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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02001
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 07-19-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02001

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THURSDAY, JULY 19, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com When the VP-16 War Eagles recently returned home to NAS Jacksonville from their suc cessful 7th Fleet deployment, they turned in their vintage P-3C Orion aircraft, as well as their tools, equipment and NATOPS manuals. Then, on July 11, VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Molly Boron led her aircrews to the P-8A Integrated Training Center where they are now studying to become the first operational squadron certified to fly the P-8A Poseidon. Boron, who took command of the squadron eight weeks ago at Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan, has served 11 years in the Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) community. I completed my P-3 flight training at VP-30 back in 2001, and now Im back with a truly talented squadron to transition to the P-8A platform. Its quite an honor for our people. Boron noted that when she was a department head at VP-40 she served under Capt. Mark Stevens (who is now commanding officer of VP-30) and alongside Cmdr. Andy Miller (who is now OIC of the P-8A Fleet Integration Team). Because we served together at VP-40, its reassuring to enter this historic transition having previously worked with the VP-30 leadership and under stand their expectations. She explained that the pre vious eight months were a blur of activity for VP-16. Our final deployment with the P-3C Orion at Kadena Air Base was filled with joint exercises and detachments to destina tions that included Indonesia, Singapore, Thailand, India, Guam and Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. The War Eagles flew nearly 4,000 flight hours. After our homecoming at NAS Jax in June, we bid fare well to our P-3 Orions and turned our attention to the P-8A transition. Since early 2011, weve been working on Northrop Grumman and Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic (HSMWL) personnel hosted a ribbon-cutting reception July 10 for the new MQ-8B Fire Scout operator training facility at NAS Jacksonville. The facility is equipped with four mission simu lators and an instructors station, as well as sepa rate classrooms. After two years of operational testing with squadrons assigned to HSMWL, the MQ-8B Fire Scout u nmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) program is seeking to lock in its future with the Navy by pro viding a leading-edge simulator center. Commander, HSMWL Capt. Doug Ten Hoopen said he was pleased to bring yet another training capability to NAS Jacksonville. Our wing of Bravo and Romeo Seahawk heli copters is the only one in naval aviation to fly Sexual assault training teams ready for deploymentMaster Mobile Training Teams from the Navys Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) task force are now deploying worldwide to provide SAPR training to fleet leaders, Navy officials said July 12. Part of the Navys aggressive efforts to prevent sexual assaults and promote essential culture changes within the force, the 14 SAPR Master Mobile Training Teams (MMTTs) will deploy from the Center for Professional and Personal Development (CPPD) around the globe starting July 13 to provide SAPR leadership (SAPR-L) training to command leadership triads (commanding officer/officer in charge, executive officer/assistant officer in charge, and command master chief/chief of the boat/senior enlisted advisor) in fleet concentration areas and locations with significant Navy presence. The command triads will then deliver the SAPR-L training to their command leadership, E-7 and above. In the last fiscal year alone, the Navy received 582 reports of sexual assault, affecting Sailors across all ranks. This crime is corrosive to both our morale and to our operational readiness. Just as all Sailors are affected, all hands must work together to reduce and ultimately elimi nate these crimes, said Rear Adm. Martha Herb, director of Personnel Readiness and Community Support. SAPR-L training will provide our team the critical tools to elimi nate sexual assault and promote the Navys core values of honor, courage and commitment that define our culture of respect and professionalism. The MMTT preparatory training to command triads will prepare the command triad to provide valuable SAPR training to officers and enlisted leaders, explained Capt. Scott Seeberger, chief of staff for the SAPR Task Force. The MMTTs have a great journey ahead of them as they train our command leaders and provide tools critical to reducing sexual assault and promoting a culture of respect and professionalism in the force. SAPR-L will be the first phase of this training utilizing a top-down leadership approach, said Seeberger. Weve structured the MMTTs to reflect the command triad with a captain, commander and master chief. Weve also added a Judge Advocate General (JAG) officer to each team to explain the legal procedures that follow an allegation of sexual assault and VP-16 begins new chapter MQ-8B Fire Scout training facility unveiled at NAS Jax

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS July 18 1775 Continental Congress resolves that each colony provide armed vessels. 1779 Commodore Abraham Whipples squadron captures 11 ships in largest prize value of Revolutionary War. 1792 John Paul Jones dies in Paris, France. 1920 Naval aircraft sink ex-German cruiser Frankfurt in target practice. 1943 German submarine shoots down K-74, the first and only U.S. air ship lost during WW II. 1966 Launch of Gemini 10 with Lt. Cmdr. John Young as Command Pilot. Mission involved 43 orbits at an alti tude of 412 nautical miles and lasted two days, 22 hours and 46 minutes. Recovery was by HS-3 helicopter from USS Guadalcanal (LPH-7). 1973 Task Force 78, a mine counter measures force, departs waters of North Vietnam after completing minesweep ing operations of 1,992 tow hours at the cost of $20.39 million. July 19 1812 The heavy frigate USS Constitution escapes from British squadron after three-day chase off New Jersey. 1886 USS Atlanta, one of the first steel-hulled American cruisers armed with breech-loading rifled guns, is commissioned. 1897 Lt. Robert Peary departs on yearlong Arctic Expedition that makes many important discoveries, including one of largest meteorites, Cape York. 1918 Armored cruiser USS San Diego sunk off Fire Island, N.Y., by a mine laid by U-156. July 20 1846 First visit of U.S. warships (USS Columbus and USS Vincennes) to Japan is unsuccessful in negotiating a treaty. 1960 USS George Washington (SSBN 598) successfully fires the first two operational Polaris missiles while sub merged off Florida. 1969 Former Navy pilot Neil Armstrong is first man to set foot on the moon. While taking the first step, he said, Thats one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. Armstrong was Commander of Apollo 11, which during its 8-day mission landed on the Sea of Tranquility. Recovery was by HS-4 helicopters from USS Hornet (CVS-12). July 21 1823 After pirate attack, Lt. David G. Farragut leads landing party to destroy pirate stronghold in Cuba. 1944 Invasion and recapture of Guam begins. 1946 In first U.S. test of adaptabil ity of jet aircraft to shipboard opera tions, XFD-1 Phantom makes landings and takeoffs without catapults from USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CV-42). July 22 1802 The heavy frigate Constellation defeats nine Corsair gunboats off Tripoli. 1905 Body of John Paul Jones moved to Annapolis, Md. for reburial. 1964 Four Navy divers (Lt. Cmdr. Robert Thompson, GM1 Lester Anderson, QMC Robert Barth and HMC Sanders Manning) submerge in SeaLab I for 10 days at a depth of 192 feet, 39 miles off Hamilton, Bermuda. They sur faced on July 31, 1964. July 23 1947 First all-jet Navy squadron (VF-17A) receives its first aircraft (FH). 1950 USS Boxer (CV-21) sets record crossing of Pacific to bring aircraft, troops and supplies to Korea at start of the conflict. 1958 USS Nautilus (SSN-571) departs Pearl Harbor for first submerged transit of North Pole. 1993 Sarah Deal becomes first woman Marine selected for naval avia tion training. July 24 1944 Following 43 days of naval gunfire and air bombardment, Naval Task Force lands Marines on Tinian. July 25 1779 Amphibious expedition against British in Penobscot Bay, ME 1863 U.S. Squadron bombards Fort Wagner, N.C. 1866 David G. Farragut is appointed the first Admiral in the U.S. Navy. 1912 First specifications for naval aircraft published. 1934 First president to visit Hawaii, Franklin D. Roosevelt, reaches Hilo on board the light cruiser USS Houston (CA-30). 1941 Bureau of Ordnance issues first Navy E certificates (for excellence) for industry. Thirteen months is a long time to be away from family, so the military allows for a twoweek R&R (rest and recupera tion) period in the middle of a yearlong deployment. Sounds generous, doesnt it? One of my annoyances at the beginning of this deployment was people who asked, Does Dustin get to come home at all? Me: Yes, he will have two weeks at home this summer. Them (smiling): Oh, well, thats nice. Me (in my head): Really? Thats nice? Two measly weeks out of 58 is nice? Would you like to see your husband for just two weeks out of a whole year? I never said this out loud, of course, because to do so would be tacky. But when Dustin left in November, I wasnt rational. Back then, two weeks felt like nothing and I wondered if it was worth having him come home at all wed just have to go through the dreaded goodbye again. That was then. Now, however, two weeks really does seem nice. If Ive learned anything in my 35 years as a military dependent, its that everyone deals with separations differently. Some people like to talk to their husband every chance they get. Others like to stick to a set day and time. Why do we need to talk mul tiple times a day? they say. We dont even talk that much when hes home. Some people like to have a big party when their husband returns. Others want it to be just family. (Note: For many, just family does not mean parents and in-laws.) Some people include their children in all aspects of R&R. Others do not. Ive even heard of couples rendezvousing at a secret destination and not tell ing the children that Dad had two weeks back in the U.S.A. What they dont know cant hurt them, right? Some people meet as a fam ily at Disney World or the Bahamas. Other people want to have a two-week slice of nor malcy at home. We all have different cir cumstances. In my familys case, our children are some what older, so they stay up late, and they dont take naps. The two oldest are in that murky, pre-teen space of wanting to be around us, but ultimately thinking were kind of boring. They usually have their own, separate plans, but they are still too young to enact them with out our help. Dustin and I wondered when wed ever have time alone. We envisioned ourselves smil ing helplessly at one another across the tenth family game of Monopoly. I mean, we cant even talk in code around these guys anymore! They can spell and everything. So we hatched a plan: Id pick him up at the airport, wed steal away for two days at the Samoset Resort in Rockland, Maine, and then surprise the kids. Wed be filled up on cou ple time and ready to share with the boys. I couldnt believe it when I saw him at the airport. One day he was across the world for nearly eight months and now he was standing in front of me. On our way to the Samoset, I remembered things that had happened in November, and I was confused: Were you here for that? Or, had you already left? Wow, you really werent here when that happened? Time seemed to have stopped and quickly moved forward at the same time. On Tuesday, we arrived home to surprise the boys. They thought our 29th Dinner with the Smileys that night was with City Councilman Geoffrey Gratwick. Thats what I had told them. Around 5:30 p.m., howev er, photographer Andrea Hand asked the boys and their bab ysitter to come outside. Your mom has a surprise for you, she said. The boys thought it would be a new kayak. The video of what hap pened next is on http:// www.Facebook.com/Dinner WithTheSmileys. We owe Councilman Gratwick a Dinner with the Smileys. But for the next two weeks, Dustin is exactly where he should be at the table, next to me and across from his boys. And thats more than nice. Its wonderful. It wasnt dinner with the city councilman 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012

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HSL-42 Det. Eight deploys HSL-42 Doomsday Detachment Eight departed their homeport of NAS Jacksonville June 18 to embark onboard USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG-81) attached to the Eisenhower Strike Group, for an extended deployment to the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsi bility (AORs). Doomsday Detachment Eight is flying the last SH-60B Bravo Seahawk helicopters before the squadron transitions to the MH-60R Romeo Seahawk helicopter next year. Det. Eight, led by Lt. Cmdr. Christian Beard and ADC(AW/SW) Rommel Pitts, includes six pilots, three aircrewmen and 17 maintainers. In preparation for deployment, the detachment completed three phase maintenance inspections and more than 3,000 manhours of maintenance, enabling the aircrew to fly over 160 flight hours at sea during a fast paced pre-deploy ment workup schedule. The Doomsdayers of Det. Eight have participated in five months of workup operations, with 33 days of underway time, completing Week One Workups, Composite Training Unit Exercise and Joint Task Force Exercise. The detachment fields two highly versatile SH-60B Seahawk LAMPS (Light Airborne Multi-Purpose System) MK III helicopters, capable of antisubmarine warfare, surface warfare, search and rescue, medical evacuation, naval surface fire support, vertical replen ishment, and a variety of other missions. The Doomsdayers of Det. Eight, while in the 5th and 6th Fleet AORs, will conduct operations includ ing counter-piracy, surface surveillance coordination, and maritime interdiction operation missions. All Det. Eight members are looking forward to sup porting the fleet from the tip of the spear and visiting new and interesting ports in the region. a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012 Naval Facilities Engineering Command SoutheastProviding facilities support services and oversight of military constructionThe Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast change of command ceremony takes place July 20 at 9 a.m. in Hangar 117 aboard NAS Jacksonville as Capt. Christopher Kiwus takes the helm from Capt. John Heinzel. Kiwus comes to NAVFAC Southeast from U.S. Africa Command in Stuttgart, Germany where he served as the Engineering Division Chief, Operations and Logistics Directorate. Heinzel will retire in a separate ceremony July 20, after 27 years of hon orable and dedicated ser vice. NAVFAC Southeast was established June 2, 2006 when NAVFAC Southern Division (Charleston, S.C.), Navy Public Works Center (Jacksonville, Fla.) and the Engineering Field Activity (Jacksonville) were disestablished. The commissioning of NAVFAC Southeast was the last phase of a major transformation of the NAVFAC global engineer ing, acquisition and public works organizations that were designed to enhance efficiency and effectiveness as well as improve product and service delivery and make access to the Navys engineering, acquisition, facilities maintenance, construction, transportation and utilities services easier for Navy Region Southeast. NAVFAC Southeast is comprised of nearly 2,000 military and civilian professional engineers, archi tects, skilled craftsmen, environmental specialists, and acquisition professionals. They provide a full spectrum of 24/7 facility support services to the Navy, Marine Corps and other supported commands in the Department of Defense and other federal agencies. Using dedicated in-house craftsmen and contract resources, NAVFAC provide maintenance, repair and construction of facilities; engineering and design sup port; utilities generation and distribution; transporta tion services; and environmental services. NAVFACs volume of business for fiscal year 2011 was roughly $2.4 billion with an annual payroll of $220 million. The NAVFAC Southeast headquarters, in Jacksonville, Fla., supports activities in more than 22 field offices within its area of responsibility. Every day presents new and different challenges from planning a new full-service hospital to the construction of a state-of-the-art hangar facility, members of the com mand make significant contributions to the Navy. For more information, visit the NAVFAC Web site at www.navfac.navy.mil or visit their facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/navfac.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012 5

