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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02003
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 07-26-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02003

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THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Chamber members learn installations economic role Nearly 20 community and business leaders took part in the Jax Chamber #ilovejax campaign July 20 and toured Navy Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), the regions largest industrial employer comprised of 1,000 Sailors, 3,000 federal employees, aug mented by 600 contractors. Jax Chamber, the business membership organization dedicated to driving economic growth in Northeast Florida, co-hosted a tour of the aircraft maintenance facility and NAS Jacksonville to highlight the militarys contributions to the region and the Warfighter. The military is one of our regions greatest strengths, said #ilovejax co-chair Matt Rapp. FRCSE is a remarkable operation that is a leader in avi ation maintenance and logis tics, and makes vital contribu tions to support our military operations and relief efforts around the world. NAS Jax ranked as the num ber one government employer in 2011 with 23,200 employees and an annual payroll of $1.2 billion followed by Duval County Public Schools with 14,059 employees as reported in the Jacksonville Business Journal 2012 Book of Lists. NAS Jacksonville recognized 101 top Sailors from the base and tenant commands for the second quarter at the Sailor of the Quarter (SOQ) luncheon at the NAS Jax Officers Club July 19. Today, the Navy has 286 ships and dozens of air craft squadrons, as well as 5,555 individual augmen tees forward deployed, said NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd. On the geo-political stage, Sailors from NAS Jacksonville play important roles around the world such as the ongoing battle in Afghanistan, the with drawal from Iraq, detainee operations at Guantanamo Bay, anti-piracy operations in the 5th Fleet AOR, coun ter-narcotics operations in the 4th Fleet AOR and pro moting regional cooperation in the 7th Fleet AOR. He added, So, despite the insanely hectic opera tional tempo that the Navy supports today, it is most encouraging and satisfying when we can take time out and pay tribute to our superstar deckplate Sailors. Members from the Navy Band Southeast brass ensemble performed the national anthem, followed by the invocation delivered by NAS Jacksonville Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore, who said, We are grateful to be blessed with such caliber of men and women who have chosen to wear the uni form of our countrys Navy. May their lives be full of your blessing as they carry out the duties and respon sibilities of which theyve been entrusted. The guest speaker was Navy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command (NRSE RCC) Sailor of the Quarter LS1(SW) Dushawn Johnson. He told his fellow SOQs, Its an honor to stand before you today and deliver my thoughts. First and foremost, we must thank our families for their unyielding support. We must thank our chains of command for plac ing their faith in us, our families for supporting us, and last but not least, we thank our shipmates. If it were not for them, we would not be here accept ing our awards. From the day we entered the Navy, weve been taught that leading and mentoring Sailors to become positive role models in the community are key elements to a suc cessful unit. Everyday, we work with the best group of professionals that any one could ask for and for that, we are truly thank ful. When we leave here Business leaders tour FRCSE The Proud Warriors of HSL-42 Detachment 9 arrived home July 16 to their families open arms and with their heads held high after a demanding, high-tempo voyage. Detachment 9, also known as Guns N Rotors, took part in Operation Martillo, an anti-drug traf ficking operation in the coastal waters of Panama and Colombia. For the past six months, the aircrew operated two SH-60B Seahawk heli copters (aptly dubbed Axl and Slash) from the guided-missile frigate USS Nicholas (FFG 47), based out of Norfolk, Va. One day after the arrival of the two Proud Warrior helicopters to their han gar on the seawall at NAS Jacksonville, Detachment 9s maintenance crew dis embarked the Nicholas at NS Mayport, signaling the conclusion of their deployment. The international partnerships with Central and South American countries combined with a joint effort from the U.S. Coast Guard and other law enforce ment agencies, led to massive seizures of illegal narcotics. The estimated eight tons of narcot ics disrupted by Detachment 9 and Nicholas was one of the largest record ed for a Navy deployment, and had a potential street value of $515 million. Despite the long deployment, families were very supportive of the mission. Even though they were gone for so long, it was worth it because of what they were able to accomplish, remarked Kelly Hughes, daughter of AZ1 Brian Hughes, who served as the lead aviation administrationman for the detachment. Over the course of their deploy ment, the detachment had little room for error. With aircraft constantly on call to locate and stop go-fast drugrunning vessels, the maintenance crew was required to be ready at a moments notice, and worked tirelessly to ensure that the detachment was battle ready at all times. Fortunately, we were very effective, said Lt. Cmdr. Nick DeLeo. We were lucky enough to have two helicopters with one always functioning. We never missed tasking due to maintenance. Welcome home, HSL-42 Det. 9 NAS Jax Sailors of the Quarter honored at luncheon

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Many things surprised me when I first saw Dustin at the airport home for his middeployment rest and recupera tion (R&R) period after nearly seven months apart. Sure, he was wearing clothes and a smile I instantly rec ognized but he was slightly thinner, definitely more tan and unshaven from 37 hours of traveling. New flecks of grey had sprouted around his temples and patches of it had settled throughout his beard. The lines making a starburst from the corner of his eyes seemed more prominent, and the skin around his neck, which I could see through his stretched-out collar, seemed sunken. On the way to the resort, where we would spend two full days together before reuniting with the kids, even Dustins stories and mannerisms felt new. He mentioned names I hadnt heard before. Wait, who is ______? I asked several times. Dustin, realizing how sepa rate our day-to-day lives had been, would backtrack and retell the story, this time filling in the blanks as if we were on a first date. His clothes smelled musty and damp. I knew they needed a good washing in hot, colorsafe bleach. I didnt even rec ognize his suitcase. Was it one from home? Nothing, however, was quite as surprising and unfamiliar as what Dustin said as soon as we got into the resort hotel room suitable for a honeymoon: Ive been thinking maybe we should have a fourth child. (This is where the record comes to a loud, screeching stop, and the sound of crickets fills the air.) Lets rewind, shall we? The day before I picked up Dustin at the airport, I couldnt stop thinking about our time at the resort. Mostly, I fantasized about: 1) sleeping past 7 a.m., 2) not watching cartoons, 3) not asking for the kids menu, 4) floating in a pool with out three children screaming, Mom, watch me! and Mom! You werent looking! 5) not being responsible for someone elses private matters in the bathroom. Number five is a big one. Ive been changing diapers or help ing little people who look like my husband use the bathroom for almost 12 years straight. Ive been someones food supply for almost a quarter of those years. At last, as fall approaches and my youngest will begin kindergarten, I see a light at the end of the tunnel. From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day, I just might have time to do something for myself . something drastic like sit in a quiet living room and do noth ing. So as the crickets chirped in our hotel room and my mind raced, I tried to understand the words that had just come from Dustins lips. Up until about a year ago, I was still unsure about being done. I didnt want to close the door. Verbalizing it even as in Im done having babies felt profane. So we just didnt say any thing at all, and I wondered when I would wake up and know, without a doubt, that the shop was out of business. Yet, in that moment, at the resort, while the prover bial crickets filled the space between me and Dustin, I thought, IM DONE, and I had never really been so sure of anything. Then I looked at Dustin. He was smiling and searching my face for answers. I tried to understand this man, the one who, incidentally, had hoped our third son with the January due date would be born on the better side of the tax season. Thats when I realized, for seven months, all Dustin had seen were the happy moments: the pictures of Ford round ing third base and running toward home; the recording of Owens new Cartoon Dad and Cartoon Owen, each of whom had a British accent; the video of Lindell doing a goal kick at his soccer game. First he stretched his arms and checked his shoelaces, then he checked the wind with his fin ger. Dustin had missed: spilled cereal and milk on the kitch en floor; tantrums in the gro cery store; fights on the couch; screaming in the carHes on my side! He touched me! Hes looking at me! He hadnt been caught not looking at an amazing dive at the pool or throwing away some trea sured artwork from school (Yes, how did that get in the trash?). I had not videotaped or photographed any of these moments. The next morning our first together Dustin asked me what was most surprising about having him home again. I told him it was the whole fourth child thing, and I nearly choked on the words. One week into R&R, during an exceptionally impressive display of lung power and stub bornness by Lindell, I looked at Dustin and mouthed, fourth child? He smiled sheepishly and said, Yeah, I guess that would be kind of difficult. Its not that we dont love our boys. You know we do. Its just that weve graduated to a new phase of parenthood, one that doesnt involve wipes and binkies, and going back doesnt feel right. I couldnt say it before, but Im ready nowwell stop while were (mostly) ahead.Will there be another Smiley? July 26 1812 U.S. frigate Essex captures British brig Leander. 1912 First airborne radio communi cations from naval aircraft to ship (Lt. John Rodgers to USS Stringham). 1946 Capt. Joy Bright Hancock appointed director, Womens Naval Reserve. 1948 President Harry S. Truman orders desegregation of the Armed Services. 1954 Three aircraft from USS Philippine Sea (CVA-47) shoot down two Chinese fighters that fired on them while they were providing air cover for rescue operations for a U.K. airliner shot down by a Chinese aircraft. July 27 1953 Korean War armistice signed at Panmunjon, Korea. 1915 Sailors and Marines land in Haiti to restore order 1916 Navy establishes a Code and Signal Section which initially worked against German ciphers and tested the security of communications during U.S. naval training maneuvers. 1926 Team of scientists from Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Carnegie Institution determine height of the Ionosphere through use of radio pulse transmitter developed by NRL 1945 USS Callaghan (DD-792) is last ship sunk by a Japanese kamikaze attack, off Okinawa. 1973 Launch of Skylab 3, the second manned mission to the first U.S. manned space station, was piloted by USMC Maj. Jack Lousma, with Navy Capt. Alan Bean as commander of the mission and former Navy electronics officer Owen Garriott as Science Pilot. The mission lasted 59 days, 11 hours and included 858 Earth orbits. Recovery was by USS New Orleans (LPH-11). July 29 1846 Sailors and Marines from U.S. sloop Cyane capture San Diego, Calif. 1918 Assistant Secretary of the Navy Franklin Roosevelt visits Queenstown, Ireland. 1967 Fire on board USSForrestal (CV 59) kills 134 crew members. July 30 1918 Units of First Marine Aviation Force arrive at Brest, France. 1941 Japanese aircraft bomb USS Tutuila (PR-4) at Chungking, China; First Navy ship damaged by Axis during World War II. 1942 FDR signs act establishing WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service). During World War II, over 80,000 officer and enlisted women served in the WAVES. 1944 Naval Task Force lands Army troops near Cape Opmarai, New Guinea. 1945 Japanese submarine, I-58, sinks USS Indianapolis (CA-35) in Philippine Sea; 316 out of 1199 crew sur vived. July 31 1815 Commodore Stephen Decatur concludes agreement with Bey of Tunis to compensate U.S. for seizure of mer chant ships during the War of 1812. 1865 East India Squadron estab lished to operate from Sunda Strait to Japan. 1874 Commissioning of USS Intrepid, first U.S. warship equipped with torpedoes. 1912 First attempt to launch an air plane by catapult made at Annapolis. 1964 All-nuclear task force with USS Long Beach, USS Enterprise, and USS Bainbridge leaves Norfolk, VA to begin voyage, Operation Sea Orbit, to circle the globe without refueling. They returned on 3 October. August 1 1801 U.S. schooner Enterprise cap tures Tripolitan ship Tripoli 1921 Successful tests of gyro scopic high level bombsight (Norden Bombsight) at Torpedo Station, Yorktown, VA. Carl Norden devel oped the bombsight for the Bureau of Ordnance. 1946 Office of Naval Research estab lished. 1950 Control of Guam transferred to Department of Interior. 1958 USS Nautilus (SSN-571) sub merges under Arctic ice cap near Point Barrow. 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012

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Kiwus assumes command of NAVFAC SoutheastCapt. Christopher Kiwus relieved Capt. John Heinzel as commanding officer, Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast in a change of command ceremony July 20 at NAS Jacksonville. Heinzels greatest leadership strengths are his pas sion for improvement and challenging the status quo, said guest speaker Rear Adm. Kevin Slates, command er, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Atlantic. He delivers results across the board and confidently makes the difficult look easy. Slates commended Heinzel and the Civil Engineer Corps officers and civilians of NAVFAC Southeast for their support to the warfighter during a period of tre mendous growth and change. He noted NAVFAC Southeasts many accomplish ments under Heinzels leadership, including nearly $4 billion in design; acquisition; construction; main tenance and repair; energy and environmental; and basic support services such as transportation and utilities for the warfighters and families in the south east region. During his tenure, Heinzel led a workforce of more than 1,800 military and civilian personnel who pro vided unparalleled impact on Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force and Joint installations throughout the south eastern United States and the Caribbean. Most significant among NAVFAC Southeasts accomplishments are the construction programs in support of the $130 million expansion of Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, the $128 million reloca tion of Third Army to Shaw Air Force Base, and U.S. Southern Commands $33 million Haiti reconstruc tion effort. Additionally, Heinzel led a robust and comprehen sive regional energy strategy focused on reducing demand and incorporating alternative technologies for energy generation. During the ceremony, Slates presented the Legion of Merit to Heinzel for his extraordinary leadership and successful execution of $1.7 billion of construction and executing $2.2 billion in contracts and services at 22 locations geographically dispersed across seven states and the Caribbean a while serving as com manding officer from July 2010 to July 2012 and cul minating 27 years of dedicated service. Kiwus told Heinzel, Your strong reputation pre cedes you and I am truly honored to be part of this fabulous team, said Kiwus. Thank you for what you have done every day to support the fleet, fighter and families. A native of Niskayuna, N.Y., Kiwus graduated from Union College in 1984, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in civil engineering. He earned a masters degree in civil engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, a masters degree in strategic studies and national security from the U.S. Naval War College, and a doctoral degree in civil and environmental engi neering from Rutgers University. He also attended the Advanced Executive Program at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University. Kiwus is a registered professional engineer in the State of Florida. He is also a member of the Acquisition Corps and is designated a Joint Specialty Officer. His most recent assignment was Engineering Division Chief, Operations and Logistics Directorate, U.S. Africa Command in Stuttgart, Germany. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 3

