<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



Jax air news
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/01997
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 06-14-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:01997

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held June 4 at Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast to officially celebrate the opening of its new Regional Call Center (RCC) projected to provide a $1.2 million annual sav ings. The Call Center started operations on Jan. 30 servicing NAS Key West, Fla. and on April 2 for NAS Corpus Christi, Texas to implement the new program, said Brian deLumeau, RCC program manager. Service to NAS Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport will be added on July 1 to complete Phase I of the program. The center is where all emergency and rou tine service calls will be handled for U.S. Navy bases from Texas to Georgia and south to Key West, as well as their associated Navy Reserve Centers. We expect the center to provide efficiency through work accomplished with less people and saving an estimated $1.2 million per year, claims deLumeau. NECE certifies international studentsEntomologists and preventive medicine technicians (PMTs) from the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) instructed 25 international students during the University of Florida Emerging Pathogens Institutesannual Certificate in Emerging Infectious Disease Research (CEIDR) program May 21-22. Students enrolled in the program traveled from 13 coun tries to complete 20 days of intensive public health training in Gainesville. [During this program] students learn about numerous epi demiological, laboratory, and entomological approaches to infectious disease control, said Dr. Gregory Gray, professor, chair of University of Floridas Department of Environmental and Global Health, and retired Medical Corps captain. They learn quite a bit about such infectious diseases and are introduced to modern food production techniques to reduce food-borne illnesses. Multiple resources are also pro vided to better equip them to do their public health or research jobs. The CEIDR program is designed to bolster international public health efforts by facilitating advanced training avail able to international public health practitioners. In doing so, this course nurtures the development of sustainable epidemio logic research capacity and promoting collaborations between international and U.S. laboratories. We share with them some laboratory techniques during their training but a major benefit from the certificate program is the professional networking that occurs afterwards, Gray said. After meeting and becoming friends with other researchers from across the world certificate trainees often share labora tory approaches to disease problems for a number of years afterwards. Potential students are generally nominated by U.S. govern ment sponsors such as the Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (DoDGEIS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. Department of State, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the Fogarty International Center. However, this program is open to anyone providing indepen dent support to his/her studies. This year marks the second time NECE instructors were requested by the University of Florida, Emerging Pathogens Institute (EPI) to support this course. Students were able draw on the many years of firsthand vector control experience that is a result of NECEs unique mission. NECEs mission focuses on reducing the incidence of human disease transmitted by blood feeding arthropods in any area of the world, said NECE Officer-in-Charge Cmdr. Eric Hoffman. This is accomplished through developing and evaluating novel tools and techniques through collaboration with worldclass organizations and establishing comprehensive control programs, whenever and wherever needed. Hoffman also said that NECEs involvement in the program along with supporting local training opportunities maintains a distinct advantage for potential efforts in years to come. The certificate program is able to draw on our experience and knowledge to train international public health profession als in creating effective and sustainable vector control pro grams when they return home, said Hoffman. Being able to participate in the certificate program is cer tainly advantageous to us by creating opportunity to cultivate professional relationships which may lead to future collabora tions, he said. Eight NECE personnel lectured on several subjects includ ing mosquito surveillance methods, mosquito identification, chemical and equipment control of ticks and mosquitoes. To familiarize the class with vector surveillance and control equipment, NECE staff performed several equipment dem onstrations, including instruction on the role of spaces sprays Dozens of CPOs, prospective CPOs and officers filled most of the pews at NAS Jacksonvilles All Saints Chapel June 6 to learn about the Battle of Midway from two Sailors and a Marine who fought in the pivotal World War II engagement. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders addressed the CPO 365 train ees about lessons learned from the Battle of Midway. Deckplate leadership makes the differ ence. Whether youre an E2 or a master chief petty officer, deckplate leadership defines what kind of Navy we are. When you hear todays guests give their accounts of Midway think about what you would have done in their place. Because when you become a CPO, no matter the circumstance, everybody will turn to you and ask, what do we do, chief? Whether its a damaged aircraft, a fire aboard ship or a Sailor in distress with a family problem you will be looked to for leadership. NAS Jacksonville CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd reinforced the skippers message, Deckplate leaders are highly visible Sailors who set the tone, know their mission, know their people and develop their people beyond their own expectations both as a team and as individuals. Today, we salute and honor our special guests on the 70th anniversary of the muchstudied naval ambush drawn up by Adm. Chester Nimitz, the U.S. Pacific Fleet com mander, said Shepherd. In June, 1942, retired BMC Jim Cunningham was an 18-year-old seaman aboard the destroy er USS Hammann (DD-412). The ship was part the USS Yorktown (CV-5) anti-aircraft screen and Cunninghams battle station was the 5 NAVFAC Southeast opens regional call center in Jacksonville Battle of Midway vets tell it like it was

PAGE 2

2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS June 13 1881 USS Jeannette crushed in Arctic ice pack. 1942 PBY Catalina sea planes, operating from the seaplane tender USS Gillis (ADV-12), conclude two days of attacks against Japanese ships and land positions on Kiska, Aleutian Islands. The battle exhausted the gasoline and bomb supply aboard Gillis, but was unsuccessful in driving the Japanese from the island. 1967 Operation Great Bend begins in Rung Sat Zone, Vietnam. June 14 1777 John Paul Jones takes command of Ranger. 1777 Continental Congress adopts design of present U.S. Flag. 1847 Commodore Matthew Perry launches amphibious river operations by Sailors and Marines on Tabasco River, Mexico. 1940 Franklin D. Roosevelt signs Naval Expansion Act to construct ships to increase Navys tonnage by 11 percent. 1985 SW2 Robert Stethem of Underwater Construction Team 1 was killed by terrorist hijackers of TWA Flight 847. He later received a Bronze Star for his heroism. June 15 1942 USS Copahee (CVE12), Capt. John Farrell com manding, was commissioned at Puget Sound Navy Yard, the first of 10 Bogue-class escort carriers converted from Maritime Commission Liberty Ship hulls. 1944 5th Fleet lands Marines on Saipan, under the cover of naval gunfire, in conquest of the Marianas. 1963 Launching of combat store ship, Mars (AFS-1), first of new class of underway replen ishment ships. 1991 Two battle groups and amphibious ships evacu ate dependents and Air Force personnel from Clark Air Force Base, Philippines after Mount Pinatubo erupts. June 16 1898 U.S. squadron bom bards Santiago, Cuba. 1965 Navy Department schedules reactivation of hos pital ship Repose (AH-16) for service in Vietnam. June 17 1833 USS Delaware enters drydock at Gosport Navy Yard in Norfolk, Va., the first war ship to enter a public drydock in the United States. 1898 Navy Hospital Corps established. 1940 Chief of Naval Operations asks U.S. Congress for money to build two-ocean Navy. 1942 Goodyear constructs a prototype model M scouting and patrol airship with 50 per cent greater range than the K Class. Four model M airships were in service during World War II. June 18 1812 U.S. declares war on Great Britain for impressments of Sailors and interference with commerce. 1942 First AfricanAmerican officer, Bernard Robinson, commissioned in Naval Reserve. 1957 CNO approves ship characteristics of the fleet bal listic missile submarine. June 19 1864 USS Kearsarge sinks Confederate raider Alabama off the coast of France. 1944 Battle of the Philippine Sea and The Marianas Turkey Shoot begins. Hi, my name is Sarah Smiley, and Im addicted to the police scanner. Just one step away from tapioca pudding and Wheel of Fortune reruns. But at least I dont own an actual scan ner; Ive only downloaded the app on my iPhone. Yes, there is an app for that. (If I told you that I paid to upgrade to the pro scanner, would you think less of me?) There was a time when I carried my iPhone so I could listen to iTunes. That was back when I would have known what this Call Me Maybe song is all about, back when I knew which artists were popular and which ones were not. But that time is gone. Today, I carry around my iPhone down to the basement while I do laundry, into the bathroom while I brush my hair so that I dont miss anything on the police scanner. Before you judge, I suggest giving the scanner app a try. The multi-layered, simultaneous plot lines will string you along (What happened to the offi cer responding to the domestic dispute call?) and suck you in. Youll find your self screaming at the phone like someone watching a close football game: Dude, shouldnt you call for backup? Dont go in there alone! Im serious; you cant make this stuff up. While one officer is responding to a complaint about a barking dog, anoth er officer is trailing a suspect through downtown. Like any good soap opera, there is mystery (who left the gas station without paying?), suspense (does the driver have a suspended license?) and scorned lovers (dispatch says X has a restraining order against Y). In the beginning, I scanned alone, after the kids had gone to bed. I even fell asleep to the scanner (not recommended if you dont like weird dreams). Then, late one night, the scanner woke me up when an officer told dispatch that he was secur ing an open shed door in the local cem etery. I sat up in bed and put my hand to my chest. Had this officer not read every Stephen King novel ever written? The first rule of horror is that you never secure an open shed door, at night, in the middle of a cemetery. That was the last time I used the scan ner as a bedtime story. It also was the last time I scanned alone. Soon after, I got my friend (code name 12-15) hooked. Friends dont let friends scan alone. (Copy that, 12-15?) Scanner 12-15 is always just a text message away for backup. Over time, the crackle and hum of the police scanner has become such a pres ence in our home and car, even the kids join in. When we pass an ambulance with lights and siren blazing, Ford grabs my phone and says, Can I turn on the scan ner and hear whats going on? Owen, however, thinks we are getting carried away. Dont you think this has gone too far? Owen said as I listened to the police chase down a robbery suspect. (Notice, Owen did not walk away from the scanner. No one walks away from the scanner.) The boys have even learned the numbers, or codes, in police-speak. Police code cheat-sheets are available online or through the app, but most of them become apparent in context. For instance, the code 10-44 (suspected men tal issues), is an easy one to figure out. Others are more obscure. Scanner 10-22 to Scanner 12-15, do you read me? Theres a 2215 on the scan ner. Whats that? That would be the time, Miss Military Wife. Over. Oh. Right. Ive often wondered if Ill hear about someone I know over the scanner. And, really, this could be handy once my boys start driving. (No guys, I cant risk it; my mom listens to the scanner.) Mostly, however, the scanner is filled with codes, peppered with familiar loca tions, and the phonetic spelling of peo ples names. As a military dependent for more than 35 years, my eyes glaze over at Alpha-Bravo-Charlie, and I usually cant make out the name. Then, two weeks ago, I got pulled over for running a red light. I was flustered when the policeman came to my window, so I hurriedly handed him everything I thought he needed: identification and registration. When he walked back to his car, I eyed the iPhone in my passenger seat. Should I turn it on and hear my name called over the scanner? What would the offi cer think when he came back and heard it on? Would his walkie-talkie and my iPhone make that ear-piercing feedback noise together? I couldnt bring myself to turn it on. The policeman returned to my window. He held up the identification I had given him. Im going to let you go with a warn ing, he said, unless this library card is your only form of personal identifica tion. I should have been embarrassed about accidentally handing a policeman my library card instead of my license. Instead, I was bummed that I didnt have on the scanner. Did 12-15? Because that would have been a good one. Until next time, Im Scanner 10-22 and Im 10-8. Friends dont let friends scan alone

PAGE 3

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 3

PAGE 4

4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 In a June 8 ceremony at NAS Jacksonvilles All Saints Chapel, the role of commanding officer of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville passed in a time-honored Navy tradition from Capt. Lynn Welling to Capt. Gayle Shaffer. An audience of more than 400 attended the event, presided over by Rear Adm. Elaine Wagner, com mander of Navy Medicine East and Naval Medical Center Portsmouth and chief of the Navy Dental Corps. Rear Adm. William Roberts, fleet surgeon for U.S. Fleet Forces Command, was the guest speaker. Welling is a former naval aviator and currently a board-certified emergency medicine physician, who departs NH Jacksonville after two highly success ful years as commanding officer. Welling thanked his family (including mom Carol; brothers Larry and Dean; children Aimee, Nick and Alex; and wife Patricia), command staff, command associations, and the medical leadership of the Jacksonville community. Welling noted what an honor his 34 years of service have been capped off by commanding the finest hospital in the Navy. He summarized, Naval Hospital Jacksonville is The One the one other hospitals turn to for advice in implementing practices that ensure patients receive the safest, highest quality care. He concluded by speaking directly to patients. We have met, and will continue to meet, our mission of providing the safest, highest quality care to you. After all, the reason we exist is to heal our nations heroes. Shaffer, NH Jacksonvilles new commanding offi cer, most recently served as executive officer of Naval Hospital Okinawa. She is a dentist, a diplomate of the American Board of General Dentistry and a fellow of the Academy of General Dentistry. Shaffer acknowledged the exceptionally high stan dard set by Welling, observing that the heroes of our nation can rest easy and focus on their mission because they and their families are receiving the best care a grateful nation can give. She wrapped up by saying, I am ready to go to work! Each speaker remarked on the theme that if theres a Navy hospital that is the one, its NH Jacksonville. NH Jacksonvilles priority, since its founding in 1941, is to heal the nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the hospital, located aboard NAS Jacksonville, and five branch health clinics in Florida (Jacksonville, Key West and Mayport) and Georgia (Albany and Kings Bay). Of its patient population 215,000 active and retired Sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. On a typi cal day, a dedicated team of 2,500 military and civilian personnel sees 1,800 outpatients, admits 15 inpatients, cares for 80 people in the ER, performs 14 same-day surgeries, fills 4,700 prescriptions, conducts 4,600 lab tests and delivers two to three babies. Additionally, up to 15 percent of its active duty staff is deployed around the globe providing combat, humanitarian and disaster care. To find out more, visit www.med.navy.mil/sites/navalhospitaljax, www. facebook/navalhospitaljacksonville and www.twitter. com/NHJax. The VP-8 Fighting Tigers held their 64th change of com mand ceremony as Cmdr. Mike Marston relieved Cmdr. Christopher Flaherty as com manding officer May 11 while undergoing final preparations for their upcoming deploy ment. A native of Philadelphia, Marston enlisted in the Naval Reserve in 1990 as an equip ment operator. He then attended Ithaca College in Ithaca, N.Y., gradu ating with a Bachelor of Arts degree in history.He received his commission in May 1995 after completion of Officer Candidate School in Pensacola. Following initial flight train ing in Pensacola he earned his naval flight officer wings in June 1996 at Randolph Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. Marstons past duty assign ments include VP-4, Navy International Programs Office in Washington DC as flag aide to the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for International Programs, White House social aide, VPU2, VQ-2, Naval War College, Newport, R.I., and the U.S. European Command at the Joint Reconnaissance Center. During his tour as VP-8 commanding officer, Flaherty oversaw several major squad ron events including an ardu ous deployment to the Navys Fifth and Seventh Fleet areas of operation and a dynamic 12-month inter-deployment readiness cycle. Under his command, the squadron also received a num ber of unit awards including the Captain Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy for antisubmarine warfare excellence, Squadron Blue M Award for medical readiness and the 2011 AVCM Donald M. Neal Golden Wrench Award for mainte nance excellence. In addition, many individ ual Fighting Tigers earned awards, most notably AO1 Naomi Stout was selected as Commander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic Sailor of the Year and flight surgeon Lt. Jennifer Kruse was named the Richard E. Luehrs Operational Flight Surgeon of the Year. In his final address as VP-8s commanding officer, Flaherty praised the squad rons achievements over his two years in VP-8, particularly the community service and outreach programs in which squadron members have been active. VP-8 members volunteer with a number of charities, including donating time and money to the Wounded Warrior Foundation and Sulzbacher Center of Jacksonville. VP-8 has also teamed up with a local orphanage at their cur rent deployment site in San Salvador, El Salvador to pro vide clothes and toys to needy children. As a parting surprise, Flaherty arranged for NFL Hall of Fame Quarterback Steve Young to address the squadron via pre-recorded video.Young was made an honorary mem ber of VP-8 and thanked the squadron for their service on their past deployment and wished VP-8 the best of luck and success on their upcoming deployment. Marston addressed the squadron and guests during the change of command, high lighting the accomplishments and milestones achieved dur ing the Fighting Tigers previ ous deployment and current inter deployment readiness cycle and welcoming the com mands new executive officer, Cmdr. Todd Libby. VP-8 is currently deployed to the Seventh and Fourth Fleet areas of responsibility. Flahertys next assignment will be in residence at the National Defense Universitys College of War in Washington, D.C where he will complete a degree in National Strategic Studies. Shaffer assumes command from Welling at Naval Hospital Jacksonville VP-8 Fighting Tigers hold change of command ceremony

