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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/01996
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 06-07-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:01996

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Sailors and local dignitaries commem orated the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Midway with a ceremony and wreath toss on June 4 aboard the guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45). Guest speaker for this years event was Rear Adm. Jack Scorby, commander, Navy Region Southeast. The Battle of Midway was undoubt edly the turning point of the war in the Pacific, Scorby said. The victory at sea cemented the role of naval aviation in combat and this celebration affords us the opportunity to commemorate the heroic actions of the fighting men of the Pacific fleet. Celebrating the hard-earned victory at Midway provides an opportunity to . recognize the courage and sacrifices of the brave veterans who fought that battle. It is a reminder of what makes our Navy great. The Battle of midway was fought June 4-7 and is considered one of the most decisive battles of World War II. At the end of the three days, the Japanese had lost four large carriers to the U.S. Navy, along with more than 100 trained pilots and 700 trained aircraft mechanics whose technical expertise could not be easily replaced, Scorby added. The victory at Midway defeated the Japanese attempt to draw the U.S. car riers into a decisive battle and also thwarted their attempts for further offensive action, he said. Today, the courage, valor and innova tion of our people continue to be the key to the Navys success. We remember this historic sea battle, a battle that changed the course of history and established the proud traditions that clearly show we are the greatest Navy in the world. We remember those who fought and what they were fighting for. The ceremony ended with a wreath tossing by Scorby, NS Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Doug Cochrane and NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander into Mayports basin from a local tug. Civic, business and govern ment leaders from Northeast Florida attended the annual NAS Jacksonville State of the Base presentation to learn about current and future oper ational and construction proj ects May 31. The briefing presented by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders, highlight ed construction projects, roles of tenant commands, energy conservation efforts, transition of the P-3A Orion to the P-8A Poseidon aircraft and the tran sition of helicopter anti-sub marine light squadrons to the new helicopter maritime strike squadrons. We are always planning ahead and set our eyes on the future whether its supporting the warfighter, energy infra structure or helping Sailors and their families with quality of life issues, said Sanders. Its our focus on customer service that makes NAS Jax the premier station in the Navy, he continued. He also discussed upcom ing military construction projects including building the Navys first Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) training and mission control facilities aboard the station. The $4.4 million training facility is expected to be com pleted at the end of fiscal year 2012 and the $22 million mis sion control facility will be completed the following year, said Sanders. At this time, we are unsure where these sys tems will be based depending on the needs of the Navy, but the operators will be trained here. Other projects planned in the near future include a new P-8A ordnance loading facility, repaving of the main runway, upgrading the base lighting system, a new All Hands Club, renovation of the base marina, gymnasium and Navy Lodge and building a new commis sary. Sanders also stressed the importance of being a good steward of the environment. We continually look at how our energy consumption today will impact our future. As of today, weve installed 5,300 solar panels on our build ings saving about $300,000 a year. And, our wastewater reuse project in which we are partnering with the City of Jacksonville, will ensure zero discharge of treated wastewa ter into the St. Johns River by 2014, he stated. The presentation also high lighted the missions of tenant commands aboard the station. NAS Jax is primarily an air field with about 75,000 take offs and landings each year. The stations largest opera tional tenant is Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11, con sisting of six active duty P-3C Orion squadrons and one THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com State of the Base promotes NAS Jacksonvilles future Remembering the Battle of Midway

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS June 6 1944 In Operation Overlord, the Allied invasion fleet (more than 2,700 ships and small craft) lands troops on Normandy beaches in the larg est amphibious landing in his tory. June 7 1819Lt. John White on merchant ship SS Franklin, anchored off Vung Tau, is first U.S. naval officer to visit Vietnam. 1917 U.S. Navy submarine chasers arrive at Corfu, Greece for anti-submarine patrols. 1942 Battle of Midway ends with the loss of aircraft carrier USS Yorktown (CV-5). 1944 Construction of artificial harbors and shel tered anchorages begins off Normandy coast. 1991 Joint Task Force Sea Angel ends relief operations in Bangladesh after Cyclone Marian June 8 1830 Sloop-of-war Vincennes becomes first U.S. warship to circle the globe. 1853 Commodore Matthew Perry arrives at Uraga, Japan to begin treaty and trade negotiations. 1880 Congress authorizes the office of Judge Advocate General (JAG). 1958 Navy and Post Office deliver first official missile mail when submarine USS Barbero (SS-317) fired Regulus II missile with 3,000 letters 100 miles east of Jacksonville, Fla. to Mayport, Fla. 1960 Helicopters from air craft carrier USS Yorktown (CVS-10) rescue 54 crewmen of British SS Shunlee, grounded on Pratus Reef in South China Sea. 1962 Medical team from Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Md.; Naval Medical Research Institute, Bethesda; and Naval Preventative Medicine Unit No. 2, Norfolk, Va. sent to San Pedro Sula, Honduras to fight epidemic of infectious gastro enteritis. 1967 Intelligence ship USS Liberty (AGTR-5) attacked by Israeli forces in the Mediterranean, 34 crewmen were killed and 173 wounded. June 9 1882 Establishment of Office of Naval Records of the War of the Rebellion (became part of Naval Historical Center). 1942 First Navy photo graphic interpretation unit set up in the Atlanic. 1959 Launching of USS George Washington (SSBN598), the first nuclear-powered fleet ballistic missile subma rine, at Groton, Conn. June 10 1854 U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., holds first formal graduation exercises. Previous classes graduated without ceremony. June 11 1853 Five Navy ships leave Norfolk, Va. on three-year expedition to survey the far Pacific. 1927 Light cruiser USS Memphis (CL-13) arrives at Washington, D.C., with Charles Lindbergh and his plane, Spirit of St. Louis, after his non-stop flight across the Atlantic. 1944 U.S. battleships off Normandy provide gunfire support to troops fighting inland. 1953 Navy ships evacu ate 20,000 Koreans from West Coast Islands to safety south of 17th parallel June 12 1944 Four U.S. Carrier Groups (15 carriers) begin attack on Japanese positions in the Marianas. 1948 The Womens Armed Forces Integration Act provides for enlistment and appoint ment of women in the Naval Reserve. 1970 After earthquake in Peru, amphibious assault ship USS Guam (LPH-9) begins 11 days of relief flights to trans port medical teams and sup plies, as well as rescue victims. 1990 Cmdr. Rosemary Mariner becomes first Navy woman to command a fleet jet aircraft squadron. Some kids go to the principals office. My kids have the prin cipal come to dinner for our 23rd Dinner with the Smileys. I had hoped that the presence of Lynn Silk, principal of 14th Street School in Bangor, would encourage extra good behavior from the boys. Sadly, I underestimated five-year-old Lindells ability to embarrass me when I least expect it. Lynn, however, knows something about managing a house full of boys. She also raised three sons, all of whom went on to serve their country and their community as policemen and soldiers. Lynns oldest son, Staff Sgt. Brandon Silk, died in a helicopter crash on June 21, 2010, while serving with the U.S. Armys 101st Airborne Division in Afghanistan. Her two younger sons, David and Blaine, are now deployed overseas. Davids wife, Jaclyn, came with Lynn to dinner, making this only the second Dinner with the Smileys that we spent with someone who is either currently or recently dealing with a deployment. (Our sixth dinner was with the Mazzei family, whose husband/father, Lincoln, was deployed last year.) Being with people who know firsthand what youre going through is crucial for military families. Lynn, Jaclyn and I bypassed explanations of lingo and poli cies often necessary for the uninitiated to military life, and we got down to the real conversation: Skype is great, but not perfect; dinnertime is the hardest time to be alone; and when people say Thirteen months will pass really quickly, do they think about what theyre actually saying? Maybe Lindell sensed the comfort and acceptance of being with another military family. Or maybe the water balloons Jaclyn brought for the boys took over his common sense. But by the end of the night, Lindell was wearing only his swim trunks and spraying his principal with a water gun. I was in nonstop apology mode, despite Lynns good nature and her obvious delight in seeing three boys play together. Jaclyns participation in the water fight, which ended with her in soaking-wet jeans and shirt, convinced me that what was unfolding on the front lawn was welcomed. In hindsight, perhaps it was exactly what everyone needed after our dinner conversation about Brandons death. Earlier in the day, I told the older boys it would be okay to ask Principal Silk about her son. Ford and Owen looked at me with disgust. Why would we ask her about that? Ford said. They thought it would be rude to make Mrs. Silk sad, despite my insistence that she probably loves talking about her son. So at dinner, while the older boys awkwardly stared at their lasa gna, I brought it up for them. Lynn told us about Brandon as a person how he broke records in track, how he loved to make people laugh, how he imitated his mom and she shared with us the details of the helicopter crash that killed him. Dustin is a helicopter pilot. After a long pause, Owen looked up at Mrs. Silk and said, How can a helicopter make someone die? Sometimes, there is no way to protect your children from reality. Many times, we shouldnt anyway. Lynn and Jaclyn had brought with them what they called their flat boys, almost-to-scale (depending on which brother you ask) cardboard cutouts of Lynns younger sons. Time pro hibited them from getting a flat Dustin for Ford, Owen and Lindell, but they brought Dustins likeness nonetheless: an ice cream cake with an edible photo image of Dustin on the top. What happened next was worse than biting the ears off a helpless chocolate bunny. I held a butchers knife above the frozen-solid cake with my husbands image on it, and when Owen and Lindell realized the horror of what was about to happen, they both screamed, No, dont do it! There was no good, less horrific place to cut. I pushed the knife into the cake and cringed. It was morbid and horrible. Still, the tears of laughter a release from all the emotion ear lier in the meal streamed down my cheeks. It had seemed like a good idea at the store, Lynn said, laughing, too. I will not eat any part with Dad on it, Owen said, which considering the size of the image, was going to be a difficult request. Ill take his head, Ford bravely said. And then, Dads going to give me a piece of his mind. As I cut around the cake, slicing the image into a dozen wedges, I realized the next problem: Forget Dustins head, who was going to eat the piece with his, well, um, you know. Go ahead, Sarah, Jaclyn said, smiling. Take one for the team and for all the military wives out there. I flopped the piece with my husbands lower half onto my plate. Lynn and Jaclyn left after the final water-gun fight outside. It was, after all, a school night for Principal Silk, too. When the boys and I were back inside, Lindell, still in his bathing suit, climbed into my lap. His back was dotted with bug bites, and he had dark, tired half moons beneath his eyes. I pulled him closer to me and he rested his head on my shoulder. Will my Daddy die in a crash? he said. I patted his back, unsure how to answer, and shushed him to sleep.Breaking bread with the principal Hey, MoneyMan I am getting ready to purchase my first new car. The car I intend to trade in was purchased used two years ago. I financed it through my credit union and still have two more years of payments. My friends all tell me that the dealership can pay off my trade as part of the deal but Im get ting conflicting advice about some thing called GAP insurance. My buddies in the shop tell me that I definitely should purchase GAP, but my LPO and division chief both say that it depends on the situation. Who should I listen to? MoneyMan Sez : Good question shipmate! I want to commend you for taking your time and seeking advice on such a large purchase. Based on the information you pro vided I am going to declare your LPO and chief the winner. GAP, or Guaranteed Auto (or Asset) Protection, is a product you can purchase to protect you if your vehicle is declared a total loss. Typically this occurs through an auto accident but could be a result of theft, fire, flood, tornado, vandal ism, or hurricanes. If your car is declared a total loss, your insurance company generally will compensate you for the actual cash value (ACV) of the vehicle. ACV may be consid erably less than the retail value and is often considerably less than the actual amount you still owe on the vehicle. GAP insurance covers the difference between what the insur ance company pays (ACV) and what you still owe on the vehicle. Your LPO and chief were cor rect in that there are situations where GAP insurance is well worth the cost, and there are situations where purchasing GAP insurance

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VP-45 held its 70th change of com mand May 25 as Cmdr. Michael Vitali relieved Cmdr. Paul Ditch as com manding officer. The guest speaker was Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven Capt. Trey Wheeler. Vitali, a native of Cleveland, Ohio, graduated from Purdue University in 1994 with a bachelors degree in history and was commissioned as an ensign in the United States Navy through the Purdue University Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps. He then earned his naval flight offi cer wings of gold at NAS Pensacola, Fla. During his first two tours, Vitali served as a tactical coordinator flying the S-3B Viking at VS-35 and then as an instructor at the S-3 Fleet Replacement Squadron, VS-41. At the end of the S-3s service, Vitali transitioned to the P-3C Orion at VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville and has since served with VP-16, VP-4, and the J-5 Strategic Policy Division for the U.S. Southern Command at MacDill Air Force Base. Ditch took command of VP-45 in May 2011. He led the squadron through a successful tri-site deploy ment to Comalapa, El Salvador; Djibouti, Djibouti; and Sigonella, Italy. The deployment supported U.S. Navy Fifth and Sixth Fleets involve ment in Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Unified Protector, Operation Active Endeavour, Operation Carib Shield, and Operation Caper Focus. Of note, these operations lead to the unseating of Libyan dictator, Momar Qaddafi, the seizure of hundreds of thousands of dollars in narcotics bound for the U.S., and the prevention of piracy around the Horn of Africa. Under Ditchs leadership, VP-45 flew 568 sorties, which resulted in the execu tion of 5435 mishap-free, combat flight hours. Vitali assumes command of VP-45 in the midst of a 12-month inter-deploy ment readiness cycle in which he will lead the squadron to prepare the squad ron for their upcoming deployment to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. He will be joined by new Executive Officer Cmdr. John Brabazon. Lt. Kevin Martin will assume command of the Southeast Regional Calibration Center (SERCC) June 7 when he relieves the retiring CWO5 Marc Manor in a 10 a.m. combined change-of-charge/retirement cere mony to be held at the NAS Jacksonville Officers Club. The events presiding officer is Capt. Paul Haas, chief-of-staff, Naval Air Forces Atlantic. Guest speaker is Capt. Marlin Anthony, commanding officer, Naval Operational Support Center, Houston, Texas. After enlisting, Martin served at sea aboard USS Nicholson (DD 982), USS Ramage (DDG 61), USS Roosevelt (DDG 80), USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67), USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) and USS Gettysburg (CG 64). He served ashore at Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Sicily. He and his wife, Kathryn, are raising one son, Jarrod, age 15. Manor, a native of Muncie, Ind., enlisted in the Navy in 1982 as a Radioman. He earned his Bachelor of Science degree in International Business from Hawaii Pacific University and a Master of Education from the University of Oklahoma. He received his commission Feb. 1, 1998. He served sea duty tours onboard USS Bainbridge (CGN 25), USS Arkansas (CGN 41), USS Cushing (DD 985), USS Dubuque (LPD 8), USS Klakring (FFG 42), and USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49). Shore assign ments include tours at Naval Communications Station Philippines, Defense Information Systems Agency Pacific Wahiawa Hawaii, Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Sicily, and Southeast Regional Calibration Center, Jacksonville. On Manors watch, SERCC completed two Airspeed projects that resulted in significant improvements to the calibration and fleet support missions. The first included an automated process to the UPM-155 test set that is used to calibrate Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) equipment on board ships. Implementation of the automated process reduced production time of the UPM-155 from an average of 13.8 hours to 5.7 hours. The second Airspeed project was the implementa tion of streamlined logistics support processes that resulted in reducing repair part turn-around time from an average of 19.1 to 6.7 days while saving 10 per cent in administrative costs. Several other process improvement and emergent repair projects were completed under Manors watch, including judicious management of micro-miniature repairs that resulted in a cost savings of over $741,000. These cost-saving and efficiency initiatives were successful because of the superb leadership of the SERCC CPOs and the extraordinary technical ability of the SERCC crew. I will forever be grateful for the opportunity to serve with such a highly professional group of Sailors, said Manor. They are all aware of the importance of their mis sion and I am certain there will be more great things to come under the leadership of Lt. Martin. He and his wife, Myrna, have two sons, Alex and Andrew. Vitali is new VP-45 commanding officer Martin takes charge of Southeast Regional Calibration Center today JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 3

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Navy seeks officers for specialty career path programThe Navy is accepting applications from eligible officers for the Fiscal Year 2013 (FY-13) Specialty Career Path (SCP) program, according to a Navy mes sage released May 29. Applications must be received at Navy Personnel Command (NPC) no later than June 25. The SCP program provides officers alternatives to the traditional command-at-sea-career path and supports demand for senior unrestricted line offi cer expertise in growing mission areas, according to NAVADMIN 167/12. The program is designed to develop and utilize selected officers in the following distinct specialty career paths: The FY-13 SCP Selection Board will be held July 23 27at Navy Personnel Command (NPC). Eligibility information and application procedures can be found in the NAVADMIN. Officers who meet eligibility requirements may apply for up to two specialty career paths. The board will select eligible officers best qualified to serve the needs of the Navy in each specialty career path. Selectees will retain their original officer designator and will receive an additional qualification designator that indicates their area of specialization. Specialty career path provide selectees jobs with increasing complexity and responsibility. Officers will gain experience and develop management and leadership skills that will best serve the Navy while providing enhanced opportunity for successful career transition upon retirement. The FY-13 SCP Selection Board will also screen pre viously unselected SCP lieutenant commanders and commanders for SCP executive (XO) and command ing officer (CO) billets within their mission areas. SCP XO and CO screened officers will be eligible to fill designated SCP milestone billets. 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012

