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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/01998
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 06-21-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:01998

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VP-8 Fighting Tigers host JMSDF squadronThe Fighting Tigers of Patrol Squadron (VP) 8 took part in a bilateral exercise with the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) June 14 at Naval Air Facility Misawa, Japan. VP-8 hosted a visit from the JMSDFs VP-2 Odin Squadron, stationed out of Hachinohe Air Base in northern Japan. Their bilateral exercise focused on tactical commu nication and coordination, and consisted of four short tactical flights two flown by the Tigers and two flown by VP-2 from which crewmen of each squad ron were aboard as observers. It was such a great opportunity to be able to work with such high quality forces, said Lt. Dan Kuriluk, a VP-8 pilot who participated as an observer on one of the Japanese flights. I was extremely impressed with the crews professionalism and skill. I highly encour age anyone who may have this opportunity in the future to participate. Odin crew members were very pleased with their experience, expressing their desire to fly with American aircrews. It was a great event to participate in and a great learning experience for both crews, said Lt. Omura, a veteran Japanese plane commander with more than 3,800 flight hours. After the exercise, both squadrons were invited to a reception on board Misawa airbase, hosted by Commander, Task Force 72.4. This provided another opportunity for VP-8 crew members to interact with their bilateral counterparts. On behalf of Patrol Squadron 2, I would like to show my deepest appreciation for todays events, said Capy. Seto of JMSDF VP-2. I also worked with VP-8 in 2002 and it is an honor to work with them again. This is a great chance to promote our relationship and we look forward to more opportunities in the future. The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 are homebased at NAS Jacksonville and are currently on a six-month deploy ment from Naval Air Facility Misawa. THURSDAY, JUNE 21, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The Tridents of VP-26 recently com pleted a six-month deployment to the Middle East where they operated out of two detachment sites in the countries of Bahrain and Qatar. Upon their return to NAS Jacksonville, the Tridents were greeted with applause, smiles and tears as they reunited with family, friends and loved ones. While in the 5th Fleet area of respon sibility, VP-26 conducted missions with both U.S. and coalition forces in support of Operation New Dawn and Operation Enduring Freedom. The squadron achieved an unprece dented 99.4 percent mission completion rate and flew more than 5,500 mishapA contingent of Mad Foxes from VP-5 participated in the exercise Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) at the Juanda Naval Air Base in Indonesia on May 30. Joined by squad rons 800, 600, 400 and 200 of the Indonesian Navy, the Mad Foxes took part in at sea training exercises and joint professional discussions designed to help facilitate pro fessional relationship building between the two countries. Combat Aircrew Four (CAC4), led by Mission Commander Lt. Cmdr. Douglas Steil and Plane Commander Lt. Trey Ross, participated on behalf of Commander Task Group 72.2. Their support included a maintenance detachment led by ADC Keiya Crawford who ensured the aircraft was fully mission capable for daily flight operations. The exercise began with an aviation symposium attend ed by representatives from both navies covering a broad range of naval aviation topics. The Indonesian Navy intro duced a variety of aircraft and explained the mission set of each; including the Casa C-212 Aviocar, GAF Nomad and the Belle 412. The Mad Foxes discussed topics including crew resource management, aircraft mis sion equipment and coordi nated operations. At the end of each presentation, members from each country discussed how they could incorporate Tridents home from deployment Mad Foxes train with Indonesian Navy

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS June 20 1813 Fifteen U.S. gunboats engage three British ships in Hampton Roads, Va. 1815 Trials of Fulton I, built by Robert Fulton, are completed in New York. This ship became the Navys first steam-driven warship. 1898 U.S. forces occupy Guam, which became first U.S. colony in the Pacific. 1913 First fatal accident in naval aviation. Ensign W. D. Billingsley killed at Annapolis, Md. 1934 Commander in Chief, Asiatic Fleet, Adm. Frank Upham reports to CNO that, based on analyses of Japanese radio traffic, any attack by (Japan) would be made without previous declaration of war or intentional warning. 1944 Battle of Philippine Sea ends with the Japanese losing two aircraft carriers and hun dreds of aircraft. June 21 1945 Okinawa is declared secure after the most costly amphibious campaign in his tory incurring 5,000 dead and 5,000 wounded. U.S. Navy also lost 30 ships with 223 damaged, mostly from kamikaze attacks. The Japanese counted at least 100,000 dead. June 22 1807 HMS Leopard attacks USS Chesapeake. 1865 Confederate raider Shenandoah fires last shot of Civil War in Bering Strait. 1884 Navy relief expedition under Cmdr. Winfield Schley rescues Army Lt. A.W. Greely and six others from Ellesmere Island in the Arctic, where they were marooned for three years. 1898 Adm. Sampson begins amphibious landing near Santiago, Cuba. June 23 1933 Commissioning of USS Macon (ZRS-5), the Navys last dirigible. 1961 Navys first major lowfrequency radio station com missioned at Cutler, Maine. 1972 Navy helicopter squadron aids flood-strick en residents in Wilkes-Barre, Scranton and Pittstown areas of Pennsylvania. June 24 1833 USS Constitution enters dry dock at Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Mass. for over haul. The ship was saved from scrapping after public support rallied to save the ship following publication of Oliver Wendell Holmes poem, Old Ironsides. 1926 Office of Assistant SecNav set up to foster naval aeronautics and aircraft build ing. 1948 Berlin airlift initiated to offset the Soviet Unions block ade of land access to the U.S., France and Great Britain sectors of Berlin. June 25 1917 Navy convoy of troop ships carrying American expe ditionary forces arrives in France. 1950 North Korea invades South Korea beginning Korean Conflict. June 26 1884 Congress autho rizes commissioning of Naval Academy graduates as ensigns. 1918 The 4th Marine bri gade captures Belleau Wood, France. At the beginning of the three-week campaign, the French fell back through the Marines, and an officer advised Marine Corps Capt. Lloyd Williams to withdraw his men. Williams replied, Retreat, hell! We just got here. 1959 Twenty-eight naval ves sels sail from the Atlantic to the Great Lakes, marking the for mal opening of Saint Lawrence Seaway to ocean-going ships. 1962 Naval Facility Cape Hatteras makes first Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) detection of a Soviet diesel sub marine. 1973 Navy Task Force 78 completes minesweeping of North Vietnamese ports. Lindell just finished preschool, which means next year hes a kindergartener. I feel sentimental, because I know from watching Ford and Owen, that sons go into kinder garten as babies, and they come out as little boys. It is one of the most transformative years of school physically, mentally and emotionally. I also learned that mothering involves a near constant state of grieving. Lindell my wild and crazy little boy is on the cusp of growing up. So Id like to document a few things, because a peculiar aspect of motherhood is that we tend to forget all the frustrating and obnoxious moments in exchange for every thing we miss about our babies. In the fall, when Im sad about Lindell beginning his journey through elementary school, I will need reminders of how thankful I should be. For instance, I will forget how many times I had to watch the cartoon Peppa Pig after lunch when Lindell wasnt in school. Granted, Peppa Pig is hilarious. When they laugh, they fall on the ground and roll on their big bellies. The youngest, baby brother pig shoots tears horizontally from his eyes when he cries. Usually, Lindell wants to watch the DVR version in reverse because he loves the way the baby brothers tears shoot back into his eyes and how the big daddy pig floats back onto his feet after a good laugh. Ill also forget how hard it was to get any thing done with Lindell home for half the day. Just as soon as Id start writing my col umn, hed yell from his bedroom, I had an accident, Mommy, I need new pants! Or Id try to clean the bathroom (mothers of boys know this is futile) and Lindell would spill his drink in the kitchen. When Id take Lindell along to do errands, everything took three-times longer than necessary. I couldnt leave the grocery store without an epic battle over candy at the check-out. At Target, hed whine for a new toy. In the middle of a store without a pub lic restroom, hed suddenly need to use the bathroom. Id buckle his seatbelt and it wouldnt feel right. Id tie his shoes and his socks would be all bumpy on his toes. And forget about doing anything for myself. Shopping for clothes meant that Lindell would crawl in and out of the dress ing room, dragging bits of clothes with him, or hed say, loud enough for anyone to hear, Whats that thing you always wear under your shirt, Mommy? These are all the things I will forget as I watch my baby transform into a little boy. Youll show me this column, and Ill be disgusted, thinking, Gee, why did I write about all that stuff? Then Ill tell you all that I remember: The way Lindells chubby legs hung from the shopping cart at Target and how his perch there brought him eye-to-eye with me. The way he ran down the aisles at the gro cery store and the wind blew back his wispy hair. How Id look at him in the rearview mir ror and see him mouthing the words to a song on the radio. The time he looked at me in the mirror of a dressing room and said I was the most beautiful mommy ever. The way hed run in and out of the clothes racks and hide behind a curtain of womens dresses. He always thought he was stealth, but Id hear his giggle and spot his round cheeks peeking out from the clothes. Ill tell you that our quiet lunches together at the kitchen table were thought-provoking and nearly meditative. Our walks to get the older brothers from school day were always without incident and temper tantrums. Lindell stayed close by, his chubby hand in mine. Then Ill tell you that I can still remem ber the way his head felt in the crook of my arm while we lay on the couch together watching Peppa Pig. Ill recall the way his rounded belly rose and fell as he become more relaxed, and the way our breathing, together, became deeper and slower as we fell asleep snuggled together, the sound of baby brother pig crying in the background. Ill remember just these things. And Ill promise you thats exactly the way it was. Off-limits establishments for military personnelThe Armed Forces Disciplinary Control Boards convened June 13 at NAS Jacksonville and determined the following businesses (including all future addresses) contin ue to be off-limits to mili tary personnel: Flash Dancers, 2003 Blanding Blvd., Jacksonville Bikini Beach Lounge, 2840 Mayport Road, Atlantic Beach Service members are prohibited from enter ing off-limits establish ments. Violation of these prohibitions may subject a member to disciplinary action under the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Family members and others associated with the Department of the Navy should be made aware that these estab lishments are off-limits to military personnel.Annoying things Ill forget as Lindell grows 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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VP-8 participates in SIFOREX off Peruvian coastThe VP-8 Fighting Tigers began their fourth U.S. and Peruvian surface and air asset training with the Peruvian submarine fleet. While operating from the Lima-Callao Naval Air Base in Lima, Peru, VP-8 successfully flew the P-3C Orion for 28 hours over three days and six events beginning May 28. During the Silent Forces Exercise (SIFOREX), Fighting Tigers crews located and tracked the submarines BAP Antofagasta and BAP Chipana, a pair of Peruvian Type-209 diesel submarines, while working in coordi nation with several Peruvian frigates and the guidedmissile frigate USS Underwood (FFG-36). Our MPRF community should make every effort to participate in this worthwhile exercise for the foreseeable future! said Lt. Cmdr. Leroy Shoesmith, mission commander for Combat Aircrew 2. Elaborating on the importance of this exercise, he stated, There is nothing better than to work with partner nations of this caliber when given the oppor tunity to practice the coordinated anti-submarine warfare skills of our militaries in a real world environ ment. For one Fighting Tiger, SIFOREX was also a home coming. LS1(SW) Oscar Vargas was born in Peru and moved to the United States in 1990. He joined the Navy Reserves in 1993 and then transitioned to active duty after Sept. 11, 2001. Vargas father, mother, sib lings, and most of his extended family still live in Peru. This visit was especially bittersweet for Vargas because his father had recently been hospitalized. Without telling his family that he would be in Peru, he surprised them and spent some long overdue time together. It was a really great opportunity, Vargas said, It was a surprise to my father, that made him cry. In addition to the at-sea portion of the exercise, VP-8 Sailors were invited to tour the BAP Antofagasta before the exercise began and later extended an invi tation to the crews of the Peruvian submariners to experience the capabilities of the highly trained air crews and the P-3C Orion aircraft. The diesel submarine is a growing threat world wide, as these types of submarines are inexpensive and easily obtained by many countries. The waters of the Pacific Ocean, the proximity to the coast and the excellent capabilities of the Peruvian crews provided a welcomed challenge for the Fighting Tigers. At the conclusion of the exercise the crews got the chance to express their gratitude for the opportunity to participate in SIFOREX 2012 and the hospitality of their Peruvian hosts. BAP Antofagasta (SS-32) is one of two Type-209/1200 submarines ordered by the Peruvian Navy in 1976. She was built by the German shipbuilder Howaldtswerke Deutsche Werft AG at its shipyard in Kiel. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012 It was an all-hands effort June 12 when a variety of Navy and civilian emergency responders answered the call of a helicopter crew in distress. NAS Jacksonvilles primary mis sion is to support the fleet, fighter and family. Part of that involves provid ing assistance in planning and devel oping integrated exercises with our fixed and rotary wing tenants, said NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, who observed the exer cise. Real-world circumstances like this only help us to sharpen our response skills and emergency procedures. In the exercise scenario, an MH-60R Seahawk helicopter assigned to the HSM-70 Spartans is conducting a functional check flight (FCF) over the St. Johns River when it experiences engine problems and must immediately return to NAS Jax. HSM-70 Aviation Safety Officer Lt. Cmdr. Joshua Hanes explained, An FCF determines whether an aircrafts engines, airframe, accessories or equip ment is functioning according to estab lished standards as the aircraft operates in its intended environment. During its approach to the seawall at NAS Jax Hangar 1122, the helicopter crew jettisons its auxiliary fuel tank into the St. Johns River. As the pilots struggle to maintain control, the helicopter suffers a hard landing that damages the rotor blades, throwing shards in all directions. A nearby fuel truck is punctured and catches fire in addition to creating a major fuel spill on the south seawall that flows into the St. Johns River. The HSM-70 aircrew simulated two injuries and one death to test the sta tions emergency medical response and the squadrons notification systems. NAS Jax Installation Training Officer Jim Butters worked with Hanes to devel op an exercise that tested the squad rons pre-mishap plan in the following areas: notifying the Aviation Mishap Board; activation of the casualty assis tance calls officer; and mustering all squadron personnel to prohibit use of cell phones until the primary next of kin are notified. Butters said, This aviation mishap exercise, developed in conjunction with HSM-70, was a fully integrated exercise that required real-world air traffic con trol, response by airfield crash/rescue units and fire department emergency medical technicians. The scenario also created the oppor tunity for the NAS Jax Environmental team to respond to a major simulated fuel spill, both on the seawall and in the St. Johns River. All of these teams got practical training and proved once again that teamwork and communica tions are the primary factors in a suc cessful response, remarked Butters. Also working the exercise along with NAS Jax and HSM-70 was the Trauma One Air Transport Unit that flew an injured member of the helicopter crew to Shands Jacksonville Medical Center. Other contributors were: Navy Jax Yacht Club, NAS Jax Boat House, NAS Jax Security, Regional Call Center, NAS Jax Emergency Operations Center and NS Mayport Mobile Aviation Fire Training unit. Overall, the exercise was a credible challenge that permitted all parties to exercise their training objectives. Most players came away with some valuable lessons learned that will improve emergency response proce dures in the future, said Undersander. Helo Drill Scenario THIS IS A DRILL HELICOP T ER CRASHES ON NAS JAX SEAWALL

