first hour of life, rooming-in with moms and babies in the same room, educating staff and patients, and fostering breastfeeding support groups. Along with its classes offered dur ing World Breastfeeding Week, (a World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action effort launched 20 years ago), NH Jacksonville offers a wide range of infant care classes free-of-charge to patients giving birth at its hospitalinclud ing baby boot camp, prenatal exer cise, Hypnobirthing, infant massage, breastfeeding, prepared childbirth and an orientation program. Plus, the hospitals new, private labor/delivery and maternal/infant suites offer cou plet care (with mom and baby rooming together), breast pumps, breastfeed ing counseling from lactation nurses, siesta for the fiesta daily quiet time to support feeding, newborn hearing screening, and an educational new born channel on television. Dads are welcome to stay the night and visiting hours are round-the-clock. NH Jacksonville patients can regis ter for free classes by calling 542-2229 (BABY). To learn more about the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (adminis tered in the U.S. by Baby Friendly USA), visit www.babyfriendlyusa.org. The Duval County Health Department (DCHD) and Florida Department of Health (DOH) encourage all parents and guardians to check the immuni zation status and school requirements for their children. As children and families across Florida prepare to start another school year, it is vital that all students have their required immu nizations. Immunization documenta tion on a DOH Form 680, Certification of Immunization, is required for all students in grades Pre-Kindergarten through 12. We encourage everyone to get your child up-to-date with their immuni zations and not wait for the school rush, said Section Administrator of Immunizations Charles Alexander. There is no time like the present to update childrens immunizations and provide them with the required docu mentation to attend school. DOH emphasizes the importance of parents scheduling an appointment with a healthcare provider or DCHD today, and not to wait until the last minute to schedule their childrens back-toschool immunizations. Accordingly, the Bureau of Immunization launched their new website www.immunizeflorida.com to bring together the best resources on vaccines and provide consumers with easy-to-understand vaccination infor mation. Encourage your healthcare provider to give all age-appropriate shots to your child during each visit. Immunizations keep your child safe from disease and cut down on sick visits to your health care provider. Many healthcare providers and families have begun preparations for the new school year, said Alexander. Immunizations should be updated at all visits, including annual physicals, interim check-ups or sport physicals. Documentation for required immu nizations is mandatory for all students entering, attending, or transferring into a Florida school in grades PreKindergarten through 12. Act now for back-to-school immunizations JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012 9

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The Feds Feed Families program, now in its fourth year, is underway through Aug. 29, and military and civilian employees across Navy Region Southeast are encour aged to donate nonperishable food. Food donations across the federal government during the 2011 campaign totaled 5.7 million pounds -nearly three times the goal of 2 mil lion pounds, according to Department of Defense (DoD) officials. D0D alone exceeded its goal of 733,800 pounds, officials said. Helping others who may be having difficulty buying basic necessities only makes sense, said OS1 Richard Scott, who heads the program for the Navy Region Southeast head quarters staff. If you are able to donate, why not? In the world we live in today, you never know when you, yourself, may need help, so why not look out for your fellow man? he said. Every bit counts and with the sup port of other commands, well collect a great deal of food. The goal for Navy Region Southeast is 98,000 pounds. RP1 Michael Hawthorne, regional coordinator for the Feds Feed Families program, believes that goal can be sur passed. NAVADMIN 210/12 set the goal for the Southeast Region at 33,600 pounds last year and the total collected was 162,496 pounds. I think that speaks for itself about the regions will ingness to exceed the goal, he said. Based on last years total collection, Ive set the unof ficial goal at 170,500 pounds. Last year, NAS Jacksonville not only led the region, but also set a Navy and a nation al record as the installation with the largest collection at 133,912 pounds. The Navys goal this year of 396,000 pounds, and DoD is striving for 1.5 million pounds of food donations for nationwide dis tribution. Hawthorne said programs like this one are a great way to give back to the local com munities. Each installation donates the items collected to a food bank within their community. NAS Jacksonville has donated to Second Harvest of North Florida in the past but