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In a ceremony held May 22 on the command quarterdeck, NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Head recognized Lawrence Mark as the Acquisition Advocate for Small Business Concerns for Fiscal Year 2012, Second Quarter. Marks path to Jacksonville was an interesting one. He served twelve years in public safety as a firefighter and emergency medical technician in Flint, Mich., and Myrtle Beach, S.C. Mark had always combined his passion for public safety with business. In 2009, he decided to hang up his fire helmet and focus solely on his business profes sion. His career in federal service began in June 2009 with a Department of Defense (DoD) college intern ship in the Civilian Personnel Management Service Recruitment Assistance Division at Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Mi. He worked as a student recruiter and was one of only five students in the country that recruited fellow students for civilian careers within DoD. Marks enthusiasm for business and entrepreneur ship blossomed at an early age. He established his first company at 17 and has created a total of four small businesses; two of those businesses were started while in he was in college. He also helped create the Entrepreneurship Association, which introduced fellow students to the busi ness sector and assisted local small businesses to expand. Marks business experience is evident. He sees beyond customary practices and considers all pos sibilities when achieving the final product. He consis tently demonstrates the discipline to get the job done right the first time. He diligently encourages small business participa tion when performing market research, to include award of several 8(a) sole source acquisitions [Small Business Administration, 8(a) Business Development Program] as authorized by the Assistant Secretary of the Navy. During this second quarter of FY12, Mark awarded nearly $7 million dollars to small business concerns. His meticulous style and conscientious efforts have tremendously enhanced NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville in achieving the mandatory DoD/Navy small business targets. Lawrence completed his Level I certification in the Acquisition Career Field of Contracting in just a few months and is currently pursuing his Level II certifi cation. Additionally, Mark received his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from Michigan Tech in 2010 and Associate Degree in Fire Science from Lake Superior State University, Mich. in 2002. Free SAT/ACT prep programs for militaryTremendous challenges face Americas military families, especially when frequentrelocationsare involved.Military families move approximately every two years and military children will attend six to nine different schools between kindergarten and high school graduation. They must become acquainted with new schools and stress canaffect school performance. It is espe cially difficult for high school students preparing for college. But, families do not need to spend a fortune preparing students for SAT and ACT exams. In alliance with the Department of Defense, and supported by athletes from the NFL and MLB, eKnowledge is donating free SAT and ACT PowerPrep Programs to military families worldwide. To place an online order go to:www.eKnowledge. com/MilNews or call51-256-4076. FY12 Second quarter small business advocate recognized JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 Providing a pathway of learningMore than 170 Navy, Marine Corps and civilian instructors staff the six Maintenance Training Units that annu ally graduate more than 21,000 students from 1,900 classes at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) on board NAS Jacksonville. We primarily support the fleet as the central point of advanced main tenance training for the P-3C Orion and the H-60 Seahawk in what we call C-squared/M-squared or Course Curriculum Model Manager, said CNATTU JAX Commanding Officer Cmdr. Michael Gramolini Sr. in a May 23 interview. In addition, our learning sites pro vide organizationaland intermediatelevel training for ground support equip ment, aviation maintenance adminis tration, undersea warfare equipment, and soon, P-8 airframes and power plants. Another growing resource is the new CNATTU JAX Mobile Training Team that provides on-site instruction for avi ation maintenance and training divi sions. In these days of reduced budgets, it can be more economical to teach on site at a squadron than to send a dozen maintainers to the CNATTU JAX schoolhouse. Senior-level enlisted responsible for maintenance control, maintenance data and technical pub lications libraries can choose from 29 courses at the organizational or inter mediate levels, said Gramolini. CNATTU JAX Executive Officer Cmdr. Daryl Pierce explained that P-3/P-8 transition will be fully supported. Were working with PMA-205, Boeing, VP-30 Fleet Integration Team and Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 to develop the P-8A Poseidon maintenance training unit. Until our new P-8 facility is con structed, weve identified classrooms and other spaces at CNATTU JAX that Boeing and contractors can utilize for interim training. Were scheduled to begin work with VP-16 in July as the War Eagles become the Navys first P-3 squadron to transition to the P-8A Poseidon. Senior Enlisted Leader ASCM(AW) Michael King said, Our H-60 Seahawk helicopter program is very robust and our C-squared/M-squared curriculum is keeping maintainers on the leadingedge of change during the transition to MH-60R and MH-60S platforms. Gramolini added, In the very near future, CNATTU JAX will pro vide MH-60R maintenance train

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 7 Photos by Clark Pierceing to a Royal Australian Navy heli copter squadron that is procuring 24 of the new Romeo ASW Seahawks. Our instructors modified the Romeo curriculum to reflect differences in Australian maintenance rates. When the Australians complete their class work, they will embed with one of the operational HSM squadrons here at NAS Jacksonville. The majority of students come to CNATTU JAX on PCS orders to increase their maintenance certifications and to get hands-on training from one of the Navys finest cadres of aviation main tenance instructors. Other students are sent TAD by their aviation maintenance officers for specialized training courses. Gramolini proudly noted, CNATTU JAX instructors have the highest ratio of master training specialists (MTS) in the CNATTU domain. The MTS qualifica tion provides recognition for outstand ing individual effort and fosters greater command training professionalism. Our MTS instructors demonstrate high ly effective teaching skills and a com prehensive understanding of learning management, training administration and curriculum management. Another part of CNATTU JAX is Training Support Department Mayport, which satisfies many training needs of the surface community including the Center for Surface Combat Systems, Surface Warfare Officers School, Center for Security Forces and the Center for Information Dominance. CNATTU JAX

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reserve squadron providing anti-subma rine/surface warfare capabilities. We are also home to VP-30, the Navys P-3C fleet replacement squadron, explained Sanders. We recently conducted the roll-out of the Navys newest surveillance aircraft the P-8A Poseidon which will transition into the fleet here this year and eventually replace the P-3C aircraft. On the helicopter side of the house, NAS Jax currently supports three squadrons that also provide anti-submarine/surface war fare capabilities. By 2015, NAS Jax will be home to four carrier-based helicopter mari time strike squadrons and one expedition ary squadron. He went on to highlight Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. They are our larg est tenant command with more than 4,000 employees. Theyve worked on basi cally every Navy aircraft since the 1940s maintaining capability for and perform ing a complete range of depot-level rework operations, said Sanders. Another pri mary command here is Naval Supply Systems Command Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville which boasts 24 sites to pro vide combat capability though logistics throughout the southeast region. Sanders also discussed the $60 million renovation of Naval Hospital Jacksonville which includes new operating rooms, expansion of the physical/occupational therapy unit, a new breast care center and much more. The hospital staff are committed to pro viding the best possible care to our military members, their families and retirees. They are also the only naval hospital working on recapturing patient care vice outsourcing, added Sanders. As for mission sustainment, NAS Jax pro actively develops encroachment protection partnerships with the City of Jacksonville and other local governments to ensure resources such as Outlying Field (OLF) Whitehouse and Pinecastle Range Complex are available for fleet training. These areas are vital for our warfighters to train. OLF Whitehouse is crucial to train pilots on carrier landings and Pinecastle is the Navys only east coast bombing range, said Sanders. We continually work with area residents and partner with the local agencies to purchase land in the surround ing areas to ensure we are in compliance with the Air Installation Compatible Use Zones Program. Sanders concluded his presentation by emphasizing what a great relationship the military has with the local community here. During my naval career Ive been stationed in many different cities. I can definitely say that Ive never seen a community that is so supportive of our military members. Thank you! After the event, guests discussed the great partnership between the military and sur rounding communities. We are fortunate and blessed to have our servicemen and women working here. The retirees and veterans are a terrific addition to the workforce we need in our communi ty. I think its important that our community continues to be one of the best supporters of our military in the nation because it will reap rewards for Jacksonville for genera tions to come, said Jaxport Chief Executive Officer Paul Anderson. STATE OF BASEis a waste of money. We have all heard the terms upside down or under water to describe the situation where the amount owed on a vehi cle is greater than the value of the vehicle. I prefer the term negative equity but all the terms mean the same thing, your vehicle is worth less than what you owe on it. When you trade in your used vehicle and have the dealership add the nega tive equity to the cost of your new car, you may be creating a negative equi ty situation on the new car you drive off the lot before the car is even one day old! In this case pur chasing gap insurance is a smart move. Another example is if you purchase a vehicle with no down payment or a very small down pay ment and finance for an extended period (greater than 60 months). Rapid depreciation of new vehi cles could cause a nega tive equity situation to develop in a relatively short amount of time. In this case, GAP insurance might be something you should consider. If you are paying cash for a vehicle or have the ability for a large down payment (greater than 20 percent) your probably will not ever see a GAP between the actual cash value and what you still owe on the vehicle. In this case GAP insurance is not something you need to spend money on. MONEYMAN What hurricane conditions mean Storm Condition IV: Estimated time of arrival (ETA) is within 72 hours Storm Condition III: ETA is within 48 hours Storm Condition II: ETA is within 24 hours Storm Condition I: ETA is within 12 hours What to do if severe weather approaches Check your disaster survival kit Review your all hazard survival plan Evacuate low-lying areas Protect your windows with boards, shut ters or tape Close all windows and doors (make your home airtight as possible) Secure outdoor objects or bring them inside Fuel the car Save at least a 3-5 day water supply Withdraw cash from the bank (ATMs may not be functioning after a storm) Monitor local media (a NOAA or Red Cross weather radio is recommended) Keep radio and flashlights on hand with plenty of batteries Know how to shelter-in-place (in your residence and your workplace) Follow ALL evacuation orders. Personnel living in the barracks: Monitor local media and follow the guid ance provided by your command Know how to shelter-in-place When ordered to evacuate keep your chain of command informed as to your location and status. Local emergency shelters provide a great service however, they are often crowded and offer little to no privacy. Plan for other alternatives such as leaving the area (help a fellow sailor that may be in a similar situa tion) to stay with friends or relatives. Navy Lodge and TVQ: NAS Jacksonville does not provide trans portation or maintain shelters. If ordered to evacuate the base it is your responsibility to know where to go and how to get there. Visit the following websites and type in the key word shelters: www.coj.net www.claycountygov.com www.co.st-johns.fl.us www.nassaucountyfl.com www.nefloridaredcross.org For base closure and recovery status of NAS Jacksonville, call the NAS Jax Hotline at: 1-800-849-6024 for a recorded message. All Navy personnel are reminded to update their family and emergency contact infor mation in the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System at https://navyfam ily.navy.mil. Hurricane Season: Severe weather information 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012

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The Navy Operational Fitness and Fueling Series (NOFFS), launched Navywide in January 2012, represents a sea of change in the way the Navy implements fitness activities. NOFFS employs a new methodology to keep Sailors ashore and afloat in top physical condition. Based on worldclass sports science training philoso phies that have produced multi-mil lion dollar athletes, NOFFS is designed to improve operational performance, decrease the incidence and severity of musculoskeletal injuries and provide foundational nutritional guidance for Sailors. The result is a program highly rel evant to Sailors. Athletes Performance Institute, a key partner in the devel opment of NOFFS, provided a lead ing-edge yet proven methodology from which the Navys experts from Center for Personal and Professional Development; Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC); Navy Bureau of Medicine; and Chief of Naval Operations Physical Readiness Program office could draw and refine to meet the needs of every operational platform. Sailors now have everything they will need at their fingertips to gain and sus tain high levels of physical performance at home or at sea. CNICs recent release of the NOFFS iPhone app (available in the iTunes app store) and the 2011 launch of the NOFFS virtual trainer found at www. navyfitness.org round out a program delivery platform unmatched within the Department of Defense. To learn more about incorporating NOFFS into a personal or command training plan, contact your local MWR Fitness Office or visit the find a NOFFS instructor tab on the website. Contact NAS Jax MWR Fitness Source at 5423518.NOFFS brings sea of change to Navy fitness The VR-62 Wardroom said goodbye to four Selected Reserve (SELRES) officers and two full-time support (FTS) offi cers May 19. Each of the SELRES offi cers had flown in support of VR-62 for between nine and 10 years, so it was a bittersweet ceremony for those in atten dance. VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Alex Ellermann expressed his sincere thanks to each officer for their enduring commitment to the squadron and the U.S. Navy. Your leadership, experience and aircraft knowledge will be truly missed, he said during a brief hail and farewell ceremony held in con junction with the retirement party at a Jacksonville Suns baseball game. The SELRES officers Cmdr. Matt Corey, Cmdr. Alex Pantaz, Cmdr. Troy Solber, and Cmdr. Chris Duffy began drilling with the squadron when VR-62 was based in Brunswick, Maine. When the squadron moved to NAS Jacksonville several years ago, they chose to commute to Jacksonville to complete their reserve careers with VR-62. Their combined careers at VR-62 are hard to quantify. They flew count less NALO missions and more than 60 detachments, carrying millions of pounds in cargo and personnel, and fly ing thousands of hours in support of the U.S. Navy. The officers expressed their appre ciation and respect for the VR-62 members who they have had the privi lege of serving with and shared their thoughts of life in VR-62. I had the amazing opportunity to fly across the Pacific with a crew to Australia. I believe this is simply one of the coolest and most rewarding jobs you can do, said Pantaz. Corey added, I have visited places all over the world with VR-62, some of which I did not even know existed. I will miss it. Lt. Cmdr. Barth Boyer, an FTS officer is also leaving VR-62 as he retires after 20 years of service. Boyer joined the Navy in May 1992 and started his career fly ing P-3s at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. He joined the FTS over 10 years ago and spent several years with VR-62 before going back to school for his mas ters degree. Boyer returned to VR-62 in 2009 and assisted with the relocation of the squadron from NAS Brunswick to NAS Jacksonville. Lt. Cmdr. Nando Vizcarrando, anoth er FTS officer with VR-62, was also bid farewell. He joined VR-62 in May 2009 and will be departing the squadron in June. Vizcarrando has taken orders to VR-53, a C-130 squadron that is based at Andrews AFB, Md. Ellermann thanked Boyer and Vizcarrando for their commitment and dedication to the squadron. I always knew I could count on you to get the job done, he stated. VR-62 Wardroom bids farewell to officers JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 9

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In Jim Collins book, Good to Great, he states that great lead ership is a paradoxical blend of humility, modesty and fero cious resolve. Collins discov ered that the best chief exec utive officers (CEOs) are usu ally more like Socrates and Abraham Lincolnsoft-spoken men of few words and many questions. Collins went on to write that soft-spoken visionary leaders usually create powerful and lasting results within their companies and among those around them. Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles CEO equivalent, Commanding Officer Capt. Lynn Welling, embodies the qualities associated with great leadership. When he assumed command of the hospital and five branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia two years ago, he brought with him an open-minded approach to problems and an ability to lis ten. On June 8, he moves on, leav ing a lasting legacy. We are part of something bigger than we are. Not just in medicinebut Navy Medicine. We are here to heal our nations heroes. And we have the honor and privilege of caring for amazing peoplethe warriors who go forward to fight our nations battles, our veterans and retirees, families who took care of the children while mom or dad was deployed for six months, the kids who missed their mom and dad . they all stepped up to something big ger than they are. And its my honor to take care of them. Its a huge responsibility. And we do it well, said Welling. Along with successfully passing more than 20 com mand readiness inspec tionsincluding receipt of The Joint Commission Gold Seal of Accreditation, the nations premier accredit ing system for hospitalsNH Jacksonville became the first hospital on Floridas First Coast to receive the prestigious Baby Friendly designation by the World Health Organization and United Nations Childrens Fund. Illustrating the hospitals clinical excellence, the Family Medicine Residency Program was named the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Clinical Site of the Year. Eleven Medical Homeport teamsthe Navy-wide approach to primary care that places patients in the center of a team of caregiverswere implemented at the hospital and branch health clinics at Kings Bay and Mayport. The Navy Inspector General recognized the commands Deployment Health Center, Third-Party Collections, Case Management and Civilian Personnel departments as best practices. The command was twice named by First Coast Worksite Wellness Council as one of Jacksonvilles healthiest com panies. And NH Jacksonvilles Patient Safety Symposium drew 200 national and region al healthcare leaders includ ing Virginia Mason Medical Center, Mayo Clinic in Florida, Baptist Health, Center for Global Health and Medical Diplomacy at the University of North Florida, and University of Florida College of Medicine. The list is endless for the com mand that serves a patient pop ulation of approximately 57,000 active and retired Sailors, Soldiers, Marines, Airmen, Guardsmen and their families with primary care doctors at one of its facilities. Capt. Lynn Welling has had a remarkable tenure of accom plishment and leadership at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, by every objective measure. What is extraordinary and unique is that he has simultaneously, in this short time, made equally important and enduring con tributions to medical excel lence in Northeast Florida, said Director of the Center for Global Health & Medical Diplomacy at the University of North Florida Yank Coble. As a leader of the Quality Collaborative of Northeast Florida, Capt. Welling made sure Navy Medicine was at the forefront of all efforts in the region to enhance quality and safety, Coble observed. Naval Hospital Jacksonville along with Nemours Childrens Clinic and University of Florida & Shands Jacksonville were the first in the community partici pating in the Patient Centered Caring Communication Initiative to improve patient and staff satisfaction, reduce medical errors and reduce claims. Coble also pointed out that Capt. Welling expanded the Patient Safety Symposium with the collaboration of major healthcare organizations in Northeast Florida, bringing in national experts while fully using local expertise. Coble went on to describe Wellings determination to impact the epidemic of pre scription drug abuse in Florida. In April 2011, Welling presented a plan that was enthusiasti cally endorsed by the Quality Collaborative of Northeast Florida, the Quality Forum, the Healthcare and Bioscience Council of Northeast Florida, and the CEOs and emergency departments of hospitals across the region. Implementation of a major public health initiative in such a short time by such a wide sector of the community is an extraordinary example of the power of leadership, said Coble. Capt. Wellings total com mitment to the three fun damental traditions of medi cinecaring, ethics and sci encealong with his personal attributes engender enormous trust and hope and the willing ness to collaborate far beyond expectations on behalf of the community. He is truly a lead er for all seasons, concluded Coble. Along with the collabora tive efforts, Welling was very focused on empowering the hospital and branch health clinic staff with the knowledge and skills needed to ensure the best care available is delivered to each and every patient. NH Jacksonville rolled out the Jacksonville Kaizen Production System (JKPS) in November 2011. We took an outside the box approach to ensure our patients get the best, safest care possi ble while staying ahead of the nations budget crisis. Weve brought together todays most powerful improvement tools and methodologies includ ing Lean Six Sigma, industrial engineering, high-reliability organizing and industry best practices. Weve added the infrastructure stability, con tinuity, accountability so we can successfully execute our readiness mission, Welling, a naval aviator turned emergency physician, explained. And its all about driving quantum leaps in performance, eliminating waste and never accepting the status quo. Using the JKPS approach, the command is already seeing measurable results. Staff has increased produc tivity in its operating rooms by 29 percent, reduced Urology Clinic wait times by 25 min utes, and improved its preoperative experience of care for patientsreducing it from a process that could take up to five hours, down to an average of only one hour. And thats just a sampling of the results gained from the now more than 200 projects. Another initiative builds on NH Jacksonvilles history of pri vate and public-sector collabo ration across the region. To help tackle the abuse of prescription pain medication in Florida, Welling and members of the Quality Collaborative of Northeast Floridas Rational Prescribing of Controlled Substances Task Force devel Naval Hospital Jacksonville CO recognized for contributions to medical excellence 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012