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012 5 Photos by Clark Pierce

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Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced June 15 that the first amphibious ready group (ARG) ship is scheduled to shift homeport to Naval Station Mayport and will arrive in the last quarter of calendar year 2013. USS New York (LPD 21), USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43), will shift from their current homeport of Norfolk, Va., to Mayport. The New York will be the first to change home port, followed by the Iwo Jima and Fort McHenry in 2014. Mabus originally announced Feb. 28 that the ARG would arrive no later than 2015. The accelerated timeline ensures continued viability of the Mayport ship repair industri al base and maintains the capabilities of the Jacksonville fleet concentration area, thereby preserving surge capability and reducing risk to fleet resources in the event of natural or manmade contingencies. This is another proud moment in our citys longstanding relationship with the U.S. Navy. I look forward to welcoming many new Navy fami lies and I applaud Secretary Mabus for his confi dence in Jacksonville, said Mayor Alvin Brown. The military installations in Jacksonville already supply an annual economic impact exceeding $14 billion for the region. Expanding the fleet will support even greater activity for local businesses and the Jacksonville housing market. Maybus concluded, I am very pleased that the Navy is able to condense the time horizon for the arrival of the Mayport ARG. The move under scores just how important Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport are to our national defense, and how committed we are to strategic dispersal on the East Coast. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and U. S. Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus announced that the First Coast will be the host of the NavyMarine Corps Classic mens basketball game featuring University of Florida and Georgetown University on Nov. 9. The game will take place on board a yet-to-be-determined aircraft carrier docked at Naval Station Mayport and is expected to be broadcast on national television. Brown and Mabus were joined by NFL Jacksonville Jaguars President Mark Lamping, whose team will help lead in the citys week long military appreciation activities. This is a unique way to say thank you to our military while putting Jacksonville on display for countless sports fans tuning in from all over the globe, said Brown. My staff, especially Sports and Entertainment Director Alan Verlander and the military affairs department, worked tirelessly on the details of this high-profile event to ensure a quality product that would boost Jacksonvilles profile as one of Americas most mili tary friendly cities. Proceeds from the event will benefit programs supporting Mayor Browns and Jacksonville Jaguars owner Shad Khans vision for transitional housing for veterans. The Navy is excited to work with the city of Jacksonville and NS Mayport to bring the Navy-Marine Corps Classic to the First Coast, Mabus said. The Navy is Americas Away Team; when we are on the job, we operate for ward around the globe and often out of sight of the American people. This is a unique opportunity to showcase the Navy, and to join together to honor our veterans and active duty military. The two college programs are among the nations elite. Both teams have won NCAA National Championships in mens basketball. Were honored to take part in such a special event, and one that brings recognition to the Navy and Marine Corps, said University of Florida head coach Billy Donovan. The Navy has a long and storied his tory in the city of Jacksonville, and this should be a truly special night. To be able to play an opponent of the caliber of Georgetown in a city that means so much to the Gator Nation is something were proud to be a part of. Georgetown University head coach John Thompson stated, It is a tremen dous honor for our team to be involved with an event that will recognize the contributions of the Navy and all of our military. We appreciate the opportunity to participate in this historic game with Florida in Jacksonville. SECNAV announces early move for amphibious ready group Navy-Marine Corps Classic set for November 9 at NS Mayport 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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The pursuit of equality is fundamental to the American story, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said in a video message released June 15 to thank gay and lesbian service members and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) civilians for their dedicated service to the nation. Recognizing June as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month, the secretary also thanked the families of gay and lesbian service members and LGBT civilians. Diversity is one of the departments greatest strengths, the secretary noted. During pride month, and every month, let us cel ebrate our rich diversity and renew our enduring com mitment to equality for all, he said. In his video message, Panetta emphasized the mili tarys diversity. The successful repeal of Dont Ask, Dont Tell proved to the nation that, just like the country we defend, we share different backgrounds, different val ues and different beliefs, he said. But together we form the greatest military force in the world. Integrity and respect are the cornerstones of military culture, the sec retary added. The Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force implemented the repeal with a focus on respect and individual dignity, Panetta said. Addressing the service members who now can serve openly regardless of their sexual orientation, the secretary lauded their service before the repeal. Before the repeal of Dont Ask, Dont Tell, he said, you faithfully served your country with profession alism and courage. And just like your fellow service members, you put your country before yourself. Today, he added, they can be proud not only of serv ing their country, but also of who they are when in uniform. The president also recognized June as LGBT Pride Month, noting that throughout the nations history, ordinary Americans have advocated for change and have led a proud and inexorable march toward free dom, fairness and full equality under the law not just for some, but for all. When the president signed the repeal act into law in December 2010, he said, We are not a nation that says, Dont ask, dont tell. We are a nation that says, Out of many, we are one. We are a nation that wel comes the service of every patriot. We are a nation that believes that all men and women are created equal. Those are the ideals that generations have fought for. Those are the ideals that we uphold today. When the repeal took effect in September 2011, Panetta said anyone who is capable of serving in uni form should be able to do so, and he re-emphasized that belief in his video message. Going forward, Panetta said, I remain commit ted to removing as many barriers as possible to make Americas military a model of equal opportunity, to ensure all who are qualified can serve in Americas military, and to give every man and woman in uni form the opportunity to rise to their highest poten tial. Panetta salutes gay, lesbian service members dedicated duty JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012 7

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free flight hours. These statistics are a true testa ment to the hard work and dedi cation put forth by the men and women of Team Trident. The maintenance department worked countless hours, under dif ficult environmental conditions, to ensure the squadron always had fully mission capable aircraft. The combat aircrews flew day in and day out, continually meet ing mission objectives, in the most challenging operational environ ment in which the U.S. Navy cur rently deploys. After all their hard work, the squadron was happy to successful ly turnover with the Grey Knights of VP-46. VP-26 deployed with command ing officer Cmdr. Noel Dahlke, but returned with a new skipper, Cmdr. Erik Thors. On May 19, the squadron held a change of command ceremo ny in Bahrain. Dahlke departed VP-26 for San Diego, where he will report to the Naval Mine and AntiSubmarine Warfare Command. The new executive officer is Cmdr. Mark Sohaney, who joins the Tridents from Strategic Pacific Command in Hawaii. Thors and Sohaney will lead the Tridents through their interdeployment readiness cycle as they prepare for their next deployment. Team Trident will take a brief operational pause dur ing their post-overseas move ment leave period before start ing the Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 advanced readiness program as they begin preparations for their next overseas deployment.VP-5VP-26those new ideas into their respec tive communities. When asked about his favorite part of the exer cise, Lt. Tim Clemens responded, It was really interesting discuss ing the similarities and differences between our military and theirs especially from the operational and training perspectives. Throughout the week, the Mad Foxes took members of the various Indonesian squadrons for famil iarization flights including range clearing, coordinated operations and a basic anti-submarine war fare (ASW) profile. The Indonesian aircrews were able to develop a feeling of what life is like on a P-3C Orion as they observed the crew perform their jobs at each crew station. For many members of the detachment, it was their first exposure working close ly with military members from a different country. I really felt like I was a part of something big, explained AWO1 Lemmons. The relationship building didnt stop at the hangar. Shortly after their arrival, the Mad Foxes were treated to a coffee break and experienced local cuisine before departing for lodging. At the aviation symposium, the VP-5 crew was treated to traditional Indonesian cuisine. Throughout the duration of the exercise, the Indonesian officers ensured the Mad Foxes were exposed to the local culture. The Mad Foxes from Task Group 72.2 were deeply grateful for the opportunity to participate in the CARAT exercise and for the chance to explore and foster new relation ships with their Indonesian Navy counter parts. Whether through a sym posium, train ing flights or sharing in the local cul ture, both the American and Indonesian aircrews came away with a better understanding and appreciation for each others Navy. CARAT 2012 is a nine-country, bilateral exercise between the United States and Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Thailand and Timor Leste. It is designed to enhance maritime security skills and opera tional cohesiveness among partici pating forces. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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FFSC helps improve quality of life at NAS JacksonvilleThe NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) offers a variety of counseling and assistance programs that help improve the quality of life for Sailors and their families. We are a well-accepted program, and I think the people who work here are dedicated to what they do, said FFSC Counseling and Advocacy Program Supervisor Tina Carlson. We probably have one of the best work life programs in the area. The FFSC has over 30 staff members ranging from counselors and educa tors to program coordinators and victim advocators. We provide a lot of support to the base for the fleet, fighter and family, said FFSC Director Myrna Wilson. The center has numerous programs that benefit active duty, reserve and retired military personnel, including the Transition Assistance Program, Career Options and Navy Skills Evaluation Program, Relocation Assistance Program and Ombudsman Program. It also prepares Sailors for deployment, return and reunions. Return and reunion is a popular pro gram that the staff enjoys because its positive, said Wilson. Initially, you see the anxiety that the families are going through during the separation, but then, when you do the return and reunion, you see the excitement. The FFSC also has programs dedi cated to military families, such as the Family Employment Readiness Program, which assists family mem bers in finding employment, and the Personal Finance Management Program, which helps families manage their income and finances. We hold training sessions to help Sailors and their families learn to bud get for success, maintain a check book, buy their first home and purchasing a vehicle, said Wilson. Military family members can seek help through the Family Advocacy Program, which focuses on prevention and awareness of domestic abuse. The program is geared towards victim safety and protection, offender accountability and rehabilitation. Domestic violence prevention is one of many issues that are addressed dur ing FFSC workshops. It also hosts work shops focusing on different life skills that will enhance self-esteem and interpersonal relations. These life skills include couples communication, stress and anger management and parenting skills. They are all considered life skills because they are topics that are provid ed to military members and their fami lies to better their lives, said Wilson. The staff ensures that children of military families are given attention as well. The New Parent Support Program helps military personnel adjust to the demands of parenthood by educating them on prenatal and postnatal care. If you have any questions, just let us know, said FFSC New Parent Support Specialist Christine Williams. You are here to learn, and we are your support system. The Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) also provides support, housing, educational, medical and per sonnel services to military families with special needs. EMFP is one of the new est programs at FFSC. Carlson said the FFSC has come a long way since the early 1980s. We were one of the original Fleet and Family Support Centers, said Carlson. Back then, it was called Family Service Center. Although most of the FFSC staff is civilian, many have military connec tions. Some are military spouses while others are retired veterans. Its not a right for me to have this job. Its a privilege and an honor to have this job, said Carlson. We dont ever forget who we work for. I wouldnt have a job if it werent for the military. We hope to leave a mark and thats the best you can hope for. I think we do make a differ ence. The NAS Jacksonville FFSC is located in Building 554 on Child Street and is open Monday through Thursday 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, call 542-5745. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012 9

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Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeasts Contingency Engineering Response Team (CERT) provided training and instruction June 7 in prepa ration for the 2012 Hurricane Season. Every year, NAVFAC Southeast] forms a CERT for the hurricane season to be ready for any natural disaster that comes our way, said Lt. Cmdr. Doug Herrin, NAVFAC Southeast contingency engi neering officer. We provide the CERT training on practic es the team uses when it goes out in the field to assess facil ity damage following natural disasters. The training provided is part of the annual plan to maintain skills and readiness for both new and experienced CERT members. We discussed required training and immunizations, as well as team and individ ual preparations for deploy ment to locations affected by a disaster, said Herrin. Our goal is to be prepared as a team and individually to respond with short notice throughout the Southeast and Caribbean regions. NAVFAC CERTs are a key part of the overall recov ery effort, consisting of one or more disaster assessment teams (DATs) made up of per sonnel who enable installa tion facility repair efforts. The teams consist of active duty civil engineer corps officers, civilian engineers, architects, public affairs officers, project managers, facilities managers and contract specialists. As CERT members, we are charged with the responsi bility to support installation response efforts and work to ensure the affected installation can return to normal opera tions as quickly as possible, said Don Maconi, NAVFAC Southeast contingency engi neer. The team received handson training for portable radio communications gear and their customized hand-held Global Positioning System (GPS) device the team utilizes to gather data and photograph damage. The team learned about GPS capabilities, said Adam Kerr, NAVFAC Southeast GIS analyst. The team was able to pull up a pre-loaded Rapid Assessment Form for quick field data entry, capture digital photographs, use GPS linked base maps, and utilize a data base of facility information that includes building size, age and cost value. CERT capabilities have been demonstrated as teams were sent to Navy installa tions in the Gulf Coast Region after Hurricanes Katrina and Gustav. The potential for natu ral disaster is always present through hurricanes, flood ing, tornados, forest fires and earthquakes. The goal of the CERT is to be prepared to exe cute their mission when the next disaster strikes. In our region, it is not a matter of if, but when we will deploy, Herrin reminded the team members as the meeting concluded. CERT will continue its training program throughout the summer with exercises planned in June and July to test the teams state of readiness. The lessons learned through previous CERT deployments and the upcoming exercises will be used by the team to continue to refine processes and procedures. Continual improvement through training will ensure that the CERT is ready to deploy the next time disaster strikes, said Herrin. CERT improves readiness for hurricane season 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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Five Sea Cadets and one League Cadet will be gradu ating from the United States Naval Sea Cadets Summer Training Program June 22 at the NAS Jacksonville Flight Line Caf. We have a good group of kids that want to learn and know different things, said Commanding Officer Lt. Kalhmam Judah. Sea Cadets Austin Brown, Anthony Martin, Allen Miller, Garrett Jamison, Carlos Rivera and League Cadet Gavin Jelinek spent two weeks at the 5-star accredited galley and received training from culi nary specialists. They traveled from different parts of Georgia and Florida and stayed at the NAS Jacksonville Heritage Cottages. They have been doing a good job, said CSCS Wendell Heyward. The cadets developed food preparation and sanitation skills and worked in the kitch en and on the serving line. I enjoyed being in the bake shop the most, said Rivera. The youngest cadet in the program, 11-year-old Jelinek, is a member of the United States Navy League Cadet Corps (NLCC). NLCC is for children between the ages of 11 and 14 who want to learn about the military. The corps prepares them for later entrance in the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps (NSCC). I cant wait to join the mili tary, said Jelinek. Sea Cadets are children between the ages of 13 and 17, and the objective of NSCC is to help the cadets develop patrio tism, courage, and self-reliance and maintain an environment free of drugs and gangs. Being in the Sea Cadets has taught me about leadership, disciple, how to take the ini tiative and responsibility, said Jamison. Especially, as you make rank, you find yourself responsible for more cadets. Sea Cadets and League Cadets are authorized by the Secretary of the Navy to wear uniforms just like they would in the military. About 65 percent of Sea Cadets enlist, said Executive Officer Lt. Lewis Teaque. Being in the Sea Cadets elimi nates the culture shock when the join the military. The cadets will be awarded certificates of achievement at end of the NSCC Summer Training Program during graduation. Flight Line Caf hosts NSCC summer training JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012 11