other locations may also be consid ered, he explained. Hawthorne added, due to its location, Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, does not collect food but instead sends a cash donation to a food bank of their choosing in the Southeast Region. Recommended items to donate ranked by need include: canned fruits and vegetables, multigrain cereals, grains, canned proteins, soups, juic es, condiments, snacks, bak ing goods, hygiene items and paper products. For more information, call 542-1531/3923 or email michael.hawthorne@navy. mil. CNRSE Feds Feed Families program underway 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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Scouts learn about nature at NAS JaxThe NAS Jacksonville Environmental Department hosted the sixth annual Nature Day Camp at the Black Point Interpretive Center July 23-27. I have about 58 Cubs Scouts and 15 Boy Scouts and 20 adults who are volunteering, said Nature Day Camp Coordinator Kim Davis. The Boy Scouts are working as den leaders while earning their environ mental science merit badge. This camp is one of 18 Nature Day Camps the Boy Scouts of America North Florida Council held this summer. During the five-day camp, Cub Scouts from the Great Muskogee District focused on different aspects of nature, ecology and conservation. The boys learned how birds, animals and insects interact within the area, how to conserve natural resources and how they help make the environment better. Were not just a regular day camp thats all about having fun. Were a learning camp, said Jean Gwinnup, who also coordinated the activities for the week. The Nature Day Camp featured a variety of activi ties ranging from arts and crafts projects to sporting events. The campers were able to build morale through different den activities like making a den flag and singing songs by the campfire. We even have a slingshot range for the scouts to practice shooting lima beans at targets, said Gwinnup. The campers were given the opportunity meet Forest Ranger Jim Volkman and Smokey the Bear who taught them the importance of maintaining fire safety when hiking or camping. The NAS Jacksonville Security Department ser vice members also visited the campers and brought military working dogs to demonstrate their ability to detect illegal drugs and explosives. These activities are meant to support the Boy Scouts of Americas mission of helping the youth build character, make ethical and moral choices and develop personal fitness. Gwinnup said she hopes the Cub Scouts will learn these values and become Eagle Scouts one day. Gwinnups 14-year-old grandson, Star Scout David Williams, has been attending since he was a Cub Scout. He is now a den leader at the Nature Day Camp. I was the camp director for four years, and I have seen many Cub Scouts grow up to be den leaders of the camp later on, said Gwinnup. We hope they will continue to keep coming every year. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012 11

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Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) has found a proven way to conserve energy and save money through its Resident Energy Conservation Program (RECP) pilot in Hawaii. PPV residents on average are reducing their utility consumption and improving the sustainability of the PPV project by reducing operating costs. The success of RECP in Hawaii is directly related to our service members and their families becoming more aware of the amount of electricity they were consuming, said Vice Adm. William French, command er, Navy Installations Command. As their awareness increased, families made a conscious choice to curb their utility usage without affecting their quality of life. Hawaii residents, who have already begun live billing, will see their allowable bandwidth decrease from 20 percent to 10 percent above or below the average normal usage rate beginning on Oct. 1, 2012. RECP began as a pilot program for PPV housing in Navy Region Hawaii in Jan. 1, 2011. The program transfers the responsibility for payment of utilities from the PPV project to the residents whose homes are individually metered. Since Hawaiis launch of RECP, the Navy PPV project has saved: 7,775 Megawatt hours (MWH) of electricity approximately 10 percent savings $1,537,060 (dollar value of the saved electricity) Over 5,300 tons of greenhouse gases. The Navy could not have achieved these savings if it were not for the cooperation of our PPV residents my hats off to them, said Corky Vazquez, CNIC housing program manager. Our residents got onboard with RECP and realized that their quality life did not change while reducing consumption. The savings will be reinvested back into our PPV housing communities to improve the quality of homes and neighborhoods. The schedule for the RECP Navy-wide rollout will be in phases. All PPV projects will begin live billing in 2013. The tentative rollout schedule for live billing is shown by region (check with the local housing office for details): New Orleans: January 2013 Northwest, Midwest, Southeast: