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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/01999
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 06-28-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:01999

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THURSDAY, JUNE 28, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The Proud Warriors of HSL42 Detachment 7 began its last SH-60B deployment while embarked aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109) June 22. During the spring of 2013, the Proud Warriors will transition from the SH-60B helicopter to the new MH-60R Seahawk helicopter and in the process become HSM72. The SH-60B has been a work horse for many years and this will be a bittersweet time for us in many ways, said Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Chester, officer in charge of HSL 42 Det. 7. However, we are ready for our mission. We intend to accomplish that mission and establish the warrior legacy as we sundown the SH-60B with honor and pride. The Dunham and Proud Warriors, deployed as part of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8, will operate in support of 5th and 6th fleet maritime security objectives. The MH-60R combines the best features of the SH-60B and SH-60F into one multi-mission platform. The improvements include an updated cockpit with digital moni tors for flight instrumentation and the addition of mission avionics. While this transition will facili tate many advantages for the pilots and aircrew, Chester said that it will be hard to say good-bye. Even with the transition ahead for the squadron, HSL 42 Det. 7 pilots said their current SH-60Bs still have a lot of fight left in them. Our maintenance team does an outstanding job of keeping our aircraft fully mission capable and ready to participate in all opera tions, said HSL 42 pilot Lt. j.g. Joal Fischer. As for their part, many members of the Proud Warrior crew said they feel a tremendous pride in being the last crew to maintain the SH-60Bs for their squadron. I think its cool to know we are playing a role in a little bit of his tory, said AD3 Torre Reese. After this deployment, we wont be named HSL 42 anymore, so we want to send it out on a high note. USS Jason Dunham and HSL 42 Det. 7 are deployed along with other CSG 8 ships and aircraft to include USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66), guided-mis sile destroyers USS Farragut (DDG 99), USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81), the seven squadrons of Carrier Air Wing 8 and Destroyer Squadron 28. Sailors, DoD personnel are encouraged to donateThe federal-wide Feds Feed Families Food Drive campaign is now underway aboard NAS Jacksonville. Department of Defense (DoD) employees nationwide will step up to meet this challenge by gather ing 1.5 million pounds of food for fami lies in need this summer. In a recently released memo, Deputy Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter expressed his personal support of the campaign and encouraged the DoD workforce to donate. The tremendous success of the 2011 food drive was a credit to the exempla ry efforts of all of you and your staffs, Carters memo reads. Running a success ful campaign requires a team effort, and leadership support is critical. Feds Feed Families allows us to showcase how car ing and giving our people are, and dem onstrates our commitment as a depart ment to helping those in need. Also in his memo, Carter encourages support with the following tasks: cies and field activities are tasked with arranging logistical support for collections June 26-27, July 24-25, and Aug. 28-29. to represent your component, coordinate with organization representatives, and lead the call for donations. age donations of non-perishable food. HSL 42 Detachment 7 begins final deployment with SH-60B Seahawk Feds Feed Families campaign goal is 1.5 million pounds Feds Feed Families 2012 CampaignFrequently Asked QuestionsWhy? Food banks across the Northeast Florida and around the country are fac ing severe shortages of non-perishable items, just as summer begins and chil dren are left without school nutrition programs. Over the past three years, we have witnessed the remarkable gener osity of our Federal workforce, collect ing an astounding 8 million pounds of food and non-perishable items. This year, we will continue to support our neighbors, families and communities across the nation by asking agencies to set their own goals and aim to beat their own best collection totals. We hope youll join us! How can I help? There are many ways you can help! Bring in your donations and share with your organizations Feds Feed Families, talk about Feds Feed Families with your community and co-workers, attend events to show your support, and volun teer to help on collection days. Contact your command coordinator or the NAS Jax Chapel for more information. What else can I do to help people in need? While this is a great campaign, think about helping those in need through out the year. Find service opportunities across the country through United We

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS June 27 1813 USS President, a 44-gun, three-masted heavy frigate anchors in Bergen, Norway. 1950 To support U.N. call to assist South Korea, Truman authorizes U.S. naval and air operations south of the 38th parallel. June 28 1794 Joshua Humphreys appointed master builder to construct Navy ships for an annual salary of $2,000. 1814 Sloop-of-War USS Wasp captures HMS Reindeer, setting her on fire and left to sink. 1865 CSS Shenandoah captures 11 American whal ers in one day. 1970 USS James Madison (SSBN-627) completes conversion to Poseidon missile capability. June 29 1925 Ships and men from 11th and 12th Naval Districts assist in relief after earthquake at Santa Barbara, Calif. 1950 President Truman authorizes sea blockade of the Korean coast. Light cruiser USS Juneau (CL119) fires first naval shore bombardment of Korean Conflict. June 30 1815 Sloop-of-War USS Peacock (22 guns) takes the 16-gun brig HMS Nautilus, in last action of the War of 1812. 1943 Third Fleet Amphibious Force lands troops on Rendova Island while naval gunfire silences Japanese artillery. July 1 1800 First American convoy duty, by 32-gun frigate USS Essex, escorts convoy of merchant ships from East Indies to U.S. 1801 U.S. squadron under Commodore Dale enters Mediterranean to strike Barbary Pirates. 1850 Naval School at Annapolis renamed Naval Academy. 1911 Trial of first Navy aircraft, Curtiss A-1. The designer, Glenn Curtiss, makes first flight in Navys first aircraft, the A-1 Triad, at Lake Keuka, N.Y., then prepares Lt. Theodore Ellyson, the first naval aviator, for his two solo flights in A-1. 1914 Prohibition of alcohol begins in the Navy. 1918 Troop transport USSCovington (ID-409) hit without warning by two torpedoes from German Submarine U-86 and sank the next day. 1933 USS Constitution Old Ironsides commences tour of principal U.S. seaports. 1946 First of two detonations, Operation Crossroads nuclear test. July 2 1923 Commissioning of Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 1926 Distinguished Flying Cross authorized by Congress. 1937 Amelia Earhart disappears in Pacific. Navy conducts extensive unsuccessful search. 1945 USS Barb (SS-220) bombards Japanese instal lations on Kaihyo Island, Japan, the first successful use of rockets against shore positions. 1946 Establishment of squadron VX-3 to evaluate adaptability of helicopters to naval purposes. 1950 USS Juneau (CL-119) and two British ships sink five of six attacking North Korean torpedo boats and gunboats. 1967 During Operation Bear Claw, 7th Fleet Amphibious Force conducts helicopter assault 12 miles inland at Con Thien, Vietnam. July 3 1898 At Battle of Santiago, Cuba, Rear Adm. Sampsons squadron destroys Spanish fleet. 1950 USS Valley Forge (CV-45) and HMS Triumph participate in first carrier action of Korean Conflict. VF-51 aircraft from Valley Forge shoot down two North Korean aircraft. The action is first combat test of F9F Panther and AD Skyraider. July 4 1776 American colonies declare their indepen dence from Great Britain. 1777 John Paul Jones hoists first Stars and Stripes flag on Ranger at Portsmouth, N.H. 1801 First Presidential Review of U.S. Marine Band and Marines at the White House. 1842 First test of electrically operated underwater torpedo sinks gunboat Boxer. 1863 Confederates surrender of Vicksburg, Miss., gives Union forces control of Mississippi River. It was the bottom of the 6th (and last) inning. They were behind by 9 runs, and their heads hung low. Now is not the time, I thought, to tell Owen he didnt make the All-Stars team and that his older brother did. I got the call right before the championship Little League game, and there hadnt been enough time to tell Owen first. Plus, it would have been bad pre-game morale. Now, as I watched the Lions drag out onto the field, their faces red and defeated, it seemed there never would be a right time. These are the moments that I miss my husband, Dustin, most. Parenting involves a heavy amount of good-cop/bad-cop, so when youre the single parent, you have to make tough choices. Do I tell him to suck it up and try harder next time? Or do I coddle him and tell him that the decision stinks? Usually, when Im coddling, Dustin plays bad cop. When Im toeing the line, he pats the boys on the back. There is an emotion al balance. That balance got all out of whack during the baseball season. My usual role from the bleachers (ultimate cheerleader and deliverer of Gatorade and bubble gum) was complicated by the need to take on Dustins role sports enthusiast, believer in the game and personal trainer. Along the way, I got it all wrong. Telling Ford that his slide into second base looked like someone jumping into a swimming pool wasnt the right thing to say. Yelling for Owen to keep his chin up wasnt welcome. The day before I knew Owen had not made All-Stars, he said, Sometimes I feel angry when I see other boys with their dads. I understood. At the beginning of the season, I overheard fathers talking about taking their boys to the batting cages, and I felt sad. Would Owen have made All-Stars if Dustin had been home to help him? I dont know. When youre missing a parent, you learn to depend on other people for support. Sometimes that support comes from other kids. Our Little League keeps boys on the same team throughout their career. (Once a Lion, always a Lion.) The kids build team identity. They bond with their coach es. They see older teammates grow and change. (Who hit their growth spurt between seasons?) And the team becomes a second, if somewhat seasonal, family. At the beginning of the championship game, it became clear that the opposing team was bringing out the big guns: their top, oldest pitcher who can throw about 80 mph. I thought of Owen in the dugout and wondered if he was scared. Then the announcer said, First up for the Lions, Owen Smiley. Oh. Dear. God. Im only half joking when I say I wanted to stop the game. From the dugout, I heard Owens teammates cheering him on. Youve got this, O, they yelled. Owen struck out, but still, his teammates gave him high-fives as he ran back to them. They know its their job to bring up future Lions. Just like his older brother before him, Owen is receiving an education in the dugout. Yes, part of that education involves learning new words and someone asking, Do you still believe in Santa Claus, but mostly, it means a dozen other brothers who can teach Owen things his mother cannot. By the bottom of the sixth, the game was virtually over. The Lions didnt stand a chance. Then someone stole second. And another stole third. Suddenly and dramatically, the Lions scored 10 runs and won the cham pionship with only one out. It was better than any major league game. And Owen had been part of it. I waited until after the team victory party, after they were drenched in sweat and full of soda and cookies. As we got in the car to go home, I broke the news. Owens happy face turned sad. Tears made dirt tracks down his cheeks. What? I didnt make it? Turns out, there is no good time to tell a kid he didnt make the team. Owens oldest teammates, the ones leaving the Lions this year, came to the car and saw that Owen was crying. They hopped in and started their pep talk. They hadnt made All-Stars the first year either. They think Owen is an awesome kid. They think he will make it next year. Owen began to smile. He remembered everything he loves about baseball mostly, the team. He went to bed (mostly) happy. And to be honest, Im not sure even his dad could have done that for him.Teammates as familyHey, Money Man! I am a single Sailor sharing a house with two shipmates. My income is enough to take care of my share of food, rent, utilities, transportation costs, a few nights out a month with a lit tle left over for savings and invest ment. Four months ago, my mom lost her job and is having trouble making ends meet on her unemploy ment compensation. She is looking for work but has been asking me for money to help meet her basic needs. I have been doing what I can but am beginning to come up short at the end of the month and am worried that I wont be able to pay my own bills if this keeps up very much lon ger. What can I do? Money Man Sez: It sounds like you were living well within your means with an eye on your financial future before your mothers situa tion arose. I applaud your efforts to provide financial assistance to your mom but highly recommend that you take a realistic look at what you are able to contribute. The first step in determining what you can afford to send your mom each month is pre paring an accurate budget. You need to maintain a roof over your head (rent & utilities), you need to eat (grocery bill), and you need to be able to get to and from work (transportation costs). These are all fixed monthly expenses that you cant afford to neglect without seri ous negative impacts to your own financial health. Discretionary expenses such as nights out, hobbies, new clothes, entertainment and so 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012

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Capt. Eric Wiese will assume command of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11) June 29 from Capt. William Wheeler III during CPRW-11s 52nd change of command. Wheelers Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance tours were completed with VP-16, an instructor tour with Fleet Replacement Squadron VP-30, a department head tour with VP-45 and commanding officer of VP-10, Brunswick, Maine. Wheeler also served as the communications officer and flag secretary for Commander, Carrier Group One, San Diego as well as qualifying as a staff tactical action officer for battle group operations. He later served as anti-subma rine warfare operations offi cer, current operations office and assistant chief of staff for Fleet Operations (N3) for Commander, Seventh Fleet in Yokosuka, Japan earning qual ifications as a fleet/joint task force battle watch captain. Prior to coming to CPRW-11, Wheeler served in what might be the most rewarding tour of his career; as the command ing officer, Joint Provincial Reconstruction Team Paktika, Forward Operating Base Sharana, Afghanistan and deputy brigade commander for Interagency/Joint Operations, Task Force Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, Forward Operating Base Salerno, Afghanistan. Wheeler has commanded CPRW-11 since December 2010 and has successfully led CPRW11 squadrons in the execution of 17,000 hours of mishap-free flying supporting 36 major fleet exercises and readiness evaluations by U.S. Fleet Forces Command. Most notable, squadrons under his command have suc cessfully deployed eight sep arate times in support of all geographic combatant com manders. CPRW-11 forces par ticipated in a variety of multinational exercises including Noble Manta and Joint Warrior. His leadership was instrumental to the plan ning and execution of the transition to the new P-8A Poseidon and future Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) Unmanned Aerial System, critical to the future success Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aviation. Additionally, he was a stal wart leader aboard NAS Jacksonville as well as the Southeast Region, volunteering countless hours to military ini tiatives and outreach programs with the local community, solidifying the Navys relation ship with local and national leaders. The CPRW-11 team wel comes Wiese from a joint tour where he served as the branch chief, Joint Staff J-8, Forces Division. Keys to relieve Moreno at HS-11Cmdr. Ryan Keys will relieve Cmdr. Edgardo Moreno as commanding officer of the HS-11 Dragonslayers on July 6 during an aerial change of command while underway with the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65). Keys graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1995 with a Bachelor of Science degree in English. He earned his wings as a naval aviator in 1997 and com pleted his initial sea tour with the Tridents of HS-3, deploying twice. In 2002, he became an instructor pilot at Fleet Replacement Squadron HS-10. He flew in excess of 700 hours completing more than 170 instructional events. While at HS-10, he qualified as a Seahawk Weapons and Tactics Instructor at the Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center in Fallon, Nev. In 2004, Keys was assigned to the staff of Commander, Strike Force Training Atlantic, where he was responsible for planning and evaluating combat search and rescue exercises for Composite Training Unit Exercises. Keys next served as training, maintenance and operations department head for the Nightdippers of HS-5, where he completed two more deployments. He attended Air War College and graduated in 2009 with a Masters of Strategic Studies. Keys reported to HS-11 as the executive officer in April 2011. The Dragonslayers have been deployed as part of the Enterprises historic final deployment since early March, conducting operations in the 5th Fleet area of responsible. The squadron is scheduled to return to NAS Jacksonville in the fall. Moreno, who has accumulated more than 3,500 flight hours, reported to HS-11 in December 2009 as executive officer and took command of the squadron in April 2011. Morenos next assignment will be attending National Defense University in Washington, D.C. The Dragonslayers new executive officer is Cmdr. Tim Kinsella whose most recent assignment was on the Joint Chiefs of Staff. CPRW-11 to hold change of command a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 3

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Dragonslayers on deployment to Fifth FleetThe Dragonslayers of HS-11 have been hard at work on their 2012 deployment to Fifth Fleet. Following a short turnaround from 2011s deployment, the squadron left NAS Jacksonville in early March on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65). This deployment is historic in that it will be the aircraft carriers final one after 51 years of service. Things instantly became busy for HS-11 when a USS Enterprise Sailor fell overboard late at night in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean one week into deployment. HS-11 launched the alert search and rescue helicopter, success fully located and recovered the distressed Sailor and had him back on board the carrier in only 27 minutes. The res cue was a testament to the search and rescue capabilities that HS-11 brings to the Enterprise Strike Group every day. Following that early rescue, HS-11 provided anti-terror ism force protection through the Straits of Gibraltar and into the Mediterranean Sea, and gained critical experience operating with various NATO ships and multinational exercises. There, HS-11 participated in anti-submarine warfare events and ferried NATO partners on board the carrier for tours and conferences. After a stop in Athens, Greece for a three-day port visit, the Enterprise Strike Group navigated the Suez Canal, ulti mately arriving in the North Arabian Sea and Arabian Gulf. In the Fifth Fleet area of responsibility, the Dragonslayers conducted plane guard operations for fixed wing aircraft flying missions over Afghanistan and provided surveil lance and reconnaissance on various surface contacts. Over the past two months, HS-11 has had two exciting port calls in Dubai and Bahrain, allowing squadron mem bers time to relax from the busy operational schedule. Every Dragonslayer has been working hard to ensure mission completion and is eagerly looking forward to returning home for some much deserved rest in the fall. The Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville recently provided a tour of Maintenance Training Unit (MTU) 1005 for several members of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). The RAN recently signed a con tract to purchase several MH-60R model helicopters. Plans are cur rently in work to integrate the RAN personnel into U.S. Navy Aviation Maintenance C schools for rating specific training on the newest model of the MH-60R. The MH-60R aviation mainte nance training for the southeast ern region is taught by CNATTU Jacksonville. NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Understander, CNATTU Jax Commanding Officer Cmdr. Michael Gramolini, CNATTU Jax Executive Officer Cmdr. Daryl Pierce and MTU 1005 Department Head ATCS Edward Krueger provided a tour for the RAN delegation and several MH-60R program managers in order to help them better under stand the level of maintenance training that their maintainers will be provided. Krueger conducted the tour stopping at all five multi-million dollar trainers that RAN per sonnel will be using to learn the complex systems of the MH-60R helicopter. His brief covered the capabilities of each trainer and approximately how RAN person nel will be on them. All members of the RAN delega tion were extremely thankful for the in-depth tour and were very excited about what the future holds for this maintenance train ing effort. RAN members will begin to arrive for training during FY-13. Pet adoption event needs volunteersFirst Coast No More Homeless Pets along with shelter and rescue groups from across Northeast Florida are holding a July Mega Pet Adoption event July 13-15 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Jacksonville Fairgrounds. Volunteers are needed to help support this event and to help find homes for more than 600 animals during the three-day event. Volunteers will participate in set-up acting as greeters, assist with dog and cat handling tasks, pro vide overnight safety for the animals and tear-down. For more information or to volunteer e-mail mtekin@fcnmhp.org or volunteer@fcnmhp.org or call 674-0665. Royal Australian Navy members tour CNATTU Jax Fireworks prohibited at NAS JaxExcept, for command controlled displays, the possession of explosives and fireworks for sale, storage or use of any description on NAS Jacksonville property, are strictly prohibited. Fireworks are spectacular to watch, and make great noises, but can be extremely dangerous in the hands of amateurs. NAS Jacksonville Fire Prevention Division rec ommends attending public fireworks displays because those shows are safer and have better visual displays then what might be accomplished at your home. Stay safe this Fourth of July holiday! 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012

