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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02000
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 07-12-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02000

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I N S I D E HSL-42 HOME SAI L ING NM SC NEW S Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Navy weeds out users of designer drugs The Navys implementation of syn thetic drug testing for synthetic chemi cal compounds like Spice and Bath Salts is helping the service close ranks on Sailors who use these prohibited and dangerous substances, officials said July 2. Navy has zero tolerance for drug abuse. Drug abuse, including use of de signer drugs and synthetic compounds, by members of the Navy is incompat ible with high standards of perfor mance, military discipline, and readi ness as embodied by of 21st Century Sailors and Marines, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director, military personnel plans and policy. The Navy reviews its testing of syn thetic compounds continuously, and also continually responds to production of new controlled and synthetic com pounds, changing testing procedures and pacing the changes being made by producers. The Navy has analyzed more than 3,300 urine samples for synthetic chem ical compounds since testing began in March, with 101 samples testing posi tive. Authorized testing under the syn thetic drug testing program is con ducted under member consent, com mand directed, unit and/or subunit sweep. NCIS will be notified of every positive sample for possible further in vestigation with a view towards poten tial disciplinary or adverse adminis trative action by the service members command. Spice is a synthetic chemical com pound that is sold as herbal incense and mimics the effects of the drug marijua na. A ban was placed on five synthetic cannabis compounds commonly found in the designer drug Spice, but also sold under different names. Some of the short-term effects include auditory and visual hallucinations, painless head pressure, panic attacks, time distortion and delirium. Longterm effects from the designer drug can include permanent physical impair ment, mental illness or death. Another synthetic chemical com pound, bath salts are sold under the common names: Vanilla Sky, Ivo ry Wave, Pure Ivory, Purple Wave, Charge+, Ocean Burst, and Sextacy. Bath salts are a potentially addictive powdered substance that is snorted, smoked or injected. They can have an adverse effect on the heart, circulation, nervous system, similar to ecstasy or cocaine, and result in lethal overdose. The unlawful possession or use by Department of the Navy personnel of controlled substance analogues (de signer drugs), natural substances, chemicals wrongfully used as inhal ants, propellants, prescribed or overthe-counter medication or pharmaceu tical compound with the intent to in duce intoxication, excitement or stupe faction of the central nervous system is prohibited via SECNAVINST 5300.28D. Violators are subject to punitive ac tion under the Uniform Code of Mili tary Justice, Article 92. The Navys Synthetic Drug Testing Operating Guide is posted on the Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Of fice (NADAP) website and contains pro cedures for commands to request syn thetic drug testing and synthetic drug testing information. The Navys zerotolerance policy towards drug use is a key contributor to the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine. To view the guide or for more news from NADAP, visit www.nadap.navy. mil. Commander, Fleet Read iness Centers shared his leadership tips and strategic vision with nearly 200 Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) civilian and mili tary leaders, supervisors, and managers during a day long conference at the Uni versity of North Florida June 25. Rear Adm. Jeffrey Pen field, responsible for eight facilities engaged in aviation maintenance, repair, and overhaul services for the Na val Aviation Enterprise, was the keynote speaker at the FRCSE Day of Leadership: Raising the Bar . A Journey to Excellence. As a former F/A-18E Su per Hornet pilot with 4,000 Thirty-five volunteers from VP-16 worked in conjunc tion with Clay County Emergency Management and the relief organization Disaster Relief and Disaster Train ing (DRADT) to help flood victims affected by the recent heavy rains of tropical storm Debby. When I heard we would get to break stuff for a good FRC commander shares vision for future Cmdr. Ryan Keys relieved Cmdr. Edgardo Cheech Moreno July 6 as commanding officer (CO) of the HS11 Dragonslayers in an airborne change-of-command ceremony in the sky above deployed aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) steaming in the Arabian Sea. The ceremony began at sea on the flight deck as Moreno addressed the HS-11 crew, offering his appreciation and gratitude to the squadron he had led. You are my family, said Moreno. I have nothing but love and respect for all of you. He also expressed a deep honor for having the opportunity to lead the Dragonslayers. When you say take care of your HS-11 conducts aerial change of commandWar Eagles help Middleburg flood victims

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS July 11 1798 Reestablishment of Marine Corps under the Con stitution. 1918 Henry Ford launches first of 100 Eagle boats. 1919 Navy Pay Corps, estab lished in 1870, is renamed Navy Supply Corps. 1943 Gunfire from U.S. cruisers and destroyers stop German and Italian tank at tack against Army beachhead at Gela, Sicily. July 12 1836 Commissioning of Charles Haswell as first regu larly appointed Engineer Of ficer. 1916 North Carolina is first Navy ship to carry and operate aircraft. 1921 Congress creates Bu reau of Aeronautics to be in charge of all matters pertain ing to naval aviation. 1951 Ninth Naval District forces assist in flood relief work in Kansas City. 1953 United Nations fleet launches heavy air and sea at tack on Wonsan Korea. Maj. John Bolt becomes first jet ace in Marine Corps. 1988 SECDEF approves opening the Navys underwater construction teams, fleet oiler, ammunition ships, and combat stores ships to women. 1990 Cmdr. Rosemary Mar iner becomes first woman to command an operational avia tion squadron (VAQ-34). July 13 1863 Steam sloop USS Wy oming battled Japanese war lords forces. 1939 Appointment of Rear Adm. Richard Byrd as com manding officer of 1939-1941 Antarctic Expedition. 1943 During Battle of Kolombangara in Solomon Is lands, U.S. lost USS Gwin (DD433) while Japanese lost the light cruiser Jintsu. 1978 A Navy F-4J Phantom II landed for the first time us ing the microwave landing sys tem (MLS) at the FAA Test Fa cility at Atlantic City, N.J. 1982 Lt. Cmdr. Barbara Al len Rainey, the first woman to be designated a naval aviator, was killed in an aircraft acci dent during a training flight. She was an instructor with VT-3 when the accident oc curred. July 14 1853 Commodore Matthew Perry lands and holds first meeting with Japanese at Ura ga, Japan. 1882 Sailors and Marines from four U.S. ships land to help restore order at Alexan dria, Egypt. 1945 U.S. warships bom bard Kamaishi, Japan, the first naval gunfire bombardment of Japanese Home Islands. 1950 U.S. Marines sail from San Diego for Korean Conflict. 1952 Laying of keel of USS Forrestal (CV-59), the first su per carrier and lead ship of her class. Design included an gled flight deck, steam cata pults and optical landing sys tem. July 15 1942 First photographic in terpretation unit set up in the Pacific. 1958 In response to request by President of Lebanon, the 6th Fleet lands 1,800 Marines at Beruit to support Lebanese government against Commu nist rebels. July 16 1862 Congress creates rank of Rear Admiral. David Farra gut is named the first Rear Ad miral. 1912 Rear Adm. Bradley Fiske receives patent for torpe do plane or airborne torpedo. 1915 First Navy ships (bat tleships Ohio, Missouri and Wisconsin (BB-9) transit Pana ma Canal. 1945 First atomic bomb test at Alamogordo, N.M. July 17 1858 U.S. sloop Niagara de parts Queenstown, Ireland, to assist in laying first trans-At lantic telegraph cable. 1898 Santiago, Cuba sur renders to U.S. Naval forces. 1927 First organized dive bombing attack in combat by Marine Corps pilots against Nicaraguan bandits who were surrounding U.S. Marine garri son at Ocotal, Nicaragua. 1944 Ammunition ex plosion at Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, Calif. kills 320, wounds 390. 1970 The P-3C began de ployed operations as VP-49 took over patrol responsibili ties at Keflavik, Iceland. 1975 Docking in space of the U.S. Apollo 18 and Soviet Soyuz 19 space crafts. This was the first manned space flight conducted jointly by the two nations and the final flight of the Apollo spacecraft. Former naval aviator Vance Brand was the Apollo command module pilot. The Apollo craft was in space for 9 days and 7.5 hours. Recovery was by USS New Or leans (LPH-11). Several months ago, right around Easter, Lindell, 5, sud denly looked up from an oth erwise quiet dinner and said, Mom, I believe in the Easter Bunny, and I believe in God, but I do not believe in camels. I glanced at Ford, 11, and Owen, 9, hoping one of them understood this proclamation and its origin. They seemed as confused as I was. Why dont you believe in camels, Lindell? I asked. Lindell shrugged. Ive never seen anything theyve done, he said. Incidentally, Lindells dad is deployed to a part of the world where camels often outnumber people. I can send him some evidence of what camels do, Dustin said. I declined the offer but told Dustin that photographs might help. Dustin sent us a picture of a truck filled with camels in the back. Lindell looked down his nose at the image on my iPhone. Horses, he said, then he went about his business. In Lindells defense, he hasnt seen many different kinds of animals. And its all my fault. Lindell made that very clear last summer when we took the boys to the Natural Histo ry museum at Harvard. After more than an hour of looking at stuffed zebras, birds and el ephants, Ford and Owen said the museum was cool, but not like seeing animals in action at a zoo. Lindell asked what a zoo is like, and my heart sunk as I realized my youngest child, the one without a scrapbook of his first year, had never been to one. At a zoo, you can see all those animals walking around and eating, Owen said excit edly. Sometimes they come up to see you and everything. Lindell stopped in the mid dle of the sidewalk. You mean theres a place where we can see animals that arent dead? Dustin and I looked at each other in horror. Then Dustin silently, knowingly, nodded. Wed take Lindell to a zoo ASAP. Between last summers mu seum trip and Lindells cam el comment, however, a lot of things happened, and none of them involved a zoo. Dustin left for deployment in November, and we began our weekly dinners in January. Be fore the snow had even melt ed in our backyard, I e-mailed the Franklin Park Zoo, just outside of Boston, and asked if we could do a Dinner with the Smileys with a zookeeper. In my letter, I shared Lindells skepticism about camels and his desire to see animals that arent dead. The Franklin Park Zoo loved the idea and set up a picnic lunch and private tour for us with the zoos president (also a former zookeeper and Uni versity of Maine graduate) John Linehan. It was our 26th (the halfway-point!) dinner. As it turns out, the Frank lin Park Zoo was also celebrat ing a milestone: its 100th anni versary. The fantastically old, stone, arched entrywaythe one that Lindell blew right past screaming, Im at a zoo! Im at a zoo! Im finally at a zoo! boasts the facilitys history. In the back of the zoo, however, there is evidence (stage direc tions and markings on the con crete) of its recent fame: the Franklin Park Zoo is where the movie Zookeeper was filmed. Another surprise: I learned something about humans at the Franklin Park Zoo. The zoos infamous gorilla Little Joe, who twice escaped sever al years ago, beats on his chest and smashes the enclosures window when he sees Mr. Line han, the alpha gorilla, come near. Without the glass, however, Little Joe is less aggressive and more cautious. I wondered if Little Joe has a computer, and if he ever visits online message forums. And then there was the lion. He roared several times, and the boys asked Mr. Linehan, What do those roars mean? Hes telling other lions that this is his territory. But there are no other lions here, Ford astutely pointed out. The lion doesnt know that. He thinks his roaring is really effective; hes never seen an other lion. Substitute any number of in dividuals in place of the lion, and you have a psychiatrists share of insight into peoples behavior that makes us go, huh? On to the camels! We had to see camels. Ford and Owen couldnt wait to prove their lit tle brother wrong. We found the camel enclo sure at the end of a sidewalk, just past the lion and tigers. The camels chewed their food with fat lips and stared at Lin dell across the grass. It was as if they were saying, Happy now, kid? Lindell was quiet as he watched them. We all made a big deal of it: See! Camels! But Lindell didnt answer. He turned on his heel and walked away. Robots, he called back to us over his shoulder. Ford, Owen and I looked at each other. Ford shrugged. It will be our pleasure to take Lindell to the Franklin Park Zoo again and again until we get this whole thing sorted out. Many surprises and lessons at Boston Zoo

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 3

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Wiese is new CPRW-11 commodorePatrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11) held its 52nd Change of Command June 29 as Capt. Eric Wiese relieved Capt. Trey Wheeler III as commodore. Wheeler was awarded the Legion of Merit by Rear Adm. Sean Buck, commander, Patrol and Recon naissance Group. Rear Adm. Brian Prindle, a longtime maritime patrol leader and commander of the Naval Safety Center, presided as the key note speaker. Wiese is a 1990 graduate of the United States Naval Academy as well as earning his Masters in Na tional Security and Strategic Stud ies from the Naval War College and Masters in Business Administra tion from the Naval Postgraduate School. Wieses Maritime Patrol and Re connaissance Force tours include: VP-26; an instructor at VP-30; a de partment head with VP-8; opera tions officer for CPRW-11 and com manding officer of VP-8. He has also served as deputy commander, Task Force 57, home-ported in Ma nama, Bahrain; flag lieutenant to Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet in Yokosuka, Japan; and most recently as branch chief, Joint Staff J-8, Forces Division. Wiese will have the lead as the pa trol and reconnaissance force ac tively begins the over two year tran sition to the P-8A Poseidon starting with VP-16 this summer. Pierce to relieve Gramolini at CNATTU Jax Cmdr. Daryl Pierce will relieve Cmdr. Michael Gramolini as commanding offi cer of the Center for Naval Aviation Tech nical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jackson ville at a change of command ceremony July 12 at the NAS Jacksonville Chapel. A native of Decatur, Ga., Pierce enlisted in the U.S. Navy under the Delayed En try Program in 1979. He reported to Re cruit Training Command (RTC) at Great Lakes, Ill. in October 1979. After RTC, he graduated from the Aviation Structural Mechanic (Hydraulics) A school in Mil lington, Tenn. Pierces enlisted tours of duty include: Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance De partment (AIMD), NAS Meridian, Miss.; Woodpeckers of VP-49 at NAS Jackson ville; Hell Razors of VA-174 at NAS Ce cil Field; Lifting Eagles of VR-24; NAS Sigonella, Italy; and Naval Air Technical Training Command, Millington, Tenn. During his enlisted tours, he was se lected as Sailor of the Year, designated a master training specialist, initiated as a chief petty officer, and earned a commis sion through the Limited Duty Officer/ Chief Warrant Officer Program. Pierce was commissioned an ensign in January 1994 and subsequently trained at Mustang University, Pensacola, Fla. His tours of duty as an officer include: Chargers of HC-6 at NAS Norfolk, Va., Seahawks of VAW-126 at NAS Norfolk, Va.; Commander, Fleet Air Western Pa cific, NAF Atsugi, Japan; Naval Air Tech nical Training Center, Pensacola; AIMD aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), The Pros Nest of VP-30, and CNATTU Jack sonville. Pierce made multiple deployments on board the following ships: USS Wasp (LHD-1), USS Kearsarge (LHD-3), USS Savannah (AOR-4), USS Supply (AOE-6), USNS Sirius (T-AFS 8), USS Enterprise (CVN-65), and USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63). He has served as detachment mainte nance officer, maintenance/material con trol officer, aircraft program officer, offi cer in charge, production control officer, maintenance officer and CNATTU Jack sonville executive officer since April 2011. Under Gramolinis leadership, CNAT TU Jacksonville flawlessly administered 162 training courses to more than 9,000 C school students. As the commands aviation maintenance training expert, his keen vision, sound planning and flawless management were directly responsible for pioneering the implementation of fu ture P-8 maintenance training facilities. He was the driving force behind the pro cess efficiencies, his relentless pursuit of excellence was a key factor in the plan ning and execution of the relocation of a Mobile Operations Center/Tactical Op erations Center to CNATTU Jacksonville, process resulted in a $2 million annual savings in training costs. Gramolini assumed command of CNATTU Jacksonville in April 2011, fol lowing his tour as the executive officer. He is transferring to Naval Munitions Command Yorktown, Va. where he will serve as chief of staff. Cmdr. Edgar Twining will serve as the new CNATTU Jacksonville executive of ficer. 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012