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oped a set of guidelines to ensure the appropriate treatment of chronic or recurrent pain in local emer gency rooms. NH Jacksonville was the first to put the guidelines into practice in its emergency room on Oct. 1, 2011. For this initiative, Welling received the Duval County Medical Society (DCMS) Distinguished Service Award for outstanding leadership and exemplary stew ardship. Capt. Welling has been at the forefront of the Rational Prescribing of Controlled Substances initia tive, said Duval County Medical Society Executive Director Bryan Campbell. His dedication to quality and compassionate care as well as his efforts spearheading the Quality Collaborative initiative will undoubtedly leave a last ing legacy throughout the entire healthcare commu nity. And as with many soft-spoken leaders, Welling is the first to attribute command achievements to his staff of 2,500 military and civilian personnel located at its hos pital and five branch health clinics. They not only embraced my vision, mission and strategic plan, but can tell you exactly how they con tribute to it on a daily basis, he said. Hes also quick to recognize his fortune to be able to build on the strong foundation set by those before him, such as Capt. Bruce Gillingham and Rear Adm. Raquel Bono. So how does a leader come in and drive such positive change in only a two-year rotation? Welling explains the two things at the root of his leadership approach. The first is to establish the mission. When you put the patient first, everything else falls in place. So we spent some very important time when we first got here in defining our mission. For everyone to know the mission, vision, strategic plan and know how to contribute to it on a daily basis was a huge undertaking. And when staff are actively engaged and know where they fit in, they can make positive differ ences, said Welling. The second aspect of Wellings leadership is execu tion. When you give staff the vision . give them lateral limits so they dont step out of their lane . adjust the rudder every now and then to course correct . moti vate and remove the barriers . its amazing to listen to depths of discussions around the hospital, and then see the results they achieve. Theres a culture of do it as opposed to those who dont do it. NH Jacksonvilles mission is clear: Provide force health protection through readiness, operational support, health promotion and quality family-centered care to all those entrusted to it, or in a word, readiness. The commanda hospital and five branch health clinicsproduces readiness. Its interesting to compare this strategic plan with Wellings remarks at the change of command ceremo ny in June 2010 when he first arrived. He said, We will be the one all other hospitals turn to when they need advice or guidance on implement ing practices that ensure each patient receives the saf est, highest quality care. We will be the one that not only conceives the plan for being the most effective and most efficient provider of that outstanding medi cal care, but the one that executes. We will be the one that leads in training our most important assets, our people, in achieving their own greatness. We will be the one our patients go out of their way to return to because they trust us. According to Welling, those goals were achieved. Not only that, the goals evolved into the blueprint for Wellings strategic plan which aligned perfectly with the Military Health Systems quadruple-aimreadi ness, population health, patient experience of care and cost. So what does Welling hope his NH Jacksonville lega cy will be? Its a goal he takes with him to each and every com mand he leads. If Ive done my job rightwhen I walk out the door no one will know Im gone. This means weve trained the staff to act on their own in alignment with the vision and mission. When they do that, we know weve changed the culture. We have embraced this change and know the imperatives out there: Patient safety and quality. Then you add the healthcare and budget cri sis. We understand that we have a sacred obligation to those people we serve. And at the same time, weve got to be smart; weve got to be better. We dont have to do more with less. We have to put the right person in the right place at the right time to do the right thing. And our guys get it. Were not there yet, but we are leading from the front, Welling continued. Its this philosophy that will pave the way on June 8 for NH Jacksonvilles next leaderCapt. Gayle Shaffer, a Dental Corps officer who was previously the execu tive officer at NH Okinawawho will come in and take the command to the next step. Getting our team of 2,500 to march in the same line, take care of thousands of patients, develop a system that helps take care of those thousands of patients in a manner that will always be there so the patients can trust it, to trust us and to know weve got their backis huge and very rewarding, said Welling, who places NH Jacksonville as one of the two most rewarding commands hes led. And like all good leaders, the Navy Medicine jour ney is never-ending. No matter how good we are today, we can and will become better tomorrow. Upon my departure, I know that Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles team of Sailors, civil ians, contractors and volunteers will continuously, passionately and relentlessly strive to deliver the care that earned us status as the one, he said. I salute you. It has been an honor to serve with you, said Welling. WELLING BUMED headquarters movesThe Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED), the flagship command for all of Navy and Marine Corps medicine, started relocating its staff May 30 from Washington, D.C., to Falls Church, Va., as part of the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Act of 2005. Vice Adm. Matt Nathan, U.S. Navy surgeon gen eral and chief, BUMED, officially transfered his flag June 1, with the rest of the BUMED staff completing their move by June 5. BUMED is alive and strong, said Nathan, at a symbolic Change of Port ceremony held May 3 at its former location in Washington, D.C. It is a culmination of the men and women who serve the Navy Medical Department, whom our Sailors, Marines, and their families are counting on to com plete the mission. We are simply about to shift col ors and go to a new homeport. BUMED has been located at the Hilltop in the Foggy Bottom area for 70 years, but the campus has served a variety of U.S. Navy and Navy Medicine activities for nearly a century. The compound holds significant Navy historical value and houses the original Naval Observatory. It is with mixed emo tions that we are leaving here, said Rear Adm. Michael Mittelman, U.S. Navy deputy surgeon gen eral. It is also with excitement that we will be mov ing to our new location. This place will always hold a special place in our hearts. Our ethos will not change, just where we sit. BUMED will be co-locating with its Army, Air Force, and TRICARE Management Activity medical counterparts into a new facility called the Defense Health Headquarters, but all the services will main tain their own missions and leadership structure. In a May 9 email message to his BUMED staff, Nathan emphasized that the mission goes on, despite the move. Defense Health Headquarters is not an entity, it is simply a building, said Nathan. BUMED has a long and proud tradition and an eight-mile stretch of highway does not change that. An address is only a geographic location. It is not what makes our com mand great it is each and every one of you, your dedication, your hard work, and your commitment to our Sailors and Marines to provide them the very best in care and support. The new address for BUMED is 7700 Arlington Blvd., Falls Church, Va., 22042-5113. As the Navy Surgeon General and Chief, BUMED, Nathan leads 63,000 Navy Medicine personnel that pro vide healthcare support to the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, their families and veterans in high opera tional tempo environments, at expeditionary medi cal facilities, medical treatment facilities, hospitals, clinics, hospital ships and research units around the world. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 11

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NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville Sailor receives honor On May 10, the South Florida Federal Executive Board (FEB) recognized ABF1(AW/SW) David Johnson as the South Florida Federal Employee of the Year in the Trades and Crafts category. Johnson serves as the fuels contracting officer representative (COR) for NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville at NAS Key West, Fla. The FEB selected Johnson out of 35,000 federal employees in South Florida and among four finalists in his category. This is a huge honor for me, and Im enormously grateful to my chain of com mand for nominating me for this award. Until I came to NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, I had never gotten any recog nition like this, so it makes me even more proud to serve with the supply pro fessionals in Key West, said Johnson. Given the large concentra tion of federal employees in South Florida, the South Florida FEB Employee of the Year award is very competitive, but also a great tool to honor the most outstanding personnel in the area. It is very competitive, and we are proud of ABF1 David Johnson for winning in the Trades and Crafts category. He is truly deserving of this award, along with his recent selection as American Petroleum Institute Navy Fuels Petty Officer of the Year, said Diane Moll, deputy site director at NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, Site Key West. Im thrilled that ABF1 Johnson has gotten the rec ognition he deserves for all of his hard work. Hes the kind of Sailor who goes full throttle in getting the job done, and thats exactly the sort of initiative every officer hopes to see in a first class petty officer with his level of responsibility, said Lt. j.g. Taylor Burks, site director for NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, Site Key West. CNATTU Jax welcomes new ombudsmanThe Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville recently named Christina Wagner as the new command ombudsman. The com mand ombuds man is an essential link between the command and family mem bers of military service mem bers. Wagner, who is married to CNATTU Jax Instructor AS2 Anthony Wagner was born in The Philippines. Her father was in the Air Force and retired as a major in 1997. She graduated high school in 2006 from Putnam City North High School in Oklahoma City, Okla. She is currently a full-time student enrolled at the University of Phoenix to complete her Bachelors of Science in Psychology. Wagner served on active duty in the U.S. Navy from July 2006 July 2011. She is an extremely motivated individual and is excited about serving CNATTU Jax as command ombudsman. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012

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Marine Sgt. Gary Stein may have thought he was simply exercising his constitutional rights when he criti cized President Obama on Facebook. Screw Obama and I will not follow all orders from him, the young Marine wrote on his Armed Forces Tea Party group page. The sergeant also posted an image of the commander-in-chief on a Jackass movie poster. The Marine further superimposed the presidents image on a poster for The Incredibles which he changed to The Horribles. While sophomoric rants are common on Facebook, this episode ended pre dictably (and poorly) for Stein when an administrative separation board voted 3-0 to discharge Stein from the service with an Other Than Honorable dis charge. This is the same characteriza tion of service that may be awarded to drug users or convicted felons. While some may consider this outcome to be harsh, the young Marine violated the long-standing American tradition of a professional, non-political military force. Department of Defense Directive (DoDD) 1344.10 lays out the basic rules for political activities by members of the Armed Forces. All service mem bers may carry out the responsibilities of citizenship. For example, a Sailor or Marine may register to vote, vote, encourage others to participate in the political process, sign petitions, attend rallies as a spectator, give money to political organizations, and put normal sized bumper stickers on their cars. However, active-duty1 military mem bers like Stein cross the line (and vio late DoDD 1344.10) when they partici pate in partisan politics or campaign for or against a political candidate. Prohibited activities include putting political posters in government hous ing, marching in a partisan parade, attending a political dinner or fund raiser, speaking on behalf of or against a candidate, fundraising for a party or cause, distributing partisan literature, or wearing the uniform to a political event. The prohibition on partisan politi cal activity carries over into the social media context. Active-duty Sailors may list their rank and title on their personal (not official) Facebook profiles and they may even fill in the political views field or like a political party, group, or candidate. However, DoD person nel should not advocate for or against a political party, partisan political group, or candidate for partisan political office through a blog, Facebook, Twitter, or any social media platform. If a Navy ship or command has its own official Facebook page, then it should never include political views as that would imply that the DoD engages in partisan politics. The bottom line is that military mem bers are entitled to their personal politi cal opinions. But those opinions should stay personal. Sailors and Marines should never imply that the DoD, the Department of the Navy, or an individ ual command is anything other than a professional, non-partisan fighting force. A summary of the rules for political activities is below. If you have any con cerns, please consult an ethics advisor or a judge advocate. The political restrictions on reservists and civilians are slightly looser than the restrictions on active-duty Service members. Members of the Armed Forces on Active Duty Members of the Armed Forces NOT on Active Duty Promote and encourage voting Yes Yes Attend partisan political club meetings Yes, when not in uniform Yes, when not in uniform capacity of a partisan political club No Yes, when not in uniform and no appearance of DoD endorsement Speak before a partisan political gathering No Yes, when not in uniform and no appearance of DoD endorsement Perform any duties for a partisan political committee or candidate No Yes,, when not in uniform and no appearance of DoD endorsement Write a letter to the editor Yes, may need disclaimer Yes, may need disclaimer Publish partisan political writings soliciting votes No Yes, when no appearance of DoD endorsement Attend partisan fundraisers and events (merely as a spectator) Yes, when not in uniform and no appearance of DoD endorsement Yes, when not in uniform and no appearance of DoD endorsement Participate in partisan fundraisers and events (more than mere spectator) No Yes, when not in uniform and no appearance of DoD endorsement Contribute money to a political party or candidate Yes Yes March in a partisan political parade No Yes, when not in uniform and no appearance of DoD endorsement Political activities and social media guidelines JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 13

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included June Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Summer Bowling Leagues Now Forming Monday Mixed Trio 7 p.m. Wednesday After Work League 4:30 p.m. Thrusday Morning Seniors 9 a.m. Thursday Night Extreme Bowling 6:30 p.m. Friday Intramural League 11:45 a.m. Sunday Fun Bunch League 4 p.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. **New fitness class Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Weekends Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Open weekdays beginning June 11 Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session one begins June 18 $40 military, $45 DoD Register for swim lessons at the base gym Summer Splash Pool Party June 9, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free food, karaoke, games and prizes!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale July 13 $58.50 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Disney World Orlando FL 4 day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Tampa Zoo $19 (Adult) $17.50 (Child) Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person Blue Man Group in Orlando $59, includes City Walk venue Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Medieval Times Free royalty upgrade with dinner reservation Pirates Dinner Adventure in Orlando Active and Retired military $12 at gate Family members purchase at ITT Adult $37, children (3-12) $26 Daytona International Speedway Jalapeno 250 $24 Coke Zero 400, July 7, $70 80 Coke Zero Shuttle $16The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Wet n Wild Day Trip June 9 $10 per person includes park fee and transportation. Dave & Busters Trip June 14 at 6 p.m. Free $10 Powercard, 20% off food & beverages and unlimited simulator play Mall & Movie Trip Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater June 15 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees June 12 & 26 for active duty June 14 & 28 for retirees & DoD personnel Junior Golf Clinic Session 1 (ages 11 17) June 25 29 Session 2 (ages 6 10) July 16 20 Session 3 (ages 11 17) August 6 10 Monday Friday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. $110 per week long sessionMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Lessons $150 per person June 15, 16, 17, 23 & 24 July 20, 21, 22, 28 & 29 Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Flying Club Call 777-8549 /6035 Ground School July 23 Aug. 29 $500 per person a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012

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Q: How can I beat the heat while exercising or working? I frequently recommend that my patients regularly exercise to help with a variety of com mon conditions. There really is very little bad that can come of a regular exercise regime to boost your metabolism and help to drop weight, adding years to your life. I tell patients with depres sion or anxiety to start an exer cise program. Exercise is a nat ural anti-depression medicine. But exercise comes with a caveat. Exposure to extreme heat while exercising or work ing in hot environments may put you at risk of heat stress. Heat stress can result in heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps or heat rashes. Our wonderful Florida sunshine makes for a hot and humid summer when we all need to understand the warnings of a heat stress injury. At greater risk of heat stress, are people who are 65 years of age or older, are overweight, suf fer from heart dis ease or high blood pressure, or take medications that may be affected by extreme heat. Heat stroke is the most serious heat-related dis order. It occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature the bodys temperature rises rapidly and the sweating mechanism fails, so the body is unable to cool down. When heat stroke occurs, the body temperature can rise to 106 degrees Fahrenheit or higher within 10 to 15 minutes. Heat stroke can cause death or per manent disability if emergency treatment is not provided. Symptoms of heat stroke include: headache temperature dizziness Take the follow ing steps to treat heat stroke: help from others around you. cool shaded area. methods such as: Soak their clothes with water. Spray, sponge or shower them with water. Fan their body. Evaporative cooling methods work best. Place the person near a fan and spray them with cool water. Heat exhaustion is the bodys response to excessive loss of the water and sodium, usually through excessive sweating. Most prone to heat exhaustion are people who are elderly or have high blood pres sure. Symptoms of heat exhaus tion include: fatigue perature Treat a worker suffering from heat exhaustion with the fol lowing: conditioned area. other cool, nonalcoholic bever ages. sponge bath. Heat syncope is a faint ing episode or dizziness that usually occurs with prolonged standing or sudden rising from a sitting or lying position. Factors that may contribute to heat syncope include dehydra tion and lack of acclimatiza tion. Symptoms of heat syncope include: People with heat syncope should: place. juice or a sports beverage. Living in Florida under the beautiful warm sun brings both advantages and disadvan tages. Think carefully about any exertion during the hottest part of the day. Remember to drink clear flu ids (water is best) regularly and workout with a partner who can look out for you. Exercise should be fun, always be care ful in the heat. Next week, in part 2 of heat stress, well discuss how to avoid heat cramps and heat rash. Until then, stay cool and enjoy good health. Lower your risk for heat stress Part 1 After 15 years of naval service, AT1 Brad McClard departed the maritime patrol com munity as a VP-10 Red Lancer, when he retired May 18. McClard will move on to his second career as lead maintenance engineer with Allied Wireline, located in Midland, Texas, where his skills and experience earned in the mili tary will help him build a successful second career. McClard was born in 1979, to parents Linda and James in the small town of Perryton, Texas. At age 17, he asked his father to sign a waiver so he could join the military. In May 1997, he left for Navy Basic Training in Great Lakes, Ill. After boot camp, McClard attended training as an aviation electronics techni cian at NAS Pensacola, Fla. Upon gradua tion, he reported to the Golden Eagles of VP-9, homeported at Barbers Point, Hawaii. During his tour from 1998-2001, he successfully completed two deployments to Diego Garcia and Japan. McClard left Hawaii as an E-5 and trans ferred to Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron (VQ) 2 in Rota, Spain. While completing mul tiple detachments in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom, he found his passion for being an AT and thrived in this challenging environment. By the time he transferred from VQ-2 in 2004, he had qualified as a collateral duty inspector and quality assurance representative. His next duty was at Fleet Readiness Center Southwest, Point Mugu, Calif. were he was assigned as the 600 division supervisor in charge of the USM-449 bench and Radar Shop. He was hand selected to lead a Lean Six Sigma event that resulted in an 85 percent production increase. It was during this tour that he met his wife, Anais, while she was in college at CalLutheran University. They were married in 2007 and departed southern California for Brunswick, Maine to join the VP-10 Red Lancers. Upon completion of his second deploy ment, McClard achieved the rank of E-6 and was assigned as the leading petty officer of the avionics branch. He led his Sailors to the successful completion of his final deploy ment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom, and New Dawn. He returned home in December 2011 just in time to witness the birth of his son, Tristen. He finished out his career with VP-10 attached to the quality assurance division.Red Lancer McClard retires from VP-10 Operation: IdenticationA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Cancer is one of our childrens biggest enemies. Chances of survival are greatly enhanced if it is identied early. Parents, please be aware of these warning signs: Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 15

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Blount Island to save $500,000 annually in energy costsA ribbon cutting ceremony was held May 16 at Marine Corps Support Facility Blount Island to offi cially celebrate the completion of their first Utility Energy Service Contracts (UESC) project saving approximately $500,000 annually in energy costs at the Marine Corps installation. UESC projects are viable as they reach out to util ity provid ers to supply financing for the projects and special incentives (e.g. rebates, cover design costs, or energy audits) to the Government and help the Navy and Marine Corps meet energy goals set by the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) and the President. We see the value added by these proj ects as they help the installation save energy and are excited about the growing use of renewable technolo gies, said Lt. Col. Richard Steele, commanding officer, Marine Corps Support Facility Blount Island. Initial calculations estimated that Blount Island Command will realize approximately $500,000 sav ings annually and reduce energy consumption by 17,000 MMBTU annually, said Tommy Sailors, facility manager, Marine Corps Support Facility Blount Island. The $5 million UESC project will reduce electrical energy usage by providing lighting conservation mea sures, replacing Air Handling Units (AHUs), installing ultra violet (UV) lights in HVAC units, HVAC compo nent upgrades, compressed air system repairs, cubi cle occupancy motion sensors, warehouse insula tion upgrades, and renewable technologies (solar hot water, photovoltaic (PV) and geothermal systems) throughout 18 facilities. It also includes the installation of 45 Advanced Meter Reading (AMR) meters, which will allow the government to more accurately track and manage facility electrical consumption, prioritize mainte nance requirements and energy saving projects. Included was replacement of thousands of T8 32W and T5 54W lamps with modern T8 28W to T5 51W, respectively, and 88 metal halide lamps with induc tion lamps. The new lamps were configured with motion occupancy sensors which aid in energy con servation. The UV lights on the AHUs kill bacteria on the exterior of the coiling coils which provides better heat transfer over the life of the system, reduces main tenance cost, and extends the life of the system, claimed Peter Wilk, project manager, Energy Systems Group. HVAC component upgrades included the replace ment of old HVAC units with newer more efficient units, along with motor upgrades to HVAC AHU and chill water pumps on building 450. The Geothermal Systems will pump water through a piping network that utilize cooler temperatures from the aqui fer (buildings104 and 450) replacing their standard Chiller Units. After the ribbon cutting everyone in attendance took a tour of the new Solar Thermal and PV systems atop the Headquarters Building (B100) to see the new array. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012