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Cmdr. Carol Schrader relieved Cmdr. John Loth as commanding officer of Transient Personnel Unit/PreTrial Confinement Facility July13 at the BOQ Pavilion. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders was the guest speaker. A native of Greenville, Pa., Schrader enlisted in the Navy in March 1983. Her first duty assignment was as a support yeoman at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. Other enlisted assignments included Naval Submarine Training Center, Pacific; Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (Protocol Office); Office of the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff (Protocol Office) and White House Military Office. Following commissioning as a limited duty officer (LDO) (administration) in May 1994, Schrader reported for duty as the admin officer/ship secre tary on board USS Samuel Gomers (AD 37) homeported in Alameda, Calif. During this tour, she qualified as officer of the deck (underway) and sur face warfare officer. After the ships decommissioning, she reported as the administrative department head on board USS Nassau (LHA 4) in Norfolk, Va. She was then assigned as offi cer in charge (OIC), Personnel Support Detachment (PSD) Dam Neck, Va. After a short ened tour due to regionalization of the PSDs, she was assigned as OIC, PSD Norfolk, Va. In 2000, Schrader was assigned as detailer for admin istration and band LDO/CWOs at Navy Personnel Command, Millington, Tenn. She then reported to USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) as the admin istration department head. She led her department through the completion of an extended selected restricted availabil ity, an inter-deployment train ing cycle and the ships final deployment before decommis sioning. Remaining in the area after her sea tour, she reported as the NAS Jax administration officer in April 2006. During this tour, she was selected for an Individual Augmentation assignment and was deployed to Iraq from September 2007 until May 2008. In October 2009, Schrader reported as branch head for executive services in the PERS 44 Division of Navy Personnel Command. Schrader has a Bachelors degree in Business Administration from St. Leo University. During the ceremony, Loth was presented the Meritorious Service Medal for out standing meritorious ser vice as commanding officer, Transient Personnel Unit/ Pre-trial Confinement Facility, Jacksonville from September 2010 to July 2012. Loths superb leadership, innovative management skills, and superior professional acu men directly influenced the successful accomplishment of every mission area with in Transient Personnel Unit/ Pre-trial Confinement Facility, Jacksonville. During his tour, Loth led, managed, and mentored his staff to process 2,931 tran sient Sailors in support of 247 shore commands and 21 ships. He was accountable for the resource stewardship of mil lions of dollars in personnel costs associated with these transients from ships, overseas units, and local squadrons. Additionally, through supe rior initiative and unparalleled drive, he ensured the seamless merger of Transient Personnel Unit and Pre-trial Confinement Facility, Jacksonville into one highly functional command. His efforts resulted in each of the facilities receiving an excel lent in both the Chief of Naval Operations corrections inspec tion and a Certified Pipeline Mover award for expeditious transient processing. Loth is transferring to Navy Region Mid-Atlantic in Norfolk, Va. Cmdr. Shawn Petre will relieve Cmdr. Todd Abrahamson as the 18th com manding officer of Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville (FACSFACJAX) July 19. Petre, a native of Manchester, N.H., has worked as a P-3C naval flight offi cer with the VP-8 Fighting Tigers, VP-30 Pros Nest, Commander, Second Fleet on board USS Mount Whitney as information warfare officer, VPU-2 Wizards, and most recently as FACSFACJAXs executive officer. He commended FACSFACJAXs for mer commanding officer. I want to congratulate Skipper Abrahamson on a fantastic tour lead ing the FACSFAC Jacksonville team. His public infor mation cam paign and unmatched mission and train ing sup port to the fleet elevated his command to new heights. I wish my friend, Skipper Abrahamson all the success in the world has he assumes the helm as air boss on Old Salt, said Petre. During Abrahamsons tour as FACSFACJAX commanding officer, he inspired an envi ronment of the FourDos: 1. DO focus on the basics; 2. DO the right thing; 3. DO respect yourself and your peers; 4. DO enjoy what you do. When asked for his parting remarks, Abrahamson stated, It has been a tremendous honor to command FACSFACJAX. The FACSFAC JAX war fighters are second to none and I leave with great satisfaction knowing that my commands mission of providing servic es to operational war fighters has been outstanding. I wish my good friend and shipmate, Cmdr. Petre all the best. Since its establishment in1977, FACSFACJAX has maintained, con trolled and monitored 80,000 square miles of sea and air space along the United States southeastern coast. FACSFACJAX is responsible for sched uling and control of offshore fleet oper ating areas. Additionally, FACSFACJAX is the lead military coordinator with the Federal Aviation Agency and other cognizant agencies for fleet liaison while conduct ing operations in the Jacksonville area of responsibility. Transient Personnel Unit/Pre-Trial Confinement Facility hold change of command Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jax to hold change of command 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012

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The Swamp Foxes of HSM-74 Detachment 3 successfully completed the squadrons first MH-60R deployed detachment on board the guided missile cruiser USS Normandy (CG 60). Detachment 3, known as The A-Team, embarked on the Norfolkbased Normandy in early May to pro vide organic helicopter assets in sup port of the 40th annual Baltic Operations (BALTOPS) and FRUKUS 2012 multina tional exercises. BALTOPS is an annual event to pro mote mutual understanding, confi dence, cooperation, and interoperabil ity among forces and personnel of part nering nations. During BALTOPS 12, 27 ships from 12 NATO and Partnership for Peace (PFP) countries participated, including Denmarks HDMS Absalon, Germanys FSG Werra, Russias Ropucha class landing ship RFS Kaliningrad, and sev eral mine countermeasure ships. Additionally, there were over twen ty aircraft from eight NATO and PFP nations participating in this large scale Baltic Sea exercise. Lt. Andrew Howerton, the detach ments operations officer said of his sec ond BALTOPS experience, The oppor tunity to work with foreign nations in planning and execution is an invaluable learning experience for our junior and more experienced pilots alike. More importantly, the ability to hone our skills and tactics in a new environment against unfamiliar platforms provid ed unparalleled training opportunities and experience to all those involved. FRUKUS is an annual event of cooperation between the naval forc es of France, the Russian Federation, Great Britain, and the United States to increase interoperability of naval forc es of participating countries under the auspices of the United Nations. The Russian Federation Navy hosted this five day training mission which involved coordination between USS Normandy with HSM-74 Det 3 embarked, French frigate De Grasse (D612), Russian naval vessel Yaroslav Mudriy (727), and Royal Navy destroyer HMS York (D98). Fifty-four members of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 62 were award ed the Humanitarian Service Medal for the VR-62 Nomads work during Operation Tomodachi. Operation Tomodachi was the humanitarian assistance mission to support the Japanese people in the wake of the earthquake and tsunami that struck Honshu, the main Island of Japan, in March of 2011.VR-62 aircraft and aircrew were already at Naval Air Facility Atsugi as part of their normal detachment rotation. They airlifted 127 tons of relief material in support of the operation. The Humanitarian Service Medal was established by Executive Order 11965 on January 19, 1977. It is awarded to members of the Armed Forces of the United States who distinguished themselves by meritorious direct participation in a Department of Defense-approved sig nificant military act or operation of a humanitarian nature. Swamp Foxes complete first MH-60R detachment deployment VR-62 receives humanitarian recognition JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012 7

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discuss recent changes in the Uniform Code of Military Justice that apply. The MMTT training is coordinated and hosted by CPPD and uses videos and a vari ety of methods to reinforce the fact that sex ual assault is a crime and will not be toler ated in the Navy. Weve put a lot of time and effort into working with the contractor to ensure that the training is innovative, effective and rel evant with todays Navy, said Capt. John Newcomer, CPPD commanding officer. There isnt a single briefing slide in the entire presentation the focus is on interac tion and facilitated face-to-face discussion to provide command leaders the tools to develop and promote a culture of change. Nearly 650 SAPR-L training sessions are scheduled in the next month, pro viding training for regular and reserve commands. The few commands that are deployed and unable to host a MMTT can receive the training via Defense Connect Online. SAPR-L train ing must be completed for all E-7 and above by Sept. 30 and SAPR-L training completion will be documented by individual commands via the Fleet Training Management Planning System. Capt. Clark Price, commanding officer of the Navy ROTC unit at Savannah State University and assigned as team leader for the Florida/Central Command MMTT, will present some of first SAPR-L sessions, start ing at NAS Pensacola, Fla. The training for the MMTTs was excel lent; it got the teams up to the podium almost immediately and ready to prepare the command triads to conduct interactive training with their senior leadership, said Price. My team has an aggressive schedule of 11 cities in 30 days allowing us to see a lot of the fleet. My team is looking forward to delivering the CNOs message on sexual assault prevention. Sexual assault prevention is an impor tant element of the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative, which consolidates a set of objectives and poli cies to maximize Sailor and Marine person al readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Navy. SAPR The VP-45 First Class Petty Officers Association (FCPOA) recently undertook the restoration of the Sweet Water Athletic Complex. The community service project included building shelves for athletic equipment, repaint ing the goalposts and field fences, repairing holes in the fields turf using tools and funds supplied completely by members of the Pelicans FCPOA. We always go overseas and help out other communi ties when we re on deployment, said AM1(AW) Randy Wade, one of the project s organizers. VP-45 FCPOA wanted to start giving back locally to let people know that VP-45 and the Navy cares about Jacksonville. Past deployment projects of the Pelicans FCPOA included everything from cleaning up a cheetah preserve in Djibouti to volunteering time with children at orphan ages in El Salvador and Sicily. Association members say they plan to coordinate similar projects in Jacksonville in the future. The FCPOA saw a need at the Sweet Water Complex where several service member s children play sports. The area is home to many single parent families who could not afford registration fees for its teams or pay for field improvements. As the complex s funds are limited, the project gave the field a much-needed overhaul. I am impressed by FCPOA s dedication to community service in Jacksonville and around the world, said Cmdr. John Brabazon. They are truly setting the example of what it means to be a World Famous Pelican. Donnie Moore, vice president of the Sweet Water Athletic Association, was also grateful for the help from the FCPOA. Additionally, 20 children from the Sweet Water Athletic Association, along with children of the Pelican FCPOA, participated in the event. Part of the day s activities included an address to the kids from Moore, in which he encouraged the children to show good sportsmanship and camaraderie. The day concluded with a pick-up game of football which was enjoyed by all. The Sweet Water Athletic Complex is located in West Jacksonville and hosts Pop Warner football and cheer leading contests. Pelicans FCPOA lends a hand in the community 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012