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After a grueling, yet successful six months at sea, the men and wom en of HSL-42 Detach ment Nine Guns N Ro tors are returning home to the Jacksonville area. The detachment was em barked on board USS Nicholas (FFG-47), in support of Operation Martillo. Operation Martillo is a partner nation effort fo cused on targeting illicit drug trafficking around the Central American isthmus. Through their in volvement in the opera tion, squadron mem bers worked with var ious agencies including the Coast Guard and Cus toms and Border Patrol while working under the control of the Joint Inter agency Taskforce-South. During the deploy ment, Guns N Rotors spent time in the Carib bean Sea as well as the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The mission focus of Operation Martillo re quired Detachment Nine to train, prior to deploy ment, in order to em bark members of a Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET). Flying with members of the LEDET enabled the aircrew to stop suspect vessels and allow the ship to close their position for boarding. In this manner, Guns N Rotors executed seven interdictions. During the deployment, USS Nicho las, along with Detach ment Nine, recovered ap proximately 7,300 kilo grams of cocaine with an estimated value of $515 million. These interdic tions also resulted in the detainment of 14 sus pects. One major factor that allowed the squadron to execute their mission was the hard work of the maintenance personnel. The maintenance team was required to keep the helicopter ready for a wide variety of missions including vertical replen ishment, search and res cue, as well as the mis sions associated with Op eration Martillo. The hard work of the detachment mainte nance team kept the he licopters available for 24-hour alert launches; launches that could oc cur on short notice de pendent on possible smuggling activity in the ships vicinity. This was no easy feat, given the amount of hours often required to be flown during an in terdiction. Around-theclock work allowed air crews to safely accom plish their mission as well as pioneer new tech niques in combating transnational organized crime. The ability of the de tachment maintainers to prepare an aircraft for flight on short notice has routinely impressed us all, according to Det Maintenance Officer Lt. HSL-42 Detachment Nine coming home after successful deployment JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 Naval Junior Reserve Officers Train ing Corps (NJROTC) students from Flor ida and Georgia high schools attended the 12th annual sailing academy at the NAS Jacksonville Mulberry Cove Ma rina. I have some sailing experience, but Ive never done anything like this, said Middleburg High School NJROTC stu dent Brandon Walp. Im a fish out of water. I love any thing that goes on the water and any thing that flies above it. I learned a lot so far between the names of the ships, whats on them and the rules and regu lations. Its a whole new language. NJROTC students who show a desire to sail were invited to attend the sailing academy sponsored by the Interscho lastic Sailing Association, South Atlan tic Division. Participants of the 40-hour week sail ing program are required to pass a 50yard swimming test and tread water for two minutes. NJROTC students pay a fee of $250 to enroll. During normal operational hours, the students would have to pay more than $1,000 to receive training. NAS Jacksonville is one of three sites that train NJROTC students annually. Sailing academies are also held in An napolis, Md. and San Diego. Despite the poor weather conditions caused by Tropical Storm Debby, 65 NJROTC students came to the marina this year. This sailing academy teaches what we consider life skills, said retired Navy Cmdr. Pat Thurman, officer in charge of the program and Middleburg High School NJROTC instructor. Were hoping that we are instill ing not only wisdom and some basics and fundamentals about how sailboats work, but also skills they can use for the rest of their lives. Their sailing training began June 23, and before getting in the water, NJROTC students were given classroom instruc tion on basic boat handling, sailing ter minology and water safety. Afterwards, they were able to take boats out onto St. Johns River and were taught sailing techniques, basic naviga tion skills and man overboard precau tions. Jacksonville University student Tim Henderson is enrolled in JUs ROTC program and helped the NJROTC high school students learn how to sail. He also attended the sailing academy in 2009. You can definitely see a big improve ment from when they showed up to where they are at now, said Henderson on day three of the class. Most of them are answering the triv ia questions correctly. All they need is the sailing experience, and they should be golden. Throughout the week, NJROTC stu dents stayed at the NAS Jacksonville Bachelor Officers Quarters, ate most of their meals at the Fleet Line Caf and participated in various recreational activities, which included trips to the bowling alley and pool. The sailing academy ended with a graduation ceremony where the NJROTC students were congratulat ed by their instructors, families and friends. NJROTC students learn to sail at Mulberry Cove Marina

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 7

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people, thats easier said than done, said Moreno. You have to do a lot to take care of your people. The first thing you have to do is lead from the front. The airborne portion of the ceremony included a ceremonial lead change in the helicopter formation flown by Keys and Moreno. On the flight deck, Keys took center stage and addressed the crew as the new commanding officer of HS-11. We will continue the Dragonslayer traditions of mission accomplishment, safe flying and mentorship, said Keys. Every person in this command plays a critical role on this team and must re spect each other. Keys, the previous executive officer of HS-11, then offered his thanks to More no for setting a favorable leadership ex ample for him to follow. Thanks, Cheech, for all that youve done for the squadron for the past two-and-a-half years, said Keys. You didnt tell me how to be a good CO. You showed me how to be an outstanding CO. Capt. Jeffrey Trent, commander, Car rier Air Wing (CVW) 1, also addressed the Dragonslayers, expressing gratitude for a job well done by Moreno and wel coming Keys as the new commanding officer. He (Moreno) cares deeply about his people, said Trent. He holds his people accountable. Most important ly, he loves you Dragonslayers. I know that skipper Keys will continue to take the Dragonslayers to bigger and better heights, added Trent. This deployment is the final de ployment for any squadron embarked aboard Enterprise, as the aircraft car rier is scheduled to be decommissioned following its return to homeport in Nor folk, Va. Consequently, this makes the last in-flight change of command the Dragonslayers will conduct aboard En terprise. It feels bittersweet, but I am hon ored to have had the opportunity to do an airborne change of command on this final historic deployment of the Big E, said Moreno, who will go on to at tend the National Defense University in Washington, D.C. With the completion of the change of command, HS-11 pilots will continue to fly combat missions in support of Oper ation Enduring Freedom in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. It has been an absolute privilege to serve with each and every one of my Dragonslayers, said Moreno. I am for tunate to have had the opportunity to serve with such a phenomenal group of consummate professionals. HS-11cause, I was all in, commented PO1 Ja son Spitzley. Clay County was heavily affected by the storms that raised the water level in Black Creek to record levels of over 25 feet in some areas. More than 100 homes were damaged and the War Ea gles were eager to help. This is a great opportunity to get our Sailors out into the community and do some real good for people who really need it, said War Eagles Lt. Ryan Burke. I personally would not miss this for the world. The War Eagles recently returned from a six-month deployment and are preparing to transition to the Navys newest aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon. We just want to give back to the com munity that has been so supportive of our men and women in uniform in Northeast Florida, commented VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Molly Bo ron. DRADT was tasked by Clay County Emergency Management to manage lo cal volunteers. I didnt think theyd bring this many people out its great, said Jim Reid, the owner of one of the affected homes. VP-16 RELIEF 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012

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flight hours under his belt, he under stands how critical aircraft mainte nance is to the warfighter. All I wanted out of maintenance was airplanes on the flight schedule. Thats what we are all about, shooting air planes off the pointy end (of a carrier), he said. Penfield has a better understanding of what it takes to maintain 3,700 air planes deployed around the world sup ported by 18,000 personnel after assum ing command six months ago. He said FRCs ultimate challenge is to push the envelope of optimization and clearly define an organic maintenance strat egy. We must follow through with mak ing the command truly operational; fol low through with driving continuous ef ficiencies, he said. The Navy does not have the option of cutting naval forc es any further. We must redefine and strengthen our command structure for better alignment with our customers, our sites, our competencies and our in tegrated support teams. Penfield shared his top 10 lead ership list to include knowing your strengths and weaknesses, teambuild ing based on transparency and trust, asking for help, gaining and holding on to your credibilityyour greatest asset, knowing when to lead and when to fol low, anticipating stakeholders needs, promoting best practices and being a good partner. I dont profess to be an expert at leadership, but I do believe in it, he said. Id like to say Im a student of lead ership. It factors in more and more when moving up the corporate ladder. An exclusive job for commanders is creating the vision and executing the long-term strategic plan according to Penfield. We must transition from a tactical and technical approach to be coming more visionary, which will re quire focused leadership. Our leader ship challenge is moving the football down the field collectively. Capt. Robert Caldwell, FRCSE com manding officer, thanked the admiral for his keen insights and candor and reminded the audience that the main tainers primary mission is to put the product in the hands of the warfight ers. Before returning to FRC headquar ters in Patuxent River, Md., the admiral toured the aircraft maintenance depot and visited the major aircraft produc tion lines, the Crinkley Engine Facility, and the avionics and manufacturing di visions on June 26. During his visit to FRCSE Detachment Jacksonville, Penfield presented Cmdr. Jerry Brown, Detachment Jacksonville officer in charge, with the Capt. Vir gil Lemmon Award for excellence in aviation maintenance. The prestigious award presented annually recognizes aviation maintenance officers who have made the most significant contributions to the aviation maintenance and logis tics fields during the year.FRCSE VISITOR VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Ste vens and Prospective Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven, Capt. Scott Wiese, awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings June 15 to the following 16 officers: Lt. Darryl Abriam, Ensign Alexander Covelle, Ensign Zachary Bowen, Lt. j.g. Terri Fitzgerald, Ensign Jonathan Horne, Ensign Shea Knecht, Ensign Patrick Kreek, Lt. j.g. Adam Myers, Lt. j.g. Mark Rice, Lt. j.g. Rory Roberge, Ensign Bradley Scholes, Ensign Bryan Scott, Ensign Daniel Star sinic, Lt. j.g. Alexi Staton, Lt. j.g. Jesurun Stock dill, and Ensign Spencer Washom. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer (UMFO) syllabus at VP30, earning their coveted Wings of Gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the CAT 1 Fleet Replacement Squadron syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT 1 syllabus, they will report to operational P-3C or EP-3 squad rons to begin their initial sea tours Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, Whidbey Island, Wash. or NAS Jackson ville. The NFO training pipeline begins with Avia tion Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, where all aviation officers undergo a classroom syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation which includes aerodynamics, meteorology and principles of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transi tion from a classroom learning environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Tex an II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3C training pipeline report to VP-30 for P-3C specific training. VP-30 wings Navys newest naval flight officers JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 9