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The unmanned aircraft communi ty received its first glimpse of the U.S. Navys MQ-4C Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) unmanned air craft system (UAS) during an unveil ing ceremony June 14 at Northrop Grummans Palmdale, Calif., manufac turing plant. Last year, we proudly celebrated the centennial of naval aviation. This year we have seen the rollout of the new P-8A patrol aircraft and now, we have the beginning of an unmanned tradition in our fleet with the rollout of BAMS, said Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson,who spoke at the unveil ing. BAMS is uniquely suited to meet the demands of the maritime environ ment and give us the advantage we will need in the future. History will record this introduction as a milestone in the second 100 years of naval aviation. Now officially called Triton, the MQ-4C unveiling caps more than four years of development with Northrop Grumman for the surveillance aircraft. Triton will be an adjunct to the P-8A Poseidon as part of the Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force fam ily of systems. Its a phenomenal event to see the fruition of our effort after four years of hard work and dedication to this pro gram, said Capt. James Hoke, program manager for the Persistent Maritime Unmanned Aircraft Systems Program Office (PMA-262), that manages the Triton program. We are looking forward to more test ing and evaluation, parts assembly and installation and radar risk-reduction tests. The next steps for the Triton program involve continued testing, functional requirements review and first flight for the system development and demon stration (SDD-1) aircraft. SDD-2 will fol low a few months behind SDD-1. The Triton air vehicle, which has a 130.9-foot wingspan, is based on the Air Forces RQ-4B Global Hawk. The Tritons sensors are based on compo nents and systems already fielded in the Department of Defense inventory. New features include the AN/ZPY-3 multi-function active-sensor (MFAS) radar system, the Tritons primary sen sor. The MFAS completed its first flight in December aboard a Gulfstream air craft.With the MFAS radar capabilities, the Triton will be able to cover more than 2.7 million square miles in a single mission. The Tritons capability to per form persistent intelligence, surveil lance and reconnaissance with a range of 2,000 nautical miles will allow P-8A, P-3C and EP-3E aircraft to focus on their core missions, adding to the UAS capability of the Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force. A Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Demonstrator (BAMS-D) unmanned aircraft being test ed by the U.S. Navy crashed June 11 at 12:11 EST near Bloodsworth Island in Dorchester County, Md. approximately 22 miles east of NAS Patuxent River, Md. No one was injured and no property was dam aged at the unpopulated swampy crash site. Navy officials said. A Navy F/A-18 aircraft made visual confirmation of the crash. Navy and regional authorities quickly responded to the crash scene, where cleanup of the site is underway. Navy officials are investigating the cause of the crash. One of five aircraft acquired from the Air Force Global Hawk program, the BAMS-D program has been developing tactics and doctrine for the employment of high-altitude unmanned patrol air craft since November 2006. BAMS-D supports more than 50 percent of mari time intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) in theater and has flown more than 5,500 combat hours in support of combat operations since 2008. BAMS-D continues to collect lessonslearned for the MQ-4C BAMS Unmanned Aircraft System and the Navy ISR family of systems in an operational arena. The aircraft involved in the mishap was procured by the Air Force in fiscal year 2011 for $45.9M. In summer 2011, the Air Force transferred this asset, at no cost to the Navy, as the service was phasing out its RQ-4A Global Hawk Block 10 aircraft. In a few weeks, family housing resi dents will be receiving the CEL Resident Satisfaction Housing Survey. The annual survey is part of Balfour Beatty Communities performance assessment program. The survey allows us to see where we are succeeding and where there is room for improvement, said Diana Heintz, community manager for Balfour Beatty. Its important for residents to fill it out honestly. Balfour Beatty Communities encour ages residents to fill them out and return them at its CEL Splash Event July 20 at the NAS Jax Outdoor Pool at 6 p.m. By completing and handing in the survey, residents will qualify for weekly prize drawings. The top prizes include a patio set. Residents who hand in the survey by Aug.10 will also qualify for a special early bird drawing. We truly strive to exceed our resi dents expectations and hope that every resident enjoys their home and the services that we provide, explained Heintz. Once residents complete their sur veys and seal them in the postagepaid envelopes provided, they can simply bring it to the Balfour Beatty Communities Management Office and drop it in the authorized locked mail box. Only CEL employees will open the returned envelopes. Survey results are completely con fidential and anonymous. The survey deadline date is Aug. 31. Northrop Grumman unveils Navys MQ-4C BAMS Triton Navy UAV crashes: No injuries or property damage have occurred Balfour Beatty Communities to kick-off 2012 Housing Survey 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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Comedian Bernie McGrenahan offered a spe cial performance for NAS Jacksonville Sailors June 12 to deter alcohol abuse, sexual assault and suicide by telling a reliving some of his own per sonal history. Sponsored by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, McGrenahan travels the world using comedy to push across his message that is simply, if they are laughing a little bit, hopefully the audience will lis ten to my story and take some thing from it. His performance touched on a variety of tough issues fac ing military members today including alcohol abuse, sui cide and sexual assault. McGrenahan opened with a 30-minute comedy routine before discussing some of the more troubling issues that affected him during his early life. I started drinking alcohol when I was in eighth grade. By the time I was 18, I had a fake ID and was going to bars with my friends. We never thought we had a problem because we were just drinking on week ends. Then it became more and more during the week as well, he recalled. His first DUI came when he was 18 and his friends left him at a bar after a night of party ing. I made a bad decision to drive the 10 miles home that night. I saw the lights and was pulled over. I was fined $2,500 and lost my dream of getting a scholarship to play baseball in college. But I told myself, I didnt have a drinking problem and kept right on partying, said McGrenahan. When I was 19, I was fired from my job for coming to work hung over. So what did I do, went right back out and got drunk again. And, I made another bad decision to drive. Thats when I got my second DUI. Unfortunately, alcohol and drug abuse also impacted another member of his family, his younger brother, Scott. Scott was an aspiring model he had everything going for him but he was on the same road I was drinking and being irresponsible. I could see it in him, but not myself. One day, I told him he needs to get it together and then I left the house. When I came home, an hour later, he had shot himself in the backyard. He was 19 and left behind our parents, my sis ter, me and his twin brother, said McGrenahan. When he pulled the trig ger, that bullet didnt just go through him. When you com mit suicide, you put a hole in the soul of your whole family. Even the death of his brother didnt stop McGrenahan from drinking. At age 26, I got my third DUI and ended up in Los Angeles County jail for six months. My mom was the only one to visit me and I swore to her that I would stop the reckless behav ior. I have been sober now for 24 years, he told the audience. Ten years ago, he created his Happy Hour Comedy Tour. I started this program because I was tired of lecture speakers who said if you go out and drink this will hap pen to you. I wanted to create a show with humor to stress the dangers of alcohol, drugs, sexual conduct and suicide, said McGrenahan, who also performs on late night comedy shows. I really enjoyed the show. McGrenahans passion shows through. I liked the way he addressed a very tough subject with humor and ease, said MAC Gary Stoldt of the NAS Jax Security Department. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast recently heard the following cases: convened at NAS Jacksonville, an airmen recruit pled guilty to wrongful possession of synthetic cannabis known as Spice, wrongful use of marijua na, housebreaking by unlaw fully entering a barracks room with intent to commit a crim inal offense, and larceny of a 22 LCD television, an iPod touch, an iPod speaker, a Dell laptop computer, five DVDs, and $400 cash, for a total value of about $2,340. The military judge sentenced the accused to 11 months confinement, forfei tures of $994 pay per month for 11 months, and a bad conduct discharge. convened at NAS Pensacola, a private first class pled guilty to abusive sexual contact with a person substantially inca pable of declining participa tion in the sexual contact. The military judge sentenced the accused to 18 months of con finement, reduction in rate to E-1 and a bad conduct dis charge. Court-Martial convened at NAS Pensacola, a seaman was acquitted of wrongful use of cocaine. convened at NS Mayport, a petty officer third class pled guilty to desertion ended by apprehension, wrongful use of methamphetamine, know ingly purchasing more than nine grams of ephedrine or pseudo-ephedrine, and distrib uting chemicals knowing that they would be used to manu facture controlled substances. The military judge sentenced the accused to three years of confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and a dishonorable discharge. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast are tried, with few exceptions, at NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, and NAS Pensacola. Therefore, the location of where a court-martial described above was convened does not necessarily correlate to the command that convened the court-martial. Comic recounts personal story, promotes sound decision-making JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012 13

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included June Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Summer Bowling Leagues Now Forming Monday Mixed Trio 7 p.m. Wednesday After Work League 4:30 p.m. Thrusday Morning Seniors 9 a.m. Thursday Night Extreme Bowling 6:30 p.m. Friday Intramural League 11:45 a.m. Sunday Fun Bunch League 4 p.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. **New fitness class Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DoD civil ians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session one begins June 18 $40 military, $45 DoD Register for swim lessons at the base gym I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale July 13 $58.50 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Disney World Orlando FL 4 day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Pirates Dinner Adventure in Orlando Active and retired military $12 at gate Family members purchase at ITT Adult $37, children (3-12) $26 Daytona International Speedway Jalapeno 250 $24 Coke Zero 400, July 7, $70 80 Coke Zero Shuttle $16The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Jax Suns Game June 21 at 6:30 p.m. Free admission and transpor tation Indoor Rock Climbing Trip June 22 at 6 p.m. $4 per person Fernandina Beach Trip June 23 at 9 a.m. Food and drinks providedNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees June 26 for active duty June 28 for retirees & DoD per sonnel Junior Golf Clinic Session 1 (ages 11 17) June 25 29 Session 2 (ages 6 10) July 16 20 Session 3 (ages 11 17) August 6 10 Monday Friday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. $110 per week long session Twilight Special Monday Friday Play 18 holes for $17 after 3 p.m. Not applicable on holidaysMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Lessons $150 per person July 20, 21, 22, 28 & 29 Aug. 17, 18, 19, 25 & 26 Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recre ation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more infor mation.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Sept. 10 Oct. 17 $500 per person Youth Flight Camps (ages 12 18) Basic Aviation Course $100 per person July 1114 register by July 3 July 1821 register by July 11 Advanced Aviation Course (basic course required) $150 per person Aug. 811 register by Aug. 1 Aug. 2225 register by Aug. 14 Free SAT/ACT prep programsTremendous challenges face Americas military families, especially when frequentrelocationsare involved.Military families move approximately every two years and military children will attend six to nine different schools between kindergarten and high school graduation. They must become acquainted with new schools and stress canaffect school performance. It is espe cially difficult for high school students preparing for college. But, families do not need to spend a fortune preparing students for SAT and ACT exams. In alliance with the Department of Defense, and supported by athletes from the NFL and MLB, eKnowledge is donating free SAT and ACT PowerPrep Programs to military families worldwide. To place an online order go to:www.eKnowledge. com/MilNews or call51-256-4076. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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Command fitness leaders continue education to better help SailorsCommand fitness leaders (CFLs) and assistant command fitness leaders from Navy Region Southeast commands attended a two-day seminar at NAS Jacksonville June 13-14 to gain knowledge on the Navys newest physi cal fitness policies. This seminar is continuing education for our certified CFLs to keep them apprised of policy changes regarding the Navys Physical Fitness program, address any concerns they might have regarding the program and provide them resources and training recommendations to better enhance their command Physical Readiness Test (PRT) program, said Lt. Cmdr. David Peterson, command fitness leader, senior program manager, Physical Readiness Program. Sixty-seven CFLs participated in the class which consisted of both class room and gym sessions. We discussed new guidelines for medical waiv ers, updated them on the Physical Readiness Information Management System (PRIMS), how to improve PRT scores, nutrition and exercise pre scription, continued Peterson. We give them new ideas to take back to their commands. Lisa Domengeaux-Marrero, CFL seminar manager, further explained the curriculum. We offer 15-20 seminars each year at naval bases world wide. Each year, we create a new curriculum so the CFLs are always get ting the latest and greatest on changes to the program, she said. We also create new exercise regimens to continually improve the Navys Physical Readiness Program. During the exercise sessions, participants were taught new variations of exercises, specifically catered to be conducted in minimal space with lim ited equipment. We showed them quite a few new exercises. We realize many Sailors dont have access to a gym or exercise equipment every day so we try to show them exercises they can do with limited space and equipment. said Peterson. We have come up with several exercise programs that provide a great work-out and are scaleable based on a persons ability to do them. He also stressed that the team is there to help CFLs with any concerns or questions they might have about the program. We want them to talk to us if they have any issues regarding policy or PRIMS. We came here to person ally address those questions and provide resources and tools they can use to improve their command physical readiness programs in a safe, condu cive manner, he continued. According to the participants, the class was definitely beneficial. This CFL seminar was really illuminating. Being able to interact and ask questions about real program circumstances and issues help to clarify the instruction, stated AWRC(NAC/AW/SW) James Pyle, command fitness leader for HSM-70. And, the physical portion of the class brought to light inventive ways to train our Sailors with minimal gear in an effective way and have fun at the same time. As trained CFLs, we tend to have a good base of fitness knowledge, but these secondary training events, like this seminar, actually spread our knowledge base and build on top of it. We learned a lot that will help us to institute the culture of fitness that the Navy is striving for on a individual and command level, added MC2 Charles White, command fitness leader at Navy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command. Sometimes commands get into PT ruts. The PT sessions that we experienced at the seminar provided us additional training options that we can bring home and rejuvenate our PT programs. And, they were tough exercises. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012 15