PAGE 5

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 5 The 2012 Navy Region Southeast Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) Fund Drive officially ended June 6 with a wrap-up celebration at the NAS Jacksonville Officers Club. This years fund drive gener ated $275,000 to benefit Sailors, Marines and their families who receive assistance through loans and grants in times of need. The total amount of funds exceeded this years goal of $250,000 by 110 percent for the region. This years fund drive went really well. More than half the commands reached their goal which is just outstand ing. VP-30 held their annual golf tournament that did really well and we tried a couple new fundraising activities like a closest-to-pin competition. But most of the fundraising came from keypersons and helpers contacting individuals on a personal basis, said Lt. Matt Malmkar of NAS Jax, who coor dinated this years fund drive. Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. praised every one for a highly successful fund drive. I want to stress how important this campaign is to raise funds to support the needs of our Sailors, Marines and their families. Last year, $5.5 million was provided to assist CNRSE families with 60 percent of that being quick assist loans, he stated. Scorby went on to recog nize NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders and Malmkar for running this years successful fund drive and several top contributors. We had 56 commands par ticipating in the fund drive with 27 commands exceed ing their goals. VP-30 was the top contributor raising almost $50,000 nearly double their goal of $26,000. NAS Key West was second raising more than $25,000 with a goal of $12,800, said Scorby. The admiral also commend ed Navy Medicine Support Command and the University of Florida NJROTC Unit for exceeding their goals by 500 percent. Its obvious that a lot of peo ple put in a great amount of effort to make this fund drive a huge success. Again, I want to personally thank all of you for a job well done! said Scorby before presenting letters of appreciation to command keypersons. NAS Jax NMCRS Director Dave Faraldo also thanked those who continue to make the event so successful each year. Without the support from the leadership and the people who believe in the cause, we could not be successful. So thank you for your tremen dous assistance in making this another great fund drive, said Faraldo. I also want to empha size that if your Sailors need help, send them to Navy and Marine Corps Relief because its the best deal in town. They will get the financial assistance they need and educational sup port to learn to manage their money which is really what we are all about. The campaign runs each year from March through May to allow military personnel and civilian employees to contrib ute to the society. During the 108 years the NMCRS has been operating, they have helped millions of people through loans and grants. NMCRS also offers other forms of assistance such as providing layettes or junior seabags to new family mem bers, a visiting nurse program to help new mothers, elderly individuals and anyone who needs a little extra help and thrift shops offering low-cost clothing and household items. For more information and to learn more about volun teer opportunities, contact the NMCRS office at 542-3515. VyStar Credit Union donated $13,500 to the Greater Jacksonville USO June 6 to help fund the sixth annual USO Military Appreciation Night. USO Night is June 13 from 6 to 11 p.m. at Adventure Landing and Shipwreck Island Water Park at Jacksonville Beach. Children ages three and younger are free, and tickets are only $2. During normal hours, daily admission at Shipwreck Island Water Park is $27.99 plus tax. For five hours, active duty service mem bers and their fami lies will enjoy unlim ited access to Shipwreck Island Waterpark and Adventure Island dry attractions, including miniature golf, go-karts, laser tag, the Wacky Worm Rollercoaster and the Frog Hopper. Arcade games and refreshments are not included. Weve sold 2,000 [tick ets and] reached the parks capacity, said NAS Jacksonville USO Center Director Lisabeth Quinn. Its a sold-out event. Its just wonderful, and were just fortunate to be able to do it, thanks to sponsors like VyStar Credit Union, said Greater Jacksonville USO Executive Director John Shockley. Some people want us to do it twice a year. We started right here at NAS Jax in 1952. This is where we got our start 60 years ago, so our roots and our heritage are here. Thats why we want to continue to support as we move forward. You never forget where you came from, said Russell Buck, regional vice president of VyStar Credit Union Oak Leaf Branch. Last year, military per sonnel from NS Mayport, NAS Jacksonville, NSB Kings Bay, the Coast Guard and Jacksonville recruiting districts also filled Adventure Landing to its limit. This is a shining example of people help ing people and our sup port to the commu nity, espe cially to our active duty mili tary and families, said Brad Smith, vice presi dent of the VyStar Credit Union branch at NAS Jax. NMCRS fund drive exceeds goal USO night at Adventure Landing sold out

PAGE 6

6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 Down and Damaged A Sikorsky HH-60H Seahawk Helicopter that crashed in Virginia during a night training exercise at Fort Pickett in 2009 underwent exten sive repairs at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) and was returned to a Norfolk-based Navy Reserve squadron in May. FRCSE artisans and support per sonnel spent two years rebuilding the mission-critical aircraft for the Red Wolves of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 84, who successfully completed a functional flight check at Naval Air Station Jacksonville before heading home May 23. The accident occurred when the Seahawks rotor wash caused a tarp used by ground crews to mark helicop ter-landing zones to become airborne and entangled in the tail rotor causing the aircraft to flip on its left side dur ing training at Castles Combat Landing Strip July 21, 2009. The two pilots and four crewmembers all suffered minor injuries. The Navy ruled the crash a Class A mishap with damages to the aircraft exceeding $1 million. HH-60 Planner and Estimator Mike Novak said when the main rotor blades started hitting the ground and com ing apart, things started flying all over the place causing widespread damage. Novak served as the liai son between FRCSE and HSC-84 and coordinated parts acquisition for the repairs from the Navys supply system. He said FRCSE artisans also stripped components from a helicopter des tined for removal from the Fleet and used the donor parts to reconstruct the destroyed aircraft. We took a struck aircraft and used several major airframe fittings and components from it, he said. We put on a new cockpit from a model B donor aircraft and did extensive struc tural repairs in the cabin overhead, specifically all four main transmission gearbox support beams. Novak said artisans also performed extensive structural repairs in the lefthand fuel cell area, extensive skin and FRCSE resurrects demolished Seahawk for Navy squadron

PAGE 7

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 7 Photos by Victor Pitts substructure repairs on the tail cone section using a donor tail pylon, and on top of the helicopter to the engine firewalls. We built that whole aircraft, top to bottom, front to back, said HH-60 Overhaul and Repair Supervisor (Mechanical) Mike Adams. Our team did a great job. It was very, very extensive. They rebuilt the whole drive train that runs from the main transmission all the way back to the tail rotor assembly. Adams credits Aircraft Mechanic Eddie Toney who he said was the key player in assembling the main rotor gearbox and main rotor head assembly from scratch using new components. Adams said Aircraft Mechanics Mike Thompson and Jake Naggiar practi cally rebuilt the whole fuselage. Together they spent a few thousand hours on the project. The job required assistance from numerous trades and professions. Adams said the electricians essen tially rewired the whole aircraft, and the avionics technicians had to install communications and radar systems. Production Controller Pat Palompo, Supply Technician George Fickett and HUB Scheduler Andy Hafler worked diligently to obtain supplies and com ponents. Structural Engineering Technician Myles Colley provided invaluable engineering support. Adams said the sheet metal workers led by O&R Supervisor (Sheet Metal) Scott Wood had to do exten sive work, such as rebuilding the structures and numerous fittings before the aircraft mechanics could even begin the reassembly. I rebuilt four or five helicopters when I worked in Pensacola, but I have never seen an aircraft in that bad of shape, said Wood. I thought they would scrap it, that it would go to the boneyard, but it didnt. Nothing was simple on this aircraft. When the aircraft rolled it twisted to where everything was out of alignment. Woods said Sheet Metal Mechanics Rob Paffe, Joshua Nix, Jeremy Burns and Ken Harwell rebuilt the airframe and replaced the nose section and main transmission beams. Wood credits the entire HH-60 team for bringing the airframe back to its original configuration, a mighty feat. The FRCSE Pattern Shop created compound contour stretch molds of the aft metal fuselage covers com monly referred to as skins and sent them for fabrica tion to another aviation maintenance depot. When the skins arrived at FRCSE, they did not meet the rigorous engineering specifications needed for correct align ment. They werent exact so we took them back to Jamie Childers, the sheet metal manufacturing supervi sor, said Wood. He worked his magic and tweaked the skins to make them fit like a glove. When you are doing double curvature, the skins can become buck led. They are fuel skins and they take a large load. HSC-84 Pilot Lt. Cmdr. Gabriel Yancey traveled to Jacksonville and flew the successful functional check flight. Also on board was ADC Ben Powers who said there are only 35 operational H models serving the Fleet. He said HSC-84 and HSC-85 will soon be the only two Fleet squadrons using the H model aircraft. We have two other aircraft still operating after receiving a number of extensive repairs at this facil ity, said Powers. FRCSE turns out a good product. The twin-engine, medium lift, Seahawk helicopter supports combat search and rescue missions and naval special warfare operations according to the U.S. Navy Fact File. It can operate from aircraft carriers and a variety of other naval and merchant vessels, as well as land bases. FRCSE

PAGE 8

8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 Service calls will be received at the center from each respec tive Public Works Department (PWD) or from a representa tive appointed on the base. The RCC staff will process the request through a Navy data management program and for ward to a base operating sup port (BOS) contract dispatch center or the PWD Shop at each base to have the work complet ed. The call center is located at NAS Jacksonville and managed by NAVFAC Southeasts Public Works Business Line and is staffed by full-time govern ment employees on a 24-hour, seven days a week basis, begin ning July 1. Currently, eight PWDs have in-house trouble desks and six have BOS operated trouble desks. These separate call cen ters are estimated to contain the cost equivalent of 40 posi tions, costing approximately $3 million per year. We believe that the new RCC can operate with 18 employees by regionalizing the work to this single loca tion, said deLumeau. The new program will also pro vide improved data integ rity through quality control and one streamlined process throughout the region. The team is getting positive responses from their custom ers and dont even notice that the move has been made to Jacksonville. People call us direct ly on our toll-free number or email us at our public email account, said Anne Rush who works in the RCC. My old customers didnt realize that I had relocated when I tell them that I am working out of the office in Jacksonville. Phase II will begin Oct. 1 by adding Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga.; NAS Kingsville, Texas; and Joint Reserve Base (JRB) Ft. Worth, Texas. Phase III begins Oct. 1, 2013 at which time the remaining bases in the Southeast region including JRB New Orleans, La.; Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport, Miss.; NAS Pensacola, Fla.; NAS Whiting Field, Fla.; Naval Support Activity (NSA) Panama City, Fla.; and NSA Orlando, Fla. The Regional Call Center set up required proper facili ties, computer equipment and a phone system capable of receiving calls and evenly dis tributing them among the call center employees. This was done by developing a Round Robin type phone system which will ring service desk phones sequentially to distrib ute the workload. Each computer is supplied with two monitors to allow multiple programs to open and fully viewable and a handsfree handset. This was antici pated to speed up the process and allow for more accurate data transfers. The computers access the Navys Geographic Information System (GIS) that gives operators access to maps and overhead photographs to pin point locations. Historically, NAVFAC Southeast had issues with the manning a call center at each base. Operational procedures were as diverse as the number of bases. Six bases had con tractor-operated call centers and some in-house workforces were also used. Therefore, dif ferent procedures were used, different approval systems and distribution of costs associated with calls. The Regional Call Center provides proper training and consistent operating proce dures to avoid old pitfalls, said deLumeau. Now appropriate chains of approval will be used to ensure consistency with pro cessing calls and associated costs with associated repairs. deLumeau explained that as they attain full steady state, the RCC will handle more than 175,000 trouble calls annually. RCCfollowed by a demonstration of the proper use of ther mal fog and truck mounted sprayers. Students were also provided the opportunity to operate a hydraulic sprayer as well as a backpack sprayer configured for both liquid and granular formulations. As part of this courses hands-on vector surveillance training, NECE personnel assisted the class with set ting up CDC light traps and gravid traps. After the traps were retrieved the following day, students were given the opportunity to develop their mosquito iden tification skills by keying out the mosquito specimens collected. Identifications were then verified by NECE and University of Florida staff members. Students were also given a demonstration on mosquito larval sur veillance techniques before being sent out to try larval dipping. Lastly, University of Florida staff members demonstrated several tick surveillance techniques. Although NECEs demonstrations and lectures com prised two days of intensive training on the surveil lance and control of vector borne diseases, the certifi cate program covered a wider scope of public health to include communicable diseases that have serious impacts on human health and national economies, an experience which could ultimately build global public health personnels capacity to respond to emerging infectious diseases such as SARS and avian influenza virus. NECE

PAGE 9

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 9 Navy honors fallen veterans during Jacksonville Memorial Day observance ceremonyTropical Storm Beryl may have delayed the Jacksonville Memorial Day ceremony by nearly two weeks, but that didnt deter local residents from pay ing tribute to service members at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Wall June 9. The presentation of wreaths to family members of those fallen service mem bers whose names were added to the wall highlighted the ceremony. The names of the service members who were added to the wall were Air Force Senior Airman Daigerrys Leon, Airman 1st Class Roswell McKim Barley and Army Pfc. Gil I. Morales Del Valle. Several guest speakers also addressed the crowd during the ceremony and Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast, was the key note speaker at the event. Scorby said hes always honored to speak on behalf of the Navy, but speak ing at the Memorial Day ceremony was especially humbling. He added, while he is proud to take part in the more than 100-year-old tradition, Americans can remember fallen service members every day. Remembering the fallen is the pri mary message of Memorial Day, but its not only about this one day each year. Today, as we remember and reflect, we must also remember to act. We must act as citizens in ways that honor and give life to those who died, he said. We can celebrate who they were and how they lived their lives and remem ber their sacrifices. We can tell their stories stories of our mothers and fathers, grandfathers and grandmoth ers, uncles, brothers and sisters, and sons and daughters, said Scorby. Each of us can find a way to ensure the legacy of our heroes endures in todays sound bite culture. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and U.S. Representative Ander Crenshaw also spoke during the event. Crenshaw reiterated the importance of remember ing all of those whose names appear on the memorial wall. The names on this wall are in part responsible for the freedoms you and I enjoy, he said. Its my prayer today and everyday that we will always remember that the greatness of America is drawn from the blood and sacrifice of those who have gone before us and those who defend us this day. When you help prevent boating accidents, you are helping us ensure Americas maritime homeland security. Boat Safely. Visit uscgboating.org or call 1-800-368-5647 for more information.Boat Safely. Visit uscgboating.org or call 1.800.368.5647 for more information. uscgboating.org or 1.800.368.5647