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The largest Navy medical facility in the southeast hosted a ceremony at the NAS Jacksonville Officers Club June 29 to recognize its 25 family medicine phy sicians who successfully completed a nationally accredited graduate medical education program that prepares them for their Navy Medicine roles car ing for service members on combat and humanitarian missions world-wide, as well as family members here at home. The Naval Hospital (NH) Jackson ville Family Medicine Residency pro gram celebrated the graduation of its 13 residents (who completed the intense 36-month residency) and 12 interns (who completed the 12-month intern ship). Both groups were awarded cer tificates from the Navy Bureau of Medi cine and Surgery during the ceremony, keynoted by retired Rear Adm. William Kiser. Capt. Gayle Shaffer, commanding of ficer of NH Jacksonville, remarked, To our new graduates both interns and residents you have trained in a pro gram that has been leading the way in residency training innovation and you now join the ranks of the almost 400 family physicians who are proud to call Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Family Medicine Residency their alma mater. She continued, As highly skilled family medicine docs, youll support the medical needs of service members and their families all over the world at hospitals like ours, on ships, over seas, and forward deployed. Like those who have gone before, you now have the honor and privilege of providing the best care available to our nations he roes and their families. Successful completion of an approved residency is required for a physician to become board-certified by the Ameri can Board of Family Medicine. NH Jack sonvilles Family Medicine Residency Program is certified by the Accredita tion Council of Graduate Medical Edu cation. Over the course of three years, the residents complete rotations in family medicine along with internal medicine, pediatrics, emergency medicine, ob stetrics and gynecology, surgery, ortho pedics, dermatology, urology, ophthal mology, ear/nose/throat, geriatrics, car diology, intensive care, neonatal inten sive care, psychiatry, neurology, com munity medicine, radiology and a vari ety of other specialties. Like other medical residencies in both the private and public sectors, NH Jacksonvilles Family Medicine Resi dency Program is highly challenging and requires participants to master both the art and science of patient care in numerous practice settings. Training can be very busy and very trying, but its very rewarding when you look back at it, said graduating resident Lt. Cmdr. David Mann. Cmdr. James Keck, program director of the Family Medicine Residency Pro gram, observed, I am proud of all that our interns and residents have accom plished. This program has a tradition of excellence, and they have exceeded expectations in a challenging training program. Our graduates are prepared to do what our country has called them to do...provide high quality care to our shipmates and their families around the globe. First-year residents have the option to continue their training, or serve in the fleet as general medical officers, flight surgeons or in undersea medicine. Fol lowing operational assignments of two or more years, residents return to com plete the second and third years of the program, expanding their knowledge and ability to approach increasingly complicated medical conditions. Graduating third-year residents se lect orders to a new command. Of this years graduating residents, follow-on orders include naval hospitals in Na ples, Guam and Okinawa; branch health clinics in Bahrain and Quantico; the Marine Corps at Camp LeJeune; and ships including the aircraft carriers USS Abraham Lincoln, USS Nimitz and USS Enterprise. NH Jacksonville is part of the Navy Medicine team that provides high-qual ity health care to more than one million eligible beneficiaries. The command is comprised of the hospital, located aboard NAS Jack sonville, and five branch health clin ics in Florida (Jacksonville, Key West and Mayport) and Georgia (Albany and Kings Bay). On a typical day, the NH Jacksonville team of 2,500 military and civilian personnel serves 1,800 outpa tients, admits 15 inpatients, cares for 80 people in the ER, performs 14 same-day surgeries, fills 4,700 prescriptions, con ducts 4,600 lab tests and delivers two to three babies. Additionally, up to 15 per cent of its active duty staff is deployed around the globe providing combat, hu manitarian and disaster care. Peggy Montgomery, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Uniform Business Of fice (UBO) manager, was selected as Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgerys (BUMED) Resource Management Ana lyst of the Year. Selected from the hundreds of an alysts across all BUMED finance and comptroller shops around the world, Montgomery was recognized for mak ing NH Jacksonville a model for best business practices, delivering excel lence in results. Bill Condon, BUMED UBO manag er, sees Montgomery as a trailblazer in adopting e-commerce solutions to opti mize business practices and improve fi nancial results. Peggy is embracing new technolo gies, moving them along and leading the way for other Navy Medicine staff to bring our methods up to date. Through Montgomerys leadership, NH Jacksonville was one of the first medical treatment facilities to move to the e-commerce method of scanning checks and electronically transferring funds from insurance companies and other payors. This allows NH Jackson ville to immediately recognize revenue for use to support patient care, and has streamlined and reduced processing time of each balance-due account from about an hour to five minutes. Over $1 million in electronic pay ments have been received by NH Jack sonville just since January 2012, thanks to Montgomery and her team. And hav ing these funds readily available ver sus waiting for paper checks to arrive by mail means the command has more immediate access to those funds to pur chase patient care equipment and fund additional clinical staff. Its very satisfying and flattering to receive this award, said Montgomery. Family medicine physicians complete training NH Jax manager named Navy Medicines Resource Management Analyst of the Year 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012

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The Bureau of Medicine and Surgery's (BUMED) sole point of accountability for carrying out the mis sions for all Navy Medicine education, training, pub lic health, and human-resource management for Sail ors and Marines around the world will be reorganized July 15, in response to a BUMED initiative to stream line operations. Navy Medicine Support Command (NMSC), com missioned Nov. 1, 2005, is scheduled to be renamed as Navy Medicine Education and Training Command (NMETC) July 11 during a change-of-command cere mony aboard NAS Jacksonville, when Capt. Gail Hath away relieves Rear Adm. Eleanor Valentin. The former NMSC's responsibilities will also re-scope as NMETC, to focus solely on the BUMED education and training mission. Personnel initially employed at NMSC will become part of the NMETC staff, and individuals whose posi tions realign to BUMED Headquarters will remain in Jacksonville as part of BUMED Detachment Jackson ville, another entity created through this administra tive realignment. Functions necessary to the overall BUMED mission, however, will remain unaffected by the change, some thing NMSC Commander Rear Adm. Eleanor Valentin said is imperative to Navy Medicine's more than 1 mil lion eligible beneficiaries. "This realignment simplifies the BUMED organiza tion structure and chain of command, and helps cre ate a more effective command and control," she said. "The new structure provides senior-level represen tation to help ensure Navy equities are maintained in military health cares increasingly joint environment. This will also help Navy Medicine better align opera tional and strategic activities." Valentin also said NMSC, an Echelon-3 command designed to provide administrative support to subor dinate commands around the world, will not dises tablish, adding that the realignment stems from U.S. Navy Surgeon General Vice Adm. Matthew L. Nathan's vision of streamlining Navy Medicine into a more ef fective, efficient and responsive organization that im proves accountability, as well as command and con trol. Nearly 150 service members, Department of De fense (DoD) and contract employees work at the NMSC headquarters as NMSC staff members and members of several Navy Medicine-wide program of fices as part of a designated region under the BUMED hierarchy. Along with Navy Medicine East, Navy Med icine West and Navy Medicine National Capital Area, NMSC has served over the past almost seven years as a regional-level command, directly reporting to BUMED on matters ranging from research and devel opment to training to medical supply systems. Val entin said that aside from Unit Identification Code changes, reporting senior signatures for administra tive purposes and other clerical shifts, NMSC person nel should remain largely unaffected. "Navy Medicine values its employees and is com mitted to making the reorganization process trans parent and seamless," she said. "I believe this realignment of key support functions and commands will improve efficiency and effective ness." NMSCs current education and training, public health and Navy Medicine-wide program responsi bilities will shift to either NMETC or BUMED. The NMETC Detachment Jacksonville will provide admin istrative, facility and other support services to person nel assigned to a BUMED Detachment Jacksonville. Although transparent to other organizations, Val entin said this realignment maintains a positive end point for Navy Medicine beneficiaries stressing that training, support to operational platforms on and un der the sea, in the air and forward deployed U.S. Navy medical professionals will still receive the unparal leled support NMSC has historically provided. NMSC, through July 15, will maintain oversight of the Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center (NMCPHC), the Navy Medicine Professional Devel opment Center (NMPDC), and Navy Medicine Oper ational Training Center (NMOTC), and provide sup port services to Naval Medical Logistics Command (NMLC), the Naval Medical Research Center (NMRC) and the Navy Medicine Information Systems Support Activity (NAVMISSA), all Echelon-4 commands. NMSC is part of the Navy Medicine team, a global health care network of 63,000 Navy medical person nel around the world who provide high-quality health care to more than 1 million eligible beneficiaries. Navy Medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Ma rines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the bat tlefield. Navy Medicine Support Command to reorganize JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 11

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AWARDShe was also instrumental in earning recognition as a best business practice from Assistant Secre tary of Defense for Health Affairs for NH Jackson villes Other Health Insurance program. For more information, visit www.med.navy.mil/ sites/navalhospitaljax, www.facebook/navalhospi taljacksonville and www.twitter.com/NHJax. VP-5 arrived at the Roy al Australian Air Force Base Pearce, Australia June 6 for Tac tical Anti-Submarine Maritime Exercise (TAMEX) 12-2. The Mad Fox crews participated in a joint exercise with the Roy al Australian Air Force (RAAF), the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), and Test and Evaluation Squadron ONE (VX-1). The exercise was designed to improve the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance interoper ability between United States and Australian forces while also assessing the anti-subma rine warfare (ASW) capabili ties of the new P-8A Poseidon. Combat Aircrews Eight and Two represented the Mad Fox es led by officer in charge Lt. Cmdr. Jason Thompson and ac companied by a maintenance detachment to support flight operations. The exercise consisted of two flights for each crew off the western coast of Australia. These flights provided an op portunity to practice coordinat ed operations with the RAAF in addition to employing joint ASW tactics. This allowed the crews to focus their training on certain aspects of ASW such as acoustic and non-acoustic search including passive and active tracking. One of these flights included a joint tracking mission with two RAN H-70Bs, a RAAF AP-3C and a P-3C from VP-5. Lt. j.g. Casey Stuart said we quickly bonded with the Aus tralians and immediately came together as allies to accomplish all of our tasks on-station. During off hours, the Mad Fox crews were afforded the op portunity to explore Perth and its surrounding area. Although some unfortunate storms af fected the climate, the crews were able to fly through the fresh and squally weather, as the Australians would say, and to mingle with the local pop ulation. Popular locations in cluded Caversham Wildlife Park, a chocolate factory and extensive shopping venues. Overall, TAMEX 12-2 provid ed Australian and U.S. aircrews and maintenance personnel a unique opportunity to practice coordinated ASW operations. Working with the Austra lians was an eye-opening ex perience. They are extremely professional and it was a plea sure to work with them on sta tion, commented Lt .j.g. Chis tina Malzahn. CS2 Alex Moleon and CS2(SW) Marnika Ash of the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf competed with oth er Sailors across the globe in the fourth annual Commander, Navy Installation Command Culinary Competition June 13 at Naval Am phibious Base, Coronado, Calif to showcase their creativity and culi nary skills. The competition consisted of 12 teams representing various Navy regions and installations world wide. This was the main event for the duo, as they have proven them selves once before during the Com mander, Navy Region Southeast Culinary Competition in January. Teams had 90 minutes to prepare two entrees that consisted of beef tenderloin and turkey breast with the secret ingredient being un veiled as shallots, a type of small red onion. The competitors dishes were judged on taste, presentation, cooking method, knife skills and proper safety and sanitation. The duo placed fourth in the competition. Were still winners, stated Mo leon and Ash. To place fourth out of 12 over all says a lot about our skills and determination to be and represent the best Navy Region Southeast! Mad Foxes head to outback NAS Jax chefs participate in CNIC culinary competition 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012

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NAS Jacksonville Water Treatment Plant monitoring exceedance of Florida drinking water rulesWhat happened? NAS Jacksonville tests the air installation drinking water system every month at numerous locations to ensure com pliance with Florida Drinking Water Rules. In late June, we tested the tap water at 42 facilities and found two of the sam ples showed the presence of total coliform bacteria. Accord ing to the Florida administrative code, we are required to give public notification when more than one sample tests positive. What was done? We immediately retested the tap water at the same loca tions as well as locations upstream and downstream of these locations. In addition, we tested the water at the air installa tion drinking water wells and Jacksonville Electric Author ity connection to the air installation water system. All of the nine tests met the Florida Drinking Water Rules and as a re sult, the drinking water at NAS Jacksonville is safe to drink. What does this mean? This is not an emergency. If it had been, you would have been notified immediately. Coliform bacteria are general ly not harmful themselves. Coliforms are bacteria which are naturally present in the environment and are used as an in dicator that other, potentially-harmful bacteria may be pres ent. Coliforms were found in more samples than allowed and this was a warning of potential problems. Usually, coliforms are a sign that there could be a problem with the systems treatment or distribution system (pipes). Whenever we detect coliform bacteria in any sample, we do immediate followup testing to see if other bacteria of greater concern, such as fecal coliform or E. Coli, are present. Follow up testing showed no signs of bacteria in the drinking water. What should I do? You do not need to boil your water or take other correc tive actions. However, if you have specific health concerns, consult your doctor. People with severely compromised im mune systems, infants, and some elderly may be at increased risk. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. General guidelines on ways to lessen the risk of infection by microbes are available from EPAs Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791. For more information, please contact NAVFAC Southeast drinking water manager at (904) 542-5610. Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly. This notice is being sent from: NAS JACKSONVILLE WATER TREATMENT PLANT Potable Water System ID: 2161212 Date distributed: 9 July 2012 VP-5 Mad Foxes celebrate promotions VP-5 wardroom is pleased to report a sharp rise in the num ber of lieutenants in the ranks of its officers. As the Mad Foxes deployed to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan the last week of May, they found ways to creatively pro mote their lieutenants through out the Seventh Fleet area of re sponsibility during June. Some officers took the oath as they crossed the International Date Line en route to Guam while others raised their right hands during the Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training Indonesia exercise as they the equator en route to Juanda Na val Air Base, Indonesia. In the squadrons new ward room at Kadena Air Base, Ja pan, VP-5 Commanding Offi cer, Cmdr. Erin Osborne pro moted five officers: Lt. j.g. Paul Reali, Lt. j.g. Dick Leary, Lt. j.g. Ray Ratliff, Lt. j.g. Craig Al mond and Lt. j.g. Charles Black well. Their lieutenant bars were proudly pinned on by their fel low officers from the junior of ficer ranks. Finally, Lt. j.g. Jake Pitchford and Lt. j.g. Alyssa Wilson be came lieutenants aboard a P-8A Poseidon during the tactical an ti-submarine warfare maritime exercise in Perth, Australia. Af ter they took they took the oath and received a tour of the new aircraft, they boarded their own P-3C in support of the exercise. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 13