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Electronic technicians from the communications division of the blue crew on board USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) vis ited VP-45 May 29 for a profes sional discussion on airborne anti-submarine warfare (ASW). The submariners are based at NSB Kings Bay, Ga. Personnel attached to sub marines are separated into two crews, a blue and gold crew. While one crew is underway on the submarine, the other crew utilizes the time in simula tors and training for their next underway period. At VP-45, the guests were given a brief on the P-3C Orions capabilities, as well as a tour of the aircraft, han gar spaces, and the tactical operations center (TOC). The Rhode Island crew was able to see first-hand the equipment which P-3 operators employ against submarines much like their own, along with the C4I components that make the operations possible. The crew made full use of their time with Lt. Seth Eisenmenger, a weapons tac tics instructor, peppering him with questions for nearly an hour. They were often amused by the fact that so much of the equipment used by both subs and Navy planes is similar. For example, the touch screen displays installed in the newer ASW Improvement Program (AIP) aircraft are very simi lar to those found on the USS Rhode Island. Lt. Joshua Pritt described the average day in the life of aircrew and demonstrated to the visitors all of the sur vival equipment aircrew are required to wear while flying. As a former enlisted subma riner himself, he jumped at the chance to bridge the gap between the ASW squadron and the submarines they hunt. Pritt responded to many questions about the life of an aviator and an officer. Ironically aviators and those who patrol the deep have a long and powerful history together, he explained. During World War II, subma rines patrolling off of the coast of Japan would routinely pick up downed flyers from mis sions gone wrong. One of the most famous examples was former President George Herbert Walker Bush, who was picked up by the die sel submarine USS Finback. Legend has it that they imme diately put him on the watchbill to qualify as officer of the deck. At the TOC, Lt. Cmdr. Kelly Holmes of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven explained how their communications were received and then passed to the air crews for joint missions. They got to see how much planning and preparation goes into each individual mission. The submariners were sur prised to learn that the air crew would meet hours before a flight to mission plan and pre-flight the entire aircrafts extensive array of systems. The visit definitely sparked a good tactical conversation, said AWO2 David Wells, VP-45 acoustic sensor operator. It was interesting to see how our respective tactics for detection and avoidance face-off in the undersea arena. The discourse focused on the P-3Cs search, localization, track, and attack methods, as well as P-3 communications and detection capabilities. The crew of the Rhode Island also shared the capabilities of their platform in ASW tactics and procedures. Both groups felt the meeting was an invalu able boon to the professional development of their craft. Its great to know what were up against, especially with the global proliferation of airborne ASW assets in the hands of guys we dont want finding us, remarked ET2 Gesell of USS Rhode Island. Summertime means fun in the sun, vacations and outdoor activities, and the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) wants Sailors and fami lies to think safety first. According to the Naval Safety Center, summer deaths spiked in 2008 then decreased in 2009 and 2010, but unfor tunately increased again last year. In 2011, between Memorial Day and Labor Day, 16 Sailors and 15 Marines lost their lives. One in an ATV wreck; three drowned; three during recreational activities; 11 in motor vehicles; and 13 on motorcycles. Losing even one Sailor or Marine is too many, especially when most of the incidents can be avoided with proper planning and training, said West. Training is the priority when it comes to motorcycle safety. According to Naval Safety Center, motorcycle fatali ties increased from six in 2010 to 13 in 2011, which is more than a 100 percent increase. Motorcycle training and safe ty starts with the command having a designated motorcycle safety represen tative (MSR). Personal motor vehicle accidents are the second highest cause of fatalities in our Navy, and motorcycles are the primary casual factor with sports bikes remaining at the top of the list. MSRs play an important role in mitigating this risk by mentoring and educating our Sailors, ensuring they are registered and complete all required motorcycle training, said West. The Naval Safety Centers summer campaign Live to Play, Play to Live, also focuses on alcohol awareness, water and boat safety, sexual assault, suicide awareness, and sports activities. Fourth of July is just around the corner so start planning safety now, said West. Whether you are on the highways, waterways or in the back yard, safety must come first. And if you drink, dont drive and have a plan to get home. When traveling long distances, remember to use TRiPS, the on-line, automated risk-assessment tool that helps users recognize and avoid the hazards they face on the highway: fatigue, not buckling up. TRiPS is locat ed at https://wwwa.nko.navy.mil. Safety is one of the key areas of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initia tive which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the his tory of the Navy and Marine Corps. To learn more about the summer campaign, visit www.safetycenter.navy. mil. USS Rhode Island crew visits VP-45 MCPON stresses the importance of summer safety for Sailors and families JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 The Navy Drug Screening Laboratory (NDSL) at NAS Jacksonville plays an important role to the fleet by screening nearly 1 million urinalysis samples each year. NDSL Jacksonville, along with labs in San Diego and Great Lakes, Ill., con tinues to support the Navys zero toler ance for drug abuse with a scientifical ly accurate testing process guaranteed to withstand any legal challenges. Our job is to test urine samples of military members for the presence of illicit drugs, including recreational and prescription drugs. The Navy has a zero tolerance drug abuse policy and we are here to support that policy using stateof-the-art testing measures, said NDSL Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Carlos LeBron. Drug abuse is a continuous safety and readiness issue for the fleet and we are just one component of the Department of Defense (DoD) effort to deter drug use in the military. We take our jobs very seriously, following strict processing and documentation proce dures and are confident in the results produced, added NDSL Operations Director Jim Evans. Testing is conducted through random screening, command directed or prob able cause urinalysis. Each command assigns a trained urinalysis coordinator responsible for obtaining samples and ensuring specimens are documented, labeled and sealed properly. The coor dinator then delivers the samples to NDSL in person, via mail or other ship ping services. At the laboratory, physical science technicians then inspect the packag ing and containers for damage and ensure seals and chain of custody sig natures are intact. All containers must match the documentation submitted. Any discrepancies are reported back to the command. The containers are then given a laboratory accession number to track the sample, logged into a comput er and placed in a secure storage area until the testing process begins. The first step in the testing process is to screen samples for the panel of drugs that DoD requires. If they are negative, the command gets a negative result and we are done with that sample, explained Evans. If there is a positive result, the sam ple goes through two more levels of test ing. We will repeat the initial screening using the same technology only this time specifically targeting the drug that presumed to be positive, he continued. We also insert tubes of water between each sample to ensure there is no carry over from one sample to another. If the sample remains posi tive, technicians conduct a confir mation test identifying a chemi cal marker that determines the type of drug and quantitative amount. If the amount exceeds the DoD cutoff for a specific drug, we report it as a posi tive result to the command. The con firmation testing processing is an ana lytical method which is really the gold standard of forensic urinalysis, said Evans. We conduct three tests, each independently poured from the same bottle, so there cannot be any argu ments about mixed up samples. Once a sample is deemed positive, the legal process takes over within the command. If its an illicit drug, the command will take legal action. If its a prescription drug, the command will conduct an investigation to ensure the service member is authorized to be on that medication. NDSL tests for seven classes of drugs including marijuana (specifically THC); cocaine; amphetamines and metham phetamines; opiates such as codeine, morphine and hydrocodone; synthetic opiates such as oxycodone (oxycontin); heroin; and designer amphetamines such as ecstasy. If a service member is suspected of using Spice, commands can authorize specific testing for these products through NDSL Great Lakes. The laboratory will also begin test ing for benzodiazepines such as Valium and Xanax in the near future. Our job is to make sure we produce the most accurate results possible. We continue to look for new ways of doing things. We have a small research and development platform here and our chemists and biochemists are currently developing new testing protocols for the Navy and other services, stated LeBron. We strive to stay on top of science as a whole, added Evans. We are inspect ed three times a year by military and civilian experts from the fields of foren sic drug testing. They also make recom mendations to ensure we are not only meeting DoD standards but interna tional standards as well. NDSL experts are also available for consult regarding interpretation of the testing process or drug component issues and often serve as expert wit nesses during court cases. According to LeBron and Evans, the number of positive results continue to remain steady in todays Navy. The rates tend to remain the same, how ever the distribution of those results is changing over time. Were seeing less positive cocaine and THC results over time, but more of the prescription drugs. However, we dont know when we report a positive test for prescription drugs if its legitimate use, said Evans. And, LeBron is quick to give warn ing to those abusing drugs. If you are doing drugs, you will get caught. It might not be tomorrow, but sooner or later you will be tested and pop posi tive, he said. Keeping warfighters safe through accurate drug testing

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 7 At NAS Jacksonville, our number one mission is supporting the warfighter. Drug abuse undermines our mission and is incompatible with the maintenance of high standards of performance and military discipline. We entrust our Sailors with a tremendous amount of responsibility and we need them to be ready 24/7. Unplanned losses negatively affect commands operational and warfighter readiness. Its every Sailors responsibility to deter drug abuse. The Navys policy is simple and clear zero tolerance. At NAS Jacksonville we continually communicate the zero tolerance policy to our Sailors and enforce it without exceptions. Photos by Kaylee LaRocque

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At NAS Jax, base chapel staff are managing the food drive. For more information, contact Chaplain (Lt.) Paul Rodgers at paul.b.rodgers@navy.mil or 542-3610. Food donations will be accepted at the specified locations during normal working hours through Aug. 29. The goals for the service branches this year are: Army, 562,000 pounds; Navy, 396,000 pounds; Air Force, 348,000 pounds; and Office of the Secretary of Defense and Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff agencies and activities, 194,000 pounds. Last year, NAS Jax personnel set a Navy and national record as the installation with the largest collection at 133,912 pounds. NAS Jax personnel hope to set the example again by exceeding last years goal. Help us reach that goal by donating today. The following are drop-off locations: NAS Jax Building 1 Quarterdeck NAS Jax Commissary NAS Jax Chapel NMCB-14 VR-58 HSM-70 NAS Jax Flight Line Cafe NAS Jax Bachelor Housing MESRON 10 VP-62 NAVFAC Southeast CAMPAIGNServe, www.serve.gov. What do area food banks need? Canned Fruits, canned veg etables, multigrain cereal, grains, canned proteins, soups, juice, con diments, snacks, baking goods, hygiene items, paper products and household items. Can peanut butter and peanut products be donated? Yes, peanut butter and peanut products can be donated. Are there any types of food you do not accept? We cannot accept perishable food items. If you have a question about the acceptability of an item youre considering donating, contact your command coordinator. Can I donate cash? Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) regulations provide that the CFC is the only monetary solicita tion in the Federal workplace on behalf of charities. We hope you will, nevertheless, consider being part of the effort by bringing in nonperishable food. Are you accepting corporate partners/sponsors? This is a federal food drive orga nized by the Chief Human Capital Officers Council in partnership with the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM), DoD, and U.S. Department of Agriculture. Why is the federal government doing this? Isnt this something that should be a private matter? Federal employees are generous members of everyones communi ty. This is a voluntary effort to for Federal employees to give back to their community by helping those in need during these tough eco nomic times. Why is this campaign limited to three months? During the summer months, food banks traditionally encoun ter lulls in the level of giving due to holidays and other demands on donors time. This year, the surge in demand coupled with a drop in donations has literally emptied food pantries shelves heading into the summer months. To help the food pantries stock up to meet critical needs for their services, the NAS Jax Chapel in partnership with the Defense Commissary Agency, Navy Exchange and various tenant commands will accept donations through Aug. 29. What authority does OPM have to do a food drive? The Feds Feed Families food drive is voluntary. It was estab lished to address this summers urgent need for assistance to our communitys families. The OPM is partnering with the Chief Human Capital Officers Council to lead the Feds Feed Families food drive. Is there a Twitter Feed or Facebook Page for the Feds Feed Families campaign? Yes, we are using both Facebook and Twitter for this years cam paign. Please Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook. com/fedsfeedfamilies and follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/ fedfooddrive. We tweet campaign activities at least one a day and would love to have our followers tweet information about their activ ities.on are areas you could choose to cut back a bit while you are helping out. Your savings and investment program would also fall in the dis cretionary category but realize that cutting back savings or investing now will impact your future finan cial wellbeing. Once you determine what you are able and willing to contribute you need to sit down with your mother and discuss both the scope and duration of assistance. Does she have a budget that accurately reflects her present financial situa tion? Are there other family mem bers who can help out financially? Is she actively seeking employ ment? How long do her benefits last? What happens if they run out before she finds gainful employ ment? This frank discussion may be a bit uncomfortable for both of you but will establish boundaries, manage expectations and set the conditions for a mutually agreed on plan of action. The U.S. Coast Guard defines search and rescue as the use of available resources to assist per sons or property in potential or actual distress (emphasis mine). It is important to ensure that those rendering assistance do not become imperiled by their own actions. Hopefully any financial assistance given to a less fortu nate family member will be well thought out and involve only avail able resources and will not cause financial distress to the member providing assistance. MONEYMAN FAQ 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012

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JAXUSA Partnership hon ored Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) with its Industry Leader Award for business achievements and corporate citizenship pre sented during a luncheon at the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront June 7. FRCSE, the largest tenant command at NAS Jacksonville and the largest industrial employer in the region, pro vides aviation maintenance, repair and overhaul services for a variety of U.S. military air craft. We recognize and appre ciate the outstanding perfor mance and corporate citi zenship of FRCSE, said Jerry Mallot, president of JAXUSA Partnership, a division of JAX Chamber. Their success speaks directly to the business advantages, excellent work force, opportunities for suc cess, and quality of life that exist in Northeast Florida. FRCSE Commanding Officer Capt. Robert Caldwell accept ed the award at a gathering of hundreds of civic leaders, including Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and guest speaker and BET (Black Entertainment Television) founder Robert Johnson. Caldwell said he was hon ored to accept the award on behalf of the facility. He said it was a validation of the extraor dinary efforts the workforce provides to the warfighting customer. FRCSE, former ly known as Naval Air Depot Jacksonville, has served the Fleet since 1940. Artisans per form heavy, depot-level main tenance on military aircraft, such as the F/A-18 Hornet/ Super Hornet Strike Fighter and the SH-60 Seahawk Utility/ Assault Helicopter, as well as on a variety of engines, compo nents and systems with onsite comprehensive engineering, logistics and manufacturing support. New industrial processes and manufacturing technolo gies, such as precision measur ing machines and 5-axis mill ing centers expand capabilities to fabricate worn out or oneof-a-kind parts to a like new condition. FRCSE is an innovative organization with 38 active Public/Private Partnerships. The facility has won numer ous awards, such as the Chief of Naval Operations 2011 Aviation Safety Award and the 2011 Founders Service Award from First Coast Manufacturers Association. FRCSE personnel are involved in numerous phil anthropic efforts, such as the workplace fund drive and Combined Federal Campaign raising $201,000 for local, national and international charities in 2011. JAXUSA Partnership is the business membership orga nization focused on regional economic development. It rep resents nearly 200 top private sector investors in Northeast Florida. The organization facil itates the creation and reten tion of quality jobs, resulting in a higher standard of living and better quality of life in the region. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Robert Sanders, Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) Officer in Charge Cmdr. Eric Hoffman and SWEAT Federal Program Director Joe Orlando, participat ed in a ribbon cutting ceremony held at the center June 22, which marked the comple tion of an extensive multi-year facility ren ovation and improvement project. This event included opening remarks, a ribbon cutting ceremony and a tour of NECEs new roof. Since 2010, NECE has undergone sub stantial facility upgrades to address Navy Occupational Safety and Health deficien cies as well as to enhance the look and functionality of the 34-year-old facility. This project took a tremendous amount of planning and coordination by our administration staff, said Hoffman. As a result, this new roof not only will extend the life of the building for many years to come but enhances our appear ance contributing to our image as an inter national center of excellence. Construction codes have changed over the years leaving us with deficiencies in many areas, said Jose Medina, head of NECEs Administrative Department. This multi-year program will allow for continued growth of staff, address crew morale, and position the center for mission success in the years to come. NECEs $2.1 million facility improvement project has included replacing outdated flat roof with a metal pitched roof, over haul of the electrical systems, the addition of 10 sparking spaces, and the renovation both mens and womens locker rooms. This command arguably does more for the war-fighter globally than any other ten ant command on base, said Sanders dur ing the opening remarks. This roof is a testament that NECE is here to stay. JAXUSA Partnership recognizes FRCSE NECE completes facility improvement project JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 9