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The Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department is hosting the annual 80 Days of Summer program through Aug. 26 at NAS Freedom Lanes. This program includes daily, weekly and grand prize drawings. Patrons are entered into the daily drawings every time a game is bowled. Youth bowl ers 17 years and younger can bowl one game daily for free until 5 p.m. Daily prize drawings include food, beverages, games of bowling and more. The weekly drawings are held on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and priz es are sponsored by the Kennedy Space Center, World Quest Resort Orlando, Clarion Suites Maingate, Adventure Landing, Pirates Dinner Adventure, Fleming Island Sleep Inn & Suites, WonderWorks, Arabian Nights, Quality Inn & Suites Orlando, CoCo Key Water Resort, Seralogo Hotel & Suites Kissimmee, Medieval Times Dinner Show, Sleuths Dinner Show, Country Inn & Suites Calypso Cay Kissimmee, St. Augustine Pirate & Treasure Museum, Alligator Farm St. Augustine, Wild Adventures Theme Park, Fairfield Inn & Suites Marriott, Wet n Wild Orlando, Dave & Busters, Old Town Trolley Tours St. Augustine, Casa Monica Hotel, Acapulco Resort in Daytona Beach, and the Daytona International Speedway. The grand prize and runner up draw ings are Sept. 1 at 7:30 p.m. The grand prize includes an Orlando family vaca tion package featuring a two-night stay at the World Quest Resort, two SeaWorld admissions and two admissions to SeaWorlds waterpark Aquatica. First runner-up receives a two-night stay at the Acapulco Resort in Daytona Beach and four personalized tours of the Daytona International Speedway. Second runner-up receives a twonight stay at the Fairfield Inn & Suites Marriott in Valdosta, Ga. and four adult admissions to Wild Adventures Theme Park. Third runner-up receives a twonight stay at the Quality Inn & Suites Orlando, four admissions to Wet n Wild and four admissions to Arabian Nights Dinner Show. The 80 Days of Summer program is open to all authorized MWR patrons. For official rules or more information call 542-3493. Weekly Prize Drawing Schedule Two drawings each week, one prize drawing per person. June 9 Kennedy Space Center 2 admissions Dave & Busters (4) $20 Powercards June 16 Clarion Suites Maingate 2 nights stay Adventure Landing Jax 2 waterpark + (5) dry activities tickets June 23 Pirates Dinner Adventure 4 admissions St. Augustine Pirate & Treasure Museum 4 admissions June 30 Fleming Island Sleep Inn & Suites 2 nights stay Kennedy Space Center 2 admissions July 7 WonderWorks 4 admissions CoCo Key Water Resort 2 nights stay July 14 Dave & Busters (4), $20 pow ercards Seralogo Hotel & Suites Kissimmee 2 nights stay July 21 Medieval Times Dinner Show 4 admissions St. Augustine Pirate & Treasure Museum 4 admissions July 28 Kennedy Space Center 2 admissions Sleuths Mystery Dinner Show 4 admissions Aug. 4 Sunday Brunch for 2 at the Casa Monica Hotel in St. Augustine Country Inn & Suites Calypso Cay Kissimmee 2 nights stay Aug. 11 St. Augustine Pirate & Treasure Museum 4 admissions Kennedy Space Center 2 admissions Aug. 18 Alligator Farm St. Augustine 4 admissions Dave & Busters, (4) $20 powercards Aug. 25 Old Town Trolley Ghost & Gravestone Package St. Augustine 1 family packages to include 2 adult admissions and two children Adventure Landing Jax 3 waterpark + (5) dry activities tickets Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. The Blood Alliance will hold blood donation drives at NAS Jax: Cool off at NAS Freedom Lanes this summer Blood donors, schedule your donation now JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 17

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 The Department of Defense (DOD) has placed strategy before budget in facing pres ent and anticipated threats while building its joint force for the future, Deputy Defense Secretary Ashton Carter said May 31. While weve been fight ing [in Iraq and Afghanistan] the world has not stood still, our friends and enemies have not stood still, and technology has not stood still, the deputy defense secretary said. Now we must meet these changes and . in some plac es, catch up with them, Carter added. To do that we must let go of the old and familiar and grab hold of the new to build what [Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Army Gen. Martin] Dempsey calls the Joint Force 2020 an agile and technologi cally advanced force of tomor row. U.S. security must face two forces simultaneously, Carter said. The first is obviously the Budget Control Act but the deeper, more fundamental force is that of strategic histo ry, he said. The 2011 Budget Control Act is a U.S. federal statute that seeks to reduce the national deficit. A sequestration mecha nism in the law automatically takes more cuts out of federal spending, including another $500 billion from DOD, which would mean a total defense budget reduction of more than $1 trillion over 10 years. The result of the Budget Control Act and the new defense strategy is a balanced strategic package in three parts. First is continued DOD dis cipline in spending taxpayer dollars. Second, is to retain tax payer confidence that DOD is putting its money to good use. Third, is what DOD calls rebal ancing toward the Asia-Pacific region. The Pacific region has enjoyed peace and stability for over 60 years, and in that cli mate, first Japan, then Korea, and even China have had an environment in which they could develop economically and politically without war or conflict, the deputy defense secretary said. Thats not a birthright, he added. That is something that was guaranteed [and] rein forced by the pivotal military power of the United States in that region. The DOD now is bolster ing defense capabilities in the Asia-Pacific region, Carter said. Meanwhile, the Air Force continues on with the new stealth bomber, the KC-46 tanker and a host of intelli gence, surveillance and recon naissance (ISR) platforms. Other capabilities going for ward include a payload mod ule for the Virginia-class sub marines, conventional prompt strike and a host of upgrades in radars, electronic protec tion, electronic warfare, new munitions of various kinds and more. Cyber security is another area where DOD will spend more in the future, Carter said, along with certain aspects of the defense science and tech nology base, special opera tions forces, unmanned aerial systems, space initiatives, and countering capabilities for ter rorism and weapons of mass destruction, including bio-ter rorism. We made decisions within the constraints of the Budget Control Act. We had to. And when additions are made to that package in one area, we of necessity have to take some thing out elsewhere, he said. Altering DODs proposed budget package could lead to an unbalanced portfolio, for example, a hollowing of the force, Carter said. Congress, he said, is resisting several changes proposed for cost savings by DOD to the fol lowing programs: miums would rise slightly for retirees; some aging single-purpose air craft in favor of newer multirole aircraft; strategic lift, for which model ing indicates is in excess of cur rent need; Army and Marine Corps to accommodate a wider spec trum of future combat capabil ity; and decidedly more capable Navy. In all our services and in all of our activities in nation al security, were embarked on a strategic transition fol lowing the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Carter said. This is just the beginning, he added. This ship is making a very big turn, and we need to follow through on our plan and keep moving toward the future. The Navy awarded a $2.3 bil lion contract to Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc. (HII) May 31, for the detail design and construction of the future USS Tripoli (LHA 7), the Navys next large-deck amphibious assault ship. Im very proud of our Navyindustry shipbuilding team and the tremendous effort that has culminated in the award of this critical shipbuilding program, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. This ship will ensure that the amphibi ous fleet remains capable of expeditionary warfare well into the 21st Century. The ship will be construct ed at the HII operations in Pascagoula, Miss. Ship delivery is expected in fiscal year 2018. Like the future USS America (LHA 6), LHA 7 has an increased aviation capacity, including an enlarged hangar deck, realignment and expan sion of the aviation mainte nance facilities, a significant increase in available stowage for parts and support equip ment, and increased aviation fuel capacity. LHA 7 will use the same gas turbine propulsion plant, zonal electrical distribution and electric auxiliary systems designed and built for USS Makin Island (LHD 8), replac ing the maintenance-intensive steam plants of earlier amphib ious ships. This unique aux iliary propulsion system is designed for fuel efficiency. The ship will provide a flex ible, multi-mission platform with capabilities that span the range of military operations from forward deployed crisis response to forcible entry oper ations. LHA 7 also will provide forward presence and power projection as an integral part of joint, interagency and multina tional maritime expeditionary forces. Tripoli will operate for sus tained periods in transit to and operations in an amphibi ous objective area to include: embarking, transporting, con trolling, inserting, sustaining and extracting elements of a Marine air-ground task force. Supporting forces will include helicopters and Osprey tilt rotors, as well as the new joint strike fighter aircraft (F-35B Lightning II short takeoff/verti cal landing). Navy General Library Program leaders announced May 25 that registration is ongoing for a shared summer reading program that will reach military families in all branches around the globe. Readers of all ages can dig into a wide variety of books centered around the theme, Reading Is So Delicious. Most programs will run eight weeks with open enrollment dur ing the summer. Activities range by location and include every thing from edible art projects to discussions of books like James and the Giant Peach. Last year we saw a 400 percent increase in participation across the program, and we plan to con tinue this trend with creative pro grams that connect with readers of all ages, said Nilya Carrato, program assistant, Navy General Library Program. This years theme ties in two great flavors reading for the fun of it and healthy eating. We want to create and support a bumper crop of voracious readers. Research spanning 100 years shows that students typically score lower on standardized tests at the end of summer vacation than they do on the same tests at the beginning of the summer. Summer reading programs can help to offset this loss, because studies also indicate students who read recreationally out-perform those who dont. Students read more when they can choose mate rials based on their own interests. This year marks the third in which 250 base and installation libraries will participate in the shared summer reading program. Last years program logged more than 10 million minutes spent reading by children and families. Sponsored by the Department of Defense with program content developed by iREAD, the Navy managed initiative, Reading Is So Delicious will reach thou sands of families. Resource guides for the pro gram were developed to motivate children to read. Summer reading programs are valuable not only in reduc ing fall-off in educational attain ment over the summer, but as a means for families and children to spend time together, an especial ly important aspect for military families, Carrato added. For more information on the program, call Nilya Carrato with the Navy General Library Program at 202-433-0785 or email dodsumread@navy.mil. The Navy General Library Program is a Commander, Navy Installations Command program designed to support base libraries around the world and participate in the initial outfitting of ship board libraries across the fleet. JaxReady mobile device hurricane app now availableJacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown announced June 1 a new mobile device weather app for citizens that can now be downloaded for free. The app is called JaxReady and it provides updates on potential storm threats, weather patterns, evacuation information, bridge and road closures, and much more. Our goal is to provide up-to-the-minute informa tion regarding all things storm-related right to users finger tips, said Brown. This will help residents who may be affected when power is out and they have no other line of communication except a mobile device such as a smartphone or an iPad. JaxReady was created by the citys information tech nologies and emergency preparedness divisions at no cost to the taxpayer. During production of this app, the citys ITD staff researched other communities in the state and across the country that had similar apps. It found that only a small number of cities across the country have such an app, meaning Jacksonville is on the leading edge of this kind of technology for resi dents. The application serves as a great example of how our city government is working hard in tough times to increase service without increasing costs, said Mayor Brown. The launch of the mobile app comes with a 30-sec ond public service announcement, that is airing on local television and radio stations. The PSA and an instructional video about JaxReady are available at http://www.youtube.com/mayoralvinbrown. Brown also reminded residents, that on the heels of Tropical Storm Beryl, they should make emergency kits now with items like canned food, can openers, water and blankets. Visit JaxReady.org to find out more about special needs shelter registration and how to create a family plan. Once a storm hits Jacksonville, its too late to pre pare. The time is now. said Brown. The JaxReady application and JaxReady.org are here to help. Carter: DOD puts strategy before budget for future force Navy awards LHA-7 construction contract Military libraries announce Summer Reading Program Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preven tive measure for growth in per sonal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their fami lies. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommo dations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. For more information or to reg ister, call 542-5745.Improve your life skills with free knowledge from FFSC

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President Barack Obama has announced a new presidential initiative aimed at preparing service members for civilian employment. Obama provided details about the military-to-civilian certification program dur ing his visit to a Honeywell International Inc. plant in Golden Valley, Minn. Defense contractor Honeywell report edly has hired hundreds of military veterans at its plants and facilities since early 2011. Let me tell you something -if you can save a life on the battlefield, you can save a life in an ambulance. If you can oversee a convoy or millions of dollars of assets in Iraq, you can help manage a supply chain or balance its books here at home, Obama said at the plant. If you can maintain the most advanced weapons in the world, if youre an electrician on a Navy ship, well, you can manufacture the next genera tion of advanced technology in our factories like this one. If youre working on complex machinery, you should be able to take those skills and find a manufacturing job right here -right here at home. But unfortunately, Obama said, many returning veter ans with such advanced skills dont get hired simply because they dont have the civilian licenses or certifications that a lot of companies require. At the same time, the presi dent noted, business lead ers often say they cant find enough workers with the skills necessary to fill open positions. Eighty percent of manufac turers say this, according to one survey, Obama said. So think about it -we got all these openings and all these skilled veterans looking for work, and somehow theyre missing each other. That doesnt make any sense, the president said, noting its time to fix it. Today, Im proud to announce new partnerships between the military and man ufacturing groups that will make it easier for companies to hire returning service mem bers who prove theyve earned the skills our country needs, Obama said. Soldiers, sailors, Marines, airmen, Coast Guardsmen if theyve got skills in machining or welding or weapons mainte nance, for example, youll have a faster track to good-paying manufacturing jobs. Service members with expe rience in logistics or mainte nance on the front lines will have a faster track to jobs in those fields here at home, he added. The initiative will enable up to 126,000 service members to obtain civilian credentials and certifications in a number of high-demand industries, offi cials said. I applaud President Obamas initiative to help thousands of service members obtain industry-recognized certifications for the trade skills they have learned and worked hard to master while in uniform, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said in a state ment issued today. The Defense Department has created a military credential ing and licensing task force as part of the initiative, officials said. It developed partnerships with major manufacturing cre dentialing agencies to expand certifications to active duty military personnel in the fields of engineering, logistics, main tenance and welding. Supported by the efforts of the Defense Departments mil itary credentialing and licens ing task force, these certifica tions will give our returning troops a leg up in a competitive job market, and they will make it easier for veterans to tran sition to civilian life, Panetta said. Service members can earn these credentials free of charge. The services will also explore how credentialing opportunities can be integrat ed into existing military train ing programs and expanded to include everyone with relevant skills and training, the officials said. The initiative was devel oped in response to a report on veterans employment by the Presidents Council of Economic Advisers and the National Economic Council. The report, Military Skills for Americas Future: Leveraging Military Service and Experience to Put Veterans and Military Spouses Back to Work, describes the difficulties faced by veterans and military spouses in transitioning their military experience to civilian employment. Three such partnerships will begin this summer, the offi cials said. The first, a partnership between the Manufacturing Skills Standards Council and the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps, will involve a pilot program for a limited number of service members. They will be eligible to achieve industry-recognized creden tials that can support a tran sition from military service to frontline jobs in the growing fields of advanced manufac turing and logistics, accord ing to a statement issued by the White House. The second partner ship, among the Army, the American Welding Society and the National Institute for Metalworking Skills, will provide unlimited certifica tion testing at the U.S. Army Ordnance School at Fort Lee, Va., for soldiers in certain machinist and welding special ties. The school trains about 20,000 service members each year to develop, produce and maintain weapons. Service members who acquire these specialties will automatically receive the equivalent civilian credentials. The third partnership, between the Army and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, will expand certi fication opportunities for offi cers and warrant officers at the Armys Engineer School at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. The school will conduct a one-year pilot program for students to quali fy as Certified Manufacturing Technologists and earn Lean Bronze Certification -indus try-standard manufacturing engineering certifications. Going forward, the presi dent and I will remain commit ted to addressing the full range of challenges our troops and their families face as they leave the service, and to making sure that these men and women have the support they so richly deserve, Panetta said in his statement. They are a national asset, and they stand ready to con tinue making our country great in their civilian careers. Eleven Sailors honed their culinary skills and graduated from First Coast Technical College (FCTC) of Culinary Arts in St. Augustine, Fla., May 25. The Sailors, who represented the 2011 Ney Award winning commands, spent two intense weeks learning new recipes and advanced culinary techniques. The Capt. Edward F. Ney award for food service excellence award pro grams was established in 1958 when the International Food Services Executives Association approached the Secretary of the Navy to sponsor this award pro gram. The Sailors proudly represented their commands at the commencement ceremony. The graduates were CS2 Anthony Oaks, CSSN Carmelo Ramos, and CSSN Ruel Jacob of USS Rentz (FFG 46), CS2 Krystle Mattia of Commander Fleet Activities Yokosuka, CS2 of Gerald Winley of Naval Amphibious Base Coronado, CS3 Hannah Forrester, CS3 Tacora Williams, CS3 Amit Shivanni, CSSN Tori Thornton of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), and CSSN John Eppers and CSSN Victor Robinson of USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62). The Navy culinary specialists learned various garnishing techniques, cooking preparation, knife skills, and sanitation from instructors Chef David Bearl, Chef Kevin Gallagher, and Chef Anthony Lowman. At the courses completion, the culi nary specialists took a certification test, which all passed with flying col ors. Although the culinary specialists wished the course had been longer, they all agreed they had gained a tremen dous amount of knowledge. As a bonus, they were able to fit in some site seeing during their two-week stay in the city, which founded in 1565. NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville Executive Officer Cmdr. Tom Dailey delivered the ceremonys commencement address. His speech reflected on the history of Navy food service, the advancement in the qual ity of its product, and also the sacrifices that Navy food service personnel have made along the way. Congratulations to your ships and stations in winning the Captain Ney Food Service Excellence Awards, said Dailey, a former culinary specialist. I also congratulate you for succeed ing here at First Coast Technical College . . Your peers and seniors will envy this opportunity to hone our craft. The FCTC course was a great reward for the hard work these Sailors put in every single day. The opportunity to perfect their craft is something these Sailors will carry with them for a career and a lifetime. A cooks job is never done, and the importance of their contribution to their shipmates quality of life cannot be overestimated. Obama announces military-to-civilian skills certification program Navy culinary specialists hone skills at FCTC JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 19

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. A major retirement savings tool avail able to all service members and DOD civilians is the Thrift Savings Plan, and soon there will be a new way to save for retirement -the Roth TSP, a senior Defense Department official said June 1. The Roth TSP, which uses aftertax dollars, will begin phased imple mentation this month for the Marine Corps, and in July for DOD civilians, said Barbara Thompson, director of the Defense Departments Office of Family Policy/Children and Youth. The Roth TSP plan will be available for Navy, Air Force and Army members in October of this year, Thompson said. The phased implementation will ensure each customers taxable wages and TSP contributions are comput ed accurately, according to Defense Finance and Accounting Service offi cials. The schedule allows for thorough testing of the complex changes made to the various civilian, active duty mil itary and reserve component payroll systems, DFAS officials said. The TSP website has a wealth of information to help guide you on the differences between the [TSP] plans, Thompson said. Financial readiness, including choos ing the right investments and savings plans, is crucial to service members financial futures, Thompson said. Service members should start saving for retirement early, she said, because they never know what path their careers might take. If you dont put something away in that retirement plan, you may not have something if you dont reach your 20 years as a military member, Thompson said. And, because of compound interest, she added, service members who wait to save until late in their careers can lose hundreds of thousands of dollars. However, financial readiness also includes debt management, managing your credit card[s] and basically [prac ticing] impulse control on your buying to make sure that you dont live outside your means, Thompson said. Free financial consulting services are available through installation family assistance centers and Military OneSource, Thompson said. Military OneSource provides advice and assistance for service member fam ily issues such as deployments, parent ing, financial management, education, child care, military spouse employ ment, and more. In any event, financial decisions should not be made in isolation, Thompson said. Its important to get expert advice, she said, and our personal finan cial counselors both on the military installations and through Military OneSource are certified financial counselors.Roth TSP to expand financial readiness options 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012