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The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 wel comed college students June 25 from the Totus Tuus ministry aboard a P-3C Orion aircraft at NAF Misawa, Japan. The students, who volunteer their time to travel abroad to minister the Catholic religion to youngsters, were excited to see the aircraft and learn about the squadrons mission while deployed to Japan. It is an honor to serve those who serve in many different parts of the world, and to minister to Catholic youth who are currently separated from their friends back home in the United States, said Program Coordinator, Alan Day. Totus Tuus, latin for totally yours, is a program for college adults who spend their summer break teaching youth programs to young children and promoting the Catholic faith. The orga nization has sent students out to Guam to minister before, but this trip repre sents the first time that the organization has sent a team to Japan. The team, sponsored by the Archdiocese of Denver, spent a week ministering to children of families who are currently stationed at Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, before moving up north, to minister for those stationed at Misawa Air Base. I am happy to welcome them aboard the aircraft to give everyone on the crew an opportunity to talk about their job and explain how we all work together to accomplish the mission, said Lt. Erin Buttler-Ricketts, command services officer. The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 are based at NAS Jacksonville and are cur rently on a tri-site scheduled six-month deployment to U.S. Southern Command and U.S. 7th Fleet areas of responsibil ity. Capt. Mark Stevens, commanding offi cer of VP-30, congratulated graduates of the P-3C CAT I (initial training syllabus) Acoustic and Non-Acoustic Operator Class 1203, Flight Engineer Class 1202, and In-flight Technician Class 1201 on July 6. Honor Graduates for the classes were: AWF3 Drew Wence (Naval Aircrewman Mechanical Class 1202), AWV3 Norbert Stahlberg (Naval Aircrewman Avionics Class 1201), AWO3 Adriana Dykes (Naval Aircrewman Operator Class 1203-NonAcoustic), and AWO3 Ryon Aguirre (Naval Aircrewman Operator Class 1203-Acoustic). All graduating Sailors were advanced at the ceremony to their listed rank by Stevens. College students visit the Fighting TigersVP-30 graduates aircrewmen 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012

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The Mexican Navy and VP-45 recently integrated into Combined Task Force (CTF) 176 on board USS Essex (LHD 2) for Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2012 exercise, June 27 to August 7. CTF-176 Commander, Rear Adm. Peter Ellis, and his com mand staff consisting of Sailors from Canada, Mexico, New Zealand and the United States operated from Essex and led more than 10 ships, 12 aircraft, three landing craft, 11 amphibi ous assault vehicles, and more than 3,500 personnel according to the Take Notice article pub lished on board Essex on July 13. Ellis stated, Its extremely impressive. The complexity of making it all work is not lost on us. Its vital to be able to work together in a combined envi ronment, with folks from other services and countries. Working together helps build trust and cooperation between nations, and RIMPAC assists in fostering and sustaining those relation ships. The Mexican Navy is partici pating in RIMPAC for the first time. This is a very important moment in history for Mexico. We are excited about train ing with the other countries in RIMPAC, and showing how capable the ARM Usumacinta is, said Cmdr. Juan Malo, CTF 176 liaison for the Mexican Navy. Usumacinta is a Tank Landing Ship (LST) home-ported in Manzanillo, Mexico. Cmdr. John Brabazon, executive officer of the VP-45 Pelicans, is a liaison to CTF 176 representing Capt. Chris Ramsden, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 2 and RIMPAC CTF 172 to ensure safe interoperability among the task forces operating in RIMPAC. VP-45 has generated a strik ing amount of anti-submarine warfare (ASW) readiness by operating in the first phase of RIMPAC. ASW primacy is our squadrons calling card. As we continue to build towards a challenging 7th Fleet deploy ment in December, operating in this complex joint environment will pay long-term dividends for the Pelican Team, said Brabazon. The relationships built during RIMPAC extended beyond the air, land, and sea. Cmdr. Malo and I shared a stateroom, said Brabazon. In the end, we are all trying to achieve the same objective serve our countries with intense pride and contribute to lasting global security. I am proud to call Cmdr. Malo my shipmate and mi amigo. CTF 176 is an expedition ary strike group and consists of participants from Australia, Canada, Chile, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Republic of Korea, Tonga, New Zealand, and the U.S. Throughout RIMPAC, the task force will participate in a wide range of amphibious exercis es, non-combatant evacuation operation exercises, helicop ter and mechanized raids, and Marine live-fire support exer cises. VP-45 Pelicans Combat Aircrew (CAC) 7 was conducting anti-submarine warfare training July 16 in the Bahamas operating area when they picked up distress calls concerning a missing aircraft over Nassau approach control fre quency. Since the crews exercise was nearly complete, Plane Commander Lt. Jeff Riggs began discussing details of the situation with the crew and developed a plan to assist with the search. Coast Guard aircraft were already in the area where air traf fic control lost communications with the small plane and happily accepted another search asset. The lost aircraft, a Beechcraft Bonanza, was carrying two American citizens who report edly left Marsh Harbor and were enroute to Daytona Beach, Fla. When Pelican 7 arrived on the scene, the U.S. Coast Guard C-130 and helicopter were unable to pro ceed to the last known position due to thunderstorms. CAC 7 extended fuel endurance so they could out last the storm. Flight Engineer AWF1 Gerber said, We knew lives were at risk, so we secured the engines to maxi mize our prudent limited endur ance. In a search and rescue mis sion, you safely do as much pos sible to help. An hour later, the last known position was clear of inclem ent weather and CAC 7 began its search in earnest. Navigator Lt. j.g. Christiane Benzing devised an observer rotation schedule to keep fresh eyes in the windows to maxi mize the effectiveness of the visual search. We train extensively for just such a situation and it really paid off. Our crew executed just like we trained and performed flawlessly. It was a tremendous crew effort, said Benzing. CAC 7 eventually spotted and reported two debris fields, one of which had an oily sheen on the surface of the water. The Coast Guard helicopter made its way to the debris to get a closer look and ordered a surface vessel to the scene. Hours later, CAC 7 guided the vessel to the exact position by using signaling devices dropped from the aircraft. In total, the crew was able to provide six hours of on station search time. Unfortunately, no survivors were located but this event showcases the flexibility and utility of the venerable P-3C Orion. VP-45 and Mexican Navy join forces during RIMPAC Pelicans play key role in Bahamas search and rescue JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 Thirty youths in the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps (NSCC) from Georgia and Florida trained for two weeks with the Seabees of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 14 aboard NAS Jacksonville. They actually drill here once every month, but then in the summer, theyll do a two-week deployment where they com plete field exercises and more in-depth training, said MC2 Justin Sharpe. The Sea Cadets received training in construction, weapons familiarization, map reading, small squad tactics, land naviga tion, radio communications, personal defense and first aid. They have a good time, said Sharpe. Weve let them drive the dump truck, the humvees and the fork lifts. The Sea Cadets slept in tents at the NMCB 14 Headquarters and at the NAS Jacksonville Antenna Farm where they received classroom instruction and hands-on training. They are going to construct a building on the compound, said Sharpe. They are also going to put up another tent at the antenna farm and dig some fighting position foxholes. Theyll go out there at night and sit in those holes, and well go out there with water balloons and water guns and act like were attacking them. They also do patrols and obstacle courses. This program is one of several U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps summer training programs that introduce Sea Cadets to a vari ety of military jobs. The Seabees of NMCB 14 are tasked with providing advance base construction, battle damage repair, contingency engi neering, humanitarian assistance and disaster recovery sup port to fleet and unified commanders. They get a lot of good training out of it, said Sharpe. Theyll go around when everybodys working, and theyll see people welding, building, repairing vehicles and even working on plumbing. Sea Cadet Geoffrey Cafarelli said the things he enjoyed learn ing most about include night ops, field operations, how to work with the fire team formations and digging defensive positions. The mission of the NSCC is to help cadets who are interested in the military develop leadership skills and maintain an envi ronment free of drugs and gang influence. Sea Cadets are youths between the ages of 13 and 17, many of which who become service members in the future. I definitely plan on going into military. I plan on going in the Seabees, and hopefully find my way into BUD/S (Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL) training and then go on to join the SEALS, said Cafarelli. The NMCB 14 NSCC summer training program ended with a graduation ceremony where the Sea Cadets celebrated at the NAS Jacksonville outdoor pool. NMCB 14 hosts NSCC summer training program

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 7

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FRCSE, the largest tenant command at NAS Jacksonville with annual rev enues of nearly $950 million, won the 2012 JAXUSA Partnership Industry Leader Award presented for business achievements and corporate citizen ship during a luncheon at the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront June 7. JAXUSA Partnership is a division of Jax Chamber. What we do here is vital to the Warfighter, said Capt. Robert Caldwell, FRCSE commanding officer. We main tain the most sophisticated and com plex weapons delivery systems in the military inventory. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders shared insights with the group during lunch about the future of the military instal lation, including the recent unveiling of the MQ-8B Fire Scout training facility, upgrades to the base marina, and the soon-to-open All Hands Club. Ron Williamson, the base safety offi cer, treated visitors to a dashboard tour of the military installation, including the first P-8A Poseidon aircraft deliv ered to the fleet in March. The Poseidon is the replacement platform for the aging P-3C Orion maritime patrol air craft. Join the Jax Chamber #ilovejax Campaign conversation on Twitter or post photos or comments on the #ilove jax Facebook page at www.facebook. com/ilovejaxfl. CHAMBERThe graduates will now report to their assigned operational squadrons to begin their initial sea tour. VP-30 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 9

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National Night Out (Against Crime) is Aug. 7, from 6 9:30 p.m. at the NAS Jax Outdoor Pool & Allegheny Softball Field. Each event will award prizes to the top-3 finishers. Kids events Adults events Interactive Exhibits Boat) car simulator). Hey, MoneyMan! I was filling out a credit application the other day and they asked for my gross income. I have also heard the term net income. What is the differ ence? Moneyman Sez: Good question shipmate. These two terms are often misunderstood. Gross income is your total pay before anything is deduct ed. A salaried employee paid $4,000 per month makes a gross income of $48,000 per year ($4,000 per month x 12 months). Your actual paycheck amount (net income) is less than $4,000 once taxes, medical insurance or any other things your employer deducts prior to depos iting your pay. This amount is your net pay (sometimes called take-home pay). Net pay is what is available to you for your fixed and discretionary expenses (food, transportation, rent, utilities, clothes, entertainment, etc.). In the case of an hourly employee, gross pay can be calculated by mul tiplying the hourly rate by 2080 (the number of working hours in a year based on a 40-hour workweek). It is important to monitor the amount you are having deducted from your gross pay to ensure that it is accu rate and you are not contributing too much or too little for federal income taxes. If you see a deduction from your pay that doesnt seem right, seek assis tance from your unit command PSD liaison or financial advisor. You can also get financial coun seling from your local Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society office on base.National Night Out events announced today, be assured we will continue to deliver our common goal excel lence. No one person is greater than the team, As Sailors of the Quarter, we will continue to strive for our goals and continue to seek new challenges. Johnson closed with a quote from Adm. George Anderson, CNO from 1961 to 1963, and who was in charge of the U.S. blockade of Cuba during the 1962 Cuban missile crisis. The Navy has both a tradition and a future, and we look with pride and confidence in both directions. Following lunch, NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders congratulated the SOQs for earning the right to be called the best in their command and in the Navy. I know it took a lot of hard work to get here today. As Vince Lombadi said, Leaders arent born theyre made. Through hard work, you achieved your goals by being the best in your command. In this time of performto-serve, advancement quotas and a shrinking force it becomes even more important for you to stand out from the crowd, said Sanders. He added, Congratulations to the men and women who we are honoring today because they represent tomor rows leadership of the Navy. Id also like to thank all the spouses and sig nificant others joining us today. We all know that the Navy is a family team and we cannot do it without the sup port of everyone at home, he said. Sanders then presented an award envelope to each SOQ containing let ters of recognition and a $25 gift card from VyStar Credit Union. The luncheon was coordinated by CTM1Aaron Rummage. The NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department picked up the luncheon costs for the SOQs and their fam ily members. Other sponsors includ ed First Command Financial, Navy Mutual Aid, University of Phoenix and USAA Insurance. SOQ 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012