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Tim Grant. It is no easy task, yet the ded ication of the detachment main tainers and their drive to ready the aircraft for flight rapidly, but more importantly safely, allowed the alert aircrew to launch in time to continue the pursuit of the go-fast vessel. Guns N Rotors finished the de ployment in the Central and South American operations area with another dramatic interdiction on June 19. Utilizing a variety of personnel and assets from Operation Martil lo, HSL-42 Detachment Nines SH60B helo crew quickly located and pursued a suspected go-fast vessel. Using the extensive training the aircrew received in the Jackson ville area, the aircrew confronted the vessel. By employing warning shots and disabling fire from the embarked Coast Guard LEDET Marksman, the go-fast vessel was stopped in its tracks. This interdiction resulted in the recovery of a substantial amount of cocaine and marijuana, and served as a final success in the Guns N Rotors deployment. Providing a twenty-four hour, seven-day-a-week airborne capa bility requires tremendous coordi nation between the detachments operations and maintenance teams. Our crew has excelled at this throughout deployment, said Detachment Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr. Nick Deleo. Walls promoted to master chiefAVCM Keir Walls of VP-16 was promoted to master chief on June 6. Walls, originally from Atlanta, joined the Navy in 1990. He attended boot camp in San Diego, fol lowed by A school in Millington, Tenn. Walls report ed to the VS-31 Topcats at NAS Jacksonville in April 1991, where he completed deployments on board USS Dwight D. Eisenhower and the maiden voyage of USS George Washington. While attached to VS-31, he was promoted to petty officer third class. In 1995, he transferred to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 20 at NAS Patuxent River, Md., where he was promoted to petty officer second class. In May 1997, he reported to VS-22 at NAS Jacksonville. While attached to the Checkmates, he deployed on board USS Enterprise and USS Harry S. Truman and was promoted to petty officer first class. During the summer of 2001, Walls checked in to VP-30, the P-3C Fleet Replacement Squadron, at NAS Jacksonville, where he was then promoted to chief pet ty officer. In December 2004, he transferred back to VS-22 and deployed on board USS Harry S. Truman. After being promoted to senior chief petty officer in 2008, Walls received orders to the Naval Air Technical Training Center in Pensacola. He reported to VP-16 in November 2011, and just re cently returned from a deployment to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. Formerly an aviation electricians mate, Walls be came an aviation technician master chief upon his promotion to master chief petty officer. Following his promotion, VP-16s Commanding Of ficer, Cmdr. Molly Boron said, It is always rewarding see your Sailors advance in rank, but it is especially memorable to promote someone to the rank of mas ter chief. The Navys master chief community became significantly stronger today. Created in 1958, the rank of master chief petty of ficer is the highest enlisted rank in the United States Navy. It is an elite group of Sailors, consisting of the top one percent of enlisted personnel. NAS Jax PresentsTuesday, Aug. 7, 6 9:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool & Allegheny Softball Field Join our community and help heighten crime and drug awareness, strengthen neighborhood spirit and send a For more information call, Youth Center 778-9772 or Base Security 542-8513 NAS Jax Security HSL-42 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012

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The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 brought smiles to the faces of young children when they dropped off personalized care packages June 20 to 48 children under the care of Fundacin Exodo, a local Comalapa orphanage. The gifts were funded by donations from the squadrons pilots, aircrew and maintainers, as well as their families. Each package included toys, candy and age-appropriate word puzzle books. Handing out these simple gifts brought much joy, not only to the or phans, but also to the Fighting Tigers received warm hugs and smiles. During their visit, the Fighting Tigers were given a tour of the orphanage and its support facilities. On-site, the orphanage boasts a greenhouse and chicken farm that pro vide the children with fresh vegetables, eggs and meat. The men and women of the squadron all agreed it was hum bling to see how self-sufficient the or phanage was. The buildings where the children live, supplies what is needed, and little more. The kids live, segregated by age and gender, in four small buildings. Each house is identified by its name and each name is from a story in the Bible about a great man or woman of strong will and dedication to God. Samuel houses the younger boys, Esther the younger girls, Moses the older boys, and Deborah houses the older girls. Children cared for at Fundacin Exodo range in age from two to 16 years. When asked about his favorite part of the experience LS2 Walter Murillo replied, I handed one of the boys his present and he was so excited. When I asked him which one of them is the best at soccer, he said I am! This reminded me how alike we all are. Some of the members of VP-8 enjoyed a quick game of soccer with the chil dren and were amazed at how well the children played. Fundacin Exodo uses sports as one way to instill self-confi dence in their charges. Fundacin Exodo is a Christian, nongovernmental organization created to restore the lives of boys and girls in sit uations of risk by providing them with academic instruction, physical care, en couragement, and hope. Fundacin Exodo helps develop these children emotionally, spiritually, aca demically and socially in a home envi ronment. VP-8 is deployed to the 4th and 7th fleet areas of responsibility, assisting in counter-drug efforts and providing hu manitarian assistance. The VP-45 Chapter of the Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Deci sions (CSADD) is enjoying its second successful month at VP-45. The Navy-wide organization is de signed to positively influence Sailors behavior through resources and tools which promote good decision-making processes, enabling leadership devel opment and influence among peers at a junior level. PSC Rishka Elzie of VP-45 founded the organization in May 2012. CSADD is important to me because when I was starting in the Navy, there was no open forum to interact with people from different walks of life to positively discuss issues that affect younger Sailors, said Elzie. Our chapter currently has eighteen members is always looking to grow. As an organization, we focus on the age group 18 to 25 but events are open to all enlisted and officer personnel. The group holds a weekly meeting on Tuesdays at 2:30 p.m. in the VP-45 training room. At the meetings, two peer leaders run an anonymous open forum where VP-45 members can dis cuss smart decision-making skills in volving relationships, work, safe alco hol use, family, and more. Members from all age groups are in attendance so many perspectives are presented during every meeting. I think this is a great initiative on behalf of our Sailors, said VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mike Vi tali. It reflects the same positive attitude they display on the hangar deck every day, including their personal desire to lookout for their shipmates and ensure success across all pay grades. Outside of weekly meetings VP-45 CSADD convenes monthly for multiple volunteer and entertainment events. Some recent events include bowling at Latitude 30 and volunteering at the Jacksonville Zoo and the Catty Shack Ranch Wildlife Sanctuary. The outside events allow our mem bers to help our greater community through volunteer work and have fun with organized liberty events, said El zie. Most importantly, the members of CSADD put the decision-making skills they learn to use by promoting them to fellow Sailors as peer advocates. We are the Sailors helping Sailors on the road to making the right deci sion, said Elzie. For more information, visit: www. facebook.com/Vp45CSADD.CSADD takes off running at VP-45VP-8 brightens orphans day in El Salvador JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 15

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Q: What are the most impor tant preventive care topics I discuss with parents? Children of military par ents are a special breed that of ten grow up uniquely different from their peers. They can tell stories of climbing Mt. Vesuvi us or running across the sands of Waikiki unlike their friends who have never lived in such exotic places. They do howev er face many of the same risks that their friends out in town face. Immunizations may be the most important medical inter vention that every child should get on time. Preventing them from ever trying to smoke cigarettes may be the most important longterm measure that a doctor can help to instill in a child. But car accidents may end up hurting our children the most. Every hour, 150 children be tween ages 0 and 19 are treat ed in emergency departments for injuries sustained in motor vehicle crashes. More children ages 5 to 19 die from crash-re lated injuries than from any other type of injury. In the Unit ed States during 2008, 968 chil dren ages 14 years and young er died as occupants in motor vehicle crashes, and approxi mately 168,000 were injured. Q: What are the risk factors? Fifteen percent of occupant deaths among children ages 0 to 14 years involved a drinking driver. More than two-thirds of fa tally injured children were killed while riding with a drinking driver. Children see, then they imi tate. Seatbelt use among young children often depends upon the drivers seat belt use. Al most 40 percent of children rid ing with unbelted drivers were themselves unrestrained. Child restraint systems are often used incorrectly. One study found that 72 percent of nearly 3,500 observed car and booster seats were misused in a way that could increase a childs risk of injury during a crash. Q: How can injuries to chil dren in motor vehicles be pre vented? Child safety seats do work. They reduce the risk of death in passenger cars by 71 percent for infants, and by 54 percent for toddlers. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recom mends booster seats for chil dren until they are at least 8 years of age or 49 tall. According to researchers at the Childrens Hospital of Phil adelphia, for children 4 to 7 years, booster seats reduce in jury risk by 59 percent com pared to seat belts alone. Children ages 12 and young er should ride in the back seat.Adults should avoid plac ing children in front of airbags. Overall, for children less than 16 years, riding in the back seat is associated with a 40 percent reduction in the risk of serious injury. Overall data collected by the CDC has shown many doctors fail to discuss vehicle safety rules with parents when they come in with their children. The findings suggest that, al though the prevalence of pedi atric injury prevention counsel ing remains low, such counsel ing was associated with safer behaviors among children, in cluding use of bicycle helmets while biking and use of car seats and seat belts while riding in motor vehicles. If youre a parent of a teen who is learning to drive, sign an agreement with them to lim it risky driving situations, such as having multiple teen passen gers and driving at night. Children should wear motor cycle or bike helmets any time they are on a motorcycle or bi cycle. Operation Homefront-Florida needs volunteers to pick up donat ed school supplies from area Dol lar Tree stores that will be distrib uted to military children in late July and early August. Dollar Tree locations through out the area are collecting dona tions through Aug. 6.Volunteers can designate which location(s) they would like to pick up dona tions from. These donations will be used to fill backpacks for military children as part of Operation Homefronts Back to School Brigade. Back to School Brigade provides military children the opportunity to start school with all the supplies they need to be successful. In 2011, Operation Homefront delivered over $2.5 million in school supplies to military chil dren. Volunteers are also needed at each distribution event to fill backpacks with school supplies and distribute backpacks to mili tary children. For more information and to vol unteer, contact Michelle Cassabon at michelle.cassabon@operation homefront.net. Keeping our children safe Volunteers needed to pickup school supplies for military children in south Florida 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tourna ment Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowl ing 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included July Family Bowling for 4 Spe cial Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Summer Bowling Leagues Now Forming Monday Mixed Trio 7 p.m. Wednesday After Work League 4:30 p.m. Thrusday Morning Seniors 9 a.m. Thursday Night Extreme Bowl ing 6:30 p.m. Friday Intramural League 11:45 a.m. Sunday Fun Bunch League 4 p.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. **New fitness class Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DoD civil ians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session two be gins July 9, session three be gins July 23 Lessons are available at the in door and outdoor pool $40 military, $45 DoD Register for swim lessons at the base gym I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! 2012 2013 Live Broadway Se ries West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale July 13 $58.50 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Disney World Orlando 4-day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Now booking all-inclusive San dals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 at tractions $20The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for in formation. Free Bowling at NAS Freedom Lanes July 18, 710 p.m. Free Jacksonville Suns Base ball Game July 19 at 6:30 p.m. Free Mall & Movie Trip Orange Park Mall & AMC The ater July 20 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees July 24 for active duty July 26 for retirees & DoD personnel Junior Golf Clinic Session 2 (ages 6 10) July 16 20 Session 3 (ages 11 17) August 6 10 Monday Friday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. $110 per week long session Twilight Special Monday Friday Play 18 holes for $17 after 3 p.m. Not applicable on holidays Golf & Dine Special Play 18-holes with cart and choice of breakfast or lunch for $26! Not applicable on holidays. Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Lessons $150 per person July 20, 21, 22, 28 & 29 Aug. 17, 18, 19, 25 & 26 Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recre ation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more infor mation. Register now for before & after school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household in come National Night Out Aug. 7, 69:30 p.m. Outdoor pool & Allegheny soft ball field Free cookout, pool games, bounce house, guest speak ers, music, outdoor movie and more!Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School September 10 October 17 $500 per person Youth Flight Camps (ages 12 18) Basic Aviation Course $100 per person July 18 21 register by July 11 Advanced Aviation Course (ba sic course required) $150 per person Aug. 8 11 register by Aug. 1 Aug. 22 25 register by Aug. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 17

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Taxpayers should be on the lookout for a new, email-based phishing scam now circulating that targets Depart ment of Defense military members, re tirees and civilian employees. The email appears to come from De fense Finance and Accounting Ser vices and displays a dot-mil email ad dress. The email states that those receiv ing disability compensation from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) may be able to obtain additional funds from the IRS. Email recipients are then asked to send various VA and IRS doc uments containing their personal and financial information such as copies of VA award letters or their income tax returns to an address in Florida. The information in these documents is then used by the scammers to com mit identity theft. Typically, identity thieves use some ones personal data to empty the vic tims financial accounts, run up charges on the victims existing cred it cards or apply for new loans, credit cards, services or benefits in the vic tims name. For more information on phish ing scams, please see http://www.irs. gov/newsroom/article/0,,id=97322,00. html. VP-45 Maintenance Master Chief AFCM(AW) Melvin Butorac, Jr. retired during a ceremony at the NAS Jax BOQ Pavilion June 22. Guest Speaker Cmdr. Greg Petro vic, prospective executive officer of VP-5, gave a fitting tribute to the me chanic who tirelessly stood the watch over the past 30 years. Other speak ers included VP-45 Commanding Of ficer Cmdr. Mike Vitali, AFCM(AW/ NAC) Nick Mellos (USN, Ret.) who pre sented the CPO Retirement Creed and ATCS(AW) Jay Ramsey who presented The Watch and coordinated the cer emony. AD1(AW) Aaron Pick, who read the poem The Forgotten Mechanic, embodied the countless Sailors Butorac mentored over his distinguished career. NAS Jax Command Chaplain Cmdr. Shannon Skidmore delivered the invo cation and benediction. Butorac is a Cleveland native who enlisted in the Navy in 1981. Follow ing basic training he completed AMS A school and the P-3 FRAMP. His first tour was with Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron Two Rangers in Rota, Spain. Other tours of duty were served with the VF-101 Grim Reapers, Navy Recruit ing Command T-34B Quality Assurance Team, VR-1 Starlifters, VP-16 War Ea gles, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast and VP-45 Pelicans. Butorac is looking forward to the next chapter in his life following his retire ment with his wife, Fatima and two sons, Nick and Sal. Master Chief Butoracs example of service and sacrifice will leave a last ing legacy with Team Pelican and our Navy, stated Vitali. He is truly the me chanic who will not be forgotten. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast recently heard the follow ing cases: At a General Court-Martial con vened on board NAS Jacksonville, an airman pled guilty to engaging in a sexual act with a person substantial ly incapacitated. The military judge sentenced the accused to four years of confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, and a dishonorable discharge. At a General Court-Martial con vened on board NAS Jacksonville, a second class petty officer pled guilty to order violations relating to a prison er, while serving as a brig guard. The military judge sentenced the accused to three years of confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, and a dishonorable discharge. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast are tried with few excep tions at NAS Jacksonville, NS Maypo rt, and NAS Pensacola. Therefore, the location of where a court-martial de scribed above was convened does not necessarily correlate to the command that convened the court-martial. Butorac retires from VP-45 after 30 years of service IRS alert on VA compensation scam JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 21