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With the arrival of hurricane sea son and the continued threat of flood ing, earthquakes and wildfires, The Humane Society of the United States urges all pet owners to make prepara tions now to care for their pets in any emergency situation. All families with pets should have an emergency supply kit for each of their pets. A three-day supply of food and water, pet medications, and leashes and har nesses should be packed into a water proof container. Veterinary records, a current photo and a few small toys should also be included. Depending on the situation, local authorities will determine the best action for local residents, either by ask ing citizens to either stay in place, or evacuate to a safe area. If the situation required you to stay in place, close your windows and doors, stay inside and follow these tips: local authorities say there is an immi nent problem. Keep pets under your direct control so that if you have to evacuate, you will not have to spend time trying to find them. nate as a safe room, put your emer gency supplies there in advance, including your pets crate and supplies. Basements or inside rooms are pre ferred, depending on the type of emer gency. newspapers as well as containers and cleaning supplies to help deal with pet waste. Puppy training pads are also useful for this purpose. out of your shelter until you know its safe. If your local government orders an evacuation, take your animals with you and follow these tips: routes from your local authorities and media and know in advance where to go. evacuate, especially if you have horses or other large animals or if you have several pets. pets, and your emergency kits with you. come, whether at a motel or a friend or relatives house. Many evacuation shelters will allow pets to accompany families. For more information, including tips for preparing horses and livestock, visit The HSUS Disaster Center at www.hsus. org/disaster. Hurricane preparednessInclude pets in your plans The Navy Food Management Team (NFMT) Mayport hosted cake dec orating training at the Naval Station Mayports Oasis Galley May 14-18. A dozen local culinary specialists (CS) attended the training, including four Sailors from USS Florida (SSGN 728) at NSB Kings Bay, Ga. CS1(SW) Adrian Dorsey of the NAS Jacksonville Flight Line Caf provid ed the training to the local Culinary Specialists. Dorsey is a renowned cake decorator, and some say one of the most gifted cake decorators in the U.S. Navy. It was great opportunity for our local culinary specialists to receive hands-on cake decorating training, said NFMT Mayport Officer in Charge CSCM(SW/ AW) Michael Carter. Ive watched him decorate several cakes for change of commands, reenlistments, and retire ment ceremonies. These were not your ordinary cakes; they were very detailed and some of the most elaborate designed cakes I have ever seen. Naval Station Mayport Oasis Galley Food Service Officer Chief Warrant Officer 4 Wanda Trammell commend ed Dorsey for his outstanding training. CS1 Dorsey definitely provided a great foundation for those culinary special ists who are seeking to become cake decorators, Trammell said. His pro fessional training and knowledge gave these Sailors some great ideas for deco rating cakes now and in the future. Seeing CS1 Dorsey in action was like watching an artist compose one of his best paintings, said CSC David Hall of USS Florida. He definitely has a lot of talent, and he displayed it this week. We will definitely take back the knowledge and training he provided this week and use it in the future. All and all, it was a great week of training for everyone. I considered myself extremely lucky to have the opportunity show my diver sity in the culinary specialists rating, said Dorsey. It has always been my goal to learn and share with other culinary specialists the things I have learned. I am thankful to some great leaders who gave me the opportunities to expand my knowledge in my rate. That is some thing I will always remember. Local culinary specialists learn art of cake decorating 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012 17 Defense Secretary Leon Panetta cautioned Congress June 13 against dismantling the strategic framework that supports the 2013 defense bud get request. Testifying along with Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, before the Senate Appropriations Committees defensesubcommittee, the secretary said some changes to the request could undermine the careful balance depart ment leaders built into military spending projections. Some of the [congressio nal] committees have . made changes with regard to our rec ommendations that were con cerned about, Panetta said. He listed three areas DOD leaders have targeted for cuts, and which some members of Congress have challenged dur ing defense budget consider ation. Some of the bills seek to reverse the decisions to elimi nate aging and lower-priority ships and aircraft, the secre tary noted. My concern is that if these decisions are totally reversed, then Ive got to find money somewhere . to maintain this old stuff. Keeping outdated equipment in service would rob needed funds from other areas, he said. That, he added, would lead to what he has long called a hollow force a military that is not trained, manned or equipped to meet current and future threats. Weve got to be able to retire what is aged and what we can achieve some savings on, Panetta said. Some in Congress have also objected to the measured and gradual reductions in end strength that weve proposed for the Army and the Marine Corps, he added. Panetta noted thatunder current plans, DOD will reduce the active Army from roughly 560,000 to 490,000, while the Marine Corps will downsize from 202,000 to 182,000 over five years. Again, if I have a large force and I dont have the money to maintain that large force, Im going to end up hollowing it out, because I cant provide the training [and] I cant provide the equipment, the secretary said. So thats why, if were going to reduce the force, then Ive got to be able to do it in a responsible way. The third spending area he discussed involves military compensation and health care. The budget request includes some additional fees for retiree health care, and limits activeduty pay raises after 2013. Panetta and Dempsey both emphasized that the depart ment does not plan to cut pay, but that compensation cost growth must be controlled to meet budget constraints. If I suddenly wind up with no reductions in that area, Ive got to reach someplace to find the money to maintain those programs, ... every low-priority program or overhead cost that is retained will have to be off set by cuts in higher-priority investments in order to comply with the Budget Control Act, he said. Panetta noted that act, which mandated the defense spend ing cuts reflected in thefiscal 2013request, also holds a more dire threat to military spend ing: sequestration. That provi sion will trigger another $500 billion across-the-board cut in defense spending over the next decade if Congress doesnt identify an equivalent level of spending cuts by January. Obviously, this is a great concern, he said, call ing sequestration a meat-ax approach. It would guarantee that we hollow out our force and inflict severe damage on our national defense, the secretary assert ed. Dempsey also spoke about the damage changes to defense spending plans could cause. The strategy-based budget request, the chairman said, ensures we retain our conven tional overmatch while divest ing capabilities not required in the active force -or at all. The spending plan reflects choices that maintain a needed balance among force structure, modernization, readiness, pay and benefits, he added. Different choices will pro duce a different balance, the chairman cautioned. So before giving us weapons we dont need or giving up on reforms that we do need, Id only ask you to make sure its the right choice, not for our armed forces but for our nation. Sequestration is absolutely certain to upend this balance, he continued. It would lead to further end-strength reduc tions, the potential cancella tion of major weapons systems and the disruption of global operations. Dempsey said slashing another half-trillion dollars from defense funding over the next 10 years under seques tration would transform U.S. forces from being unquestion ably powerful everywhere to being less visible globally and presenting less of an over match to our adversaries. That transformation would, in turn, change the nations deterrent stance and potentially increase the likelihood of conflict, the chairman said. The general noted that because the law allows defense leaders to cut spending in only certain areas, only three broad areas would be available to ser vice chiefs faced with seques tration: training, maintenance and modernization. Thats it. Theres no magic in the budget at that point, Dempsey said. And those three accounts will be subjected to all of the cuts mandated by sequestration. Panetta appealed to the sen ators to take action to avert a potential disaster by preserv ing the strategy based defense spending plan submitted in February. I know the members of this committee are commit ted to working together to stop sequester, and I want you to know that we are prepared to work with you to try to do what is necessary to avoid that cri sis, he said. When ADC(SW/AW) Anthony Hughes received news in November 2011, that he was on the Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) list he felt like his life was over. I remem ber my CO (commanding officer) sitting me down and saying Chief, Ive got some bad news, and I immediately knew what was coming, said Hughes. His commanding officer informed him of his selection for ERB, which angered him. I felt like I had honored my part of the bargain, and the Navy had just backed out on the deal, said Hughes. Instead of giving up or feeling sorry for himself, Hughes said he quickly accepted the news and started looking toward the future. I literally knew exactly what I had to do at that very moment; from that day on my only mission was to get my family back home, so I could get a new job ASAP. Hughes is one of 2,946 Sailors chosen for separation by the ERB in late 2011, all of whom were from a list of approximately 16,000 records the board reviewed to help reduce manning and meet quotas in various rates across the fleet. With record high retention and low attrition among active duty Sailors, the Navy became overmanned by greater than 103 percent in 31 of 84 rat ings, resulting in increased competition and reduced advancement opportunities for strong-performing Sailors to reenlist. The ERB was introduced to allow the Navy to achieve stability and fit across the force while retaining balance based on seniority, skills, and experi ence. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert explained in his official blog that, ERB reduces overall manpower by reducing the number of Sailors in over manned ratings through conversions and separations. Navy leadership realized; however, that while the ERB was fair and necessary for the needs of the Navy, it also left Sailors with questions and concerns for their future. The ERB and follow-on transition process have my full attention, wrote Greenert, we are putting great efforts to ensure the ERB process is being conducted professionally and fairly. More importantly, we look to ensure that the means for transition is clear, broadly applied, open and readily available. For Hughes, that message couldnt have been clear er. I knew I couldnt mess around, he said. With a wife and two small kids, I have mouths to feed and bills to pay. There was no way I was going to let this situation mess up my family and our way of life, and as it turned out, neither was the Navy. Soon after Hughes received the news, a representa tive from Challenger, Gray and Christmas (CGC), a firm contracted by the Navy to provide extensive transition services for ERB Sailors, reached out to him and began working with him on his life after active duty. One thing that I really needed to work on was my resume, I was taking action on all other areas of my life, from my move to my out processing, but my resume needed work, and the folks at CGC really helped with it. Hughes said he was very impressed with the compre hensive resume services offered by CGC. I felt like I was talking with someone that had been through the transition process, was in a similar position in the service when they were active duty, so they knew literally all the aspects of creating a resume for me, he said. In the end my future employer told me my resume was excellent, and a key reason I got the job. CGC is an employment placement firm that was con tracted to continue to build on the job skills, success and training acquired during Sailors careers and suc ceed in the civilian job market, said Rick Trimmer, a contract manager for Commander, Navy Installations Command, who manages CGCs contract. We (the Navy) have asked them to reach out to each ERB Sailor and offer as much assistance in their employment transition as possible, from resume writing to help finding employers that need Sailors with their specific skill sets. Hughes explained that CGC worked in a partnership with other firms and assigned him a personal coach to help with his transition. The coach I had, Dennis, offered to take my phone calls with questions or con cerns at any time, he even gave me his personal cell phone number. I knew he was doing everything he could to help me find a job, he said. Hughes reiterated that while CGC was a great help, they couldnt do all the work. A lot of this is self motivation, he said. Sure, theyll help you, but you need to take initiative and work with them too. For instance they could only give me a draft for the resume; I had to fill out my information before their editors could make it presentable. CGC is also contracted to assist with actual job search help by providing employment resources to Sailors and even practice interviews and salary negotiation tech niques. I was overwhelmed with all they were offer ing, luckily, with my networking efforts I was fortunate enough to meet my future employer here on NSA Crane, so I didnt really need the full complement of CGCs ser vices, Hughes explained. In the end, Hughes setback turned out to be a road to a new a bright future, noted his wife, Nikki Hughes. The main stressor with getting out of the Navy is clearly the job search, said Nikki Hughes. But I must say, within the blink of an eye Anthony had a job offer...with the ERB resources (CGC) plus my husbands natural abilities to take charge of the situation, we are ready for the next chapter! Hughes has a job offer with a local contracting com pany in his hometown of Crane, Ind., where he plans to settle his family after he leaves active duty in September 2012. Ill tell you this, no one is going to hand you a job, but with a little help from the Navy and CGC, plus my willingness to lean forward and make a plan, I was able to ensure a future and a life after my 14 year plus career in the Navy. The Navys contract with CGC is extensive and tasks them to reach out to all ERB Sailors. Sailors are encour aged to contact CGC by calling 1-800-971-4288 or by e-mail at cgcusnavy@challengergray.com if they desire services and have not heard from CGC. Sailors can also contact the Help Center at Commander, Navy Personnel Command by calling 866-827-5672 for more information. For more information visit the NPC ERB Web Page at www.npc.navy.mil/boards/ERB/, contact the NPC cus tomer service center at 1-866-U-ASK-NPC (1-866-8275672) or email cscmailbox@navy.mil. Dod leaders strongly urge Congress to preserve budget request Transition benefits: Life after ERB Saffir Simpson Hurricane ScaleTropical Storm Winds 39-73 mph Category 1 Hurricane Winds 74-95 mph. No real damage to buildings. Damage to unanchored mobile homes. Category 2 Hurricane Winds 96-110 mph. Some damage to building roofs, doors and windows. Considerable damage to mobile homes. Some trees blown down. Storm surge to 6-8 feet. Flooding in low-lying areas. Category 3 Hurricane Winds 111-130 mph. Some structural damage to small res idences. Large trees blown down. Mobile homes destroyed. Storm surges of 12-13 feet. Category 4 Hurricane Winds 131-155 mph. Can cause extreme damage to mobile homes, roofs and boats and knock down trees and power lines. Usually requires evacuation to all low-lying areas within two miles of beaches. Major erosion of beach areas. Terrain may be flooded well inland. Category 5 Hurricane Winds 156 mph and up. Complete roof failure on many resi dences and industrial buildings and cata strophic damage to residences and indus trial buildings. Flooding causes major dam age to lower floors of all structures near shoreline. Massive evacuation of residential areas within 50 miles of the shoreline may be required.