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Navy Region Southeast has made great strides in getting motorcycle riders into the appropriate training courses that are proven life-savers, including the Basic Rider Course, Military Sportbike Rider Course, and Experienced Rider Course. The region has nearly 4,000 riders, and 42 percent of them ride sport bikes built for speed. Max Bassett, Naval Air Station Jacksonvilles deputy safety manager, said training is crucial for these riders. New riders learn respect for the motorcycle and an appreci ation for just how quickly these high performance machines can exceed the capabilities of an inexperienced rider, he said. Other technical skills taught during training include how to properly lean, turn, brake, accelerate, and take necessary emergency evasive actions. The courses also incorporate some Operational Risk Management and self-analysis of risk behav iors and riding mindsets. They also learn a great appreciation for just how much extra protection they have when wearing proper personal protective equipment such as a full face helmet, jackets and pants designed for motorcycle riders, along with motorcycle boots and gloves, Bassett said. One of the biggest prob lems with motorcycle training across the fleet is a high noshow rate for courses. This can make wait times for cours es unnecessarily long, and its a wasted opportunity for Sailors who need to get into a class. The training safety courses are taught by contractors from Cape Fox Professional Services, and paid for by Commander, Navy Installations Command. The bill for classes is a set fee and costs the same whether one rider or a full class shows up. The Southeast Region has brought their no-show rate down considerably by increas ing training notifications to Sailors and their supervisors, and by informing the com mand master chief about any one who fails to show up for assigned training. They have also reduced wait times for courses by adding extra classes whenever the wait time exceeds 30 days. Bassett said the leadership of Rear Adm. Jack Scorby, Commander, Navy Region Southeast, and the cooperative working environment between the regions chiefs mess, safe ty professionals, command motorcycle safety represen tatives, and Cape Fox train ers has been key, but he also credits mentorship programs developed by riders to help one another. Mentors are our first line of defense, Bassett said. Without them actively iden tifying our new riders and sit ting down with them to get them signed up for training, we would not enjoy the successes weve had. Their contributions are making a difference and will absolutely save lives. The Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) is once again playing a key role as government agencies and organiza tions across the United States support the 2012 Feds Feed Families food drive campaign, which runs through Aug. 31. Military customers and federal employees can donate nonperishable food and personal hygiene items to the campaign using marked bins located at the entries or exits of participating com missaries. Donations to the program help charitable organizations such as the local food bank. In this tough economy, sometimes its hard to make ends meet, said DeCA Director and CEO Joseph Jeu. More people than ever before are using food banks, which are struggling to meet the demand. This food drive is an extra boost to keep families fed. Last year, 770,000 pounds of food stuffs were donated at commissary locations. The DoD 2012 Feds Feed Families campaign has set its goal at 1.5 million pounds. The most needed items for donations include: Canned vegetables low sodium, no salt; Canned fruits in light syrup or its own juices; Canned proteins tuna, salmon, chicken, peanut butter and beans; Soups beef stew, chili, chicken noo dle, turkey or rice; Condiments tomato-based sauces, light soy sauce, ketchup, mustard, salad dressing or oils; Snacks individually packed snacks, crackers, trail mix, dried fruit, granola and cereal bars, pretzels and sandwich crackers; Multigrain cereal; 100 percent juice all sizes, including juice boxes; Grains brown and white rice, oat meal, bulgar, quinoa, couscous, pasta, and macaroni and cheese; Paper products and household items paper towels, napkins, cleaning sup plies; Hygiene items diapers, deodorants (men and women), feminine products, toilet paper, tissues, soap, toothpaste and shampoo. The Feds Feed Families food drive campaign grew out of the Serve America Act that created United We Serve, an initiative that urged Americans to contribute to the nations economic recovery by helping their communities. The U.S. Office of Personnel Management and the Chief Human Capital Council are managing the campaign. Commissary participation is tied to its local installations ability to pro vide support to pick up and deliver the donated items. DeCAs customers and employees can and will make a difference in the lives of the children and families deal ing with hunger, Jeu said. Southeast Region makes motorcycle safety a priority Your commissary supports Feds Feed Families program Beginner Rider Course Experienced Rider Course Military Sportbike Rider Course Call for class dates NAS Jax Safety Office 542-3082 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 11

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The guided missile frigate USS Nicholas (FFG 47) deliv ered more than four tons of cocaine and marijuana to Naval Station Mayport July 17. The haul was seized from drug interdictions conducted in sup port of Operation Martillo. Crew members offloaded approximately 3,408 kilograms (7,500 pounds) of cocaine, and 109 kilograms (239 pounds) of marijuana, with an estimated wholesale value of more than $93 million. The amount of cocaine seized was enough for 7.2 million doses, each dose approximately the same size as a sugar packet. Nicholas returned to port after a 175-day deployment supporting counter illicit traf ficking operations aimed at disrupting transnational orga nized crime and keeping drugs off the streets. With the help of some part ners in the region we accom plished what we set out to do; disrupt the drug trade, said Cmdr. Stephen Fuller, USS Nicholas commanding officer. Interdictions are challeng ing, but with the help of other naval units, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and the partner nation navies, we executed a successful deploy ment. During the deployment, Nicholas, with embarked U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET), conducted a com bination of six disruptions and interdictions while in the Caribbean Sea, and the Atlantic and Pacific coastal waters of South and Central America. Also during the deployment, Nicholas transited the Panama Canal twice, conducted pass ing exercises and an officer exchange with the Colombian Navy, certified 22 pilots through HSL-42 Detachment 9, conducted four underway replenishments with a Chilean oiler, and a Crossing the Line ceremony when the ship crossed the equator. U.S. Navy and Coast Guard vessels, U.S. military and patrol aircraft from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agen cy, along with the support of allied and partner nation forces assisted with patrolling coastal regions from Colombia to Mexico to detect and moni tor illicit traffic in order to cue and support PNs and U.S. inter agency interdiction efforts. Patrol airplanes from Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 77 (VAW-77), Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) oper ating from El Salvador along with U.S. Customs and Border Protection long range patrol aircraft operating from NAS Jacksonville and NAS Corpus Christi, Texas, use sophisticat ed sensors to detect suspicious vessels and coordinate inter dictions by the U.S. Navy, Coast Guard and partner nations patrolling the region. More than 80 percent of the narcotics transiting through Mexico on their way to U.S. markets enter via maritime littoral routes, with the main conveyance being go-fast boats. By teaming up with regional partner nations and allied forces to scrutinize the littorals, transnational orga nized crime networks will be denied those routes. Operation Martillo (Spanish for hammer) is a U.S., European and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit traffick ing routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. This joint service, interagency, and multinational operation is being led by Joint Interagency Task Force South, the agency charged with detec tion, monitoring, and support ing the interdiction of illicit trafficking in a 42 million-sq.mi. area under the direction of U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM). Operation Martillo is a com ponent of the U.S. govern ments coordinated interagen cy regional security strategy in support of the White House strategy to combat transna tional organized crime and the U.S. Central America Regional Security Initiative. Drug seizure: USS Nicholas off loads 4 tons at NS MayportHSL-42 and VP-8 assisted with interdictions Check Us Out Online: www.jaxairnews.com JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 13

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Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus and Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert, visited the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) July 18 for the Navys Great Green Fleet demonstration during the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise. The Great Green Fleet dem onstration is a step towards the Department of the Navys goal to reduce consumption of ener gy, decrease reliance on fossil fuels and significantly increase the use of alternative energy. Greenert emphasized the importance of the Navys biofu el initiative and its importance for the Navys future energy plan. Biofuel is made with algae, plants and animal fat. Well be using a 50-50 mixture of that to show that in fact there is an alternative to petroleum prod ucts, said Greenert. Weve got to look for alternative fuels, weve got to look for alternative opportunities, and weve got to be efficient in energy. Nimitz took on more than 180,000 gal lons of 50-50 biofuel, a new blend of hydro-processed renewable jet (HRJ-5) fuel July 17, in preparation for the Navys Great Green Fleet demonstra tion. Mabus spoke about how biofuels are a drop-in fuel and will not change operations at all. We dont have to change the operations, and we dont have to change anything that we are doing, said Mabus. The bio fuel is used in exactly the same way, by the same platforms and by the same engines. During an all hands call, Greenert took time to thank the crew of Nimitz and encour aged the crew to continue what they are doing. Every time I come aboard a great ship like Nimitz and talk to a great crew, it helps me understand what weve got to do and thats go back to Washington, make sure you are organized, trained and equipped to do the job you need to do. For the demon stration, Mabus and Greenert also visited USS Chafee (DDG 90), and USS Princeton (CG 59) to see the biofuel onload and to observe how they will use the fuel on board. RIMPAC 2012 is the 23rd exercise in the series that began in 1971. Twenty-two nations, more than 40 surface ships and submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in the RIMPAC exercise from June 29 to Aug. 3, in and around the Hawaiian Islands. The worlds largest inter national maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the worlds oceans. Capt. Mark Stevens relieved Capt. William Trey Wheeler III as presi dent of the Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) National Officers Team on June 26. Stevens, the commanding offi cer of fleet replacement squadron VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville and for mer vice president of MPA, stepped up to the president position in prep aration for Wheelers June 29 change of command, in which he was relieved as Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11. Serving on the national team this past year has been a great learning experience for all of us, said Stevens. We have grown quickly, exceeded our expectations as an inaugural associa tion. I look forward to helping guide MPA through a new set of milestones during its second year. Wheeler, who is moving to the Northern Virginia/Washington D.C. area, will continue to be an active par ticipant in the organization as a mem ber of the board of directors. I am truly impressed with the amount of support MPA has received since the beginning, said Wheeler. Its a testament to the hard work of the MPA team who made the effort to stand-up this organization, and its been a plea sure and an honor to be a part of it. Succeeding Stevens as MPA vice president is Capt. Eric Wiese, com mander, Patrol Wing ELEVEN. Wiese joins CPRW-11 after a stint as the Force Management Branch Chief in J-8 at the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Pentagon. A Florida not-for-profit corporation established in 2011 and headquar tered in Jacksonville, Fla., the Maritime Patrol Association is dedicated to its mission to be the premier profession al organization representing the U.S. Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community by promoting the use of the patrol and reconnaissance aircraft in the United States Navy. The organiza tion is tax-exempt under section 501(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code (Tax ID No. 45-1968605). For more information, con tact Executive Director September Wilkerson, at (904) 563-4036 or info@ maritimepatrolassociation.org. And check out the MPA website at: www. maritimepatrolassociation.org. SecNav, CNO visit Nimitz for Great Green Fleet biofuel demo Stevens relieves Wheeler asMaritime Patrol president 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012

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Jacksonville has three more days supply of lifesaving blood each year thanks to the gener ous contributions of the work force at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), the larg est tenant command at NAS Jacksonville. FRCSE sponsored three blood drives in 2011 yield ing 1,232 units totaling three percent of all donations col lected by The Blood Alliance, a nonprofit blood bank serv ing Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. Maurice Brown, the blood banks donor resource consul tant, said using less staff and fewer mobile collection units make this drive especially ben eficial. An average of five mobile collection buses and 20 staff members is all we use to achieve this, said Brown. It is a very cost effective way for us to reach donors, and FRCSE sets the bar pretty high for others to emulate. Brown said thousands of people are alive today because of FRCSEs gift of life donations. He said the military facilitys efforts are a godsend. FRCSE holds three drives annually each consisting of three days at two locations: two days at NAS Jacksonville and one at Cecil Commerce Center. Brown credits the efforts of Frank Taormina, Sr., a pub lic affairs specialist who has served as the commands blood drive chairperson since 2000, and FRCSE leaders for their continued support. Fortunately we have a large group of dedicated donors who come through at every blood drive, said Taormina. With the constant need for blood, my focus is always on the recipients when Im put ting together these blood drives. Our blood drive direct ly impacts the community in which we work and live. We do it for our families, our friends and our neighbors who may one day benefit from the gift of blood. Capt. Robert Caldwell, com manding officer of the aviation maintenance facility, said the generosity of the Sailors and civilians at FRCSE never ceases to amaze him. I cant tell you how proud I am of our workforce, he said. They are not only making a difference in the local commu nity, but also a difference for our brave men and women who are forward deployed. The Navy issued a new energy pol icy that will drive energy consump tion reduction at all Navy installations, transform the shore energy culture and seek new or existing technical solutions for reducing energy, officials announced July 10. The Shore Energy Management Instruction signifies a complete revi sion from the previous version pub lished in 1994. The instruction codifies Navys policy and strategy to ensure energy security as a strategic imperative, meet federal mandates and executive orders, and achieve Department of the Navy (DoN) shore energy goals. Since naval forces require constant support from shore installations, Navy is mitigating its vulnerabilities related to the electrical grid such as outages from natural disasters and man-made events by lowering consumption, integrating renewable energy sources and increasing control of energy sup ply and distribution. Energy reliability, resiliency and redundancy are essen tial components of the Navys Critical Infrastructure Protection program. Energy security is critical because warfighters need assured access to reli able supplies of energy to meet oper ational needs afloat or ashore, said FRCSE workforce sets blood donation milestone Navy issues new shore energy policy to achieve energy security goals JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 15