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NAVFAC awarded Secretarys Cup Annual award recognizes commands for promoting small business opportunities The Navys Office of Small Business Programs awarded the Secretarys Cup award to Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) for promoting acquisition opportunities for small busi nesses during a ceremony held at the Pentagon June 15. Of 38,659 contracts awarded by NAVFAC last year, 25,296 went to small businesses. NAVFAC Southeast is proud to be a part of NAVFACs winning team in their selection for the Office of Small Business Programs Secretarys Cup, said NAVFAC Southeast Small Business Director Nelson Smith. Since its inception, NAVFAC Southeast has worked hard to develop a culture of small business awareness, with the ulti mate goal of providing the maximum practicable opportunities for our small business partners. NAVFAC exceeded all government-wide pro gram goals and targets, with 44 percent of the total dollars awarded going to small businesses. Additionally, the command surpassed all of its goals in contract awards to service-disabled vet eran-owned small business, disadvantaged small business, and women-owned small businesses. At Southeast, we have demonstrated this com mitment by exceeding all of our small business tar gets for the past three year, said Nelson. Last year, NAVFAC Southeast awarded over $975 million in prime contracts to small businesses throughout our area of responsibility. We take very seriously the Department of the Navy Office of Small Business Program motto: Small Business The First Option. Small business outreach was another key factor in NAVFAC winning the award this year, as small business specialists and key acquisition personnel participated in 252 outreach events throughout the year, reaching more than 46,000 attendees world wide. We take every opportunity to work with the community to educate and inform them of oppor tunities, said Smith. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012

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Dont put off colon cancer screening Screening patients for cancer is an idea that continues to gather momentum in our country. President Richard Nixon actually launched the idea of a war against cancer in 1969. We havent won the war yet, but we continue to find strategies that seem to help find cancers earlier. Nipping cancers in the bud is always the best game plan. Q: How can I best prevent getting colon cancer? Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men and women in the United States. Only lung cancer kills more Americans each year. In 2005, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that more than 141,000 people were diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and 53,000 people died from it. Charles Schultz, the famous cartoonist creator of Charlie Brown never got screened for colon cancer despite having a Dad who died of the dis ease. Your first colonos copy should be scheduled at age 50 for white and Hispanic patients, and age 45 for African-American patients. Caught early, colorectal cancer can be cured. Screening rates for colorectal cancer are rising among adults age 50. In 1997 approximately 25 per cent of adults in this age group were screened for colorectal cancer with the rate rising to 55 percent in 2008 for most Americans. Naval Hospital Jacksonville recorded 72.5 per cent of its enrolled patients age 50 and older were screened as of December 2009. Some cancer experts equate not getting a colo noscopy after age 50 is much like not getting a mammogram as recommended. Colon cancer kills more people than breast can cer, and many more people than cervical cancer, yet how often is colon cancer screening discussed with you by your provider at your routine visits? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention challenge physicians to find the time and resources to educate patients about the options for colorec tal cancer screening methods and issue patient reminders to ensure it is not forgotten at routine visits. Ask your provider about colorectal screening at your next appointment. CNRSE civilian graduates from Naval War CollegeCarol Lucius, a civilian assigned to Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE), graduated from phase one of the U.S. Naval War College (NWC) Joint Professional Military Education Program in Newport, R.I., June 15. Lucius, CNRSE work and family life coordinator, accepted her certificate of completion along with more than 500 other graduates during a ceremony attended by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert. Your studies here provide you an opportunity to reassess yourself, your situation and your service, and to recharge yourself intellectually to see things more clearly, Greenert said. The program is primarily designed for senior offi cers throughout all branches of the military, but it also serves as a great opportunity for Department of Defense civilians to become more professionally rounded, Lucius said. Not too many civilians, and very few women, were in my classes or graduated from the program. Its geared toward officers at the 0-4 and 0-5 level for promotion, but I wanted to broaden my knowledge of Navy operations, she said. After having worked with our operations team in disaster response, I got more of a flavor of the big pic ture of the Navy and wanted to learn more. The curriculum included three courses focusing on joint maritime operations, national security decision making, and strategy and war. Lucius chose to complete the program on board NAS Jacksonville through the colleges Fleet Seminar Progam which allows students to earn their cer tificate locally over a three-year period rather than attend the one-year residency program in Newport. It was a big learning curve, but doable, she said. It was great to have bright folks in class and good teachers to bounce ideas around and to learn from. I think they might have learned something from having a civilian in the class, too. According to Lucius, the knowledge and experience she gained from attending the program will be instru mental to her future efforts at CNRSE. It helps me to know how my role fits into Big Navy. We help Sailors and families everyday in the Fleet and Family Support Program, so it is helpful to know more about the nuts and bolts of what we do. In his closing remarks, Rear Adm. John Christenson, NWC president, expressed his confidence in the knowledge and skills the graduates have acquired during their time as NWC students. You depart Newport to be part of the solution, to win any war and to defend freedom, Christenson said. You depart with greater trust and confidence in your service and international partners. You depart with the knowledge of centuries directly relevant to the challenges of today. The Naval War College was established in 1884 as a small institution with mostly summer courses. It has evolved into a one-year, resident program that gradu ates about 600 students a year, and a distance pro gram that graduates about 1,000 students a year. More than 50,000 students have graduated since its first class of nine students in 1885, and about 300 of todays admirals, generals and senior executive ser vice leaders are alumni. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 11

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Pool party attracts fun-seeking familiesThe Summer Splash Pool Party kicked off the summer season in a wildly wet fashion at the NAS Jax Outdoor Pool June 16. The event was a combined effort of Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) and the Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department that provided a fun-filled day of free activities empha sizing fun and fitness for Navy families. Special events included a cardboard boat regatta, where a family team of four or more competed to build a floatable boat out of cardboard and other materi als such as duct tape and pool noodles. Following the regatta was the Karaoke contest where contestants displayed their singing talent. Throughout the event, participants had the oppor tunity to win fabulous prizes such as a bicycle, a 19 flat screen TV, as well as family passes to the Jacksonville Zoo and Adventure Landing. The event concluded with a dance competition where participants won awards for the Best Dad, Best Mom, Most Energy, Most Creative and Best Family Dance. One pool patron, Suzanne Speight, said the weath er held out and it was a great time. The music and food were awesome and the event was a great opportunity for the kids and parents to have some fun. Every patron at the event received a free hot dog, soda and chips. The party went on until 6 p.m., giving the families plenty of sun and laughs for the weekend. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 13

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Sailors frocked at CPRW-11Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven Capt. Trey Wheeler frocked 14 Sailors during a recent ceremony as shipmates and family members gathered to congratulate them. The following were frocked to their new rates: AWO1 Aaron Dyer; AWO1 Hector Rivera; AWO1 Marvelous Salters; AWO1 Nicholas Taylor; AWO1 Daryl Trail; AWO1 Jacqueline Workman; IT1 Marcus Wade; OS2 Geoffery Coleman; OS2 Grant Cullum; OS2 Jennifer Glover; IT2 Daniel Grimes; RP2 Chester Harden; ET2 Eric Holsey; OS3 Paul Avila and YN3 Kirk Brown. With their new appointments, these Sailors will now enjoy the responsibilities that come with their new rank. Commodore Wheeler congrat ulated them for their sustained superior performance and exhort ed them to continue the good work. Doane retires after 24 years service Lt. Thomas Doane of Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Elevens (CPRW-11) Mobile Tactical Operations Center (MTOC) recently retired after 24 years of naval service. Doane, a prior enlisted helicopter aircrewmen was commissioned an aviation operations limited duty officer in 2002. During his illustrious career, Doane has been deployed to the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian Ocean, Mediterranean Sea and the Persian Gulf. He also served on the ground in Iraq. Prior to arriving at the MTOC, he served as the officer in charge (OIC) of Rescue Swimmer School, Jacksonville. During his retirement ceremony, Doane was award ed the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal for his meritorious service while serving as OIC of MTOC Detachment Djibouti, Africa and MTOC Three assistant OIC. His citation commended him for his unmatched operational experience, which was instrumental in supporting Sixth Fleet deployed personnel. Doane also led a team of 14 Sailors, providing Command, Control, Communication, Computer and Intelligence (C4I) support to four allied nations during Exercise Grampus. Doanes distinctive accomplishments and selfless dedication during his tour at CPRW-11 marked the pinnacle of his 24 years of naval service. CPRW-11 bids farewell to Woods Lt. Cmdr. Casey Woods of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11) retired from active duty after 22 years of active service during a ceremony June 22. Capt. Frank Naylor III, com manding officer of Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division was the guest speaker. Woods graduated from Ninnekah High School in Oklahoma in 1990 and enlisted in the United States Marine Corps shortly thereafter. As a young Marine he served in Hotel Battery 3/12, 3rd BN, 10th Marines, and Kilo Battery, 3rd BN, 10th Marines, Camp Lejeune, N.C. and supported multiple combat opera tions during Operations Desert Storm and Desert Shield. Woods earned a Bachelors of Arts degree in Liberal Arts from the University of Missouri, Kansas City in 1997 and later obtained a commission in the United States Navy. As a commissioned officer, Woods served in the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Community as an instructor tactical coordinator with VP-16, Fleet Replacement Squadron VP-30 and VP-5 deploying to every region of the world. He also completed a tour on board USS Enterprise as a tactical action officer. The culmination of his naval service came while serving as the training offi cer for CPRW-11 and was instrumental in the success ful introduction of the P-8A Poseidon to the nations fighting force. Woods mili tary decora tions include the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (four awards), Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (three awards), Combat Action Ribbon, and various service/unit awards. He was also awarded the Meritorious Service Medal for his leader ship and foresight as the CPRW-11 training officer while performing his duties in an exemplary manner. The citation stated his contribu tions were critical to the successful implementation of the P-3C fleet synthetic training environment, the P-8A Post-Fleet Replacement Squadron training and his role as the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force Symposium lead coordinator where he led 50 Sailors in the execution of a demanding week-long schedule including the P-8A rollout and fleet intro duction ceremony. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 15

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Navy Medicine Support Command Sailors, civilians celebrate Hospital Corps 114th Birthday Service members, civilian employees and con tracted workers from the Bureau of Medicine and Surgerys (BUMED) sole point of accountability for medical education and training participated in a ceremony highlighting the Hospital Corps 114th birthday June 18 at NAS Jacksonville. Navy Medicine Support Command personnel, an Echelon 3 entity overseeing the majority of medi cal training available to U.S. Navy medical pro fessionals, hosted a cake-cutting ceremony and presentation on the history of the largest U.S. Navy Corps, something retired HMCM Michael Stewart, NMSC Defense Medical Human Resources System Internet (DMHRS) program manager said is imper ative for current and former hospital corpsmen to remember and appreciate. On this anniversary of the Hospital Corps, it is important for us to stop and reflect back on the past 114 years because of all of the incredible sacrifices that have been made by this group of warriors on behalf of freedom, he said. Although we have had many names the legacy has remained one of valor, duty, and sacrifice. From the earliest days of the founding of the Hospital Corps in 1898 to today, men and women have proudly worn the caduceus (although earlier days had us wearing a Red Cross) and that rating badge signified to everyone in the Navy and Marine Corps team that they were avail able to provide whatever form of healthcare that was needed at anytime. Stewart, who served as the BUMED force master chief the highest-ranking enlisted hospital corps man in the Navy before his retirement, said the rich history of the hospital corpsman rating, along with the men and women who have taken the hos pital corpsman oath for more than a century have had a profound impact on service members around the world. The heritage of the Hospital Corps is unmatched by any other group in all of the Armed Forces and is the only enlisted Corps, he said. It would be impossible to know how many men and women have their lives touched by the actions of Doc or who lived to fight another day because their corps man was willing to go in harms way to save them. Not only in battle but in peacetime as well, the U.S. Navy Hospital Corpsman has been the backbone of Navy medicine and will continue to be the stan dard by which all others are compared. HM2(FMF) Matt Biecker, NMSCs most junior hospital corpsman, and HMCS Karen Tracy, NMSC Reserve Component training leading senior chief petty officer, the senior-most hospital corpsman at NMSC, cut a cake during the brief ceremony, some thing Biecker said was an honor. Working at a command with so many hospital corpsmen some who are now retired but served during Vietnam and in Iraq and Afghanistan has served to broaden my horizons about the role corpsmen play in the Navy, he said. Im honored to be part of the Hospital Corps, and part of the his tory we continue to write all over the world. Navy Medicine Support Command provides a single point of accountability for all Navy Medicine education, training, public health and human resource management for Sailors and Marines as well as providing innovative and responsive leaders in health support services. NMSC is part of the Navy Medicine team, a global healthcare network of 63,000 Navy medical per sonnel around the world who provide high-quality health care to more than one million eligible ben eficiaries. Navy Medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the battlefield. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012

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Test Results Table NAS Jacksonville Radiological ContaminantsContaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo./yr.) MCL Violation Y/N Level Detected Range of Results MCLG MCL Likely Source of Contamination Inorganic ContaminantsContaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo./yr.) MCL Violation Y/N Level Detected Range of Results MCLG MCL Likely Source of Contamination Disinfection By-Products (TTHMs/HAA5/Chlorine Residual) (NAS only)Contaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo./ yr.) MCL Violation Y/N Level Detected Range of Results MCLG or MRDLG MCL or MRDL Likely Source of Contamination Secondary ContaminantsContaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo./ yr.) MCL Violation Y/N Level Detected Range of Results MCLG or MRDLG MCL or MRDL Likely Source of Contamination Lead and Copper (Tap Water) (NAS only)Contaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo./yr.) AL Violation Y/N 90th Percentile Result No. of sites exceeding the AL MCLG AL (Action Level) Likely Source of Contamination The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: (A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic sys tems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. (B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater dis charges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming. (C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses. (D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems. (E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturallyoccurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribes reg ulations which limit the amount of certain contami nants in water provided by public water systems. Federal Department of Agriculture regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause seri ous health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is pri marily from materials and components asso ciated with service lines and home plumbing. NAVFAC SE is responsible for providing high quality drink ing water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to two minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are con cerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http:// www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. All drinking water, including bottled water, may reason ably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not nec essarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immunocompromised persons such as persons with cancer under going chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryp tosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 4264791 or www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. For further information or questions concerning this report, call 542-5610. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC SE), Public Works Department (PWD), as the NAS Jacksonville water utility service provider, is pleased to provide you with the 2011 annu al Water Quality Report. PWD provides a safe and dependable supply of drinking water through three deep wells which draw from the Floridan aquifer. In 2011, the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) performed a source water assess ment that identified no potential sources of contam ination near our wells. Assessment results are on the DEP Source Water Assessment and Protection Program website at www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp. Treatment of your water supply includes aeration for odor control and chlorination for disinfection. In 2003, the station began receiving potable water from JEA, therefore, some of the data in this report is from JEA testing. NAVFAC SE routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to federal and state laws and regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on results of monitoring from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 2011. Data obtained before Jan. 1, 2011 and presented in this report, are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations. Below are the definitions of terms and abbreviations used in the report: Action Level (AL) the concentration of a contami nant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Maximum Contaminant Level The Maximum Allowed (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal The Goal(MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drink ing water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Maximum Residual Disinfection Level (MRDL) The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial con taminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants Non-Detects (ND) indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis. Not Applicable (N/A) No value limit or restriction has been applied to this particular parameter. Parts per billion (ppb) one part per billion corre sponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000. Parts per million (ppm) one part per million cor responds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000. Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 17

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included July Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowl ing, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Summer Bowling Leagues Now Forming Monday Mixed Trio 7 p.m. Wednesday After Work League 4:30 p.m. Thrusday Morning Seniors 9 a.m. Thursday Night Extreme Bowling 6:30 p.m. Friday Intramural League 11:45 a.m. Sunday Fun Bunch League 4 p.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. **New fitness class Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DOD civilians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session two begins July 9 Lessons are available at the indoor and outdoor pool $40 military, $45 DOD Register for swim lessons at the base gym I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! Wild Adventures offering FREE admis sion for active duty, retirees, disabled veterans and reservists July 1 8, 2012 Family members can purchase dis counted tickets at ITT 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale July 13 $58.50 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Daytona International Speedway Jalapeno 250 $24 Coke Zero 400, July 7, $70 80 Coke Zero Shuttle $16The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Dine N Dash Free food at Liberty Vault June 28 at 6 p.m. Trapeze Class Learn to trapeze at Trapeze High Florida in Fleming Island June 30 at 3 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees July 10 & 24 for active duty July 12 & 26 for retirees & DoD person nel Junior Golf Clinic Session 2 (ages 6 10) July 16 20 Session 3 (ages 11 17) August 6 10 Monday Friday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. $110 per week long session Twilight Special Monday Friday Play 18 holes for $17 after 3 p.m. Not applicable on holidaysMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Lessons $150 per person July 20, 21, 22, 28 & 29 August 17, 18, 19, 25 & 26 Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Sept. 10 Oct. 17 $500 per person Youth Flight Camps (ages 12 18) Basic Aviation Course $100 per person July 11 14 register by July 3 July 18 21 register by July 11 Advanced Aviation Course (basic course required) $150 per person Aug. 8 11 register by Aug. 1 Aug. 22 25 register by Aug. 14 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012