PAGE 10

10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 gun on the fantail. During the first attack of Japanese bombers, the destroyer fired about 120 rounds of 5 and 900 rounds of 20mm yet the enemy scored hits on Yorktown, which began smoking heavily and slowed to a stop. Damage control went well and Yorktown was soon underway again, launching aircraft. But another enemy aerial attack struck the carrier this time leaving it dead in the water at a severe list. The carriers Sailors began abandoning ship and Hammann assisted in picking up 87 survivors from the water and life rafts. Later that after noon, while tied up to the Yorktown to assist with damage con trol, Cunningham and his Hammann ship mates saw more trouble approaching. I was walking along the deck and saw four wakes in the distance coming straight at us. Some of our gunners were firing at the wakes in hopes of exploding the torpedoes but two struck Hammann and two struck the Yorktown, said Cunningham. It is estimated that Hammann sunk within three to four minutes after the first torpedo explosion. I swam out to a life raft, but there was no room in it. There was fuel oil, blood and body parts floating on the surface and screams from the wounded, remembered Cunningham, who had suffered internal inju ries and was coughing up blood. He and his shipmates were picked up by the destroyer USS Behhan (DD-397) and taken to Pearl Harbor for medical treatment. Retired ATC Marlin Crider was a radioman aboard a PBY-5A Catalina flying boat assigned to VP-72. We were based at Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, but were operating a threeplane detachment from the airfield on Midway Island. PBYs were the eyes of the fleet in this time before radar. In addition to our scout ing role in search of the Japanese fleet, we also flew search-and-rescue missions for downed air men. Following the Battle of Midway, VP-72 was one of four PBY squadrons sup porting the fierce fight ing on Guadalcanal, as well as the series of naval battles fought in the seas around the island. When Crider left the Pacific, he was assigned to NAS Quonset Point, R.I., where he worked with a Massachusetts Institute of Technology team developing antisubmarine magnetic anomaly detector (MAD) gear. From there, he was attached to a Royal Air Force unit until the end of World War II. Marine Corps veteran Marvin Hollis was part of the garrison dug in near the airstrip to repel any Japanese troops landing on Midway Island. We spent a lot of our time building dugouts at tactical locations that would shelter up to12 riflemen. The Japanese air attack, about 20 min utes of bombing and strafing, damaged oil tanks, the seaplane han gar and other buildings but left the airfield rela tively unscathed. Fortunately, our navy damaged the Japanese fleet so decisively they gave up their plan to land troops and attack our positions on Midway Island, said Hollis. The prospective CPOs in attendance were part of CPO 365, a threephase, year round devel opment program to make Sailors more effec tive deckplate leaders. Learning naval history and heritage is part of CPO 365 training. MIDWAY More than 800 guests honored World War II vet erans at the 15th Annual Commemoration of the U.S. Victory at Midway Memorial Dinner held June 9 at the World Golf Village Renaissance Resort in St. Augustine. The event, sponsored by the U.S. Navy League, was intend ed to pay homage to 16 veter ans who fought so valiantly at the Battle of Midway. The night began with intro ductions between the Midway veterans, Navy League offi cials and other distinguished guests. Among them, Adm. Mark Ferguson, Vice Chief of Naval Operations and Rear Adm. Jack Scorby, commander, Navy Region Southeast. Ferguson served as the spe cial guest speaker and dis cussed how the men of the Battle of Midway have inspired service members of today. We gather again to honor these veterans and to remind ourselves of our own capacity for greatness. We honor those who took the risk to launch the attack, those who fought on despite the odds from their ships and the island of Midway, those who flew on when their fuel gages were low, those who attacked without regard for their own personal safety and knowing they would like ly not survive, and those who risked their lives to save the ones of their shipmates, said Ferguson. Retired BMC Bill Ingram was one of the men Ferguson spoke of. He served on board USS Houston (CA-30) when the ship was torpedoed and sank on March 2, 1942. Ingram was pulled from the shark-infest ed water after a few days by a Japanese patrol boat, interro gated, beaten and then thrown back in the water because he was of no intelligence value. Ingram was recaptured and taken to Java with numerous other prisoners of war. They were put to work for three and a half years on a railroad project building a bridge over the River Kwai in Thailand. That was a terrible time those years. I was thankful to come home and it did not keep me from wanting to serve, said Ingram. Retiring from the Navy was one of my happiest and greatest accom plishments. Ingram and the rest of the 16 Midway survivors were hon ored as they received com memorative plaques presented by Ferguson along with his per sonal coin. Ferguson said he believes the historian Walter Lord said it best when he wrote, They had no right to win. Yet they did, and in doing so they changed the course of the war . . Even against the greatest odds, there is something in the human spirit a magic blend of skill, faith, and valor that can lift men from certain defeat to incredible victory. In our Navy today, a new generation has accepted the gift of American leadership at sea. Our Navy has never been more in demand and never more needed around the globe. On any given day, nearly half of our ships are underway and on station, said Ferguson. The Battle of Midway is wide ly regarded as the most impor tant naval battle of the Pacific in World War II. Approximately one month after the Battle of Coral Sea and six months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the U.S. Navy decisively defeated the Imperial Japanese Navy and turned the war in U.S. favor. VCNO, Navy League Honor Midway Vets at memorial dinner

PAGE 11

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 11 VP-45 aircrew tour Brazilian submarineIn May, the Pelicans of VP-45 con ducted bi-lateral training with the BMS Tikuna (S34), a Brazilian Type209 submarine, in an anti-submarine warfare exercise as part of the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Groups Composite Training Unit Exercise. Recently, many of the same sensor operators from VP-45 were able to take a closer look at the submarine much closer than even the P-3s infra red camera. After completing the exercise with the carrier strike group, the Tikuna pulled into NS Kings Bay, Ga. for a week of visits and training with U.S. submarine forces. Additionally, the crew of the Tikuna extended an invita tion to VP-45 to tour their boat and the Pelicans gladly took them up on their offer. My first impression of the sub was how small it was, said AWO2 Jim Ballenger, a non-acoustic sensor oper ator at VP-45. At 210 feet in length and a crew of 48 sailors, the Tikuna is a tight squeeze for most. Despite its diminutive size, the Tikuna, and other diesel-electric submarines like it, can pose a viable threat to surface ships maintaining freedom of the seas around the world. With the widespread availability of diesel-electric submarine technology, there is nothing more valuable than knowing the capabilities and limita tions of those assets, said Lt. Cmdr. Frank Davis of VP-45. The chance for our crews to see a Type 209 up close is a tremendous training opportunity as we prepare for our deployment at the end of this year. With more than 100 ships (including five Type-209 submarines) in commis sion, the Brazilian Navy is the largest in South America. Broadarrow Express runs from Key Largo to Key WestMembers of the six-man team Broadarrow Express, from Patrol Squadron Six Two (VP-62) ran a 100mile relay in the Florida Keys last month. The 5th annual KEYS100 was held May 19 and 20. The race was a pointto-point event beginning in Key Largo and ending in Key West on the Atlantic Ocean at Smathers Beach. KEYS100 pro motes charitable fundraising for pros tate cancer education and free screen ings, and for 2012, supported of the work of The Cancer Foundation of the Florida Keys. For our team, each member ran a total of five legs each, ranging from two to 7.1 miles in length, said ATCS(AW) Tim Large, VP-62 maintenance senior chief. Cmdr. Jon Townsend, our executive officer, has run this race the last two years, Large continued. He thought that having a squadron team would be a great morale booster and help get the Broadarrow name out in the commu nity. Team members included Townsend, Large, Lt. Cmdr.Joseph Kovacocy, AMEC Jake Baxter, AWO1(NAC/AW) Erick Alcala and AWO2(NAC/AW) Daniel Jervey. Overall, each runner ran approxi mately 17 miles, said Large.The Broadarrow express ran the race in 14 hours 21minutes and 58 seconds, plac ing 40th out of a total of 107 teams.Our overall pace was 8:37 per mile. If you start to feel good during an ultra-marathon dont worry, youll get over it, Large added.

PAGE 12

12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012

PAGE 13

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 13 The Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville recently announced its Civilians of the Quarter for Second Quarter 2012. Instructor of the Quarter because of her strict work ethic and expertise in delivering outstanding techni cal instructions. Passmore is qualified to teach 24 of 27 courses cur rently taught in Maintenance Training Unit 7016 at CNATTU Jax. She is also personally responsible for conducting 10 formal course reviews and teaching 62 students for a combined total of 272 hours of instruc tion. Quarter. He is qualified to teach 10 avionics courses within Maintenance Training Unit 1011. Hayes was directly responsible for the training and mentoring of numerous students for a combined total of 452 instructional hours. Not only is he an instructor, but he is also a student enrolled in off-duty education, as he works on his masters degree in business admin istration from Webster University. Most everything is running smoothly as the transition from P-3C Orion to P-8A Poseidon gathers momentum, said VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens in a June 8 interview. In our sole P-8, were aver aging 150 flight hours per month, which is high but necessary to stay on track with our train-the-trainer plan. The goal is to have our core cadre of qualified P-8 instruc tors ready to welcome VP-16 in mid-July. He explained, After the War Eagles turn in their P-3s, the pilots, NFOs and aircrew will check in at the P-8A Integrated Training Center (ITC) and start their CAT II transition syl labus, which takes about five months. The squadrons maintain ers will check in at CNATTU Jax (Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit) for organizational-level mainte nance classes taught by Boeing instructors, after which theyll check in at VP-30 and embed themselves in our mainte nance department. Eventually they get their PQS (Personnel Qualification Standards) book lets signed off for the P-8A. (PQS is a compilation of the minimum knowledge and skills that an individual must demonstrate in order to qualify to stand watches or perform other specific routine duties necessary for the safety, securi ty or proper operation of a ship, aircraft or support system.) Stevens added, By January, theyll return to Hangar 511 and stand up their mainte nance department and com plete a series of drills in prepa ration for their safe for flight inspection. He concluded, By the end of January, the War Eagles will stand alone and begin their 12-month IDRC (InterDeployment Readiness Cycle) in preparation for the first deployment of a P-8 squadron. As the fleet replacement squadron for the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF), VP-30 is con currently training aircrew and maintainers for both P-3C Orion and P-8A Poseidon. Its very challenging for our roster of instructors but train ing people to safely operate the retiring P-3 is no less important than the transition to P-8. Our plan is to transition two squadrons each year. The squadrons second P-8A from the Boeing pro duction line in Seattle, Wash., will be accept ed by VP-30 in July. An addi tional P-8A will arrive at NAS Jacksonville each succeding month, so the squadron will be operating six Poseidon aircraft by the end of 2012.CNATTU Jax honors civilians of the second quarter VP-30/P-8A Poseidon: Let the training begin

PAGE 14

14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 VP-5 recently hosted a group of 16 Mad Fox Alumni from 1970-75 which included members of the famous nineplane P-3 formation flight over Sigonella, Italy. These men were also among the first in the community to welcome the P-3C model into service. When I was in VP-5, we flew P-3As and Bs. They brought us the P-3C at the end of 1974, remarked Charles Lansford. The 16 retired alumni members included: Cmdr. Pat Lanier, Cmdr. Robert Thompson, Cmdr. Don Walsh, AFCM James Clark, AVCM Dan Piekarczy, AFCM Gordan Richau, ADCS Bob Carter, AMCS Butch Hubbard, AXCS Earl Porter, ATCS Russel Wise, AWCS Buster Rodgers, AKC Karl Fishennich, ATC Jim Gruentzel, ATC Charles Lansford, ADC Bob Ormandy and AMS1 John Pyla. They joined VP-5 Executive Officer Cmdr. Matt Pottenburgh for lunch at Mulligans prior to the squad ron tour. Our Naval Aviation heri tage is extremely important. We jumped at the opportunity to honor these Mad Foxes and thank them for their service said Pottenburgh. Many of these men had not seen each other in many years. It is great to see so many of these guys that I served with again, Clark said as faded pic tures, old cruise books and several sea stories were passed around and shared during lunch. After lunch, the men were escorted through the squadron hangar where they met cur rent Mad Foxes hard at work in preparation for deployment to Japan. Several of the alum ni made a brave attempt to stow away in the pack out and Lanier even offered to com plete a functional check flight if needed. I just need a flight physical, he said. Following a tour of several aircraft, the men were hon ored during command quar ters. The squadrons new com manding officer, Cmdr. Erin Osborn, presented awards to numerous Mad Foxes and hon ored the alumni in a more for mal setting. At the end of every quarters, VP-5 concludes with a customary sendoff shout. This time it was led by Wise, one of the alumni guests. He stood in front of the men and women of VP-5 along with his shipmates from the 1970s and shouted, NO FOX . . to which everyone shouted back, LIKE A MAD FOX! Free SAT/ACT prep programs for militaryTremendous challenges face Americas military families, especially when frequentrelocationsare involved. Military families move approximately every two years and military children will attend six to nine different schools between kindergarten and high school graduation. They must become acquainted with new schools and stress canaffect school performance. It is espe cially difficult for high school students preparing for college. But, families do not need to spend a fortune pre paring students for SAT and ACT exams. In alliance with the Department of Defense, and supported by athletes from the NFL and MLB, eKnowledge is donating free SAT and ACT PowerPrep Programs to military families world wide. To place an online order go to:www.eKnowl edge.com/MilNews or call51-256-4076. VP-5 welcomes alumni to the Fox Den

PAGE 15

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 15 CAMPS ARE OPEN TO BOTH MILITARY & CIVILIAN TEENS AGES 12 18 WITH BASE ACCESS CALL THE JAX NAVY FLYING CLUB AT (904) 777-8549 FOR MORE INFORMATION.