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Monday Pizza Madness $5 for 14 one-topping pizza 2:30 9 p.m., dine in or carry-out only Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included July Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 4 10 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1-lane bowl ing, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us. Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Summer Bowling Leagues Now Forming Monday Mixed Trio 7 p.m. Wednesday After Work League 4:30 p.m. Thrusday Morning Seniors 9 a.m. Thursday Night Extreme Bowling 6:30 p.m. Friday Intramural League 11:45 a.m. Sunday Fun Bunch League 4 p.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym45-minute, high-intensity group trainingFamily Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at 542-3518/4238. **New fitness class** Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DOD civilians, $3 for guests Learn-to-swim session three begins July 23 Lessons available at the indoor and out door pool $40 military, $45 DOD Register for swim lessons at the base gym I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 LegoLand 1 day $45.50, 1 day w/water park $52.75, 2 days $54.50, 2 days w/ water park $58.75 NFL Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1-day $29.50, 2-day $40 Disney World Orlando 4-day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Tampa Zoo $19 adult $17.50 child Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations Jacksonville Zoo adult $12, child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT MOSH $7 $12 Blue Man Group in Orlando $59, includes City Walk venue Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Medieval Times Free royalty upgrade with dinner reservationThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Daytona Beach Trip July 29 at 9 a.m. Paintball Trip August 4 at 9 a.m. Jax Suns Baseball Trip August 9 at 6:30 p.m. River Day at Mulberry Cove Marina Enjoy free tubing, wakeboarding, kaya king, stand-up paddle boarding, games, prizes food and more! August 11, 11 a.m. 4 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees August 10 & 24 for active duty August 12 & 26 for retirees & DoD per sonnel Junior Golf Clinic Session 3 (ages 11 17) August 6 10 Monday Friday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. $110 per week long session Twilight Special Monday Friday Play 18 holes for $17 after 3 p.m. Not applicable on holidays Golf & Dine Special Play 18-holes with cart and choice of breakfast or lunch for $26! Not available on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Lessons $150 per person August 17, 18, 19, 25 & 26 Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic on siteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Register now for before & after school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household income National Night Out August 7 at 6 9:30 p.m. Outdoor pool & Allegheny softball field Free cookout, pool games, bounce house, guest speakers, music, outdoor movie and more! Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School September 10 October 17 $500 per person Advanced Aviation Course (basic course required) $150 per person August 8 11 register by August 1 August 22 25 register by August 14 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012

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Todays Sailors are impacted by numerous financial issues, including declining home values, policy programs affecting retention, current job market, and permanent change of station orders outside their current area. Poor planning in any of these areas can affect the service members secu rity clearance, job performance and job stability. The Navy offers numerous programs for sailors concerning financial issues at the command level and through the sta tions Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC). As first-time homebuyer STG3 Jennifer Ford learned, There are many financial programs geared to assist military members and veterans. The PenFed Foundation recently created the Dream Makers grant to assist qualified first-time homebuyers in covering clos ing costs and the down payment. Its extremely user friendly and Sailors can receive up to $5,000 in a non-repayable grant. Application and eligibility require ments can be found at www.pentagon foundation.org. At the command level, an active chain-of-command and Command Financial Specialist are the first line of assistance for financial programs impacting sailors and their families. A Leave and Earning Statement (LES) alone is not enough to plan for future financial stability. Financial planning worksheets can be constructed from the sailors current financial situation. In addition to a LES, living expenses, investments, and any indebtedness must be included when creating the financial planning work sheet. From this, a financial plan can be created to fit the sailors needs. In addition, financial issues can be addressed at the station-level by utilizing the NAS Jax FFSC. Strategies for First-time Homebuyers and Best Deals In Car Buying, Money, Debt and Credit Management, Transition Assistance, and Relocation Assistance are just a few of the courses and counseling offered by FFSC. FFSC Financial Manager Rufus Bundrige added, Service members and their families must be informed to set realistic expectations and goals to help them prepare for an unpredictable future. Financial stability affects not only the individual service member, but it impacts mission readiness. If you or a family member needs a financial makeover, contact Bundrige at 542-4976 and learn your options for a brighter financial future. FFSC offers help with financial issues that impact Sailors JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 17

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Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Fleet Readiness and Logistics, Vice Adm. Phil Cullom. This instruction is just one example of how we are driving a spartan energy ethos in our shore operations. We are com mitted to cost-effective ly achieving our energy goals by pursuing energy efficiency, transform ing our energy culture, and integrating renew able energy technologies, where viable. The revised instruction includes specific respon sibilities and actions that commands and person nel ashore must take in implementing the Navy Shore Energy program. For example, each Navy installation will have a tailored energy con sumption reduction goal based on its unique ener gy situation. By increasing ener gy efficiency, Navy can reduce operating costs, multiply the impact of current and future alter native energy sources and achieve DoN renew able energy targets. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus laid out five aggressive energy goals in October 2009 to improve energy security and efficiency afloat and ashore and increase our energy security. To review the instruc tion, visit http:// greenfleet.dodlive. mil/files/2012/07/ OPNAVINST-4100.5E.pdf. For more information about the Navys Energy Program, visit www. greenfleet.dodlive.mil or www.facebook.com/ navalenergy. ENERGY Chapel center hosts 16th annual Vacation Bible SchoolNinety-four children took part in Vacation Bible School (VBS) July 16 20 at NAS Jacksonville Chapel Center. Our theme this year is Sonrise National Park. The lessons all deal with the Lord Jesus and different aspects of his impact in our lives that let us know that we can trust him, that he loves us and that he takes care of us. Then, the overall theme around it is set in the national park type venue, said Grace Heffner, VBS director and the chapels director of the religious educa tion department. Students between the ages of 5 and 12 switched between 45-minute class room sessions throughout the day. They par ticipated in vari ous activities that included arts and crafts, as well as singing. I really like coloring while learning about God, said Alyssa Hanners, a VBS student. More than 30 adult and teenage volunteers came to help the chil dren learn and have fun at VBS. The teens do earn community ser vice hours. Theres a letter that the cha pel gives to them stating that they have given hours, said Heffner. Heffner said this is the 15th VBS she has directed, and she continues to direct the program because of the chil dren. There was a little boy in one of the classrooms who did not know who Jesus was, and he keeps saying, Whos Jesus? as the teacher kept presenting the mate rial. After about half way through it, the light came on, and he said, Now, I know who Jesus is. That is why we do it, said Heffner. VBS ended in All Saints Chapel with a musical program where family and friends gathered to watch the students sing. Next years VBS is being planned to take place in July. VBS students do not have to be members of a congregation at NAS Jacksonville Chapel Center, and volunteers are welcome. Call 542-3051 for more information. 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012

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A group of employers from Omaha, Lincoln and other Nebraska cities have a better understanding of what the U.S. military does after participating in a brief visit to the Jacksonville tri-base area, coordi nated by the Nebraska Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR) State Committee. The group of 25 business owners and supervi sors spent three days visiting area military instal lations, including Navy Reserve aviation squad rons and Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic at NAS Jacksonville, the Trident Training Facility at NSB Kings Bay, the Marine Corps Blount Island Command, and the Florida National Guard Headquarters in St. Augustine. Bringing groups to Jacksonville really gives us an opportunity to showcase a wide spectrum of the mili tary, in the same geographic area, said Bill Nelson, program support director of the ESGR for Nebraska. A boss lift is a relatively small group of people, but if we pick key employers, they can go back and tell their peers what it is all about. The tour began with a stop at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1000, home to Fleet Logistics Support Squadrons VR-62 and VR-58. The employers learned that although the two Navy Reserve squadrons have similar names, they have different missions and uti lize different aircraft. Jeff Williams, who owns an electrical contract ing company, said he enjoyed the opportunity to go aboard the aircraft and learn about the training simu lators. I got a greater appreciation for the kinds of sim ulator training that our military is using, and how they are employing that technology as a cost-effective training tool, he said. Williams received an ESGR Freedom Award, the organizations highest honor, for his outstanding support of a mobilized Reservist in a company of 15 employees. Its the right thing to do, and this experience has confirmed that mindset for me 100 percent. Navy Reservists from NAS Jax-based squadrons said they were glad for the opportunity to talk about their mission. As a Reservist myself, I cant say enough about the importance of this type of visit, said Lt. Cmdr. Pete Pacifico, a pilot assigned to VR-58. Its not only important for employers to really understand some of the challenges we face being a civilian and a service member, but also realize the great advantages we bring to the table as employees. Although not every command visited had affiliated Reserve or Guard units, the boss lift gave participants insight as to how the National Guard and Reserve forces integrate into the Department of Defense total force, and the importance of military training. It was very eye opening to realize all that goes in to keeping our nation safe, said Devin Ahearn, a dis trict manager at Arbys restaurants in Wyoming and Nebraska. After touring the Trident Training Facility, Ahearn said she was impressed with the process for attaining the dolphins warfare insignia. As a leader, I think that kind of cross training can be valuable in any situation, and we dont do enough of it, she added. Nebraska ESGR Program Support Director Bill Nelson said the boss lift program is a critical tool in helping employers realize the importance of support ing citizen-service members. Troops who leave their job and go halfway around the world to protect our nations freedom need to be laser-focused on their job. They cant be filled with the worry of wondering if their civilian job will be wait ing for them when they return from a deployment, he said. The whirlwind visit kept the group busy from start to finish, although they did find time to go to Atlantic Beach for dinner one night. You cant go to Florida from Nebraska and not put your feet in the sand, said Williams, holding a hand ful of Florida seashells to take back to his son. Departing from NAS Jax aboard a KC-135 Stratotanker piloted by the 155th Air Refueling Wing of the Nebraska Air National Guard, the boss had one final opportunity to witness military operations, get ting a close up view of the in-flight refueling mission of the plane. ESGR is a Department of Defense organization, designed to facilitate relationships between Reservists and Guardsmen and their civilian employers. ESGR volunteers work to educate employers about the ben efits of employing Guardsmen and Reservists, inform employees of their rights, gain and maintain employer support for Guard and Reserve service by recogniz ing outstanding support, and help resolve conflict through mediation. State committees sponsor trips, called boss lifts, to military installations throughout the country. Employers learn importance of Reserve, Guard mission JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 19

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Arlington National Cemetery does not make pre-arrangements or take reservations before the time of death. Therefore, the sur viving spouse or parent of the child should go to the local funeral home to make arrangements for any ser vices. The funeral home director should contact Arlington National Cemetery to make burial arrange ments through the Consolidated Customer Service Center at (877) 907-8585. Normally, a copy of the last dis charge or retirement DD-214 is all the documentation that is neces sary. After calling, a case file num ber will be issued for further refer ence and use. Fax number is (571) 256-3334 and email is anc.isb@ army.conus.mil. The funeral home director that you use will coordinate with a funeral home in the Washington, DC area for pick up, storage, and transportation to the cemetery of the service members remains. While there is no charge for intern ment at Arlington, the deceased family will be responsible for pay ing any and all transportation and storage charges. Expect upwards of three to four months delay after being assigned a block time for burial. There are six funeral times (9 a.m., 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 2 p.m. and 3 p.m.) and four to five funerals are commenced daily at the same time from the administration building. The ideal requested funeral time is 1 p.m., alternately 11 a.m., to avoid out-of-town guests having to come the night before the ceremony. Internment/inurnment services and military honors are provided on a first-come, first-served basis. For enlisted personnel, honors will be provided by the appropri ate military service branch and consists of pallbearers, firing party and a bugler. The caisson, if avail able, as well as a chaplain can be requested by the family at the time of burial arrangement. For commissioned and warrant officers, in addition to standard honors, caisson, band, and escort troops are scheduled as requested by the family. The riderless (capari soned) horse is used for Army and Marine colonels and above rank. Only one set of official military honors can be provided. If a sur viving spouse/family desires to have military honors at a memorial service in the hometown or where the deceased lived, contact the local military representatives (i.e. ROTC or Junior ROTC unit, Fleet Reserve Unit, veterans group and volunteer groups) for the service. Additional information can be found at the Arlington National Cemetery web site at: http://www.arlingtoncem etery.mil/FuneralInformation/ SchedulingServices.aspx. Jessica Fowler and her husband, AT2 Patrick Fowler moved to NAS Jax from MCBH Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii in January 2011. She has been the ombuds man for HSL-42 since August 2011. Since the first day we checked in at HSL-42, our com mand leadership has been phenomenal. Weve never been attached to a command that was more supportive of their Sailors and their families than the Proud Warriors have been. Im just so proud to be a part of that, she said. Jessica also works full time as an AmeriCorps VISTA serving as the military engagement manager at HandsOn Jacksonville where she has engaged over 400 volunteers in more than 1,800 hours of volunteer service in the past five months. In addition to creating projects that are open to the entire com munity, she has also worked with command volunteer coordinators to set up projects for com mand service days. My position at HandsOn Jacksonville appealed to me because it gave me the opportunity to integrate two things Im very passionate about, volunteerism and supporting our military community, she said Jessica got her Bachelors in Marketing from the University of Connecticut. Her husband is currently deployed with HSL-42 Detachment 7 on board USS Jason Dunham. For more information about any of the sports call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail: bill.bonser@navy. mil. Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com nasjaxmwr. Retiree news: Burial in Arlington National Cemetery Check Us Out Online: www.jaxairnews.com 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012