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VP-8 Fighting Tigers host JMSDF squadronThe Fighting Tigers of Patrol Squadron (VP) 8 took part in a bilateral exercise with the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) June 14 at Naval Air Facility Misawa, Japan. VP-8 hosted a visit from the JMSDFs VP-2 Odin Squadron, stationed out of Hachinohe Air Base in northern Japan. Their bilateral exercise focused on tactical communication and coordination, and consisted of four short tactical flights two flown by the Tigers and two flown by VP-2 from which crewmen of each squadron were aboard as observers. It was such a great opportunity to be able to work with such high quality forces, said Lt. Dan Kuriluk, a VP-8 pilot who participated as an observer on one of the Japanese flights. I was extremely impressed with the crews professionalism and skill. I highly encour age anyone who may have this opportunity in the future to participate. Odin crew members were very pleased with their experience, expressing their desire to fly with American aircrews. It was a great event to participate in and a great learning experience for both crews, said Lt. Omura, a veteran Japanese plane commander with more than 3,800 flight hours. After the exercise, both squadrons were invited to a reception on board Misawa airbase, hosted by Commander, Task Force 72.4. This provided another opportunity for VP-8 crew members to interact with their bilateral counterparts. On behalf of Patrol Squadron 2, I would like to show my deepest appreciation for todays events, said Capy. Seto of JMSDF VP-2. I also worked with VP-8 in 2002 and it is an honor to work with them again. This is a great chance to promote our relationship and we look forward to more opportunities in the future. The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 are homebased at NAS Jacksonville and are currently on a six-month deployment from Naval Air Facility Misawa. THURSDAY, JUNE 21, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The Tridents of VP-26 recently completed a six-month deployment to the Middle East where they operated out of two detachment sites in the countries of Bahrain and Qatar. Upon their return to NAS Jacksonville, the Tridents were greeted with applause, smiles and tears as they reunited with family, friends and loved ones. While in the 5th Fleet area of responsibility, VP-26 conducted missions with both U.S. and coalition forces in support of Operation New Dawn and Operation Enduring Freedom. The squadron achieved an unprece dented 99.4 percent mission completion rate and flew more than 5,500 mishapA contingent of Mad Foxes from VP-5 participated in the exercise Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) at the Juanda Naval Air Base in Indonesia on May 30. Joined by squad rons 800, 600, 400 and 200 of the Indonesian Navy, the Mad Foxes took part in at sea training exercises and joint professional discussions designed to help facilitate professional relationship building between the two countries. Combat Aircrew Four (CAC4), led by Mission Commander Lt. Cmdr. Douglas Steil and Plane Commander Lt. Trey Ross, participated on behalf of Commander Task Group 72.2. Their support included a maintenance detachment led by ADC Keiya Crawford who ensured the aircraft was fully mission capable for daily flight operations. The exercise began with an aviation symposium attend ed by representatives from both navies covering a broad range of naval aviation topics. The Indonesian Navy intro duced a variety of aircraft and explained the mission set of each; including the Casa C-212 Aviocar, GAF Nomad and the Belle 412. The Mad Foxes discussed topics including crew resource management, aircraft mis sion equipment and coordi nated operations. At the end of each presentation, members from each country discussed how they could incorporate Tridents home from deployment Mad Foxes train with Indonesian Navy

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS June 20 1813 Fifteen U.S. gunboats engage three British ships in Hampton Roads, Va. 1815 Trials of Fulton I, built by Robert Fulton, are completed in New York. This ship became the Navys first steam-driven warship. 1898 U.S. forces occupy Guam, which became first U.S. colony in the Pacific. 1913 First fatal accident in naval aviation. Ensign W. D. Billingsley killed at Annapolis, Md. 1934 Commander in Chief, Asiatic Fleet, Adm. Frank Upham reports to CNO that, based on analyses of Japanese radio traffic, any attack by (Japan) would be made without previous declaration of war or intentional warning. 1944 Battle of Philippine Sea ends with the Japanese losing two aircraft carriers and hun dreds of aircraft. June 21 1945 Okinawa is declared secure after the most costly amphibious campaign in his tory incurring 5,000 dead and 5,000 wounded. U.S. Navy also lost 30 ships with 223 damaged, mostly from kamikaze attacks. The Japanese counted at least 100,000 dead. June 22 1807 HMS Leopard attacks USS Chesapeake. 1865 Confederate raider Shenandoah fires last shot of Civil War in Bering Strait. 1884 Navy relief expedition under Cmdr. Winfield Schley rescues Army Lt. A.W. Greely and six others from Ellesmere Island in the Arctic, where they were marooned for three years. 1898 Adm. Sampson begins amphibious landing near Santiago, Cuba. June 23 1933 Commissioning of USS Macon (ZRS-5), the Navys last dirigible. 1961 Navys first major lowfrequency radio station com missioned at Cutler, Maine. 1972 Navy helicopter squadron aids flood-strick en residents in Wilkes-Barre, Scranton and Pittstown areas of Pennsylvania. June 24 1833 USS Constitution enters dry dock at Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Mass. for over haul. The ship was saved from scrapping after public support rallied to save the ship following publication of Oliver Wendell Holmes poem, Old Ironsides. 1926 Office of Assistant SecNav set up to foster naval aeronautics and aircraft build ing. 1948 Berlin airlift initiated to offset the Soviet Unions block ade of land access to the U.S., France and Great Britain sectors of Berlin. June 25 1917 Navy convoy of troop ships carrying American expe ditionary forces arrives in France. 1950 North Korea invades South Korea beginning Korean Conflict. June 26 1884 Congress autho rizes commissioning of Naval Academy graduates as ensigns. 1918 The 4th Marine bri gade captures Belleau Wood, France. At the beginning of the three-week campaign, the French fell back through the Marines, and an officer advised Marine Corps Capt. Lloyd Williams to withdraw his men. Williams replied, Retreat, hell! We just got here. 1959 Twenty-eight naval vessels sail from the Atlantic to the Great Lakes, marking the for mal opening of Saint Lawrence Seaway to ocean-going ships. 1962 Naval Facility Cape Hatteras makes first Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) detection of a Soviet diesel submarine. 1973 Navy Task Force 78 completes minesweeping of North Vietnamese ports. Lindell just finished preschool, which means next year hes a kindergartener. I feel sentimental, because I know from watching Ford and Owen, that sons go into kinder garten as babies, and they come out as little boys. It is one of the most transformative years of school physically, mentally and emotionally. I also learned that mothering involves a near constant state of grieving. Lindell my wild and crazy little boy is on the cusp of growing up. So Id like to document a few things, because a peculiar aspect of motherhood is that we tend to forget all the frustrating and obnoxious moments in exchange for everything we miss about our babies. In the fall, when Im sad about Lindell beginning his journey through elementary school, I will need reminders of how thankful I should be. For instance, I will forget how many times I had to watch the cartoon Peppa Pig after lunch when Lindell wasnt in school. Granted, Peppa Pig is hilarious. When they laugh, they fall on the ground and roll on their big bellies. The youngest, baby brother pig shoots tears horizontally from his eyes when he cries. Usually, Lindell wants to watch the DVR version in reverse because he loves the way the baby brothers tears shoot back into his eyes and how the big daddy pig floats back onto his feet after a good laugh. Ill also forget how hard it was to get anything done with Lindell home for half the day. Just as soon as Id start writing my col umn, hed yell from his bedroom, I had an accident, Mommy, I need new pants! Or Id try to clean the bathroom (mothers of boys know this is futile) and Lindell would spill his drink in the kitchen. When Id take Lindell along to do errands, everything took three-times longer than necessary. I couldnt leave the grocery store without an epic battle over candy at the check-out. At Target, hed whine for a new toy. In the middle of a store without a public restroom, hed suddenly need to use the bathroom. Id buckle his seatbelt and it wouldnt feel right. Id tie his shoes and his socks would be all bumpy on his toes. And forget about doing anything for myself. Shopping for clothes meant that Lindell would crawl in and out of the dressing room, dragging bits of clothes with him, or hed say, loud enough for anyone to hear, Whats that thing you always wear under your shirt, Mommy? These are all the things I will forget as I watch my baby transform into a little boy. Youll show me this column, and Ill be disgusted, thinking, Gee, why did I write about all that stuff? Then Ill tell you all that I remember: The way Lindells chubby legs hung from the shopping cart at Target and how his perch there brought him eye-to-eye with me. The way he ran down the aisles at the grocery store and the wind blew back his wispy hair. How Id look at him in the rearview mirror and see him mouthing the words to a song on the radio. The time he looked at me in the mirror of a dressing room and said I was the most beautiful mommy ever. The way hed run in and out of the clothes racks and hide behind a curtain of womens dresses. He always thought he was stealth, but Id hear his giggle and spot his round cheeks peeking out from the clothes. Ill tell you that our quiet lunches together at the kitchen table were thought-provoking and nearly meditative. Our walks to get the older brothers from school day were always without incident and temper tantrums. Lindell stayed close by, his chubby hand in mine. Then Ill tell you that I can still remem ber the way his head felt in the crook of my arm while we lay on the couch together watching Peppa Pig. Ill recall the way his rounded belly rose and fell as he become more relaxed, and the way our breathing, together, became deeper and slower as we fell asleep snuggled together, the sound of baby brother pig crying in the background. Ill remember just these things. And Ill promise you thats exactly the way it was. Off-limits establishments for military personnelThe Armed Forces Disciplinary Control Boards convened June 13 at NAS Jacksonville and determined the following businesses (including all future addresses) continue to be off-limits to military personnel: Flash Dancers, 2003 Blanding Blvd., Jacksonville Bikini Beach Lounge, 2840 Mayport Road, Atlantic Beach Service members are prohibited from enter ing off-limits establish ments. Violation of these prohibitions may subject a member to disciplinary action under the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Family members and others associated with the Department of the Navy should be made aware that these estab lishments are off-limits to military personnel.Annoying things Ill forget as Lindell grows 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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VP-8 participates in SIFOREX off Peruvian coastThe VP-8 Fighting Tigers began their fourth U.S. and Peruvian surface and air asset training with the Peruvian submarine fleet. While operating from the Lima-Callao Naval Air Base in Lima, Peru, VP-8 successfully flew the P-3C Orion for 28 hours over three days and six events beginning May 28. During the Silent Forces Exercise (SIFOREX), Fighting Tigers crews located and tracked the submarines BAP Antofagasta and BAP Chipana, a pair of Peruvian Type-209 diesel submarines, while working in coordination with several Peruvian frigates and the guidedmissile frigate USS Underwood (FFG-36). Our MPRF community should make every effort to participate in this worthwhile exercise for the foreseeable future! said Lt. Cmdr. Leroy Shoesmith, mission commander for Combat Aircrew 2. Elaborating on the importance of this exercise, he stated, There is nothing better than to work with partner nations of this caliber when given the opportunity to practice the coordinated anti-submarine warfare skills of our militaries in a real world environment. For one Fighting Tiger, SIFOREX was also a homecoming. LS1(SW) Oscar Vargas was born in Peru and moved to the United States in 1990. He joined the Navy Reserves in 1993 and then transitioned to active duty after Sept. 11, 2001. Vargas father, mother, sib lings, and most of his extended family still live in Peru. This visit was especially bittersweet for Vargas because his father had recently been hospitalized. Without telling his family that he would be in Peru, he surprised them and spent some long overdue time together. It was a really great opportunity, Vargas said, It was a surprise to my father, that made him cry. In addition to the at-sea portion of the exercise, VP-8 Sailors were invited to tour the BAP Antofagasta before the exercise began and later extended an invitation to the crews of the Peruvian submariners to experience the capabilities of the highly trained air crews and the P-3C Orion aircraft. The diesel submarine is a growing threat world wide, as these types of submarines are inexpensive and easily obtained by many countries. The waters of the Pacific Ocean, the proximity to the coast and the excellent capabilities of the Peruvian crews provided a welcomed challenge for the Fighting Tigers. At the conclusion of the exercise the crews got the chance to express their gratitude for the opportunity to participate in SIFOREX 2012 and the hospitality of their Peruvian hosts. BAP Antofagasta (SS-32) is one of two Type-209/1200 submarines ordered by the Peruvian Navy in 1976. She was built by the German shipbuilder Howaldtswerke Deutsche Werft AG at its shipyard in Kiel. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012 It was an all-hands effort June 12 when a variety of Navy and civilian emergency responders answered the call of a helicopter crew in distress. NAS Jacksonvilles primary mis sion is to support the fleet, fighter and family. Part of that involves provid ing assistance in planning and devel oping integrated exercises with our fixed and rotary wing tenants, said NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, who observed the exer cise. Real-world circumstances like this only help us to sharpen our response skills and emergency procedures. In the exercise scenario, an MH-60R Seahawk helicopter assigned to the HSM-70 Spartans is conducting a functional check flight (FCF) over the St. Johns River when it experiences engine problems and must immediately return to NAS Jax. HSM-70 Aviation Safety Officer Lt. Cmdr. Joshua Hanes explained, An FCF determines whether an aircrafts engines, airframe, accessories or equipment is functioning according to established standards as the aircraft operates in its intended environment. During its approach to the seawall at NAS Jax Hangar 1122, the helicopter crew jettisons its auxiliary fuel tank into the St. Johns River. As the pilots struggle to maintain control, the helicopter suffers a hard landing that damages the rotor blades, throwing shards in all directions. A nearby fuel truck is punctured and catches fire in addition to creating a major fuel spill on the south seawall that flows into the St. Johns River. The HSM-70 aircrew simulated two injuries and one death to test the sta tions emergency medical response and the squadrons notification systems. NAS Jax Installation Training Officer Jim Butters worked with Hanes to develop an exercise that tested the squad rons pre-mishap plan in the following areas: notifying the Aviation Mishap Board; activation of the casualty assis tance calls officer; and mustering all squadron personnel to prohibit use of cell phones until the primary next of kin are notified. Butters said, This aviation mishap exercise, developed in conjunction with HSM-70, was a fully integrated exercise that required real-world air traffic control, response by airfield crash/rescue units and fire department emergency medical technicians. The scenario also created the opportunity for the NAS Jax Environmental team to respond to a major simulated fuel spill, both on the seawall and in the St. Johns River. All of these teams got practical training and proved once again that teamwork and communica tions are the primary factors in a suc cessful response, remarked Butters. Also working the exercise along with NAS Jax and HSM-70 was the Trauma One Air Transport Unit that flew an injured member of the helicopter crew to Shands Jacksonville Medical Center. Other contributors were: Navy Jax Yacht Club, NAS Jax Boat House, NAS Jax Security, Regional Call Center, NAS Jax Emergency Operations Center and NS Mayport Mobile Aviation Fire Training unit. Overall, the exercise was a credible challenge that permitted all parties to exercise their training objectives. Most players came away with some valuable lessons learned that will improve emergency response proce dures in the future, said Undersander. Helo Drill Scenario THIS IS A DRILL HELICOP T ER CRASHES ON NAS JAX SEAWALL