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Sailors and local dignitaries commemorated the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Midway with a ceremony and wreath toss on June 4 aboard the guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45). Guest speaker for this years event was Rear Adm. Jack Scorby, commander, Navy Region Southeast. The Battle of Midway was undoubt edly the turning point of the war in the Pacific, Scorby said. The victory at sea cemented the role of naval aviation in combat and this celebration affords us the opportunity to commemorate the heroic actions of the fighting men of the Pacific fleet. Celebrating the hard-earned victory at Midway provides an opportunity to . recognize the courage and sacrifices of the brave veterans who fought that battle. It is a reminder of what makes our Navy great. The Battle of midway was fought June 4-7 and is considered one of the most decisive battles of World War II. At the end of the three days, the Japanese had lost four large carriers to the U.S. Navy, along with more than 100 trained pilots and 700 trained aircraft mechanics whose technical expertise could not be easily replaced, Scorby added. The victory at Midway defeated the Japanese attempt to draw the U.S. car riers into a decisive battle and also thwarted their attempts for further offensive action, he said. Today, the courage, valor and innovation of our people continue to be the key to the Navys success. We remember this historic sea battle, a battle that changed the course of history and established the proud traditions that clearly show we are the greatest Navy in the world. We remember those who fought and what they were fighting for. The ceremony ended with a wreath tossing by Scorby, NS Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Doug Cochrane and NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander into Mayports basin from a local tug. Civic, business and govern ment leaders from Northeast Florida attended the annual NAS Jacksonville State of the Base presentation to learn about current and future operational and construction proj ects May 31. The briefing presented by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders, highlight ed construction projects, roles of tenant commands, energy conservation efforts, transition of the P-3A Orion to the P-8A Poseidon aircraft and the transition of helicopter anti-sub marine light squadrons to the new helicopter maritime strike squadrons. We are always planning ahead and set our eyes on the future whether its supporting the warfighter, energy infra structure or helping Sailors and their families with quality of life issues, said Sanders. Its our focus on customer service that makes NAS Jax the premier station in the Navy, he continued. He also discussed upcom ing military construction projects including building the Navys first Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) training and mission control facilities aboard the station. The $4.4 million training facility is expected to be com pleted at the end of fiscal year 2012 and the $22 million mis sion control facility will be completed the following year, said Sanders. At this time, we are unsure where these sys tems will be based depending on the needs of the Navy, but the operators will be trained here. Other projects planned in the near future include a new P-8A ordnance loading facility, repaving of the main runway, upgrading the base lighting system, a new All Hands Club, renovation of the base marina, gymnasium and Navy Lodge and building a new commis sary. Sanders also stressed the importance of being a good steward of the environment. We continually look at how our energy consumption today will impact our future. As of today, weve installed 5,300 solar panels on our build ings saving about $300,000 a year. And, our wastewater reuse project in which we are partnering with the City of Jacksonville, will ensure zero discharge of treated wastewa ter into the St. Johns River by 2014, he stated. The presentation also high lighted the missions of tenant commands aboard the station. NAS Jax is primarily an airfield with about 75,000 take offs and landings each year. The stations largest opera tional tenant is Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11, con sisting of six active duty P-3C Orion squadrons and one THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com State of the Base promotes NAS Jacksonvilles future Remembering the Battle of Midway

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS June 6 1944 In Operation Overlord, the Allied invasion fleet (more than 2,700 ships and small craft) lands troops on Normandy beaches in the largest amphibious landing in his tory. June 7 1819Lt. John White on merchant ship SS Franklin, anchored off Vung Tau, is first U.S. naval officer to visit Vietnam. 1917 U.S. Navy submarine chasers arrive at Corfu, Greece for anti-submarine patrols. 1942 Battle of Midway ends with the loss of aircraft carrier USS Yorktown (CV-5). 1944 Construction of artificial harbors and shel tered anchorages begins off Normandy coast. 1991 Joint Task Force Sea Angel ends relief operations in Bangladesh after Cyclone Marian June 8 1830 Sloop-of-war Vincennes becomes first U.S. warship to circle the globe. 1853 Commodore Matthew Perry arrives at Uraga, Japan to begin treaty and trade negotiations. 1880 Congress authorizes the office of Judge Advocate General (JAG). 1958 Navy and Post Office deliver first official missile mail when submarine USS Barbero (SS-317) fired Regulus II missile with 3,000 letters 100 miles east of Jacksonville, Fla. to Mayport, Fla. 1960 Helicopters from air craft carrier USS Yorktown (CVS-10) rescue 54 crewmen of British SS Shunlee, grounded on Pratus Reef in South China Sea. 1962 Medical team from Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Md.; Naval Medical Research Institute, Bethesda; and Naval Preventative Medicine Unit No. 2, Norfolk, Va. sent to San Pedro Sula, Honduras to fight epidemic of infectious gastro enteritis. 1967 Intelligence ship USS Liberty (AGTR-5) attacked by Israeli forces in the Mediterranean, 34 crewmen were killed and 173 wounded. June 9 1882 Establishment of Office of Naval Records of the War of the Rebellion (became part of Naval Historical Center). 1942 First Navy photo graphic interpretation unit set up in the Atlanic. 1959 Launching of USS George Washington (SSBN598), the first nuclear-powered fleet ballistic missile subma rine, at Groton, Conn. June 10 1854 U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., holds first formal graduation exercises. Previous classes graduated without ceremony. June 11 1853 Five Navy ships leave Norfolk, Va. on three-year expedition to survey the far Pacific. 1927 Light cruiser USS Memphis (CL-13) arrives at Washington, D.C., with Charles Lindbergh and his plane, Spirit of St. Louis, after his non-stop flight across the Atlantic. 1944 U.S. battleships off Normandy provide gunfire support to troops fighting inland. 1953 Navy ships evacu ate 20,000 Koreans from West Coast Islands to safety south of 17th parallel June 12 1944 Four U.S. Carrier Groups (15 carriers) begin attack on Japanese positions in the Marianas. 1948 The Womens Armed Forces Integration Act provides for enlistment and appoint ment of women in the Naval Reserve. 1970 After earthquake in Peru, amphibious assault ship USS Guam (LPH-9) begins 11 days of relief flights to trans port medical teams and sup plies, as well as rescue victims. 1990 Cmdr. Rosemary Mariner becomes first Navy woman to command a fleet jet aircraft squadron. Some kids go to the principals office. My kids have the principal come to dinner for our 23rd Dinner with the Smileys. I had hoped that the presence of Lynn Silk, principal of 14th Street School in Bangor, would encourage extra good behavior from the boys. Sadly, I underestimated five-year-old Lindells ability to embarrass me when I least expect it. Lynn, however, knows something about managing a house full of boys. She also raised three sons, all of whom went on to serve their country and their community as policemen and soldiers. Lynns oldest son, Staff Sgt. Brandon Silk, died in a helicopter crash on June 21, 2010, while serving with the U.S. Armys 101st Airborne Division in Afghanistan. Her two younger sons, David and Blaine, are now deployed overseas. Davids wife, Jaclyn, came with Lynn to dinner, making this only the second Dinner with the Smileys that we spent with someone who is either currently or recently dealing with a deployment. (Our sixth dinner was with the Mazzei family, whose husband/father, Lincoln, was deployed last year.) Being with people who know firsthand what youre going through is crucial for military families. Lynn, Jaclyn and I bypassed explanations of lingo and policies often necessary for the uninitiated to military life, and we got down to the real conversation: Skype is great, but not perfect; dinnertime is the hardest time to be alone; and when people say Thirteen months will pass really quickly, do they think about what theyre actually saying? Maybe Lindell sensed the comfort and acceptance of being with another military family. Or maybe the water balloons Jaclyn brought for the boys took over his common sense. But by the end of the night, Lindell was wearing only his swim trunks and spraying his principal with a water gun. I was in nonstop apology mode, despite Lynns good nature and her obvious delight in seeing three boys play together. Jaclyns participation in the water fight, which ended with her in soaking-wet jeans and shirt, convinced me that what was unfolding on the front lawn was welcomed. In hindsight, perhaps it was exactly what everyone needed after our dinner conversation about Brandons death. Earlier in the day, I told the older boys it would be okay to ask Principal Silk about her son. Ford and Owen looked at me with disgust. Why would we ask her about that? Ford said. They thought it would be rude to make Mrs. Silk sad, despite my insistence that she probably loves talking about her son. So at dinner, while the older boys awkwardly stared at their lasagna, I brought it up for them. Lynn told us about Brandon as a person how he broke records in track, how he loved to make people laugh, how he imitated his mom and she shared with us the details of the helicopter crash that killed him. Dustin is a helicopter pilot. After a long pause, Owen looked up at Mrs. Silk and said, How can a helicopter make someone die? Sometimes, there is no way to protect your children from reality. Many times, we shouldnt anyway. Lynn and Jaclyn had brought with them what they called their flat boys, almost-to-scale (depending on which brother you ask) cardboard cutouts of Lynns younger sons. Time prohibited them from getting a flat Dustin for Ford, Owen and Lindell, but they brought Dustins likeness nonetheless: an ice cream cake with an edible photo image of Dustin on the top. What happened next was worse than biting the ears off a helpless chocolate bunny. I held a butchers knife above the frozen-solid cake with my husbands image on it, and when Owen and Lindell realized the horror of what was about to happen, they both screamed, No, dont do it! There was no good, less horrific place to cut. I pushed the knife into the cake and cringed. It was morbid and horrible. Still, the tears of laughter a release from all the emotion earlier in the meal streamed down my cheeks. It had seemed like a good idea at the store, Lynn said, laughing, too. I will not eat any part with Dad on it, Owen said, which considering the size of the image, was going to be a difficult request. Ill take his head, Ford bravely said. And then, Dads going to give me a piece of his mind. As I cut around the cake, slicing the image into a dozen wedges, I realized the next problem: Forget Dustins head, who was going to eat the piece with his, well, um, you know. Go ahead, Sarah, Jaclyn said, smiling. Take one for the team and for all the military wives out there. I flopped the piece with my husbands lower half onto my plate. Lynn and Jaclyn left after the final water-gun fight outside. It was, after all, a school night for Principal Silk, too. When the boys and I were back inside, Lindell, still in his bathing suit, climbed into my lap. His back was dotted with bug bites, and he had dark, tired half moons beneath his eyes. I pulled him closer to me and he rested his head on my shoulder. Will my Daddy die in a crash? he said. I patted his back, unsure how to answer, and shushed him to sleep.Breaking bread with the principal Hey, MoneyMan I am getting ready to purchase my first new car. The car I intend to trade in was purchased used two years ago. I financed it through my credit union and still have two more years of payments. My friends all tell me that the dealership can pay off my trade as part of the deal but Im getting conflicting advice about something called GAP insurance. My buddies in the shop tell me that I definitely should purchase GAP, but my LPO and division chief both say that it depends on the situation. Who should I listen to? MoneyMan Sez : Good question shipmate! I want to commend you for taking your time and seeking advice on such a large purchase. Based on the information you pro vided I am going to declare your LPO and chief the winner. GAP, or Guaranteed Auto (or Asset) Protection, is a product you can purchase to protect you if your vehicle is declared a total loss. Typically this occurs through an auto accident but could be a result of theft, fire, flood, tornado, vandalism, or hurricanes. If your car is declared a total loss, your insurance company generally will compensate you for the actual cash value (ACV) of the vehicle. ACV may be considerably less than the retail value and is often considerably less than the actual amount you still owe on the vehicle. GAP insurance covers the difference between what the insurance company pays (ACV) and what you still owe on the vehicle. Your LPO and chief were cor rect in that there are situations where GAP insurance is well worth the cost, and there are situations where purchasing GAP insurance

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VP-45 held its 70th change of com mand May 25 as Cmdr. Michael Vitali relieved Cmdr. Paul Ditch as com manding officer. The guest speaker was Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven Capt. Trey Wheeler. Vitali, a native of Cleveland, Ohio, graduated from Purdue University in 1994 with a bachelors degree in history and was commissioned as an ensign in the United States Navy through the Purdue University Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps. He then earned his naval flight offi cer wings of gold at NAS Pensacola, Fla. During his first two tours, Vitali served as a tactical coordinator flying the S-3B Viking at VS-35 and then as an instructor at the S-3 Fleet Replacement Squadron, VS-41. At the end of the S-3s service, Vitali transitioned to the P-3C Orion at VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville and has since served with VP-16, VP-4, and the J-5 Strategic Policy Division for the U.S. Southern Command at MacDill Air Force Base. Ditch took command of VP-45 in May 2011. He led the squadron through a successful tri-site deploy ment to Comalapa, El Salvador; Djibouti, Djibouti; and Sigonella, Italy. The deployment supported U.S. Navy Fifth and Sixth Fleets involve ment in Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Unified Protector, Operation Active Endeavour, Operation Carib Shield, and Operation Caper Focus. Of note, these operations lead to the unseating of Libyan dictator, Momar Qaddafi, the seizure of hundreds of thousands of dollars in narcotics bound for the U.S., and the prevention of piracy around the Horn of Africa. Under Ditchs leadership, VP-45 flew 568 sorties, which resulted in the execution of 5435 mishap-free, combat flight hours. Vitali assumes command of VP-45 in the midst of a 12-month inter-deploy ment readiness cycle in which he will lead the squadron to prepare the squadron for their upcoming deployment to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. He will be joined by new Executive Officer Cmdr. John Brabazon. Lt. Kevin Martin will assume command of the Southeast Regional Calibration Center (SERCC) June 7 when he relieves the retiring CWO5 Marc Manor in a 10 a.m. combined change-of-charge/retirement ceremony to be held at the NAS Jacksonville Officers Club. The events presiding officer is Capt. Paul Haas, chief-of-staff, Naval Air Forces Atlantic. Guest speaker is Capt. Marlin Anthony, commanding officer, Naval Operational Support Center, Houston, Texas. After enlisting, Martin served at sea aboard USS Nicholson (DD 982), USS Ramage (DDG 61), USS Roosevelt (DDG 80), USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67), USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) and USS Gettysburg (CG 64). He served ashore at Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Sicily. He and his wife, Kathryn, are raising one son, Jarrod, age 15. Manor, a native of Muncie, Ind., enlisted in the Navy in 1982 as a Radioman. He earned his Bachelor of Science degree in International Business from Hawaii Pacific University and a Master of Education from the University of Oklahoma. He received his commission Feb. 1, 1998. He served sea duty tours onboard USS Bainbridge (CGN 25), USS Arkansas (CGN 41), USS Cushing (DD 985), USS Dubuque (LPD 8), USS Klakring (FFG 42), and USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49). Shore assign ments include tours at Naval Communications Station Philippines, Defense Information Systems Agency Pacific Wahiawa Hawaii, Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Sicily, and Southeast Regional Calibration Center, Jacksonville. On Manors watch, SERCC completed two Airspeed projects that resulted in significant improvements to the calibration and fleet support missions. The first included an automated process to the UPM-155 test set that is used to calibrate Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) equipment on board ships. Implementation of the automated process reduced production time of the UPM-155 from an average of 13.8 hours to 5.7 hours. The second Airspeed project was the implementation of streamlined logistics support processes that resulted in reducing repair part turn-around time from an average of 19.1 to 6.7 days while saving 10 percent in administrative costs. Several other process improvement and emergent repair projects were completed under Manors watch, including judicious management of micro-miniature repairs that resulted in a cost savings of over $741,000. These cost-saving and efficiency initiatives were successful because of the superb leadership of the SERCC CPOs and the extraordinary technical ability of the SERCC crew. I will forever be grateful for the opportunity to serve with such a highly professional group of Sailors, said Manor. They are all aware of the importance of their mission and I am certain there will be more great things to come under the leadership of Lt. Martin. He and his wife, Myrna, have two sons, Alex and Andrew. Vitali is new VP-45 commanding officer Martin takes charge of Southeast Regional Calibration Center today JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 3

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Navy seeks officers for specialty career path programThe Navy is accepting applications from eligible officers for the Fiscal Year 2013 (FY-13) Specialty Career Path (SCP) program, according to a Navy message released May 29. Applications must be received at Navy Personnel Command (NPC) no later than June 25. The SCP program provides officers alternatives to the traditional command-at-sea-career path and supports demand for senior unrestricted line offi cer expertise in growing mission areas, according to NAVADMIN 167/12. The program is designed to develop and utilize selected officers in the following distinct specialty career paths: The FY-13 SCP Selection Board will be held July 23 27at Navy Personnel Command (NPC). Eligibility information and application procedures can be found in the NAVADMIN. Officers who meet eligibility requirements may apply for up to two specialty career paths. The board will select eligible officers best qualified to serve the needs of the Navy in each specialty career path. Selectees will retain their original officer designator and will receive an additional qualification designator that indicates their area of specialization. Specialty career path provide selectees jobs with increasing complexity and responsibility. Officers will gain experience and develop management and leadership skills that will best serve the Navy while providing enhanced opportunity for successful career transition upon retirement. The FY-13 SCP Selection Board will also screen previously unselected SCP lieutenant commanders and commanders for SCP executive (XO) and command ing officer (CO) billets within their mission areas. SCP XO and CO screened officers will be eligible to fill designated SCP milestone billets. 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012