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Navy leadership has implemented the Operational Stress Control (OSC) program to help Sailors and their families recog nize and navigate stress, said Navy officials, June 18. According to Capt. Kurt Scott, director, Navy Behavioral Health, the Navys goal is to help individuals identify stressors and develop the skills and tools to be resilient and handle the curveballs life may throw. Deployment work-ups, a sick child, four-section duty and marital trouble can all cause stress levels to rise. Stress is a fact of life but resiliency helps make stress manageable. Stress is normal and can help you excel and succeed, but there is a point when stress may impact your ability to meet lifes challenges, said Scott. OSC defines resilience as the capacity to withstand, recover, grow and adapt in the face of stressors and changing demands. Scott discussed four skills that can help Sailors and their families improve resilience. Balanced, nutritious meals with moderate portions help fuel the body. Getting enough sleep is critical to physical and emo tional well being. Regular exercise helps you physically and improves your mood. ed friendship can help individuals achieve personal and pro fessional success. A friend can provide support, influence per sonal growth and provide a source of strength during difficult times, said Scott. Financial strain is a top stressor. It can cause personality changes in an individual and has been linked to depression which can impact duty performance and interpersonal rela tionships, said Scott. Fleet and Family Support Centers, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society and command financial specialists can help Sailors examine their finances and develop a budget. advisor or chaplain can be a great outlet for stress reduction and resiliency. When stress becomes overbearing to your well being, ask for assistance. Asking for help is a sign of strength and a commitment to yourself to perform at your optimal level, said Scott. Friends, families and co-workers can be your support network, but there may be times when someone with more experience, knowledge and skill is better suited to provide the help you need. The OSC continuum can help individuals determine what level of support is needed. The continuum is a color-coded guide for Sailors and leaders to measure their stress as it relates to one of four color-coded zones: green is ready, yellow is react ing, orange is injured and red is ill. The green zone is where we want to be but the green zone is not stress free, said Scott. It means you have the skills and the tools you need to really be able to manage what life is throwing at you. Learning from life lessons makes you stronger and more resilient and that is our goal. To learn more, visit the Navys OSC blog www.navynavstress.com. Resilience helps Sailors and families navigate rough times JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 19

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NAS Jacksonville host ed the fourth annual GSA Expo at the NAS Jax Officers Club June 21. The event is put on by the U.S. General Services Administration to show case what vendors offer to the military. The main purpose of this event is to bring con tractors together with the military, so they can get the best value for the taxpayers dollars, said GSA Customer Service Director Linda Hosey. Suppliers at the expo display their latest prod ucts ranging from office supplies to furniture. We have all kinds of vendors who attend this expo, Hosey added. Many are small busi nesses including some based in Jacksonville, so theyre bringing money back into the local com munity. Vendors compete for the business, but this expo gives them a neu tral ground to meet with contractors and project managers, so they know what they have to offer, said Hosey. NAS Jax Fire Chief Mark Brusoe attended the expo. He stopped at the Municipal Energy Services table and tried on a pair of Dragon Fire Gloves. These are amaz ing gloves, said Brusoe. We purchased these for NS Mayport last year and continue to look at new gear that our firefighters might need. Vendors dont normally get a chance to market their products to military personnel so many are thrilled to participate in the expo. The price for a table is a very nomi nal cost and the pro ceeds go to the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department to fund pro grams for Sailors, said Hosey. Hosey added that the expo grows a little bit every year, however, the vendors continue to change. AM1(AW) John Rezaie attended the expo because he heard there were a lot of GSA new products on display. I came to look at some of the products and to dis cuss possible job oppor tunities for when I retire from the Navy, said Rezaie. Im getting a head start now that its getting towards the end of my career. Dr. Jill Biden shed light on her message of rallying sup port for military families June 19 with a presentation before one of the worlds largest gath erings devoted to national ser vice andvolunteerism. Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, spoke in Chicago at the National Conference on Volunteering and Service, which brought together an esti mated 5,000 people to discuss ideas and challenges in com munity service. The confer ence is sponsored by Point of Light, a nonprofit born in 1990 out of former President George H.W. Bushs call for volunteer ism. The organization last year assisted 4.3 million volunteers and 77,052 partners in 20 coun tries, according to its website. Biden, whose son served in the Army in Iraq, told the audi ence that one of the best parts of my role as second lady is spending time with so many veterans and military families. She said she always is inspired by their strength and resilience and said they rep resent only one percent of the U.S. population. Thats why she and First Lady Michelle Obama started the Joining Forces campaign to mobilize all of America to support troops, vet erans and families. Since then, Americans have stepped up in many ways, Biden said, either as individu als, congregations, communi ties or companies.In collab oration with the Corporation for National and Community Service, Points of Light has facilitated volunteerism such as: Mission Continues that under score the connection between military service and engaging returning veterans in civilian service; sands of veterans serving in AmeriCorps and SeniorCorps with 200 communities serving 700,000 military families in the next two years; and nonprofits like Operation Homefront and the National Military Family Association. This type of community support is absolutely critical to military families not just while our troops are deployed . or when we welcome them home . but for the months and years after they return to their communities, Biden said. The CNCSannounced that more than 1,000 new AmeriCorps members the largest in the agencys his tory will provide education, employment and other services to veterans and military fami lies this year, White House offi cials said in a news release. The new AmeriCorps mem bers will add to the support of more than 140 organizations and at least 27,000 Senior Corps and AmeriCorps members to serve some 600,000 veterans and military families in more than 200 communities across the country, giving a major boost to the Joining Forces ini tiative, it says. Our servicemen and women risk everything to protect America. It is our solemn obli gation to support them and their families when they come home, said Wendy Spencer, CEO of the Corporation for National and Community Service. At CNCS, we have taken this mission to heart. Serving and engaging veter ans and military families is a top priority for us, and we are proud to make significant new investments to support those who have served. Spencer announced that CNCS will award more than $6.2 million in AmeriCorps grants to the American Legion Auxiliary, AMVETS, the California Department of Veterans Affairs, Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, Points of Light, Rebuilding Together, the Washington Vet Corps, and others. AmeriCorps members will provide services including job placement, behavioral health counseling, community reha bilitation and reintegration projects, homeless veteran sup port and financial literacy, and tutoring children of deployed service members, she said. More than 16,000 military veterans have already served as AmeriCorps members, Koby J. Langley, CNCS senior advisor for wounded warrior, veterans and military family initiatives, said. The skills and leadership abilities forged in the hills of Afghanistan and sands of Iraq can be applied to solving prob lems here at home, he said. AmeriCorps offers an oppor tunity to continue serving on a different battlefield, helping meet challenges in our com munities. Almost seventy years to the day, more than 800 mili tary veterans, active duty servicemen, Navy League sup porters, and interested members of the public gathered to commemorate the Battle of Midway June 9 in St. Augustine. As part of the festivi ties, U.S. Naval Sea Cadets and Junior ROTC groups throughout north central Florida and southern Georgia were invited to participate in an essay contest about the battle with prizes to be awarded at the dinner. Sea Cadet Cole Arnold, 14, of Manatee Division in Yankeetown, Fla., penned his 700-word entry and then recorded the required YouTube video reciting his paper on board America Victory ship in Tampa. His hard work earned him a third place finish. Arnold, who has been a history buff his whole life, was thrilled to meet veterans who were actually on board USS Yorktown (CV-5) and other ships that he learned about when doing his research. During the reception, he spent time talking with Woody Richmond who had to abandon ship during combat and was most impressed by hearing all of the stories of the dif ferent prisoners and what they had to go through. Towards the end of the evening, Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson presented Arnold with a plaque and congratulated him for his efforts. Looking forward to joining the Marines one day, the cadets parting thoughts in his essay reflect his love of country. As generations change the unwavering and undaunted American spirit will not. Midway showed us that against all odds we prevailed and finished strong. Midway wasnt just a battle but a statement of our strength, wrote Arnold. Biden promotes service to military families Sea Cadet wins essay contest, meets Navy admiral, WWII veterans NAS Jacksonville hosts GSA Expo Free SAT/ACT prep programsMilitary families move often and military children may attend many schools between kindergarten and high school graduation.It is especially difficult for high school students pre paring for college. But, families do not need to spend a fortune preparing stu dents for SAT and ACT exams. In alliance with the DoD, and sup ported by the NFL and MLB, eKnowl edge is donating free SAT and ACT PowerPrep Programs to military fami lies worldwide.To place an online order go to:www.eKnowledge.com/ MilNews or call51-256-4076. 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012

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Changes coming for boaters and huntersOn July 1, the law enforce ment division of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) will gain an additional 145 positions when it merges with the law enforcement arm of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). Law enforcement officers with the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (DACS), who patrol conservation and recreation lands, will also become FWC law enforcement officers. FWC manages and protects the states diverse fish and wildlife habitat, including spe cies that inhabit the land and waters of NAS Jacksonville. Unlike the Jacksonville Sheriffs Office, we dont have a particular zone we have to stay in, said FWC Law Enforcement Officer Roland Green, who docks his patrol boat on the St. Johns River at NAS Jacksonville. We cover from the Atlantic ocean to Julington Creek and all the rivers and creeks in between. Green has worked as an FWC officer for nine years and is one of 700 sworn FWC law enforce ment officers statewide. Our main mission is to pro tect and manage more than 575 species of wildlife, as well as freshwater and saltwater fish species, said Green. We have 28 officers covering Clay, Nassau, Baker, Bradford, Union and Duval counties. This merger will give us a bigger role throughout the state, said Green. We will now have a larger jurisdiction, including all of the state parks, conservation and recreational lands. This reorganization will save the state more than $3 million over the next five years and $1.28 million in recurring savings, said FWC Division of Law Enforcement Community Relations Coordinator Katie Purcell. This will more efficiently support and protect the public because there will be more offi cers working in the field. It will also fix any overlapping that occurred when the FWC and DEP patrolled the same areas. While on marine patrol, FWC officers make sure boaters maintain the posted speeds for no-wake zones such as the manatee zones that are locat ed throughout the St. Johns River and other waterways. Theyre also on the lookout for boaters who may be operating under the influence of alcohol or drugs. During the winter calv ing season, FWC monitors the North Atlantic right whales that migrate to northeast Florida waters to birth to their young. Officers patrol offshore to make sure no recreational or commercial boaters get too close and that the whales dont get tangled in nets. We had a rescue recently involving a six-foot dolphin that was tangled up in three crab traps at the North Florida Shipyard, said Green. We were able to cut the lines and safely release the dolphin. Boating safety is a big pro gram. Every time FWC stops a vessel, they do a safety check to ensure that all the proper equipment is on board. Were also the lead agency for investigating boating acci dents, said Green. When theres an accident on the water, we respond to it. Three weeks ago, FWC res cued a man whose sailboat wrecked south of the Buckman Bridge in Jacksonville. We got him safely out of the water after the mast on his racing sailboat broke and left him stranded in the river, said Green. In fact, we get a lot of calls from sailboats that set off from yacht clubs and getting into trouble with unexpected wind gusts, said Green. Florida is the fishing capitol of the world, said Green. The Gulf, Atlantic and all the lakes and rivers offer a great variety of fish. We make sure recreational and com mercial fishermen comply with state fishing laws, both inshore and offshore. To notify FWC of any waterrelated complaint, call (904) 359-3883. Give our dispatcher the Florida boat registration num ber and a description of the boat, so we can locate and pro cess them, said Green. Under SECNAV discusses new golden era of American sea power At the U.S. Naval War College (NWC) annual Current Strategy Forum (CSF), in Newport, R.I., Under Secretary of the Navy Robert Work told more than 900 students and guests that the U.S. Navy is entering a golden era of sea power, during his keynote speech June 12. Despite difficult economic challenges around the world, Work was optimistic about a strategic shift and focus toward Asia-Pacific and reflected on how the Navy and Marine Corps team transitions from todays conflicts and positions itself for the challenges of tomorrow. Our strategic concept and our organizational construct is precisely aligned with the strategic requirements for the 21st century, he said. It is hard to imagine a more maritime friendly strategic environment. Work discussed the con nection between Americas national security and its economy. To explain the interconnection, Work said the nation has not been in a situation like this since the early 1950s when President Eisenhower was in office. He pointed out that the country is at a strategic inflection point where the post-Iraq and Afghanistan military drawdown is occurring at the same time public debt is increasing. One thing that is very much different about this draw-down than the others in our history is you cant buy as much with $700 billion as you could at $550 billion. Things cost more so the Navy will emphasize capability over capacity. The importance and continued need for a strong nation was empha sized throughout his talk. The tenets of American sea power on world economic growth are as valid today as when Adm. Alfred Thayer Mahan wrote, The Influence of Sea Power on History, in 1890. Oceans are central to the economy, which means they are central to our national strategy, said Work. Ready reliable information, secure finances, stable economies and free global trade depend upon the free navigation of the oceans. In keeping with the theme of this years CSF, Sustaining U.S. Global Leadership: Priorities for 21st Century Defense, Work emphasized the Navy and Marine Corps teams importance to a national strategy focused on securing the economic interests of the United States. This is a warfighting Navy and Marine Corps, Work emphasized. The Navy and Marine Corps team is ready for war and will forward deploy to help preserve the peace, protect American, allied and global interests, and assure freedom of access during peace and war. This year marks the 63rd annual CSF hosted by the Secretary of the Navy. The first CSF, held May 9, 1949, offered an opportunity for the nations public servants, scholars and senior military officers to join the college faculty and students to discuss the future strategy of the United States. Over the decades, the forum has expanded to include a crosssection of Americas civilian leadership to encourage a wide-ranging debate on national and international security. What makes people attempt suicide? Its a vital question, as the answer could help men tal health professionals and even friends and family better recognize when they need to step in to help to save a life. Theories about suicide motives abound, but as one presenter noted yesterday at the annual suicide prevention conference spon sored jointly by the Defense and Veterans Affairs departments, not much data exists on the question. Craig Bryan, a doctor of psychology, is associate director of the National Center for Veterans Studies at the University of Utah and an assistant professor for the universitys psychology department. At the conference, he presented the results of a study aimed at identifying the motives of 72 active-duty service members who attempted suicide. They had collectively attempted suicide 136 times over their lives, he said, adding that 21 percent never attempted suicide and two participants had made five attempts each. Study participants 66 men and six women ranged in age from 19 to 44 and had served between one and 19 years in the mili tary. Each person referred to the study had been discharged from an inpatient hospital stay for suicide risk. Bryan noted the study also served as a course of treatment. Phase 1 focused on crisis management and distress toler ance. Phase 2 aimed at problem solving and restructuring of the participants suicide belief systems, and Phase 3 was dedicated to relapse prevention. Phase 1 must target emotion regulation, Bryan emphasized. Patients have to learn to deal effectively with painful emotions or they cant progress further in therapy, he explained. Bryan told the conference audience that the functional model of self-harm wide ly referenced in suicide prevention work notes four major groups of possible suicide motives: feelings; something even if its bad; avoid punishment from others or avoid doing something undesirable; and get attention or let others know how I feel. Identifying the why is one of the essen tial ingredients in work to reduce suicide attempt rates, he said, because once patients understand their motivations, they can develop strategies and coping skills to deal with those challenges. Bryan said one aim of the study, which used the functional model, was to teach patients how to suffer in a way that doesnt require you to die. The study asked participants to identify their own motives for a suicide attempt from a list of 33 potential reasons, which were divided among the functional models four groups. All participants selected emotional relief, specifically to stop bad feelings, as a factor, he noted, though 95 percent also noted other reasons. Bryan described the frequency of other factors noted in the study. Participants iden tified avoidance or escape with the top single reason being to get away or escape from other people as a factor 82.4 percent of the time. Interpersonal influence was noted by 80.1 percent of participants, with the most-cited response being to communicate or let oth ers know how desperate you were. And 72.8 percent endorsed feeling generation as a fac tor, with to feel something, even if it was pain as the most common response. After patients confronted the reasons they had attempted or considered suicide, Bryan said, it was like a light bulb went on. While all of the participants originally said they attempted suicide because they wanted to die, 95 percent acknowledged after selecting factors they realized they had not wanted to die, but wanted to end emotional pain. What this means from a clinical stand point is we have to start integrating these behavioral [and] functional understandings of suicide attempts into our treatment, he said. This is a primary mechanism or ingre dient of . behavioral therapy, which is the treatment that were currently testing for active-duty soldiers. As part of the study, participants received a smart book during their first 30 minutes of therapy, Bryan said. Patients wrote in the books throughout their course of therapy, adding lessons learned during each session about what was working for them. At the end of Phase 3, the smart book comes out again and participants review the lessons and skills, Bryan said. If patients get stuck in thinking about how a previous suicide attempt could have been handled differently or how to face a current challenge, he added, the smart books remind them of approaches they learned in therapy. It is a core intervention, he said. Study offers glimpse into suicide motives JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 21