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012 5 Photos by Clark Pierce

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Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced June 15 that the first amphibious ready group (ARG) ship is scheduled to shift homeport to Naval Station Mayport and will arrive in the last quarter of calendar year 2013. USS New York (LPD 21), USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43), will shift from their current homeport of Norfolk, Va., to Mayport. The New York will be the first to change home port, followed by the Iwo Jima and Fort McHenry in 2014. Mabus originally announced Feb. 28 that the ARG would arrive no later than 2015. The accelerated timeline ensures continued viability of the Mayport ship repair industri al base and maintains the capabilities of the Jacksonville fleet concentration area, thereby preserving surge capability and reducing risk to fleet resources in the event of natural or manmade contingencies. This is another proud moment in our citys longstanding relationship with the U.S. Navy. I look forward to welcoming many new Navy fami lies and I applaud Secretary Mabus for his confidence in Jacksonville, said Mayor Alvin Brown. The military installations in Jacksonville already supply an annual economic impact exceeding $14 billion for the region. Expanding the fleet will support even greater activity for local businesses and the Jacksonville housing market. Maybus concluded, I am very pleased that the Navy is able to condense the time horizon for the arrival of the Mayport ARG. The move under scores just how important Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport are to our national defense, and how committed we are to strategic dispersal on the East Coast. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and U. S. Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus announced that the First Coast will be the host of the NavyMarine Corps Classic mens basketball game featuring University of Florida and Georgetown University on Nov. 9. The game will take place on board a yet-to-be-determined aircraft carrier docked at Naval Station Mayport and is expected to be broadcast on national television. Brown and Mabus were joined by NFL Jacksonville Jaguars President Mark Lamping, whose team will help lead in the citys week long military appreciation activities. This is a unique way to say thank you to our military while putting Jacksonville on display for countless sports fans tuning in from all over the globe, said Brown. My staff, especially Sports and Entertainment Director Alan Verlander and the military affairs department, worked tirelessly on the details of this high-profile event to ensure a quality product that would boost Jacksonvilles profile as one of Americas most mili tary friendly cities. Proceeds from the event will benefit programs supporting Mayor Browns and Jacksonville Jaguars owner Shad Khans vision for transitional housing for veterans. The Navy is excited to work with the city of Jacksonville and NS Mayport to bring the Navy-Marine Corps Classic to the First Coast, Mabus said. The Navy is Americas Away Team; when we are on the job, we operate forward around the globe and often out of sight of the American people. This is a unique opportunity to showcase the Navy, and to join together to honor our veterans and active duty military. The two college programs are among the nations elite. Both teams have won NCAA National Championships in mens basketball. Were honored to take part in such a special event, and one that brings recognition to the Navy and Marine Corps, said University of Florida head coach Billy Donovan. The Navy has a long and storied history in the city of Jacksonville, and this should be a truly special night. To be able to play an opponent of the caliber of Georgetown in a city that means so much to the Gator Nation is something were proud to be a part of. Georgetown University head coach John Thompson stated, It is a tremen dous honor for our team to be involved with an event that will recognize the contributions of the Navy and all of our military. We appreciate the opportunity to participate in this historic game with Florida in Jacksonville. SECNAV announces early move for amphibious ready group Navy-Marine Corps Classic set for November 9 at NS Mayport 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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The pursuit of equality is fundamental to the American story, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said in a video message released June 15 to thank gay and lesbian service members and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) civilians for their dedicated service to the nation. Recognizing June as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month, the secretary also thanked the families of gay and lesbian service members and LGBT civilians. Diversity is one of the departments greatest strengths, the secretary noted. During pride month, and every month, let us cel ebrate our rich diversity and renew our enduring commitment to equality for all, he said. In his video message, Panetta emphasized the militarys diversity. The successful repeal of Dont Ask, Dont Tell proved to the nation that, just like the country we defend, we share different backgrounds, different values and different beliefs, he said. But together we form the greatest military force in the world. Integrity and respect are the cornerstones of military culture, the sec retary added. The Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force implemented the repeal with a focus on respect and individual dignity, Panetta said. Addressing the service members who now can serve openly regardless of their sexual orientation, the secretary lauded their service before the repeal. Before the repeal of Dont Ask, Dont Tell, he said, you faithfully served your country with profession alism and courage. And just like your fellow service members, you put your country before yourself. Today, he added, they can be proud not only of serving their country, but also of who they are when in uniform. The president also recognized June as LGBT Pride Month, noting that throughout the nations history, ordinary Americans have advocated for change and have led a proud and inexorable march toward freedom, fairness and full equality under the law not just for some, but for all. When the president signed the repeal act into law in December 2010, he said, We are not a nation that says, Dont ask, dont tell. We are a nation that says, Out of many, we are one. We are a nation that wel comes the service of every patriot. We are a nation that believes that all men and women are created equal. Those are the ideals that generations have fought for. Those are the ideals that we uphold today. When the repeal took effect in September 2011, Panetta said anyone who is capable of serving in uniform should be able to do so, and he re-emphasized that belief in his video message. Going forward, Panetta said, I remain commit ted to removing as many barriers as possible to make Americas military a model of equal opportunity, to ensure all who are qualified can serve in Americas military, and to give every man and woman in uni form the opportunity to rise to their highest poten tial. Panetta salutes gay, lesbian service members dedicated duty JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012 7

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free flight hours. These statistics are a true testa ment to the hard work and dedi cation put forth by the men and women of Team Trident. The maintenance department worked countless hours, under difficult environmental conditions, to ensure the squadron always had fully mission capable aircraft. The combat aircrews flew day in and day out, continually meet ing mission objectives, in the most challenging operational environ ment in which the U.S. Navy cur rently deploys. After all their hard work, the squadron was happy to successfully turnover with the Grey Knights of VP-46. VP-26 deployed with command ing officer Cmdr. Noel Dahlke, but returned with a new skipper, Cmdr. Erik Thors. On May 19, the squadron held a change of command ceremo ny in Bahrain. Dahlke departed VP-26 for San Diego, where he will report to the Naval Mine and AntiSubmarine Warfare Command. The new executive officer is Cmdr. Mark Sohaney, who joins the Tridents from Strategic Pacific Command in Hawaii. Thors and Sohaney will lead the Tridents through their interdeployment readiness cycle as they prepare for their next deployment. Team Trident will take a brief operational pause dur ing their post-overseas move ment leave period before start ing the Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 advanced readiness program as they begin preparations for their next overseas deployment.VP-5VP-26those new ideas into their respec tive communities. When asked about his favorite part of the exercise, Lt. Tim Clemens responded, It was really interesting discuss ing the similarities and differences between our military and theirs especially from the operational and training perspectives. Throughout the week, the Mad Foxes took members of the various Indonesian squadrons for famil iarization flights including range clearing, coordinated operations and a basic anti-submarine war fare (ASW) profile. The Indonesian aircrews were able to develop a feeling of what life is like on a P-3C Orion as they observed the crew perform their jobs at each crew station. For many members of the detachment, it was their first exposure working close ly with military members from a different country. I really felt like I was a part of something big, explained AWO1 Lemmons. The relationship building didnt stop at the hangar. Shortly after their arrival, the Mad Foxes were treated to a coffee break and experienced local cuisine before departing for lodging. At the aviation symposium, the VP-5 crew was treated to traditional Indonesian cuisine. Throughout the duration of the exercise, the Indonesian officers ensured the Mad Foxes were exposed to the local culture. The Mad Foxes from Task Group 72.2 were deeply grateful for the opportunity to participate in the CARAT exercise and for the chance to explore and foster new relation ships with their Indonesian Navy counter parts. Whether through a sym posium, train ing flights or sharing in the local cul ture, both the American and Indonesian aircrews came away with a better understanding and appreciation for each others Navy. CARAT 2012 is a nine-country, bilateral exercise between the United States and Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Thailand and Timor Leste. It is designed to enhance maritime security skills and operational cohesiveness among participating forces. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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FFSC helps improve quality of life at NAS JacksonvilleThe NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) offers a variety of counseling and assistance programs that help improve the quality of life for Sailors and their families. We are a well-accepted program, and I think the people who work here are dedicated to what they do, said FFSC Counseling and Advocacy Program Supervisor Tina Carlson. We probably have one of the best work life programs in the area. The FFSC has over 30 staff members ranging from counselors and educa tors to program coordinators and victim advocators. We provide a lot of support to the base for the fleet, fighter and family, said FFSC Director Myrna Wilson. The center has numerous programs that benefit active duty, reserve and retired military personnel, including the Transition Assistance Program, Career Options and Navy Skills Evaluation Program, Relocation Assistance Program and Ombudsman Program. It also prepares Sailors for deployment, return and reunions. Return and reunion is a popular program that the staff enjoys because its positive, said Wilson. Initially, you see the anxiety that the families are going through during the separation, but then, when you do the return and reunion, you see the excitement. The FFSC also has programs dedi cated to military families, such as the Family Employment Readiness Program, which assists family mem bers in finding employment, and the Personal Finance Management Program, which helps families manage their income and finances. We hold training sessions to help Sailors and their families learn to bud get for success, maintain a check book, buy their first home and purchasing a vehicle, said Wilson. Military family members can seek help through the Family Advocacy Program, which focuses on prevention and awareness of domestic abuse. The program is geared towards victim safety and protection, offender accountability and rehabilitation. Domestic violence prevention is one of many issues that are addressed dur ing FFSC workshops. It also hosts workshops focusing on different life skills that will enhance self-esteem and interpersonal relations. These life skills include couples communication, stress and anger management and parenting skills. They are all considered life skills because they are topics that are provided to military members and their families to better their lives, said Wilson. The staff ensures that children of military families are given attention as well. The New Parent Support Program helps military personnel adjust to the demands of parenthood by educating them on prenatal and postnatal care. If you have any questions, just let us know, said FFSC New Parent Support Specialist Christine Williams. You are here to learn, and we are your support system. The Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) also provides support, housing, educational, medical and per sonnel services to military families with special needs. EMFP is one of the new est programs at FFSC. Carlson said the FFSC has come a long way since the early 1980s. We were one of the original Fleet and Family Support Centers, said Carlson. Back then, it was called Family Service Center. Although most of the FFSC staff is civilian, many have military connec tions. Some are military spouses while others are retired veterans. Its not a right for me to have this job. Its a privilege and an honor to have this job, said Carlson. We dont ever forget who we work for. I wouldnt have a job if it werent for the military. We hope to leave a mark and thats the best you can hope for. I think we do make a differ ence. The NAS Jacksonville FFSC is located in Building 554 on Child Street and is open Monday through Thursday 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, call 542-5745. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012 9

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Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeasts Contingency Engineering Response Team (CERT) provided training and instruction June 7 in prepa ration for the 2012 Hurricane Season. Every year, NAVFAC Southeast] forms a CERT for the hurricane season to be ready for any natural disaster that comes our way, said Lt. Cmdr. Doug Herrin, NAVFAC Southeast contingency engi neering officer. We provide the CERT training on practic es the team uses when it goes out in the field to assess facil ity damage following natural disasters. The training provided is part of the annual plan to maintain skills and readiness for both new and experienced CERT members. We discussed required training and immunizations, as well as team and individ ual preparations for deploy ment to locations affected by a disaster, said Herrin. Our goal is to be prepared as a team and individually to respond with short notice throughout the Southeast and Caribbean regions. NAVFAC CERTs are a key part of the overall recov ery effort, consisting of one or more disaster assessment teams (DATs) made up of per sonnel who enable installa tion facility repair efforts. The teams consist of active duty civil engineer corps officers, civilian engineers, architects, public affairs officers, project managers, facilities managers and contract specialists. As CERT members, we are charged with the responsi bility to support installation response efforts and work to ensure the affected installation can return to normal opera tions as quickly as possible, said Don Maconi, NAVFAC Southeast contingency engi neer. The team received handson training for portable radio communications gear and their customized hand-held Global Positioning System (GPS) device the team utilizes to gather data and photograph damage. The team learned about GPS capabilities, said Adam Kerr, NAVFAC Southeast GIS analyst. The team was able to pull up a pre-loaded Rapid Assessment Form for quick field data entry, capture digital photographs, use GPS linked base maps, and utilize a data base of facility information that includes building size, age and cost value. CERT capabilities have been demonstrated as teams were sent to Navy installa tions in the Gulf Coast Region after Hurricanes Katrina and Gustav. The potential for natu ral disaster is always present through hurricanes, flood ing, tornados, forest fires and earthquakes. The goal of the CERT is to be prepared to execute their mission when the next disaster strikes. In our region, it is not a matter of if, but when we will deploy, Herrin reminded the team members as the meeting concluded. CERT will continue its training program throughout the summer with exercises planned in June and July to test the teams state of readiness. The lessons learned through previous CERT deployments and the upcoming exercises will be used by the team to continue to refine processes and procedures. Continual improvement through training will ensure that the CERT is ready to deploy the next time disaster strikes, said Herrin. CERT improves readiness for hurricane season 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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Five Sea Cadets and one League Cadet will be gradu ating from the United States Naval Sea Cadets Summer Training Program June 22 at the NAS Jacksonville Flight Line Caf. We have a good group of kids that want to learn and know different things, said Commanding Officer Lt. Kalhmam Judah. Sea Cadets Austin Brown, Anthony Martin, Allen Miller, Garrett Jamison, Carlos Rivera and League Cadet Gavin Jelinek spent two weeks at the 5-star accredited galley and received training from culi nary specialists. They traveled from different parts of Georgia and Florida and stayed at the NAS Jacksonville Heritage Cottages. They have been doing a good job, said CSCS Wendell Heyward. The cadets developed food preparation and sanitation skills and worked in the kitchen and on the serving line. I enjoyed being in the bake shop the most, said Rivera. The youngest cadet in the program, 11-year-old Jelinek, is a member of the United States Navy League Cadet Corps (NLCC). NLCC is for children between the ages of 11 and 14 who want to learn about the military. The corps prepares them for later entrance in the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps (NSCC). I cant wait to join the mili tary, said Jelinek. Sea Cadets are children between the ages of 13 and 17, and the objective of NSCC is to help the cadets develop patriotism, courage, and self-reliance and maintain an environment free of drugs and gangs. Being in the Sea Cadets has taught me about leadership, disciple, how to take the ini tiative and responsibility, said Jamison. Especially, as you make rank, you find yourself responsible for more cadets. Sea Cadets and League Cadets are authorized by the Secretary of the Navy to wear uniforms just like they would in the military. About 65 percent of Sea Cadets enlist, said Executive Officer Lt. Lewis Teaque. Being in the Sea Cadets eliminates the culture shock when the join the military. The cadets will be awarded certificates of achievement at end of the NSCC Summer Training Program during graduation. Flight Line Caf hosts NSCC summer training JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012 11