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I N S I D E HSL-42 HOME SAI L ING NM SC NEW S Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Navy weeds out users of designer drugs The Navys implementation of syn thetic drug testing for synthetic chemical compounds like Spice and Bath Salts is helping the service close ranks on Sailors who use these prohibited and dangerous substances, officials said July 2. Navy has zero tolerance for drug abuse. Drug abuse, including use of designer drugs and synthetic compounds, by members of the Navy is incompat ible with high standards of perfor mance, military discipline, and readi ness as embodied by of 21st Century Sailors and Marines, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director, military personnel plans and policy. The Navy reviews its testing of syn thetic compounds continuously, and also continually responds to production of new controlled and synthetic com pounds, changing testing procedures and pacing the changes being made by producers. The Navy has analyzed more than 3,300 urine samples for synthetic chemical compounds since testing began in March, with 101 samples testing posi tive. Authorized testing under the syn thetic drug testing program is con ducted under member consent, com mand directed, unit and/or subunit sweep. NCIS will be notified of every positive sample for possible further in vestigation with a view towards poten tial disciplinary or adverse adminis trative action by the service members command. Spice is a synthetic chemical com pound that is sold as herbal incense and mimics the effects of the drug marijuana. A ban was placed on five synthetic cannabis compounds commonly found in the designer drug Spice, but also sold under different names. Some of the short-term effects include auditory and visual hallucinations, painless head pressure, panic attacks, time distortion and delirium. Longterm effects from the designer drug can include permanent physical impair ment, mental illness or death. Another synthetic chemical com pound, bath salts are sold under the common names: Vanilla Sky, Ivo ry Wave, Pure Ivory, Purple Wave, Charge+, Ocean Burst, and Sextacy. Bath salts are a potentially addictive powdered substance that is snorted, smoked or injected. They can have an adverse effect on the heart, circulation, nervous system, similar to ecstasy or cocaine, and result in lethal overdose. The unlawful possession or use by Department of the Navy personnel of controlled substance analogues (de signer drugs), natural substances, chemicals wrongfully used as inhal ants, propellants, prescribed or overthe-counter medication or pharmaceu tical compound with the intent to in duce intoxication, excitement or stupe faction of the central nervous system is prohibited via SECNAVINST 5300.28D. Violators are subject to punitive ac tion under the Uniform Code of Mili tary Justice, Article 92. The Navys Synthetic Drug Testing Operating Guide is posted on the Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Office (NADAP) website and contains procedures for commands to request syn thetic drug testing and synthetic drug testing information. The Navys zerotolerance policy towards drug use is a key contributor to the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine. To view the guide or for more news from NADAP, visit www.nadap.navy. mil. Commander, Fleet Read iness Centers shared his leadership tips and strategic vision with nearly 200 Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) civilian and mili tary leaders, supervisors, and managers during a daylong conference at the Uni versity of North Florida June 25. Rear Adm. Jeffrey Pen field, responsible for eight facilities engaged in aviation maintenance, repair, and overhaul services for the Naval Aviation Enterprise, was the keynote speaker at the FRCSE Day of Leadership: Raising the Bar . A Journey to Excellence. As a former F/A-18E Su per Hornet pilot with 4,000 Thirty-five volunteers from VP-16 worked in conjunc tion with Clay County Emergency Management and the relief organization Disaster Relief and Disaster Train ing (DRADT) to help flood victims affected by the recent heavy rains of tropical storm Debby. When I heard we would get to break stuff for a good FRC commander shares vision for future Cmdr. Ryan Keys relieved Cmdr. Edgardo Cheech Moreno July 6 as commanding officer (CO) of the HS11 Dragonslayers in an airborne change-of-command ceremony in the sky above deployed aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) steaming in the Arabian Sea. The ceremony began at sea on the flight deck as Moreno addressed the HS-11 crew, offering his appreciation and gratitude to the squadron he had led. You are my family, said Moreno. I have nothing but love and respect for all of you. He also expressed a deep honor for having the opportunity to lead the Dragonslayers. When you say take care of your HS-11 conducts aerial change of commandWar Eagles help Middleburg flood victims

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS July 11 1798 Reestablishment of Marine Corps under the Con stitution. 1918 Henry Ford launches first of 100 Eagle boats. 1919 Navy Pay Corps, established in 1870, is renamed Navy Supply Corps. 1943 Gunfire from U.S. cruisers and destroyers stop German and Italian tank at tack against Army beachhead at Gela, Sicily. July 12 1836 Commissioning of Charles Haswell as first regu larly appointed Engineer Of ficer. 1916 North Carolina is first Navy ship to carry and operate aircraft. 1921 Congress creates Bu reau of Aeronautics to be in charge of all matters pertain ing to naval aviation. 1951 Ninth Naval District forces assist in flood relief work in Kansas City. 1953 United Nations fleet launches heavy air and sea at tack on Wonsan Korea. Maj. John Bolt becomes first jet ace in Marine Corps. 1988 SECDEF approves opening the Navys underwater construction teams, fleet oiler, ammunition ships, and combat stores ships to women. 1990 Cmdr. Rosemary Mariner becomes first woman to command an operational aviation squadron (VAQ-34). July 13 1863 Steam sloop USS Wy oming battled Japanese war lords forces. 1939 Appointment of Rear Adm. Richard Byrd as com manding officer of 1939-1941 Antarctic Expedition. 1943 During Battle of Kolombangara in Solomon Is lands, U.S. lost USS Gwin (DD433) while Japanese lost the light cruiser Jintsu. 1978 A Navy F-4J Phantom II landed for the first time us ing the microwave landing system (MLS) at the FAA Test Fa cility at Atlantic City, N.J. 1982 Lt. Cmdr. Barbara Al len Rainey, the first woman to be designated a naval aviator, was killed in an aircraft acci dent during a training flight. She was an instructor with VT-3 when the accident oc curred. July 14 1853 Commodore Matthew Perry lands and holds first meeting with Japanese at Ura ga, Japan. 1882 Sailors and Marines from four U.S. ships land to help restore order at Alexan dria, Egypt. 1945 U.S. warships bom bard Kamaishi, Japan, the first naval gunfire bombardment of Japanese Home Islands. 1950 U.S. Marines sail from San Diego for Korean Conflict. 1952 Laying of keel of USS Forrestal (CV-59), the first super carrier and lead ship of her class. Design included an gled flight deck, steam cata pults and optical landing sys tem. July 15 1942 First photographic interpretation unit set up in the Pacific. 1958 In response to request by President of Lebanon, the 6th Fleet lands 1,800 Marines at Beruit to support Lebanese government against Commu nist rebels. July 16 1862 Congress creates rank of Rear Admiral. David Farra gut is named the first Rear Admiral. 1912 Rear Adm. Bradley Fiske receives patent for torpedo plane or airborne torpedo. 1915 First Navy ships (bat tleships Ohio, Missouri and Wisconsin (BB-9) transit Pana ma Canal. 1945 First atomic bomb test at Alamogordo, N.M. July 17 1858 U.S. sloop Niagara departs Queenstown, Ireland, to assist in laying first trans-At lantic telegraph cable. 1898 Santiago, Cuba sur renders to U.S. Naval forces. 1927 First organized dive bombing attack in combat by Marine Corps pilots against Nicaraguan bandits who were surrounding U.S. Marine garrison at Ocotal, Nicaragua. 1944 Ammunition ex plosion at Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, Calif. kills 320, wounds 390. 1970 The P-3C began de ployed operations as VP-49 took over patrol responsibili ties at Keflavik, Iceland. 1975 Docking in space of the U.S. Apollo 18 and Soviet Soyuz 19 space crafts. This was the first manned space flight conducted jointly by the two nations and the final flight of the Apollo spacecraft. Former naval aviator Vance Brand was the Apollo command module pilot. The Apollo craft was in space for 9 days and 7.5 hours. Recovery was by USS New Or leans (LPH-11). Several months ago, right around Easter, Lindell, 5, sud denly looked up from an oth erwise quiet dinner and said, Mom, I believe in the Easter Bunny, and I believe in God, but I do not believe in camels. I glanced at Ford, 11, and Owen, 9, hoping one of them understood this proclamation and its origin. They seemed as confused as I was. Why dont you believe in camels, Lindell? I asked. Lindell shrugged. Ive never seen anything theyve done, he said. Incidentally, Lindells dad is deployed to a part of the world where camels often outnumber people. I can send him some evidence of what camels do, Dustin said. I declined the offer but told Dustin that photographs might help. Dustin sent us a picture of a truck filled with camels in the back. Lindell looked down his nose at the image on my iPhone. Horses, he said, then he went about his business. In Lindells defense, he hasnt seen many different kinds of animals. And its all my fault. Lindell made that very clear last summer when we took the boys to the Natural Histo ry museum at Harvard. After more than an hour of looking at stuffed zebras, birds and el ephants, Ford and Owen said the museum was cool, but not like seeing animals in action at a zoo. Lindell asked what a zoo is like, and my heart sunk as I realized my youngest child, the one without a scrapbook of his first year, had never been to one. At a zoo, you can see all those animals walking around and eating, Owen said excit edly. Sometimes they come up to see you and everything. Lindell stopped in the mid dle of the sidewalk. You mean theres a place where we can see animals that arent dead? Dustin and I looked at each other in horror. Then Dustin silently, knowingly, nodded. Wed take Lindell to a zoo ASAP. Between last summers mu seum trip and Lindells cam el comment, however, a lot of things happened, and none of them involved a zoo. Dustin left for deployment in November, and we began our weekly dinners in January. Be fore the snow had even melt ed in our backyard, I e-mailed the Franklin Park Zoo, just outside of Boston, and asked if we could do a Dinner with the Smileys with a zookeeper. In my letter, I shared Lindells skepticism about camels and his desire to see animals that arent dead. The Franklin Park Zoo loved the idea and set up a picnic lunch and private tour for us with the zoos president (also a former zookeeper and Uni versity of Maine graduate) John Linehan. It was our 26th (the halfway-point!) dinner. As it turns out, the Frank lin Park Zoo was also celebrating a milestone: its 100th anniversary. The fantastically old, stone, arched entrywaythe one that Lindell blew right past screaming, Im at a zoo! Im at a zoo! Im finally at a zoo! boasts the facilitys history. In the back of the zoo, however, there is evidence (stage direc tions and markings on the concrete) of its recent fame: the Franklin Park Zoo is where the movie Zookeeper was filmed. Another surprise: I learned something about humans at the Franklin Park Zoo. The zoos infamous gorilla Little Joe, who twice escaped sever al years ago, beats on his chest and smashes the enclosures window when he sees Mr. Linehan, the alpha gorilla, come near. Without the glass, however, Little Joe is less aggressive and more cautious. I wondered if Little Joe has a computer, and if he ever visits online message forums. And then there was the lion. He roared several times, and the boys asked Mr. Linehan, What do those roars mean? Hes telling other lions that this is his territory. But there are no other lions here, Ford astutely pointed out. The lion doesnt know that. He thinks his roaring is really effective; hes never seen an other lion. Substitute any number of individuals in place of the lion, and you have a psychiatrists share of insight into peoples behavior that makes us go, huh? On to the camels! We had to see camels. Ford and Owen couldnt wait to prove their little brother wrong. We found the camel enclo sure at the end of a sidewalk, just past the lion and tigers. The camels chewed their food with fat lips and stared at Lin dell across the grass. It was as if they were saying, Happy now, kid? Lindell was quiet as he watched them. We all made a big deal of it: See! Camels! But Lindell didnt answer. He turned on his heel and walked away. Robots, he called back to us over his shoulder. Ford, Owen and I looked at each other. Ford shrugged. It will be our pleasure to take Lindell to the Franklin Park Zoo again and again until we get this whole thing sorted out. Many surprises and lessons at Boston Zoo