PAGE 16

16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Executive Officer Capt. John Rice, a Civil Engineer Corps officer, was presented the Legion of Merit Medal June 8 during his retirement ceremo ny celebrating nearly 35 years of dedi cated service with his last tour at NAS Jacksonville. Guest speaker Rear Adm. Mark Handley spoke of Rices commitment to the country, the U.S. Marine Corps and the U.S. Navy. He said it had been a tre mendous honor to be at the ceremony, seeing Rice go from Marine Corps pri vate to a captain in the U.S. Navy. There are three things that I have learned in the military, said Rice. First, be careful with power and always do the right thing. Second, you must be an effective leader. Lastly, people are our greatest asset. He spoke to the many mentors who helped shape his life and career as a naval officer, he thanked the few who he has been blessed with the oppor tunity to lead conveying his sincerest respect and he hoped to cast some final guidance to the junior officers that they could embrace. He truly made it about his father and his family. He spoke highly of his fathers military service accomplish ments and of his mother who recently passed. Like Rice, his father was a great example of honor, courage and com mitment having served in World War II, Korea and Vietnam. I pay tribute to both my parents today because they laid the ground work for my life, said Rice. They set the example and they established the height of the bar. I have them to thank. My wife has been a rock solid supporter my entire career, and I love her so very much. My children, Gregory, Michael, Brian, and Katie, have made my life full. God has blessed me with an awe some family and numerous friends, I am glad that I will be nearby helping raise my grandson to be a fine man, just like his father, Rice proudly stated. NAVFAC SE Commanding Officer Capt. John Heinzel presented Rice the Legion of Merit Medal for exceptional performance while serving as executive officer for NAVFAC Southeast from May 2009 to June 2012. Rice provided extraordinary lead ership and technical expertise while directing over 2,000 military and civil ian personnel at 22 geographically dis persed locations across seven states and the Caribbean performing $3.74 billion in construction, $1 billion of facility ser vices and 14,000 contract actions. His innovative management led to increased service and lower costs for supported commanders as he central ized facilities and maintenance tech nical and acquisition support for $100 million in annual contracting; tran sitioned from contract support to inhouse capability for safety training, energy management, retro-commis sioning and engineering design; and restructured field offices to increase efficiency. Rices superior performance of duties highlights the culmination of 35 years of honorable and dedicated service. Rices first assignment was assis tant resident officer in charge of con struction, Okinawa, Japan. He trans ferred to Naval Security Group Activity, Homestead, Fla., in May 1987 and served as public works officer. In August 1990, he detached and attended the Georgia Institute of Technology earning his Master of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering. In January 1992, he transferred to Camp Lejune, N.C., where he served as senior assistant resident officer in charge of construction. In May 1995, he transferred to Pensacola, Fla., as the BRAC/MILCON coordinator for the Chief of Naval Education and Training. In May 1997, he reported to the Public Works Center Pensacola and served as the production officer. He had the honor of serving as executive officer of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5 in April 1998, earning the Battle E twice during his tour. In June 2000, he reported to Commander, Third Naval Construction Brigade as chief of staff. Rice took command of Naval Construction Training Center in Gulfport, Miss. in 2002. In 2004, he transferred to Naval Construction Battalion Center, Gulfport, serving as executive officer and helped the base recover after Hurricane Katrina. In 2006, he reported to Naval Facilities Engineering Command Mid-Atlantic to serve as operations officer. Rice transferred in 2008 to serve as assistant chief of staff, Engineering Directorate (J7) Multi-National Security Transition Command in Iraq, helping build much-needed operational and training facilities for the Iraqi Security Force. Upon his return in May 2009, he transferred to Jacksonville where he completed his final tour serving as executive officer, NAVFAC Southeast. Civil Engineer Corps officer retires after 35 years, awarded Legion of Merit

PAGE 17

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 17 Q: How can I beat the heat while exercis ing or working? Last week, we discussed heat stroke and heat exhaus tion. Our wonderful Florida sunshine makes for a hot and humid summer when we all need to understand the warnings of a heat stress injury. Exposure to extreme heat while exercising or working in hot environments puts you at risk of heat stress. At greatest risk are people ages 65 years and older, those who are overweight, and those who suffer from heart disease, high blood pressure, or take medications that may be affected by extreme heat. Heat cramps usually affect people who sweat profusely during strenuous activity. Perspiration depletes the bodys sodium and moisture levels. Low-salt levels in muscles cause painful cramps. Heat cramps may also be a symptom of heat exhaustion. Muscle pain or spasms usually in the abdo men, arms or legs are symptoms of heat cramps. People with heat cramps should: hours after the cramps subside because further exertion may lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Seek medical attention if any of the following apply: Heat rash is a skin irritation caused by exces sive sweating during hot, humid weather. Symptoms of heat rash include: appears on skin. chest, on the groin, under the breasts and in elbow creases. Persons experiencing heat rash should: when possible. may be used to increase comfort). Dr. Joes tips to prevent heat-related illness es because the best defense is prevention. of your activity level. thirsty to drink. Warning: If your doctor limits the amount of fluid you drink or has you on water pills, ask how much you should drink while the weather is hot. that contain alcohol or large amounts of sugar as these actually cause you to lose more body fluid. Also, avoid very cold drinks, because they can cause stomach cramps. ditioned space. If your home does not have air conditioning, go to the shop ping mall or public library even a few hours spent in air conditioning can help your body stay cooler when you go back into the heat. ting clothing. Although anybody can suffer from heat-related illness, some people are at greater risk than others. Check regularly on: with heart disease or high blood pressure. Visit at-risk adults at least twice a day and watch for signs of heat stress. If you must be out in the heat, limit your out door activity to morning and evening hours. Never leave anyone in a closed, parked vehicle. When it is very hot outside cut down on exer cise. If you must exercise while it is hot, drink two to four glasses of cool, non-alcoholic fluids each hour. A sports beverage can replace the salt and minerals you lose in perspiration. Warning: If you are on a low-salt diet, talk with your doctor before drinking a sports beverage. Protect yourself from the sun by wearing a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses and by applying sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher (the most effective products say broad spectrum or UVA/UVB protection on their labels) Living in Florida under the beautiful warm sun has its advantages and disadvantages. Think carefully about any exertion during the hottest part of the midday under the hot sun. Remember to drink clear fluids regularly and workout with a partner who can look out for you. Exercise should be fun, so always be care ful in the heat. Lower your risk for heat stress Part 2

PAGE 18

18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 The U.S. Navy received public comments June 6 on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement/Overseas Environmental Impact Statement (EIS/OEIS) for Navy training and testing activities conducted in the Atlantic Fleet Training and Testing (AFTT) Study Area, during its meeting at the Prime Osborn Convention Center in Jacksonville. The AFTT region cov ers approximately 2.6 mil lion square nautical miles and encompasses the at-sea portions of Navy range complexes and research, development, testing and evaluation ranges along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. The Navy is accepting com ments throughout the 60-day comment period that ends July 10. All comments must be post marked or received by July 10 to be considered in the final EIS/ OEIS. Written comments may be submitted to www.AFTTEIS. com or by mail to: Naval Facilities Engineering Command Atlantic Attn: Code EV22 (AFTT EIS Project Managers) 6506 Hampton Blvd. Norfolk, VA 23508-1278 Copies of the Draft EIS/ OEIS are available online or at the following public librar ies: Jacksonville Public Library, 303 N. Laura St., Jacksonville; and Camden County Public Library, 1410 Highway 40 East, Kingsland, Ga. The Navy proposes to conduct training and testing activities which may include the use of active sonar and explosives pri marily within existing range complexes and testing ranges along the east coast of the United States, Gulf of Mexico, Navy pier-side locations, port transit channels and the lower Chesapeake Bay. The proposed action also includes activities such as sonar maintenance and gunnery exercises conducted concurrently with ship transits and which may occur outside Navy range complexes and test ing ranges. The proposed action includes sonar testing conducted as part of overhaul, modernization, maintenance and repair activi ties at shipyard and Navy piers as well as new construction and overhaul at Navy-contracted shipbuilder locations. The AFTT Draft EIS/OEIS updated the science and anal yses needed to continue criti cal previous studies into one, thereby incorporating expanded areas, and new science, plat forms and activities including ship shock testing on the east coast. Results from these studies show Navy activities continue to have negligible affects on marine mammal and turtle populations, including endan gered species. Monitoring of Navy activities over the past several years supports these conclusions. Navy briefs AFTT to Northeast Florida residents

PAGE 19

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 19 When is the best time to sign up for Social Security benefits? The answer is: only you can deter mine the best time based on a number of variables. Your age, health and family longevity. Fiscal need, amount of earnings you still bring in. Amount of benefit based on the age timetable. Social Security benefits start as early as age 62. But, the benefit is approxi mately 25 percent of full benefit. Full Social Security benefit occurs at age 66 or 67 currently, based on your birth year after 1942. And for every year you delay receiving your benefit, the amount changes by approximately 8 percent each year. For example if you were born in 1950: At age 62, benefit = 75 percent of full benefit (minimum amount) At age 66, benefit = 100 percent (full benefit amount) At age 67, benefit = 108 percent of full benefit At age 70, benefit = 132 percent of full benefit (maximum amount) If healthy and you have a family his tory of longevity, you might come out ahead by waiting to sign up for Social Security. If health or family history isnt the best, you might want to begin taking benefits as soon as possible. If married, and you and/or your wife work and earn income, and/or receive a retirement pension (think about yours or her retired pay), or any other tax able investment or savings accounts that could affect your Social Security holdback and your federal tax liability, go to http://www.ssa.gov/pgm/retire ment.htm and http://www.irs.gov/pub/ irs-pdf/p554.pdf for more information. Breakeven point: This is the point where delaying to receive bene fits equals the amount you will have received if taking early benefit. In other words, where the 25 percent reduced benefit paid out = the amount of full benefit pay out. The cross over occurs approximately some nine years after full benefit starts, baring any changes or inflationary adjustments. What happens to my Social Security if I get divorced? If you are 62-plus, were married 10-plus years, are currently unmar ried and not entitled to receive a higher benefit based on your own work, you can receive benefits based on your exs earnings, even if he or she has remar ried. The following are the guidelines: lower earner may receive benefits based on the higher earners work. benefits on your exs work, and your ex is still eligible to collect what he or she has earned over the years. fies for benefits, you can still receive benefits if you have been divorced two years. benefits without reducing the amount of your exs benefits. divorced spousal benefits, up to your full retirement age, the higher your ben efits will be. Additional information can be found at aarp.org/work/social-security or by calling 1-800-772-1213. The Social Security question

PAGE 20

20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included June Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowl ing, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Summer Bowling Leagues Now Forming Monday Mixed Trio 7 p.m. Wednesday After Work League 4:30 p.m. Thrusday Morning Seniors 9 a.m. Thursday Night Extreme Bowling 6:30 p.m. Friday Intramural League 11:45 a.m. Sunday Fun Bunch League 4 p.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group train ing Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. **New fitness class Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session one begins June 18 $40 military, $45 DoD Register for swim lessons at the base gym I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale July 13 $58.50 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Disney World Orlando FL 4 day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Medieval Times Free royalty upgrade with dinner reservation Pirates Dinner Adventure in Orlando Active and Retired military $12 at gate Family members purchase at ITT Adult $37, children (3-12) $26 Daytona International Speedway Jalapeno 250 $24 Coke Zero 400, July 7, $70 80 Coke Zero Shuttle $16The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Dave & Busters Trip June 14 at 6 p.m. Free $10 Powercard, 20 percent off food & beverages and unlimited simulator play Mall & Movie Trip Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater June 15 at 6 p.m. Jacksonville Sharks Game June 16 at 6 p.m. Jacksonville Suns Game June 21 at 6:30 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees June 26 for active duty June 14 & 28 for retirees & DoD person nel Junior Golf Clinic Session 1 (ages 11 17) June 25 29 Session 2 (ages 6 10) July 16 20 Session 3 (ages 11 17) August 6 10 Monday Friday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. $110 per week long session Twilight Special Monday Friday Play 18 holes for $17 after 3 p.m. Not applicable on holidaysMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Lessons $150 per person June 15, 16, 17, 23 & 24 July 20, 21, 22, 28 & 29 Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite! Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School July 23 August 29 $500 per person Youth Flight Camps (ages 12 18) Basic Aviation Course $100 per person June 27 30 register by June 20 July 11 14 register by July 3 July 18 21 register by July 11 Advanced Aviation Course (basic course required) $150 per person Aug. 8 11 register by Aug. 1 Aug. 22 25 register by Aug. 14

PAGE 21

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 21 Commissary patrons advised to stock up for emergenciesThis year marks the 20th anniversary of Hurricane Andrew, which slammed into South Florida Aug. 24, 1992, devastating Homestead, Florida City and parts of Miami before it crossed the Gulf of Mexico to strike the Louisiana coast line. Its a sober reminder that your commissary wants to help make sure you are prepared for any disaster. Disaster preparedness can help improve your odds for survival, and the Defense Commissary Agency and its industry partners are working together to offer items needed for severe weather survival kits at low prices, said DeCA Director of Sales Chris Burns. Andrews anniversary drives home the point that everyone should be prepared, Burns said. Your commissary can help you do that. Weve got lots of items to stock up your survival kit. Since April 1, canned chicken, powdered milk, batteries, weather-ready flashlights, all-weather tape, first aid kits, lighters, matches, candles and hand sanitizer have been reduced in price as part of DeCAs severe weather promotional package that runs until Oct. 31. The package coincides with the prime times for both tornado and hurricane seasons in the United States. Tornado season runs from April to July. The National Weather reports that 2011 was a record breaking year; it was the second most active year in recent memory, with a total of 1,690. April 2011 has the greatest monthly total of tornadoes in modern record keeping with 758. April also holds the record for the greatest num ber of tornadoes on one day April 27 with 200. The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 through Nov. 30 and includes the North Atlantic Ocean, the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is predicting a less-active season this year versus other years. Predictions from the NOAA call for a 70 percent chance for about nine to 15 named storms, four to eight of which could become hurricanes; and one to three are expected to be major hurricanes. These predictions do not include which hurri canes will make landfall, because its not possible to plot landfall weeks or months ahead of a storm, the NOAA website said. Although the NOAA is calling for a less-active hurricane season, it still pays to be prepared, Burns said. All of our customers no matter where they are should be prepared for any disaster. The commissary can supply our customers with what they need to survive. Emergency preparedness officials suggest hav ing a disaster supply kit that includes the following items: Water at least one gallon daily, per person (three-day supply for evacuation, two-week supply for home) Nonperishable foods canned meats, fruits, veg etables, dried fruits, nuts, raisins, cereal, crackers, cookies, energy bars, granola, peanut butter, and foods for infants and the elderly (three-day supply for evacuation, two-week supply for home) Paper goods writing paper, paper plates, paper towels and toilet paper Cooking items pots, pans, baking sheet, cook ing utensils, charcoal, a grill and a manual can opener First-aid kit including bandages, medicines and prescription drugs Cleaning materials bleach, sanitizing spray, and hand and laundry soap Specialty foods diet and low-calorie foods and drinks Toiletries personal hygiene items and moisture wipes Pet care items food, water, muzzle, leash, car rier, medications, medical records, and identifica tion and immunization tags Lighting accessories flashlight, batteries, can dles and matches Battery-powered or hand-crank radio (NOAA Weather Radio, if possible) Duct tape, scissors Multipurpose tool Copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information, proof of address, deed/lease to home, passports, birth cer tificates and insurance policies) Cell phone with chargers Family and emergency contact information Extra cash Emergency blanket Maps of the area Blankets or sleeping bags DeCA recommends that customers take advan tage of their commissary benefit and its average savings of 30 percent or more to stock up on emer gency items that can sustain them during a crisis. The Blood Alliance will hold blood donation drives at NAS Jax: June 18, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Building 1 June 22, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Branch Health Clinic Building 964 June 25, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax Building 3032 June 26, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax For more information, call 353-8263, Ext. 2324. If you are a parent with young children, back to school can mean back to the doctors office for annual school required physi cals. School physicals are often required to help ensure that chil dren enter the classroom in good health, with up-to-date immuniza tions and free of any diseases that could pose a risk to classmates. For children age 5-11, TRICARE covers annual physicals and immunizations required in con nection with school enrollment. Parents should note that TRICARE does not cover sports or camp physicals. If your child requires a sports or camp physical, you may be required to submit a Request for Non-covered Services form to your provider. By completing this form, you acknowledge that you will be paying for the non-covered service. The form is available on the Humana Military Healthcare Services, Inc. (Humana Military) Web site at www.humana-military. com. TRICARE also provides wellchild care for eligible children from birth to age 6. The well-child benefit includes routine newborn care, comprehensive health pro motion and disease prevention exams, vision and hearing screen ings and routine immunizations (according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines), and developmen tal assessment (according to the American Academy of Pediatrics). For well-child care, there are no copayments or cost shares. To learn more about TRICAREs school-physical coverage and wellchild benefit, visit www.tricare.mil or Humana Militarys Web site. Back-to-School physicals and well-child care