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THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Chamber members learn installations economic role Nearly 20 community and business leaders took part in the Jax Chamber #ilovejax campaign July 20 and toured Navy Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), the regions largest industrial employer comprised of 1,000 Sailors, 3,000 federal employees, aug mented by 600 contractors. Jax Chamber, the business membership organization dedicated to driving economic growth in Northeast Florida, co-hosted a tour of the aircraft maintenance facility and NAS Jacksonville to highlight the militarys contributions to the region and the Warfighter. The military is one of our regions greatest strengths, said #ilovejax co-chair Matt Rapp. FRCSE is a remarkable operation that is a leader in aviation maintenance and logis tics, and makes vital contributions to support our military operations and relief efforts around the world. NAS Jax ranked as the num ber one government employer in 2011 with 23,200 employees and an annual payroll of $1.2 billion followed by Duval County Public Schools with 14,059 employees as reported in the Jacksonville Business Journal 2012 Book of Lists. NAS Jacksonville recognized 101 top Sailors from the base and tenant commands for the second quarter at the Sailor of the Quarter (SOQ) luncheon at the NAS Jax Officers Club July 19. Today, the Navy has 286 ships and dozens of air craft squadrons, as well as 5,555 individual augmentees forward deployed, said NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd. On the geo-political stage, Sailors from NAS Jacksonville play important roles around the world such as the ongoing battle in Afghanistan, the withdrawal from Iraq, detainee operations at Guantanamo Bay, anti-piracy operations in the 5th Fleet AOR, counter-narcotics operations in the 4th Fleet AOR and promoting regional cooperation in the 7th Fleet AOR. He added, So, despite the insanely hectic opera tional tempo that the Navy supports today, it is most encouraging and satisfying when we can take time out and pay tribute to our superstar deckplate Sailors. Members from the Navy Band Southeast brass ensemble performed the national anthem, followed by the invocation delivered by NAS Jacksonville Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore, who said, We are grateful to be blessed with such caliber of men and women who have chosen to wear the uniform of our countrys Navy. May their lives be full of your blessing as they carry out the duties and responsibilities of which theyve been entrusted. The guest speaker was Navy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command (NRSE RCC) Sailor of the Quarter LS1(SW) Dushawn Johnson. He told his fellow SOQs, Its an honor to stand before you today and deliver my thoughts. First and foremost, we must thank our families for their unyielding support. We must thank our chains of command for plac ing their faith in us, our families for supporting us, and last but not least, we thank our shipmates. If it were not for them, we would not be here accepting our awards. From the day we entered the Navy, weve been taught that leading and mentoring Sailors to become positive role models in the community are key elements to a successful unit. Everyday, we work with the best group of professionals that any one could ask for and for that, we are truly thank ful. When we leave here Business leaders tour FRCSE The Proud Warriors of HSL-42 Detachment 9 arrived home July 16 to their families open arms and with their heads held high after a demanding, high-tempo voyage. Detachment 9, also known as Guns N Rotors, took part in Operation Martillo, an anti-drug traf ficking operation in the coastal waters of Panama and Colombia. For the past six months, the aircrew operated two SH-60B Seahawk heli copters (aptly dubbed Axl and Slash) from the guided-missile frigate USS Nicholas (FFG 47), based out of Norfolk, Va. One day after the arrival of the two Proud Warrior helicopters to their hangar on the seawall at NAS Jacksonville, Detachment 9s maintenance crew disembarked the Nicholas at NS Mayport, signaling the conclusion of their deployment. The international partnerships with Central and South American countries combined with a joint effort from the U.S. Coast Guard and other law enforcement agencies, led to massive seizures of illegal narcotics. The estimated eight tons of narcot ics disrupted by Detachment 9 and Nicholas was one of the largest record ed for a Navy deployment, and had a potential street value of $515 million. Despite the long deployment, families were very supportive of the mission. Even though they were gone for so long, it was worth it because of what they were able to accomplish, remarked Kelly Hughes, daughter of AZ1 Brian Hughes, who served as the lead aviation administrationman for the detachment. Over the course of their deploy ment, the detachment had little room for error. With aircraft constantly on call to locate and stop go-fast drugrunning vessels, the maintenance crew was required to be ready at a moments notice, and worked tirelessly to ensure that the detachment was battle ready at all times. Fortunately, we were very effective, said Lt. Cmdr. Nick DeLeo. We were lucky enough to have two helicopters with one always functioning. We never missed tasking due to maintenance. Welcome home, HSL-42 Det. 9 NAS Jax Sailors of the Quarter honored at luncheon

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Many things surprised me when I first saw Dustin at the airport home for his middeployment rest and recupera tion (R&R) period after nearly seven months apart. Sure, he was wearing clothes and a smile I instantly rec ognized but he was slightly thinner, definitely more tan and unshaven from 37 hours of traveling. New flecks of grey had sprouted around his temples and patches of it had settled throughout his beard. The lines making a starburst from the corner of his eyes seemed more prominent, and the skin around his neck, which I could see through his stretched-out collar, seemed sunken. On the way to the resort, where we would spend two full days together before reuniting with the kids, even Dustins stories and mannerisms felt new. He mentioned names I hadnt heard before. Wait, who is ______? I asked several times. Dustin, realizing how sepa rate our day-to-day lives had been, would backtrack and retell the story, this time filling in the blanks as if we were on a first date. His clothes smelled musty and damp. I knew they needed a good washing in hot, colorsafe bleach. I didnt even rec ognize his suitcase. Was it one from home? Nothing, however, was quite as surprising and unfamiliar as what Dustin said as soon as we got into the resort hotel room suitable for a honeymoon: Ive been thinking maybe we should have a fourth child. (This is where the record comes to a loud, screeching stop, and the sound of crickets fills the air.) Lets rewind, shall we? The day before I picked up Dustin at the airport, I couldnt stop thinking about our time at the resort. Mostly, I fantasized about: 1) sleeping past 7 a.m., 2) not watching cartoons, 3) not asking for the kids menu, 4) floating in a pool with out three children screaming, Mom, watch me! and Mom! You werent looking! 5) not being responsible for someone elses private matters in the bathroom. Number five is a big one. Ive been changing diapers or helping little people who look like my husband use the bathroom for almost 12 years straight. Ive been someones food supply for almost a quarter of those years. At last, as fall approaches and my youngest will begin kindergarten, I see a light at the end of the tunnel. From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day, I just might have time to do something for myself . something drastic like sit in a quiet living room and do nothing. So as the crickets chirped in our hotel room and my mind raced, I tried to understand the words that had just come from Dustins lips. Up until about a year ago, I was still unsure about being done. I didnt want to close the door. Verbalizing it even as in Im done having babies felt profane. So we just didnt say any thing at all, and I wondered when I would wake up and know, without a doubt, that the shop was out of business. Yet, in that moment, at the resort, while the prover bial crickets filled the space between me and Dustin, I thought, IM DONE, and I had never really been so sure of anything. Then I looked at Dustin. He was smiling and searching my face for answers. I tried to understand this man, the one who, incidentally, had hoped our third son with the January due date would be born on the better side of the tax season. Thats when I realized, for seven months, all Dustin had seen were the happy moments: the pictures of Ford round ing third base and running toward home; the recording of Owens new Cartoon Dad and Cartoon Owen, each of whom had a British accent; the video of Lindell doing a goal kick at his soccer game. First he stretched his arms and checked his shoelaces, then he checked the wind with his fin ger. Dustin had missed: spilled cereal and milk on the kitch en floor; tantrums in the gro cery store; fights on the couch; screaming in the carHes on my side! He touched me! Hes looking at me! He hadnt been caught not looking at an amazing dive at the pool or throwing away some trea sured artwork from school (Yes, how did that get in the trash?). I had not videotaped or photographed any of these moments. The next morning our first together Dustin asked me what was most surprising about having him home again. I told him it was the whole fourth child thing, and I nearly choked on the words. One week into R&R, during an exceptionally impressive display of lung power and stubbornness by Lindell, I looked at Dustin and mouthed, fourth child? He smiled sheepishly and said, Yeah, I guess that would be kind of difficult. Its not that we dont love our boys. You know we do. Its just that weve graduated to a new phase of parenthood, one that doesnt involve wipes and binkies, and going back doesnt feel right. I couldnt say it before, but Im ready nowwell stop while were (mostly) ahead.Will there be another Smiley? July 26 1812 U.S. frigate Essex captures British brig Leander. 1912 First airborne radio communications from naval aircraft to ship (Lt. John Rodgers to USS Stringham). 1946 Capt. Joy Bright Hancock appointed director, Womens Naval Reserve. 1948 President Harry S. Truman orders desegregation of the Armed Services. 1954 Three aircraft from USS Philippine Sea (CVA-47) shoot down two Chinese fighters that fired on them while they were providing air cover for rescue operations for a U.K. airliner shot down by a Chinese aircraft. July 27 1953 Korean War armistice signed at Panmunjon, Korea. 1915 Sailors and Marines land in Haiti to restore order 1916 Navy establishes a Code and Signal Section which initially worked against German ciphers and tested the security of communications during U.S. naval training maneuvers. 1926 Team of scientists from Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Carnegie Institution determine height of the Ionosphere through use of radio pulse transmitter developed by NRL 1945 USS Callaghan (DD-792) is last ship sunk by a Japanese kamikaze attack, off Okinawa. 1973 Launch of Skylab 3, the second manned mission to the first U.S. manned space station, was piloted by USMC Maj. Jack Lousma, with Navy Capt. Alan Bean as commander of the mission and former Navy electronics officer Owen Garriott as Science Pilot. The mission lasted 59 days, 11 hours and included 858 Earth orbits. Recovery was by USS New Orleans (LPH-11). July 29 1846 Sailors and Marines from U.S. sloop Cyane capture San Diego, Calif. 1918 Assistant Secretary of the Navy Franklin Roosevelt visits Queenstown, Ireland. 1967 Fire on board USSForrestal (CV 59) kills 134 crew members. July 30 1918 Units of First Marine Aviation Force arrive at Brest, France. 1941 Japanese aircraft bomb USS Tutuila (PR-4) at Chungking, China; First Navy ship damaged by Axis during World War II. 1942 FDR signs act establishing WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service). During World War II, over 80,000 officer and enlisted women served in the WAVES. 1944 Naval Task Force lands Army troops near Cape Opmarai, New Guinea. 1945 Japanese submarine, I-58, sinks USS Indianapolis (CA-35) in Philippine Sea; 316 out of 1199 crew survived. July 31 1815 Commodore Stephen Decatur concludes agreement with Bey of Tunis to compensate U.S. for seizure of mer chant ships during the War of 1812. 1865 East India Squadron estab lished to operate from Sunda Strait to Japan. 1874 Commissioning of USS Intrepid, first U.S. warship equipped with torpedoes. 1912 First attempt to launch an air plane by catapult made at Annapolis. 1964 All-nuclear task force with USS Long Beach, USS Enterprise, and USS Bainbridge leaves Norfolk, VA to begin voyage, Operation Sea Orbit, to circle the globe without refueling. They returned on 3 October. August 1 1801 U.S. schooner Enterprise cap tures Tripolitan ship Tripoli 1921 Successful tests of gyro scopic high level bombsight (Norden Bombsight) at Torpedo Station, Yorktown, VA. Carl Norden devel oped the bombsight for the Bureau of Ordnance. 1946 Office of Naval Research established. 1950 Control of Guam transferred to Department of Interior. 1958 USS Nautilus (SSN-571) sub merges under Arctic ice cap near Point Barrow. 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012

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Kiwus assumes command of NAVFAC SoutheastCapt. Christopher Kiwus relieved Capt. John Heinzel as commanding officer, Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast in a change of command ceremony July 20 at NAS Jacksonville. Heinzels greatest leadership strengths are his passion for improvement and challenging the status quo, said guest speaker Rear Adm. Kevin Slates, commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Atlantic. He delivers results across the board and confidently makes the difficult look easy. Slates commended Heinzel and the Civil Engineer Corps officers and civilians of NAVFAC Southeast for their support to the warfighter during a period of tremendous growth and change. He noted NAVFAC Southeasts many accomplish ments under Heinzels leadership, including nearly $4 billion in design; acquisition; construction; main tenance and repair; energy and environmental; and basic support services such as transportation and utilities for the warfighters and families in the southeast region. During his tenure, Heinzel led a workforce of more than 1,800 military and civilian personnel who pro vided unparalleled impact on Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force and Joint installations throughout the south eastern United States and the Caribbean. Most significant among NAVFAC Southeasts accomplishments are the construction programs in support of the $130 million expansion of Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, the $128 million relocation of Third Army to Shaw Air Force Base, and U.S. Southern Commands $33 million Haiti reconstruc tion effort. Additionally, Heinzel led a robust and comprehensive regional energy strategy focused on reducing demand and incorporating alternative technologies for energy generation. During the ceremony, Slates presented the Legion of Merit to Heinzel for his extraordinary leadership and successful execution of $1.7 billion of construction and executing $2.2 billion in contracts and services at 22 locations geographically dispersed across seven states and the Caribbean a while serving as com manding officer from July 2010 to July 2012 and culminating 27 years of dedicated service. Kiwus told Heinzel, Your strong reputation pre cedes you and I am truly honored to be part of this fabulous team, said Kiwus. Thank you for what you have done every day to support the fleet, fighter and families. A native of Niskayuna, N.Y., Kiwus graduated from Union College in 1984, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in civil engineering. He earned a masters degree in civil engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, a masters degree in strategic studies and national security from the U.S. Naval War College, and a doctoral degree in civil and environmental engi neering from Rutgers University. He also attended the Advanced Executive Program at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University. Kiwus is a registered professional engineer in the State of Florida. He is also a member of the Acquisition Corps and is designated a Joint Specialty Officer. His most recent assignment was Engineering Division Chief, Operations and Logistics Directorate, U.S. Africa Command in Stuttgart, Germany. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 3