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Wiese is new CPRW-11 commodorePatrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11) held its 52nd Change of Command June 29 as Capt. Eric Wiese relieved Capt. Trey Wheeler III as commodore. Wheeler was awarded the Legion of Merit by Rear Adm. Sean Buck, commander, Patrol and Recon naissance Group. Rear Adm. Brian Prindle, a longtime maritime patrol leader and commander of the Naval Safety Center, presided as the key note speaker. Wiese is a 1990 graduate of the United States Naval Academy as well as earning his Masters in Na tional Security and Strategic Stud ies from the Naval War College and Masters in Business Administra tion from the Naval Postgraduate School. Wieses Maritime Patrol and Re connaissance Force tours include: VP-26; an instructor at VP-30; a department head with VP-8; opera tions officer for CPRW-11 and com manding officer of VP-8. He has also served as deputy commander, Task Force 57, home-ported in Ma nama, Bahrain; flag lieutenant to Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet in Yokosuka, Japan; and most recently as branch chief, Joint Staff J-8, Forces Division. Wiese will have the lead as the patrol and reconnaissance force ac tively begins the over two year transition to the P-8A Poseidon starting with VP-16 this summer. Pierce to relieve Gramolini at CNATTU Jax Cmdr. Daryl Pierce will relieve Cmdr. Michael Gramolini as commanding offi cer of the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jackson ville at a change of command ceremony July 12 at the NAS Jacksonville Chapel. A native of Decatur, Ga., Pierce enlisted in the U.S. Navy under the Delayed En try Program in 1979. He reported to Re cruit Training Command (RTC) at Great Lakes, Ill. in October 1979. After RTC, he graduated from the Aviation Structural Mechanic (Hydraulics) A school in Millington, Tenn. Pierces enlisted tours of duty include: Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance De partment (AIMD), NAS Meridian, Miss.; Woodpeckers of VP-49 at NAS Jacksonville; Hell Razors of VA-174 at NAS Ce cil Field; Lifting Eagles of VR-24; NAS Sigonella, Italy; and Naval Air Technical Training Command, Millington, Tenn. During his enlisted tours, he was se lected as Sailor of the Year, designated a master training specialist, initiated as a chief petty officer, and earned a commission through the Limited Duty Officer/ Chief Warrant Officer Program. Pierce was commissioned an ensign in January 1994 and subsequently trained at Mustang University, Pensacola, Fla. His tours of duty as an officer include: Chargers of HC-6 at NAS Norfolk, Va., Seahawks of VAW-126 at NAS Norfolk, Va.; Commander, Fleet Air Western Pa cific, NAF Atsugi, Japan; Naval Air Tech nical Training Center, Pensacola; AIMD aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), The Pros Nest of VP-30, and CNATTU Jack sonville. Pierce made multiple deployments on board the following ships: USS Wasp (LHD-1), USS Kearsarge (LHD-3), USS Savannah (AOR-4), USS Supply (AOE-6), USNS Sirius (T-AFS 8), USS Enterprise (CVN-65), and USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63). He has served as detachment mainte nance officer, maintenance/material con trol officer, aircraft program officer, offi cer in charge, production control officer, maintenance officer and CNATTU Jack sonville executive officer since April 2011. Under Gramolinis leadership, CNAT TU Jacksonville flawlessly administered 162 training courses to more than 9,000 C school students. As the commands aviation maintenance training expert, his keen vision, sound planning and flawless management were directly responsible for pioneering the implementation of fu ture P-8 maintenance training facilities. He was the driving force behind the process efficiencies, his relentless pursuit of excellence was a key factor in the plan ning and execution of the relocation of a Mobile Operations Center/Tactical Op erations Center to CNATTU Jacksonville, process resulted in a $2 million annual savings in training costs. Gramolini assumed command of CNATTU Jacksonville in April 2011, fol lowing his tour as the executive officer. He is transferring to Naval Munitions Command Yorktown, Va. where he will serve as chief of staff. Cmdr. Edgar Twining will serve as the new CNATTU Jacksonville executive of ficer. 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012

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After a grueling, yet successful six months at sea, the men and wom en of HSL-42 Detach ment Nine Guns N Ro tors are returning home to the Jacksonville area. The detachment was embarked on board USS Nicholas (FFG-47), in support of Operation Martillo. Operation Martillo is a partner nation effort fo cused on targeting illicit drug trafficking around the Central American isthmus. Through their in volvement in the opera tion, squadron mem bers worked with var ious agencies including the Coast Guard and Customs and Border Patrol while working under the control of the Joint Interagency Taskforce-South. During the deploy ment, Guns N Rotors spent time in the Carib bean Sea as well as the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The mission focus of Operation Martillo re quired Detachment Nine to train, prior to deploy ment, in order to em bark members of a Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET). Flying with members of the LEDET enabled the aircrew to stop suspect vessels and allow the ship to close their position for boarding. In this manner, Guns N Rotors executed seven interdictions. During the deployment, USS Nicho las, along with Detach ment Nine, recovered approximately 7,300 kilo grams of cocaine with an estimated value of $515 million. These interdic tions also resulted in the detainment of 14 sus pects. One major factor that allowed the squadron to execute their mission was the hard work of the maintenance personnel. The maintenance team was required to keep the helicopter ready for a wide variety of missions including vertical replenishment, search and res cue, as well as the mis sions associated with Operation Martillo. The hard work of the detachment mainte nance team kept the he licopters available for 24-hour alert launches; launches that could oc cur on short notice de pendent on possible smuggling activity in the ships vicinity. This was no easy feat, given the amount of hours often required to be flown during an in terdiction. Around-theclock work allowed air crews to safely accom plish their mission as well as pioneer new techniques in combating transnational organized crime. The ability of the de tachment maintainers to prepare an aircraft for flight on short notice has routinely impressed us all, according to Det Maintenance Officer Lt. HSL-42 Detachment Nine coming home after successful deployment JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 Naval Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (NJROTC) students from Florida and Georgia high schools attended the 12th annual sailing academy at the NAS Jacksonville Mulberry Cove Ma rina. I have some sailing experience, but Ive never done anything like this, said Middleburg High School NJROTC stu dent Brandon Walp. Im a fish out of water. I love any thing that goes on the water and any thing that flies above it. I learned a lot so far between the names of the ships, whats on them and the rules and regulations. Its a whole new language. NJROTC students who show a desire to sail were invited to attend the sailing academy sponsored by the Interscho lastic Sailing Association, South Atlan tic Division. Participants of the 40-hour week sailing program are required to pass a 50yard swimming test and tread water for two minutes. NJROTC students pay a fee of $250 to enroll. During normal operational hours, the students would have to pay more than $1,000 to receive training. NAS Jacksonville is one of three sites that train NJROTC students annually. Sailing academies are also held in An napolis, Md. and San Diego. Despite the poor weather conditions caused by Tropical Storm Debby, 65 NJROTC students came to the marina this year. This sailing academy teaches what we consider life skills, said retired Navy Cmdr. Pat Thurman, officer in charge of the program and Middleburg High School NJROTC instructor. Were hoping that we are instill ing not only wisdom and some basics and fundamentals about how sailboats work, but also skills they can use for the rest of their lives. Their sailing training began June 23, and before getting in the water, NJROTC students were given classroom instruc tion on basic boat handling, sailing terminology and water safety. Afterwards, they were able to take boats out onto St. Johns River and were taught sailing techniques, basic navigation skills and man overboard precau tions. Jacksonville University student Tim Henderson is enrolled in JUs ROTC program and helped the NJROTC high school students learn how to sail. He also attended the sailing academy in 2009. You can definitely see a big improvement from when they showed up to where they are at now, said Henderson on day three of the class. Most of them are answering the trivia questions correctly. All they need is the sailing experience, and they should be golden. Throughout the week, NJROTC stu dents stayed at the NAS Jacksonville Bachelor Officers Quarters, ate most of their meals at the Fleet Line Caf and participated in various recreational activities, which included trips to the bowling alley and pool. The sailing academy ended with a graduation ceremony where the NJROTC students were congratulat ed by their instructors, families and friends. NJROTC students learn to sail at Mulberry Cove Marina

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people, thats easier said than done, said Moreno. You have to do a lot to take care of your people. The first thing you have to do is lead from the front. The airborne portion of the ceremony included a ceremonial lead change in the helicopter formation flown by Keys and Moreno. On the flight deck, Keys took center stage and addressed the crew as the new commanding officer of HS-11. We will continue the Dragonslayer traditions of mission accomplishment, safe flying and mentorship, said Keys. Every person in this command plays a critical role on this team and must re spect each other. Keys, the previous executive officer of HS-11, then offered his thanks to Moreno for setting a favorable leadership example for him to follow. Thanks, Cheech, for all that youve done for the squadron for the past two-and-a-half years, said Keys. You didnt tell me how to be a good CO. You showed me how to be an outstanding CO. Capt. Jeffrey Trent, commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1, also addressed the Dragonslayers, expressing gratitude for a job well done by Moreno and welcoming Keys as the new commanding officer. He (Moreno) cares deeply about his people, said Trent. He holds his people accountable. Most important ly, he loves you Dragonslayers. I know that skipper Keys will continue to take the Dragonslayers to bigger and better heights, added Trent. This deployment is the final de ployment for any squadron embarked aboard Enterprise, as the aircraft car rier is scheduled to be decommissioned following its return to homeport in Norfolk, Va. Consequently, this makes the last in-flight change of command the Dragonslayers will conduct aboard En terprise. It feels bittersweet, but I am hon ored to have had the opportunity to do an airborne change of command on this final historic deployment of the Big E, said Moreno, who will go on to at tend the National Defense University in Washington, D.C. With the completion of the change of command, HS-11 pilots will continue to fly combat missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. It has been an absolute privilege to serve with each and every one of my Dragonslayers, said Moreno. I am fortunate to have had the opportunity to serve with such a phenomenal group of consummate professionals. HS-11cause, I was all in, commented PO1 Jason Spitzley. Clay County was heavily affected by the storms that raised the water level in Black Creek to record levels of over 25 feet in some areas. More than 100 homes were damaged and the War Ea gles were eager to help. This is a great opportunity to get our Sailors out into the community and do some real good for people who really need it, said War Eagles Lt. Ryan Burke. I personally would not miss this for the world. The War Eagles recently returned from a six-month deployment and are preparing to transition to the Navys newest aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon. We just want to give back to the community that has been so supportive of our men and women in uniform in Northeast Florida, commented VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Molly Bo ron. DRADT was tasked by Clay County Emergency Management to manage local volunteers. I didnt think theyd bring this many people out its great, said Jim Reid, the owner of one of the affected homes. VP-16 RELIEF 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012

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flight hours under his belt, he under stands how critical aircraft mainte nance is to the warfighter. All I wanted out of maintenance was airplanes on the flight schedule. Thats what we are all about, shooting air planes off the pointy end (of a carrier), he said. Penfield has a better understanding of what it takes to maintain 3,700 air planes deployed around the world supported by 18,000 personnel after assuming command six months ago. He said FRCs ultimate challenge is to push the envelope of optimization and clearly define an organic maintenance strat egy. We must follow through with mak ing the command truly operational; follow through with driving continuous efficiencies, he said. The Navy does not have the option of cutting naval forc es any further. We must redefine and strengthen our command structure for better alignment with our customers, our sites, our competencies and our integrated support teams. Penfield shared his top 10 lead ership list to include knowing your strengths and weaknesses, teambuild ing based on transparency and trust, asking for help, gaining and holding on to your credibilityyour greatest asset, knowing when to lead and when to follow, anticipating stakeholders needs, promoting best practices and being a good partner. I dont profess to be an expert at leadership, but I do believe in it, he said. Id like to say Im a student of leadership. It factors in more and more when moving up the corporate ladder. An exclusive job for commanders is creating the vision and executing the long-term strategic plan according to Penfield. We must transition from a tactical and technical approach to be coming more visionary, which will re quire focused leadership. Our leader ship challenge is moving the football down the field collectively. Capt. Robert Caldwell, FRCSE com manding officer, thanked the admiral for his keen insights and candor and reminded the audience that the main tainers primary mission is to put the product in the hands of the warfight ers. Before returning to FRC headquar ters in Patuxent River, Md., the admiral toured the aircraft maintenance depot and visited the major aircraft produc tion lines, the Crinkley Engine Facility, and the avionics and manufacturing divisions on June 26. During his visit to FRCSE Detachment Jacksonville, Penfield presented Cmdr. Jerry Brown, Detachment Jacksonville officer in charge, with the Capt. Vir gil Lemmon Award for excellence in aviation maintenance. The prestigious award presented annually recognizes aviation maintenance officers who have made the most significant contributions to the aviation maintenance and logistics fields during the year.FRCSE VISITOR VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Ste vens and Prospective Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven, Capt. Scott Wiese, awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings June 15 to the following 16 officers: Lt. Darryl Abriam, Ensign Alexander Covelle, Ensign Zachary Bowen, Lt. j.g. Terri Fitzgerald, Ensign Jonathan Horne, Ensign Shea Knecht, Ensign Patrick Kreek, Lt. j.g. Adam Myers, Lt. j.g. Mark Rice, Lt. j.g. Rory Roberge, Ensign Bradley Scholes, Ensign Bryan Scott, Ensign Daniel Starsinic, Lt. j.g. Alexi Staton, Lt. j.g. Jesurun Stockdill, and Ensign Spencer Washom. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer (UMFO) syllabus at VP30, earning their coveted Wings of Gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the CAT 1 Fleet Replacement Squadron syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT 1 syllabus, they will report to operational P-3C or EP-3 squad rons to begin their initial sea tours Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, Whidbey Island, Wash. or NAS Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with Avia tion Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, where all aviation officers undergo a classroom syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation which includes aerodynamics, meteorology and principles of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transition from a classroom learning environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Tex an II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3C training pipeline report to VP-30 for P-3C specific training. VP-30 wings Navys newest naval flight officers JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 9