PAGE 1

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held June 4 at Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast to officially celebrate the opening of its new Regional Call Center (RCC) projected to provide a $1.2 million annual sav ings. The Call Center started operations on Jan. 30 servicing NAS Key West, Fla. and on April 2 for NAS Corpus Christi, Texas to implement the new program, said Brian deLumeau, RCC program manager. Service to NAS Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport will be added on July 1 to complete Phase I of the program. The center is where all emergency and rou tine service calls will be handled for U.S. Navy bases from Texas to Georgia and south to Key West, as well as their associated Navy Reserve Centers. We expect the center to provide efficiency through work accomplished with less people and saving an estimated $1.2 million per year, claims deLumeau. NECE certifies international studentsEntomologists and preventive medicine technicians (PMTs) from the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) instructed 25 international students during the University of Florida Emerging Pathogens Institutesannual Certificate in Emerging Infectious Disease Research (CEIDR) program May 21-22. Students enrolled in the program traveled from 13 coun tries to complete 20 days of intensive public health training in Gainesville. [During this program] students learn about numerous epidemiological, laboratory, and entomological approaches to infectious disease control, said Dr. Gregory Gray, professor, chair of University of Floridas Department of Environmental and Global Health, and retired Medical Corps captain. They learn quite a bit about such infectious diseases and are introduced to modern food production techniques to reduce food-borne illnesses. Multiple resources are also pro vided to better equip them to do their public health or research jobs. The CEIDR program is designed to bolster international public health efforts by facilitating advanced training avail able to international public health practitioners. In doing so, this course nurtures the development of sustainable epidemiologic research capacity and promoting collaborations between international and U.S. laboratories. We share with them some laboratory techniques during their training but a major benefit from the certificate program is the professional networking that occurs afterwards, Gray said. After meeting and becoming friends with other researchers from across the world certificate trainees often share labora tory approaches to disease problems for a number of years afterwards. Potential students are generally nominated by U.S. government sponsors such as the Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (DoDGEIS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. Department of State, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the Fogarty International Center. However, this program is open to anyone providing indepen dent support to his/her studies. This year marks the second time NECE instructors were requested by the University of Florida, Emerging Pathogens Institute (EPI) to support this course. Students were able draw on the many years of firsthand vector control experience that is a result of NECEs unique mission. NECEs mission focuses on reducing the incidence of human disease transmitted by blood feeding arthropods in any area of the world, said NECE Officer-in-Charge Cmdr. Eric Hoffman. This is accomplished through developing and evaluating novel tools and techniques through collaboration with worldclass organizations and establishing comprehensive control programs, whenever and wherever needed. Hoffman also said that NECEs involvement in the program along with supporting local training opportunities maintains a distinct advantage for potential efforts in years to come. The certificate program is able to draw on our experience and knowledge to train international public health professionals in creating effective and sustainable vector control pro grams when they return home, said Hoffman. Being able to participate in the certificate program is certainly advantageous to us by creating opportunity to cultivate professional relationships which may lead to future collaborations, he said. Eight NECE personnel lectured on several subjects includ ing mosquito surveillance methods, mosquito identification, chemical and equipment control of ticks and mosquitoes. To familiarize the class with vector surveillance and control equipment, NECE staff performed several equipment dem onstrations, including instruction on the role of spaces sprays Dozens of CPOs, prospective CPOs and officers filled most of the pews at NAS Jacksonvilles All Saints Chapel June 6 to learn about the Battle of Midway from two Sailors and a Marine who fought in the pivotal World War II engagement. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders addressed the CPO 365 train ees about lessons learned from the Battle of Midway. Deckplate leadership makes the differ ence. Whether youre an E2 or a master chief petty officer, deckplate leadership defines what kind of Navy we are. When you hear todays guests give their accounts of Midway think about what you would have done in their place. Because when you become a CPO, no matter the circumstance, everybody will turn to you and ask, what do we do, chief? Whether its a damaged aircraft, a fire aboard ship or a Sailor in distress with a family problem you will be looked to for leadership. NAS Jacksonville CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd reinforced the skippers message, Deckplate leaders are highly visible Sailors who set the tone, know their mission, know their people and develop their people beyond their own expectations both as a team and as individuals. Today, we salute and honor our special guests on the 70th anniversary of the muchstudied naval ambush drawn up by Adm. Chester Nimitz, the U.S. Pacific Fleet com mander, said Shepherd. In June, 1942, retired BMC Jim Cunningham was an 18-year-old seaman aboard the destroyer USS Hammann (DD-412). The ship was part the USS Yorktown (CV-5) anti-aircraft screen and Cunninghams battle station was the 5 NAVFAC Southeast opens regional call center in Jacksonville Battle of Midway vets tell it like it was

PAGE 2

2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS June 13 1881 USS Jeannette crushed in Arctic ice pack. 1942 PBY Catalina sea planes, operating from the seaplane tender USS Gillis (ADV-12), conclude two days of attacks against Japanese ships and land positions on Kiska, Aleutian Islands. The battle exhausted the gasoline and bomb supply aboard Gillis, but was unsuccessful in driving the Japanese from the island. 1967 Operation Great Bend begins in Rung Sat Zone, Vietnam. June 14 1777 John Paul Jones takes command of Ranger. 1777 Continental Congress adopts design of present U.S. Flag. 1847 Commodore Matthew Perry launches amphibious river operations by Sailors and Marines on Tabasco River, Mexico. 1940 Franklin D. Roosevelt signs Naval Expansion Act to construct ships to increase Navys tonnage by 11 percent. 1985 SW2 Robert Stethem of Underwater Construction Team 1 was killed by terrorist hijackers of TWA Flight 847. He later received a Bronze Star for his heroism. June 15 1942 USS Copahee (CVE12), Capt. John Farrell com manding, was commissioned at Puget Sound Navy Yard, the first of 10 Bogue-class escort carriers converted from Maritime Commission Liberty Ship hulls. 1944 5th Fleet lands Marines on Saipan, under the cover of naval gunfire, in conquest of the Marianas. 1963 Launching of combat store ship, Mars (AFS-1), first of new class of underway replen ishment ships. 1991 Two battle groups and amphibious ships evacu ate dependents and Air Force personnel from Clark Air Force Base, Philippines after Mount Pinatubo erupts. June 16 1898 U.S. squadron bom bards Santiago, Cuba. 1965 Navy Department schedules reactivation of hos pital ship Repose (AH-16) for service in Vietnam. June 17 1833 USS Delaware enters drydock at Gosport Navy Yard in Norfolk, Va., the first war ship to enter a public drydock in the United States. 1898 Navy Hospital Corps established. 1940 Chief of Naval Operations asks U.S. Congress for money to build two-ocean Navy. 1942 Goodyear constructs a prototype model M scouting and patrol airship with 50 percent greater range than the K Class. Four model M airships were in service during World War II. June 18 1812 U.S. declares war on Great Britain for impressments of Sailors and interference with commerce. 1942 First AfricanAmerican officer, Bernard Robinson, commissioned in Naval Reserve. 1957 CNO approves ship characteristics of the fleet ballistic missile submarine. June 19 1864 USS Kearsarge sinks Confederate raider Alabama off the coast of France. 1944 Battle of the Philippine Sea and The Marianas Turkey Shoot begins. Hi, my name is Sarah Smiley, and Im addicted to the police scanner. Just one step away from tapioca pudding and Wheel of Fortune reruns. But at least I dont own an actual scanner; Ive only downloaded the app on my iPhone. Yes, there is an app for that. (If I told you that I paid to upgrade to the pro scanner, would you think less of me?) There was a time when I carried my iPhone so I could listen to iTunes. That was back when I would have known what this Call Me Maybe song is all about, back when I knew which artists were popular and which ones were not. But that time is gone. Today, I carry around my iPhone down to the basement while I do laundry, into the bathroom while I brush my hair so that I dont miss anything on the police scanner. Before you judge, I suggest giving the scanner app a try. The multi-layered, simultaneous plot lines will string you along (What happened to the offi cer responding to the domestic dispute call?) and suck you in. Youll find your self screaming at the phone like someone watching a close football game: Dude, shouldnt you call for backup? Dont go in there alone! Im serious; you cant make this stuff up. While one officer is responding to a complaint about a barking dog, anoth er officer is trailing a suspect through downtown. Like any good soap opera, there is mystery (who left the gas station without paying?), suspense (does the driver have a suspended license?) and scorned lovers (dispatch says X has a restraining order against Y). In the beginning, I scanned alone, after the kids had gone to bed. I even fell asleep to the scanner (not recommended if you dont like weird dreams). Then, late one night, the scanner woke me up when an officer told dispatch that he was securing an open shed door in the local cem etery. I sat up in bed and put my hand to my chest. Had this officer not read every Stephen King novel ever written? The first rule of horror is that you never secure an open shed door, at night, in the middle of a cemetery. That was the last time I used the scanner as a bedtime story. It also was the last time I scanned alone. Soon after, I got my friend (code name 12-15) hooked. Friends dont let friends scan alone. (Copy that, 12-15?) Scanner 12-15 is always just a text message away for backup. Over time, the crackle and hum of the police scanner has become such a pres ence in our home and car, even the kids join in. When we pass an ambulance with lights and siren blazing, Ford grabs my phone and says, Can I turn on the scanner and hear whats going on? Owen, however, thinks we are getting carried away. Dont you think this has gone too far? Owen said as I listened to the police chase down a robbery suspect. (Notice, Owen did not walk away from the scanner. No one walks away from the scanner.) The boys have even learned the numbers, or codes, in police-speak. Police code cheat-sheets are available online or through the app, but most of them become apparent in context. For instance, the code 10-44 (suspected mental issues), is an easy one to figure out. Others are more obscure. Scanner 10-22 to Scanner 12-15, do you read me? Theres a 2215 on the scanner. Whats that? That would be the time, Miss Military Wife. Over. Oh. Right. Ive often wondered if Ill hear about someone I know over the scanner. And, really, this could be handy once my boys start driving. (No guys, I cant risk it; my mom listens to the scanner.) Mostly, however, the scanner is filled with codes, peppered with familiar locations, and the phonetic spelling of peo ples names. As a military dependent for more than 35 years, my eyes glaze over at Alpha-Bravo-Charlie, and I usually cant make out the name. Then, two weeks ago, I got pulled over for running a red light. I was flustered when the policeman came to my window, so I hurriedly handed him everything I thought he needed: identification and registration. When he walked back to his car, I eyed the iPhone in my passenger seat. Should I turn it on and hear my name called over the scanner? What would the offi cer think when he came back and heard it on? Would his walkie-talkie and my iPhone make that ear-piercing feedback noise together? I couldnt bring myself to turn it on. The policeman returned to my window. He held up the identification I had given him. Im going to let you go with a warning, he said, unless this library card is your only form of personal identifica tion. I should have been embarrassed about accidentally handing a policeman my library card instead of my license. Instead, I was bummed that I didnt have on the scanner. Did 12-15? Because that would have been a good one. Until next time, Im Scanner 10-22 and Im 10-8. Friends dont let friends scan alone

PAGE 3

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 3

PAGE 4

4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 In a June 8 ceremony at NAS Jacksonvilles All Saints Chapel, the role of commanding officer of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville passed in a time-honored Navy tradition from Capt. Lynn Welling to Capt. Gayle Shaffer. An audience of more than 400 attended the event, presided over by Rear Adm. Elaine Wagner, com mander of Navy Medicine East and Naval Medical Center Portsmouth and chief of the Navy Dental Corps. Rear Adm. William Roberts, fleet surgeon for U.S. Fleet Forces Command, was the guest speaker. Welling is a former naval aviator and currently a board-certified emergency medicine physician, who departs NH Jacksonville after two highly success ful years as commanding officer. Welling thanked his family (including mom Carol; brothers Larry and Dean; children Aimee, Nick and Alex; and wife Patricia), command staff, command associations, and the medical leadership of the Jacksonville community. Welling noted what an honor his 34 years of service have been capped off by commanding the finest hospital in the Navy. He summarized, Naval Hospital Jacksonville is The One the one other hospitals turn to for advice in implementing practices that ensure patients receive the safest, highest quality care. He concluded by speaking directly to patients. We have met, and will continue to meet, our mission of providing the safest, highest quality care to you. After all, the reason we exist is to heal our nations heroes. Shaffer, NH Jacksonvilles new commanding offi cer, most recently served as executive officer of Naval Hospital Okinawa. She is a dentist, a diplomate of the American Board of General Dentistry and a fellow of the Academy of General Dentistry. Shaffer acknowledged the exceptionally high stan dard set by Welling, observing that the heroes of our nation can rest easy and focus on their mission because they and their families are receiving the best care a grateful nation can give. She wrapped up by saying, I am ready to go to work! Each speaker remarked on the theme that if theres a Navy hospital that is the one, its NH Jacksonville. NH Jacksonvilles priority, since its founding in 1941, is to heal the nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the hospital, located aboard NAS Jacksonville, and five branch health clinics in Florida (Jacksonville, Key West and Mayport) and Georgia (Albany and Kings Bay). Of its patient population 215,000 active and retired Sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. On a typical day, a dedicated team of 2,500 military and civilian personnel sees 1,800 outpatients, admits 15 inpatients, cares for 80 people in the ER, performs 14 same-day surgeries, fills 4,700 prescriptions, conducts 4,600 lab tests and delivers two to three babies. Additionally, up to 15 percent of its active duty staff is deployed around the globe providing combat, humanitarian and disaster care. To find out more, visit www.med.navy.mil/sites/navalhospitaljax, www. facebook/navalhospitaljacksonville and www.twitter. com/NHJax. The VP-8 Fighting Tigers held their 64th change of command ceremony as Cmdr. Mike Marston relieved Cmdr. Christopher Flaherty as com manding officer May 11 while undergoing final preparations for their upcoming deploy ment. A native of Philadelphia, Marston enlisted in the Naval Reserve in 1990 as an equip ment operator. He then attended Ithaca College in Ithaca, N.Y., gradu ating with a Bachelor of Arts degree in history.He received his commission in May 1995 after completion of Officer Candidate School in Pensacola. Following initial flight train ing in Pensacola he earned his naval flight officer wings in June 1996 at Randolph Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. Marstons past duty assignments include VP-4, Navy International Programs Office in Washington DC as flag aide to the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for International Programs, White House social aide, VPU2, VQ-2, Naval War College, Newport, R.I., and the U.S. European Command at the Joint Reconnaissance Center. During his tour as VP-8 commanding officer, Flaherty oversaw several major squad ron events including an ardu ous deployment to the Navys Fifth and Seventh Fleet areas of operation and a dynamic 12-month inter-deployment readiness cycle. Under his command, the squadron also received a number of unit awards including the Captain Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy for antisubmarine warfare excellence, Squadron Blue M Award for medical readiness and the 2011 AVCM Donald M. Neal Golden Wrench Award for mainte nance excellence. In addition, many individ ual Fighting Tigers earned awards, most notably AO1 Naomi Stout was selected as Commander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic Sailor of the Year and flight surgeon Lt. Jennifer Kruse was named the Richard E. Luehrs Operational Flight Surgeon of the Year. In his final address as VP-8s commanding officer, Flaherty praised the squad rons achievements over his two years in VP-8, particularly the community service and outreach programs in which squadron members have been active. VP-8 members volunteer with a number of charities, including donating time and money to the Wounded Warrior Foundation and Sulzbacher Center of Jacksonville. VP-8 has also teamed up with a local orphanage at their cur rent deployment site in San Salvador, El Salvador to pro vide clothes and toys to needy children. As a parting surprise, Flaherty arranged for NFL Hall of Fame Quarterback Steve Young to address the squadron via pre-recorded video.Young was made an honorary mem ber of VP-8 and thanked the squadron for their service on their past deployment and wished VP-8 the best of luck and success on their upcoming deployment. Marston addressed the squadron and guests during the change of command, highlighting the accomplishments and milestones achieved dur ing the Fighting Tigers previ ous deployment and current inter deployment readiness cycle and welcoming the com mands new executive officer, Cmdr. Todd Libby. VP-8 is currently deployed to the Seventh and Fourth Fleet areas of responsibility. Flahertys next assignment will be in residence at the National Defense Universitys College of War in Washington, D.C where he will complete a degree in National Strategic Studies. Shaffer assumes command from Welling at Naval Hospital Jacksonville VP-8 Fighting Tigers hold change of command ceremony