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THURSDAY, JUNE 28, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The Proud Warriors of HSL42 Detachment 7 began its last SH-60B deployment while embarked aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109) June 22. During the spring of 2013, the Proud Warriors will transition from the SH-60B helicopter to the new MH-60R Seahawk helicopter and in the process become HSM72. The SH-60B has been a work horse for many years and this will be a bittersweet time for us in many ways, said Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Chester, officer in charge of HSL 42 Det. 7. However, we are ready for our mission. We intend to accomplish that mission and establish the warrior legacy as we sundown the SH-60B with honor and pride. The Dunham and Proud Warriors, deployed as part of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8, will operate in support of 5th and 6th fleet maritime security objectives. The MH-60R combines the best features of the SH-60B and SH-60F into one multi-mission platform. The improvements include an updated cockpit with digital monitors for flight instrumentation and the addition of mission avionics. While this transition will facili tate many advantages for the pilots and aircrew, Chester said that it will be hard to say good-bye. Even with the transition ahead for the squadron, HSL 42 Det. 7 pilots said their current SH-60Bs still have a lot of fight left in them. Our maintenance team does an outstanding job of keeping our aircraft fully mission capable and ready to participate in all opera tions, said HSL 42 pilot Lt. j.g. Joal Fischer. As for their part, many members of the Proud Warrior crew said they feel a tremendous pride in being the last crew to maintain the SH-60Bs for their squadron. I think its cool to know we are playing a role in a little bit of his tory, said AD3 Torre Reese. After this deployment, we wont be named HSL 42 anymore, so we want to send it out on a high note. USS Jason Dunham and HSL 42 Det. 7 are deployed along with other CSG 8 ships and aircraft to include USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66), guided-missile destroyers USS Farragut (DDG 99), USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81), the seven squadrons of Carrier Air Wing 8 and Destroyer Squadron 28. Sailors, DoD personnel are encouraged to donateThe federal-wide Feds Feed Families Food Drive campaign is now underway aboard NAS Jacksonville. Department of Defense (DoD) employees nationwide will step up to meet this challenge by gather ing 1.5 million pounds of food for fami lies in need this summer. In a recently released memo, Deputy Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter expressed his personal support of the campaign and encouraged the DoD workforce to donate. The tremendous success of the 2011 food drive was a credit to the exempla ry efforts of all of you and your staffs, Carters memo reads. Running a successful campaign requires a team effort, and leadership support is critical. Feds Feed Families allows us to showcase how caring and giving our people are, and demonstrates our commitment as a depart ment to helping those in need. Also in his memo, Carter encourages support with the following tasks: cies and field activities are tasked with arranging logistical support for collections June 26-27, July 24-25, and Aug. 28-29. to represent your component, coordinate with organization representatives, and lead the call for donations. age donations of non-perishable food. HSL 42 Detachment 7 begins final deployment with SH-60B Seahawk Feds Feed Families campaign goal is 1.5 million pounds Feds Feed Families 2012 CampaignFrequently Asked QuestionsWhy? Food banks across the Northeast Florida and around the country are facing severe shortages of non-perishable items, just as summer begins and chil dren are left without school nutrition programs. Over the past three years, we have witnessed the remarkable gener osity of our Federal workforce, collect ing an astounding 8 million pounds of food and non-perishable items. This year, we will continue to support our neighbors, families and communities across the nation by asking agencies to set their own goals and aim to beat their own best collection totals. We hope youll join us! How can I help? There are many ways you can help! Bring in your donations and share with your organizations Feds Feed Families, talk about Feds Feed Families with your community and co-workers, attend events to show your support, and volunteer to help on collection days. Contact your command coordinator or the NAS Jax Chapel for more information. What else can I do to help people in need? While this is a great campaign, think about helping those in need through out the year. Find service opportunities across the country through United We

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS June 27 1813 USS President, a 44-gun, three-masted heavy frigate anchors in Bergen, Norway. 1950 To support U.N. call to assist South Korea, Truman authorizes U.S. naval and air operations south of the 38th parallel. June 28 1794 Joshua Humphreys appointed master builder to construct Navy ships for an annual salary of $2,000. 1814 Sloop-of-War USS Wasp captures HMS Reindeer, setting her on fire and left to sink. 1865 CSS Shenandoah captures 11 American whalers in one day. 1970 USS James Madison (SSBN-627) completes conversion to Poseidon missile capability. June 29 1925 Ships and men from 11th and 12th Naval Districts assist in relief after earthquake at Santa Barbara, Calif. 1950 President Truman authorizes sea blockade of the Korean coast. Light cruiser USS Juneau (CL119) fires first naval shore bombardment of Korean Conflict. June 30 1815 Sloop-of-War USS Peacock (22 guns) takes the 16-gun brig HMS Nautilus, in last action of the War of 1812. 1943 Third Fleet Amphibious Force lands troops on Rendova Island while naval gunfire silences Japanese artillery. July 1 1800 First American convoy duty, by 32-gun frigate USS Essex, escorts convoy of merchant ships from East Indies to U.S. 1801 U.S. squadron under Commodore Dale enters Mediterranean to strike Barbary Pirates. 1850 Naval School at Annapolis renamed Naval Academy. 1911 Trial of first Navy aircraft, Curtiss A-1. The designer, Glenn Curtiss, makes first flight in Navys first aircraft, the A-1 Triad, at Lake Keuka, N.Y., then prepares Lt. Theodore Ellyson, the first naval aviator, for his two solo flights in A-1. 1914 Prohibition of alcohol begins in the Navy. 1918 Troop transport USSCovington (ID-409) hit without warning by two torpedoes from German Submarine U-86 and sank the next day. 1933 USS Constitution Old Ironsides commences tour of principal U.S. seaports. 1946 First of two detonations, Operation Crossroads nuclear test. July 2 1923 Commissioning of Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 1926 Distinguished Flying Cross authorized by Congress. 1937 Amelia Earhart disappears in Pacific. Navy conducts extensive unsuccessful search. 1945 USS Barb (SS-220) bombards Japanese installations on Kaihyo Island, Japan, the first successful use of rockets against shore positions. 1946 Establishment of squadron VX-3 to evaluate adaptability of helicopters to naval purposes. 1950 USS Juneau (CL-119) and two British ships sink five of six attacking North Korean torpedo boats and gunboats. 1967 During Operation Bear Claw, 7th Fleet Amphibious Force conducts helicopter assault 12 miles inland at Con Thien, Vietnam. July 3 1898 At Battle of Santiago, Cuba, Rear Adm. Sampsons squadron destroys Spanish fleet. 1950 USS Valley Forge (CV-45) and HMS Triumph participate in first carrier action of Korean Conflict. VF-51 aircraft from Valley Forge shoot down two North Korean aircraft. The action is first combat test of F9F Panther and AD Skyraider. July 4 1776 American colonies declare their indepen dence from Great Britain. 1777 John Paul Jones hoists first Stars and Stripes flag on Ranger at Portsmouth, N.H. 1801 First Presidential Review of U.S. Marine Band and Marines at the White House. 1842 First test of electrically operated underwater torpedo sinks gunboat Boxer. 1863 Confederates surrender of Vicksburg, Miss., gives Union forces control of Mississippi River. It was the bottom of the 6th (and last) inning. They were behind by 9 runs, and their heads hung low. Now is not the time, I thought, to tell Owen he didnt make the All-Stars team and that his older brother did. I got the call right before the championship Little League game, and there hadnt been enough time to tell Owen first. Plus, it would have been bad pre-game morale. Now, as I watched the Lions drag out onto the field, their faces red and defeated, it seemed there never would be a right time. These are the moments that I miss my husband, Dustin, most. Parenting involves a heavy amount of good-cop/bad-cop, so when youre the single parent, you have to make tough choices. Do I tell him to suck it up and try harder next time? Or do I coddle him and tell him that the decision stinks? Usually, when Im coddling, Dustin plays bad cop. When Im toeing the line, he pats the boys on the back. There is an emotional balance. That balance got all out of whack during the baseball season. My usual role from the bleachers (ultimate cheerleader and deliverer of Gatorade and bubble gum) was complicated by the need to take on Dustins role sports enthusiast, believer in the game and personal trainer. Along the way, I got it all wrong. Telling Ford that his slide into second base looked like someone jumping into a swimming pool wasnt the right thing to say. Yelling for Owen to keep his chin up wasnt welcome. The day before I knew Owen had not made All-Stars, he said, Sometimes I feel angry when I see other boys with their dads. I understood. At the beginning of the season, I overheard fathers talking about taking their boys to the batting cages, and I felt sad. Would Owen have made All-Stars if Dustin had been home to help him? I dont know. When youre missing a parent, you learn to depend on other people for support. Sometimes that support comes from other kids. Our Little League keeps boys on the same team throughout their career. (Once a Lion, always a Lion.) The kids build team identity. They bond with their coach es. They see older teammates grow and change. (Who hit their growth spurt between seasons?) And the team becomes a second, if somewhat seasonal, family. At the beginning of the championship game, it became clear that the opposing team was bringing out the big guns: their top, oldest pitcher who can throw about 80 mph. I thought of Owen in the dugout and wondered if he was scared. Then the announcer said, First up for the Lions, Owen Smiley. Oh. Dear. God. Im only half joking when I say I wanted to stop the game. From the dugout, I heard Owens teammates cheering him on. Youve got this, O, they yelled. Owen struck out, but still, his teammates gave him high-fives as he ran back to them. They know its their job to bring up future Lions. Just like his older brother before him, Owen is receiving an education in the dugout. Yes, part of that education involves learning new words and someone asking, Do you still believe in Santa Claus, but mostly, it means a dozen other brothers who can teach Owen things his mother cannot. By the bottom of the sixth, the game was virtually over. The Lions didnt stand a chance. Then someone stole second. And another stole third. Suddenly and dramatically, the Lions scored 10 runs and won the cham pionship with only one out. It was better than any major league game. And Owen had been part of it. I waited until after the team victory party, after they were drenched in sweat and full of soda and cookies. As we got in the car to go home, I broke the news. Owens happy face turned sad. Tears made dirt tracks down his cheeks. What? I didnt make it? Turns out, there is no good time to tell a kid he didnt make the team. Owens oldest teammates, the ones leaving the Lions this year, came to the car and saw that Owen was crying. They hopped in and started their pep talk. They hadnt made All-Stars the first year either. They think Owen is an awesome kid. They think he will make it next year. Owen began to smile. He remembered everything he loves about baseball mostly, the team. He went to bed (mostly) happy. And to be honest, Im not sure even his dad could have done that for him.Teammates as familyHey, Money Man! I am a single Sailor sharing a house with two shipmates. My income is enough to take care of my share of food, rent, utilities, transportation costs, a few nights out a month with a lit tle left over for savings and invest ment. Four months ago, my mom lost her job and is having trouble making ends meet on her unemployment compensation. She is looking for work but has been asking me for money to help meet her basic needs. I have been doing what I can but am beginning to come up short at the end of the month and am worried that I wont be able to pay my own bills if this keeps up very much lon ger. What can I do? Money Man Sez: It sounds like you were living well within your means with an eye on your financial future before your mothers situa tion arose. I applaud your efforts to provide financial assistance to your mom but highly recommend that you take a realistic look at what you are able to contribute. The first step in determining what you can afford to send your mom each month is preparing an accurate budget. You need to maintain a roof over your head (rent & utilities), you need to eat (grocery bill), and you need to be able to get to and from work (transportation costs). These are all fixed monthly expenses that you cant afford to neglect without seri ous negative impacts to your own financial health. Discretionary expenses such as nights out, hobbies, new clothes, entertainment and so 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012

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Capt. Eric Wiese will assume command of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11) June 29 from Capt. William Wheeler III during CPRW-11s 52nd change of command. Wheelers Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance tours were completed with VP-16, an instructor tour with Fleet Replacement Squadron VP-30, a department head tour with VP-45 and commanding officer of VP-10, Brunswick, Maine. Wheeler also served as the communications officer and flag secretary for Commander, Carrier Group One, San Diego as well as qualifying as a staff tactical action officer for battle group operations. He later served as anti-subma rine warfare operations offi cer, current operations office and assistant chief of staff for Fleet Operations (N3) for Commander, Seventh Fleet in Yokosuka, Japan earning qual ifications as a fleet/joint task force battle watch captain. Prior to coming to CPRW-11, Wheeler served in what might be the most rewarding tour of his career; as the command ing officer, Joint Provincial Reconstruction Team Paktika, Forward Operating Base Sharana, Afghanistan and deputy brigade commander for Interagency/Joint Operations, Task Force Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, Forward Operating Base Salerno, Afghanistan. Wheeler has commanded CPRW-11 since December 2010 and has successfully led CPRW11 squadrons in the execution of 17,000 hours of mishap-free flying supporting 36 major fleet exercises and readiness evaluations by U.S. Fleet Forces Command. Most notable, squadrons under his command have suc cessfully deployed eight sep arate times in support of all geographic combatant com manders. CPRW-11 forces participated in a variety of multinational exercises including Noble Manta and Joint Warrior. His leadership was instrumental to the plan ning and execution of the transition to the new P-8A Poseidon and future Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) Unmanned Aerial System, critical to the future success Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aviation. Additionally, he was a stal wart leader aboard NAS Jacksonville as well as the Southeast Region, volunteering countless hours to military initiatives and outreach programs with the local community, solidifying the Navys relation ship with local and national leaders. The CPRW-11 team wel comes Wiese from a joint tour where he served as the branch chief, Joint Staff J-8, Forces Division. Keys to relieve Moreno at HS-11Cmdr. Ryan Keys will relieve Cmdr. Edgardo Moreno as commanding officer of the HS-11 Dragonslayers on July 6 during an aerial change of command while underway with the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65). Keys graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1995 with a Bachelor of Science degree in English. He earned his wings as a naval aviator in 1997 and completed his initial sea tour with the Tridents of HS-3, deploying twice. In 2002, he became an instructor pilot at Fleet Replacement Squadron HS-10. He flew in excess of 700 hours completing more than 170 instructional events. While at HS-10, he qualified as a Seahawk Weapons and Tactics Instructor at the Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center in Fallon, Nev. In 2004, Keys was assigned to the staff of Commander, Strike Force Training Atlantic, where he was responsible for planning and evaluating combat search and rescue exercises for Composite Training Unit Exercises. Keys next served as training, maintenance and operations department head for the Nightdippers of HS-5, where he completed two more deployments. He attended Air War College and graduated in 2009 with a Masters of Strategic Studies. Keys reported to HS-11 as the executive officer in April 2011. The Dragonslayers have been deployed as part of the Enterprises historic final deployment since early March, conducting operations in the 5th Fleet area of responsible. The squadron is scheduled to return to NAS Jacksonville in the fall. Moreno, who has accumulated more than 3,500 flight hours, reported to HS-11 in December 2009 as executive officer and took command of the squadron in April 2011. Morenos next assignment will be attending National Defense University in Washington, D.C. The Dragonslayers new executive officer is Cmdr. Tim Kinsella whose most recent assignment was on the Joint Chiefs of Staff. CPRW-11 to hold change of command a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 3

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Dragonslayers on deployment to Fifth FleetThe Dragonslayers of HS-11 have been hard at work on their 2012 deployment to Fifth Fleet. Following a short turnaround from 2011s deployment, the squadron left NAS Jacksonville in early March on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65). This deployment is historic in that it will be the aircraft carriers final one after 51 years of service. Things instantly became busy for HS-11 when a USS Enterprise Sailor fell overboard late at night in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean one week into deployment. HS-11 launched the alert search and rescue helicopter, success fully located and recovered the distressed Sailor and had him back on board the carrier in only 27 minutes. The rescue was a testament to the search and rescue capabilities that HS-11 brings to the Enterprise Strike Group every day. Following that early rescue, HS-11 provided anti-terror ism force protection through the Straits of Gibraltar and into the Mediterranean Sea, and gained critical experience operating with various NATO ships and multinational exercises. There, HS-11 participated in anti-submarine warfare events and ferried NATO partners on board the carrier for tours and conferences. After a stop in Athens, Greece for a three-day port visit, the Enterprise Strike Group navigated the Suez Canal, ultimately arriving in the North Arabian Sea and Arabian Gulf. In the Fifth Fleet area of responsibility, the Dragonslayers conducted plane guard operations for fixed wing aircraft flying missions over Afghanistan and provided surveil lance and reconnaissance on various surface contacts. Over the past two months, HS-11 has had two exciting port calls in Dubai and Bahrain, allowing squadron members time to relax from the busy operational schedule. Every Dragonslayer has been working hard to ensure mission completion and is eagerly looking forward to returning home for some much deserved rest in the fall. The Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville recently provided a tour of Maintenance Training Unit (MTU) 1005 for several members of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). The RAN recently signed a contract to purchase several MH-60R model helicopters. Plans are cur rently in work to integrate the RAN personnel into U.S. Navy Aviation Maintenance C schools for rating specific training on the newest model of the MH-60R. The MH-60R aviation mainte nance training for the southeast ern region is taught by CNATTU Jacksonville. NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Understander, CNATTU Jax Commanding Officer Cmdr. Michael Gramolini, CNATTU Jax Executive Officer Cmdr. Daryl Pierce and MTU 1005 Department Head ATCS Edward Krueger provided a tour for the RAN delegation and several MH-60R program managers in order to help them better under stand the level of maintenance training that their maintainers will be provided. Krueger conducted the tour stopping at all five multi-million dollar trainers that RAN per sonnel will be using to learn the complex systems of the MH-60R helicopter. His brief covered the capabilities of each trainer and approximately how RAN person nel will be on them. All members of the RAN delegation were extremely thankful for the in-depth tour and were very excited about what the future holds for this maintenance training effort. RAN members will begin to arrive for training during FY-13. Pet adoption event needs volunteersFirst Coast No More Homeless Pets along with shelter and rescue groups from across Northeast Florida are holding a July Mega Pet Adoption event July 13-15 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Jacksonville Fairgrounds. Volunteers are needed to help support this event and to help find homes for more than 600 animals during the three-day event. Volunteers will participate in set-up acting as greeters, assist with dog and cat handling tasks, provide overnight safety for the animals and tear-down. For more information or to volunteer e-mail mtekin@fcnmhp.org or volunteer@fcnmhp.org or call 674-0665. Royal Australian Navy members tour CNATTU Jax Fireworks prohibited at NAS JaxExcept, for command controlled displays, the possession of explosives and fireworks for sale, storage or use of any description on NAS Jacksonville property, are strictly prohibited. Fireworks are spectacular to watch, and make great noises, but can be extremely dangerous in the hands of amateurs. NAS Jacksonville Fire Prevention Division rec ommends attending public fireworks displays because those shows are safer and have better visual displays then what might be accomplished at your home. Stay safe this Fourth of July holiday! 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012