April 2013 Southwest: July 2013 Mid-Atlantic and Northeast: October 2013 The Navy RECP program was initiated in response to an Office of the Secretary of Defense established requirement for PPV projects to transfer responsibility for payment of utilities to the residents. The program will initially focus on electricity and gas usage. For specific information about RECP and specific information pertaining to an installation, contact your local Navy housing office. A master list of all Navy installation housing offices is available at www.cnic. navy.mil/housing Resident Energy Conversation Program succeeding 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included August Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session two begins July 9, session three begins July 23 Lessons are available at the indoor and outdoor pool $40 military, $45 DoD Register for swim lessons at the base gym I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23, 2013 Preferred seating $42, lower level seating $22 Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Legoland 1 day $45.50, 1 day w/water park $52.75, 2 day $54.50, 2 day w/water park $58.75 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Paintball Trip Aug. 4 at 9 a.m. Jax Suns Baseball Trip Aug. 9 at 6:30 p.m. River Day at the Mulberry Cove Marina Enjoy free tubing, wakeboarding, kayaking, stand-up paddle boarding, games, prizes, food and more! Aug. 11, 11 a.m. 4 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Aug. 10 & 24 for active duty Aug. 12 & 26 for retirees & DoD personnel Junior Golf Clinic Session 3 (ages 11 17) Aug. 610 Monday Friday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. $110 per week long session Twilight Special Monday Friday Play 18 holes for $17 after 3 p.m. Not applicable on holidays Golf & Dine Special Play 18-holes with cart and choice of breakfast or lunch for $26! Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Lessons $150 per person August 17, 18, 19, 25 & 26 Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Register now for before & after school programAges 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12Fees based on household income National Night Out Aug. 7, 69:30 p.m. Outdoor pool & Allegheny softball field Free cookout, pool games, bounce house, guest speakers, music, outdoor movie and more!Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Sept. 10 Oct. 17 $500 per person Youth Flight Camps (ages 12 18) Advanced Aviation Course (basic course required) $150 per person Aug. 22 25 register by Aug. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012 13

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Surface Rescue Swimmer School instructors at NAS Jacksonville trained 10 Sea Cadets from Georgia and Florida, July 22 to July 27. To join the program, each participant had to be at least an E2 Sea Cadet, 16 years old and a second-class swimmer in excellent physical condition. Theyre going to get challenged just by coming to a place like this with a curriculum that leaves some adults exhausted, said AWSC Billy Price. The six-day training course provides classroom instruction and hands-on experience. It teaches Sea Cadets tech niques and proper handling of lifesav ing equipment, as well as basic skills needed for search and rescue incidents. Were not just here to teach them how to be good swimmers, but also what it takes to be a rescue swimmer, said Price. By the third day of the program, Sea Cadets were taught how to clear their masks and use their fins. They also learned how to approach a survivor in the water and carry them to safety. We also put them through our physical training test comprised of pull-ups, sit-ups, push-ups, a run and a swim, said AWS2 Zachary Klesser. Yesterday, they were talking about how easy its going to be, and today, they realize its much harder, said Price. This program is one of several U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps (NSCC) summer training programs that introduce Sea Cadets to a variety of military jobs. Rescue swimmers are responsible for saving pilots of downed aircraft, people aboard stranded or capsized vessels at sea, and civilian survivors of natural disasters. The goal here is to teach them what to expect, said Price. Instead of it being a huge surprise, theyre going to get an idea this week of what being a rescue swimmer is all about. The mission of the NSCC is to help cadets who are interested in the mili tary develop leadership skills and maintain an environment free of drugs and gangs. Sea Cadets are youths between the ages of 13 and 17, many of whom volunteer to become service members in the future. About 75 percent of these guys tell me that they want to be aviation rescue swimmers, said Price. So, we must be doing something right. The NSCC Summer Training Search and Rescue Program ended with a graduation ceremony July 27.Sea Cadets learn what it takes to be a rescue swimmer 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012 15 Mad Foxes pitch in to clean up Okinawa beaches The VP-5 Mad Foxes recently teamed