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the Fire Scout. We began in 2010 with a 4th Fleet drug interdiction mission aboard the guided-missile frigate USS McInerney (FFG 8), where Fire Scout helped confiscate 60kilos of cocaine from a fast boat. The next MQ-8B success came from the 5th Fleet deployment aboard the frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40). From off the coast of Somalia, Fire Scout provided an overland ISR (intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance) platform for special oper ations forces. Most recently, the frigate USS Klakring (FFG 42) deployed to the Horn of Africa area of responsibility with four Fire Scouts. As the Fire Scout UAV program evolves, it will be part of what we call composite detachments that deploy with a manned MH-60R Seahawk and an unmanned Fire Scout. Also, with todays shrinking budgets, this new center allows us to train squadron personnel without incurring the travel, food and lodging expenses to send them to NAS Patuxent River, Md. Today, were bridging the Fire Scout simulator capac ity gap and improving the already robust training environment here at NAS Jax, said Ten Hoopen. He concluded, For the past two years, operator and maintainer training has taken place here in temporary spaces among the H-60 Seahawk crews. In a few minutes, youll see the leading-edge design of our new permanent simulator facility. George Vardoulakis, vice president and program manager of tactical unmanned systems for Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, welcomed the military and civilian guests. Fire Scout complements the Navys manned helicopters by effectively extend ing the range and area of ship-based intelligence gathering operations, said Vardoulakis. Its modular architecture accommo dates a variety of electro-optical, infrared and communications payloads that pro vide groundand ship-based command ers with high levels of situational aware ness and precision targeting support, he added. The system has been in develop ment for about 10 years and is particularly well suited to support littoral combat ship missions such as drug interdiction, antipiracy, search and rescue, and reconnais sance operations. He said that todays Navy is increasing its mix of manned and unmanned activities and that this Fire Scout training facility will ensure operators are well schooled in executing its multi-mission capabilities. According to a Northrop Grumman, the MQ-8B Fire Scout is an unmanned heli copter for U.S. Navy situational awareness and precision targeting. The unmanned aircraft is based on the Schweizer Model 333 two-seat manned helicopter. It can autonomously take off and land on any avi ation-capable warship and at unprepared landing zones near battlefields. Northrop Grumman has demonstrat ed MQ-8 Fire Scout radar capability to detect and track several targets with a Telephonics RDR-1700B radar system. The Fire Scout may eventually be armed with gun pods, Hydra 70-millimeter rocket pods and small missiles. The MQ-8 Fire Scout is 30 feet long and 9.4 feet tall, with a rotor diameter of 27.5 feet. It can fly as fast as 125 knots and achieve altitudes of up to 20,000 feet. MQ-8 VP-16the P-8A manpower requirements. Unlike the P-3 aircrew, the P-8 does not require a flight engineer. And the P-8 maintenance department is much smaller so weve been working on transfers for those who will not be joining the transition, said Boron. While on deployment, we sent some of our top maintenance profes sionals back to NAS Jax to observe the VP-30 safe-for-flight inspection of the P-8A so wed have a better picture of what to expect in the coming months. At the P-8A Integrated Training Center, VP-16 pilots, NFOs and war fare operators spend their first two weeks getting familiarized with the Poseidon through lectures and computer-based classroom training. Then the training migrates to the P-8A operational flight trainer (OFT), a fullmotion reproduction of the aircraft cockpit that replicates the visual outof-window display and cockpit noises. The OFT can be used as a standalone trainer or be connected with the weapons tactics trainer (WTT) in order to fly a P-8A complete with mission systems. In the WTT stand-alone configuration, mission specialists receive realistic weap ons and sensor employment training. The P-8A mission systems include dual display screens at five operator stations two acoustic stations, one non-acoustic station, one tac tical coordina tion and one navigation and communications station. The P-8A stations are completely interchange able with respect to data. Also, an operator can sit at any of the five sta tions and operate any system. Boron added, As our aircrew train at the P-8A ITC, our maintainers are attending classes at CNATTU-Jax, as well as getting hands-on instruction at the maintenance department of VP-30. We expect our pilots to begin logging actual flight hours at about our 55th training day. If everything goes according to plan, we should finish training in December and be ready for our safe-for-flight certification in January, said Boron. Our greatest challenge is that there is no blueprint for this transition in the MPRF community because its been 50 years since Orion went opera tional. At the same time, its very exciting to help shape the transition pro cess and find solutions to any speed bumps we may encounter along the way. We will also pass along lessons learned to squadrons following in the footprints of VP-16. In 2013, the War Eagles will enter their traditional Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC) with two P-8A Poseidons. They will certify 12 combat aircrews and be ready to deploy the first week of December, at which time they expect to be assigned six Poseidon aircraft. The P-8A Poseidon is the latest Navy aircraft designed to execute longrange anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions. It will replace the P-3C Orion, which has been in operation for more than 50 years. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012 9

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HSL-42, Detachment Ten, Night Furies, have recently passed the halfway mark into their seven-month 5th Fleet deployment. The NAS Jacksonville-based detachment left Norfolk, Va. on March12 on board USS James E. Williams (DDG 95) and transited across the Atlantic Ocean as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group. Before the Night Furies entered the Mediterranean Sea they were tasked with their first of many challenging missions, a medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) through the Strait of Gibraltar to USS Enterprise. With weather, sea state, and ships distance working against the crew, they were able to deliver the patient to the USS Enterprise, saving the finger of a talented culinary specialist. Since then, the Night Furies have con tinued to display their talents flying over 400 hours with tasks consisting of surface surveillance and control, vertical replen ishment (VERTREP), maritime intercep tion operations, visit, board, search, and seizure (VBSS), and passenger transfers in support of the strike group while operating in the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Gulf of Oman, and Arabian Gulf. USS James E. Williams and Detach-ment Ten have worked diligently to improve relations with countries in the region by participating in multiple exercises includ ing Eagle Salute and PASSEX with the Egyptian Navy and Indigo Serpent with the Saudi Arabian Navy. The Night Furies continue to balance operational needs, maintenance require ments, and training to continuously pro vide the best aircraft and aircrews possible to complete the various demanding mis sions. Training with the ships crew has allowed for practice search and rescue lit ter training with the VBSS team, helicopter in-flight refueling and forward VERTREP training. All of this has been accom plished while the detachments aircraft have completed major phase maintenance inspections with subsequent functional check flights. Diligent training continues in addi tion to completing maintenance work and missions, resulting in newly-pinned enlisted aviation warfare specialist petty officers, with several more in the process. Following the results of Marchs advance ment exams, Detachment Ten was proud to frock three detachment members, includ ing AWR2 Amado Vazquez, AE2 Sasha Haywood, and AT2 Warren Mercer. With so much already experienced dur ing their first four months at sea, the Night Furies are looking forward to the challeng es that lay ahead of them in their second half of the deployment. HSL-42 Detachment Twos Men in Black are poised to make history as the squad rons first all MQ-8B Fire Scout detachment. Following successful com posite SH-60B/Fire Scout deployments on board USS McInerney and USS Halyburton, Detachment Two will embark on board USS Klakring and operate solely as an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) detachment. The MQ-8B is a rotary wing vertical takeoff and landing tactical unmanned air vehicle (VTUAV) designed to provide an intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) plat form for U.S. Navy ships and coalition partners. Todays modern battlefield has a high demand for unmanned ISR, and the Men in Black will sup ply it to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility. Detachment Two, led by Lt. Cmdr. Jay Lambert and AWSC(NAC/AW) John Chapman, consists of five offi cer air vehicle operators, four enlisted mission payload oper ators, 21 enlisted maintainers and technicians, and a handful of civilian Northrop Grumman instructors, technicians and engineers. The Northrop Grumman team has been immeasurably helpful and sup portive from the detachments standup, and they will con tinue to be an invaluable asset throughout the deployment. Similar to SH-60B work ups, Detachment Two partici pated in a Week One Work Up cycle, an underway Advanced Readiness Program evaluation, and a Composite Unit Training Exercise (COMPTUEX). During COMPTUEX and under the supervision of Northrop Grumman instructors and engineers, the Men in Black became the first military crew in history to operate two air craft simultaneously from a single ground control station and conduct a Dual Air Vehicle (DAV) Tactical Control Data Link swap in a tactical training environment. Two days later, Detachment Two flew con tinuous DAV operations off the coast of North Carolina, which marked the end of a historic and successful COMPTUEX. While the MQ-8B is relatively young in its service-life, USS Klakring will embark on its final deployment after 30 years of naval service. Both the ships crew and the air department are looking forward to the chal lenges ahead as the ship sets sail for its final cruise. HSL-42 Detachment Two is mission-ready to provide ISR services, and the Men in Black will continue HSL-42s legacy as the premier and frontline operators of the MQ-8B Fire Scout. Men in Black to deploy solely with UAVs Night Furies continue to lead the way 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012

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Six teams of Navy culinary specialists (CS) participat ed the All-American Platter Culinary Competition hosted by the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf July 11. The event was held to allow the CS teams to showcase their best burgers, potato salad and baked beans. This is a kick-off to sum mer so we challenged culi nary specialists from different commands in the area to cre ate home-cooked hamburg ers, said NAS Jax Food Service Officer CWO4 Kathy Wiseman. Its a great way for them to receive training so when it comes time for certification, they are used to cooking under pressure. We gave them the option of using their creative talents to make something unique. By hosting these competitions, the CSs get some extra train ing and have some fun doing it. A lot of times, they dont have the opportunity to learn and be creative in their day-to-day jobs, she added. The CS teams consisted of three or four members from the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf, NS Mayport Oasis Galley, Naval Hospital Jax Child Street Caf, USS DeWert, USS Carney and USS The Sullivans. As the teams chopped, diced, sauted and grilled their ingre dients to prepare the platters, judges graded them on safety and sanitary measures in the kitchen. After putting the fin ishing touches on the plates, the CSs presented them to the judges, describing the meal and how it was prepared. Once the judges calculated their scores for overall prepa ration, presentation, creativ ity and taste, the winners were announced and presented tro phies for their efforts. Placing first for their puffed pastry lamb burgers was the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf, followed by the USS Carney team and the NS Mayport Oasis Galley. Ive been training Navy cooks since 1989 and these are some of the finest cooks in the world. Morale starts in the chow line and this is what its all about train ing and improving meals and what they can deliver to their customers, stated Chef David Bearl of the First Coast Technical College, who was one of the judges for the com petition. By putting on a com petition like this, it gives them enthusiasm for what they do every day. Were here to give them advice and enhance their skills. Weve had a lot of great competition here. CWO4 Wiseman has been instrumen tal in promoting some wonder ful training opportunities. We are currently imple menting a plan to change the way we do business by looking at our menus and balancing them with the right amount of fresh products and prepared products, he said. We also continue to look at training to ensure our CSs are getting the training need ed both aboard ships and on shore. We do this through the Adopt-a-Ship Program by bringing chefs to the ships, through our certification pro gram and through competi tions. These competitions are critical to maintaining our culinary specialists proficien cies. For the participants, it was not only fun but gave them the opportunity to try something different. When you cook in the Navy, most of the time we use recipe cards and have to follow strict guidelines. But when we par ticipate in competitions like this, we can do our own thing and really showcase our talents and skills. And of course, when NAS Jax Flight Line Caf hosts culinary competition JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012 11