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Electronic technicians from the communications division of the blue crew on board USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) vis ited VP-45 May 29 for a professional discussion on airborne anti-submarine warfare (ASW). The submariners are based at NSB Kings Bay, Ga. Personnel attached to sub marines are separated into two crews, a blue and gold crew. While one crew is underway on the submarine, the other crew utilizes the time in simula tors and training for their next underway period. At VP-45, the guests were given a brief on the P-3C Orions capabilities, as well as a tour of the aircraft, han gar spaces, and the tactical operations center (TOC). The Rhode Island crew was able to see first-hand the equipment which P-3 operators employ against submarines much like their own, along with the C4I components that make the operations possible. The crew made full use of their time with Lt. Seth Eisenmenger, a weapons tac tics instructor, peppering him with questions for nearly an hour. They were often amused by the fact that so much of the equipment used by both subs and Navy planes is similar. For example, the touch screen displays installed in the newer ASW Improvement Program (AIP) aircraft are very simi lar to those found on the USS Rhode Island. Lt. Joshua Pritt described the average day in the life of aircrew and demonstrated to the visitors all of the sur vival equipment aircrew are required to wear while flying. As a former enlisted subma riner himself, he jumped at the chance to bridge the gap between the ASW squadron and the submarines they hunt. Pritt responded to many questions about the life of an aviator and an officer. Ironically aviators and those who patrol the deep have a long and powerful history together, he explained. During World War II, submarines patrolling off of the coast of Japan would routinely pick up downed flyers from mis sions gone wrong. One of the most famous examples was former President George Herbert Walker Bush, who was picked up by the die sel submarine USS Finback. Legend has it that they imme diately put him on the watchbill to qualify as officer of the deck. At the TOC, Lt. Cmdr. Kelly Holmes of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven explained how their communications were received and then passed to the air crews for joint missions. They got to see how much planning and preparation goes into each individual mission. The submariners were sur prised to learn that the air crew would meet hours before a flight to mission plan and pre-flight the entire aircrafts extensive array of systems. The visit definitely sparked a good tactical conversation, said AWO2 David Wells, VP-45 acoustic sensor operator. It was interesting to see how our respective tactics for detection and avoidance face-off in the undersea arena. The discourse focused on the P-3Cs search, localization, track, and attack methods, as well as P-3 communications and detection capabilities. The crew of the Rhode Island also shared the capabilities of their platform in ASW tactics and procedures. Both groups felt the meeting was an invaluable boon to the professional development of their craft. Its great to know what were up against, especially with the global proliferation of airborne ASW assets in the hands of guys we dont want finding us, remarked ET2 Gesell of USS Rhode Island. Summertime means fun in the sun, vacations and outdoor activities, and the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) wants Sailors and families to think safety first. According to the Naval Safety Center, summer deaths spiked in 2008 then decreased in 2009 and 2010, but unfortunately increased again last year. In 2011, between Memorial Day and Labor Day, 16 Sailors and 15 Marines lost their lives. One in an ATV wreck; three drowned; three during recreational activities; 11 in motor vehicles; and 13 on motorcycles. Losing even one Sailor or Marine is too many, especially when most of the incidents can be avoided with proper planning and training, said West. Training is the priority when it comes to motorcycle safety. According to Naval Safety Center, motorcycle fatali ties increased from six in 2010 to 13 in 2011, which is more than a 100 percent increase. Motorcycle training and safe ty starts with the command having a designated motorcycle safety representative (MSR). Personal motor vehicle accidents are the second highest cause of fatalities in our Navy, and motorcycles are the primary casual factor with sports bikes remaining at the top of the list. MSRs play an important role in mitigating this risk by mentoring and educating our Sailors, ensuring they are registered and complete all required motorcycle training, said West. The Naval Safety Centers summer campaign Live to Play, Play to Live, also focuses on alcohol awareness, water and boat safety, sexual assault, suicide awareness, and sports activities. Fourth of July is just around the corner so start planning safety now, said West. Whether you are on the highways, waterways or in the back yard, safety must come first. And if you drink, dont drive and have a plan to get home. When traveling long distances, remember to use TRiPS, the on-line, automated risk-assessment tool that helps users recognize and avoid the hazards they face on the highway: fatigue, not buckling up. TRiPS is located at https://wwwa.nko.navy.mil. Safety is one of the key areas of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initia tive which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the his tory of the Navy and Marine Corps. To learn more about the summer campaign, visit www.safetycenter.navy. mil. USS Rhode Island crew visits VP-45 MCPON stresses the importance of summer safety for Sailors and families JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 The Navy Drug Screening Laboratory (NDSL) at NAS Jacksonville plays an important role to the fleet by screening nearly 1 million urinalysis samples each year. NDSL Jacksonville, along with labs in San Diego and Great Lakes, Ill., continues to support the Navys zero tolerance for drug abuse with a scientifical ly accurate testing process guaranteed to withstand any legal challenges. Our job is to test urine samples of military members for the presence of illicit drugs, including recreational and prescription drugs. The Navy has a zero tolerance drug abuse policy and we are here to support that policy using stateof-the-art testing measures, said NDSL Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Carlos LeBron. Drug abuse is a continuous safety and readiness issue for the fleet and we are just one component of the Department of Defense (DoD) effort to deter drug use in the military. We take our jobs very seriously, following strict processing and documentation proce dures and are confident in the results produced, added NDSL Operations Director Jim Evans. Testing is conducted through random screening, command directed or prob able cause urinalysis. Each command assigns a trained urinalysis coordinator responsible for obtaining samples and ensuring specimens are documented, labeled and sealed properly. The coor dinator then delivers the samples to NDSL in person, via mail or other shipping services. At the laboratory, physical science technicians then inspect the packag ing and containers for damage and ensure seals and chain of custody sig natures are intact. All containers must match the documentation submitted. Any discrepancies are reported back to the command. The containers are then given a laboratory accession number to track the sample, logged into a computer and placed in a secure storage area until the testing process begins. The first step in the testing process is to screen samples for the panel of drugs that DoD requires. If they are negative, the command gets a negative result and we are done with that sample, explained Evans. If there is a positive result, the sam ple goes through two more levels of testing. We will repeat the initial screening using the same technology only this time specifically targeting the drug that presumed to be positive, he continued. We also insert tubes of water between each sample to ensure there is no carry over from one sample to another. If the sample remains posi tive, technicians conduct a confir mation test identifying a chemi cal marker that determines the type of drug and quantitative amount. If the amount exceeds the DoD cutoff for a specific drug, we report it as a posi tive result to the command. The con firmation testing processing is an ana lytical method which is really the gold standard of forensic urinalysis, said Evans. We conduct three tests, each independently poured from the same bottle, so there cannot be any argu ments about mixed up samples. Once a sample is deemed positive, the legal process takes over within the command. If its an illicit drug, the command will take legal action. If its a prescription drug, the command will conduct an investigation to ensure the service member is authorized to be on that medication. NDSL tests for seven classes of drugs including marijuana (specifically THC); cocaine; amphetamines and metham phetamines; opiates such as codeine, morphine and hydrocodone; synthetic opiates such as oxycodone (oxycontin); heroin; and designer amphetamines such as ecstasy. If a service member is suspected of using Spice, commands can authorize specific testing for these products through NDSL Great Lakes. The laboratory will also begin test ing for benzodiazepines such as Valium and Xanax in the near future. Our job is to make sure we produce the most accurate results possible. We continue to look for new ways of doing things. We have a small research and development platform here and our chemists and biochemists are currently developing new testing protocols for the Navy and other services, stated LeBron. We strive to stay on top of science as a whole, added Evans. We are inspected three times a year by military and civilian experts from the fields of forensic drug testing. They also make recommendations to ensure we are not only meeting DoD standards but interna tional standards as well. NDSL experts are also available for consult regarding interpretation of the testing process or drug component issues and often serve as expert wit nesses during court cases. According to LeBron and Evans, the number of positive results continue to remain steady in todays Navy. The rates tend to remain the same, how ever the distribution of those results is changing over time. Were seeing less positive cocaine and THC results over time, but more of the prescription drugs. However, we dont know when we report a positive test for prescription drugs if its legitimate use, said Evans. And, LeBron is quick to give warn ing to those abusing drugs. If you are doing drugs, you will get caught. It might not be tomorrow, but sooner or later you will be tested and pop posi tive, he said. Keeping warfighters safe through accurate drug testing

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 7 At NAS Jacksonville, our number one mission is supporting the warfighter. Drug abuse undermines our mission and is incompatible with the maintenance of high standards of performance and military discipline. We entrust our Sailors with a tremendous amount of responsibility and we need them to be ready 24/7. Unplanned losses negatively affect commands operational and warfighter readiness. Its every Sailors responsibility to deter drug abuse. The Navys policy is simple and clear zero tolerance. At NAS Jacksonville we continually communicate the zero tolerance policy to our Sailors and enforce it without exceptions. Photos by Kaylee LaRocque

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At NAS Jax, base chapel staff are managing the food drive. For more information, contact Chaplain (Lt.) Paul Rodgers at paul.b.rodgers@navy.mil or 542-3610. Food donations will be accepted at the specified locations during normal working hours through Aug. 29. The goals for the service branches this year are: Army, 562,000 pounds; Navy, 396,000 pounds; Air Force, 348,000 pounds; and Office of the Secretary of Defense and Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff agencies and activities, 194,000 pounds. Last year, NAS Jax personnel set a Navy and national record as the installation with the largest collection at 133,912 pounds. NAS Jax personnel hope to set the example again by exceeding last years goal. Help us reach that goal by donating today. The following are drop-off locations: NAS Jax Building 1 Quarterdeck NAS Jax Commissary NAS Jax Chapel NMCB-14 VR-58 HSM-70 NAS Jax Flight Line Cafe NAS Jax Bachelor Housing MESRON 10 VP-62 NAVFAC Southeast CAMPAIGNServe, www.serve.gov. What do area food banks need? Canned Fruits, canned veg etables, multigrain cereal, grains, canned proteins, soups, juice, con diments, snacks, baking goods, hygiene items, paper products and household items. Can peanut butter and peanut products be donated? Yes, peanut butter and peanut products can be donated. Are there any types of food you do not accept? We cannot accept perishable food items. If you have a question about the acceptability of an item youre considering donating, contact your command coordinator. Can I donate cash? Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) regulations provide that the CFC is the only monetary solicita tion in the Federal workplace on behalf of charities. We hope you will, nevertheless, consider being part of the effort by bringing in nonperishable food. Are you accepting corporate partners/sponsors? This is a federal food drive orga nized by the Chief Human Capital Officers Council in partnership with the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM), DoD, and U.S. Department of Agriculture. Why is the federal government doing this? Isnt this something that should be a private matter? Federal employees are generous members of everyones communi ty. This is a voluntary effort to for Federal employees to give back to their community by helping those in need during these tough eco nomic times. Why is this campaign limited to three months? During the summer months, food banks traditionally encoun ter lulls in the level of giving due to holidays and other demands on donors time. This year, the surge in demand coupled with a drop in donations has literally emptied food pantries shelves heading into the summer months. To help the food pantries stock up to meet critical needs for their services, the NAS Jax Chapel in partnership with the Defense Commissary Agency, Navy Exchange and various tenant commands will accept donations through Aug. 29. What authority does OPM have to do a food drive? The Feds Feed Families food drive is voluntary. It was estab lished to address this summers urgent need for assistance to our communitys families. The OPM is partnering with the Chief Human Capital Officers Council to lead the Feds Feed Families food drive. Is there a Twitter Feed or Facebook Page for the Feds Feed Families campaign? Yes, we are using both Facebook and Twitter for this years cam paign. Please Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook. com/fedsfeedfamilies and follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/ fedfooddrive. We tweet campaign activities at least one a day and would love to have our followers tweet information about their activ ities.on are areas you could choose to cut back a bit while you are helping out. Your savings and investment program would also fall in the discretionary category but realize that cutting back savings or investing now will impact your future financial wellbeing. Once you determine what you are able and willing to contribute you need to sit down with your mother and discuss both the scope and duration of assistance. Does she have a budget that accurately reflects her present financial situation? Are there other family members who can help out financially? Is she actively seeking employ ment? How long do her benefits last? What happens if they run out before she finds gainful employ ment? This frank discussion may be a bit uncomfortable for both of you but will establish boundaries, manage expectations and set the conditions for a mutually agreed on plan of action. The U.S. Coast Guard defines search and rescue as the use of available resources to assist per sons or property in potential or actual distress (emphasis mine). It is important to ensure that those rendering assistance do not become imperiled by their own actions. Hopefully any financial assistance given to a less fortu nate family member will be well thought out and involve only available resources and will not cause financial distress to the member providing assistance. MONEYMAN FAQ 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012

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JAXUSA Partnership hon ored Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) with its Industry Leader Award for business achievements and corporate citizenship pre sented during a luncheon at the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront June 7. FRCSE, the largest tenant command at NAS Jacksonville and the largest industrial employer in the region, pro vides aviation maintenance, repair and overhaul services for a variety of U.S. military aircraft. We recognize and appre ciate the outstanding perfor mance and corporate citi zenship of FRCSE, said Jerry Mallot, president of JAXUSA Partnership, a division of JAX Chamber. Their success speaks directly to the business advantages, excellent work force, opportunities for suc cess, and quality of life that exist in Northeast Florida. FRCSE Commanding Officer Capt. Robert Caldwell accept ed the award at a gathering of hundreds of civic leaders, including Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and guest speaker and BET (Black Entertainment Television) founder Robert Johnson. Caldwell said he was hon ored to accept the award on behalf of the facility. He said it was a validation of the extraordinary efforts the workforce provides to the warfighting customer. FRCSE, former ly known as Naval Air Depot Jacksonville, has served the Fleet since 1940. Artisans per form heavy, depot-level main tenance on military aircraft, such as the F/A-18 Hornet/ Super Hornet Strike Fighter and the SH-60 Seahawk Utility/ Assault Helicopter, as well as on a variety of engines, components and systems with onsite comprehensive engineering, logistics and manufacturing support. New industrial processes and manufacturing technolo gies, such as precision measuring machines and 5-axis mill ing centers expand capabilities to fabricate worn out or oneof-a-kind parts to a like new condition. FRCSE is an innovative organization with 38 active Public/Private Partnerships. The facility has won numer ous awards, such as the Chief of Naval Operations 2011 Aviation Safety Award and the 2011 Founders Service Award from First Coast Manufacturers Association. FRCSE personnel are involved in numerous phil anthropic efforts, such as the workplace fund drive and Combined Federal Campaign raising $201,000 for local, national and international charities in 2011. JAXUSA Partnership is the business membership orga nization focused on regional economic development. It represents nearly 200 top private sector investors in Northeast Florida. The organization facilitates the creation and reten tion of quality jobs, resulting in a higher standard of living and better quality of life in the region. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Robert Sanders, Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) Officer in Charge Cmdr. Eric Hoffman and SWEAT Federal Program Director Joe Orlando, participated in a ribbon cutting ceremony held at the center June 22, which marked the completion of an extensive multi-year facility renovation and improvement project. This event included opening remarks, a ribbon cutting ceremony and a tour of NECEs new roof. Since 2010, NECE has undergone sub stantial facility upgrades to address Navy Occupational Safety and Health deficien cies as well as to enhance the look and functionality of the 34-year-old facility. This project took a tremendous amount of planning and coordination by our administration staff, said Hoffman. As a result, this new roof not only will extend the life of the building for many years to come but enhances our appear ance contributing to our image as an international center of excellence. Construction codes have changed over the years leaving us with deficiencies in many areas, said Jose Medina, head of NECEs Administrative Department. This multi-year program will allow for continued growth of staff, address crew morale, and position the center for mission success in the years to come. NECEs $2.1 million facility improvement project has included replacing outdated flat roof with a metal pitched roof, over haul of the electrical systems, the addition of 10 sparking spaces, and the renovation both mens and womens locker rooms. This command arguably does more for the war-fighter globally than any other tenant command on base, said Sanders dur ing the opening remarks. This roof is a testament that NECE is here to stay. JAXUSA Partnership recognizes FRCSE NECE completes facility improvement project JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 9