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The largest Navy medical facility in the southeast hosted a ceremony at the NAS Jacksonville Officers Club June 29 to recognize its 25 family medicine physicians who successfully completed a nationally accredited graduate medical education program that prepares them for their Navy Medicine roles car ing for service members on combat and humanitarian missions world-wide, as well as family members here at home. The Naval Hospital (NH) Jackson ville Family Medicine Residency pro gram celebrated the graduation of its 13 residents (who completed the intense 36-month residency) and 12 interns (who completed the 12-month intern ship). Both groups were awarded cer tificates from the Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery during the ceremony, keynoted by retired Rear Adm. William Kiser. Capt. Gayle Shaffer, commanding officer of NH Jacksonville, remarked, To our new graduates both interns and residents you have trained in a program that has been leading the way in residency training innovation and you now join the ranks of the almost 400 family physicians who are proud to call Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Family Medicine Residency their alma mater. She continued, As highly skilled family medicine docs, youll support the medical needs of service members and their families all over the world at hospitals like ours, on ships, over seas, and forward deployed. Like those who have gone before, you now have the honor and privilege of providing the best care available to our nations he roes and their families. Successful completion of an approved residency is required for a physician to become board-certified by the Ameri can Board of Family Medicine. NH Jacksonvilles Family Medicine Residency Program is certified by the Accredita tion Council of Graduate Medical Edu cation. Over the course of three years, the residents complete rotations in family medicine along with internal medicine, pediatrics, emergency medicine, ob stetrics and gynecology, surgery, orthopedics, dermatology, urology, ophthal mology, ear/nose/throat, geriatrics, cardiology, intensive care, neonatal intensive care, psychiatry, neurology, com munity medicine, radiology and a variety of other specialties. Like other medical residencies in both the private and public sectors, NH Jacksonvilles Family Medicine Resi dency Program is highly challenging and requires participants to master both the art and science of patient care in numerous practice settings. Training can be very busy and very trying, but its very rewarding when you look back at it, said graduating resident Lt. Cmdr. David Mann. Cmdr. James Keck, program director of the Family Medicine Residency Program, observed, I am proud of all that our interns and residents have accom plished. This program has a tradition of excellence, and they have exceeded expectations in a challenging training program. Our graduates are prepared to do what our country has called them to do...provide high quality care to our shipmates and their families around the globe. First-year residents have the option to continue their training, or serve in the fleet as general medical officers, flight surgeons or in undersea medicine. Following operational assignments of two or more years, residents return to complete the second and third years of the program, expanding their knowledge and ability to approach increasingly complicated medical conditions. Graduating third-year residents se lect orders to a new command. Of this years graduating residents, follow-on orders include naval hospitals in Na ples, Guam and Okinawa; branch health clinics in Bahrain and Quantico; the Marine Corps at Camp LeJeune; and ships including the aircraft carriers USS Abraham Lincoln, USS Nimitz and USS Enterprise. NH Jacksonville is part of the Navy Medicine team that provides high-quality health care to more than one million eligible beneficiaries. The command is comprised of the hospital, located aboard NAS Jack sonville, and five branch health clin ics in Florida (Jacksonville, Key West and Mayport) and Georgia (Albany and Kings Bay). On a typical day, the NH Jacksonville team of 2,500 military and civilian personnel serves 1,800 outpa tients, admits 15 inpatients, cares for 80 people in the ER, performs 14 same-day surgeries, fills 4,700 prescriptions, con ducts 4,600 lab tests and delivers two to three babies. Additionally, up to 15 percent of its active duty staff is deployed around the globe providing combat, humanitarian and disaster care. Peggy Montgomery, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Uniform Business Office (UBO) manager, was selected as Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgerys (BUMED) Resource Management Ana lyst of the Year. Selected from the hundreds of an alysts across all BUMED finance and comptroller shops around the world, Montgomery was recognized for mak ing NH Jacksonville a model for best business practices, delivering excel lence in results. Bill Condon, BUMED UBO manag er, sees Montgomery as a trailblazer in adopting e-commerce solutions to optimize business practices and improve financial results. Peggy is embracing new technolo gies, moving them along and leading the way for other Navy Medicine staff to bring our methods up to date. Through Montgomerys leadership, NH Jacksonville was one of the first medical treatment facilities to move to the e-commerce method of scanning checks and electronically transferring funds from insurance companies and other payors. This allows NH Jackson ville to immediately recognize revenue for use to support patient care, and has streamlined and reduced processing time of each balance-due account from about an hour to five minutes. Over $1 million in electronic pay ments have been received by NH Jack sonville just since January 2012, thanks to Montgomery and her team. And having these funds readily available ver sus waiting for paper checks to arrive by mail means the command has more immediate access to those funds to purchase patient care equipment and fund additional clinical staff. Its very satisfying and flattering to receive this award, said Montgomery. Family medicine physicians complete training NH Jax manager named Navy Medicines Resource Management Analyst of the Year 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012

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The Bureau of Medicine and Surgery's (BUMED) sole point of accountability for carrying out the missions for all Navy Medicine education, training, public health, and human-resource management for Sailors and Marines around the world will be reorganized July 15, in response to a BUMED initiative to streamline operations. Navy Medicine Support Command (NMSC), com missioned Nov. 1, 2005, is scheduled to be renamed as Navy Medicine Education and Training Command (NMETC) July 11 during a change-of-command cere mony aboard NAS Jacksonville, when Capt. Gail Hathaway relieves Rear Adm. Eleanor Valentin. The former NMSC's responsibilities will also re-scope as NMETC, to focus solely on the BUMED education and training mission. Personnel initially employed at NMSC will become part of the NMETC staff, and individuals whose positions realign to BUMED Headquarters will remain in Jacksonville as part of BUMED Detachment Jackson ville, another entity created through this administrative realignment. Functions necessary to the overall BUMED mission, however, will remain unaffected by the change, something NMSC Commander Rear Adm. Eleanor Valentin said is imperative to Navy Medicine's more than 1 million eligible beneficiaries. "This realignment simplifies the BUMED organization structure and chain of command, and helps create a more effective command and control," she said. "The new structure provides senior-level representation to help ensure Navy equities are maintained in military health cares increasingly joint environment. This will also help Navy Medicine better align operational and strategic activities." Valentin also said NMSC, an Echelon-3 command designed to provide administrative support to subordinate commands around the world, will not dises tablish, adding that the realignment stems from U.S. Navy Surgeon General Vice Adm. Matthew L. Nathan's vision of streamlining Navy Medicine into a more effective, efficient and responsive organization that improves accountability, as well as command and con trol. Nearly 150 service members, Department of De fense (DoD) and contract employees work at the NMSC headquarters as NMSC staff members and members of several Navy Medicine-wide program offices as part of a designated region under the BUMED hierarchy. Along with Navy Medicine East, Navy Medicine West and Navy Medicine National Capital Area, NMSC has served over the past almost seven years as a regional-level command, directly reporting to BUMED on matters ranging from research and development to training to medical supply systems. Val entin said that aside from Unit Identification Code changes, reporting senior signatures for administra tive purposes and other clerical shifts, NMSC personnel should remain largely unaffected. "Navy Medicine values its employees and is com mitted to making the reorganization process trans parent and seamless," she said. "I believe this realignment of key support functions and commands will improve efficiency and effectiveness." NMSCs current education and training, public health and Navy Medicine-wide program responsi bilities will shift to either NMETC or BUMED. The NMETC Detachment Jacksonville will provide administrative, facility and other support services to personnel assigned to a BUMED Detachment Jacksonville. Although transparent to other organizations, Val entin said this realignment maintains a positive endpoint for Navy Medicine beneficiaries stressing that training, support to operational platforms on and under the sea, in the air and forward deployed U.S. Navy medical professionals will still receive the unparal leled support NMSC has historically provided. NMSC, through July 15, will maintain oversight of the Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center (NMCPHC), the Navy Medicine Professional Devel opment Center (NMPDC), and Navy Medicine Oper ational Training Center (NMOTC), and provide sup port services to Naval Medical Logistics Command (NMLC), the Naval Medical Research Center (NMRC) and the Navy Medicine Information Systems Support Activity (NAVMISSA), all Echelon-4 commands. NMSC is part of the Navy Medicine team, a global health care network of 63,000 Navy medical person nel around the world who provide high-quality health care to more than 1 million eligible beneficiaries. Navy Medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the battlefield. Navy Medicine Support Command to reorganize JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 11

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AWARDShe was also instrumental in earning recognition as a best business practice from Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs for NH Jacksonvilles Other Health Insurance program. For more information, visit www.med.navy.mil/ sites/navalhospitaljax, www.facebook/navalhospi taljacksonville and www.twitter.com/NHJax. VP-5 arrived at the Roy al Australian Air Force Base Pearce, Australia June 6 for Tactical Anti-Submarine Maritime Exercise (TAMEX) 12-2. The Mad Fox crews participated in a joint exercise with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), and Test and Evaluation Squadron ONE (VX-1). The exercise was designed to improve the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance interoper ability between United States and Australian forces while also assessing the anti-subma rine warfare (ASW) capabili ties of the new P-8A Poseidon. Combat Aircrews Eight and Two represented the Mad Fox es led by officer in charge Lt. Cmdr. Jason Thompson and ac companied by a maintenance detachment to support flight operations. The exercise consisted of two flights for each crew off the western coast of Australia. These flights provided an op portunity to practice coordinat ed operations with the RAAF in addition to employing joint ASW tactics. This allowed the crews to focus their training on certain aspects of ASW such as acoustic and non-acoustic search including passive and active tracking. One of these flights included a joint tracking mission with two RAN H-70Bs, a RAAF AP-3C and a P-3C from VP-5. Lt. j.g. Casey Stuart said we quickly bonded with the Aus tralians and immediately came together as allies to accomplish all of our tasks on-station. During off hours, the Mad Fox crews were afforded the opportunity to explore Perth and its surrounding area. Although some unfortunate storms af fected the climate, the crews were able to fly through the fresh and squally weather, as the Australians would say, and to mingle with the local pop ulation. Popular locations in cluded Caversham Wildlife Park, a chocolate factory and extensive shopping venues. Overall, TAMEX 12-2 provid ed Australian and U.S. aircrews and maintenance personnel a unique opportunity to practice coordinated ASW operations. Working with the Austra lians was an eye-opening ex perience. They are extremely professional and it was a plea sure to work with them on sta tion, commented Lt .j.g. Chis tina Malzahn. CS2 Alex Moleon and CS2(SW) Marnika Ash of the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf competed with oth er Sailors across the globe in the fourth annual Commander, Navy Installation Command Culinary Competition June 13 at Naval Amphibious Base, Coronado, Calif to showcase their creativity and culinary skills. The competition consisted of 12 teams representing various Navy regions and installations world wide. This was the main event for the duo, as they have proven themselves once before during the Commander, Navy Region Southeast Culinary Competition in January. Teams had 90 minutes to prepare two entrees that consisted of beef tenderloin and turkey breast with the secret ingredient being un veiled as shallots, a type of small red onion. The competitors dishes were judged on taste, presentation, cooking method, knife skills and proper safety and sanitation. The duo placed fourth in the competition. Were still winners, stated Mo leon and Ash. To place fourth out of 12 over all says a lot about our skills and determination to be and represent the best Navy Region Southeast! Mad Foxes head to outback NAS Jax chefs participate in CNIC culinary competition 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012

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NAS Jacksonville Water Treatment Plant monitoring exceedance of Florida drinking water rulesWhat happened? NAS Jacksonville tests the air installation drinking water system every month at numerous locations to ensure com pliance with Florida Drinking Water Rules. In late June, we tested the tap water at 42 facilities and found two of the samples showed the presence of total coliform bacteria. According to the Florida administrative code, we are required to give public notification when more than one sample tests positive. What was done? We immediately retested the tap water at the same loca tions as well as locations upstream and downstream of these locations. In addition, we tested the water at the air installation drinking water wells and Jacksonville Electric Author ity connection to the air installation water system. All of the nine tests met the Florida Drinking Water Rules and as a result, the drinking water at NAS Jacksonville is safe to drink. What does this mean? This is not an emergency. If it had been, you would have been notified immediately. Coliform bacteria are general ly not harmful themselves. Coliforms are bacteria which are naturally present in the environment and are used as an indicator that other, potentially-harmful bacteria may be present. Coliforms were found in more samples than allowed and this was a warning of potential problems. Usually, coliforms are a sign that there could be a problem with the systems treatment or distribution system (pipes). Whenever we detect coliform bacteria in any sample, we do immediate followup testing to see if other bacteria of greater concern, such as fecal coliform or E. Coli, are present. Follow up testing showed no signs of bacteria in the drinking water. What should I do? You do not need to boil your water or take other correc tive actions. However, if you have specific health concerns, consult your doctor. People with severely compromised im mune systems, infants, and some elderly may be at increased risk. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. General guidelines on ways to lessen the risk of infection by microbes are available from EPAs Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791. For more information, please contact NAVFAC Southeast drinking water manager at (904) 542-5610. Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly. This notice is being sent from: NAS JACKSONVILLE WATER TREATMENT PLANT Potable Water System ID: 2161212 Date distributed: 9 July 2012 VP-5 Mad Foxes celebrate promotions VP-5 wardroom is pleased to report a sharp rise in the num ber of lieutenants in the ranks of its officers. As the Mad Foxes deployed to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan the last week of May, they found ways to creatively pro mote their lieutenants throughout the Seventh Fleet area of responsibility during June. Some officers took the oath as they crossed the International Date Line en route to Guam while others raised their right hands during the Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training Indonesia exercise as they the equator en route to Juanda Naval Air Base, Indonesia. In the squadrons new ward room at Kadena Air Base, Ja pan, VP-5 Commanding Offi cer, Cmdr. Erin Osborne pro moted five officers: Lt. j.g. Paul Reali, Lt. j.g. Dick Leary, Lt. j.g. Ray Ratliff, Lt. j.g. Craig Al mond and Lt. j.g. Charles Blackwell. Their lieutenant bars were proudly pinned on by their fel low officers from the junior of ficer ranks. Finally, Lt. j.g. Jake Pitchford and Lt. j.g. Alyssa Wilson be came lieutenants aboard a P-8A Poseidon during the tactical anti-submarine warfare maritime exercise in Perth, Australia. After they took they took the oath and received a tour of the new aircraft, they boarded their own P-3C in support of the exercise. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 13