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12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012 you make burgers from scratch, its a lot better than buying packaged ones from the store. We get to be creative, said CS2 Gerald Foxworth of the Naval Hospital Jax Child Street Caf. This is my first competition and I really loved it. Ive wanted to be a chef since I was 16 and now Im living my dream as a cook in the Navy. This competition was all about burgers although we put a little twist to it by creating a puffed pastry using lamb and other ingredients. We wanted to do something different, added CS2(SW) Marnika Ash of the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf. Weve been participating in a lot of fine-dining competi tions lately, so it was fun to have an every day type food event even though we put our own unique spin on it. According to Naval Supply Systems Command Food Service Director Cmdr. Danny King, who also judged the com petition, the Navy continues to strive to provide healthy, nutri tious meals to Sailors both at sea and on shore. COMPETITION It was a 13-year-old girls sheer determination that con vinced her immigrant parents in 2003 to let her join the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps (NSCC), a decision that led to a mentor and later an officers commis sion. Ensign Katie Castro cred its her involvement with the Sea Cadet program and one remarkable mentor, June Tillett, for helping her to real ize her dream of pursuing a career in the U.S. Navy. Castro was one of 1,077 midship men to receive a diploma dur ing the U.S. Naval Academy Class of 2012 graduation and commissioning ceremony in Annapolis, Md., May 29. Castro said she was obsessed with military aviation at a young age and dreamed of one day becoming a pilot. She learned about NSCC from an article in the local paper with a photo of Sea Cadet AN Aaron Stemen sitting in a helicopter simulator at NAS Jacksonville. She contacted Tillett, the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) industrial manufacturing program man ager, who also serves as the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps regional director for Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia. With 17 years of ser vice, Tillett currently holds the rank of NSCC lieutenant com mander. She has oversight for nine units and 315 personnel from Daytona Beach, Fla. to Savannah, Ga. Tillett said Castros Cubanborn father took a lot of con vincing; he was worried his daughter would deploy to a war zone. In the end, he allowed his burgeoning ballerina to join the Sea Cadets. Katie had so much confi dence, said Tillett. When she first reported in 2003 for training in her civilian cloth ing, she saluted me. I had never seen that before. She said, Maam, Im going to the Naval Academy, and I believed her. She was an exemplary Sea Cadet; she always wanted to do the right thing. To complete her basic mili tary requirements and course work prior to graduating from high school, Castro attended two summer training sessions each year to earn the rank of chief petty officer in 2007, the highest attainable enlisted sea cadet rank. Only 10 per cent complete the requirement according to Tillett. Castro said Tillett played a major role in her suc cess. When I was a Sea Cadet, I remember thinking I want to be like her when I grow up, she said. Cmdr. Tillett was one of my most important mentors with an incorruptible moral compass. Castro entered the Naval Academy in 2008 to pursue an aeronautical engineering degree with a minor in French. Her dream to become a naval aviator was shattered when she learned her nearsightedness was not surgically correctible. I was sitting in the lobby of Bethesda feeling sorry for myself when a bus pulled up filled with wounded warriors some without arms and legs arriving for physical therapy, she said. They were strong and stoic. It was a sobering moment; it was a slap in the face. Up until that moment, life had been all about her. She started to ask herself how she could best serve the Navy. Back at the academy, she learned from the senior submarine nuclear accessions officer that her class was the first to be open to direct transition to the Navys submarine ser vice. After two grueling tech nical interviews and a final interview with Adm. Kirkland Donald, director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion, Castro made the cut, along with six other pioneering women. Adm. Donald trashed my uniform and corrected my grammar, she said. When he asked me why I wanted to serve in his submarine force, I told him Im not here on a whim. She reported to the Naval Nuclear Power Training Command in Charleston, S.C., in early July for 12 months of training followed by 10 weeks of study at the Submarine Officer Basic Course in Connecticut. The first female officers to complete the Navys nuclear submarine program broke a longstanding gen der barrier by joining crews on Ohio-class submarines in November 2011. Balfour Beatty Communities to kick-off 2012 housing surveyIn a few weeks, family housing residents will be receiving the CEL Resident Satisfaction Housing Survey. The annual survey is part of Balfour Beatty Communities performance assessment program. The survey allows us to see where we are succeed ing and where there is room for improvement, said Diana Heintz, community manager for Balfour Beatty. Its important for residents to fill it out honestly. Balfour Beatty Communities encourages residents to fill them out and return them at its CEL Splash Event July 20 at the NAS Jax Outdoor Pool at 6 p.m. By completing and handing in the survey, residents will qualify for weekly prize drawings. The top prizes include a patio set. Residents who hand in the sur vey by Aug.10 will also qualify for a special early bird drawing. We truly strive to exceed our residents expecta tions and hope that every resident enjoys their home and the services that we provide, explained Heintz. Once residents complete their surveys and seal them in the postage-paid envelopes provided, they can simply bring it to the Balfour Beatty Communities Management Office and drop it in the authorized locked mailbox. Only CEL employees will open the returned envelopes. Survey results are completely confidential and anonymous. The survey deadline date is Aug. 31. 2 local recipients receive scholorshipsWings Over America Scholarship Foundation (WOASF) announced its 2012 scholarship award recipients June 6. There were 49 winners nationwide and include two from the Jacksonville area. Winners were selected on the basis of academic excellence, extra-curricular activities, community service and char acter. WOASF scholarships are valued at $2,000 or more. Local recipients includ ed: High School Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation Scholarship College NAS Oceana Spouses Scholarship The Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation annually sponsors more than 40 scholarships for students who have chosen to continue their education. Its mission is to provide college schol arships to dependent children and spouses of all naval aviation commands, officer and enlisted, active duty, retired, honorably discharged or deceased. The Foundation has proudly awarded more than $635,000 to outstanding stu dents since 1987. The foundation is fund ed solely through the generous contribu tions of private and corporate sources and is a registered a 501(c) 3 non-profit foundation. NAS Jacksonville has an abundance of rep tiles, some nice and some not so nice. The Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake, Canebrake Rattlesnake, Dusky Pigmy Rattlesnake, and Cottonmouth Moccasin are members of the hemotoxin species whose venom can cause damage to the surrounding body tissue when bitten. These are pit vipers with fangs that inject their venom much like a hypodermic syringe. It has been found that on the first strike or fang pen etration, only 40 percent of these cases result in venom being introduced, however, if stricken a second time, venom is almost always present. The venom may cause death if not treated properly and promptly! The Eastern Coral Snake, whose venom attacks the central nervous system, is the only neurotoxin species present in the NAS Jax area. It has small teeth that break the skin, and its venom is introduced by excreting venom into its saliva. They have a small mouth, which makes these bites uncommon. Direct handling is usually the cause. The best way to avoid being injured by a snake is to leave them alone and stay away from them. Alligators can be found in and around most ditches and ponds at NAS Jax. It is against the law to feed them. Feeding them can cause them to become familiar with people, encouraging them to become a nuisance when fishermen arrive or individuals are simply out to enjoy nature. Then they will have to be relocated or destroyed. With the rainy season is upon us, the water level is rising thereby pushing wildlife further inland to higher ground so be cautious and aware of where you step. Remember, we also have Florida Panthers, and Black Bears which are on the protected spe cies list on outlying properties. The feral hogs are considered a nuisance ani mal but can be aggressive with the presence of humans while protecting their young. Be safe out there! If you spot a snake, alligator or other wild ani mal where it shouldnt be, leave it alone and call NAS Jax Security Dispatch at 542-2662 or 911 if you feel threatened. For further information, contact the NAS Jax game warden at 542-0969, Ext. 144. Sea Cadet/Academy grad credits FRCSE mentor for success Be cautious when encountering snakes, alligators and other wildlife Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation awards 56 scholarships nationally

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Frockings at NAS Jacksonville are often low-key with only the presence of fellow squadron mates in the respec tive commands hangar. Yet, as VP-45 frocked their newest senior chiefs, AMCS Patrick McNulty and AWOCS Tom George, the event was tinted with a special touch of heritage and reflection. Not only were they frocked to senior chief, but they were witnessed by the family of the late AWCS Sidney Smith who served in VP-45 as an from December 1999 to February 2004 and again from November 2006 until his death in August 2008. Sonia Smith spoke to the command for the first time since her husbands passing. After she pinned the single starred anchor on George, VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Michael Vitali, intro duced her to the command and then handed her the micro phone. My husband always said you never know who pays atten tion to you on a day to day basis while youre doing your job, she said. And you never know the impact that you have on others. Reiterating, she stated, Its not your job which people remember you for; rather it is how you make others feel. George, who served with Smith at VP-30, considered Smith to be the most impor tant mentor in his career. George not only carries Smiths legacy with him symbolically by wearing his single-starred anchors, but he also bears that same legacy professionally. The most lasting impact that senior chief made on my career was the lesson that you need to affect the life of at least one of your Sailors every day. He taught me that if youre not doing that, youre not doing your job as a senior chief, stat ed George. Both Mrs. Smith and George agree that the bequest of Smiths anchors brings a poi gnant closure to both his naval career and his passing. McNulty was also inspired by the visit and stated, I was touched that the Smith family took the time to come witness our frocking. I never had the honor of working with Sidney, but the legacy he left behind will continue to inspire and motivate all future Pelicans! Each year, VP-45 presents the Senior Chief Sidney Smith Award to a deserving Sailor, E-6 and below. This years award winner was AD2 Royce Harrell. The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) is announcing changes to short sale policies that will make it easier for military homeowners with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac mortgages to honor their financial commitments when they are issued a Permanent Change of Station (PCS) order. FHFA will issue guidance by Sept. 30 and it will be effective 60 days later. Currently, military hom eowners with PCS orders are required to move to a new duty station under short, strict time lines. However, service mem bers still remain bound to their financial obligations, including their mortgages. If their homes have declined in value, they may be unable to sell the home and obtain sufficient funds to pay off the mortgage debt obli gating them to continue mak ing monthly payments after relocating to a new duty sta tion. Changes to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac short sale poli cies for military homeowners will alleviate some of the issues faced when a member of the Armed Forces receives a PCS order including the burden of having to sell their home in a difficult housing market. These changes dovetail with guid ance issued by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to servicers last year establishing PCS orders as a qualifying hardship for for bearance and loan modifica tions. A short sale, also known as a pre-foreclosure sale, is when you sell your home for less than the balance remaining on your mortgage. If your mortgage company agrees to a short sale, you can sell your home and pay off all (or a portion of) your mortgage balance with the pro ceeds. Service members with PCS orders will be: immediately, even when they are current on their existing mortgage (the PCS order is treated as a hardship to deem them eligible); judgments from Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac when receiv ing permission for a short sale; and requirement for a cash con tribution or promissory note so long as the property was pur chased on or before June 30, 2012, (to apply personal assets to cover the shortfall after out standing unpaid principal bal ance and sales price). Eligibility requirements military and have a PCS order. be owned or guaranteed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. current or delinquent on their mortgage to apply for a short sale. have been purchased on or before June 30, 2012. Homeowners can determine if they have a Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac loan by going to: loanlookup or calling 800-7Fannie (8 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST) porate/ or 800-Freddie (8 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST) Resources com/Military or call 877-MIL4566 (Fannie Mae) avoidforeclosure or call 800-Freddie (8 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST) VP-45 promotes senior chiefs Short sale assistance available for military homeowners Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012 13

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Recycling Center benefits Sailors quality of life and environmentThe NAS Jacksonville Recycling Center is dedicated to collecting and processing recyclables on base. They take all recyclables, including cardboard, white paper, newspaper, clear and colored glass bot tles, colored plastic bottles, cans, copper wire and even lead batteries. Certain things that we cant pick up are trash, plastic bags and hazardous materials, said STG2(SW) John Oyler, who works for the recycling center. Everything we collect either gets compressed into square bails or collected in metal bins, added Oyler. An outside company then comes and takes every thing away to be processed. According to Qualified Recycling Program Manager Mark Craig, all profits from recycling on base benefit Sailors quality of life. One-hundred percent of our profit goes to Morale Welfare and Recreation, so they can put that money back into programs that benefit Sailors and their families, such as outdoor recreation, the Auto Skills Center and the unit allocation fund, said Craig. Recycling on base has advanced by leaps and bounds, said Oyler. When I got here in 2009, the metal in the yard was stacked up higher than our truck. It was just too big of a workload for the amount of people they had working here at that time. Now, its gone. Since then, weve had as many as 30 people working here at one time, but now were down to only 15. Even though our numbers have decreased, our quality of work has progressed. We have crews that go around to all of the build ings on base and empty out recycling bins, said Recycling Center Leading Chief Petty Officer ATC Jeffery Deckard. Our trucks run Monday through Friday collecting paper products from offices through out the base. A big inconvenience for the Recycling Center is dealing with garbage. Its a common misconception that were garbage men, said Oyler. A lot of old food gets put into the bins mixed with the recyclables, and we have to throw it all away because its unsanitary. We regularly find open dip cups and sometimes old cups of noodle soup in the recycle bins. Weve also found raccoons and snakes before in closed up bins, continued Oyler. Someone once dropped off a box of kittens. The kittens were even tually adopted after the vet on base gave them their shots. The Recycling Center is also unable to recycle pack ing paper. It gums up the machines, said Oyler. Its just too thin of a material, but we take anything else thats recyclable. To discard used oil, oil filters, brake pads and anti freeze, drop it off at the NAS Jax Auto Skills Center located in Building 622 next door to the recycling center. Electronic recyclables are collected every Thursday from 9:30-11:30 a.m. at Building 1948 behind the Fire Station on Mustin Road. The NAS Jax Recycling Center is located in Building 623 on Birmingham Avenue. Call 542-3113 for answers to any recycling questions. The 10th anniversary of the Lt. Cmdr. Jim Warmowski Share the Road Memorial Bicycle Ride will take place Saturday, July 21 at 8 a.m. All military and civilian personnel are invited to participate in this bicycle ride and celebrate the life of Warmowski, a former NAS Jacksonville naval offi cer, who was tragically killed by an intoxicated driver while training for the Kona Ironman Triathlon. The ride will depart the Fleming Island Winn Dixie parking lot on CR-220 at 8 a.m. and proceed down US-17 for 12 miles to the site of the tragic accident. An NAS Jacksonville chaplain will deliver prayers, a Navy Band Southeast bugler will play taps and two NAS Jacksonville sailors will place a wreath at the memorial marker. The peloton will ride the first 12 miles as a group. After a ceremony, cyclists will have the option to ride back to the starting point or continue on with the North Florida Bicycle Club. The club will be offering three different rides raging from 23, 34 or 42 miles for those cyclists wanting to participate in a longer ride. For more information, call NAS Jacksonville PAO, Miriam S. Gallet at 542-5588.Celebrate a naval officers life by riding your bicycle 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Monday Pizza Madness $5 for a 14 one topping pizza 2:30 9 p.m., dine in or carry-out only Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included July Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 4 10 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowl ing, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Summer Bowling Leagues Now Forming Monday Mixed Trio 7 p.m. Wednesday After Work League 4:30 p.m. Thrusday Morning Seniors 9 a.m. Thursday Night Extreme Bowling 6:30 p.m. Friday Intramural League 11:45 a.m. Sunday Fun Bunch League 4 p.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group train ing Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. **New fitness class Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DOD civilians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session two begins July 9, session three begins July 23 Lessons are available at the indoor and outdoor pool $40 military, $45 DODRegister for swim lessons at the base gym I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Legoland 1 day $45.50, 1 day w/water park $52.75, 2 day $54.50, 2 day w/water park $58.75 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sec tions 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day $29.50, 2 day $40 Disney World Orlando FL 4 day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Tampa Zoo $19 (Adult) $17.50 (Child) Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person delete Blue Man Group in Orlando $59, includes City Walk venue Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Medieval Times Free royalty upgrade with dinner reservationThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Free Jacksonville Suns Baseball Game July 19 at 6:30 p.m. Free Mall & Movie Trip Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater July 20 at 6 p.m. Adventure Landing Trip July 21 at 10 a.m. Daytona Beach Trip July 29 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees July 24 for active duty July 26 for retirees & DoD personnel Junior Golf Clinic Session 2 (ages 6 10) July 16 20 delete Session 3 (ages 11 17) August 6 10 Monday Friday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. $110 per week long session Twilight Special Monday Friday Play 18 holes for $17 after 3 p.m. Not applicable on holidays Golf & Dine Special Play 18-holes with cart and choice of breakfast or lunch for $26! Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Lessons $150 per person July 20, 21, 22, 28 & 29 August 17, 18, 19, 25 & 26 Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Register now for before & after school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household income National Night Out August 7, 6 9:30 p.m. Outdoor pool & Allegheny softball field Free cookout, pool games, bounce house, guest speakers, music, outdoor movie and more!Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School September 10 October 17 $500 per person Youth Flight Camps (ages 12 18) Basic Aviation Course $100 per person July 18 21 register by July 11 delete Advanced Aviation Course (basic course required) $150 per person August 8 11 register by August 1 August 22 25 register by August 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012 15