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NAVFAC awarded Secretarys Cup Annual award recognizes commands for promoting small business opportunities The Navys Office of Small Business Programs awarded the Secretarys Cup award to Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) for promoting acquisition opportunities for small busi nesses during a ceremony held at the Pentagon June 15. Of 38,659 contracts awarded by NAVFAC last year, 25,296 went to small businesses. NAVFAC Southeast is proud to be a part of NAVFACs winning team in their selection for the Office of Small Business Programs Secretarys Cup, said NAVFAC Southeast Small Business Director Nelson Smith. Since its inception, NAVFAC Southeast has worked hard to develop a culture of small business awareness, with the ultimate goal of providing the maximum practicable opportunities for our small business partners. NAVFAC exceeded all government-wide pro gram goals and targets, with 44 percent of the total dollars awarded going to small businesses. Additionally, the command surpassed all of its goals in contract awards to service-disabled vet eran-owned small business, disadvantaged small business, and women-owned small businesses. At Southeast, we have demonstrated this com mitment by exceeding all of our small business targets for the past three year, said Nelson. Last year, NAVFAC Southeast awarded over $975 million in prime contracts to small businesses throughout our area of responsibility. We take very seriously the Department of the Navy Office of Small Business Program motto: Small Business The First Option. Small business outreach was another key factor in NAVFAC winning the award this year, as small business specialists and key acquisition personnel participated in 252 outreach events throughout the year, reaching more than 46,000 attendees world wide. We take every opportunity to work with the community to educate and inform them of oppor tunities, said Smith. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012

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Dont put off colon cancer screening Screening patients for cancer is an idea that continues to gather momentum in our country. President Richard Nixon actually launched the idea of a war against cancer in 1969. We havent won the war yet, but we continue to find strategies that seem to help find cancers earlier. Nipping cancers in the bud is always the best game plan. Q: How can I best prevent getting colon cancer? Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men and women in the United States. Only lung cancer kills more Americans each year. In 2005, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that more than 141,000 people were diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and 53,000 people died from it. Charles Schultz, the famous cartoonist creator of Charlie Brown never got screened for colon cancer despite having a Dad who died of the dis ease. Your first colonos copy should be scheduled at age 50 for white and Hispanic patients, and age 45 for African-American patients. Caught early, colorectal cancer can be cured. Screening rates for colorectal cancer are rising among adults age 50. In 1997 approximately 25 percent of adults in this age group were screened for colorectal cancer with the rate rising to 55 percent in 2008 for most Americans. Naval Hospital Jacksonville recorded 72.5 per cent of its enrolled patients age 50 and older were screened as of December 2009. Some cancer experts equate not getting a colo noscopy after age 50 is much like not getting a mammogram as recommended. Colon cancer kills more people than breast can cer, and many more people than cervical cancer, yet how often is colon cancer screening discussed with you by your provider at your routine visits? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention challenge physicians to find the time and resources to educate patients about the options for colorec tal cancer screening methods and issue patient reminders to ensure it is not forgotten at routine visits. Ask your provider about colorectal screening at your next appointment. CNRSE civilian graduates from Naval War CollegeCarol Lucius, a civilian assigned to Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE), graduated from phase one of the U.S. Naval War College (NWC) Joint Professional Military Education Program in Newport, R.I., June 15. Lucius, CNRSE work and family life coordinator, accepted her certificate of completion along with more than 500 other graduates during a ceremony attended by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert. Your studies here provide you an opportunity to reassess yourself, your situation and your service, and to recharge yourself intellectually to see things more clearly, Greenert said. The program is primarily designed for senior offi cers throughout all branches of the military, but it also serves as a great opportunity for Department of Defense civilians to become more professionally rounded, Lucius said. Not too many civilians, and very few women, were in my classes or graduated from the program. Its geared toward officers at the 0-4 and 0-5 level for promotion, but I wanted to broaden my knowledge of Navy operations, she said. After having worked with our operations team in disaster response, I got more of a flavor of the big picture of the Navy and wanted to learn more. The curriculum included three courses focusing on joint maritime operations, national security decision making, and strategy and war. Lucius chose to complete the program on board NAS Jacksonville through the colleges Fleet Seminar Progam which allows students to earn their cer tificate locally over a three-year period rather than attend the one-year residency program in Newport. It was a big learning curve, but doable, she said. It was great to have bright folks in class and good teachers to bounce ideas around and to learn from. I think they might have learned something from having a civilian in the class, too. According to Lucius, the knowledge and experience she gained from attending the program will be instrumental to her future efforts at CNRSE. It helps me to know how my role fits into Big Navy. We help Sailors and families everyday in the Fleet and Family Support Program, so it is helpful to know more about the nuts and bolts of what we do. In his closing remarks, Rear Adm. John Christenson, NWC president, expressed his confidence in the knowledge and skills the graduates have acquired during their time as NWC students. You depart Newport to be part of the solution, to win any war and to defend freedom, Christenson said. You depart with greater trust and confidence in your service and international partners. You depart with the knowledge of centuries directly relevant to the challenges of today. The Naval War College was established in 1884 as a small institution with mostly summer courses. It has evolved into a one-year, resident program that graduates about 600 students a year, and a distance pro gram that graduates about 1,000 students a year. More than 50,000 students have graduated since its first class of nine students in 1885, and about 300 of todays admirals, generals and senior executive ser vice leaders are alumni. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 11

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Pool party attracts fun-seeking familiesThe Summer Splash Pool Party kicked off the summer season in a wildly wet fashion at the NAS Jax Outdoor Pool June 16. The event was a combined effort of Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) and the Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department that provided a fun-filled day of free activities emphasizing fun and fitness for Navy families. Special events included a cardboard boat regatta, where a family team of four or more competed to build a floatable boat out of cardboard and other materi als such as duct tape and pool noodles. Following the regatta was the Karaoke contest where contestants displayed their singing talent. Throughout the event, participants had the opportunity to win fabulous prizes such as a bicycle, a 19 flat screen TV, as well as family passes to the Jacksonville Zoo and Adventure Landing. The event concluded with a dance competition where participants won awards for the Best Dad, Best Mom, Most Energy, Most Creative and Best Family Dance. One pool patron, Suzanne Speight, said the weather held out and it was a great time. The music and food were awesome and the event was a great opportunity for the kids and parents to have some fun. Every patron at the event received a free hot dog, soda and chips. The party went on until 6 p.m., giving the families plenty of sun and laughs for the weekend. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 13

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Sailors frocked at CPRW-11Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven Capt. Trey Wheeler frocked 14 Sailors during a recent ceremony as shipmates and family members gathered to congratulate them. The following were frocked to their new rates: AWO1 Aaron Dyer; AWO1 Hector Rivera; AWO1 Marvelous Salters; AWO1 Nicholas Taylor; AWO1 Daryl Trail; AWO1 Jacqueline Workman; IT1 Marcus Wade; OS2 Geoffery Coleman; OS2 Grant Cullum; OS2 Jennifer Glover; IT2 Daniel Grimes; RP2 Chester Harden; ET2 Eric Holsey; OS3 Paul Avila and YN3 Kirk Brown. With their new appointments, these Sailors will now enjoy the responsibilities that come with their new rank. Commodore Wheeler congrat ulated them for their sustained superior performance and exhorted them to continue the good work. Doane retires after 24 years service Lt. Thomas Doane of Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Elevens (CPRW-11) Mobile Tactical Operations Center (MTOC) recently retired after 24 years of naval service. Doane, a prior enlisted helicopter aircrewmen was commissioned an aviation operations limited duty officer in 2002. During his illustrious career, Doane has been deployed to the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian Ocean, Mediterranean Sea and the Persian Gulf. He also served on the ground in Iraq. Prior to arriving at the MTOC, he served as the officer in charge (OIC) of Rescue Swimmer School, Jacksonville. During his retirement ceremony, Doane was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal for his meritorious service while serving as OIC of MTOC Detachment Djibouti, Africa and MTOC Three assistant OIC. His citation commended him for his unmatched operational experience, which was instrumental in supporting Sixth Fleet deployed personnel. Doane also led a team of 14 Sailors, providing Command, Control, Communication, Computer and Intelligence (C4I) support to four allied nations during Exercise Grampus. Doanes distinctive accomplishments and selfless dedication during his tour at CPRW-11 marked the pinnacle of his 24 years of naval service. CPRW-11 bids farewell to Woods Lt. Cmdr. Casey Woods of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11) retired from active duty after 22 years of active service during a ceremony June 22. Capt. Frank Naylor III, com manding officer of Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division was the guest speaker. Woods graduated from Ninnekah High School in Oklahoma in 1990 and enlisted in the United States Marine Corps shortly thereafter. As a young Marine he served in Hotel Battery 3/12, 3rd BN, 10th Marines, and Kilo Battery, 3rd BN, 10th Marines, Camp Lejeune, N.C. and supported multiple combat operations during Operations Desert Storm and Desert Shield. Woods earned a Bachelors of Arts degree in Liberal Arts from the University of Missouri, Kansas City in 1997 and later obtained a commission in the United States Navy. As a commissioned officer, Woods served in the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Community as an instructor tactical coordinator with VP-16, Fleet Replacement Squadron VP-30 and VP-5 deploying to every region of the world. He also completed a tour on board USS Enterprise as a tactical action officer. The culmination of his naval service came while serving as the training officer for CPRW-11 and was instrumental in the successful introduction of the P-8A Poseidon to the nations fighting force. Woods mili tary decora tions include the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (four awards), Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (three awards), Combat Action Ribbon, and various service/unit awards. He was also awarded the Meritorious Service Medal for his leader ship and foresight as the CPRW-11 training officer while performing his duties in an exemplary manner. The citation stated his contribu tions were critical to the successful implementation of the P-3C fleet synthetic training environment, the P-8A Post-Fleet Replacement Squadron training and his role as the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force Symposium lead coordinator where he led 50 Sailors in the execution of a demanding week-long schedule including the P-8A rollout and fleet intro duction ceremony. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 15

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Navy Medicine Support Command Sailors, civilians celebrate Hospital Corps 114th Birthday Service members, civilian employees and con tracted workers from the Bureau of Medicine and Surgerys (BUMED) sole point of accountability for medical education and training participated in a ceremony highlighting the Hospital Corps 114th birthday June 18 at NAS Jacksonville. Navy Medicine Support Command personnel, an Echelon 3 entity overseeing the majority of medi cal training available to U.S. Navy medical pro fessionals, hosted a cake-cutting ceremony and presentation on the history of the largest U.S. Navy Corps, something retired HMCM Michael Stewart, NMSC Defense Medical Human Resources System Internet (DMHRS) program manager said is imperative for current and former hospital corpsmen to remember and appreciate. On this anniversary of the Hospital Corps, it is important for us to stop and reflect back on the past 114 years because of all of the incredible sacrifices that have been made by this group of warriors on behalf of freedom, he said. Although we have had many names the legacy has remained one of valor, duty, and sacrifice. From the earliest days of the founding of the Hospital Corps in 1898 to today, men and women have proudly worn the caduceus (although earlier days had us wearing a Red Cross) and that rating badge signified to everyone in the Navy and Marine Corps team that they were available to provide whatever form of healthcare that was needed at anytime. Stewart, who served as the BUMED force master chief the highest-ranking enlisted hospital corpsman in the Navy before his retirement, said the rich history of the hospital corpsman rating, along with the men and women who have taken the hospital corpsman oath for more than a century have had a profound impact on service members around the world. The heritage of the Hospital Corps is unmatched by any other group in all of the Armed Forces and is the only enlisted Corps, he said. It would be impossible to know how many men and women have their lives touched by the actions of Doc or who lived to fight another day because their corpsman was willing to go in harms way to save them. Not only in battle but in peacetime as well, the U.S. Navy Hospital Corpsman has been the backbone of Navy medicine and will continue to be the standard by which all others are compared. HM2(FMF) Matt Biecker, NMSCs most junior hospital corpsman, and HMCS Karen Tracy, NMSC Reserve Component training leading senior chief petty officer, the senior-most hospital corpsman at NMSC, cut a cake during the brief ceremony, something Biecker said was an honor. Working at a command with so many hospital corpsmen some who are now retired but served during Vietnam and in Iraq and Afghanistan has served to broaden my horizons about the role corpsmen play in the Navy, he said. Im honored to be part of the Hospital Corps, and part of the history we continue to write all over the world. Navy Medicine Support Command provides a single point of accountability for all Navy Medicine education, training, public health and human resource management for Sailors and Marines as well as providing innovative and responsive leaders in health support services. NMSC is part of the Navy Medicine team, a global healthcare network of 63,000 Navy medical per sonnel around the world who provide high-quality health care to more than one million eligible ben eficiaries. Navy Medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the battlefield. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012

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Test Results Table NAS Jacksonville Radiological ContaminantsContaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo./yr.) MCL Violation Y/N Level Detected Range of Results MCLGMCL Likely Source of Contamination Inorganic ContaminantsContaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo./yr.) MCL Violation Y/N Level Detected Range of Results MCLGMCL Likely Source of Contamination Disinfection By-Products (TTHMs/HAA5/Chlorine Residual) (NAS only)Contaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo./ yr.) MCL Violation Y/N Level Detected Range of Results MCLG or MRDLG MCL or MRDL Likely Source of Contamination Secondary ContaminantsContaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo./ yr.) MCL Violation Y/N Level Detected Range of Results MCLG or MRDLG MCL or MRDL Likely Source of Contamination Lead and Copper (Tap Water) (NAS only)Contaminant and Unit of Measurement Dates of sampling (mo./yr.) AL Violation Y/N 90th Percentile Result No. of sites exceeding the AL MCLG AL (Action Level) Likely Source of Contamination The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: (A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. (B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater dis charges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming. (C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses. (D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems. (E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturallyoccurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribes reg ulations which limit the amount of certain contami nants in water provided by public water systems. Federal Department of Agriculture regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause seri ous health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is pri marily from materials and components asso ciated with service lines and home plumbing. NAVFAC SE is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to two minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http:// www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. All drinking water, including bottled water, may reason ably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immunocompromised persons such as persons with cancer under going chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryp tosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 4264791 or www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. For further information or questions concerning this report, call 542-5610. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC SE), Public Works Department (PWD), as the NAS Jacksonville water utility service provider, is pleased to provide you with the 2011 annual Water Quality Report. PWD provides a safe and dependable supply of drinking water through three deep wells which draw from the Floridan aquifer. In 2011, the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) performed a source water assess ment that identified no potential sources of contamination near our wells. Assessment results are on the DEP Source Water Assessment and Protection Program website at www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp. Treatment of your water supply includes aeration for odor control and chlorination for disinfection. In 2003, the station began receiving potable water from JEA, therefore, some of the data in this report is from JEA testing. NAVFAC SE routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to federal and state laws and regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on results of monitoring from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 2011. Data obtained before Jan. 1, 2011 and presented in this report, are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations. Below are the definitions of terms and abbreviations used in the report: Action Level (AL) the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Maximum Contaminant Level The Maximum Allowed (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal The Goal(MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drink ing water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Maximum Residual Disinfection Level (MRDL) The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants Non-Detects (ND) indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis. Not Applicable (N/A) No value limit or restriction has been applied to this particular parameter. Parts per billion (ppb) one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000. Parts per million (ppm) one part per million cor responds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000. Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 17

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included July Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Summer Bowling Leagues Now Forming Monday Mixed Trio 7 p.m. Wednesday After Work League 4:30 p.m. Thrusday Morning Seniors 9 a.m. Thursday Night Extreme Bowling 6:30 p.m. Friday Intramural League 11:45 a.m. Sunday Fun Bunch League 4 p.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. **New fitness class Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DOD civilians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session two begins July 9 Lessons are available at the indoor and outdoor pool $40 military, $45 DOD Register for swim lessons at the base gym I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Trapeze High Florida Fleming Island $35 per person Scenic St. Augustine Cruise Adult $11.75, child $5.50 Wet N Wild Orlando Adult $34, child $29 Blast Away Beach is now open! Wild Adventures offering FREE admission for active duty, retirees, disabled veterans and reservists July 1 8, 2012 Family members can purchase discounted tickets at ITT 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale July 13 $58.50 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Daytona International Speedway Jalapeno 250 $24 Coke Zero 400, July 7, $70 80 Coke Zero Shuttle $16The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Dine N Dash Free food at Liberty Vault June 28 at 6 p.m. Trapeze Class Learn to trapeze at Trapeze High Florida in Fleming Island June 30 at 3 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees July 10 & 24 for active duty July 12 & 26 for retirees & DoD personnel Junior Golf Clinic Session 2 (ages 6 10) July 16 20 Session 3 (ages 11 17) August 6 10 Monday Friday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. $110 per week long session Twilight Special Monday Friday Play 18 holes for $17 after 3 p.m. Not applicable on holidaysMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Lessons $150 per person July 20, 21, 22, 28 & 29 August 17, 18, 19, 25 & 26 Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Sept. 10 Oct. 17 $500 per person Youth Flight Camps (ages 12 18) Basic Aviation Course $100 per person July 11 14 register by July 3 July 18 21 register by July 11 Advanced Aviation Course (basic course required) $150 per person Aug. 8 11 register by Aug. 1 Aug. 22 25 register by Aug. 14 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012