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The unmanned aircraft communi ty received its first glimpse of the U.S. Navys MQ-4C Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) unmanned air craft system (UAS) during an unveil ing ceremony June 14 at Northrop Grummans Palmdale, Calif., manufac turing plant. Last year, we proudly celebrated the centennial of naval aviation. This year we have seen the rollout of the new P-8A patrol aircraft and now, we have the beginning of an unmanned tradition in our fleet with the rollout of BAMS, said Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson,who spoke at the unveiling. BAMS is uniquely suited to meet the demands of the maritime environ ment and give us the advantage we will need in the future. History will record this introduction as a milestone in the second 100 years of naval aviation. Now officially called Triton, the MQ-4C unveiling caps more than four years of development with Northrop Grumman for the surveillance aircraft. Triton will be an adjunct to the P-8A Poseidon as part of the Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force fam ily of systems. Its a phenomenal event to see the fruition of our effort after four years of hard work and dedication to this pro gram, said Capt. James Hoke, program manager for the Persistent Maritime Unmanned Aircraft Systems Program Office (PMA-262), that manages the Triton program. We are looking forward to more testing and evaluation, parts assembly and installation and radar risk-reduction tests. The next steps for the Triton program involve continued testing, functional requirements review and first flight for the system development and demon stration (SDD-1) aircraft. SDD-2 will follow a few months behind SDD-1. The Triton air vehicle, which has a 130.9-foot wingspan, is based on the Air Forces RQ-4B Global Hawk. The Tritons sensors are based on compo nents and systems already fielded in the Department of Defense inventory. New features include the AN/ZPY-3 multi-function active-sensor (MFAS) radar system, the Tritons primary sensor. The MFAS completed its first flight in December aboard a Gulfstream air craft.With the MFAS radar capabilities, the Triton will be able to cover more than 2.7 million square miles in a single mission. The Tritons capability to per form persistent intelligence, surveil lance and reconnaissance with a range of 2,000 nautical miles will allow P-8A, P-3C and EP-3E aircraft to focus on their core missions, adding to the UAS capability of the Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force. A Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Demonstrator (BAMS-D) unmanned aircraft being test ed by the U.S. Navy crashed June 11 at 12:11 EST near Bloodsworth Island in Dorchester County, Md. approximately 22 miles east of NAS Patuxent River, Md. No one was injured and no property was dam aged at the unpopulated swampy crash site. Navy officials said. A Navy F/A-18 aircraft made visual confirmation of the crash. Navy and regional authorities quickly responded to the crash scene, where cleanup of the site is underway. Navy officials are investigating the cause of the crash. One of five aircraft acquired from the Air Force Global Hawk program, the BAMS-D program has been developing tactics and doctrine for the employment of high-altitude unmanned patrol aircraft since November 2006. BAMS-D supports more than 50 percent of maritime intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) in theater and has flown more than 5,500 combat hours in support of combat operations since 2008. BAMS-D continues to collect lessonslearned for the MQ-4C BAMS Unmanned Aircraft System and the Navy ISR family of systems in an operational arena. The aircraft involved in the mishap was procured by the Air Force in fiscal year 2011 for $45.9M. In summer 2011, the Air Force transferred this asset, at no cost to the Navy, as the service was phasing out its RQ-4A Global Hawk Block 10 aircraft. In a few weeks, family housing resi dents will be receiving the CEL Resident Satisfaction Housing Survey. The annual survey is part of Balfour Beatty Communities performance assessment program. The survey allows us to see where we are succeeding and where there is room for improvement, said Diana Heintz, community manager for Balfour Beatty. Its important for residents to fill it out honestly. Balfour Beatty Communities encour ages residents to fill them out and return them at its CEL Splash Event July 20 at the NAS Jax Outdoor Pool at 6 p.m. By completing and handing in the survey, residents will qualify for weekly prize drawings. The top prizes include a patio set. Residents who hand in the survey by Aug.10 will also qualify for a special early bird drawing. We truly strive to exceed our resi dents expectations and hope that every resident enjoys their home and the services that we provide, explained Heintz. Once residents complete their sur veys and seal them in the postagepaid envelopes provided, they can simply bring it to the Balfour Beatty Communities Management Office and drop it in the authorized locked mail box. Only CEL employees will open the returned envelopes. Survey results are completely con fidential and anonymous. The survey deadline date is Aug. 31. Northrop Grumman unveils Navys MQ-4C BAMS Triton Navy UAV crashes: No injuries or property damage have occurred Balfour Beatty Communities to kick-off 2012 Housing Survey 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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Comedian Bernie McGrenahan offered a spe cial performance for NAS Jacksonville Sailors June 12 to deter alcohol abuse, sexual assault and suicide by telling a reliving some of his own per sonal history. Sponsored by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, McGrenahan travels the world using comedy to push across his message that is simply, if they are laughing a little bit, hopefully the audience will listen to my story and take something from it. His performance touched on a variety of tough issues fac ing military members today including alcohol abuse, sui cide and sexual assault. McGrenahan opened with a 30-minute comedy routine before discussing some of the more troubling issues that affected him during his early life. I started drinking alcohol when I was in eighth grade. By the time I was 18, I had a fake ID and was going to bars with my friends. We never thought we had a problem because we were just drinking on week ends. Then it became more and more during the week as well, he recalled. His first DUI came when he was 18 and his friends left him at a bar after a night of party ing. I made a bad decision to drive the 10 miles home that night. I saw the lights and was pulled over. I was fined $2,500 and lost my dream of getting a scholarship to play baseball in college. But I told myself, I didnt have a drinking problem and kept right on partying, said McGrenahan. When I was 19, I was fired from my job for coming to work hung over. So what did I do, went right back out and got drunk again. And, I made another bad decision to drive. Thats when I got my second DUI. Unfortunately, alcohol and drug abuse also impacted another member of his family, his younger brother, Scott. Scott was an aspiring model he had everything going for him but he was on the same road I was drinking and being irresponsible. I could see it in him, but not myself. One day, I told him he needs to get it together and then I left the house. When I came home, an hour later, he had shot himself in the backyard. He was 19 and left behind our parents, my sister, me and his twin brother, said McGrenahan. When he pulled the trig ger, that bullet didnt just go through him. When you com mit suicide, you put a hole in the soul of your whole family. Even the death of his brother didnt stop McGrenahan from drinking. At age 26, I got my third DUI and ended up in Los Angeles County jail for six months. My mom was the only one to visit me and I swore to her that I would stop the reckless behavior. I have been sober now for 24 years, he told the audience. Ten years ago, he created his Happy Hour Comedy Tour. I started this program because I was tired of lecture speakers who said if you go out and drink this will hap pen to you. I wanted to create a show with humor to stress the dangers of alcohol, drugs, sexual conduct and suicide, said McGrenahan, who also performs on late night comedy shows. I really enjoyed the show. McGrenahans passion shows through. I liked the way he addressed a very tough subject with humor and ease, said MAC Gary Stoldt of the NAS Jax Security Department. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast recently heard the following cases: convened at NAS Jacksonville, an airmen recruit pled guilty to wrongful possession of synthetic cannabis known as Spice, wrongful use of marijuana, housebreaking by unlaw fully entering a barracks room with intent to commit a crim inal offense, and larceny of a 22 LCD television, an iPod touch, an iPod speaker, a Dell laptop computer, five DVDs, and $400 cash, for a total value of about $2,340. The military judge sentenced the accused to 11 months confinement, forfeitures of $994 pay per month for 11 months, and a bad conduct discharge. convened at NAS Pensacola, a private first class pled guilty to abusive sexual contact with a person substantially inca pable of declining participa tion in the sexual contact. The military judge sentenced the accused to 18 months of con finement, reduction in rate to E-1 and a bad conduct dis charge. Court-Martial convened at NAS Pensacola, a seaman was acquitted of wrongful use of cocaine. convened at NS Mayport, a petty officer third class pled guilty to desertion ended by apprehension, wrongful use of methamphetamine, know ingly purchasing more than nine grams of ephedrine or pseudo-ephedrine, and distributing chemicals knowing that they would be used to manu facture controlled substances. The military judge sentenced the accused to three years of confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and a dishonorable discharge. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast are tried, with few exceptions, at NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, and NAS Pensacola. Therefore, the location of where a court-martial described above was convened does not necessarily correlate to the command that convened the court-martial. Comic recounts personal story, promotes sound decision-making JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012 13

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included June Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Summer Bowling Leagues Now Forming Monday Mixed Trio 7 p.m. Wednesday After Work League 4:30 p.m. Thrusday Morning Seniors 9 a.m. Thursday Night Extreme Bowling 6:30 p.m. Friday Intramural League 11:45 a.m. Sunday Fun Bunch League 4 p.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. **New fitness class Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session one begins June 18 $40 military, $45 DoD Register for swim lessons at the base gym I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale July 13 $58.50 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Disney World Orlando FL 4 day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Pirates Dinner Adventure in Orlando Active and retired military $12 at gate Family members purchase at ITT Adult $37, children (3-12) $26 Daytona International Speedway Jalapeno 250 $24 Coke Zero 400, July 7, $70 80 Coke Zero Shuttle $16The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Jax Suns Game June 21 at 6:30 p.m. Free admission and transportation Indoor Rock Climbing Trip June 22 at 6 p.m. $4 per person Fernandina Beach Trip June 23 at 9 a.m. Food and drinks providedNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees June 26 for active duty June 28 for retirees & DoD personnel Junior Golf Clinic Session 1 (ages 11 17) June 25 29 Session 2 (ages 6 10) July 16 20 Session 3 (ages 11 17) August 6 10 Monday Friday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. $110 per week long session Twilight Special Monday Friday Play 18 holes for $17 after 3 p.m. Not applicable on holidaysMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Lessons $150 per person July 20, 21, 22, 28 & 29 Aug. 17, 18, 19, 25 & 26 Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School Sept. 10 Oct. 17 $500 per person Youth Flight Camps (ages 12 18) Basic Aviation Course $100 per person July 1114 register by July 3 July 1821 register by July 11 Advanced Aviation Course (basic course required) $150 per person Aug. 811 register by Aug. 1 Aug. 2225 register by Aug. 14 Free SAT/ACT prep programsTremendous challenges face Americas military families, especially when frequentrelocationsare involved.Military families move approximately every two years and military children will attend six to nine different schools between kindergarten and high school graduation. They must become acquainted with new schools and stress canaffect school performance. It is espe cially difficult for high school students preparing for college. But, families do not need to spend a fortune preparing students for SAT and ACT exams. In alliance with the Department of Defense, and supported by athletes from the NFL and MLB, eKnowledge is donating free SAT and ACT PowerPrep Programs to military families worldwide. To place an online order go to:www.eKnowledge. com/MilNews or call51-256-4076. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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Command fitness leaders continue education to better help SailorsCommand fitness leaders (CFLs) and assistant command fitness leaders from Navy Region Southeast commands attended a two-day seminar at NAS Jacksonville June 13-14 to gain knowledge on the Navys newest physical fitness policies. This seminar is continuing education for our certified CFLs to keep them apprised of policy changes regarding the Navys Physical Fitness program, address any concerns they might have regarding the program and provide them resources and training recommendations to better enhance their command Physical Readiness Test (PRT) program, said Lt. Cmdr. David Peterson, command fitness leader, senior program manager, Physical Readiness Program. Sixty-seven CFLs participated in the class which consisted of both classroom and gym sessions. We discussed new guidelines for medical waivers, updated them on the Physical Readiness Information Management System (PRIMS), how to improve PRT scores, nutrition and exercise prescription, continued Peterson. We give them new ideas to take back to their commands. Lisa Domengeaux-Marrero, CFL seminar manager, further explained the curriculum. We offer 15-20 seminars each year at naval bases worldwide. Each year, we create a new curriculum so the CFLs are always getting the latest and greatest on changes to the program, she said. We also create new exercise regimens to continually improve the Navys Physical Readiness Program. During the exercise sessions, participants were taught new variations of exercises, specifically catered to be conducted in minimal space with limited equipment. We showed them quite a few new exercises. We realize many Sailors dont have access to a gym or exercise equipment every day so we try to show them exercises they can do with limited space and equipment. said Peterson. We have come up with several exercise programs that provide a great work-out and are scaleable based on a persons ability to do them. He also stressed that the team is there to help CFLs with any concerns or questions they might have about the program. We want them to talk to us if they have any issues regarding policy or PRIMS. We came here to personally address those questions and provide resources and tools they can use to improve their command physical readiness programs in a safe, conducive manner, he continued. According to the participants, the class was definitely beneficial. This CFL seminar was really illuminating. Being able to interact and ask questions about real program circumstances and issues help to clarify the instruction, stated AWRC(NAC/AW/SW) James Pyle, command fitness leader for HSM-70. And, the physical portion of the class brought to light inventive ways to train our Sailors with minimal gear in an effective way and have fun at the same time. As trained CFLs, we tend to have a good base of fitness knowledge, but these secondary training events, like this seminar, actually spread our knowledge base and build on top of it. We learned a lot that will help us to institute the culture of fitness that the Navy is striving for on a individual and command level, added MC2 Charles White, command fitness leader at Navy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command. Sometimes commands get into PT ruts. The PT sessions that we experienced at the seminar provided us additional training options that we can bring home and rejuvenate our PT programs. And, they were tough exercises. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012 15