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The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 wel comed college students June 25 from the Totus Tuus ministry aboard a P-3C Orion aircraft at NAF Misawa, Japan. The students, who volunteer their time to travel abroad to minister the Catholic religion to youngsters, were excited to see the aircraft and learn about the squadrons mission while deployed to Japan. It is an honor to serve those who serve in many different parts of the world, and to minister to Catholic youth who are currently separated from their friends back home in the United States, said Program Coordinator, Alan Day. Totus Tuus, latin for totally yours, is a program for college adults who spend their summer break teaching youth programs to young children and promoting the Catholic faith. The organization has sent students out to Guam to minister before, but this trip repre sents the first time that the organization has sent a team to Japan. The team, sponsored by the Archdiocese of Denver, spent a week ministering to children of families who are currently stationed at Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, before moving up north, to minister for those stationed at Misawa Air Base. I am happy to welcome them aboard the aircraft to give everyone on the crew an opportunity to talk about their job and explain how we all work together to accomplish the mission, said Lt. Erin Buttler-Ricketts, command services officer. The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 are based at NAS Jacksonville and are cur rently on a tri-site scheduled six-month deployment to U.S. Southern Command and U.S. 7th Fleet areas of responsibility. Capt. Mark Stevens, commanding offi cer of VP-30, congratulated graduates of the P-3C CAT I (initial training syllabus) Acoustic and Non-Acoustic Operator Class 1203, Flight Engineer Class 1202, and In-flight Technician Class 1201 on July 6. Honor Graduates for the classes were: AWF3 Drew Wence (Naval Aircrewman Mechanical Class 1202), AWV3 Norbert Stahlberg (Naval Aircrewman Avionics Class 1201), AWO3 Adriana Dykes (Naval Aircrewman Operator Class 1203-NonAcoustic), and AWO3 Ryon Aguirre (Naval Aircrewman Operator Class 1203-Acoustic). All graduating Sailors were advanced at the ceremony to their listed rank by Stevens. College students visit the Fighting TigersVP-30 graduates aircrewmen 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012

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The Mexican Navy and VP-45 recently integrated into Combined Task Force (CTF) 176 on board USS Essex (LHD 2) for Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2012 exercise, June 27 to August 7. CTF-176 Commander, Rear Adm. Peter Ellis, and his com mand staff consisting of Sailors from Canada, Mexico, New Zealand and the United States operated from Essex and led more than 10 ships, 12 aircraft, three landing craft, 11 amphibious assault vehicles, and more than 3,500 personnel according to the Take Notice article pub lished on board Essex on July 13. Ellis stated, Its extremely impressive. The complexity of making it all work is not lost on us. Its vital to be able to work together in a combined envi ronment, with folks from other services and countries. Working together helps build trust and cooperation between nations, and RIMPAC assists in fostering and sustaining those relation ships. The Mexican Navy is partici pating in RIMPAC for the first time. This is a very important moment in history for Mexico. We are excited about train ing with the other countries in RIMPAC, and showing how capable the ARM Usumacinta is, said Cmdr. Juan Malo, CTF 176 liaison for the Mexican Navy. Usumacinta is a Tank Landing Ship (LST) home-ported in Manzanillo, Mexico. Cmdr. John Brabazon, executive officer of the VP-45 Pelicans, is a liaison to CTF 176 representing Capt. Chris Ramsden, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 2 and RIMPAC CTF 172 to ensure safe interoperability among the task forces operating in RIMPAC. VP-45 has generated a strik ing amount of anti-submarine warfare (ASW) readiness by operating in the first phase of RIMPAC. ASW primacy is our squadrons calling card. As we continue to build towards a challenging 7th Fleet deploy ment in December, operating in this complex joint environment will pay long-term dividends for the Pelican Team, said Brabazon. The relationships built during RIMPAC extended beyond the air, land, and sea. Cmdr. Malo and I shared a stateroom, said Brabazon. In the end, we are all trying to achieve the same objective serve our countries with intense pride and contribute to lasting global security. I am proud to call Cmdr. Malo my shipmate and mi amigo. CTF 176 is an expedition ary strike group and consists of participants from Australia, Canada, Chile, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Republic of Korea, Tonga, New Zealand, and the U.S. Throughout RIMPAC, the task force will participate in a wide range of amphibious exercis es, non-combatant evacuation operation exercises, helicop ter and mechanized raids, and Marine live-fire support exer cises. VP-45 Pelicans Combat Aircrew (CAC) 7 was conducting anti-submarine warfare training July 16 in the Bahamas operating area when they picked up distress calls concerning a missing aircraft over Nassau approach control fre quency. Since the crews exercise was nearly complete, Plane Commander Lt. Jeff Riggs began discussing details of the situation with the crew and developed a plan to assist with the search. Coast Guard aircraft were already in the area where air traf fic control lost communications with the small plane and happily accepted another search asset. The lost aircraft, a Beechcraft Bonanza, was carrying two American citizens who report edly left Marsh Harbor and were enroute to Daytona Beach, Fla. When Pelican 7 arrived on the scene, the U.S. Coast Guard C-130 and helicopter were unable to proceed to the last known position due to thunderstorms. CAC 7 extended fuel endurance so they could out last the storm. Flight Engineer AWF1 Gerber said, We knew lives were at risk, so we secured the engines to maximize our prudent limited endur ance. In a search and rescue mis sion, you safely do as much pos sible to help. An hour later, the last known position was clear of inclem ent weather and CAC 7 began its search in earnest. Navigator Lt. j.g. Christiane Benzing devised an observer rotation schedule to keep fresh eyes in the windows to maximize the effectiveness of the visual search. We train extensively for just such a situation and it really paid off. Our crew executed just like we trained and performed flawlessly. It was a tremendous crew effort, said Benzing. CAC 7 eventually spotted and reported two debris fields, one of which had an oily sheen on the surface of the water. The Coast Guard helicopter made its way to the debris to get a closer look and ordered a surface vessel to the scene. Hours later, CAC 7 guided the vessel to the exact position by using signaling devices dropped from the aircraft. In total, the crew was able to provide six hours of on station search time. Unfortunately, no survivors were located but this event showcases the flexibility and utility of the venerable P-3C Orion. VP-45 and Mexican Navy join forces during RIMPAC Pelicans play key role in Bahamas search and rescue JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 Thirty youths in the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps (NSCC) from Georgia and Florida trained for two weeks with the Seabees of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 14 aboard NAS Jacksonville. They actually drill here once every month, but then in the summer, theyll do a two-week deployment where they com plete field exercises and more in-depth training, said MC2 Justin Sharpe. The Sea Cadets received training in construction, weapons familiarization, map reading, small squad tactics, land navigation, radio communications, personal defense and first aid. They have a good time, said Sharpe. Weve let them drive the dump truck, the humvees and the fork lifts. The Sea Cadets slept in tents at the NMCB 14 Headquarters and at the NAS Jacksonville Antenna Farm where they received classroom instruction and hands-on training. They are going to construct a building on the compound, said Sharpe. They are also going to put up another tent at the antenna farm and dig some fighting position foxholes. Theyll go out there at night and sit in those holes, and well go out there with water balloons and water guns and act like were attacking them. They also do patrols and obstacle courses. This program is one of several U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps summer training programs that introduce Sea Cadets to a variety of military jobs. The Seabees of NMCB 14 are tasked with providing advance base construction, battle damage repair, contingency engi neering, humanitarian assistance and disaster recovery sup port to fleet and unified commanders. They get a lot of good training out of it, said Sharpe. Theyll go around when everybodys working, and theyll see people welding, building, repairing vehicles and even working on plumbing. Sea Cadet Geoffrey Cafarelli said the things he enjoyed learn ing most about include night ops, field operations, how to work with the fire team formations and digging defensive positions. The mission of the NSCC is to help cadets who are interested in the military develop leadership skills and maintain an environment free of drugs and gang influence. Sea Cadets are youths between the ages of 13 and 17, many of which who become service members in the future. I definitely plan on going into military. I plan on going in the Seabees, and hopefully find my way into BUD/S (Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL) training and then go on to join the SEALS, said Cafarelli. The NMCB 14 NSCC summer training program ended with a graduation ceremony where the Sea Cadets celebrated at the NAS Jacksonville outdoor pool. NMCB 14 hosts NSCC summer training program

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FRCSE, the largest tenant command at NAS Jacksonville with annual rev enues of nearly $950 million, won the 2012 JAXUSA Partnership Industry Leader Award presented for business achievements and corporate citizen ship during a luncheon at the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront June 7. JAXUSA Partnership is a division of Jax Chamber. What we do here is vital to the Warfighter, said Capt. Robert Caldwell, FRCSE commanding officer. We maintain the most sophisticated and com plex weapons delivery systems in the military inventory. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders shared insights with the group during lunch about the future of the military instal lation, including the recent unveiling of the MQ-8B Fire Scout training facility, upgrades to the base marina, and the soon-to-open All Hands Club. Ron Williamson, the base safety offi cer, treated visitors to a dashboard tour of the military installation, including the first P-8A Poseidon aircraft deliv ered to the fleet in March. The Poseidon is the replacement platform for the aging P-3C Orion maritime patrol air craft. Join the Jax Chamber #ilovejax Campaign conversation on Twitter or post photos or comments on the #ilovejax Facebook page at www.facebook. com/ilovejaxfl. CHAMBERThe graduates will now report to their assigned operational squadrons to begin their initial sea tour. VP-30 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 9

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National Night Out (Against Crime) is Aug. 7, from 6 9:30 p.m. at the NAS Jax Outdoor Pool & Allegheny Softball Field. Each event will award prizes to the top-3 finishers. Kids events Adults events Interactive Exhibits Boat) car simulator). Hey, MoneyMan! I was filling out a credit application the other day and they asked for my gross income. I have also heard the term net income. What is the difference? Moneyman Sez: Good question shipmate. These two terms are often misunderstood. Gross income is your total pay before anything is deduct ed. A salaried employee paid $4,000 per month makes a gross income of $48,000 per year ($4,000 per month x 12 months). Your actual paycheck amount (net income) is less than $4,000 once taxes, medical insurance or any other things your employer deducts prior to depositing your pay. This amount is your net pay (sometimes called take-home pay). Net pay is what is available to you for your fixed and discretionary expenses (food, transportation, rent, utilities, clothes, entertainment, etc.). In the case of an hourly employee, gross pay can be calculated by mul tiplying the hourly rate by 2080 (the number of working hours in a year based on a 40-hour workweek). It is important to monitor the amount you are having deducted from your gross pay to ensure that it is accurate and you are not contributing too much or too little for federal income taxes. If you see a deduction from your pay that doesnt seem right, seek assis tance from your unit command PSD liaison or financial advisor. You can also get financial coun seling from your local Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society office on base.National Night Out events announced today, be assured we will continue to deliver our common goal excel lence. No one person is greater than the team, As Sailors of the Quarter, we will continue to strive for our goals and continue to seek new challenges. Johnson closed with a quote from Adm. George Anderson, CNO from 1961 to 1963, and who was in charge of the U.S. blockade of Cuba during the 1962 Cuban missile crisis. The Navy has both a tradition and a future, and we look with pride and confidence in both directions. Following lunch, NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders congratulated the SOQs for earning the right to be called the best in their command and in the Navy. I know it took a lot of hard work to get here today. As Vince Lombadi said, Leaders arent born theyre made. Through hard work, you achieved your goals by being the best in your command. In this time of performto-serve, advancement quotas and a shrinking force it becomes even more important for you to stand out from the crowd, said Sanders. He added, Congratulations to the men and women who we are honoring today because they represent tomor rows leadership of the Navy. Id also like to thank all the spouses and sig nificant others joining us today. We all know that the Navy is a family team and we cannot do it without the sup port of everyone at home, he said. Sanders then presented an award envelope to each SOQ containing let ters of recognition and a $25 gift card from VyStar Credit Union. The luncheon was coordinated by CTM1Aaron Rummage. The NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department picked up the luncheon costs for the SOQs and their fam ily members. Other sponsors includ ed First Command Financial, Navy Mutual Aid, University of Phoenix and USAA Insurance. SOQ 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012