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Navy leadership has implemented the Operational Stress Control (OSC) program to help Sailors and their families recognize and navigate stress, said Navy officials, June 18. According to Capt. Kurt Scott, director, Navy Behavioral Health, the Navys goal is to help individuals identify stressors and develop the skills and tools to be resilient and handle the curveballs life may throw. Deployment work-ups, a sick child, four-section duty and marital trouble can all cause stress levels to rise. Stress is a fact of life but resiliency helps make stress manageable. Stress is normal and can help you excel and succeed, but there is a point when stress may impact your ability to meet lifes challenges, said Scott. OSC defines resilience as the capacity to withstand, recover, grow and adapt in the face of stressors and changing demands. Scott discussed four skills that can help Sailors and their families improve resilience. Balanced, nutritious meals with moderate portions help fuel the body. Getting enough sleep is critical to physical and emotional well being. Regular exercise helps you physically and improves your mood. ed friendship can help individuals achieve personal and professional success. A friend can provide support, influence personal growth and provide a source of strength during difficult times, said Scott. Financial strain is a top stressor. It can cause personality changes in an individual and has been linked to depression which can impact duty performance and interpersonal rela tionships, said Scott. Fleet and Family Support Centers, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society and command financial specialists can help Sailors examine their finances and develop a budget. advisor or chaplain can be a great outlet for stress reduction and resiliency. When stress becomes overbearing to your well being, ask for assistance. Asking for help is a sign of strength and a commitment to yourself to perform at your optimal level, said Scott. Friends, families and co-workers can be your support network, but there may be times when someone with more experience, knowledge and skill is better suited to provide the help you need. The OSC continuum can help individuals determine what level of support is needed. The continuum is a color-coded guide for Sailors and leaders to measure their stress as it relates to one of four color-coded zones: green is ready, yellow is reacting, orange is injured and red is ill. The green zone is where we want to be but the green zone is not stress free, said Scott. It means you have the skills and the tools you need to really be able to manage what life is throwing at you. Learning from life lessons makes you stronger and more resilient and that is our goal. To learn more, visit the Navys OSC blog www.navynavstress.com. Resilience helps Sailors and families navigate rough times JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 19

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NAS Jacksonville host ed the fourth annual GSA Expo at the NAS Jax Officers Club June 21. The event is put on by the U.S. General Services Administration to show case what vendors offer to the military. The main purpose of this event is to bring contractors together with the military, so they can get the best value for the taxpayers dollars, said GSA Customer Service Director Linda Hosey. Suppliers at the expo display their latest prod ucts ranging from office supplies to furniture. We have all kinds of vendors who attend this expo, Hosey added. Many are small busi nesses including some based in Jacksonville, so theyre bringing money back into the local com munity. Vendors compete for the business, but this expo gives them a neu tral ground to meet with contractors and project managers, so they know what they have to offer, said Hosey. NAS Jax Fire Chief Mark Brusoe attended the expo. He stopped at the Municipal Energy Services table and tried on a pair of Dragon Fire Gloves. These are amazing gloves, said Brusoe. We purchased these for NS Mayport last year and continue to look at new gear that our firefighters might need. Vendors dont normally get a chance to market their products to military personnel so many are thrilled to participate in the expo. The price for a table is a very nomi nal cost and the pro ceeds go to the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department to fund pro grams for Sailors, said Hosey. Hosey added that the expo grows a little bit every year, however, the vendors continue to change. AM1(AW) John Rezaie attended the expo because he heard there were a lot of GSA new products on display. I came to look at some of the products and to dis cuss possible job oppor tunities for when I retire from the Navy, said Rezaie. Im getting a head start now that its getting towards the end of my career. Dr. Jill Biden shed light on her message of rallying sup port for military families June 19 with a presentation before one of the worlds largest gath erings devoted to national service andvolunteerism. Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, spoke in Chicago at the National Conference on Volunteering and Service, which brought together an estimated 5,000 people to discuss ideas and challenges in com munity service. The confer ence is sponsored by Point of Light, a nonprofit born in 1990 out of former President George H.W. Bushs call for volunteer ism. The organization last year assisted 4.3 million volunteers and 77,052 partners in 20 countries, according to its website. Biden, whose son served in the Army in Iraq, told the audience that one of the best parts of my role as second lady is spending time with so many veterans and military families. She said she always is inspired by their strength and resilience and said they rep resent only one percent of the U.S. population. Thats why she and First Lady Michelle Obama started the Joining Forces campaign to mobilize all of America to support troops, veterans and families. Since then, Americans have stepped up in many ways, Biden said, either as individu als, congregations, communi ties or companies.In collab oration with the Corporation for National and Community Service, Points of Light has facilitated volunteerism such as: Mission Continues that underscore the connection between military service and engaging returning veterans in civilian service; sands of veterans serving in AmeriCorps and SeniorCorps with 200 communities serving 700,000 military families in the next two years; and nonprofits like Operation Homefront and the National Military Family Association. This type of community support is absolutely critical to military families not just while our troops are deployed . or when we welcome them home . but for the months and years after they return to their communities, Biden said. The CNCSannounced that more than 1,000 new AmeriCorps members the largest in the agencys his tory will provide education, employment and other services to veterans and military fami lies this year, White House officials said in a news release. The new AmeriCorps mem bers will add to the support of more than 140 organizations and at least 27,000 Senior Corps and AmeriCorps members to serve some 600,000 veterans and military families in more than 200 communities across the country, giving a major boost to the Joining Forces initiative, it says. Our servicemen and women risk everything to protect America. It is our solemn obli gation to support them and their families when they come home, said Wendy Spencer, CEO of the Corporation for National and Community Service. At CNCS, we have taken this mission to heart. Serving and engaging veter ans and military families is a top priority for us, and we are proud to make significant new investments to support those who have served. Spencer announced that CNCS will award more than $6.2 million in AmeriCorps grants to the American Legion Auxiliary, AMVETS, the California Department of Veterans Affairs, Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, Points of Light, Rebuilding Together, the Washington Vet Corps, and others. AmeriCorps members will provide services including job placement, behavioral health counseling, community reha bilitation and reintegration projects, homeless veteran support and financial literacy, and tutoring children of deployed service members, she said. More than 16,000 military veterans have already served as AmeriCorps members, Koby J. Langley, CNCS senior advisor for wounded warrior, veterans and military family initiatives, said. The skills and leadership abilities forged in the hills of Afghanistan and sands of Iraq can be applied to solving problems here at home, he said. AmeriCorps offers an oppor tunity to continue serving on a different battlefield, helping meet challenges in our com munities. Almost seventy years to the day, more than 800 mili tary veterans, active duty servicemen, Navy League supporters, and interested members of the public gathered to commemorate the Battle of Midway June 9 in St. Augustine. As part of the festivi ties, U.S. Naval Sea Cadets and Junior ROTC groups throughout north central Florida and southern Georgia were invited to participate in an essay contest about the battle with prizes to be awarded at the dinner. Sea Cadet Cole Arnold, 14, of Manatee Division in Yankeetown, Fla., penned his 700-word entry and then recorded the required YouTube video reciting his paper on board America Victory ship in Tampa. His hard work earned him a third place finish. Arnold, who has been a history buff his whole life, was thrilled to meet veterans who were actually on board USS Yorktown (CV-5) and other ships that he learned about when doing his research. During the reception, he spent time talking with Woody Richmond who had to abandon ship during combat and was most impressed by hearing all of the stories of the different prisoners and what they had to go through. Towards the end of the evening, Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson presented Arnold with a plaque and congratulated him for his efforts. Looking forward to joining the Marines one day, the cadets parting thoughts in his essay reflect his love of country. As generations change the unwavering and undaunted American spirit will not. Midway showed us that against all odds we prevailed and finished strong. Midway wasnt just a battle but a statement of our strength, wrote Arnold. Biden promotes service to military families Sea Cadet wins essay contest, meets Navy admiral, WWII veterans NAS Jacksonville hosts GSA Expo Free SAT/ACT prep programsMilitary families move often and military children may attend many schools between kindergarten and high school graduation.It is especially difficult for high school students pre paring for college. But, families do not need to spend a fortune preparing students for SAT and ACT exams. In alliance with the DoD, and sup ported by the NFL and MLB, eKnowledge is donating free SAT and ACT PowerPrep Programs to military families worldwide.To place an online order go to:www.eKnowledge.com/ MilNews or call51-256-4076. 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012

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Changes coming for boaters and huntersOn July 1, the law enforce ment division of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) will gain an additional 145 positions when it merges with the law enforcement arm of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). Law enforcement officers with the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (DACS), who patrol conservation and recreation lands, will also become FWC law enforcement officers. FWC manages and protects the states diverse fish and wildlife habitat, including species that inhabit the land and waters of NAS Jacksonville. Unlike the Jacksonville Sheriffs Office, we dont have a particular zone we have to stay in, said FWC Law Enforcement Officer Roland Green, who docks his patrol boat on the St. Johns River at NAS Jacksonville. We cover from the Atlantic ocean to Julington Creek and all the rivers and creeks in between. Green has worked as an FWC officer for nine years and is one of 700 sworn FWC law enforcement officers statewide. Our main mission is to protect and manage more than 575 species of wildlife, as well as freshwater and saltwater fish species, said Green. We have 28 officers covering Clay, Nassau, Baker, Bradford, Union and Duval counties. This merger will give us a bigger role throughout the state, said Green. We will now have a larger jurisdiction, including all of the state parks, conservation and recreational lands. This reorganization will save the state more than $3 million over the next five years and $1.28 million in recurring savings, said FWC Division of Law Enforcement Community Relations Coordinator Katie Purcell. This will more efficiently support and protect the public because there will be more officers working in the field. It will also fix any overlapping that occurred when the FWC and DEP patrolled the same areas. While on marine patrol, FWC officers make sure boaters maintain the posted speeds for no-wake zones such as the manatee zones that are located throughout the St. Johns River and other waterways. Theyre also on the lookout for boaters who may be operating under the influence of alcohol or drugs. During the winter calv ing season, FWC monitors the North Atlantic right whales that migrate to northeast Florida waters to birth to their young. Officers patrol offshore to make sure no recreational or commercial boaters get too close and that the whales dont get tangled in nets. We had a rescue recently involving a six-foot dolphin that was tangled up in three crab traps at the North Florida Shipyard, said Green. We were able to cut the lines and safely release the dolphin. Boating safety is a big pro gram. Every time FWC stops a vessel, they do a safety check to ensure that all the proper equipment is on board. Were also the lead agency for investigating boating acci dents, said Green. When theres an accident on the water, we respond to it. Three weeks ago, FWC res cued a man whose sailboat wrecked south of the Buckman Bridge in Jacksonville. We got him safely out of the water after the mast on his racing sailboat broke and left him stranded in the river, said Green. In fact, we get a lot of calls from sailboats that set off from yacht clubs and getting into trouble with unexpected wind gusts, said Green. Florida is the fishing capitol of the world, said Green. The Gulf, Atlantic and all the lakes and rivers offer a great variety of fish. We make sure recreational and com mercial fishermen comply with state fishing laws, both inshore and offshore. To notify FWC of any waterrelated complaint, call (904) 359-3883. Give our dispatcher the Florida boat registration num ber and a description of the boat, so we can locate and process them, said Green. Under SECNAV discusses new golden era of American sea power At the U.S. Naval War College (NWC) annual Current Strategy Forum (CSF), in Newport, R.I., Under Secretary of the Navy Robert Work told more than 900 students and guests that the U.S. Navy is entering a golden era of sea power, during his keynote speech June 12. Despite difficult economic challenges around the world, Work was optimistic about a strategic shift and focus toward Asia-Pacific and reflected on how the Navy and Marine Corps team transitions from todays conflicts and positions itself for the challenges of tomorrow. Our strategic concept and our organizational construct is precisely aligned with the strategic requirements for the 21st century, he said. It is hard to imagine a more maritime friendly strategic environment. Work discussed the con nection between Americas national security and its economy. To explain the interconnection, Work said the nation has not been in a situation like this since the early 1950s when President Eisenhower was in office. He pointed out that the country is at a strategic inflection point where the post-Iraq and Afghanistan military drawdown is occurring at the same time public debt is increasing. One thing that is very much different about this draw-down than the others in our history is you cant buy as much with $700 billion as you could at $550 billion. Things cost more so the Navy will emphasize capability over capacity. The importance and continued need for a strong nation was emphasized throughout his talk. The tenets of American sea power on world economic growth are as valid today as when Adm. Alfred Thayer Mahan wrote, The Influence of Sea Power on History, in 1890. Oceans are central to the economy, which means they are central to our national strategy, said Work. Ready reliable information, secure finances, stable economies and free global trade depend upon the free navigation of the oceans. In keeping with the theme of this years CSF, Sustaining U.S. Global Leadership: Priorities for 21st Century Defense, Work emphasized the Navy and Marine Corps teams importance to a national strategy focused on securing the economic interests of the United States. This is a warfighting Navy and Marine Corps, Work emphasized. The Navy and Marine Corps team is ready for war and will forward deploy to help preserve the peace, protect American, allied and global interests, and assure freedom of access during peace and war. This year marks the 63rd annual CSF hosted by the Secretary of the Navy. The first CSF, held May 9, 1949, offered an opportunity for the nations public servants, scholars and senior military officers to join the college faculty and students to discuss the future strategy of the United States. Over the decades, the forum has expanded to include a crosssection of Americas civilian leadership to encourage a wide-ranging debate on national and international security. What makes people attempt suicide? Its a vital question, as the answer could help mental health professionals and even friends and family better recognize when they need to step in to help to save a life. Theories about suicide motives abound, but as one presenter noted yesterday at the annual suicide prevention conference sponsored jointly by the Defense and Veterans Affairs departments, not much data exists on the question. Craig Bryan, a doctor of psychology, is associate director of the National Center for Veterans Studies at the University of Utah and an assistant professor for the universitys psychology department. At the conference, he presented the results of a study aimed at identifying the motives of 72 active-duty service members who attempted suicide. They had collectively attempted suicide 136 times over their lives, he said, adding that 21 percent never attempted suicide and two participants had made five attempts each. Study participants 66 men and six women ranged in age from 19 to 44 and had served between one and 19 years in the military. Each person referred to the study had been discharged from an inpatient hospital stay for suicide risk. Bryan noted the study also served as a course of treatment. Phase 1 focused on crisis management and distress toler ance. Phase 2 aimed at problem solving and restructuring of the participants suicide belief systems, and Phase 3 was dedicated to relapse prevention. Phase 1 must target emotion regulation, Bryan emphasized. Patients have to learn to deal effectively with painful emotions or they cant progress further in therapy, he explained. Bryan told the conference audience that the functional model of self-harm wide ly referenced in suicide prevention work notes four major groups of possible suicide motives: feelings; something even if its bad; avoid punishment from others or avoid doing something undesirable; and get attention or let others know how I feel. Identifying the why is one of the essential ingredients in work to reduce suicide attempt rates, he said, because once patients understand their motivations, they can develop strategies and coping skills to deal with those challenges. Bryan said one aim of the study, which used the functional model, was to teach patients how to suffer in a way that doesnt require you to die. The study asked participants to identify their own motives for a suicide attempt from a list of 33 potential reasons, which were divided among the functional models four groups. All participants selected emotional relief, specifically to stop bad feelings, as a factor, he noted, though 95 percent also noted other reasons. Bryan described the frequency of other factors noted in the study. Participants identified avoidance or escape with the top single reason being to get away or escape from other people as a factor 82.4 percent of the time. Interpersonal influence was noted by 80.1 percent of participants, with the most-cited response being to communicate or let others know how desperate you were. And 72.8 percent endorsed feeling generation as a factor, with to feel something, even if it was pain as the most common response. After patients confronted the reasons they had attempted or considered suicide, Bryan said, it was like a light bulb went on. While all of the participants originally said they attempted suicide because they wanted to die, 95 percent acknowledged after selecting factors they realized they had not wanted to die, but wanted to end emotional pain. What this means from a clinical stand point is we have to start integrating these behavioral [and] functional understandings of suicide attempts into our treatment, he said. This is a primary mechanism or ingredient of . behavioral therapy, which is the treatment that were currently testing for active-duty soldiers. As part of the study, participants received a smart book during their first 30 minutes of therapy, Bryan said. Patients wrote in the books throughout their course of therapy, adding lessons learned during each session about what was working for them. At the end of Phase 3, the smart book comes out again and participants review the lessons and skills, Bryan said. If patients get stuck in thinking about how a previous suicide attempt could have been handled differently or how to face a current challenge, he added, the smart books remind them of approaches they learned in therapy. It is a core intervention, he said. Study offers glimpse into suicide motives JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 28, 2012 21