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THURSDAY, JULY 19, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com When the VP-16 War Eagles recently returned home to NAS Jacksonville from their suc cessful 7th Fleet deployment, they turned in their vintage P-3C Orion aircraft, as well as their tools, equipment and NATOPS manuals. Then, on July 11, VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Molly Boron led her aircrews to the P-8A Integrated Training Center where they are now studying to become the first operational squadron certified to fly the P-8A Poseidon. Boron, who took command of the squadron eight weeks ago at Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan, has served 11 years in the Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) community. I completed my P-3 flight training at VP-30 back in 2001, and now Im back with a truly talented squadron to transition to the P-8A platform. Its quite an honor for our people. Boron noted that when she was a department head at VP-40 she served under Capt. Mark Stevens (who is now commanding officer of VP-30) and alongside Cmdr. Andy Miller (who is now OIC of the P-8A Fleet Integration Team). Because we served together at VP-40, its reassuring to enter this historic transition having previously worked with the VP-30 leadership and under stand their expectations. She explained that the pre vious eight months were a blur of activity for VP-16. Our final deployment with the P-3C Orion at Kadena Air Base was filled with joint exercises and detachments to destina tions that included Indonesia, Singapore, Thailand, India, Guam and Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. The War Eagles flew nearly 4,000 flight hours. After our homecoming at NAS Jax in June, we bid fare well to our P-3 Orions and turned our attention to the P-8A transition. Since early 2011, weve been working on Northrop Grumman and Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic (HSMWL) personnel hosted a ribbon-cutting reception July 10 for the new MQ-8B Fire Scout operator training facility at NAS Jacksonville. The facility is equipped with four mission simulators and an instructors station, as well as sepa rate classrooms. After two years of operational testing with squadrons assigned to HSMWL, the MQ-8B Fire Scout u nmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) program is seeking to lock in its future with the Navy by providing a leading-edge simulator center. Commander, HSMWL Capt. Doug Ten Hoopen said he was pleased to bring yet another training capability to NAS Jacksonville. Our wing of Bravo and Romeo Seahawk heli copters is the only one in naval aviation to fly Sexual assault training teams ready for deploymentMaster Mobile Training Teams from the Navys Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) task force are now deploying worldwide to provide SAPR training to fleet leaders, Navy officials said July 12. Part of the Navys aggressive efforts to prevent sexual assaults and promote essential culture changes within the force, the 14 SAPR Master Mobile Training Teams (MMTTs) will deploy from the Center for Professional and Personal Development (CPPD) around the globe starting July 13 to provide SAPR leadership (SAPR-L) training to command leadership triads (commanding officer/officer in charge, executive officer/assistant officer in charge, and command master chief/chief of the boat/senior enlisted advisor) in fleet concentration areas and locations with significant Navy presence. The command triads will then deliver the SAPR-L training to their command leadership, E-7 and above. In the last fiscal year alone, the Navy received 582 reports of sexual assault, affecting Sailors across all ranks. This crime is corrosive to both our morale and to our operational readiness. Just as all Sailors are affected, all hands must work together to reduce and ultimately eliminate these crimes, said Rear Adm. Martha Herb, director of Personnel Readiness and Community Support. SAPR-L training will provide our team the critical tools to eliminate sexual assault and promote the Navys core values of honor, courage and commitment that define our culture of respect and professionalism. The MMTT preparatory training to command triads will prepare the command triad to provide valuable SAPR training to officers and enlisted leaders, explained Capt. Scott Seeberger, chief of staff for the SAPR Task Force. The MMTTs have a great journey ahead of them as they train our command leaders and provide tools critical to reducing sexual assault and promoting a culture of respect and professionalism in the force. SAPR-L will be the first phase of this training utilizing a top-down leadership approach, said Seeberger. Weve structured the MMTTs to reflect the command triad with a captain, commander and master chief. Weve also added a Judge Advocate General (JAG) officer to each team to explain the legal procedures that follow an allegation of sexual assault and VP-16 begins new chapter MQ-8B Fire Scout training facility unveiled at NAS Jax

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS July 18 1775 Continental Congress resolves that each colony provide armed vessels. 1779 Commodore Abraham Whipples squadron captures 11 ships in largest prize value of Revolutionary War. 1792 John Paul Jones dies in Paris, France. 1920 Naval aircraft sink ex-German cruiser Frankfurt in target practice. 1943 German submarine shoots down K-74, the first and only U.S. air ship lost during WW II. 1966 Launch of Gemini 10 with Lt. Cmdr. John Young as Command Pilot. Mission involved 43 orbits at an alti tude of 412 nautical miles and lasted two days, 22 hours and 46 minutes. Recovery was by HS-3 helicopter from USS Guadalcanal (LPH-7). 1973 Task Force 78, a mine countermeasures force, departs waters of North Vietnam after completing minesweep ing operations of 1,992 tow hours at the cost of $20.39 million. July 19 1812 The heavy frigate USS Constitution escapes from British squadron after three-day chase off New Jersey. 1886 USS Atlanta, one of the first steel-hulled American cruisers armed with breech-loading rifled guns, is commissioned. 1897 Lt. Robert Peary departs on yearlong Arctic Expedition that makes many important discoveries, including one of largest meteorites, Cape York. 1918 Armored cruiser USS San Diego sunk off Fire Island, N.Y., by a mine laid by U-156. July 20 1846 First visit of U.S. warships (USS Columbus and USS Vincennes) to Japan is unsuccessful in negotiating a treaty. 1960 USS George Washington (SSBN 598) successfully fires the first two operational Polaris missiles while submerged off Florida. 1969 Former Navy pilot Neil Armstrong is first man to set foot on the moon. While taking the first step, he said, Thats one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. Armstrong was Commander of Apollo 11, which during its 8-day mission landed on the Sea of Tranquility. Recovery was by HS-4 helicopters from USS Hornet (CVS-12). July 21 1823 After pirate attack, Lt. David G. Farragut leads landing party to destroy pirate stronghold in Cuba. 1944 Invasion and recapture of Guam begins. 1946 In first U.S. test of adaptabil ity of jet aircraft to shipboard opera tions, XFD-1 Phantom makes landings and takeoffs without catapults from USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CV-42). July 22 1802 The heavy frigate Constellation defeats nine Corsair gunboats off Tripoli. 1905 Body of John Paul Jones moved to Annapolis, Md. for reburial. 1964 Four Navy divers (Lt. Cmdr. Robert Thompson, GM1 Lester Anderson, QMC Robert Barth and HMC Sanders Manning) submerge in SeaLab I for 10 days at a depth of 192 feet, 39 miles off Hamilton, Bermuda. They surfaced on July 31, 1964. July 23 1947 First all-jet Navy squadron (VF-17A) receives its first aircraft (FH). 1950 USS Boxer (CV-21) sets record crossing of Pacific to bring aircraft, troops and supplies to Korea at start of the conflict. 1958 USS Nautilus (SSN-571) departs Pearl Harbor for first submerged transit of North Pole. 1993 Sarah Deal becomes first woman Marine selected for naval avia tion training. July 24 1944 Following 43 days of naval gunfire and air bombardment, Naval Task Force lands Marines on Tinian. July 25 1779 Amphibious expedition against British in Penobscot Bay, ME 1863 U.S. Squadron bombards Fort Wagner, N.C. 1866 David G. Farragut is appointed the first Admiral in the U.S. Navy. 1912 First specifications for naval aircraft published. 1934 First president to visit Hawaii, Franklin D. Roosevelt, reaches Hilo on board the light cruiser USS Houston (CA-30). 1941 Bureau of Ordnance issues first Navy E certificates (for excellence) for industry. Thirteen months is a long time to be away from family, so the military allows for a twoweek R&R (rest and recupera tion) period in the middle of a yearlong deployment. Sounds generous, doesnt it? One of my annoyances at the beginning of this deployment was people who asked, Does Dustin get to come home at all? Me: Yes, he will have two weeks at home this summer. Them (smiling): Oh, well, thats nice. Me (in my head): Really? Thats nice? Two measly weeks out of 58 is nice? Would you like to see your husband for just two weeks out of a whole year? I never said this out loud, of course, because to do so would be tacky. But when Dustin left in November, I wasnt rational. Back then, two weeks felt like nothing and I wondered if it was worth having him come home at all wed just have to go through the dreaded goodbye again. That was then. Now, however, two weeks really does seem nice. If Ive learned anything in my 35 years as a military dependent, its that everyone deals with separations differently. Some people like to talk to their husband every chance they get. Others like to stick to a set day and time. Why do we need to talk multiple times a day? they say. We dont even talk that much when hes home. Some people like to have a big party when their husband returns. Others want it to be just family. (Note: For many, just family does not mean parents and in-laws.) Some people include their children in all aspects of R&R. Others do not. Ive even heard of couples rendezvousing at a secret destination and not tell ing the children that Dad had two weeks back in the U.S.A. What they dont know cant hurt them, right? Some people meet as a fam ily at Disney World or the Bahamas. Other people want to have a two-week slice of normalcy at home. We all have different cir cumstances. In my familys case, our children are some what older, so they stay up late, and they dont take naps. The two oldest are in that murky, pre-teen space of wanting to be around us, but ultimately thinking were kind of boring. They usually have their own, separate plans, but they are still too young to enact them with out our help. Dustin and I wondered when wed ever have time alone. We envisioned ourselves smil ing helplessly at one another across the tenth family game of Monopoly. I mean, we cant even talk in code around these guys anymore! They can spell and everything. So we hatched a plan: Id pick him up at the airport, wed steal away for two days at the Samoset Resort in Rockland, Maine, and then surprise the kids. Wed be filled up on couple time and ready to share with the boys. I couldnt believe it when I saw him at the airport. One day he was across the world for nearly eight months and now he was standing in front of me. On our way to the Samoset, I remembered things that had happened in November, and I was confused: Were you here for that? Or, had you already left? Wow, you really werent here when that happened? Time seemed to have stopped and quickly moved forward at the same time. On Tuesday, we arrived home to surprise the boys. They thought our 29th Dinner with the Smileys that night was with City Councilman Geoffrey Gratwick. Thats what I had told them. Around 5:30 p.m., however, photographer Andrea Hand asked the boys and their bab ysitter to come outside. Your mom has a surprise for you, she said. The boys thought it would be a new kayak. The video of what hap pened next is on http:// www.Facebook.com/Dinner WithTheSmileys. We owe Councilman Gratwick a Dinner with the Smileys. But for the next two weeks, Dustin is exactly where he should be at the table, next to me and across from his boys. And thats more than nice. Its wonderful. It wasnt dinner with the city councilman 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012

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HSL-42 Det. Eight deploys HSL-42 Doomsday Detachment Eight departed their homeport of NAS Jacksonville June 18 to embark onboard USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG-81) attached to the Eisenhower Strike Group, for an extended deployment to the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility (AORs). Doomsday Detachment Eight is flying the last SH-60B Bravo Seahawk helicopters before the squadron transitions to the MH-60R Romeo Seahawk helicopter next year. Det. Eight, led by Lt. Cmdr. Christian Beard and ADC(AW/SW) Rommel Pitts, includes six pilots, three aircrewmen and 17 maintainers. In preparation for deployment, the detachment completed three phase maintenance inspections and more than 3,000 manhours of maintenance, enabling the aircrew to fly over 160 flight hours at sea during a fast paced pre-deployment workup schedule. The Doomsdayers of Det. Eight have participated in five months of workup operations, with 33 days of underway time, completing Week One Workups, Composite Training Unit Exercise and Joint Task Force Exercise. The detachment fields two highly versatile SH-60B Seahawk LAMPS (Light Airborne Multi-Purpose System) MK III helicopters, capable of antisubmarine warfare, surface warfare, search and rescue, medical evacuation, naval surface fire support, vertical replenishment, and a variety of other missions. The Doomsdayers of Det. Eight, while in the 5th and 6th Fleet AORs, will conduct operations includ ing counter-piracy, surface surveillance coordination, and maritime interdiction operation missions. All Det. Eight members are looking forward to supporting the fleet from the tip of the spear and visiting new and interesting ports in the region. a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012 Naval Facilities Engineering Command SoutheastProviding facilities support services and oversight of military constructionThe Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast change of command ceremony takes place July 20 at 9 a.m. in Hangar 117 aboard NAS Jacksonville as Capt. Christopher Kiwus takes the helm from Capt. John Heinzel. Kiwus comes to NAVFAC Southeast from U.S. Africa Command in Stuttgart, Germany where he served as the Engineering Division Chief, Operations and Logistics Directorate. Heinzel will retire in a separate ceremony July 20, after 27 years of hon orable and dedicated service. NAVFAC Southeast was established June 2, 2006 when NAVFAC Southern Division (Charleston, S.C.), Navy Public Works Center (Jacksonville, Fla.) and the Engineering Field Activity (Jacksonville) were disestablished. The commissioning of NAVFAC Southeast was the last phase of a major transformation of the NAVFAC global engineering, acquisition and public works organizations that were designed to enhance efficiency and effectiveness as well as improve product and service delivery and make access to the Navys engineering, acquisition, facilities maintenance, construction, transportation and utilities services easier for Navy Region Southeast. NAVFAC Southeast is comprised of nearly 2,000 military and civilian professional engineers, archi tects, skilled craftsmen, environmental specialists, and acquisition professionals. They provide a full spectrum of 24/7 facility support services to the Navy, Marine Corps and other supported commands in the Department of Defense and other federal agencies. Using dedicated in-house craftsmen and contract resources, NAVFAC provide maintenance, repair and construction of facilities; engineering and design support; utilities generation and distribution; transportation services; and environmental services. NAVFACs volume of business for fiscal year 2011 was roughly $2.4 billion with an annual payroll of $220 million. The NAVFAC Southeast headquarters, in Jacksonville, Fla., supports activities in more than 22 field offices within its area of responsibility. Every day presents new and different challenges from planning a new full-service hospital to the construction of a state-of-the-art hangar facility, members of the command make significant contributions to the Navy. For more information, visit the NAVFAC Web site at www.navfac.navy.mil or visit their facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/navfac.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012 5