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Tim Grant. It is no easy task, yet the ded ication of the detachment main tainers and their drive to ready the aircraft for flight rapidly, but more importantly safely, allowed the alert aircrew to launch in time to continue the pursuit of the go-fast vessel. Guns N Rotors finished the de ployment in the Central and South American operations area with another dramatic interdiction on June 19. Utilizing a variety of personnel and assets from Operation Martillo, HSL-42 Detachment Nines SH60B helo crew quickly located and pursued a suspected go-fast vessel. Using the extensive training the aircrew received in the Jackson ville area, the aircrew confronted the vessel. By employing warning shots and disabling fire from the embarked Coast Guard LEDET Marksman, the go-fast vessel was stopped in its tracks. This interdiction resulted in the recovery of a substantial amount of cocaine and marijuana, and served as a final success in the Guns N Rotors deployment. Providing a twenty-four hour, seven-day-a-week airborne capa bility requires tremendous coordination between the detachments operations and maintenance teams. Our crew has excelled at this throughout deployment, said Detachment Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr. Nick Deleo. Walls promoted to master chiefAVCM Keir Walls of VP-16 was promoted to master chief on June 6. Walls, originally from Atlanta, joined the Navy in 1990. He attended boot camp in San Diego, fol lowed by A school in Millington, Tenn. Walls reported to the VS-31 Topcats at NAS Jacksonville in April 1991, where he completed deployments on board USS Dwight D. Eisenhower and the maiden voyage of USS George Washington. While attached to VS-31, he was promoted to petty officer third class. In 1995, he transferred to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 20 at NAS Patuxent River, Md., where he was promoted to petty officer second class. In May 1997, he reported to VS-22 at NAS Jacksonville. While attached to the Checkmates, he deployed on board USS Enterprise and USS Harry S. Truman and was promoted to petty officer first class. During the summer of 2001, Walls checked in to VP-30, the P-3C Fleet Replacement Squadron, at NAS Jacksonville, where he was then promoted to chief petty officer. In December 2004, he transferred back to VS-22 and deployed on board USS Harry S. Truman. After being promoted to senior chief petty officer in 2008, Walls received orders to the Naval Air Technical Training Center in Pensacola. He reported to VP-16 in November 2011, and just recently returned from a deployment to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. Formerly an aviation electricians mate, Walls be came an aviation technician master chief upon his promotion to master chief petty officer. Following his promotion, VP-16s Commanding Of ficer, Cmdr. Molly Boron said, It is always rewarding see your Sailors advance in rank, but it is especially memorable to promote someone to the rank of mas ter chief. The Navys master chief community became significantly stronger today. Created in 1958, the rank of master chief petty of ficer is the highest enlisted rank in the United States Navy. It is an elite group of Sailors, consisting of the top one percent of enlisted personnel. NAS Jax PresentsTuesday, Aug. 7, 6 9:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool & Allegheny Softball Field Join our community and help heighten crime and drug awareness, strengthen neighborhood spirit and send a For more information call, Youth Center 778-9772 or Base Security 542-8513 NAS Jax Security HSL-42 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012

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The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 brought smiles to the faces of young children when they dropped off personalized care packages June 20 to 48 children under the care of Fundacin Exodo, a local Comalapa orphanage. The gifts were funded by donations from the squadrons pilots, aircrew and maintainers, as well as their families. Each package included toys, candy and age-appropriate word puzzle books. Handing out these simple gifts brought much joy, not only to the or phans, but also to the Fighting Tigers received warm hugs and smiles. During their visit, the Fighting Tigers were given a tour of the orphanage and its support facilities. On-site, the orphanage boasts a greenhouse and chicken farm that provide the children with fresh vegetables, eggs and meat. The men and women of the squadron all agreed it was humbling to see how self-sufficient the or phanage was. The buildings where the children live, supplies what is needed, and little more. The kids live, segregated by age and gender, in four small buildings. Each house is identified by its name and each name is from a story in the Bible about a great man or woman of strong will and dedication to God. Samuel houses the younger boys, Esther the younger girls, Moses the older boys, and Deborah houses the older girls. Children cared for at Fundacin Exodo range in age from two to 16 years. When asked about his favorite part of the experience LS2 Walter Murillo replied, I handed one of the boys his present and he was so excited. When I asked him which one of them is the best at soccer, he said I am! This reminded me how alike we all are. Some of the members of VP-8 enjoyed a quick game of soccer with the chil dren and were amazed at how well the children played. Fundacin Exodo uses sports as one way to instill self-confi dence in their charges. Fundacin Exodo is a Christian, nongovernmental organization created to restore the lives of boys and girls in situations of risk by providing them with academic instruction, physical care, encouragement, and hope. Fundacin Exodo helps develop these children emotionally, spiritually, aca demically and socially in a home envi ronment. VP-8 is deployed to the 4th and 7th fleet areas of responsibility, assisting in counter-drug efforts and providing hu manitarian assistance. The VP-45 Chapter of the Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Deci sions (CSADD) is enjoying its second successful month at VP-45. The Navy-wide organization is de signed to positively influence Sailors behavior through resources and tools which promote good decision-making processes, enabling leadership devel opment and influence among peers at a junior level. PSC Rishka Elzie of VP-45 founded the organization in May 2012. CSADD is important to me because when I was starting in the Navy, there was no open forum to interact with people from different walks of life to positively discuss issues that affect younger Sailors, said Elzie. Our chapter currently has eighteen members is always looking to grow. As an organization, we focus on the age group 18 to 25 but events are open to all enlisted and officer personnel. The group holds a weekly meeting on Tuesdays at 2:30 p.m. in the VP-45 training room. At the meetings, two peer leaders run an anonymous open forum where VP-45 members can discuss smart decision-making skills involving relationships, work, safe alco hol use, family, and more. Members from all age groups are in attendance so many perspectives are presented during every meeting. I think this is a great initiative on behalf of our Sailors, said VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mike Vi tali. It reflects the same positive attitude they display on the hangar deck every day, including their personal desire to lookout for their shipmates and ensure success across all pay grades. Outside of weekly meetings VP-45 CSADD convenes monthly for multiple volunteer and entertainment events. Some recent events include bowling at Latitude 30 and volunteering at the Jacksonville Zoo and the Catty Shack Ranch Wildlife Sanctuary. The outside events allow our members to help our greater community through volunteer work and have fun with organized liberty events, said Elzie. Most importantly, the members of CSADD put the decision-making skills they learn to use by promoting them to fellow Sailors as peer advocates. We are the Sailors helping Sailors on the road to making the right deci sion, said Elzie. For more information, visit: www. facebook.com/Vp45CSADD.CSADD takes off running at VP-45VP-8 brightens orphans day in El Salvador JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 15

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Q: What are the most impor tant preventive care topics I discuss with parents? Children of military par ents are a special breed that often grow up uniquely different from their peers. They can tell stories of climbing Mt. Vesuvi us or running across the sands of Waikiki unlike their friends who have never lived in such exotic places. They do howev er face many of the same risks that their friends out in town face. Immunizations may be the most important medical inter vention that every child should get on time. Preventing them from ever trying to smoke cigarettes may be the most important longterm measure that a doctor can help to instill in a child. But car accidents may end up hurting our children the most. Every hour, 150 children be tween ages 0 and 19 are treat ed in emergency departments for injuries sustained in motor vehicle crashes. More children ages 5 to 19 die from crash-re lated injuries than from any other type of injury. In the United States during 2008, 968 children ages 14 years and young er died as occupants in motor vehicle crashes, and approxi mately 168,000 were injured. Q: What are the risk factors? Fifteen percent of occupant deaths among children ages 0 to 14 years involved a drinking driver. More than two-thirds of fa tally injured children were killed while riding with a drinking driver. Children see, then they imi tate. Seatbelt use among young children often depends upon the drivers seat belt use. Al most 40 percent of children riding with unbelted drivers were themselves unrestrained. Child restraint systems are often used incorrectly. One study found that 72 percent of nearly 3,500 observed car and booster seats were misused in a way that could increase a childs risk of injury during a crash. Q: How can injuries to chil dren in motor vehicles be pre vented? Child safety seats do work. They reduce the risk of death in passenger cars by 71 percent for infants, and by 54 percent for toddlers. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recom mends booster seats for chil dren until they are at least 8 years of age or 49 tall. According to researchers at the Childrens Hospital of Phil adelphia, for children 4 to 7 years, booster seats reduce in jury risk by 59 percent com pared to seat belts alone. Children ages 12 and young er should ride in the back seat.Adults should avoid plac ing children in front of airbags. Overall, for children less than 16 years, riding in the back seat is associated with a 40 percent reduction in the risk of serious injury. Overall data collected by the CDC has shown many doctors fail to discuss vehicle safety rules with parents when they come in with their children. The findings suggest that, al though the prevalence of pedi atric injury prevention counseling remains low, such counsel ing was associated with safer behaviors among children, in cluding use of bicycle helmets while biking and use of car seats and seat belts while riding in motor vehicles. If youre a parent of a teen who is learning to drive, sign an agreement with them to limit risky driving situations, such as having multiple teen passen gers and driving at night. Children should wear motor cycle or bike helmets any time they are on a motorcycle or bi cycle. Operation Homefront-Florida needs volunteers to pick up donated school supplies from area Dollar Tree stores that will be distributed to military children in late July and early August. Dollar Tree locations through out the area are collecting dona tions through Aug. 6.Volunteers can designate which location(s) they would like to pick up dona tions from. These donations will be used to fill backpacks for military children as part of Operation Homefronts Back to School Brigade. Back to School Brigade provides military children the opportunity to start school with all the supplies they need to be successful. In 2011, Operation Homefront delivered over $2.5 million in school supplies to military chil dren. Volunteers are also needed at each distribution event to fill backpacks with school supplies and distribute backpacks to mili tary children. For more information and to volunteer, contact Michelle Cassabon at michelle.cassabon@operation homefront.net. Keeping our children safe Volunteers needed to pickup school supplies for military children in south Florida 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included July Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Summer Bowling Leagues Now Forming Monday Mixed Trio 7 p.m. Wednesday After Work League 4:30 p.m. Thrusday Morning Seniors 9 a.m. Thursday Night Extreme Bowling 6:30 p.m. Friday Intramural League 11:45 a.m. Sunday Fun Bunch League 4 p.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. **New fitness class Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session two begins July 9, session three begins July 23 Lessons are available at the indoor and outdoor pool $40 military, $45 DoD Register for swim lessons at the base gym I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale July 13 $58.50 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Disney World Orlando 4-day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Free Bowling at NAS Freedom Lanes July 18, 710 p.m. Free Jacksonville Suns Baseball Game July 19 at 6:30 p.m. Free Mall & Movie Trip Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater July 20 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees July 24 for active duty July 26 for retirees & DoD personnel Junior Golf Clinic Session 2 (ages 6 10) July 16 20 Session 3 (ages 11 17) August 6 10 Monday Friday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. $110 per week long session Twilight Special Monday Friday Play 18 holes for $17 after 3 p.m. Not applicable on holidays Golf & Dine Special Play 18-holes with cart and choice of breakfast or lunch for $26! Not applicable on holidays. Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Lessons $150 per person July 20, 21, 22, 28 & 29 Aug. 17, 18, 19, 25 & 26 Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Register now for before & after school program Ages 5 (starting kindergarten) through 12 Fees based on household income National Night Out Aug. 7, 69:30 p.m. Outdoor pool & Allegheny softball field Free cookout, pool games, bounce house, guest speakers, music, outdoor movie and more!Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School September 10 October 17 $500 per person Youth Flight Camps (ages 12 18) Basic Aviation Course $100 per person July 18 21 register by July 11 Advanced Aviation Course (basic course required) $150 per person Aug. 8 11 register by Aug. 1 Aug. 22 25 register by Aug. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 17

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Taxpayers should be on the lookout for a new, email-based phishing scam now circulating that targets Depart ment of Defense military members, retirees and civilian employees. The email appears to come from Defense Finance and Accounting Ser vices and displays a dot-mil email address. The email states that those receiv ing disability compensation from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) may be able to obtain additional funds from the IRS. Email recipients are then asked to send various VA and IRS documents containing their personal and financial information such as copies of VA award letters or their income tax returns to an address in Florida. The information in these documents is then used by the scammers to commit identity theft. Typically, identity thieves use someones personal data to empty the vic tims financial accounts, run up charges on the victims existing credit cards or apply for new loans, credit cards, services or benefits in the vic tims name. For more information on phish ing scams, please see http://www.irs. gov/newsroom/article/0,,id=97322,00. html. VP-45 Maintenance Master Chief AFCM(AW) Melvin Butorac, Jr. retired during a ceremony at the NAS Jax BOQ Pavilion June 22. Guest Speaker Cmdr. Greg Petro vic, prospective executive officer of VP-5, gave a fitting tribute to the me chanic who tirelessly stood the watch over the past 30 years. Other speak ers included VP-45 Commanding Of ficer Cmdr. Mike Vitali, AFCM(AW/ NAC) Nick Mellos (USN, Ret.) who pre sented the CPO Retirement Creed and ATCS(AW) Jay Ramsey who presented The Watch and coordinated the cer emony. AD1(AW) Aaron Pick, who read the poem The Forgotten Mechanic, embodied the countless Sailors Butorac mentored over his distinguished career. NAS Jax Command Chaplain Cmdr. Shannon Skidmore delivered the invo cation and benediction. Butorac is a Cleveland native who enlisted in the Navy in 1981. Follow ing basic training he completed AMS A school and the P-3 FRAMP. His first tour was with Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron Two Rangers in Rota, Spain. Other tours of duty were served with the VF-101 Grim Reapers, Navy Recruit ing Command T-34B Quality Assurance Team, VR-1 Starlifters, VP-16 War Eagles, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast and VP-45 Pelicans. Butorac is looking forward to the next chapter in his life following his retire ment with his wife, Fatima and two sons, Nick and Sal. Master Chief Butoracs example of service and sacrifice will leave a last ing legacy with Team Pelican and our Navy, stated Vitali. He is truly the mechanic who will not be forgotten. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast recently heard the follow ing cases: At a General Court-Martial con vened on board NAS Jacksonville, an airman pled guilty to engaging in a sexual act with a person substantial ly incapacitated. The military judge sentenced the accused to four years of confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, and a dishonorable discharge. At a General Court-Martial con vened on board NAS Jacksonville, a second class petty officer pled guilty to order violations relating to a prisoner, while serving as a brig guard. The military judge sentenced the accused to three years of confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, and a dishonorable discharge. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast are tried with few excep tions at NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, and NAS Pensacola. Therefore, the location of where a court-martial de scribed above was convened does not necessarily correlate to the command that convened the court-martial. Butorac retires from VP-45 after 30 years of service IRS alert on VA compensation scam JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 12, 2012 21