with the VQ-1 World Watchers and the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) to clean debris washed up on the beaches of Senaga Island, Japan. The island is just south of Naha Airport in southwest Okinawa,. It is home to numerous playgrounds for children, several baseball fields, small recreational beaches, fishing piers and even Osprey watching. Periodically, the beau tiful beaches become cluttered with lit ter. On July 7, the Mad Foxes joined the World Watchers for some camaraderie and community relations service as they cleared the trash from the beaches, playground, roads and piers. VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Erin Osborne remarked, This is one of numerous events we have planned with our JMSDF sister squadron. Community service on the beaches of Okinawa was a perfect way to start our relationship this deployment. After more than four hours of work, the squadrons returned the beach es of Senaga Island to a pristine condition. After a morning meeting with the United Kingdoms top defense official, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta lauded an important milestone in the U.S.-U.K. defense relationship. On July 19, in Fort Worth, Texas, British Defense Secretary Philip Hammond will take the first international delivery of an F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, Panetta told reporters at a Pentagon news conference alongside his British counterpart. The United Kingdom was the first partner nation to join the F-35 program and has been a tremendous partner throughout the development, testing, and the initial production, the secretary added. The aircrafts multiyear system devel opment and demonstration period involves development and testing of the entire aircraft system, including its manufacture. Along with the United States and the United Kingdom, other nations partner ing in this phase of F-35 development are Italy, the Netherlands, Turkey, Canada, Denmark, Norway and Australia. As partners, the countries can bid for work and participate in the aircrafts development. Israel and Singapore agreed to join the program as security cooperation participants, entitled to delivery priorities, cer tain program information and countryspecific F-35 technical studies. The United Kingdom was the first partner nation to join the F-35 program and has been a tremendous partner throughout the development, testing and initial production, Panetta told report ers. Im pleased by the significant prog ress that the program has made across all the service variants, particularly in the past year, he said, adding that despite a long road still ahead, progress is being made in testing and stabilizing future F-35 production and sustainment plans. The F-35 represents, I believe, the future of tactical aviation for both of our armed services, Panetta said. This advanced aircrafts air superiority, its precision strike capability will help ensure our dominance of the skies for years to come. Hammond said the British armed forc es will continue close collaboration with the United States as its most important defense relationship, building on the shared experience of a decade fighting together in Iraq and Afghanistan. Our wide-ranging intelligence rela tionship, our joint work on the F-35B, regenerating the U.K.s carrier strike capability, and of course the work on the nuclear deterrent and the common missile compartment -all [are] crucial keystones of our relationship, he said. Hammond added that he has assur ances at the highest levels that the F-35 program is now on track and doing very well. It went through a period 18 months or so ago when it was placed on probation because of some technical difficulties [but] its come out of those, he said. The aircrafts B variant now has clocked more than 1,000 hours of flying time and the U.S. Marine Corps is suc cessfully flying it from ships, Hammond said. He said the U.S. Defense Department has been massively supportive of [the project] and is providing us with all sorts of facilities to maintain and regenerate our capabilities to operate a carrier flight deck and to maintain the skills in our pilots, many of whom are now flying with the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps to keep those skills alive. Panetta said hes made it clear that the F-35 fighter plane is critical to a future defense strategy that depends on agility, flexibility and the ability to stay on the cutting edge of technology. Were committed to all three [F-35] variants because we think each of the forces will be able to use that kind of weaponry for the future so that we can effectively control the skies as we con front the enemies of tomorrow, Panetta said. The secretary said hes confident that were going to be able, working with industry, working with Congress, to meet our full commitment with regards to the joint strike fighter. Panetta lauds first international F-35 delivery Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony coming Nov. 8U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a member of the