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Cmdr. Carol Schrader relieved Cmdr. John Loth as commanding officer of Transient Personnel Unit/PreTrial Confinement Facility July13 at the BOQ Pavilion. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders was the guest speaker. A native of Greenville, Pa., Schrader enlisted in the Navy in March 1983. Her first duty assignment was as a support yeoman at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. Other enlisted assignments included Naval Submarine Training Center, Pacific; Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (Protocol Office); Office of the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff (Protocol Office) and White House Military Office. Following commissioning as a limited duty officer (LDO) (administration) in May 1994, Schrader reported for duty as the admin officer/ship secre tary on board USS Samuel Gomers (AD 37) homeported in Alameda, Calif. During this tour, she qualified as officer of the deck (underway) and sur face warfare officer. After the ships decommissioning, she reported as the administrative department head on board USS Nassau (LHA 4) in Norfolk, Va. She was then assigned as officer in charge (OIC), Personnel Support Detachment (PSD) Dam Neck, Va. After a short ened tour due to regionalization of the PSDs, she was assigned as OIC, PSD Norfolk, Va. In 2000, Schrader was assigned as detailer for admin istration and band LDO/CWOs at Navy Personnel Command, Millington, Tenn. She then reported to USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) as the administration department head. She led her department through the completion of an extended selected restricted availabil ity, an inter-deployment train ing cycle and the ships final deployment before decommis sioning. Remaining in the area after her sea tour, she reported as the NAS Jax administration officer in April 2006. During this tour, she was selected for an Individual Augmentation assignment and was deployed to Iraq from September 2007 until May 2008. In October 2009, Schrader reported as branch head for executive services in the PERS 44 Division of Navy Personnel Command. Schrader has a Bachelors degree in Business Administration from St. Leo University. During the ceremony, Loth was presented the Meritorious Service Medal for out standing meritorious ser vice as commanding officer, Transient Personnel Unit/ Pre-trial Confinement Facility, Jacksonville from September 2010 to July 2012. Loths superb leadership, innovative management skills, and superior professional acu men directly influenced the successful accomplishment of every mission area with in Transient Personnel Unit/ Pre-trial Confinement Facility, Jacksonville. During his tour, Loth led, managed, and mentored his staff to process 2,931 tran sient Sailors in support of 247 shore commands and 21 ships. He was accountable for the resource stewardship of mil lions of dollars in personnel costs associated with these transients from ships, overseas units, and local squadrons. Additionally, through supe rior initiative and unparalleled drive, he ensured the seamless merger of Transient Personnel Unit and Pre-trial Confinement Facility, Jacksonville into one highly functional command. His efforts resulted in each of the facilities receiving an excel lent in both the Chief of Naval Operations corrections inspec tion and a Certified Pipeline Mover award for expeditious transient processing. Loth is transferring to Navy Region Mid-Atlantic in Norfolk, Va. Cmdr. Shawn Petre will relieve Cmdr. Todd Abrahamson as the 18th com manding officer of Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville (FACSFACJAX) July 19. Petre, a native of Manchester, N.H., has worked as a P-3C naval flight offi cer with the VP-8 Fighting Tigers, VP-30 Pros Nest, Commander, Second Fleet on board USS Mount Whitney as information warfare officer, VPU-2 Wizards, and most recently as FACSFACJAXs executive officer. He commended FACSFACJAXs for mer commanding officer. I want to congratulate Skipper Abrahamson on a fantastic tour lead ing the FACSFAC Jacksonville team. His public infor mation cam paign and unmatched mission and train ing sup port to the fleet elevated his command to new heights. I wish my friend, Skipper Abrahamson all the success in the world has he assumes the helm as air boss on Old Salt, said Petre. During Abrahamsons tour as FACSFACJAX commanding officer, he inspired an envi ronment of the FourDos: 1. DO focus on the basics; 2. DO the right thing; 3. DO respect yourself and your peers; 4. DO enjoy what you do. When asked for his parting remarks, Abrahamson stated, It has been a tremendous honor to command FACSFACJAX. The FACSFAC JAX war fighters are second to none and I leave with great satisfaction knowing that my commands mission of providing servic es to operational war fighters has been outstanding. I wish my good friend and shipmate, Cmdr. Petre all the best. Since its establishment in1977, FACSFACJAX has maintained, con trolled and monitored 80,000 square miles of sea and air space along the United States southeastern coast. FACSFACJAX is responsible for scheduling and control of offshore fleet operating areas. Additionally, FACSFACJAX is the lead military coordinator with the Federal Aviation Agency and other cognizant agencies for fleet liaison while conducting operations in the Jacksonville area of responsibility. Transient Personnel Unit/Pre-Trial Confinement Facility hold change of command Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jax to hold change of command 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012

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The Swamp Foxes of HSM-74 Detachment 3 successfully completed the squadrons first MH-60R deployed detachment on board the guided missile cruiser USS Normandy (CG 60). Detachment 3, known as The A-Team, embarked on the Norfolkbased Normandy in early May to pro vide organic helicopter assets in sup port of the 40th annual Baltic Operations (BALTOPS) and FRUKUS 2012 multinational exercises. BALTOPS is an annual event to pro mote mutual understanding, confi dence, cooperation, and interoperabil ity among forces and personnel of partnering nations. During BALTOPS 12, 27 ships from 12 NATO and Partnership for Peace (PFP) countries participated, including Denmarks HDMS Absalon, Germanys FSG Werra, Russias Ropucha class landing ship RFS Kaliningrad, and several mine countermeasure ships. Additionally, there were over twen ty aircraft from eight NATO and PFP nations participating in this large scale Baltic Sea exercise. Lt. Andrew Howerton, the detach ments operations officer said of his second BALTOPS experience, The opportunity to work with foreign nations in planning and execution is an invaluable learning experience for our junior and more experienced pilots alike. More importantly, the ability to hone our skills and tactics in a new environment against unfamiliar platforms provid ed unparalleled training opportunities and experience to all those involved. FRUKUS is an annual event of cooperation between the naval forc es of France, the Russian Federation, Great Britain, and the United States to increase interoperability of naval forc es of participating countries under the auspices of the United Nations. The Russian Federation Navy hosted this five day training mission which involved coordination between USS Normandy with HSM-74 Det 3 embarked, French frigate De Grasse (D612), Russian naval vessel Yaroslav Mudriy (727), and Royal Navy destroyer HMS York (D98). Fifty-four members of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 62 were awarded the Humanitarian Service Medal for the VR-62 Nomads work during Operation Tomodachi. Operation Tomodachi was the humanitarian assistance mission to support the Japanese people in the wake of the earthquake and tsunami that struck Honshu, the main Island of Japan, in March of 2011.VR-62 aircraft and aircrew were already at Naval Air Facility Atsugi as part of their normal detachment rotation. They airlifted 127 tons of relief material in support of the operation. The Humanitarian Service Medal was established by Executive Order 11965 on January 19, 1977. It is awarded to members of the Armed Forces of the United States who distinguished themselves by meritorious direct participation in a Department of Defense-approved sig nificant military act or operation of a humanitarian nature. Swamp Foxes complete first MH-60R detachment deployment VR-62 receives humanitarian recognition JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012 7

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discuss recent changes in the Uniform Code of Military Justice that apply. The MMTT training is coordinated and hosted by CPPD and uses videos and a variety of methods to reinforce the fact that sexual assault is a crime and will not be toler ated in the Navy. Weve put a lot of time and effort into working with the contractor to ensure that the training is innovative, effective and relevant with todays Navy, said Capt. John Newcomer, CPPD commanding officer. There isnt a single briefing slide in the entire presentation the focus is on interaction and facilitated face-to-face discussion to provide command leaders the tools to develop and promote a culture of change. Nearly 650 SAPR-L training sessions are scheduled in the next month, pro viding training for regular and reserve commands. The few commands that are deployed and unable to host a MMTT can receive the training via Defense Connect Online. SAPR-L train ing must be completed for all E-7 and above by Sept. 30 and SAPR-L training completion will be documented by individual commands via the Fleet Training Management Planning System. Capt. Clark Price, commanding officer of the Navy ROTC unit at Savannah State University and assigned as team leader for the Florida/Central Command MMTT, will present some of first SAPR-L sessions, start ing at NAS Pensacola, Fla. The training for the MMTTs was excel lent; it got the teams up to the podium almost immediately and ready to prepare the command triads to conduct interactive training with their senior leadership, said Price. My team has an aggressive schedule of 11 cities in 30 days allowing us to see a lot of the fleet. My team is looking forward to delivering the CNOs message on sexual assault prevention. Sexual assault prevention is an impor tant element of the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative, which consolidates a set of objectives and poli cies to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Navy. SAPR The VP-45 First Class Petty Officers Association (FCPOA) recently undertook the restoration of the Sweet Water Athletic Complex. The community service project included building shelves for athletic equipment, repainting the goalposts and field fences, repairing holes in the fields turf using tools and funds supplied completely by members of the Pelicans FCPOA. We always go overseas and help out other communities when we re on deployment, said AM1(AW) Randy Wade, one of the project s organizers. VP-45 FCPOA wanted to start giving back locally to let people know that VP-45 and the Navy cares about Jacksonville. Past deployment projects of the Pelicans FCPOA included everything from cleaning up a cheetah preserve in Djibouti to volunteering time with children at orphanages in El Salvador and Sicily. Association members say they plan to coordinate similar projects in Jacksonville in the future. The FCPOA saw a need at the Sweet Water Complex where several service member s children play sports. The area is home to many single parent families who could not afford registration fees for its teams or pay for field improvements. As the complex s funds are limited, the project gave the field a much-needed overhaul. I am impressed by FCPOA s dedication to community service in Jacksonville and around the world, said Cmdr. John Brabazon. They are truly setting the example of what it means to be a World Famous Pelican. Donnie Moore, vice president of the Sweet Water Athletic Association, was also grateful for the help from the FCPOA. Additionally, 20 children from the Sweet Water Athletic Association, along with children of the Pelican FCPOA, participated in the event. Part of the day s activities included an address to the kids from Moore, in which he encouraged the children to show good sportsmanship and camaraderie. The day concluded with a pick-up game of football which was enjoyed by all. The Sweet Water Athletic Complex is located in West Jacksonville and hosts Pop Warner football and cheer leading contests. Pelicans FCPOA lends a hand in the community 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012