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In a ceremony held May 22 on the command quarterdeck, NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Head recognized Lawrence Mark as the Acquisition Advocate for Small Business Concerns for Fiscal Year 2012, Second Quarter. Marks path to Jacksonville was an interesting one. He served twelve years in public safety as a firefighter and emergency medical technician in Flint, Mich., and Myrtle Beach, S.C. Mark had always combined his passion for public safety with business. In 2009, he decided to hang up his fire helmet and focus solely on his business profession. His career in federal service began in June 2009 with a Department of Defense (DoD) college intern ship in the Civilian Personnel Management Service Recruitment Assistance Division at Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Mi. He worked as a student recruiter and was one of only five students in the country that recruited fellow students for civilian careers within DoD. Marks enthusiasm for business and entrepreneurship blossomed at an early age. He established his first company at 17 and has created a total of four small businesses; two of those businesses were started while in he was in college. He also helped create the Entrepreneurship Association, which introduced fellow students to the business sector and assisted local small businesses to expand. Marks business experience is evident. He sees beyond customary practices and considers all pos sibilities when achieving the final product. He consistently demonstrates the discipline to get the job done right the first time. He diligently encourages small business participa tion when performing market research, to include award of several 8(a) sole source acquisitions [Small Business Administration, 8(a) Business Development Program] as authorized by the Assistant Secretary of the Navy. During this second quarter of FY12, Mark awarded nearly $7 million dollars to small business concerns. His meticulous style and conscientious efforts have tremendously enhanced NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville in achieving the mandatory DoD/Navy small business targets. Lawrence completed his Level I certification in the Acquisition Career Field of Contracting in just a few months and is currently pursuing his Level II certifi cation. Additionally, Mark received his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from Michigan Tech in 2010 and Associate Degree in Fire Science from Lake Superior State University, Mich. in 2002. Free SAT/ACT prep programs for militaryTremendous challenges face Americas military families, especially when frequentrelocationsare involved.Military families move approximately every two years and military children will attend six to nine different schools between kindergarten and high school graduation. They must become acquainted with new schools and stress canaffect school performance. It is espe cially difficult for high school students preparing for college. But, families do not need to spend a fortune preparing students for SAT and ACT exams. In alliance with the Department of Defense, and supported by athletes from the NFL and MLB, eKnowledge is donating free SAT and ACT PowerPrep Programs to military families worldwide. To place an online order go to:www.eKnowledge. com/MilNews or call51-256-4076. FY12 Second quarter small business advocate recognized JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 Providing a pathway of learningMore than 170 Navy, Marine Corps and civilian instructors staff the six Maintenance Training Units that annually graduate more than 21,000 students from 1,900 classes at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) on board NAS Jacksonville. We primarily support the fleet as the central point of advanced main tenance training for the P-3C Orion and the H-60 Seahawk in what we call C-squared/M-squared or Course Curriculum Model Manager, said CNATTU JAX Commanding Officer Cmdr. Michael Gramolini Sr. in a May 23 interview. In addition, our learning sites pro vide organizationaland intermediatelevel training for ground support equipment, aviation maintenance adminis tration, undersea warfare equipment, and soon, P-8 airframes and power plants. Another growing resource is the new CNATTU JAX Mobile Training Team that provides on-site instruction for aviation maintenance and training divi sions. In these days of reduced budgets, it can be more economical to teach on site at a squadron than to send a dozen maintainers to the CNATTU JAX schoolhouse. Senior-level enlisted responsible for maintenance control, maintenance data and technical pub lications libraries can choose from 29 courses at the organizational or inter mediate levels, said Gramolini. CNATTU JAX Executive Officer Cmdr. Daryl Pierce explained that P-3/P-8 transition will be fully supported. Were working with PMA-205, Boeing, VP-30 Fleet Integration Team and Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 to develop the P-8A Poseidon maintenance training unit. Until our new P-8 facility is con structed, weve identified classrooms and other spaces at CNATTU JAX that Boeing and contractors can utilize for interim training. Were scheduled to begin work with VP-16 in July as the War Eagles become the Navys first P-3 squadron to transition to the P-8A Poseidon. Senior Enlisted Leader ASCM(AW) Michael King said, Our H-60 Seahawk helicopter program is very robust and our C-squared/M-squared curriculum is keeping maintainers on the leadingedge of change during the transition to MH-60R and MH-60S platforms. Gramolini added, In the very near future, CNATTU JAX will pro vide MH-60R maintenance train

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 7 Photos by Clark Pierceing to a Royal Australian Navy heli copter squadron that is procuring 24 of the new Romeo ASW Seahawks. Our instructors modified the Romeo curriculum to reflect differences in Australian maintenance rates. When the Australians complete their class work, they will embed with one of the operational HSM squadrons here at NAS Jacksonville. The majority of students come to CNATTU JAX on PCS orders to increase their maintenance certifications and to get hands-on training from one of the Navys finest cadres of aviation main tenance instructors. Other students are sent TAD by their aviation maintenance officers for specialized training courses. Gramolini proudly noted, CNATTU JAX instructors have the highest ratio of master training specialists (MTS) in the CNATTU domain. The MTS qualifica tion provides recognition for outstanding individual effort and fosters greater command training professionalism. Our MTS instructors demonstrate highly effective teaching skills and a com prehensive understanding of learning management, training administration and curriculum management. Another part of CNATTU JAX is Training Support Department Mayport, which satisfies many training needs of the surface community including the Center for Surface Combat Systems, Surface Warfare Officers School, Center for Security Forces and the Center for Information Dominance. CNATTU JAX

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reserve squadron providing anti-subma rine/surface warfare capabilities. We are also home to VP-30, the Navys P-3C fleet replacement squadron, explained Sanders. We recently conducted the roll-out of the Navys newest surveillance aircraft the P-8A Poseidon which will transition into the fleet here this year and eventually replace the P-3C aircraft. On the helicopter side of the house, NAS Jax currently supports three squadrons that also provide anti-submarine/surface war fare capabilities. By 2015, NAS Jax will be home to four carrier-based helicopter maritime strike squadrons and one expedition ary squadron. He went on to highlight Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. They are our larg est tenant command with more than 4,000 employees. Theyve worked on basi cally every Navy aircraft since the 1940s maintaining capability for and perform ing a complete range of depot-level rework operations, said Sanders. Another pri mary command here is Naval Supply Systems Command Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville which boasts 24 sites to pro vide combat capability though logistics throughout the southeast region. Sanders also discussed the $60 million renovation of Naval Hospital Jacksonville which includes new operating rooms, expansion of the physical/occupational therapy unit, a new breast care center and much more. The hospital staff are committed to providing the best possible care to our military members, their families and retirees. They are also the only naval hospital working on recapturing patient care vice outsourcing, added Sanders. As for mission sustainment, NAS Jax proactively develops encroachment protection partnerships with the City of Jacksonville and other local governments to ensure resources such as Outlying Field (OLF) Whitehouse and Pinecastle Range Complex are available for fleet training. These areas are vital for our warfighters to train. OLF Whitehouse is crucial to train pilots on carrier landings and Pinecastle is the Navys only east coast bombing range, said Sanders. We continually work with area residents and partner with the local agencies to purchase land in the surrounding areas to ensure we are in compliance with the Air Installation Compatible Use Zones Program. Sanders concluded his presentation by emphasizing what a great relationship the military has with the local community here. During my naval career Ive been stationed in many different cities. I can definitely say that Ive never seen a community that is so supportive of our military members. Thank you! After the event, guests discussed the great partnership between the military and sur rounding communities. We are fortunate and blessed to have our servicemen and women working here. The retirees and veterans are a terrific addition to the workforce we need in our community. I think its important that our community continues to be one of the best supporters of our military in the nation because it will reap rewards for Jacksonville for genera tions to come, said Jaxport Chief Executive Officer Paul Anderson. STATE OF BASEis a waste of money. We have all heard the terms upside down or under water to describe the situation where the amount owed on a vehi cle is greater than the value of the vehicle. I prefer the term negative equity but all the terms mean the same thing, your vehicle is worth less than what you owe on it. When you trade in your used vehicle and have the dealership add the nega tive equity to the cost of your new car, you may be creating a negative equi ty situation on the new car you drive off the lot before the car is even one day old! In this case pur chasing gap insurance is a smart move. Another example is if you purchase a vehicle with no down payment or a very small down payment and finance for an extended period (greater than 60 months). Rapid depreciation of new vehicles could cause a nega tive equity situation to develop in a relatively short amount of time. In this case, GAP insurance might be something you should consider. If you are paying cash for a vehicle or have the ability for a large down payment (greater than 20 percent) your probably will not ever see a GAP between the actual cash value and what you still owe on the vehicle. In this case GAP insurance is not something you need to spend money on. MONEYMAN What hurricane conditions mean Storm Condition IV: Estimated time of arrival (ETA) is within 72 hours Storm Condition III: ETA is within 48 hours Storm Condition II: ETA is within 24 hours Storm Condition I: ETA is within 12 hours What to do if severe weather approaches Check your disaster survival kit Review your all hazard survival plan Evacuate low-lying areas Protect your windows with boards, shutters or tape Close all windows and doors (make your home airtight as possible) Secure outdoor objects or bring them inside Fuel the car Save at least a 3-5 day water supply Withdraw cash from the bank (ATMs may not be functioning after a storm) Monitor local media (a NOAA or Red Cross weather radio is recommended) Keep radio and flashlights on hand with plenty of batteries Know how to shelter-in-place (in your residence and your workplace) Follow ALL evacuation orders. Personnel living in the barracks: Monitor local media and follow the guidance provided by your command Know how to shelter-in-place When ordered to evacuate keep your chain of command informed as to your location and status. Local emergency shelters provide a great service however, they are often crowded and offer little to no privacy. Plan for other alternatives such as leaving the area (help a fellow sailor that may be in a similar situation) to stay with friends or relatives. Navy Lodge and TVQ: NAS Jacksonville does not provide trans portation or maintain shelters. If ordered to evacuate the base it is your responsibility to know where to go and how to get there. Visit the following websites and type in the keyword shelters: www.coj.net www.claycountygov.com www.co.st-johns.fl.us www.nassaucountyfl.com www.nefloridaredcross.org For base closure and recovery status of NAS Jacksonville, call the NAS Jax Hotline at: 1-800-849-6024 for a recorded message. All Navy personnel are reminded to update their family and emergency contact infor mation in the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System at https://navyfamily.navy.mil. Hurricane Season: Severe weather information 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012

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The Navy Operational Fitness and Fueling Series (NOFFS), launched Navywide in January 2012, represents a sea of change in the way the Navy implements fitness activities. NOFFS employs a new methodology to keep Sailors ashore and afloat in top physical condition. Based on worldclass sports science training philoso phies that have produced multi-mil lion dollar athletes, NOFFS is designed to improve operational performance, decrease the incidence and severity of musculoskeletal injuries and provide foundational nutritional guidance for Sailors. The result is a program highly rel evant to Sailors. Athletes Performance Institute, a key partner in the devel opment of NOFFS, provided a lead ing-edge yet proven methodology from which the Navys experts from Center for Personal and Professional Development; Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC); Navy Bureau of Medicine; and Chief of Naval Operations Physical Readiness Program office could draw and refine to meet the needs of every operational platform. Sailors now have everything they will need at their fingertips to gain and sustain high levels of physical performance at home or at sea. CNICs recent release of the NOFFS iPhone app (available in the iTunes app store) and the 2011 launch of the NOFFS virtual trainer found at www. navyfitness.org round out a program delivery platform unmatched within the Department of Defense. To learn more about incorporating NOFFS into a personal or command training plan, contact your local MWR Fitness Office or visit the find a NOFFS instructor tab on the website. Contact NAS Jax MWR Fitness Source at 5423518.NOFFS brings sea of change to Navy fitness The VR-62 Wardroom said goodbye to four Selected Reserve (SELRES) officers and two full-time support (FTS) offi cers May 19. Each of the SELRES offi cers had flown in support of VR-62 for between nine and 10 years, so it was a bittersweet ceremony for those in attendance. VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Alex Ellermann expressed his sincere thanks to each officer for their enduring commitment to the squadron and the U.S. Navy. Your leadership, experience and aircraft knowledge will be truly missed, he said during a brief hail and farewell ceremony held in con junction with the retirement party at a Jacksonville Suns baseball game. The SELRES officers Cmdr. Matt Corey, Cmdr. Alex Pantaz, Cmdr. Troy Solber, and Cmdr. Chris Duffy began drilling with the squadron when VR-62 was based in Brunswick, Maine. When the squadron moved to NAS Jacksonville several years ago, they chose to commute to Jacksonville to complete their reserve careers with VR-62. Their combined careers at VR-62 are hard to quantify. They flew count less NALO missions and more than 60 detachments, carrying millions of pounds in cargo and personnel, and flying thousands of hours in support of the U.S. Navy. The officers expressed their appre ciation and respect for the VR-62 members who they have had the privilege of serving with and shared their thoughts of life in VR-62. I had the amazing opportunity to fly across the Pacific with a crew to Australia. I believe this is simply one of the coolest and most rewarding jobs you can do, said Pantaz. Corey added, I have visited places all over the world with VR-62, some of which I did not even know existed. I will miss it. Lt. Cmdr. Barth Boyer, an FTS officer is also leaving VR-62 as he retires after 20 years of service. Boyer joined the Navy in May 1992 and started his career fly ing P-3s at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. He joined the FTS over 10 years ago and spent several years with VR-62 before going back to school for his masters degree. Boyer returned to VR-62 in 2009 and assisted with the relocation of the squadron from NAS Brunswick to NAS Jacksonville. Lt. Cmdr. Nando Vizcarrando, another FTS officer with VR-62, was also bid farewell. He joined VR-62 in May 2009 and will be departing the squadron in June. Vizcarrando has taken orders to VR-53, a C-130 squadron that is based at Andrews AFB, Md. Ellermann thanked Boyer and Vizcarrando for their commitment and dedication to the squadron. I always knew I could count on you to get the job done, he stated. VR-62 Wardroom bids farewell to officers JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 9

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In Jim Collins book, Good to Great, he states that great leadership is a paradoxical blend of humility, modesty and fero cious resolve. Collins discov ered that the best chief exec utive officers (CEOs) are usu ally more like Socrates and Abraham Lincolnsoft-spoken men of few words and many questions. Collins went on to write that soft-spoken visionary leaders usually create powerful and lasting results within their companies and among those around them. Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles CEO equivalent, Commanding Officer Capt. Lynn Welling, embodies the qualities associated with great leadership. When he assumed command of the hospital and five branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia two years ago, he brought with him an open-minded approach to problems and an ability to lis ten. On June 8, he moves on, leaving a lasting legacy. We are part of something bigger than we are. Not just in medicinebut Navy Medicine. We are here to heal our nations heroes. And we have the honor and privilege of caring for amazing peoplethe warriors who go forward to fight our nations battles, our veterans and retirees, families who took care of the children while mom or dad was deployed for six months, the kids who missed their mom and dad . they all stepped up to something big ger than they are. And its my honor to take care of them. Its a huge responsibility. And we do it well, said Welling. Along with successfully passing more than 20 com mand readiness inspec tionsincluding receipt of The Joint Commission Gold Seal of Accreditation, the nations premier accredit ing system for hospitalsNH Jacksonville became the first hospital on Floridas First Coast to receive the prestigious Baby Friendly designation by the World Health Organization and United Nations Childrens Fund. Illustrating the hospitals clinical excellence, the Family Medicine Residency Program was named the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Clinical Site of the Year. Eleven Medical Homeport teamsthe Navy-wide approach to primary care that places patients in the center of a team of caregiverswere implemented at the hospital and branch health clinics at Kings Bay and Mayport. The Navy Inspector General recognized the commands Deployment Health Center, Third-Party Collections, Case Management and Civilian Personnel departments as best practices. The command was twice named by First Coast Worksite Wellness Council as one of Jacksonvilles healthiest com panies. And NH Jacksonvilles Patient Safety Symposium drew 200 national and region al healthcare leaders includ ing Virginia Mason Medical Center, Mayo Clinic in Florida, Baptist Health, Center for Global Health and Medical Diplomacy at the University of North Florida, and University of Florida College of Medicine. The list is endless for the com mand that serves a patient population of approximately 57,000 active and retired Sailors, Soldiers, Marines, Airmen, Guardsmen and their families with primary care doctors at one of its facilities. Capt. Lynn Welling has had a remarkable tenure of accom plishment and leadership at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, by every objective measure. What is extraordinary and unique is that he has simultaneously, in this short time, made equally important and enduring con tributions to medical excel lence in Northeast Florida, said Director of the Center for Global Health & Medical Diplomacy at the University of North Florida Yank Coble. As a leader of the Quality Collaborative of Northeast Florida, Capt. Welling made sure Navy Medicine was at the forefront of all efforts in the region to enhance quality and safety, Coble observed. Naval Hospital Jacksonville along with Nemours Childrens Clinic and University of Florida & Shands Jacksonville were the first in the community partici pating in the Patient Centered Caring Communication Initiative to improve patient and staff satisfaction, reduce medical errors and reduce claims. Coble also pointed out that Capt. Welling expanded the Patient Safety Symposium with the collaboration of major healthcare organizations in Northeast Florida, bringing in national experts while fully using local expertise. Coble went on to describe Wellings determination to impact the epidemic of pre scription drug abuse in Florida. In April 2011, Welling presented a plan that was enthusiasti cally endorsed by the Quality Collaborative of Northeast Florida, the Quality Forum, the Healthcare and Bioscience Council of Northeast Florida, and the CEOs and emergency departments of hospitals across the region. Implementation of a major public health initiative in such a short time by such a wide sector of the community is an extraordinary example of the power of leadership, said Coble. Capt. Wellings total com mitment to the three fun damental traditions of medi cinecaring, ethics and sci encealong with his personal attributes engender enormous trust and hope and the willingness to collaborate far beyond expectations on behalf of the community. He is truly a lead er for all seasons, concluded Coble. Along with the collabora tive efforts, Welling was very focused on empowering the hospital and branch health clinic staff with the knowledge and skills needed to ensure the best care available is delivered to each and every patient. NH Jacksonville rolled out the Jacksonville Kaizen Production System (JKPS) in November 2011. We took an outside the box approach to ensure our patients get the best, safest care possi ble while staying ahead of the nations budget crisis. Weve brought together todays most powerful improvement tools and methodologies includ ing Lean Six Sigma, industrial engineering, high-reliability organizing and industry best practices. Weve added the infrastructure stability, con tinuity, accountability so we can successfully execute our readiness mission, Welling, a naval aviator turned emergency physician, explained. And its all about driving quantum leaps in performance, eliminating waste and never accepting the status quo. Using the JKPS approach, the command is already seeing measurable results. Staff has increased produc tivity in its operating rooms by 29 percent, reduced Urology Clinic wait times by 25 min utes, and improved its preoperative experience of care for patientsreducing it from a process that could take up to five hours, down to an average of only one hour. And thats just a sampling of the results gained from the now more than 200 projects. Another initiative builds on NH Jacksonvilles history of pri vate and public-sector collabo ration across the region. To help tackle the abuse of prescription pain medication in Florida, Welling and members of the Quality Collaborative of Northeast Floridas Rational Prescribing of Controlled Substances Task Force devel Naval Hospital Jacksonville CO recognized for contributions to medical excellence 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012