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With the arrival of hurricane sea son and the continued threat of flood ing, earthquakes and wildfires, The Humane Society of the United States urges all pet owners to make prepara tions now to care for their pets in any emergency situation. All families with pets should have an emergency supply kit for each of their pets. A three-day supply of food and water, pet medications, and leashes and har nesses should be packed into a water proof container. Veterinary records, a current photo and a few small toys should also be included. Depending on the situation, local authorities will determine the best action for local residents, either by asking citizens to either stay in place, or evacuate to a safe area. If the situation required you to stay in place, close your windows and doors, stay inside and follow these tips: local authorities say there is an immi nent problem. Keep pets under your direct control so that if you have to evacuate, you will not have to spend time trying to find them. nate as a safe room, put your emer gency supplies there in advance, including your pets crate and supplies. Basements or inside rooms are pre ferred, depending on the type of emer gency. newspapers as well as containers and cleaning supplies to help deal with pet waste. Puppy training pads are also useful for this purpose. out of your shelter until you know its safe. If your local government orders an evacuation, take your animals with you and follow these tips: routes from your local authorities and media and know in advance where to go. evacuate, especially if you have horses or other large animals or if you have several pets. pets, and your emergency kits with you. come, whether at a motel or a friend or relatives house. Many evacuation shelters will allow pets to accompany families. For more information, including tips for preparing horses and livestock, visit The HSUS Disaster Center at www.hsus. org/disaster. Hurricane preparednessInclude pets in your plans The Navy Food Management Team (NFMT) Mayport hosted cake dec orating training at the Naval Station Mayports Oasis Galley May 14-18. A dozen local culinary specialists (CS) attended the training, including four Sailors from USS Florida (SSGN 728) at NSB Kings Bay, Ga. CS1(SW) Adrian Dorsey of the NAS Jacksonville Flight Line Caf provid ed the training to the local Culinary Specialists. Dorsey is a renowned cake decorator, and some say one of the most gifted cake decorators in the U.S. Navy. It was great opportunity for our local culinary specialists to receive hands-on cake decorating training, said NFMT Mayport Officer in Charge CSCM(SW/ AW) Michael Carter. Ive watched him decorate several cakes for change of commands, reenlistments, and retire ment ceremonies. These were not your ordinary cakes; they were very detailed and some of the most elaborate designed cakes I have ever seen. Naval Station Mayport Oasis Galley Food Service Officer Chief Warrant Officer 4 Wanda Trammell commend ed Dorsey for his outstanding training. CS1 Dorsey definitely provided a great foundation for those culinary special ists who are seeking to become cake decorators, Trammell said. His pro fessional training and knowledge gave these Sailors some great ideas for decorating cakes now and in the future. Seeing CS1 Dorsey in action was like watching an artist compose one of his best paintings, said CSC David Hall of USS Florida. He definitely has a lot of talent, and he displayed it this week. We will definitely take back the knowledge and training he provided this week and use it in the future. All and all, it was a great week of training for everyone. I considered myself extremely lucky to have the opportunity show my diversity in the culinary specialists rating, said Dorsey. It has always been my goal to learn and share with other culinary specialists the things I have learned. I am thankful to some great leaders who gave me the opportunities to expand my knowledge in my rate. That is something I will always remember. Local culinary specialists learn art of cake decorating 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 21, 2012 17 Defense Secretary Leon Panetta cautioned Congress June 13 against dismantling the strategic framework that supports the 2013 defense budget request. Testifying along with Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, before the Senate Appropriations Committees defensesubcommittee, the secretary said some changes to the request could undermine the careful balance depart ment leaders built into military spending projections. Some of the [congressio nal] committees have . made changes with regard to our recommendations that were concerned about, Panetta said. He listed three areas DOD leaders have targeted for cuts, and which some members of Congress have challenged during defense budget consider ation. Some of the bills seek to reverse the decisions to elimi nate aging and lower-priority ships and aircraft, the secre tary noted. My concern is that if these decisions are totally reversed, then Ive got to find money somewhere . to maintain this old stuff. Keeping outdated equipment in service would rob needed funds from other areas, he said. That, he added, would lead to what he has long called a hollow force a military that is not trained, manned or equipped to meet current and future threats. Weve got to be able to retire what is aged and what we can achieve some savings on, Panetta said. Some in Congress have also objected to the measured and gradual reductions in end strength that weve proposed for the Army and the Marine Corps, he added. Panetta noted thatunder current plans, DOD will reduce the active Army from roughly 560,000 to 490,000, while the Marine Corps will downsize from 202,000 to 182,000 over five years. Again, if I have a large force and I dont have the money to maintain that large force, Im going to end up hollowing it out, because I cant provide the training [and] I cant provide the equipment, the secretary said. So thats why, if were going to reduce the force, then Ive got to be able to do it in a responsible way. The third spending area he discussed involves military compensation and health care. The budget request includes some additional fees for retiree health care, and limits activeduty pay raises after 2013. Panetta and Dempsey both emphasized that the depart ment does not plan to cut pay, but that compensation cost growth must be controlled to meet budget constraints. If I suddenly wind up with no reductions in that area, Ive got to reach someplace to find the money to maintain those programs, ... every low-priority program or overhead cost that is retained will have to be off set by cuts in higher-priority investments in order to comply with the Budget Control Act, he said. Panetta noted that act, which mandated the defense spend ing cuts reflected in thefiscal 2013request, also holds a more dire threat to military spend ing: sequestration. That provi sion will trigger another $500 billion across-the-board cut in defense spending over the next decade if Congress doesnt identify an equivalent level of spending cuts by January. Obviously, this is a great concern, he said, call ing sequestration a meat-ax approach. It would guarantee that we hollow out our force and inflict severe damage on our national defense, the secretary assert ed. Dempsey also spoke about the damage changes to defense spending plans could cause. The strategy-based budget request, the chairman said, ensures we retain our conventional overmatch while divesting capabilities not required in the active force -or at all. The spending plan reflects choices that maintain a needed balance among force structure, modernization, readiness, pay and benefits, he added. Different choices will pro duce a different balance, the chairman cautioned. So before giving us weapons we dont need or giving up on reforms that we do need, Id only ask you to make sure its the right choice, not for our armed forces but for our nation. Sequestration is absolutely certain to upend this balance, he continued. It would lead to further end-strength reduc tions, the potential cancella tion of major weapons systems and the disruption of global operations. Dempsey said slashing another half-trillion dollars from defense funding over the next 10 years under seques tration would transform U.S. forces from being unquestion ably powerful everywhere to being less visible globally and presenting less of an over match to our adversaries. That transformation would, in turn, change the nations deterrent stance and potentially increase the likelihood of conflict, the chairman said. The general noted that because the law allows defense leaders to cut spending in only certain areas, only three broad areas would be available to service chiefs faced with seques tration: training, maintenance and modernization. Thats it. Theres no magic in the budget at that point, Dempsey said. And those three accounts will be subjected to all of the cuts mandated by sequestration. Panetta appealed to the sen ators to take action to avert a potential disaster by preserving the strategy based defense spending plan submitted in February. I know the members of this committee are commit ted to working together to stop sequester, and I want you to know that we are prepared to work with you to try to do what is necessary to avoid that cri sis, he said. When ADC(SW/AW) Anthony Hughes received news in November 2011, that he was on the Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) list he felt like his life was over. I remember my CO (commanding officer) sitting me down and saying Chief, Ive got some bad news, and I immediately knew what was coming, said Hughes. His commanding officer informed him of his selection for ERB, which angered him. I felt like I had honored my part of the bargain, and the Navy had just backed out on the deal, said Hughes. Instead of giving up or feeling sorry for himself, Hughes said he quickly accepted the news and started looking toward the future. I literally knew exactly what I had to do at that very moment; from that day on my only mission was to get my family back home, so I could get a new job ASAP. Hughes is one of 2,946 Sailors chosen for separation by the ERB in late 2011, all of whom were from a list of approximately 16,000 records the board reviewed to help reduce manning and meet quotas in various rates across the fleet. With record high retention and low attrition among active duty Sailors, the Navy became overmanned by greater than 103 percent in 31 of 84 ratings, resulting in increased competition and reduced advancement opportunities for strong-performing Sailors to reenlist. The ERB was introduced to allow the Navy to achieve stability and fit across the force while retaining balance based on seniority, skills, and experience. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert explained in his official blog that, ERB reduces overall manpower by reducing the number of Sailors in over manned ratings through conversions and separations. Navy leadership realized; however, that while the ERB was fair and necessary for the needs of the Navy, it also left Sailors with questions and concerns for their future. The ERB and follow-on transition process have my full attention, wrote Greenert, we are putting great efforts to ensure the ERB process is being conducted professionally and fairly. More importantly, we look to ensure that the means for transition is clear, broadly applied, open and readily available. For Hughes, that message couldnt have been clear er. I knew I couldnt mess around, he said. With a wife and two small kids, I have mouths to feed and bills to pay. There was no way I was going to let this situation mess up my family and our way of life, and as it turned out, neither was the Navy. Soon after Hughes received the news, a representa tive from Challenger, Gray and Christmas (CGC), a firm contracted by the Navy to provide extensive transition services for ERB Sailors, reached out to him and began working with him on his life after active duty. One thing that I really needed to work on was my resume, I was taking action on all other areas of my life, from my move to my out processing, but my resume needed work, and the folks at CGC really helped with it. Hughes said he was very impressed with the comprehensive resume services offered by CGC. I felt like I was talking with someone that had been through the transition process, was in a similar position in the service when they were active duty, so they knew literally all the aspects of creating a resume for me, he said. In the end my future employer told me my resume was excellent, and a key reason I got the job. CGC is an employment placement firm that was con tracted to continue to build on the job skills, success and training acquired during Sailors careers and suc ceed in the civilian job market, said Rick Trimmer, a contract manager for Commander, Navy Installations Command, who manages CGCs contract. We (the Navy) have asked them to reach out to each ERB Sailor and offer as much assistance in their employment transition as possible, from resume writing to help finding employers that need Sailors with their specific skill sets. Hughes explained that CGC worked in a partnership with other firms and assigned him a personal coach to help with his transition. The coach I had, Dennis, offered to take my phone calls with questions or con cerns at any time, he even gave me his personal cell phone number. I knew he was doing everything he could to help me find a job, he said. Hughes reiterated that while CGC was a great help, they couldnt do all the work. A lot of this is self motivation, he said. Sure, theyll help you, but you need to take initiative and work with them too. For instance they could only give me a draft for the resume; I had to fill out my information before their editors could make it presentable. CGC is also contracted to assist with actual job search help by providing employment resources to Sailors and even practice interviews and salary negotiation tech niques. I was overwhelmed with all they were offer ing, luckily, with my networking efforts I was fortunate enough to meet my future employer here on NSA Crane, so I didnt really need the full complement of CGCs services, Hughes explained. In the end, Hughes setback turned out to be a road to a new a bright future, noted his wife, Nikki Hughes. The main stressor with getting out of the Navy is clearly the job search, said Nikki Hughes. But I must say, within the blink of an eye Anthony had a job offer...with the ERB resources (CGC) plus my husbands natural abilities to take charge of the situation, we are ready for the next chapter! Hughes has a job offer with a local contracting com pany in his hometown of Crane, Ind., where he plans to settle his family after he leaves active duty in September 2012. Ill tell you this, no one is going to hand you a job, but with a little help from the Navy and CGC, plus my willingness to lean forward and make a plan, I was able to ensure a future and a life after my 14 year plus career in the Navy. The Navys contract with CGC is extensive and tasks them to reach out to all ERB Sailors. Sailors are encouraged to contact CGC by calling 1-800-971-4288 or by e-mail at cgcusnavy@challengergray.com if they desire services and have not heard from CGC. Sailors can also contact the Help Center at Commander, Navy Personnel Command by calling 866-827-5672 for more information. For more information visit the NPC ERB Web Page at www.npc.navy.mil/boards/ERB/, contact the NPC cus tomer service center at 1-866-U-ASK-NPC (1-866-8275672) or email cscmailbox@navy.mil. Dod leaders strongly urge Congress to preserve budget request Transition benefits: Life after ERB Saffir Simpson Hurricane ScaleTropical Storm Winds 39-73 mph Category 1 Hurricane Winds 74-95 mph. No real damage to buildings. Damage to unanchored mobile homes. Category 2 Hurricane Winds 96-110 mph. Some damage to building roofs, doors and windows. Considerable damage to mobile homes. Some trees blown down. Storm surge to 6-8 feet. Flooding in low-lying areas. Category 3 Hurricane Winds 111-130 mph. Some structural damage to small residences. Large trees blown down. Mobile homes destroyed. Storm surges of 12-13 feet. Category 4 Hurricane Winds 131-155 mph. Can cause extreme damage to mobile homes, roofs and boats and knock down trees and power lines. Usually requires evacuation to all low-lying areas within two miles of beaches. Major erosion of beach areas. Terrain may be flooded well inland. Category 5 Hurricane Winds 156 mph and up. Complete roof failure on many residences and industrial buildings and cata strophic damage to residences and indus trial buildings. Flooding causes major damage to lower floors of all structures near shoreline. Massive evacuation of residential areas within 50 miles of the shoreline may be required.