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the Fire Scout. We began in 2010 with a 4th Fleet drug interdiction mission aboard the guided-missile frigate USS McInerney (FFG 8), where Fire Scout helped confiscate 60kilos of cocaine from a fast boat. The next MQ-8B success came from the 5th Fleet deployment aboard the frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40). From off the coast of Somalia, Fire Scout provided an overland ISR (intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance) platform for special operations forces. Most recently, the frigate USS Klakring (FFG 42) deployed to the Horn of Africa area of responsibility with four Fire Scouts. As the Fire Scout UAV program evolves, it will be part of what we call composite detachments that deploy with a manned MH-60R Seahawk and an unmanned Fire Scout. Also, with todays shrinking budgets, this new center allows us to train squadron personnel without incurring the travel, food and lodging expenses to send them to NAS Patuxent River, Md. Today, were bridging the Fire Scout simulator capac ity gap and improving the already robust training environment here at NAS Jax, said Ten Hoopen. He concluded, For the past two years, operator and maintainer training has taken place here in temporary spaces among the H-60 Seahawk crews. In a few minutes, youll see the leading-edge design of our new permanent simulator facility. George Vardoulakis, vice president and program manager of tactical unmanned systems for Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, welcomed the military and civilian guests. Fire Scout complements the Navys manned helicopters by effectively extending the range and area of ship-based intelligence gathering operations, said Vardoulakis. Its modular architecture accommo dates a variety of electro-optical, infrared and communications payloads that pro vide groundand ship-based command ers with high levels of situational aware ness and precision targeting support, he added. The system has been in develop ment for about 10 years and is particularly well suited to support littoral combat ship missions such as drug interdiction, antipiracy, search and rescue, and reconnais sance operations. He said that todays Navy is increasing its mix of manned and unmanned activities and that this Fire Scout training facility will ensure operators are well schooled in executing its multi-mission capabilities. According to a Northrop Grumman, the MQ-8B Fire Scout is an unmanned heli copter for U.S. Navy situational awareness and precision targeting. The unmanned aircraft is based on the Schweizer Model 333 two-seat manned helicopter. It can autonomously take off and land on any aviation-capable warship and at unprepared landing zones near battlefields. Northrop Grumman has demonstrat ed MQ-8 Fire Scout radar capability to detect and track several targets with a Telephonics RDR-1700B radar system. The Fire Scout may eventually be armed with gun pods, Hydra 70-millimeter rocket pods and small missiles. The MQ-8 Fire Scout is 30 feet long and 9.4 feet tall, with a rotor diameter of 27.5 feet. It can fly as fast as 125 knots and achieve altitudes of up to 20,000 feet. MQ-8 VP-16the P-8A manpower requirements. Unlike the P-3 aircrew, the P-8 does not require a flight engineer. And the P-8 maintenance department is much smaller so weve been working on transfers for those who will not be joining the transition, said Boron. While on deployment, we sent some of our top maintenance profes sionals back to NAS Jax to observe the VP-30 safe-for-flight inspection of the P-8A so wed have a better picture of what to expect in the coming months. At the P-8A Integrated Training Center, VP-16 pilots, NFOs and warfare operators spend their first two weeks getting familiarized with the Poseidon through lectures and computer-based classroom training. Then the training migrates to the P-8A operational flight trainer (OFT), a fullmotion reproduction of the aircraft cockpit that replicates the visual outof-window display and cockpit noises. The OFT can be used as a standalone trainer or be connected with the weapons tactics trainer (WTT) in order to fly a P-8A complete with mission systems. In the WTT stand-alone configuration, mission specialists receive realistic weap ons and sensor employment training. The P-8A mission systems include dual display screens at five operator stations two acoustic stations, one non-acoustic station, one tac tical coordina tion and one navigation and communications station. The P-8A stations are completely interchangeable with respect to data. Also, an operator can sit at any of the five sta tions and operate any system. Boron added, As our aircrew train at the P-8A ITC, our maintainers are attending classes at CNATTU-Jax, as well as getting hands-on instruction at the maintenance department of VP-30. We expect our pilots to begin logging actual flight hours at about our 55th training day. If everything goes according to plan, we should finish training in December and be ready for our safe-for-flight certification in January, said Boron. Our greatest challenge is that there is no blueprint for this transition in the MPRF community because its been 50 years since Orion went operational. At the same time, its very exciting to help shape the transition process and find solutions to any speed bumps we may encounter along the way. We will also pass along lessons learned to squadrons following in the footprints of VP-16. In 2013, the War Eagles will enter their traditional Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC) with two P-8A Poseidons. They will certify 12 combat aircrews and be ready to deploy the first week of December, at which time they expect to be assigned six Poseidon aircraft. The P-8A Poseidon is the latest Navy aircraft designed to execute longrange anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions. It will replace the P-3C Orion, which has been in operation for more than 50 years. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012 9

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HSL-42, Detachment Ten, Night Furies, have recently passed the halfway mark into their seven-month 5th Fleet deployment. The NAS Jacksonville-based detachment left Norfolk, Va. on March12 on board USS James E. Williams (DDG 95) and transited across the Atlantic Ocean as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group. Before the Night Furies entered the Mediterranean Sea they were tasked with their first of many challenging missions, a medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) through the Strait of Gibraltar to USS Enterprise. With weather, sea state, and ships distance working against the crew, they were able to deliver the patient to the USS Enterprise, saving the finger of a talented culinary specialist. Since then, the Night Furies have con tinued to display their talents flying over 400 hours with tasks consisting of surface surveillance and control, vertical replen ishment (VERTREP), maritime intercep tion operations, visit, board, search, and seizure (VBSS), and passenger transfers in support of the strike group while operating in the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Gulf of Oman, and Arabian Gulf. USS James E. Williams and Detach-ment Ten have worked diligently to improve relations with countries in the region by participating in multiple exercises includ ing Eagle Salute and PASSEX with the Egyptian Navy and Indigo Serpent with the Saudi Arabian Navy. The Night Furies continue to balance operational needs, maintenance require ments, and training to continuously pro vide the best aircraft and aircrews possible to complete the various demanding mis sions. Training with the ships crew has allowed for practice search and rescue lit ter training with the VBSS team, helicopter in-flight refueling and forward VERTREP training. All of this has been accom plished while the detachments aircraft have completed major phase maintenance inspections with subsequent functional check flights. Diligent training continues in addi tion to completing maintenance work and missions, resulting in newly-pinned enlisted aviation warfare specialist petty officers, with several more in the process. Following the results of Marchs advance ment exams, Detachment Ten was proud to frock three detachment members, includ ing AWR2 Amado Vazquez, AE2 Sasha Haywood, and AT2 Warren Mercer. With so much already experienced dur ing their first four months at sea, the Night Furies are looking forward to the challenges that lay ahead of them in their second half of the deployment. HSL-42 Detachment Twos Men in Black are poised to make history as the squad rons first all MQ-8B Fire Scout detachment. Following successful com posite SH-60B/Fire Scout deployments on board USS McInerney and USS Halyburton, Detachment Two will embark on board USS Klakring and operate solely as an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) detachment. The MQ-8B is a rotary wing vertical takeoff and landing tactical unmanned air vehicle (VTUAV) designed to provide an intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) platform for U.S. Navy ships and coalition partners. Todays modern battlefield has a high demand for unmanned ISR, and the Men in Black will supply it to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility. Detachment Two, led by Lt. Cmdr. Jay Lambert and AWSC(NAC/AW) John Chapman, consists of five offi cer air vehicle operators, four enlisted mission payload operators, 21 enlisted maintainers and technicians, and a handful of civilian Northrop Grumman instructors, technicians and engineers. The Northrop Grumman team has been immeasurably helpful and supportive from the detachments standup, and they will con tinue to be an invaluable asset throughout the deployment. Similar to SH-60B work ups, Detachment Two partici pated in a Week One Work Up cycle, an underway Advanced Readiness Program evaluation, and a Composite Unit Training Exercise (COMPTUEX). During COMPTUEX and under the supervision of Northrop Grumman instructors and engineers, the Men in Black became the first military crew in history to operate two air craft simultaneously from a single ground control station and conduct a Dual Air Vehicle (DAV) Tactical Control Data Link swap in a tactical training environment. Two days later, Detachment Two flew con tinuous DAV operations off the coast of North Carolina, which marked the end of a historic and successful COMPTUEX. While the MQ-8B is relatively young in its service-life, USS Klakring will embark on its final deployment after 30 years of naval service. Both the ships crew and the air department are looking forward to the challenges ahead as the ship sets sail for its final cruise. HSL-42 Detachment Two is mission-ready to provide ISR services, and the Men in Black will continue HSL-42s legacy as the premier and frontline operators of the MQ-8B Fire Scout. Men in Black to deploy solely with UAVs Night Furies continue to lead the way 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012

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Six teams of Navy culinary specialists (CS) participat ed the All-American Platter Culinary Competition hosted by the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf July 11. The event was held to allow the CS teams to showcase their best burgers, potato salad and baked beans. This is a kick-off to sum mer so we challenged culi nary specialists from different commands in the area to cre ate home-cooked hamburg ers, said NAS Jax Food Service Officer CWO4 Kathy Wiseman. Its a great way for them to receive training so when it comes time for certification, they are used to cooking under pressure. We gave them the option of using their creative talents to make something unique. By hosting these competitions, the CSs get some extra train ing and have some fun doing it. A lot of times, they dont have the opportunity to learn and be creative in their day-to-day jobs, she added. The CS teams consisted of three or four members from the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf, NS Mayport Oasis Galley, Naval Hospital Jax Child Street Caf, USS DeWert, USS Carney and USS The Sullivans. As the teams chopped, diced, sauted and grilled their ingredients to prepare the platters, judges graded them on safety and sanitary measures in the kitchen. After putting the fin ishing touches on the plates, the CSs presented them to the judges, describing the meal and how it was prepared. Once the judges calculated their scores for overall prepa ration, presentation, creativ ity and taste, the winners were announced and presented trophies for their efforts. Placing first for their puffed pastry lamb burgers was the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf, followed by the USS Carney team and the NS Mayport Oasis Galley. Ive been training Navy cooks since 1989 and these are some of the finest cooks in the world. Morale starts in the chow line and this is what its all about train ing and improving meals and what they can deliver to their customers, stated Chef David Bearl of the First Coast Technical College, who was one of the judges for the com petition. By putting on a competition like this, it gives them enthusiasm for what they do every day. Were here to give them advice and enhance their skills. Weve had a lot of great competition here. CWO4 Wiseman has been instrumental in promoting some wonderful training opportunities. We are currently imple menting a plan to change the way we do business by looking at our menus and balancing them with the right amount of fresh products and prepared products, he said. We also continue to look at training to ensure our CSs are getting the training need ed both aboard ships and on shore. We do this through the Adopt-a-Ship Program by bringing chefs to the ships, through our certification pro gram and through competi tions. These competitions are critical to maintaining our culinary specialists proficien cies. For the participants, it was not only fun but gave them the opportunity to try something different. When you cook in the Navy, most of the time we use recipe cards and have to follow strict guidelines. But when we par ticipate in competitions like this, we can do our own thing and really showcase our talents and skills. And of course, when NAS Jax Flight Line Caf hosts culinary competition JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012 11

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12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012 you make burgers from scratch, its a lot better than buying packaged ones from the store. We get to be creative, said CS2 Gerald Foxworth of the Naval Hospital Jax Child Street Caf. This is my first competition and I really loved it. Ive wanted to be a chef since I was 16 and now Im living my dream as a cook in the Navy. This competition was all about burgers although we put a little twist to it by creating a puffed pastry using lamb and other ingredients. We wanted to do something different, added CS2(SW) Marnika Ash of the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf. Weve been participating in a lot of fine-dining competi tions lately, so it was fun to have an every day type food event even though we put our own unique spin on it. According to Naval Supply Systems Command Food Service Director Cmdr. Danny King, who also judged the competition, the Navy continues to strive to provide healthy, nutritious meals to Sailors both at sea and on shore. COMPETITION It was a 13-year-old girls sheer determination that con vinced her immigrant parents in 2003 to let her join the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps (NSCC), a decision that led to a mentor and later an officers commis sion. Ensign Katie Castro cred its her involvement with the Sea Cadet program and one remarkable mentor, June Tillett, for helping her to real ize her dream of pursuing a career in the U.S. Navy. Castro was one of 1,077 midship men to receive a diploma dur ing the U.S. Naval Academy Class of 2012 graduation and commissioning ceremony in Annapolis, Md., May 29. Castro said she was obsessed with military aviation at a young age and dreamed of one day becoming a pilot. She learned about NSCC from an article in the local paper with a photo of Sea Cadet AN Aaron Stemen sitting in a helicopter simulator at NAS Jacksonville. She contacted Tillett, the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) industrial manufacturing program man ager, who also serves as the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps regional director for Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia. With 17 years of ser vice, Tillett currently holds the rank of NSCC lieutenant com mander. She has oversight for nine units and 315 personnel from Daytona Beach, Fla. to Savannah, Ga. Tillett said Castros Cubanborn father took a lot of con vincing; he was worried his daughter would deploy to a war zone. In the end, he allowed his burgeoning ballerina to join the Sea Cadets. Katie had so much confi dence, said Tillett. When she first reported in 2003 for training in her civilian cloth ing, she saluted me. I had never seen that before. She said, Maam, Im going to the Naval Academy, and I believed her. She was an exemplary Sea Cadet; she always wanted to do the right thing. To complete her basic mili tary requirements and course work prior to graduating from high school, Castro attended two summer training sessions each year to earn the rank of chief petty officer in 2007, the highest attainable enlisted sea cadet rank. Only 10 per cent complete the requirement according to Tillett. Castro said Tillett played a major role in her suc cess. When I was a Sea Cadet, I remember thinking I want to be like her when I grow up, she said. Cmdr. Tillett was one of my most important mentors with an incorruptible moral compass. Castro entered the Naval Academy in 2008 to pursue an aeronautical engineering degree with a minor in French. Her dream to become a naval aviator was shattered when she learned her nearsightedness was not surgically correctible. I was sitting in the lobby of Bethesda feeling sorry for myself when a bus pulled up filled with wounded warriors some without arms and legs arriving for physical therapy, she said. They were strong and stoic. It was a sobering moment; it was a slap in the face. Up until that moment, life had been all about her. She started to ask herself how she could best serve the Navy. Back at the academy, she learned from the senior submarine nuclear accessions officer that her class was the first to be open to direct transition to the Navys submarine ser vice. After two grueling tech nical interviews and a final interview with Adm. Kirkland Donald, director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion, Castro made the cut, along with six other pioneering women. Adm. Donald trashed my uniform and corrected my grammar, she said. When he asked me why I wanted to serve in his submarine force, I told him Im not here on a whim. She reported to the Naval Nuclear Power Training Command in Charleston, S.C., in early July for 12 months of training followed by 10 weeks of study at the Submarine Officer Basic Course in Connecticut. The first female officers to complete the Navys nuclear submarine program broke a longstanding gen der barrier by joining crews on Ohio-class submarines in November 2011. Balfour Beatty Communities to kick-off 2012 housing surveyIn a few weeks, family housing residents will be receiving the CEL Resident Satisfaction Housing Survey. The annual survey is part of Balfour Beatty Communities performance assessment program. The survey allows us to see where we are succeeding and where there is room for improvement, said Diana Heintz, community manager for Balfour Beatty. Its important for residents to fill it out honestly. Balfour Beatty Communities encourages residents to fill them out and return them at its CEL Splash Event July 20 at the NAS Jax Outdoor Pool at 6 p.m. By completing and handing in the survey, residents will qualify for weekly prize drawings. The top prizes include a patio set. Residents who hand in the sur vey by Aug.10 will also qualify for a special early bird drawing. We truly strive to exceed our residents expecta tions and hope that every resident enjoys their home and the services that we provide, explained Heintz. Once residents complete their surveys and seal them in the postage-paid envelopes provided, they can simply bring it to the Balfour Beatty Communities Management Office and drop it in the authorized locked mailbox. Only CEL employees will open the returned envelopes. Survey results are completely confidential and anonymous. The survey deadline date is Aug. 31. 2 local recipients receive scholorshipsWings Over America Scholarship Foundation (WOASF) announced its 2012 scholarship award recipients June 6. There were 49 winners nationwide and include two from the Jacksonville area. Winners were selected on the basis of academic excellence, extra-curricular activities, community service and char acter. WOASF scholarships are valued at $2,000 or more. Local recipients included: High School Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation Scholarship College NAS Oceana Spouses Scholarship The Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation annually sponsors more than 40 scholarships for students who have chosen to continue their education. Its mission is to provide college scholarships to dependent children and spouses of all naval aviation commands, officer and enlisted, active duty, retired, honorably discharged or deceased. The Foundation has proudly awarded more than $635,000 to outstanding stu dents since 1987. The foundation is funded solely through the generous contributions of private and corporate sources and is a registered a 501(c) 3 non-profit foundation. NAS Jacksonville has an abundance of rep tiles, some nice and some not so nice. The Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake, Canebrake Rattlesnake, Dusky Pigmy Rattlesnake, and Cottonmouth Moccasin are members of the hemotoxin species whose venom can cause damage to the surrounding body tissue when bitten. These are pit vipers with fangs that inject their venom much like a hypodermic syringe. It has been found that on the first strike or fang pen etration, only 40 percent of these cases result in venom being introduced, however, if stricken a second time, venom is almost always present. The venom may cause death if not treated properly and promptly! The Eastern Coral Snake, whose venom attacks the central nervous system, is the only neurotoxin species present in the NAS Jax area. It has small teeth that break the skin, and its venom is introduced by excreting venom into its saliva. They have a small mouth, which makes these bites uncommon. Direct handling is usually the cause. The best way to avoid being injured by a snake is to leave them alone and stay away from them. Alligators can be found in and around most ditches and ponds at NAS Jax. It is against the law to feed them. Feeding them can cause them to become familiar with people, encouraging them to become a nuisance when fishermen arrive or individuals are simply out to enjoy nature. Then they will have to be relocated or destroyed. With the rainy season is upon us, the water level is rising thereby pushing wildlife further inland to higher ground so be cautious and aware of where you step. Remember, we also have Florida Panthers, and Black Bears which are on the protected species list on outlying properties. The feral hogs are considered a nuisance animal but can be aggressive with the presence of humans while protecting their young. Be safe out there! If you spot a snake, alligator or other wild animal where it shouldnt be, leave it alone and call NAS Jax Security Dispatch at 542-2662 or 911 if you feel threatened. For further information, contact the NAS Jax game warden at 542-0969, Ext. 144. Sea Cadet/Academy grad credits FRCSE mentor for success Be cautious when encountering snakes, alligators and other wildlife Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation awards 56 scholarships nationally