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oped a set of guidelines to ensure the appropriate treatment of chronic or recurrent pain in local emer gency rooms. NH Jacksonville was the first to put the guidelines into practice in its emergency room on Oct. 1, 2011. For this initiative, Welling received the Duval County Medical Society (DCMS) Distinguished Service Award for outstanding leadership and exemplary stewardship. Capt. Welling has been at the forefront of the Rational Prescribing of Controlled Substances initia tive, said Duval County Medical Society Executive Director Bryan Campbell. His dedication to quality and compassionate care as well as his efforts spearheading the Quality Collaborative initiative will undoubtedly leave a last ing legacy throughout the entire healthcare commu nity. And as with many soft-spoken leaders, Welling is the first to attribute command achievements to his staff of 2,500 military and civilian personnel located at its hospital and five branch health clinics. They not only embraced my vision, mission and strategic plan, but can tell you exactly how they con tribute to it on a daily basis, he said. Hes also quick to recognize his fortune to be able to build on the strong foundation set by those before him, such as Capt. Bruce Gillingham and Rear Adm. Raquel Bono. So how does a leader come in and drive such positive change in only a two-year rotation? Welling explains the two things at the root of his leadership approach. The first is to establish the mission. When you put the patient first, everything else falls in place. So we spent some very important time when we first got here in defining our mission. For everyone to know the mission, vision, strategic plan and know how to contribute to it on a daily basis was a huge undertaking. And when staff are actively engaged and know where they fit in, they can make positive differences, said Welling. The second aspect of Wellings leadership is execu tion. When you give staff the vision . give them lateral limits so they dont step out of their lane . adjust the rudder every now and then to course correct . motivate and remove the barriers . its amazing to listen to depths of discussions around the hospital, and then see the results they achieve. Theres a culture of do it as opposed to those who dont do it. NH Jacksonvilles mission is clear: Provide force health protection through readiness, operational support, health promotion and quality family-centered care to all those entrusted to it, or in a word, readiness. The commanda hospital and five branch health clinicsproduces readiness. Its interesting to compare this strategic plan with Wellings remarks at the change of command ceremony in June 2010 when he first arrived. He said, We will be the one all other hospitals turn to when they need advice or guidance on implement ing practices that ensure each patient receives the safest, highest quality care. We will be the one that not only conceives the plan for being the most effective and most efficient provider of that outstanding medi cal care, but the one that executes. We will be the one that leads in training our most important assets, our people, in achieving their own greatness. We will be the one our patients go out of their way to return to because they trust us. According to Welling, those goals were achieved. Not only that, the goals evolved into the blueprint for Wellings strategic plan which aligned perfectly with the Military Health Systems quadruple-aimreadi ness, population health, patient experience of care and cost. So what does Welling hope his NH Jacksonville legacy will be? Its a goal he takes with him to each and every com mand he leads. If Ive done my job rightwhen I walk out the door no one will know Im gone. This means weve trained the staff to act on their own in alignment with the vision and mission. When they do that, we know weve changed the culture. We have embraced this change and know the imperatives out there: Patient safety and quality. Then you add the healthcare and budget cri sis. We understand that we have a sacred obligation to those people we serve. And at the same time, weve got to be smart; weve got to be better. We dont have to do more with less. We have to put the right person in the right place at the right time to do the right thing. And our guys get it. Were not there yet, but we are leading from the front, Welling continued. Its this philosophy that will pave the way on June 8 for NH Jacksonvilles next leaderCapt. Gayle Shaffer, a Dental Corps officer who was previously the execu tive officer at NH Okinawawho will come in and take the command to the next step. Getting our team of 2,500 to march in the same line, take care of thousands of patients, develop a system that helps take care of those thousands of patients in a manner that will always be there so the patients can trust it, to trust us and to know weve got their backis huge and very rewarding, said Welling, who places NH Jacksonville as one of the two most rewarding commands hes led. And like all good leaders, the Navy Medicine jour ney is never-ending. No matter how good we are today, we can and will become better tomorrow. Upon my departure, I know that Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles team of Sailors, civil ians, contractors and volunteers will continuously, passionately and relentlessly strive to deliver the care that earned us status as the one, he said. I salute you. It has been an honor to serve with you, said Welling. WELLING BUMED headquarters movesThe Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED), the flagship command for all of Navy and Marine Corps medicine, started relocating its staff May 30 from Washington, D.C., to Falls Church, Va., as part of the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Act of 2005. Vice Adm. Matt Nathan, U.S. Navy surgeon gen eral and chief, BUMED, officially transfered his flag June 1, with the rest of the BUMED staff completing their move by June 5. BUMED is alive and strong, said Nathan, at a symbolic Change of Port ceremony held May 3 at its former location in Washington, D.C. It is a culmination of the men and women who serve the Navy Medical Department, whom our Sailors, Marines, and their families are counting on to com plete the mission. We are simply about to shift colors and go to a new homeport. BUMED has been located at the Hilltop in the Foggy Bottom area for 70 years, but the campus has served a variety of U.S. Navy and Navy Medicine activities for nearly a century. The compound holds significant Navy historical value and houses the original Naval Observatory. It is with mixed emotions that we are leaving here, said Rear Adm. Michael Mittelman, U.S. Navy deputy surgeon general. It is also with excitement that we will be moving to our new location. This place will always hold a special place in our hearts. Our ethos will not change, just where we sit. BUMED will be co-locating with its Army, Air Force, and TRICARE Management Activity medical counterparts into a new facility called the Defense Health Headquarters, but all the services will maintain their own missions and leadership structure. In a May 9 email message to his BUMED staff, Nathan emphasized that the mission goes on, despite the move. Defense Health Headquarters is not an entity, it is simply a building, said Nathan. BUMED has a long and proud tradition and an eight-mile stretch of highway does not change that. An address is only a geographic location. It is not what makes our command great it is each and every one of you, your dedication, your hard work, and your commitment to our Sailors and Marines to provide them the very best in care and support. The new address for BUMED is 7700 Arlington Blvd., Falls Church, Va., 22042-5113. As the Navy Surgeon General and Chief, BUMED, Nathan leads 63,000 Navy Medicine personnel that pro vide healthcare support to the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, their families and veterans in high opera tional tempo environments, at expeditionary medical facilities, medical treatment facilities, hospitals, clinics, hospital ships and research units around the world. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 11

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NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville Sailor receives honor On May 10, the South Florida Federal Executive Board (FEB) recognized ABF1(AW/SW) David Johnson as the South Florida Federal Employee of the Year in the Trades and Crafts category. Johnson serves as the fuels contracting officer representative (COR) for NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville at NAS Key West, Fla. The FEB selected Johnson out of 35,000 federal employees in South Florida and among four finalists in his category. This is a huge honor for me, and Im enormously grateful to my chain of command for nominating me for this award. Until I came to NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, I had never gotten any recog nition like this, so it makes me even more proud to serve with the supply pro fessionals in Key West, said Johnson. Given the large concentration of federal employees in South Florida, the South Florida FEB Employee of the Year award is very competitive, but also a great tool to honor the most outstanding personnel in the area. It is very competitive, and we are proud of ABF1 David Johnson for winning in the Trades and Crafts category. He is truly deserving of this award, along with his recent selection as American Petroleum Institute Navy Fuels Petty Officer of the Year, said Diane Moll, deputy site director at NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, Site Key West. Im thrilled that ABF1 Johnson has gotten the recognition he deserves for all of his hard work. Hes the kind of Sailor who goes full throttle in getting the job done, and thats exactly the sort of initiative every officer hopes to see in a first class petty officer with his level of responsibility, said Lt. j.g. Taylor Burks, site director for NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, Site Key West. CNATTU Jax welcomes new ombudsmanThe Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville recently named Christina Wagner as the new command ombudsman. The com mand ombuds man is an essential link between the command and family mem bers of military service mem bers. Wagner, who is married to CNATTU Jax Instructor AS2 Anthony Wagner was born in The Philippines. Her father was in the Air Force and retired as a major in 1997. She graduated high school in 2006 from Putnam City North High School in Oklahoma City, Okla. She is currently a full-time student enrolled at the University of Phoenix to complete her Bachelors of Science in Psychology. Wagner served on active duty in the U.S. Navy from July 2006 July 2011. She is an extremely motivated individual and is excited about serving CNATTU Jax as command ombudsman. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012

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Marine Sgt. Gary Stein may have thought he was simply exercising his constitutional rights when he criti cized President Obama on Facebook. Screw Obama and I will not follow all orders from him, the young Marine wrote on his Armed Forces Tea Party group page. The sergeant also posted an image of the commander-in-chief on a Jackass movie poster. The Marine further superimposed the presidents image on a poster for The Incredibles which he changed to The Horribles. While sophomoric rants are common on Facebook, this episode ended pre dictably (and poorly) for Stein when an administrative separation board voted 3-0 to discharge Stein from the service with an Other Than Honorable dis charge. This is the same characterization of service that may be awarded to drug users or convicted felons. While some may consider this outcome to be harsh, the young Marine violated the long-standing American tradition of a professional, non-political military force. Department of Defense Directive (DoDD) 1344.10 lays out the basic rules for political activities by members of the Armed Forces. All service mem bers may carry out the responsibilities of citizenship. For example, a Sailor or Marine may register to vote, vote, encourage others to participate in the political process, sign petitions, attend rallies as a spectator, give money to political organizations, and put normal sized bumper stickers on their cars. However, active-duty1 military mem bers like Stein cross the line (and vio late DoDD 1344.10) when they participate in partisan politics or campaign for or against a political candidate. Prohibited activities include putting political posters in government hous ing, marching in a partisan parade, attending a political dinner or fund raiser, speaking on behalf of or against a candidate, fundraising for a party or cause, distributing partisan literature, or wearing the uniform to a political event. The prohibition on partisan politi cal activity carries over into the social media context. Active-duty Sailors may list their rank and title on their personal (not official) Facebook profiles and they may even fill in the political views field or like a political party, group, or candidate. However, DoD person nel should not advocate for or against a political party, partisan political group, or candidate for partisan political office through a blog, Facebook, Twitter, or any social media platform. If a Navy ship or command has its own official Facebook page, then it should never include political views as that would imply that the DoD engages in partisan politics. The bottom line is that military members are entitled to their personal political opinions. But those opinions should stay personal. Sailors and Marines should never imply that the DoD, the Department of the Navy, or an individ ual command is anything other than a professional, non-partisan fighting force. A summary of the rules for political activities is below. If you have any concerns, please consult an ethics advisor or a judge advocate. The political restrictions on reservists and civilians are slightly looser than the restrictions on active-duty Service members. Members of the Armed Forces on Active Duty Members of the Armed Forces NOT on Active Duty Promote and encourage voting Yes Yes Attend partisan political club meetings Yes, when not in uniform Yes, when not in uniform capacity of a partisan political club No Yes, when not in uniform and no appearance of DoD endorsement Speak before a partisan political gathering No Yes, when not in uniform and no appearance of DoD endorsement Perform any duties for a partisan political committee or candidate No Yes,, when not in uniform and no appearance of DoD endorsement Write a letter to the editor Yes, may need disclaimer Yes, may need disclaimer Publish partisan political writings soliciting votes No Yes, when no appearance of DoD endorsement Attend partisan fundraisers and events (merely as a spectator) Yes, when not in uniform and no appearance of DoD endorsement Yes, when not in uniform and no appearance of DoD endorsement Participate in partisan fundraisers and events (more than mere spectator) No Yes, when not in uniform and no appearance of DoD endorsement Contribute money to a political party or candidate Yes Yes March in a partisan political parade No Yes, when not in uniform and no appearance of DoD endorsement Political activities and social media guidelines JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 13

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included June Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Summer Bowling Leagues Now Forming Monday Mixed Trio 7 p.m. Wednesday After Work League 4:30 p.m. Thrusday Morning Seniors 9 a.m. Thursday Night Extreme Bowling 6:30 p.m. Friday Intramural League 11:45 a.m. Sunday Fun Bunch League 4 p.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. **New fitness class Extreme Boot Camp Behind the fitness center Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Outdoor Pool Open Weekends Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Open weekdays beginning June 11 Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session one begins June 18 $40 military, $45 DoD Register for swim lessons at the base gym Summer Splash Pool Party June 9, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free food, karaoke, games and prizes!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. 2012 2013 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale July 13 $58.50 Jaguar game shuttle $12 Disney World Orlando FL 4 day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Tampa Zoo $19 (Adult) $17.50 (Child) Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person Blue Man Group in Orlando $59, includes City Walk venue Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 Adventure Landing Season Pass $86.50 Combo $32, Wet pass $21, 5 attractions $20 Medieval Times Free royalty upgrade with dinner reservation Pirates Dinner Adventure in Orlando Active and Retired military $12 at gate Family members purchase at ITT Adult $37, children (3-12) $26 Daytona International Speedway Jalapeno 250 $24 Coke Zero 400, July 7, $70 80 Coke Zero Shuttle $16The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Wet n Wild Day Trip June 9 $10 per person includes park fee and transportation. Dave & Busters Trip June 14 at 6 p.m. Free $10 Powercard, 20% off food & beverages and unlimited simulator play Mall & Movie Trip Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater June 15 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees June 12 & 26 for active duty June 14 & 28 for retirees & DoD personnel Junior Golf Clinic Session 1 (ages 11 17) June 25 29 Session 2 (ages 6 10) July 16 20 Session 3 (ages 11 17) August 6 10 Monday Friday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. $110 per week long sessionMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Lessons $150 per person June 15, 16, 17, 23 & 24 July 20, 21, 22, 28 & 29 Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Flying Club Call 777-8549 /6035 Ground School July 23 Aug. 29 $500 per person a CFC participantProvided as a public service marchforbabies.org 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012

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Q: How can I beat the heat while exercising or working? I frequently recommend that my patients regularly exercise to help with a variety of com mon conditions. There really is very little bad that can come of a regular exercise regime to boost your metabolism and help to drop weight, adding years to your life. I tell patients with depres sion or anxiety to start an exercise program. Exercise is a natural anti-depression medicine. But exercise comes with a caveat. Exposure to extreme heat while exercising or work ing in hot environments may put you at risk of heat stress. Heat stress can result in heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps or heat rashes. Our wonderful Florida sunshine makes for a hot and humid summer when we all need to understand the warnings of a heat stress injury. At greater risk of heat stress, are people who are 65 years of age or older, are overweight, suf fer from heart disease or high blood pressure, or take medications that may be affected by extreme heat. Heat stroke is the most serious heat-related dis order. It occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature the bodys temperature rises rapidly and the sweating mechanism fails, so the body is unable to cool down. When heat stroke occurs, the body temperature can rise to 106 degrees Fahrenheit or higher within 10 to 15 minutes. Heat stroke can cause death or per manent disability if emergency treatment is not provided. Symptoms of heat stroke include: headache temperature dizziness Take the following steps to treat heat stroke: help from others around you. cool shaded area. methods such as: Soak their clothes with water. Spray, sponge or shower them with water. Fan their body. Evaporative cooling methods work best. Place the person near a fan and spray them with cool water. Heat exhaustion is the bodys response to excessive loss of the water and sodium, usually through excessive sweating. Most prone to heat exhaustion are people who are elderly or have high blood pressure. Symptoms of heat exhaus tion include: fatigue perature Treat a worker suffering from heat exhaustion with the fol lowing: conditioned area. other cool, nonalcoholic beverages. sponge bath. Heat syncope is a faint ing episode or dizziness that usually occurs with prolonged standing or sudden rising from a sitting or lying position. Factors that may contribute to heat syncope include dehydra tion and lack of acclimatiza tion. Symptoms of heat syncope include: People with heat syncope should: place. juice or a sports beverage. Living in Florida under the beautiful warm sun brings both advantages and disadvantages. Think carefully about any exertion during the hottest part of the day. Remember to drink clear fluids (water is best) regularly and workout with a partner who can look out for you. Exercise should be fun, always be care ful in the heat. Next week, in part 2 of heat stress, well discuss how to avoid heat cramps and heat rash. Until then, stay cool and enjoy good health. Lower your risk for heat stress Part 1 After 15 years of naval service, AT1 Brad McClard departed the maritime patrol com munity as a VP-10 Red Lancer, when he retired May 18. McClard will move on to his second career as lead maintenance engineer with Allied Wireline, located in Midland, Texas, where his skills and experience earned in the mili tary will help him build a successful second career. McClard was born in 1979, to parents Linda and James in the small town of Perryton, Texas. At age 17, he asked his father to sign a waiver so he could join the military. In May 1997, he left for Navy Basic Training in Great Lakes, Ill. After boot camp, McClard attended training as an aviation electronics techni cian at NAS Pensacola, Fla. Upon gradua tion, he reported to the Golden Eagles of VP-9, homeported at Barbers Point, Hawaii. During his tour from 1998-2001, he successfully completed two deployments to Diego Garcia and Japan. McClard left Hawaii as an E-5 and trans ferred to Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron (VQ) 2 in Rota, Spain. While completing multiple detachments in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom, he found his passion for being an AT and thrived in this challenging environment. By the time he transferred from VQ-2 in 2004, he had qualified as a collateral duty inspector and quality assurance representative. His next duty was at Fleet Readiness Center Southwest, Point Mugu, Calif. were he was assigned as the 600 division supervisor in charge of the USM-449 bench and Radar Shop. He was hand selected to lead a Lean Six Sigma event that resulted in an 85 percent production increase. It was during this tour that he met his wife, Anais, while she was in college at CalLutheran University. They were married in 2007 and departed southern California for Brunswick, Maine to join the VP-10 Red Lancers. Upon completion of his second deploy ment, McClard achieved the rank of E-6 and was assigned as the leading petty officer of the avionics branch. He led his Sailors to the successful completion of his final deploy ment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom, and New Dawn. He returned home in December 2011 just in time to witness the birth of his son, Tristen. He finished out his career with VP-10 attached to the quality assurance division.Red Lancer McClard retires from VP-10 Operation: IdenticationA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Cancer is one of our childrens biggest enemies. Chances of survival are greatly enhanced if it is identied early. Parents, please be aware of these warning signs: Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 15

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Blount Island to save $500,000 annually in energy costsA ribbon cutting ceremony was held May 16 at Marine Corps Support Facility Blount Island to offi cially celebrate the completion of their first Utility Energy Service Contracts (UESC) project saving approximately $500,000 annually in energy costs at the Marine Corps installation. UESC projects are viable as they reach out to util ity provid ers to supply financing for the projects and special incentives (e.g. rebates, cover design costs, or energy audits) to the Government and help the Navy and Marine Corps meet energy goals set by the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) and the President. We see the value added by these proj ects as they help the installation save energy and are excited about the growing use of renewable technologies, said Lt. Col. Richard Steele, commanding officer, Marine Corps Support Facility Blount Island. Initial calculations estimated that Blount Island Command will realize approximately $500,000 sav ings annually and reduce energy consumption by 17,000 MMBTU annually, said Tommy Sailors, facility manager, Marine Corps Support Facility Blount Island. The $5 million UESC project will reduce electrical energy usage by providing lighting conservation measures, replacing Air Handling Units (AHUs), installing ultra violet (UV) lights in HVAC units, HVAC compo nent upgrades, compressed air system repairs, cubi cle occupancy motion sensors, warehouse insula tion upgrades, and renewable technologies (solar hot water, photovoltaic (PV) and geothermal systems) throughout 18 facilities. It also includes the installation of 45 Advanced Meter Reading (AMR) meters, which will allow the government to more accurately track and manage facility electrical consumption, prioritize mainte nance requirements and energy saving projects. Included was replacement of thousands of T8 32W and T5 54W lamps with modern T8 28W to T5 51W, respectively, and 88 metal halide lamps with induc tion lamps. The new lamps were configured with motion occupancy sensors which aid in energy con servation. The UV lights on the AHUs kill bacteria on the exterior of the coiling coils which provides better heat transfer over the life of the system, reduces main tenance cost, and extends the life of the system, claimed Peter Wilk, project manager, Energy Systems Group. HVAC component upgrades included the replace ment of old HVAC units with newer more efficient units, along with motor upgrades to HVAC AHU and chill water pumps on building 450. The Geothermal Systems will pump water through a piping network that utilize cooler temperatures from the aqui fer (buildings104 and 450) replacing their standard Chiller Units. After the ribbon cutting everyone in attendance took a tour of the new Solar Thermal and PV systems atop the Headquarters Building (B100) to see the new array. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012