PAGE 5

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 5 The 2012 Navy Region Southeast Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) Fund Drive officially ended June 6 with a wrap-up celebration at the NAS Jacksonville Officers Club. This years fund drive gener ated $275,000 to benefit Sailors, Marines and their families who receive assistance through loans and grants in times of need. The total amount of funds exceeded this years goal of $250,000 by 110 percent for the region. This years fund drive went really well. More than half the commands reached their goal which is just outstand ing. VP-30 held their annual golf tournament that did really well and we tried a couple new fundraising activities like a closest-to-pin competition. But most of the fundraising came from keypersons and helpers contacting individuals on a personal basis, said Lt. Matt Malmkar of NAS Jax, who coordinated this years fund drive. Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. praised every one for a highly successful fund drive. I want to stress how important this campaign is to raise funds to support the needs of our Sailors, Marines and their families. Last year, $5.5 million was provided to assist CNRSE families with 60 percent of that being quick assist loans, he stated. Scorby went on to recog nize NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders and Malmkar for running this years successful fund drive and several top contributors. We had 56 commands par ticipating in the fund drive with 27 commands exceed ing their goals. VP-30 was the top contributor raising almost $50,000 nearly double their goal of $26,000. NAS Key West was second raising more than $25,000 with a goal of $12,800, said Scorby. The admiral also commended Navy Medicine Support Command and the University of Florida NJROTC Unit for exceeding their goals by 500 percent. Its obvious that a lot of people put in a great amount of effort to make this fund drive a huge success. Again, I want to personally thank all of you for a job well done! said Scorby before presenting letters of appreciation to command keypersons. NAS Jax NMCRS Director Dave Faraldo also thanked those who continue to make the event so successful each year. Without the support from the leadership and the people who believe in the cause, we could not be successful. So thank you for your tremen dous assistance in making this another great fund drive, said Faraldo. I also want to emphasize that if your Sailors need help, send them to Navy and Marine Corps Relief because its the best deal in town. They will get the financial assistance they need and educational support to learn to manage their money which is really what we are all about. The campaign runs each year from March through May to allow military personnel and civilian employees to contrib ute to the society. During the 108 years the NMCRS has been operating, they have helped millions of people through loans and grants. NMCRS also offers other forms of assistance such as providing layettes or junior seabags to new family mem bers, a visiting nurse program to help new mothers, elderly individuals and anyone who needs a little extra help and thrift shops offering low-cost clothing and household items. For more information and to learn more about volun teer opportunities, contact the NMCRS office at 542-3515. VyStar Credit Union donated $13,500 to the Greater Jacksonville USO June 6 to help fund the sixth annual USO Military Appreciation Night. USO Night is June 13 from 6 to 11 p.m. at Adventure Landing and Shipwreck Island Water Park at Jacksonville Beach. Children ages three and younger are free, and tickets are only $2. During normal hours, daily admission at Shipwreck Island Water Park is $27.99 plus tax. For five hours, active duty service mem bers and their fami lies will enjoy unlim ited access to Shipwreck Island Waterpark and Adventure Island dry attractions, including miniature golf, go-karts, laser tag, the Wacky Worm Rollercoaster and the Frog Hopper. Arcade games and refreshments are not included. Weve sold 2,000 [tick ets and] reached the parks capacity, said NAS Jacksonville USO Center Director Lisabeth Quinn. Its a sold-out event. Its just wonderful, and were just fortunate to be able to do it, thanks to sponsors like VyStar Credit Union, said Greater Jacksonville USO Executive Director John Shockley. Some people want us to do it twice a year. We started right here at NAS Jax in 1952. This is where we got our start 60 years ago, so our roots and our heritage are here. Thats why we want to continue to support as we move forward. You never forget where you came from, said Russell Buck, regional vice president of VyStar Credit Union Oak Leaf Branch. Last year, military per sonnel from NS Mayport, NAS Jacksonville, NSB Kings Bay, the Coast Guard and Jacksonville recruiting districts also filled Adventure Landing to its limit. This is a shining example of people help ing people and our sup port to the commu nity, espe cially to our active duty mili tary and families, said Brad Smith, vice presi dent of the VyStar Credit Union branch at NAS Jax. NMCRS fund drive exceeds goal USO night at Adventure Landing sold out

PAGE 6

6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 Down and Damaged A Sikorsky HH-60H Seahawk Helicopter that crashed in Virginia during a night training exercise at Fort Pickett in 2009 underwent exten sive repairs at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) and was returned to a Norfolk-based Navy Reserve squadron in May. FRCSE artisans and support per sonnel spent two years rebuilding the mission-critical aircraft for the Red Wolves of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 84, who successfully completed a functional flight check at Naval Air Station Jacksonville before heading home May 23. The accident occurred when the Seahawks rotor wash caused a tarp used by ground crews to mark helicopter-landing zones to become airborne and entangled in the tail rotor causing the aircraft to flip on its left side dur ing training at Castles Combat Landing Strip July 21, 2009. The two pilots and four crewmembers all suffered minor injuries. The Navy ruled the crash a Class A mishap with damages to the aircraft exceeding $1 million. HH-60 Planner and Estimator Mike Novak said when the main rotor blades started hitting the ground and com ing apart, things started flying all over the place causing widespread damage. Novak served as the liai son between FRCSE and HSC-84 and coordinated parts acquisition for the repairs from the Navys supply system. He said FRCSE artisans also stripped components from a helicopter des tined for removal from the Fleet and used the donor parts to reconstruct the destroyed aircraft. We took a struck aircraft and used several major airframe fittings and components from it, he said. We put on a new cockpit from a model B donor aircraft and did extensive struc tural repairs in the cabin overhead, specifically all four main transmission gearbox support beams. Novak said artisans also performed extensive structural repairs in the lefthand fuel cell area, extensive skin and FRCSE resurrects demolished Seahawk for Navy squadron

PAGE 7

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 7 Photos by Victor Pitts substructure repairs on the tail cone section using a donor tail pylon, and on top of the helicopter to the engine firewalls. We built that whole aircraft, top to bottom, front to back, said HH-60 Overhaul and Repair Supervisor (Mechanical) Mike Adams. Our team did a great job. It was very, very extensive. They rebuilt the whole drive train that runs from the main transmission all the way back to the tail rotor assembly. Adams credits Aircraft Mechanic Eddie Toney who he said was the key player in assembling the main rotor gearbox and main rotor head assembly from scratch using new components. Adams said Aircraft Mechanics Mike Thompson and Jake Naggiar practically rebuilt the whole fuselage. Together they spent a few thousand hours on the project. The job required assistance from numerous trades and professions. Adams said the electricians essen tially rewired the whole aircraft, and the avionics technicians had to install communications and radar systems. Production Controller Pat Palompo, Supply Technician George Fickett and HUB Scheduler Andy Hafler worked diligently to obtain supplies and com ponents. Structural Engineering Technician Myles Colley provided invaluable engineering support. Adams said the sheet metal workers led by O&R Supervisor (Sheet Metal) Scott Wood had to do extensive work, such as rebuilding the structures and numerous fittings before the aircraft mechanics could even begin the reassembly. I rebuilt four or five helicopters when I worked in Pensacola, but I have never seen an aircraft in that bad of shape, said Wood. I thought they would scrap it, that it would go to the boneyard, but it didnt. Nothing was simple on this aircraft. When the aircraft rolled it twisted to where everything was out of alignment. Woods said Sheet Metal Mechanics Rob Paffe, Joshua Nix, Jeremy Burns and Ken Harwell rebuilt the airframe and replaced the nose section and main transmission beams. Wood credits the entire HH-60 team for bringing the airframe back to its original configuration, a mighty feat. The FRCSE Pattern Shop created compound contour stretch molds of the aft metal fuselage covers com monly referred to as skins and sent them for fabrica tion to another aviation maintenance depot. When the skins arrived at FRCSE, they did not meet the rigorous engineering specifications needed for correct align ment. They werent exact so we took them back to Jamie Childers, the sheet metal manufacturing supervi sor, said Wood. He worked his magic and tweaked the skins to make them fit like a glove. When you are doing double curvature, the skins can become buckled. They are fuel skins and they take a large load. HSC-84 Pilot Lt. Cmdr. Gabriel Yancey traveled to Jacksonville and flew the successful functional check flight. Also on board was ADC Ben Powers who said there are only 35 operational H models serving the Fleet. He said HSC-84 and HSC-85 will soon be the only two Fleet squadrons using the H model aircraft. We have two other aircraft still operating after receiving a number of extensive repairs at this facility, said Powers. FRCSE turns out a good product. The twin-engine, medium lift, Seahawk helicopter supports combat search and rescue missions and naval special warfare operations according to the U.S. Navy Fact File. It can operate from aircraft carriers and a variety of other naval and merchant vessels, as well as land bases. FRCSE

PAGE 8

8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 Service calls will be received at the center from each respective Public Works Department (PWD) or from a representa tive appointed on the base. The RCC staff will process the request through a Navy data management program and for ward to a base operating sup port (BOS) contract dispatch center or the PWD Shop at each base to have the work completed. The call center is located at NAS Jacksonville and managed by NAVFAC Southeasts Public Works Business Line and is staffed by full-time govern ment employees on a 24-hour, seven days a week basis, beginning July 1. Currently, eight PWDs have in-house trouble desks and six have BOS operated trouble desks. These separate call centers are estimated to contain the cost equivalent of 40 posi tions, costing approximately $3 million per year. We believe that the new RCC can operate with 18 employees by regionalizing the work to this single loca tion, said deLumeau. The new program will also pro vide improved data integ rity through quality control and one streamlined process throughout the region. The team is getting positive responses from their custom ers and dont even notice that the move has been made to Jacksonville. People call us direct ly on our toll-free number or email us at our public email account, said Anne Rush who works in the RCC. My old customers didnt realize that I had relocated when I tell them that I am working out of the office in Jacksonville. Phase II will begin Oct. 1 by adding Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga.; NAS Kingsville, Texas; and Joint Reserve Base (JRB) Ft. Worth, Texas. Phase III begins Oct. 1, 2013 at which time the remaining bases in the Southeast region including JRB New Orleans, La.; Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport, Miss.; NAS Pensacola, Fla.; NAS Whiting Field, Fla.; Naval Support Activity (NSA) Panama City, Fla.; and NSA Orlando, Fla. The Regional Call Center set up required proper facili ties, computer equipment and a phone system capable of receiving calls and evenly dis tributing them among the call center employees. This was done by developing a Round Robin type phone system which will ring service desk phones sequentially to distribute the workload. Each computer is supplied with two monitors to allow multiple programs to open and fully viewable and a handsfree handset. This was antici pated to speed up the process and allow for more accurate data transfers. The computers access the Navys Geographic Information System (GIS) that gives operators access to maps and overhead photographs to pin point locations. Historically, NAVFAC Southeast had issues with the manning a call center at each base. Operational procedures were as diverse as the number of bases. Six bases had con tractor-operated call centers and some in-house workforces were also used. Therefore, different procedures were used, different approval systems and distribution of costs associated with calls. The Regional Call Center provides proper training and consistent operating proce dures to avoid old pitfalls, said deLumeau. Now appropriate chains of approval will be used to ensure consistency with processing calls and associated costs with associated repairs. deLumeau explained that as they attain full steady state, the RCC will handle more than 175,000 trouble calls annually. RCCfollowed by a demonstration of the proper use of thermal fog and truck mounted sprayers. Students were also provided the opportunity to operate a hydraulic sprayer as well as a backpack sprayer configured for both liquid and granular formulations. As part of this courses hands-on vector surveillance training, NECE personnel assisted the class with setting up CDC light traps and gravid traps. After the traps were retrieved the following day, students were given the opportunity to develop their mosquito identification skills by keying out the mosquito specimens collected. Identifications were then verified by NECE and University of Florida staff members. Students were also given a demonstration on mosquito larval sur veillance techniques before being sent out to try larval dipping. Lastly, University of Florida staff members demonstrated several tick surveillance techniques. Although NECEs demonstrations and lectures comprised two days of intensive training on the surveil lance and control of vector borne diseases, the certificate program covered a wider scope of public health to include communicable diseases that have serious impacts on human health and national economies, an experience which could ultimately build global public health personnels capacity to respond to emerging infectious diseases such as SARS and avian influenza virus. NECE

PAGE 9

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 9 Navy honors fallen veterans during Jacksonville Memorial Day observance ceremonyTropical Storm Beryl may have delayed the Jacksonville Memorial Day ceremony by nearly two weeks, but that didnt deter local residents from pay ing tribute to service members at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Wall June 9. The presentation of wreaths to family members of those fallen service mem bers whose names were added to the wall highlighted the ceremony. The names of the service members who were added to the wall were Air Force Senior Airman Daigerrys Leon, Airman 1st Class Roswell McKim Barley and Army Pfc. Gil I. Morales Del Valle. Several guest speakers also addressed the crowd during the ceremony and Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast, was the key note speaker at the event. Scorby said hes always honored to speak on behalf of the Navy, but speaking at the Memorial Day ceremony was especially humbling. He added, while he is proud to take part in the more than 100-year-old tradition, Americans can remember fallen service members every day. Remembering the fallen is the pri mary message of Memorial Day, but its not only about this one day each year. Today, as we remember and reflect, we must also remember to act. We must act as citizens in ways that honor and give life to those who died, he said. We can celebrate who they were and how they lived their lives and remem ber their sacrifices. We can tell their stories stories of our mothers and fathers, grandfathers and grandmoth ers, uncles, brothers and sisters, and sons and daughters, said Scorby. Each of us can find a way to ensure the legacy of our heroes endures in todays sound bite culture. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and U.S. Representative Ander Crenshaw also spoke during the event. Crenshaw reiterated the importance of remember ing all of those whose names appear on the memorial wall. The names on this wall are in part responsible for the freedoms you and I enjoy, he said. Its my prayer today and everyday that we will always remember that the greatness of America is drawn from the blood and sacrifice of those who have gone before us and those who defend us this day. When you help prevent boating accidents, you are helping us ensure Americas maritime homeland security. Boat Safely. Visit uscgboating.org or call 1-800-368-5647 for more information.Boat Safely. Visit uscgboating.org or call 1.800.368.5647 for more information. uscgboating.org or 1.800.368.5647