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Navy Region Southeast has made great strides in getting motorcycle riders into the appropriate training courses that are proven life-savers, including the Basic Rider Course, Military Sportbike Rider Course, and Experienced Rider Course. The region has nearly 4,000 riders, and 42 percent of them ride sport bikes built for speed. Max Bassett, Naval Air Station Jacksonvilles deputy safety manager, said training is crucial for these riders. New riders learn respect for the motorcycle and an appreciation for just how quickly these high performance machines can exceed the capabilities of an inexperienced rider, he said. Other technical skills taught during training include how to properly lean, turn, brake, accelerate, and take necessary emergency evasive actions. The courses also incorporate some Operational Risk Management and self-analysis of risk behaviors and riding mindsets. They also learn a great appreciation for just how much extra protection they have when wearing proper personal protective equipment such as a full face helmet, jackets and pants designed for motorcycle riders, along with motorcycle boots and gloves, Bassett said. One of the biggest prob lems with motorcycle training across the fleet is a high noshow rate for courses. This can make wait times for courses unnecessarily long, and its a wasted opportunity for Sailors who need to get into a class. The training safety courses are taught by contractors from Cape Fox Professional Services, and paid for by Commander, Navy Installations Command. The bill for classes is a set fee and costs the same whether one rider or a full class shows up. The Southeast Region has brought their no-show rate down considerably by increasing training notifications to Sailors and their supervisors, and by informing the com mand master chief about any one who fails to show up for assigned training. They have also reduced wait times for courses by adding extra classes whenever the wait time exceeds 30 days. Bassett said the leadership of Rear Adm. Jack Scorby, Commander, Navy Region Southeast, and the cooperative working environment between the regions chiefs mess, safe ty professionals, command motorcycle safety represen tatives, and Cape Fox train ers has been key, but he also credits mentorship programs developed by riders to help one another. Mentors are our first line of defense, Bassett said. Without them actively identifying our new riders and sit ting down with them to get them signed up for training, we would not enjoy the successes weve had. Their contributions are making a difference and will absolutely save lives. The Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) is once again playing a key role as government agencies and organiza tions across the United States support the 2012 Feds Feed Families food drive campaign, which runs through Aug. 31. Military customers and federal employees can donate nonperishable food and personal hygiene items to the campaign using marked bins located at the entries or exits of participating commissaries. Donations to the program help charitable organizations such as the local food bank. In this tough economy, sometimes its hard to make ends meet, said DeCA Director and CEO Joseph Jeu. More people than ever before are using food banks, which are struggling to meet the demand. This food drive is an extra boost to keep families fed. Last year, 770,000 pounds of food stuffs were donated at commissary locations. The DoD 2012 Feds Feed Families campaign has set its goal at 1.5 million pounds. The most needed items for donations include: Canned vegetables low sodium, no salt; Canned fruits in light syrup or its own juices; Canned proteins tuna, salmon, chicken, peanut butter and beans; Soups beef stew, chili, chicken noodle, turkey or rice; Condiments tomato-based sauces, light soy sauce, ketchup, mustard, salad dressing or oils; Snacks individually packed snacks, crackers, trail mix, dried fruit, granola and cereal bars, pretzels and sandwich crackers; Multigrain cereal; 100 percent juice all sizes, including juice boxes; Grains brown and white rice, oat meal, bulgar, quinoa, couscous, pasta, and macaroni and cheese; Paper products and household items paper towels, napkins, cleaning sup plies; Hygiene items diapers, deodorants (men and women), feminine products, toilet paper, tissues, soap, toothpaste and shampoo. The Feds Feed Families food drive campaign grew out of the Serve America Act that created United We Serve, an initiative that urged Americans to contribute to the nations economic recovery by helping their communities. The U.S. Office of Personnel Management and the Chief Human Capital Council are managing the campaign. Commissary participation is tied to its local installations ability to pro vide support to pick up and deliver the donated items. DeCAs customers and employees can and will make a difference in the lives of the children and families dealing with hunger, Jeu said. Southeast Region makes motorcycle safety a priority Your commissary supports Feds Feed Families program Beginner Rider Course Experienced Rider Course Military Sportbike Rider Course Call for class dates NAS Jax Safety Office 542-3082 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 11

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The guided missile frigate USS Nicholas (FFG 47) deliv ered more than four tons of cocaine and marijuana to Naval Station Mayport July 17. The haul was seized from drug interdictions conducted in support of Operation Martillo. Crew members offloaded approximately 3,408 kilograms (7,500 pounds) of cocaine, and 109 kilograms (239 pounds) of marijuana, with an estimated wholesale value of more than $93 million. The amount of cocaine seized was enough for 7.2 million doses, each dose approximately the same size as a sugar packet. Nicholas returned to port after a 175-day deployment supporting counter illicit traf ficking operations aimed at disrupting transnational orga nized crime and keeping drugs off the streets. With the help of some partners in the region we accom plished what we set out to do; disrupt the drug trade, said Cmdr. Stephen Fuller, USS Nicholas commanding officer. Interdictions are challeng ing, but with the help of other naval units, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and the partner nation navies, we executed a successful deploy ment. During the deployment, Nicholas, with embarked U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET), conducted a com bination of six disruptions and interdictions while in the Caribbean Sea, and the Atlantic and Pacific coastal waters of South and Central America. Also during the deployment, Nicholas transited the Panama Canal twice, conducted pass ing exercises and an officer exchange with the Colombian Navy, certified 22 pilots through HSL-42 Detachment 9, conducted four underway replenishments with a Chilean oiler, and a Crossing the Line ceremony when the ship crossed the equator. U.S. Navy and Coast Guard vessels, U.S. military and patrol aircraft from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agen cy, along with the support of allied and partner nation forces assisted with patrolling coastal regions from Colombia to Mexico to detect and monitor illicit traffic in order to cue and support PNs and U.S. interagency interdiction efforts. Patrol airplanes from Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 77 (VAW-77), Patrol Squadron Eight (VP-8) oper ating from El Salvador along with U.S. Customs and Border Protection long range patrol aircraft operating from NAS Jacksonville and NAS Corpus Christi, Texas, use sophisticated sensors to detect suspicious vessels and coordinate inter dictions by the U.S. Navy, Coast Guard and partner nations patrolling the region. More than 80 percent of the narcotics transiting through Mexico on their way to U.S. markets enter via maritime littoral routes, with the main conveyance being go-fast boats. By teaming up with regional partner nations and allied forces to scrutinize the littorals, transnational orga nized crime networks will be denied those routes. Operation Martillo (Spanish for hammer) is a U.S., European and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit traffick ing routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. This joint service, interagency, and multinational operation is being led by Joint Interagency Task Force South, the agency charged with detection, monitoring, and supporting the interdiction of illicit trafficking in a 42 million-sq.mi. area under the direction of U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM). Operation Martillo is a com ponent of the U.S. govern ments coordinated interagen cy regional security strategy in support of the White House strategy to combat transna tional organized crime and the U.S. Central America Regional Security Initiative. Drug seizure: USS Nicholas off loads 4 tons at NS MayportHSL-42 and VP-8 assisted with interdictions Check Us Out Online: www.jaxairnews.com JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 13

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Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus and Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert, visited the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) July 18 for the Navys Great Green Fleet demonstration during the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise. The Great Green Fleet dem onstration is a step towards the Department of the Navys goal to reduce consumption of energy, decrease reliance on fossil fuels and significantly increase the use of alternative energy. Greenert emphasized the importance of the Navys biofuel initiative and its importance for the Navys future energy plan. Biofuel is made with algae, plants and animal fat. Well be using a 50-50 mixture of that to show that in fact there is an alternative to petroleum prod ucts, said Greenert. Weve got to look for alternative fuels, weve got to look for alternative opportunities, and weve got to be efficient in energy. Nimitz took on more than 180,000 gallons of 50-50 biofuel, a new blend of hydro-processed renewable jet (HRJ-5) fuel July 17, in preparation for the Navys Great Green Fleet demonstra tion. Mabus spoke about how biofuels are a drop-in fuel and will not change operations at all. We dont have to change the operations, and we dont have to change anything that we are doing, said Mabus. The bio fuel is used in exactly the same way, by the same platforms and by the same engines. During an all hands call, Greenert took time to thank the crew of Nimitz and encouraged the crew to continue what they are doing. Every time I come aboard a great ship like Nimitz and talk to a great crew, it helps me understand what weve got to do and thats go back to Washington, make sure you are organized, trained and equipped to do the job you need to do. For the demon stration, Mabus and Greenert also visited USS Chafee (DDG 90), and USS Princeton (CG 59) to see the biofuel onload and to observe how they will use the fuel on board. RIMPAC 2012 is the 23rd exercise in the series that began in 1971. Twenty-two nations, more than 40 surface ships and submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in the RIMPAC exercise from June 29 to Aug. 3, in and around the Hawaiian Islands. The worlds largest inter national maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the worlds oceans. Capt. Mark Stevens relieved Capt. William Trey Wheeler III as presi dent of the Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) National Officers Team on June 26. Stevens, the commanding offi cer of fleet replacement squadron VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville and for mer vice president of MPA, stepped up to the president position in prep aration for Wheelers June 29 change of command, in which he was relieved as Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11. Serving on the national team this past year has been a great learning experience for all of us, said Stevens. We have grown quickly, exceeded our expectations as an inaugural associa tion. I look forward to helping guide MPA through a new set of milestones during its second year. Wheeler, who is moving to the Northern Virginia/Washington D.C. area, will continue to be an active participant in the organization as a mem ber of the board of directors. I am truly impressed with the amount of support MPA has received since the beginning, said Wheeler. Its a testament to the hard work of the MPA team who made the effort to stand-up this organization, and its been a plea sure and an honor to be a part of it. Succeeding Stevens as MPA vice president is Capt. Eric Wiese, com mander, Patrol Wing ELEVEN. Wiese joins CPRW-11 after a stint as the Force Management Branch Chief in J-8 at the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Pentagon. A Florida not-for-profit corporation established in 2011 and headquar tered in Jacksonville, Fla., the Maritime Patrol Association is dedicated to its mission to be the premier profession al organization representing the U.S. Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community by promoting the use of the patrol and reconnaissance aircraft in the United States Navy. The organiza tion is tax-exempt under section 501(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code (Tax ID No. 45-1968605). For more information, con tact Executive Director September Wilkerson, at (904) 563-4036 or info@ maritimepatrolassociation.org. And check out the MPA website at: www. maritimepatrolassociation.org. SecNav, CNO visit Nimitz for Great Green Fleet biofuel demo Stevens relieves Wheeler asMaritime Patrol president 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012

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Jacksonville has three more days supply of lifesaving blood each year thanks to the generous contributions of the work force at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), the larg est tenant command at NAS Jacksonville. FRCSE sponsored three blood drives in 2011 yield ing 1,232 units totaling three percent of all donations col lected by The Blood Alliance, a nonprofit blood bank serv ing Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. Maurice Brown, the blood banks donor resource consul tant, said using less staff and fewer mobile collection units make this drive especially beneficial. An average of five mobile collection buses and 20 staff members is all we use to achieve this, said Brown. It is a very cost effective way for us to reach donors, and FRCSE sets the bar pretty high for others to emulate. Brown said thousands of people are alive today because of FRCSEs gift of life donations. He said the military facilitys efforts are a godsend. FRCSE holds three drives annually each consisting of three days at two locations: two days at NAS Jacksonville and one at Cecil Commerce Center. Brown credits the efforts of Frank Taormina, Sr., a pub lic affairs specialist who has served as the commands blood drive chairperson since 2000, and FRCSE leaders for their continued support. Fortunately we have a large group of dedicated donors who come through at every blood drive, said Taormina. With the constant need for blood, my focus is always on the recipients when Im put ting together these blood drives. Our blood drive direct ly impacts the community in which we work and live. We do it for our families, our friends and our neighbors who may one day benefit from the gift of blood. Capt. Robert Caldwell, com manding officer of the aviation maintenance facility, said the generosity of the Sailors and civilians at FRCSE never ceases to amaze him. I cant tell you how proud I am of our workforce, he said. They are not only making a difference in the local community, but also a difference for our brave men and women who are forward deployed. The Navy issued a new energy pol icy that will drive energy consump tion reduction at all Navy installations, transform the shore energy culture and seek new or existing technical solutions for reducing energy, officials announced July 10. The Shore Energy Management Instruction signifies a complete revi sion from the previous version pub lished in 1994. The instruction codifies Navys policy and strategy to ensure energy security as a strategic imperative, meet federal mandates and executive orders, and achieve Department of the Navy (DoN) shore energy goals. Since naval forces require constant support from shore installations, Navy is mitigating its vulnerabilities related to the electrical grid such as outages from natural disasters and man-made events by lowering consumption, integrating renewable energy sources and increasing control of energy sup ply and distribution. Energy reliability, resiliency and redundancy are essen tial components of the Navys Critical Infrastructure Protection program. Energy security is critical because warfighters need assured access to reliable supplies of energy to meet oper ational needs afloat or ashore, said FRCSE workforce sets blood donation milestone Navy issues new shore energy policy to achieve energy security goals JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 15