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Frockings at NAS Jacksonville are often low-key with only the presence of fellow squadron mates in the respec tive commands hangar. Yet, as VP-45 frocked their newest senior chiefs, AMCS Patrick McNulty and AWOCS Tom George, the event was tinted with a special touch of heritage and reflection. Not only were they frocked to senior chief, but they were witnessed by the family of the late AWCS Sidney Smith who served in VP-45 as an from December 1999 to February 2004 and again from November 2006 until his death in August 2008. Sonia Smith spoke to the command for the first time since her husbands passing. After she pinned the single starred anchor on George, VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Michael Vitali, intro duced her to the command and then handed her the micro phone. My husband always said you never know who pays atten tion to you on a day to day basis while youre doing your job, she said. And you never know the impact that you have on others. Reiterating, she stated, Its not your job which people remember you for; rather it is how you make others feel. George, who served with Smith at VP-30, considered Smith to be the most impor tant mentor in his career. George not only carries Smiths legacy with him symbolically by wearing his single-starred anchors, but he also bears that same legacy professionally. The most lasting impact that senior chief made on my career was the lesson that you need to affect the life of at least one of your Sailors every day. He taught me that if youre not doing that, youre not doing your job as a senior chief, stated George. Both Mrs. Smith and George agree that the bequest of Smiths anchors brings a poi gnant closure to both his naval career and his passing. McNulty was also inspired by the visit and stated, I was touched that the Smith family took the time to come witness our frocking. I never had the honor of working with Sidney, but the legacy he left behind will continue to inspire and motivate all future Pelicans! Each year, VP-45 presents the Senior Chief Sidney Smith Award to a deserving Sailor, E-6 and below. This years award winner was AD2 Royce Harrell. The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) is announcing changes to short sale policies that will make it easier for military homeowners with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac mortgages to honor their financial commitments when they are issued a Permanent Change of Station (PCS) order. FHFA will issue guidance by Sept. 30 and it will be effective 60 days later. Currently, military hom eowners with PCS orders are required to move to a new duty station under short, strict timelines. However, service mem bers still remain bound to their financial obligations, including their mortgages. If their homes have declined in value, they may be unable to sell the home and obtain sufficient funds to pay off the mortgage debt obligating them to continue mak ing monthly payments after relocating to a new duty sta tion. Changes to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac short sale poli cies for military homeowners will alleviate some of the issues faced when a member of the Armed Forces receives a PCS order including the burden of having to sell their home in a difficult housing market. These changes dovetail with guid ance issued by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to servicers last year establishing PCS orders as a qualifying hardship for for bearance and loan modifica tions. A short sale, also known as a pre-foreclosure sale, is when you sell your home for less than the balance remaining on your mortgage. If your mortgage company agrees to a short sale, you can sell your home and pay off all (or a portion of) your mortgage balance with the proceeds. Service members with PCS orders will be: immediately, even when they are current on their existing mortgage (the PCS order is treated as a hardship to deem them eligible); judgments from Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac when receiv ing permission for a short sale; and requirement for a cash con tribution or promissory note so long as the property was pur chased on or before June 30, 2012, (to apply personal assets to cover the shortfall after outstanding unpaid principal bal ance and sales price). Eligibility requirements military and have a PCS order. be owned or guaranteed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. current or delinquent on their mortgage to apply for a short sale. have been purchased on or before June 30, 2012. Homeowners can determine if they have a Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac loan by going to: loanlookup or calling 800-7Fannie (8 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST) porate/ or 800-Freddie (8 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST) Resources com/Military or call 877-MIL4566 (Fannie Mae) avoidforeclosure or call 800-Freddie (8 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST) VP-45 promotes senior chiefs Short sale assistance available for military homeowners Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012 13

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Recycling Center benefits Sailors quality of life and environmentThe NAS Jacksonville Recycling Center is dedicated to collecting and processing recyclables on base. They take all recyclables, including cardboard, white paper, newspaper, clear and colored glass bottles, colored plastic bottles, cans, copper wire and even lead batteries. Certain things that we cant pick up are trash, plastic bags and hazardous materials, said STG2(SW) John Oyler, who works for the recycling center. Everything we collect either gets compressed into square bails or collected in metal bins, added Oyler. An outside company then comes and takes every thing away to be processed. According to Qualified Recycling Program Manager Mark Craig, all profits from recycling on base benefit Sailors quality of life. One-hundred percent of our profit goes to Morale Welfare and Recreation, so they can put that money back into programs that benefit Sailors and their families, such as outdoor recreation, the Auto Skills Center and the unit allocation fund, said Craig. Recycling on base has advanced by leaps and bounds, said Oyler. When I got here in 2009, the metal in the yard was stacked up higher than our truck. It was just too big of a workload for the amount of people they had working here at that time. Now, its gone. Since then, weve had as many as 30 people working here at one time, but now were down to only 15. Even though our numbers have decreased, our quality of work has progressed. We have crews that go around to all of the build ings on base and empty out recycling bins, said Recycling Center Leading Chief Petty Officer ATC Jeffery Deckard. Our trucks run Monday through Friday collecting paper products from offices throughout the base. A big inconvenience for the Recycling Center is dealing with garbage. Its a common misconception that were garbage men, said Oyler. A lot of old food gets put into the bins mixed with the recyclables, and we have to throw it all away because its unsanitary. We regularly find open dip cups and sometimes old cups of noodle soup in the recycle bins. Weve also found raccoons and snakes before in closed up bins, continued Oyler. Someone once dropped off a box of kittens. The kittens were even tually adopted after the vet on base gave them their shots. The Recycling Center is also unable to recycle packing paper. It gums up the machines, said Oyler. Its just too thin of a material, but we take anything else thats recyclable. To discard used oil, oil filters, brake pads and antifreeze, drop it off at the NAS Jax Auto Skills Center located in Building 622 next door to the recycling center. Electronic recyclables are collected every Thursday from 9:30-11:30 a.m. at Building 1948 behind the Fire Station on Mustin Road. The NAS Jax Recycling Center is located in Building 623 on Birmingham Avenue. Call 542-3113 for answers to any recycling questions. The 10th anniversary of the Lt. Cmdr. Jim Warmowski Share the Road Memorial Bicycle Ride will take place Saturday, July 21 at 8 a.m. All military and civilian personnel are invited to participate in this bicycle ride and celebrate the life of Warmowski, a former NAS Jacksonville naval offi cer, who was tragically killed by an intoxicated driver while training for the Kona Ironman Triathlon. The ride will depart the Fleming Island Winn Dixie parking lot on CR-220 at 8 a.m. and proceed down US-17 for 12 miles to the site of the tragic accident. An NAS Jacksonville chaplain will deliver prayers, a Navy Band Southeast bugler will play taps and two NAS Jacksonville sailors will place a wreath at the memorial marker. The peloton will ride the first 12 miles as a group. After a ceremony, cyclists will have the option to ride back to the starting point or continue on with the North Florida Bicycle Club. The club will be offering three different rides raging from 23, 34 or 42 miles for those cyclists wanting to participate in a longer ride. For more information, call NAS Jacksonville PAO, Miriam S. Gallet at 542-5588.Celebrate a naval officers life by riding your bicycle 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Monday Pizza Madness $5 for a 14 one topping pizza 2:30 9 p.m., dine in or carry-out only Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included July Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 4 10 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Summer Bowling Leagues Now Forming Monday Mixed Trio 7 p.m. Wednesday After Work League 4:30 p.m. Thrusday Morning Seniors 9 a.m. Thursday Night Extreme Bowling 6:30 p.m. Friday Intramural League 11:45 a.m. Sunday Fun Bunch League 4 p.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. **New fitness class Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DOD civilians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session two begins July 9, session three begins July 23 Lessons are available at the indoor and outdoor pool $40 military, $45 DODRegister for swim lessons at the base gym I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Legoland 1 day $45.50, 1 day w/water park $52.75, 2 day $54.50, 2 day w/water park $58.75 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets $58.50 sections 146 & 147 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day $29.50, 2 day $40 Disney World Orlando FL 4 day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Tampa Zoo $19 (Adult) $17.50 (Child) Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person delete Blue Man Group in Orlando $59, includes City Walk venue Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Medieval Times Free royalty upgrade with dinner reservationThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Free Jacksonville Suns Baseball Game July 19 at 6:30 p.m. Free Mall & Movie Trip Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater July 20 at 6 p.m. Adventure Landing Trip July 21 at 10 a.m. Daytona Beach Trip July 29 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees July 24 for active duty July 26 for retirees & DoD personnel Junior Golf Clinic Session 2 (ages 6 10) July 16 20 delete Session 3 (ages 11 17) August 6 10 Monday Friday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. $110 per week long session Twilight Special Monday Friday Play 18 holes for $17 after 3 p.m. Not applicable on holidays Golf & Dine Special Play 18-holes with cart and choice of breakfast or lunch for $26! Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Lessons $150 per person July 20, 21, 22, 28 & 29 August 17, 18, 19, 25 & 26 Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Register now for before & after school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household income National Night Out August 7, 6 9:30 p.m. Outdoor pool & Allegheny softball field Free cookout, pool games, bounce house, guest speakers, music, outdoor movie and more!Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School September 10 October 17 $500 per person Youth Flight Camps (ages 12 18) Basic Aviation Course $100 per person July 18 21 register by July 11 delete Advanced Aviation Course (basic course required) $150 per person August 8 11 register by August 1 August 22 25 register by August 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 19, 2012 15