U.S. House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, announced that his 2012 Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony will honor Fourth Congressional District Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans. Those eligible for the honor will receive certificates of special recognition in a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 8. The registration deadline is Oct. 5. All service branches were involved in a joint effort during Desert Shield and Desert Storm operations, serving our country on land, in the air and in territorial waters in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Syria and beyond, said Crenshaw. Like the veterans before them, they deserve recognition and thanks for putting their lives at stake for our country. On Nov. 8, I look forward to honoring eligible Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans during my annu al Veterans Special Recognition Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville.The program is always one of the high lights of my year. Desert Shield and Desert Storm veterans who live in the Fourth Congressional District and would like to participate are strongly encouraged to contact Crenshaws district offices in Jacksonville at (904) 5980481, on the mobile office phone at (386) 365-3316, or on the district toll free line from the 850 area code at 888-755-5607. The application can also be obtained on Crenshaws official website at www.crenshaw.house.gov. Go to Constituent Services, then Special Events & Notices, and lastly the Veterans Recognition Ceremony to download the press release and application. Completed applications and documentation should be mailed to: 1061 Riverside Avenue, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32204. To determine eligibility for the certificate, veterans must complete an application and submit a copy of their DD-214.Veterans who received the Southwest Asia Service Medal qualify for this program.

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In an effort make a difference in their com munity, culinary specialists (CS) from the NAS Jacksonville Flight Line Caf helped serve break fast and issue clothing at the Clara White Mission in Jacksonville July 13 for more than 350 people. By volunteering, the CSs got a firsthand look at some of the simple things many take for granted. The opportunity proved fulfilling for the volun teers and helped them form social bonds and strengthen their commu nity. I felt empowered to be able to feel like I have made a difference, said CS2 Nikita Thompson. Clara White Mission was founded by a former slave and has existed for over 100 years. It has aided in supporting the Jacksonville commu nity by providing meals andtransitional hous ingfor the homeless. They offer boundless resources for the less for tunate by providing food, housing, and training in vocational programs. Their assistance with guiding people is instru mental for their journey to help restore their lives. Navy closer to landing UAV on aircraft carrierA team from the Navy Unmanned Combat Air System program office tested communication soft ware for the Unmanned Combat Air System Carrier Demonstration (UCAS-D) program aboard the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) during its sea trials, July 7-10. The UCAS-D program, based at the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) on NAS Paxutent River, Md., is designed to demonstrate the ability for the unmanned, autonomous X47-B unmanned air vehicle (UAV) to launch from and land safely on an aircraft carrier. Thirty-seven NAVAIR engineers and contract per sonnel were embarked on Truman to test UCAS-D unmanned aircraft and shipboard UCAS-D software. We are one of the first aircraft carriers in the fleet to have Navy UCAS-D equipment installed on board, said Lt. Cmdr. Chad Young, Trumans assistant air operations officer. Its purpose is to communicate with the UCAS-D flight software on their unmanned aircraft. The tests aboard Truman ensured shipboard UCAS-D software was interfacing properly with the unmanned aircrafts software using a surrogate air craft, which was a contracted King Air. They are looking for confirmation that our systems are properly monitoring the unmanned surrogate aircraft, said Young. This testing will eventually lead to unmanned aircraft landing on and launching from U.S. Navy aircraft carriers. The software on board the King Air, an aircraft that is comparable to the Navys C-12 Huron, was modified to include an accurate representation of X-47B onboard systems. In June 2011, UCAS-D was tested aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) using an F/A-18D Hornet. Were refining the system, said Lt. James Reynolds, UCAS-D surrogate project officer with Air Test and Evaluation Squadron 23 of NAS Patuxent River. During last years tests on Ike, we found minor interfacing issues with the in-flight software aboard the Hornet, and have modified that software to be more similar to the software in the X-47B. The King Air has more room on board compared to the Hornet, so we were able to include a better