PAGE 10

10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 gun on the fantail. During the first attack of Japanese bombers, the destroyer fired about 120 rounds of 5 and 900 rounds of 20mm yet the enemy scored hits on Yorktown, which began smoking heavily and slowed to a stop. Damage control went well and Yorktown was soon underway again, launching aircraft. But another enemy aerial attack struck the carrier this time leaving it dead in the water at a severe list. The carriers Sailors began abandoning ship and Hammann assisted in picking up 87 survivors from the water and life rafts. Later that after noon, while tied up to the Yorktown to assist with damage con trol, Cunningham and his Hammann ship mates saw more trouble approaching. I was walking along the deck and saw four wakes in the distance coming straight at us. Some of our gunners were firing at the wakes in hopes of exploding the torpedoes but two struck Hammann and two struck the Yorktown, said Cunningham. It is estimated that Hammann sunk within three to four minutes after the first torpedo explosion. I swam out to a life raft, but there was no room in it. There was fuel oil, blood and body parts floating on the surface and screams from the wounded, remembered Cunningham, who had suffered internal inju ries and was coughing up blood. He and his shipmates were picked up by the destroyer USS Behhan (DD-397) and taken to Pearl Harbor for medical treatment. Retired ATC Marlin Crider was a radioman aboard a PBY-5A Catalina flying boat assigned to VP-72. We were based at Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, but were operating a threeplane detachment from the airfield on Midway Island. PBYs were the eyes of the fleet in this time before radar. In addition to our scout ing role in search of the Japanese fleet, we also flew search-and-rescue missions for downed air men. Following the Battle of Midway, VP-72 was one of four PBY squadrons sup porting the fierce fight ing on Guadalcanal, as well as the series of naval battles fought in the seas around the island. When Crider left the Pacific, he was assigned to NAS Quonset Point, R.I., where he worked with a Massachusetts Institute of Technology team developing antisubmarine magnetic anomaly detector (MAD) gear. From there, he was attached to a Royal Air Force unit until the end of World War II. Marine Corps veteran Marvin Hollis was part of the garrison dug in near the airstrip to repel any Japanese troops landing on Midway Island. We spent a lot of our time building dugouts at tactical locations that would shelter up to12 riflemen. The Japanese air attack, about 20 min utes of bombing and strafing, damaged oil tanks, the seaplane han gar and other buildings but left the airfield relatively unscathed. Fortunately, our navy damaged the Japanese fleet so decisively they gave up their plan to land troops and attack our positions on Midway Island, said Hollis. The prospective CPOs in attendance were part of CPO 365, a threephase, year round devel opment program to make Sailors more effec tive deckplate leaders. Learning naval history and heritage is part of CPO 365 training. MIDWAY More than 800 guests honored World War II vet erans at the 15th Annual Commemoration of the U.S. Victory at Midway Memorial Dinner held June 9 at the World Golf Village Renaissance Resort in St. Augustine. The event, sponsored by the U.S. Navy League, was intend ed to pay homage to 16 veter ans who fought so valiantly at the Battle of Midway. The night began with intro ductions between the Midway veterans, Navy League offi cials and other distinguished guests. Among them, Adm. Mark Ferguson, Vice Chief of Naval Operations and Rear Adm. Jack Scorby, commander, Navy Region Southeast. Ferguson served as the spe cial guest speaker and dis cussed how the men of the Battle of Midway have inspired service members of today. We gather again to honor these veterans and to remind ourselves of our own capacity for greatness. We honor those who took the risk to launch the attack, those who fought on despite the odds from their ships and the island of Midway, those who flew on when their fuel gages were low, those who attacked without regard for their own personal safety and knowing they would like ly not survive, and those who risked their lives to save the ones of their shipmates, said Ferguson. Retired BMC Bill Ingram was one of the men Ferguson spoke of. He served on board USS Houston (CA-30) when the ship was torpedoed and sank on March 2, 1942. Ingram was pulled from the shark-infest ed water after a few days by a Japanese patrol boat, interro gated, beaten and then thrown back in the water because he was of no intelligence value. Ingram was recaptured and taken to Java with numerous other prisoners of war. They were put to work for three and a half years on a railroad project building a bridge over the River Kwai in Thailand. That was a terrible time those years. I was thankful to come home and it did not keep me from wanting to serve, said Ingram. Retiring from the Navy was one of my happiest and greatest accom plishments. Ingram and the rest of the 16 Midway survivors were hon ored as they received com memorative plaques presented by Ferguson along with his personal coin. Ferguson said he believes the historian Walter Lord said it best when he wrote, They had no right to win. Yet they did, and in doing so they changed the course of the war . . Even against the greatest odds, there is something in the human spirit a magic blend of skill, faith, and valor that can lift men from certain defeat to incredible victory. In our Navy today, a new generation has accepted the gift of American leadership at sea. Our Navy has never been more in demand and never more needed around the globe. On any given day, nearly half of our ships are underway and on station, said Ferguson. The Battle of Midway is widely regarded as the most important naval battle of the Pacific in World War II. Approximately one month after the Battle of Coral Sea and six months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the U.S. Navy decisively defeated the Imperial Japanese Navy and turned the war in U.S. favor. VCNO, Navy League Honor Midway Vets at memorial dinner

PAGE 11

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 11 VP-45 aircrew tour Brazilian submarineIn May, the Pelicans of VP-45 conducted bi-lateral training with the BMS Tikuna (S34), a Brazilian Type209 submarine, in an anti-submarine warfare exercise as part of the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Groups Composite Training Unit Exercise. Recently, many of the same sensor operators from VP-45 were able to take a closer look at the submarine much closer than even the P-3s infrared camera. After completing the exercise with the carrier strike group, the Tikuna pulled into NS Kings Bay, Ga. for a week of visits and training with U.S. submarine forces. Additionally, the crew of the Tikuna extended an invitation to VP-45 to tour their boat and the Pelicans gladly took them up on their offer. My first impression of the sub was how small it was, said AWO2 Jim Ballenger, a non-acoustic sensor operator at VP-45. At 210 feet in length and a crew of 48 sailors, the Tikuna is a tight squeeze for most. Despite its diminutive size, the Tikuna, and other diesel-electric submarines like it, can pose a viable threat to surface ships maintaining freedom of the seas around the world. With the widespread availability of diesel-electric submarine technology, there is nothing more valuable than knowing the capabilities and limita tions of those assets, said Lt. Cmdr. Frank Davis of VP-45. The chance for our crews to see a Type 209 up close is a tremendous training opportunity as we prepare for our deployment at the end of this year. With more than 100 ships (including five Type-209 submarines) in commission, the Brazilian Navy is the largest in South America. Broadarrow Express runs from Key Largo to Key WestMembers of the six-man team Broadarrow Express, from Patrol Squadron Six Two (VP-62) ran a 100mile relay in the Florida Keys last month. The 5th annual KEYS100 was held May 19 and 20. The race was a pointto-point event beginning in Key Largo and ending in Key West on the Atlantic Ocean at Smathers Beach. KEYS100 promotes charitable fundraising for pros tate cancer education and free screen ings, and for 2012, supported of the work of The Cancer Foundation of the Florida Keys. For our team, each member ran a total of five legs each, ranging from two to 7.1 miles in length, said ATCS(AW) Tim Large, VP-62 maintenance senior chief. Cmdr. Jon Townsend, our executive officer, has run this race the last two years, Large continued. He thought that having a squadron team would be a great morale booster and help get the Broadarrow name out in the commu nity. Team members included Townsend, Large, Lt. Cmdr.Joseph Kovacocy, AMEC Jake Baxter, AWO1(NAC/AW) Erick Alcala and AWO2(NAC/AW) Daniel Jervey. Overall, each runner ran approxi mately 17 miles, said Large.The Broadarrow express ran the race in 14 hours 21minutes and 58 seconds, placing 40th out of a total of 107 teams.Our overall pace was 8:37 per mile. If you start to feel good during an ultra-marathon dont worry, youll get over it, Large added.

PAGE 12

12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012

PAGE 13

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 13 The Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville recently announced its Civilians of the Quarter for Second Quarter 2012. Instructor of the Quarter because of her strict work ethic and expertise in delivering outstanding technical instructions. Passmore is qualified to teach 24 of 27 courses currently taught in Maintenance Training Unit 7016 at CNATTU Jax. She is also personally responsible for conducting 10 formal course reviews and teaching 62 students for a combined total of 272 hours of instruction. Quarter. He is qualified to teach 10 avionics courses within Maintenance Training Unit 1011. Hayes was directly responsible for the training and mentoring of numerous students for a combined total of 452 instructional hours. Not only is he an instructor, but he is also a student enrolled in off-duty education, as he works on his masters degree in business administration from Webster University. Most everything is running smoothly as the transition from P-3C Orion to P-8A Poseidon gathers momentum, said VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens in a June 8 interview. In our sole P-8, were aver aging 150 flight hours per month, which is high but necessary to stay on track with our train-the-trainer plan. The goal is to have our core cadre of qualified P-8 instruc tors ready to welcome VP-16 in mid-July. He explained, After the War Eagles turn in their P-3s, the pilots, NFOs and aircrew will check in at the P-8A Integrated Training Center (ITC) and start their CAT II transition syl labus, which takes about five months. The squadrons maintain ers will check in at CNATTU Jax (Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit) for organizational-level mainte nance classes taught by Boeing instructors, after which theyll check in at VP-30 and embed themselves in our mainte nance department. Eventually they get their PQS (Personnel Qualification Standards) booklets signed off for the P-8A. (PQS is a compilation of the minimum knowledge and skills that an individual must demonstrate in order to qualify to stand watches or perform other specific routine duties necessary for the safety, security or proper operation of a ship, aircraft or support system.) Stevens added, By January, theyll return to Hangar 511 and stand up their mainte nance department and com plete a series of drills in preparation for their safe for flight inspection. He concluded, By the end of January, the War Eagles will stand alone and begin their 12-month IDRC (InterDeployment Readiness Cycle) in preparation for the first deployment of a P-8 squadron. As the fleet replacement squadron for the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF), VP-30 is con currently training aircrew and maintainers for both P-3C Orion and P-8A Poseidon. Its very challenging for our roster of instructors but training people to safely operate the retiring P-3 is no less important than the transition to P-8. Our plan is to transition two squadrons each year. The squadrons second P-8A from the Boeing pro duction line in Seattle, Wash., will be accept ed by VP-30 in July. An addi tional P-8A will arrive at NAS Jacksonville each succeding month, so the squadron will be operating six Poseidon aircraft by the end of 2012.CNATTU Jax honors civilians of the second quarter VP-30/P-8A Poseidon: Let the training begin

PAGE 14

14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 VP-5 recently hosted a group of 16 Mad Fox Alumni from 1970-75 which included members of the famous nineplane P-3 formation flight over Sigonella, Italy. These men were also among the first in the community to welcome the P-3C model into service. When I was in VP-5, we flew P-3As and Bs. They brought us the P-3C at the end of 1974, remarked Charles Lansford. The 16 retired alumni members included: Cmdr. Pat Lanier, Cmdr. Robert Thompson, Cmdr. Don Walsh, AFCM James Clark, AVCM Dan Piekarczy, AFCM Gordan Richau, ADCS Bob Carter, AMCS Butch Hubbard, AXCS Earl Porter, ATCS Russel Wise, AWCS Buster Rodgers, AKC Karl Fishennich, ATC Jim Gruentzel, ATC Charles Lansford, ADC Bob Ormandy and AMS1 John Pyla. They joined VP-5 Executive Officer Cmdr. Matt Pottenburgh for lunch at Mulligans prior to the squad ron tour. Our Naval Aviation heri tage is extremely important. We jumped at the opportunity to honor these Mad Foxes and thank them for their service said Pottenburgh. Many of these men had not seen each other in many years. It is great to see so many of these guys that I served with again, Clark said as faded pictures, old cruise books and several sea stories were passed around and shared during lunch. After lunch, the men were escorted through the squadron hangar where they met cur rent Mad Foxes hard at work in preparation for deployment to Japan. Several of the alumni made a brave attempt to stow away in the pack out and Lanier even offered to com plete a functional check flight if needed. I just need a flight physical, he said. Following a tour of several aircraft, the men were hon ored during command quar ters. The squadrons new commanding officer, Cmdr. Erin Osborn, presented awards to numerous Mad Foxes and honored the alumni in a more for mal setting. At the end of every quarters, VP-5 concludes with a customary sendoff shout. This time it was led by Wise, one of the alumni guests. He stood in front of the men and women of VP-5 along with his shipmates from the 1970s and shouted, NO FOX . . to which everyone shouted back, LIKE A MAD FOX! Free SAT/ACT prep programs for militaryTremendous challenges face Americas military families, especially when frequentrelocationsare involved. Military families move approximately every two years and military children will attend six to nine different schools between kindergarten and high school graduation. They must become acquainted with new schools and stress canaffect school performance. It is especially difficult for high school students preparing for college. But, families do not need to spend a fortune preparing students for SAT and ACT exams. In alliance with the Department of Defense, and supported by athletes from the NFL and MLB, eKnowledge is donating free SAT and ACT PowerPrep Programs to military families world wide. To place an online order go to:www.eKnowl edge.com/MilNews or call51-256-4076. VP-5 welcomes alumni to the Fox Den

PAGE 15

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 15 CAMPS ARE OPEN TO BOTH MILITARY & CIVILIAN TEENS AGES 12 18 WITH BASE ACCESS CALL THE JAX NAVY FLYING CLUB AT (904) 777-8549 FOR MORE INFORMATION.