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Monday Pizza Madness $5 for 14 one-topping pizza 2:30 9 p.m., dine in or carry-out only Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included July Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 4 10 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1-lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us. Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Summer Bowling Leagues Now Forming Monday Mixed Trio 7 p.m. Wednesday After Work League 4:30 p.m. Thrusday Morning Seniors 9 a.m. Thursday Night Extreme Bowling 6:30 p.m. Friday Intramural League 11:45 a.m. Sunday Fun Bunch League 4 p.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym45-minute, high-intensity group trainingFamily Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at 542-3518/4238. **New fitness class** Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DOD civilians, $3 for guests Learn-to-swim session three begins July 23 Lessons available at the indoor and outdoor pool $40 military, $45 DOD Register for swim lessons at the base gym I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 LegoLand 1 day $45.50, 1 day w/water park $52.75, 2 days $54.50, 2 days w/ water park $58.75 NFL Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1-day $29.50, 2-day $40 Disney World Orlando 4-day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Tampa Zoo $19 adult $17.50 child Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations Jacksonville Zoo adult $12, child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT MOSH $7 $12 Blue Man Group in Orlando $59, includes City Walk venue Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Medieval Times Free royalty upgrade with dinner reservationThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Daytona Beach Trip July 29 at 9 a.m. Paintball Trip August 4 at 9 a.m. Jax Suns Baseball Trip August 9 at 6:30 p.m. River Day at Mulberry Cove Marina Enjoy free tubing, wakeboarding, kayaking, stand-up paddle boarding, games, prizes food and more! August 11, 11 a.m. 4 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees August 10 & 24 for active duty August 12 & 26 for retirees & DoD personnel Junior Golf Clinic Session 3 (ages 11 17) August 6 10 Monday Friday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. $110 per week long session Twilight Special Monday Friday Play 18 holes for $17 after 3 p.m. Not applicable on holidays Golf & Dine Special Play 18-holes with cart and choice of breakfast or lunch for $26! Not available on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Lessons $150 per person August 17, 18, 19, 25 & 26 Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic on siteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Register now for before & after school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household income National Night Out August 7 at 6 9:30 p.m. Outdoor pool & Allegheny softball field Free cookout, pool games, bounce house, guest speakers, music, outdoor movie and more! Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School September 10 October 17 $500 per person Advanced Aviation Course (basic course required) $150 per person August 8 11 register by August 1 August 22 25 register by August 14 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012

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Todays Sailors are impacted by numerous financial issues, including declining home values, policy programs affecting retention, current job market, and permanent change of station orders outside their current area. Poor planning in any of these areas can affect the service members secu rity clearance, job performance and job stability. The Navy offers numerous programs for sailors concerning financial issues at the command level and through the stations Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC). As first-time homebuyer STG3 Jennifer Ford learned, There are many financial programs geared to assist military members and veterans. The PenFed Foundation recently created the Dream Makers grant to assist qualified first-time homebuyers in covering closing costs and the down payment. Its extremely user friendly and Sailors can receive up to $5,000 in a non-repayable grant. Application and eligibility require ments can be found at www.pentagonfoundation.org. At the command level, an active chain-of-command and Command Financial Specialist are the first line of assistance for financial programs impacting sailors and their families. A Leave and Earning Statement (LES) alone is not enough to plan for future financial stability. Financial planning worksheets can be constructed from the sailors current financial situation. In addition to a LES, living expenses, investments, and any indebtedness must be included when creating the financial planning work sheet. From this, a financial plan can be created to fit the sailors needs. In addition, financial issues can be addressed at the station-level by utilizing the NAS Jax FFSC. Strategies for First-time Homebuyers and Best Deals In Car Buying, Money, Debt and Credit Management, Transition Assistance, and Relocation Assistance are just a few of the courses and counseling offered by FFSC. FFSC Financial Manager Rufus Bundrige added, Service members and their families must be informed to set realistic expectations and goals to help them prepare for an unpredictable future. Financial stability affects not only the individual service member, but it impacts mission readiness. If you or a family member needs a financial makeover, contact Bundrige at 542-4976 and learn your options for a brighter financial future. FFSC offers help with financial issues that impact Sailors JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 17

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Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Fleet Readiness and Logistics, Vice Adm. Phil Cullom. This instruction is just one example of how we are driving a spartan energy ethos in our shore operations. We are com mitted to cost-effective ly achieving our energy goals by pursuing energy efficiency, transform ing our energy culture, and integrating renew able energy technologies, where viable. The revised instruction includes specific respon sibilities and actions that commands and person nel ashore must take in implementing the Navy Shore Energy program. For example, each Navy installation will have a tailored energy con sumption reduction goal based on its unique energy situation. By increasing ener gy efficiency, Navy can reduce operating costs, multiply the impact of current and future alter native energy sources and achieve DoN renewable energy targets. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus laid out five aggressive energy goals in October 2009 to improve energy security and efficiency afloat and ashore and increase our energy security. To review the instruc tion, visit http:// greenfleet.dodlive. mil/files/2012/07/ OPNAVINST-4100.5E.pdf. For more information about the Navys Energy Program, visit www. greenfleet.dodlive.mil or www.facebook.com/ navalenergy. ENERGY Chapel center hosts 16th annual Vacation Bible SchoolNinety-four children took part in Vacation Bible School (VBS) July 16 20 at NAS Jacksonville Chapel Center. Our theme this year is Sonrise National Park. The lessons all deal with the Lord Jesus and different aspects of his impact in our lives that let us know that we can trust him, that he loves us and that he takes care of us. Then, the overall theme around it is set in the national park type venue, said Grace Heffner, VBS director and the chapels director of the religious educa tion department. Students between the ages of 5 and 12 switched between 45-minute class room sessions throughout the day. They par ticipated in vari ous activities that included arts and crafts, as well as singing. I really like coloring while learning about God, said Alyssa Hanners, a VBS student. More than 30 adult and teenage volunteers came to help the chil dren learn and have fun at VBS. The teens do earn community ser vice hours. Theres a letter that the chapel gives to them stating that they have given hours, said Heffner. Heffner said this is the 15th VBS she has directed, and she continues to direct the program because of the children. There was a little boy in one of the classrooms who did not know who Jesus was, and he keeps saying, Whos Jesus? as the teacher kept presenting the material. After about half way through it, the light came on, and he said, Now, I know who Jesus is. That is why we do it, said Heffner. VBS ended in All Saints Chapel with a musical program where family and friends gathered to watch the students sing. Next years VBS is being planned to take place in July. VBS students do not have to be members of a congregation at NAS Jacksonville Chapel Center, and volunteers are welcome. Call 542-3051 for more information. 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012

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A group of employers from Omaha, Lincoln and other Nebraska cities have a better understanding of what the U.S. military does after participating in a brief visit to the Jacksonville tri-base area, coordi nated by the Nebraska Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR) State Committee. The group of 25 business owners and supervi sors spent three days visiting area military instal lations, including Navy Reserve aviation squad rons and Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic at NAS Jacksonville, the Trident Training Facility at NSB Kings Bay, the Marine Corps Blount Island Command, and the Florida National Guard Headquarters in St. Augustine. Bringing groups to Jacksonville really gives us an opportunity to showcase a wide spectrum of the military, in the same geographic area, said Bill Nelson, program support director of the ESGR for Nebraska. A boss lift is a relatively small group of people, but if we pick key employers, they can go back and tell their peers what it is all about. The tour began with a stop at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1000, home to Fleet Logistics Support Squadrons VR-62 and VR-58. The employers learned that although the two Navy Reserve squadrons have similar names, they have different missions and uti lize different aircraft. Jeff Williams, who owns an electrical contract ing company, said he enjoyed the opportunity to go aboard the aircraft and learn about the training simulators. I got a greater appreciation for the kinds of sim ulator training that our military is using, and how they are employing that technology as a cost-effective training tool, he said. Williams received an ESGR Freedom Award, the organizations highest honor, for his outstanding support of a mobilized Reservist in a company of 15 employees. Its the right thing to do, and this experience has confirmed that mindset for me 100 percent. Navy Reservists from NAS Jax-based squadrons said they were glad for the opportunity to talk about their mission. As a Reservist myself, I cant say enough about the importance of this type of visit, said Lt. Cmdr. Pete Pacifico, a pilot assigned to VR-58. Its not only important for employers to really understand some of the challenges we face being a civilian and a service member, but also realize the great advantages we bring to the table as employees. Although not every command visited had affiliated Reserve or Guard units, the boss lift gave participants insight as to how the National Guard and Reserve forces integrate into the Department of Defense total force, and the importance of military training. It was very eye opening to realize all that goes in to keeping our nation safe, said Devin Ahearn, a district manager at Arbys restaurants in Wyoming and Nebraska. After touring the Trident Training Facility, Ahearn said she was impressed with the process for attaining the dolphins warfare insignia. As a leader, I think that kind of cross training can be valuable in any situation, and we dont do enough of it, she added. Nebraska ESGR Program Support Director Bill Nelson said the boss lift program is a critical tool in helping employers realize the importance of supporting citizen-service members. Troops who leave their job and go halfway around the world to protect our nations freedom need to be laser-focused on their job. They cant be filled with the worry of wondering if their civilian job will be wait ing for them when they return from a deployment, he said. The whirlwind visit kept the group busy from start to finish, although they did find time to go to Atlantic Beach for dinner one night. You cant go to Florida from Nebraska and not put your feet in the sand, said Williams, holding a handful of Florida seashells to take back to his son. Departing from NAS Jax aboard a KC-135 Stratotanker piloted by the 155th Air Refueling Wing of the Nebraska Air National Guard, the boss had one final opportunity to witness military operations, get ting a close up view of the in-flight refueling mission of the plane. ESGR is a Department of Defense organization, designed to facilitate relationships between Reservists and Guardsmen and their civilian employers. ESGR volunteers work to educate employers about the benefits of employing Guardsmen and Reservists, inform employees of their rights, gain and maintain employer support for Guard and Reserve service by recogniz ing outstanding support, and help resolve conflict through mediation. State committees sponsor trips, called boss lifts, to military installations throughout the country. Employers learn importance of Reserve, Guard mission JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012 19

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Arlington National Cemetery does not make pre-arrangements or take reservations before the time of death. Therefore, the sur viving spouse or parent of the child should go to the local funeral home to make arrangements for any ser vices. The funeral home director should contact Arlington National Cemetery to make burial arrange ments through the Consolidated Customer Service Center at (877) 907-8585. Normally, a copy of the last dis charge or retirement DD-214 is all the documentation that is neces sary. After calling, a case file number will be issued for further reference and use. Fax number is (571) 256-3334 and email is anc.isb@ army.conus.mil. The funeral home director that you use will coordinate with a funeral home in the Washington, DC area for pick up, storage, and transportation to the cemetery of the service members remains. While there is no charge for internment at Arlington, the deceased family will be responsible for paying any and all transportation and storage charges. Expect upwards of three to four months delay after being assigned a block time for burial. There are six funeral times (9 a.m., 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 2 p.m. and 3 p.m.) and four to five funerals are commenced daily at the same time from the administration building. The ideal requested funeral time is 1 p.m., alternately 11 a.m., to avoid out-of-town guests having to come the night before the ceremony. Internment/inurnment services and military honors are provided on a first-come, first-served basis. For enlisted personnel, honors will be provided by the appropri ate military service branch and consists of pallbearers, firing party and a bugler. The caisson, if available, as well as a chaplain can be requested by the family at the time of burial arrangement. For commissioned and warrant officers, in addition to standard honors, caisson, band, and escort troops are scheduled as requested by the family. The riderless (caparisoned) horse is used for Army and Marine colonels and above rank. Only one set of official military honors can be provided. If a sur viving spouse/family desires to have military honors at a memorial service in the hometown or where the deceased lived, contact the local military representatives (i.e. ROTC or Junior ROTC unit, Fleet Reserve Unit, veterans group and volunteer groups) for the service. Additional information can be found at the Arlington National Cemetery web site at: http://www.arlingtoncem etery.mil/FuneralInformation/ SchedulingServices.aspx. Jessica Fowler and her husband, AT2 Patrick Fowler moved to NAS Jax from MCBH Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii in January 2011. She has been the ombuds man for HSL-42 since August 2011. Since the first day we checked in at HSL-42, our com mand leadership has been phenomenal. Weve never been attached to a command that was more supportive of their Sailors and their families than the Proud Warriors have been. Im just so proud to be a part of that, she said. Jessica also works full time as an AmeriCorps VISTA serving as the military engagement manager at HandsOn Jacksonville where she has engaged over 400 volunteers in more than 1,800 hours of volunteer service in the past five months. In addition to creating projects that are open to the entire com munity, she has also worked with command volunteer coordinators to set up projects for com mand service days. My position at HandsOn Jacksonville appealed to me because it gave me the opportunity to integrate two things Im very passionate about, volunteerism and supporting our military community, she said Jessica got her Bachelors in Marketing from the University of Connecticut. Her husband is currently deployed with HSL-42 Detachment 7 on board USS Jason Dunham. For more information about any of the sports call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail: bill.bonser@navy. mil. Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com nasjaxmwr. Retiree news: Burial in Arlington National Cemetery Check Us Out Online: www.jaxairnews.com 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 26, 2012

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