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The Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department is hosting the annual 80 Days of Summer program through Aug. 26 at NAS Freedom Lanes. This program includes daily, weekly and grand prize drawings. Patrons are entered into the daily drawings every time a game is bowled. Youth bowl ers 17 years and younger can bowl one game daily for free until 5 p.m. Daily prize drawings include food, beverages, games of bowling and more. The weekly drawings are held on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and priz es are sponsored by the Kennedy Space Center, World Quest Resort Orlando, Clarion Suites Maingate, Adventure Landing, Pirates Dinner Adventure, Fleming Island Sleep Inn & Suites, WonderWorks, Arabian Nights, Quality Inn & Suites Orlando, CoCo Key Water Resort, Seralogo Hotel & Suites Kissimmee, Medieval Times Dinner Show, Sleuths Dinner Show, Country Inn & Suites Calypso Cay Kissimmee, St. Augustine Pirate & Treasure Museum, Alligator Farm St. Augustine, Wild Adventures Theme Park, Fairfield Inn & Suites Marriott, Wet n Wild Orlando, Dave & Busters, Old Town Trolley Tours St. Augustine, Casa Monica Hotel, Acapulco Resort in Daytona Beach, and the Daytona International Speedway. The grand prize and runner up drawings are Sept. 1 at 7:30 p.m. The grand prize includes an Orlando family vacation package featuring a two-night stay at the World Quest Resort, two SeaWorld admissions and two admissions to SeaWorlds waterpark Aquatica. First runner-up receives a two-night stay at the Acapulco Resort in Daytona Beach and four personalized tours of the Daytona International Speedway. Second runner-up receives a twonight stay at the Fairfield Inn & Suites Marriott in Valdosta, Ga. and four adult admissions to Wild Adventures Theme Park. Third runner-up receives a twonight stay at the Quality Inn & Suites Orlando, four admissions to Wet n Wild and four admissions to Arabian Nights Dinner Show. The 80 Days of Summer program is open to all authorized MWR patrons. For official rules or more information call 542-3493. Weekly Prize Drawing Schedule Two drawings each week, one prize drawing per person. June 9 Kennedy Space Center 2 admissions Dave & Busters (4) $20 Powercards June 16 Clarion Suites Maingate 2 nights stay Adventure Landing Jax 2 waterpark + (5) dry activities tickets June 23 Pirates Dinner Adventure 4 admissions St. Augustine Pirate & Treasure Museum 4 admissions June 30 Fleming Island Sleep Inn & Suites 2 nights stay Kennedy Space Center 2 admissions July 7 WonderWorks 4 admissions CoCo Key Water Resort 2 nights stay July 14 Dave & Busters (4), $20 powercards Seralogo Hotel & Suites Kissimmee 2 nights stay July 21 Medieval Times Dinner Show 4 admissions St. Augustine Pirate & Treasure Museum 4 admissions July 28 Kennedy Space Center 2 admissions Sleuths Mystery Dinner Show 4 admissions Aug. 4 Sunday Brunch for 2 at the Casa Monica Hotel in St. Augustine Country Inn & Suites Calypso Cay Kissimmee 2 nights stay Aug. 11 St. Augustine Pirate & Treasure Museum 4 admissions Kennedy Space Center 2 admissions Aug. 18 Alligator Farm St. Augustine 4 admissions Dave & Busters, (4) $20 powercards Aug. 25 Old Town Trolley Ghost & Gravestone Package St. Augustine 1 family packages to include 2 adult admissions and two children Adventure Landing Jax 3 waterpark + (5) dry activities tickets Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. The Blood Alliance will hold blood donation drives at NAS Jax: Cool off at NAS Freedom Lanes this summer Blood donors, schedule your donation now JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 17

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 The Department of Defense (DOD) has placed strategy before budget in facing pres ent and anticipated threats while building its joint force for the future, Deputy Defense Secretary Ashton Carter said May 31. While weve been fight ing [in Iraq and Afghanistan] the world has not stood still, our friends and enemies have not stood still, and technology has not stood still, the deputy defense secretary said. Now we must meet these changes and . in some places, catch up with them, Carter added. To do that we must let go of the old and familiar and grab hold of the new to build what [Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Army Gen. Martin] Dempsey calls the Joint Force 2020 an agile and technologically advanced force of tomor row. U.S. security must face two forces simultaneously, Carter said. The first is obviously the Budget Control Act but the deeper, more fundamental force is that of strategic histo ry, he said. The 2011 Budget Control Act is a U.S. federal statute that seeks to reduce the national deficit. A sequestration mecha nism in the law automatically takes more cuts out of federal spending, including another $500 billion from DOD, which would mean a total defense budget reduction of more than $1 trillion over 10 years. The result of the Budget Control Act and the new defense strategy is a balanced strategic package in three parts. First is continued DOD dis cipline in spending taxpayer dollars. Second, is to retain taxpayer confidence that DOD is putting its money to good use. Third, is what DOD calls rebalancing toward the Asia-Pacific region. The Pacific region has enjoyed peace and stability for over 60 years, and in that cli mate, first Japan, then Korea, and even China have had an environment in which they could develop economically and politically without war or conflict, the deputy defense secretary said. Thats not a birthright, he added. That is something that was guaranteed [and] rein forced by the pivotal military power of the United States in that region. The DOD now is bolster ing defense capabilities in the Asia-Pacific region, Carter said. Meanwhile, the Air Force continues on with the new stealth bomber, the KC-46 tanker and a host of intelli gence, surveillance and recon naissance (ISR) platforms. Other capabilities going for ward include a payload mod ule for the Virginia-class sub marines, conventional prompt strike and a host of upgrades in radars, electronic protec tion, electronic warfare, new munitions of various kinds and more. Cyber security is another area where DOD will spend more in the future, Carter said, along with certain aspects of the defense science and tech nology base, special opera tions forces, unmanned aerial systems, space initiatives, and countering capabilities for ter rorism and weapons of mass destruction, including bio-ter rorism. We made decisions within the constraints of the Budget Control Act. We had to. And when additions are made to that package in one area, we of necessity have to take some thing out elsewhere, he said. Altering DODs proposed budget package could lead to an unbalanced portfolio, for example, a hollowing of the force, Carter said. Congress, he said, is resisting several changes proposed for cost savings by DOD to the following programs: miums would rise slightly for retirees; some aging single-purpose aircraft in favor of newer multirole aircraft; strategic lift, for which model ing indicates is in excess of current need; Army and Marine Corps to accommodate a wider spec trum of future combat capability; and decidedly more capable Navy. In all our services and in all of our activities in nation al security, were embarked on a strategic transition fol lowing the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Carter said. This is just the beginning, he added. This ship is making a very big turn, and we need to follow through on our plan and keep moving toward the future. The Navy awarded a $2.3 billion contract to Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc. (HII) May 31, for the detail design and construction of the future USS Tripoli (LHA 7), the Navys next large-deck amphibious assault ship. Im very proud of our Navyindustry shipbuilding team and the tremendous effort that has culminated in the award of this critical shipbuilding program, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. This ship will ensure that the amphibi ous fleet remains capable of expeditionary warfare well into the 21st Century. The ship will be construct ed at the HII operations in Pascagoula, Miss. Ship delivery is expected in fiscal year 2018. Like the future USS America (LHA 6), LHA 7 has an increased aviation capacity, including an enlarged hangar deck, realignment and expan sion of the aviation mainte nance facilities, a significant increase in available stowage for parts and support equip ment, and increased aviation fuel capacity. LHA 7 will use the same gas turbine propulsion plant, zonal electrical distribution and electric auxiliary systems designed and built for USS Makin Island (LHD 8), replacing the maintenance-intensive steam plants of earlier amphibious ships. This unique aux iliary propulsion system is designed for fuel efficiency. The ship will provide a flex ible, multi-mission platform with capabilities that span the range of military operations from forward deployed crisis response to forcible entry operations. LHA 7 also will provide forward presence and power projection as an integral part of joint, interagency and multinational maritime expeditionary forces. Tripoli will operate for sus tained periods in transit to and operations in an amphibious objective area to include: embarking, transporting, con trolling, inserting, sustaining and extracting elements of a Marine air-ground task force. Supporting forces will include helicopters and Osprey tilt rotors, as well as the new joint strike fighter aircraft (F-35B Lightning II short takeoff/vertical landing). Navy General Library Program leaders announced May 25 that registration is ongoing for a shared summer reading program that will reach military families in all branches around the globe. Readers of all ages can dig into a wide variety of books centered around the theme, Reading Is So Delicious. Most programs will run eight weeks with open enrollment during the summer. Activities range by location and include every thing from edible art projects to discussions of books like James and the Giant Peach. Last year we saw a 400 percent increase in participation across the program, and we plan to continue this trend with creative programs that connect with readers of all ages, said Nilya Carrato, program assistant, Navy General Library Program. This years theme ties in two great flavors reading for the fun of it and healthy eating. We want to create and support a bumper crop of voracious readers. Research spanning 100 years shows that students typically score lower on standardized tests at the end of summer vacation than they do on the same tests at the beginning of the summer. Summer reading programs can help to offset this loss, because studies also indicate students who read recreationally out-perform those who dont. Students read more when they can choose materials based on their own interests. This year marks the third in which 250 base and installation libraries will participate in the shared summer reading program. Last years program logged more than 10 million minutes spent reading by children and families. Sponsored by the Department of Defense with program content developed by iREAD, the Navy managed initiative, Reading Is So Delicious will reach thou sands of families. Resource guides for the pro gram were developed to motivate children to read. Summer reading programs are valuable not only in reduc ing fall-off in educational attain ment over the summer, but as a means for families and children to spend time together, an especial ly important aspect for military families, Carrato added. For more information on the program, call Nilya Carrato with the Navy General Library Program at 202-433-0785 or email dodsumread@navy.mil. The Navy General Library Program is a Commander, Navy Installations Command program designed to support base libraries around the world and participate in the initial outfitting of ship board libraries across the fleet. JaxReady mobile device hurricane app now availableJacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown announced June 1 a new mobile device weather app for citizens that can now be downloaded for free. The app is called JaxReady and it provides updates on potential storm threats, weather patterns, evacuation information, bridge and road closures, and much more. Our goal is to provide up-to-the-minute informa tion regarding all things storm-related right to users finger tips, said Brown. This will help residents who may be affected when power is out and they have no other line of communication except a mobile device such as a smartphone or an iPad. JaxReady was created by the citys information technologies and emergency preparedness divisions at no cost to the taxpayer. During production of this app, the citys ITD staff researched other communities in the state and across the country that had similar apps. It found that only a small number of cities across the country have such an app, meaning Jacksonville is on the leading edge of this kind of technology for residents. The application serves as a great example of how our city government is working hard in tough times to increase service without increasing costs, said Mayor Brown. The launch of the mobile app comes with a 30-second public service announcement, that is airing on local television and radio stations. The PSA and an instructional video about JaxReady are available at http://www.youtube.com/mayoralvinbrown. Brown also reminded residents, that on the heels of Tropical Storm Beryl, they should make emergency kits now with items like canned food, can openers, water and blankets. Visit JaxReady.org to find out more about special needs shelter registration and how to create a family plan. Once a storm hits Jacksonville, its too late to prepare. The time is now. said Brown. The JaxReady application and JaxReady.org are here to help. Carter: DOD puts strategy before budget for future force Navy awards LHA-7 construction contract Military libraries announce Summer Reading Program Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preven tive measure for growth in per sonal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their fami lies. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommo dations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. For more information or to register, call 542-5745.Improve your life skills with free knowledge from FFSC

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President Barack Obama has announced a new presidential initiative aimed at preparing service members for civilian employment. Obama provided details about the military-to-civilian certification program dur ing his visit to a Honeywell International Inc. plant in Golden Valley, Minn. Defense contractor Honeywell report edly has hired hundreds of military veterans at its plants and facilities since early 2011. Let me tell you something -if you can save a life on the battlefield, you can save a life in an ambulance. If you can oversee a convoy or millions of dollars of assets in Iraq, you can help manage a supply chain or balance its books here at home, Obama said at the plant. If you can maintain the most advanced weapons in the world, if youre an electrician on a Navy ship, well, you can manufacture the next genera tion of advanced technology in our factories like this one. If youre working on complex machinery, you should be able to take those skills and find a manufacturing job right here -right here at home. But unfortunately, Obama said, many returning veter ans with such advanced skills dont get hired simply because they dont have the civilian licenses or certifications that a lot of companies require. At the same time, the presi dent noted, business lead ers often say they cant find enough workers with the skills necessary to fill open positions. Eighty percent of manufac turers say this, according to one survey, Obama said. So think about it -we got all these openings and all these skilled veterans looking for work, and somehow theyre missing each other. That doesnt make any sense, the president said, noting its time to fix it. Today, Im proud to announce new partnerships between the military and manufacturing groups that will make it easier for companies to hire returning service members who prove theyve earned the skills our country needs, Obama said. Soldiers, sailors, Marines, airmen, Coast Guardsmen if theyve got skills in machining or welding or weapons maintenance, for example, youll have a faster track to good-paying manufacturing jobs. Service members with experience in logistics or mainte nance on the front lines will have a faster track to jobs in those fields here at home, he added. The initiative will enable up to 126,000 service members to obtain civilian credentials and certifications in a number of high-demand industries, offi cials said. I applaud President Obamas initiative to help thousands of service members obtain industry-recognized certifications for the trade skills they have learned and worked hard to master while in uniform, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said in a statement issued today. The Defense Department has created a military credential ing and licensing task force as part of the initiative, officials said. It developed partnerships with major manufacturing credentialing agencies to expand certifications to active duty military personnel in the fields of engineering, logistics, maintenance and welding. Supported by the efforts of the Defense Departments military credentialing and licens ing task force, these certifica tions will give our returning troops a leg up in a competitive job market, and they will make it easier for veterans to tran sition to civilian life, Panetta said. Service members can earn these credentials free of charge. The services will also explore how credentialing opportunities can be integrat ed into existing military train ing programs and expanded to include everyone with relevant skills and training, the officials said. The initiative was devel oped in response to a report on veterans employment by the Presidents Council of Economic Advisers and the National Economic Council. The report, Military Skills for Americas Future: Leveraging Military Service and Experience to Put Veterans and Military Spouses Back to Work, describes the difficulties faced by veterans and military spouses in transitioning their military experience to civilian employment. Three such partnerships will begin this summer, the offi cials said. The first, a partnership between the Manufacturing Skills Standards Council and the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps, will involve a pilot program for a limited number of service members. They will be eligible to achieve industry-recognized creden tials that can support a tran sition from military service to frontline jobs in the growing fields of advanced manufac turing and logistics, accord ing to a statement issued by the White House. The second partner ship, among the Army, the American Welding Society and the National Institute for Metalworking Skills, will provide unlimited certifica tion testing at the U.S. Army Ordnance School at Fort Lee, Va., for soldiers in certain machinist and welding specialties. The school trains about 20,000 service members each year to develop, produce and maintain weapons. Service members who acquire these specialties will automatically receive the equivalent civilian credentials. The third partnership, between the Army and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, will expand certi fication opportunities for offi cers and warrant officers at the Armys Engineer School at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. The school will conduct a one-year pilot program for students to quali fy as Certified Manufacturing Technologists and earn Lean Bronze Certification -indus try-standard manufacturing engineering certifications. Going forward, the presi dent and I will remain committed to addressing the full range of challenges our troops and their families face as they leave the service, and to making sure that these men and women have the support they so richly deserve, Panetta said in his statement. They are a national asset, and they stand ready to con tinue making our country great in their civilian careers. Eleven Sailors honed their culinary skills and graduated from First Coast Technical College (FCTC) of Culinary Arts in St. Augustine, Fla., May 25. The Sailors, who represented the 2011 Ney Award winning commands, spent two intense weeks learning new recipes and advanced culinary techniques. The Capt. Edward F. Ney award for food service excellence award pro grams was established in 1958 when the International Food Services Executives Association approached the Secretary of the Navy to sponsor this award program. The Sailors proudly represented their commands at the commencement ceremony. The graduates were CS2 Anthony Oaks, CSSN Carmelo Ramos, and CSSN Ruel Jacob of USS Rentz (FFG 46), CS2 Krystle Mattia of Commander Fleet Activities Yokosuka, CS2 of Gerald Winley of Naval Amphibious Base Coronado, CS3 Hannah Forrester, CS3 Tacora Williams, CS3 Amit Shivanni, CSSN Tori Thornton of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), and CSSN John Eppers and CSSN Victor Robinson of USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62). The Navy culinary specialists learned various garnishing techniques, cooking preparation, knife skills, and sanitation from instructors Chef David Bearl, Chef Kevin Gallagher, and Chef Anthony Lowman. At the courses completion, the culi nary specialists took a certification test, which all passed with flying col ors. Although the culinary specialists wished the course had been longer, they all agreed they had gained a tremen dous amount of knowledge. As a bonus, they were able to fit in some site seeing during their two-week stay in the city, which founded in 1565. NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville Executive Officer Cmdr. Tom Dailey delivered the ceremonys commencement address. His speech reflected on the history of Navy food service, the advancement in the qual ity of its product, and also the sacrifices that Navy food service personnel have made along the way. Congratulations to your ships and stations in winning the Captain Ney Food Service Excellence Awards, said Dailey, a former culinary specialist. I also congratulate you for succeeding here at First Coast Technical College . . Your peers and seniors will envy this opportunity to hone our craft. The FCTC course was a great reward for the hard work these Sailors put in every single day. The opportunity to perfect their craft is something these Sailors will carry with them for a career and a lifetime. A cooks job is never done, and the importance of their contribution to their shipmates quality of life cannot be overestimated. Obama announces military-to-civilian skills certification program Navy culinary specialists hone skills at FCTC JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012 19

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. A major retirement savings tool available to all service members and DOD civilians is the Thrift Savings Plan, and soon there will be a new way to save for retirement -the Roth TSP, a senior Defense Department official said June 1. The Roth TSP, which uses aftertax dollars, will begin phased imple mentation this month for the Marine Corps, and in July for DOD civilians, said Barbara Thompson, director of the Defense Departments Office of Family Policy/Children and Youth. The Roth TSP plan will be available for Navy, Air Force and Army members in October of this year, Thompson said. The phased implementation will ensure each customers taxable wages and TSP contributions are comput ed accurately, according to Defense Finance and Accounting Service offi cials. The schedule allows for thorough testing of the complex changes made to the various civilian, active duty military and reserve component payroll systems, DFAS officials said. The TSP website has a wealth of information to help guide you on the differences between the [TSP] plans, Thompson said. Financial readiness, including choosing the right investments and savings plans, is crucial to service members financial futures, Thompson said. Service members should start saving for retirement early, she said, because they never know what path their careers might take. If you dont put something away in that retirement plan, you may not have something if you dont reach your 20 years as a military member, Thompson said. And, because of compound interest, she added, service members who wait to save until late in their careers can lose hundreds of thousands of dollars. However, financial readiness also includes debt management, managing your credit card[s] and basically [practicing] impulse control on your buying to make sure that you dont live outside your means, Thompson said. Free financial consulting services are available through installation family assistance centers and Military OneSource, Thompson said. Military OneSource provides advice and assistance for service member family issues such as deployments, parenting, financial management, education, child care, military spouse employ ment, and more. In any event, financial decisions should not be made in isolation, Thompson said. Its important to get expert advice, she said, and our personal finan cial counselors both on the military installations and through Military OneSource are certified financial counselors.Roth TSP to expand financial readiness options 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 7, 2012