PAGE 16

16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Executive Officer Capt. John Rice, a Civil Engineer Corps officer, was presented the Legion of Merit Medal June 8 during his retirement ceremo ny celebrating nearly 35 years of dedi cated service with his last tour at NAS Jacksonville. Guest speaker Rear Adm. Mark Handley spoke of Rices commitment to the country, the U.S. Marine Corps and the U.S. Navy. He said it had been a tremendous honor to be at the ceremony, seeing Rice go from Marine Corps pri vate to a captain in the U.S. Navy. There are three things that I have learned in the military, said Rice. First, be careful with power and always do the right thing. Second, you must be an effective leader. Lastly, people are our greatest asset. He spoke to the many mentors who helped shape his life and career as a naval officer, he thanked the few who he has been blessed with the oppor tunity to lead conveying his sincerest respect and he hoped to cast some final guidance to the junior officers that they could embrace. He truly made it about his father and his family. He spoke highly of his fathers military service accomplish ments and of his mother who recently passed. Like Rice, his father was a great example of honor, courage and com mitment having served in World War II, Korea and Vietnam. I pay tribute to both my parents today because they laid the ground work for my life, said Rice. They set the example and they established the height of the bar. I have them to thank. My wife has been a rock solid supporter my entire career, and I love her so very much. My children, Gregory, Michael, Brian, and Katie, have made my life full. God has blessed me with an awe some family and numerous friends, I am glad that I will be nearby helping raise my grandson to be a fine man, just like his father, Rice proudly stated. NAVFAC SE Commanding Officer Capt. John Heinzel presented Rice the Legion of Merit Medal for exceptional performance while serving as executive officer for NAVFAC Southeast from May 2009 to June 2012. Rice provided extraordinary lead ership and technical expertise while directing over 2,000 military and civil ian personnel at 22 geographically dispersed locations across seven states and the Caribbean performing $3.74 billion in construction, $1 billion of facility services and 14,000 contract actions. His innovative management led to increased service and lower costs for supported commanders as he central ized facilities and maintenance tech nical and acquisition support for $100 million in annual contracting; tran sitioned from contract support to inhouse capability for safety training, energy management, retro-commis sioning and engineering design; and restructured field offices to increase efficiency. Rices superior performance of duties highlights the culmination of 35 years of honorable and dedicated service. Rices first assignment was assis tant resident officer in charge of con struction, Okinawa, Japan. He trans ferred to Naval Security Group Activity, Homestead, Fla., in May 1987 and served as public works officer. In August 1990, he detached and attended the Georgia Institute of Technology earning his Master of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering. In January 1992, he transferred to Camp Lejune, N.C., where he served as senior assistant resident officer in charge of construction. In May 1995, he transferred to Pensacola, Fla., as the BRAC/MILCON coordinator for the Chief of Naval Education and Training. In May 1997, he reported to the Public Works Center Pensacola and served as the production officer. He had the honor of serving as executive officer of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5 in April 1998, earning the Battle E twice during his tour. In June 2000, he reported to Commander, Third Naval Construction Brigade as chief of staff. Rice took command of Naval Construction Training Center in Gulfport, Miss. in 2002. In 2004, he transferred to Naval Construction Battalion Center, Gulfport, serving as executive officer and helped the base recover after Hurricane Katrina. In 2006, he reported to Naval Facilities Engineering Command Mid-Atlantic to serve as operations officer. Rice transferred in 2008 to serve as assistant chief of staff, Engineering Directorate (J7) Multi-National Security Transition Command in Iraq, helping build much-needed operational and training facilities for the Iraqi Security Force. Upon his return in May 2009, he transferred to Jacksonville where he completed his final tour serving as executive officer, NAVFAC Southeast. Civil Engineer Corps officer retires after 35 years, awarded Legion of Merit

PAGE 17

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 17 Q: How can I beat the heat while exercising or working? Last week, we discussed heat stroke and heat exhaustion. Our wonderful Florida sunshine makes for a hot and humid summer when we all need to understand the warnings of a heat stress injury. Exposure to extreme heat while exercising or working in hot environments puts you at risk of heat stress. At greatest risk are people ages 65 years and older, those who are overweight, and those who suffer from heart disease, high blood pressure, or take medications that may be affected by extreme heat. Heat cramps usually affect people who sweat profusely during strenuous activity. Perspiration depletes the bodys sodium and moisture levels. Low-salt levels in muscles cause painful cramps. Heat cramps may also be a symptom of heat exhaustion. Muscle pain or spasms usually in the abdo men, arms or legs are symptoms of heat cramps. People with heat cramps should: hours after the cramps subside because further exertion may lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Seek medical attention if any of the following apply: Heat rash is a skin irritation caused by excessive sweating during hot, humid weather. Symptoms of heat rash include: appears on skin. chest, on the groin, under the breasts and in elbow creases. Persons experiencing heat rash should: when possible. may be used to increase comfort). Dr. Joes tips to prevent heat-related illnesses because the best defense is prevention. of your activity level. thirsty to drink. Warning: If your doctor limits the amount of fluid you drink or has you on water pills, ask how much you should drink while the weather is hot. that contain alcohol or large amounts of sugar as these actually cause you to lose more body fluid. Also, avoid very cold drinks, because they can cause stomach cramps. ditioned space. If your home does not have air conditioning, go to the shopping mall or public library even a few hours spent in air conditioning can help your body stay cooler when you go back into the heat. ting clothing. Although anybody can suffer from heat-related illness, some people are at greater risk than others. Check regularly on: with heart disease or high blood pressure. Visit at-risk adults at least twice a day and watch for signs of heat stress. If you must be out in the heat, limit your outdoor activity to morning and evening hours. Never leave anyone in a closed, parked vehicle. When it is very hot outside cut down on exer cise. If you must exercise while it is hot, drink two to four glasses of cool, non-alcoholic fluids each hour. A sports beverage can replace the salt and minerals you lose in perspiration. Warning: If you are on a low-salt diet, talk with your doctor before drinking a sports beverage. Protect yourself from the sun by wearing a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses and by applying sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher (the most effective products say broad spectrum or UVA/UVB protection on their labels) Living in Florida under the beautiful warm sun has its advantages and disadvantages. Think carefully about any exertion during the hottest part of the midday under the hot sun. Remember to drink clear fluids regularly and workout with a partner who can look out for you. Exercise should be fun, so always be careful in the heat. Lower your risk for heat stress Part 2

PAGE 18

18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 The U.S. Navy received public comments June 6 on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement/Overseas Environmental Impact Statement (EIS/OEIS) for Navy training and testing activities conducted in the Atlantic Fleet Training and Testing (AFTT) Study Area, during its meeting at the Prime Osborn Convention Center in Jacksonville. The AFTT region cov ers approximately 2.6 mil lion square nautical miles and encompasses the at-sea portions of Navy range complexes and research, development, testing and evaluation ranges along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. The Navy is accepting com ments throughout the 60-day comment period that ends July 10. All comments must be post marked or received by July 10 to be considered in the final EIS/ OEIS. Written comments may be submitted to www.AFTTEIS. com or by mail to: Naval Facilities Engineering Command Atlantic Attn: Code EV22 (AFTT EIS Project Managers) 6506 Hampton Blvd. Norfolk, VA 23508-1278 Copies of the Draft EIS/ OEIS are available online or at the following public librar ies: Jacksonville Public Library, 303 N. Laura St., Jacksonville; and Camden County Public Library, 1410 Highway 40 East, Kingsland, Ga. The Navy proposes to conduct training and testing activities which may include the use of active sonar and explosives pri marily within existing range complexes and testing ranges along the east coast of the United States, Gulf of Mexico, Navy pier-side locations, port transit channels and the lower Chesapeake Bay. The proposed action also includes activities such as sonar maintenance and gunnery exercises conducted concurrently with ship transits and which may occur outside Navy range complexes and testing ranges. The proposed action includes sonar testing conducted as part of overhaul, modernization, maintenance and repair activi ties at shipyard and Navy piers as well as new construction and overhaul at Navy-contracted shipbuilder locations. The AFTT Draft EIS/OEIS updated the science and anal yses needed to continue criti cal previous studies into one, thereby incorporating expanded areas, and new science, plat forms and activities including ship shock testing on the east coast. Results from these studies show Navy activities continue to have negligible affects on marine mammal and turtle populations, including endan gered species. Monitoring of Navy activities over the past several years supports these conclusions. Navy briefs AFTT to Northeast Florida residents

PAGE 19

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 19 When is the best time to sign up for Social Security benefits? The answer is: only you can deter mine the best time based on a number of variables. Your age, health and family longevity. Fiscal need, amount of earnings you still bring in. Amount of benefit based on the age timetable. Social Security benefits start as early as age 62. But, the benefit is approxi mately 25 percent of full benefit. Full Social Security benefit occurs at age 66 or 67 currently, based on your birth year after 1942. And for every year you delay receiving your benefit, the amount changes by approximately 8 percent each year. For example if you were born in 1950: At age 62, benefit = 75 percent of full benefit (minimum amount) At age 66, benefit = 100 percent (full benefit amount) At age 67, benefit = 108 percent of full benefit At age 70, benefit = 132 percent of full benefit (maximum amount) If healthy and you have a family his tory of longevity, you might come out ahead by waiting to sign up for Social Security. If health or family history isnt the best, you might want to begin taking benefits as soon as possible. If married, and you and/or your wife work and earn income, and/or receive a retirement pension (think about yours or her retired pay), or any other tax able investment or savings accounts that could affect your Social Security holdback and your federal tax liability, go to http://www.ssa.gov/pgm/retire ment.htm and http://www.irs.gov/pub/ irs-pdf/p554.pdf for more information. Breakeven point: This is the point where delaying to receive bene fits equals the amount you will have received if taking early benefit. In other words, where the 25 percent reduced benefit paid out = the amount of full benefit pay out. The cross over occurs approximately some nine years after full benefit starts, baring any changes or inflationary adjustments. What happens to my Social Security if I get divorced? If you are 62-plus, were married 10-plus years, are currently unmar ried and not entitled to receive a higher benefit based on your own work, you can receive benefits based on your exs earnings, even if he or she has remar ried. The following are the guidelines: lower earner may receive benefits based on the higher earners work. benefits on your exs work, and your ex is still eligible to collect what he or she has earned over the years. fies for benefits, you can still receive benefits if you have been divorced two years. benefits without reducing the amount of your exs benefits. divorced spousal benefits, up to your full retirement age, the higher your benefits will be. Additional information can be found at aarp.org/work/social-security or by calling 1-800-772-1213. The Social Security question

PAGE 20

20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included June Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Summer Bowling Leagues Now Forming Monday Mixed Trio 7 p.m. Wednesday After Work League 4:30 p.m. Thrusday Morning Seniors 9 a.m. Thursday Night Extreme Bowling 6:30 p.m. Friday Intramural League 11:45 a.m. Sunday Fun Bunch League 4 p.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. **New fitness class Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session one begins June 18 $40 military, $45 DoD Register for swim lessons at the base gym I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale July 13 $58.50 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Disney World Orlando FL 4 day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Medieval Times Free royalty upgrade with dinner reservation Pirates Dinner Adventure in Orlando Active and Retired military $12 at gate Family members purchase at ITT Adult $37, children (3-12) $26 Daytona International Speedway Jalapeno 250 $24 Coke Zero 400, July 7, $70 80 Coke Zero Shuttle $16The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Dave & Busters Trip June 14 at 6 p.m. Free $10 Powercard, 20 percent off food & beverages and unlimited simulator play Mall & Movie Trip Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater June 15 at 6 p.m. Jacksonville Sharks Game June 16 at 6 p.m. Jacksonville Suns Game June 21 at 6:30 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees June 26 for active duty June 14 & 28 for retirees & DoD personnel Junior Golf Clinic Session 1 (ages 11 17) June 25 29 Session 2 (ages 6 10) July 16 20 Session 3 (ages 11 17) August 6 10 Monday Friday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. $110 per week long session Twilight Special Monday Friday Play 18 holes for $17 after 3 p.m. Not applicable on holidaysMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Lessons $150 per person June 15, 16, 17, 23 & 24 July 20, 21, 22, 28 & 29 Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite! Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Ground School July 23 August 29 $500 per person Youth Flight Camps (ages 12 18) Basic Aviation Course $100 per person June 27 30 register by June 20 July 11 14 register by July 3 July 18 21 register by July 11 Advanced Aviation Course (basic course required) $150 per person Aug. 8 11 register by Aug. 1 Aug. 22 25 register by Aug. 14

PAGE 21

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 14, 2012 21 Commissary patrons advised to stock up for emergenciesThis year marks the 20th anniversary of Hurricane Andrew, which slammed into South Florida Aug. 24, 1992, devastating Homestead, Florida City and parts of Miami before it crossed the Gulf of Mexico to strike the Louisiana coast line. Its a sober reminder that your commissary wants to help make sure you are prepared for any disaster. Disaster preparedness can help improve your odds for survival, and the Defense Commissary Agency and its industry partners are working together to offer items needed for severe weather survival kits at low prices, said DeCA Director of Sales Chris Burns. Andrews anniversary drives home the point that everyone should be prepared, Burns said. Your commissary can help you do that. Weve got lots of items to stock up your survival kit. Since April 1, canned chicken, powdered milk, batteries, weather-ready flashlights, all-weather tape, first aid kits, lighters, matches, candles and hand sanitizer have been reduced in price as part of DeCAs severe weather promotional package that runs until Oct. 31. The package coincides with the prime times for both tornado and hurricane seasons in the United States. Tornado season runs from April to July. The National Weather reports that 2011 was a record breaking year; it was the second most active year in recent memory, with a total of 1,690. April 2011 has the greatest monthly total of tornadoes in modern record keeping with 758. April also holds the record for the greatest number of tornadoes on one day April 27 with 200. The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 through Nov. 30 and includes the North Atlantic Ocean, the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is predicting a less-active season this year versus other years. Predictions from the NOAA call for a 70 percent chance for about nine to 15 named storms, four to eight of which could become hurricanes; and one to three are expected to be major hurricanes. These predictions do not include which hurri canes will make landfall, because its not possible to plot landfall weeks or months ahead of a storm, the NOAA website said. Although the NOAA is calling for a less-active hurricane season, it still pays to be prepared, Burns said. All of our customers no matter where they are should be prepared for any disaster. The commissary can supply our customers with what they need to survive. Emergency preparedness officials suggest hav ing a disaster supply kit that includes the following items: Water at least one gallon daily, per person (three-day supply for evacuation, two-week supply for home) Nonperishable foods canned meats, fruits, vegetables, dried fruits, nuts, raisins, cereal, crackers, cookies, energy bars, granola, peanut butter, and foods for infants and the elderly (three-day supply for evacuation, two-week supply for home) Paper goods writing paper, paper plates, paper towels and toilet paper Cooking items pots, pans, baking sheet, cook ing utensils, charcoal, a grill and a manual can opener First-aid kit including bandages, medicines and prescription drugs Cleaning materials bleach, sanitizing spray, and hand and laundry soap Specialty foods diet and low-calorie foods and drinks Toiletries personal hygiene items and moisture wipes Pet care items food, water, muzzle, leash, carrier, medications, medical records, and identification and immunization tags Lighting accessories flashlight, batteries, candles and matches Battery-powered or hand-crank radio (NOAA Weather Radio, if possible) Duct tape, scissors Multipurpose tool Copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information, proof of address, deed/lease to home, passports, birth certificates and insurance policies) Cell phone with chargers Family and emergency contact information Extra cash Emergency blanket Maps of the area Blankets or sleeping bags DeCA recommends that customers take advan tage of their commissary benefit and its average savings of 30 percent or more to stock up on emergency items that can sustain them during a crisis. The Blood Alliance will hold blood donation drives at NAS Jax: June 18, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Building 1 June 22, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Branch Health Clinic Building 964 June 25, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax Building 3032 June 26, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax For more information, call 353-8263, Ext. 2324. If you are a parent with young children, back to school can mean back to the doctors office for annual school required physi cals. School physicals are often required to help ensure that chil dren enter the classroom in good health, with up-to-date immunizations and free of any diseases that could pose a risk to classmates. For children age 5-11, TRICARE covers annual physicals and immunizations required in con nection with school enrollment. Parents should note that TRICARE does not cover sports or camp physicals. If your child requires a sports or camp physical, you may be required to submit a Request for Non-covered Services form to your provider. By completing this form, you acknowledge that you will be paying for the non-covered service. The form is available on the Humana Military Healthcare Services, Inc. (Humana Military) Web site at www.humana-military. com. TRICARE also provides wellchild care for eligible children from birth to age 6. The well-child benefit includes routine newborn care, comprehensive health pro motion and disease prevention exams, vision and hearing screen ings and routine immunizations (according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines), and developmen tal assessment (according to the American Academy of Pediatrics). For well-child care, there are no copayments or cost shares. To learn more about TRICAREs school-physical coverage and wellchild benefit, visit www.tricare.mil or Humana Militarys Web site. Back-to-School physicals and well-child care