model of UAV software and more accurately test the software. The NAVAIR team also tested shipboard UCAS-D software integration with Trumans Carrier Air-Traffic Control Center and primary flight control. The testing went well, said Reynolds. We accomplished all of our objectives and it was a very successful detachment. [The UAV] is certainly much closer to ready for prime time than it has been in the past. Testing a new aircraft, especially one that is unmanned, is a slow process, said Reynolds. Initial UAV testing was completed in 2002, followed by more testing aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) in 2005. This is what developmental flight testing is all about, said Reynolds. Its the small steps that make the big evolutions happen. The UCAS-D program is scheduled to return to Truman for upcoming underway periods to conduct further tests. I think our effort makes the evolutionary steps necessary to arrive at a capability the Navy needs, said Reynolds. There are challenges, but we are doing what it takes to achieve our goal. Flight Line Caf Sailors volunteer to make a difference 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 2, 2012 17 The NAS Jax Youth Activities Center (YAC) summer campers presented their annual Summer Camp Talent Show for family members and friends at the YAC Gymnasium July 27. The children showcased their talents by singing, dancing and performing skits as the audience cheered them on. The whole theme of the week has been based around talent giving the kids the opportunity to discover what they are talents they might have. Talent is not just singing and dancing so we try to give them different ideas of how they can use their talents. And by putting on this show each year, it gives them the chance to show off their skills. Every child is unique in their own way, said YAC Director Aaron Long. According to Long, the kids and their counselors start planning for the show several weeks before the event and spend quite a bit of time practicing their moves. They all come up with their own songs and routines. They are respon sible for doing all their own numbers, he added. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil Natasha Gascot, a civilian employee at NAS Jax Security, is thinking about buying a motorcycle. But before she goes shopping, she wants to develop her riding skills through a free basic rider course (BRC) offered on base by Cape Fox Professional Services (CFPS), a company contracted by the Navy to provide recreational, traffic and motorcycle safety training. Natasha was part of a beginners riding class on the practice range at NAS Jacksonville and she was hav ing a little difficulty coordinating the controls on her range motorcycle, said Connie Policastro, a motorcycle safety instructor with CFPS. So her instructor recommended that she come to Building One and put in some time on the simulator to become more comfortable with the controls. Gascot said, This simulator allows me to practice throttle-and-clutch coordination for smoother gear shifts, as well as proper braking. I want to build my confidence and be ready for the next BRC class. Policastro explained that the Honda SMART (Safe Motorcyclist Awareness and Recognition Trainer) helps new motorcycle riders develop defen sive riding skills. Its a traffic simu lator designed around the real-world challenge of riding in traffic on public roads. The key to the SMART is that it uti lizes a motorcycle-like cockpit, with a seat, handlebars fitted with active throttle, front brake and clutch, and foot pegs with rear brake and shift lever to fully imitate a motorcycle. Other technical skills taught dur ing SMART training include how to properly lean, turn, brake, accelerate, and take necessary emergency evasive actions. YAC kids display their talent Motorcycle trainer provides no-risk intro to street riding The Navy announced the annual recertification of Special Duty Assignment Pay (SDAP) for fiscal year 2012 in a message released July 6. According to NAVADMIN 206/12, SDAP recertification is conducted annually to ensure commands are maintain ing an accurate account of members eligibility for SDAP. Recertification began with the release of the message and commands have until Aug. 31. SDAP is an incentive pay, ranging from $75 to $450 a month, used to entice qualified personnel to accept designated assignments and to sustain adequate manning levels. In order to qualify for SDAP, Sailors must be assigned to and working in a valid billet on the command Manpower Authorization Listing. This billet must be authorized by the Bureau of Naval Personnel as a Special Duty Assignment billet according to the latest SDAP NAVADMIN. Recertification is typically completed by a commands admin department or personnel officer with the com manding officer recertifying each member. Sailors can read OPNAVINST 1160.6B and talk with their command career counselor to learn more about SDAP. A complete list of authorized skills and pay levels can be found in NAVADMIN 356/11.Annual Special Duty Assignment Pay recertification underway