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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/01986
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 04-26-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:01986

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THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Special Projects Patrol Squadron (VPU) 1 will hold its disestablishment ceremo ny April 27 at 10 a.m. at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117. The Old Buzzards trace their lineage back 40 years when the Chief of Naval Operations requested the cre ation of a specially trained maritime patrol unit possess ing the necessary expertise, flexibility and quick reaction capability to respond to imme diate tasking from the Joint Chiefs of Staff. As a result, a unique special projects detachment of P-3s was formed from operationally proven aircrew and mainte nance professionals. As the demand for P-3 Special Projects assets increased, the detachment became an independent unit under the command of its first officer-in-charge. During this period, the Sailors of VPU-1 continued their proud tradition of operational maritime patrol expertise, rapid response and professionalism. The Old Buzzards served during the Cold War, in Operation Desert Shield/ Storm, as well as numerous other military operations and crises. In March 1996, the unit was formally established as a patrol squadron under the command of Cmdr. Walter Kreitler. For more than 16 years the Old Buzzards upheld the high est standards of the U.S. Navy and the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force. The squadron, flying at least two specially equipped Orions, has operated from NAS Jax since July 2009 when they relocated from NAS Brunswick, Maine. VPU-1 Old Buzzards to disestablish RDC coverage to expandNavy Region Southeast (NRSE) is consolidating installation emergency dispatch services including police, fire and emergency medical into a single 911 call center. By the end of 2013, dispactch services for 13 instal lations will be centralized to the Region Dispatch Center (RDC) on board NAS Jacksonville. These efforts will include every installation throughout the region except for Naval Station (NS) Guantanamo Bay and Naval Support Activity (NSA) Orlando. The consolidation is part of a larger, Navy wide movement to consolidate each regions emergency dispatch services into a single dispatch center located at regional headquarters. According to Tom Fasanello, NRSE dispatch manager, the changes will help standard ize the system. Previously, each installation had its own dispatch center to respond to 911 and emergency service requests, he said. Additionally, the emer gency numbers were not necessarily 911, depending on the location. As part of the RDC consolidation, a new 911 telephone routing system is being deployed. The RDC currently dispatches for five installations, including NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, NSA Panama City, Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport and NAS Meridian. Residents at these loca tions will continue to dial 911 for emergency services after the consoli dation. For those installations yet to consolidate, instructions for emer gency notification procedures will be distributed prior to any changes. In addition to standardizing the emergency notification process The Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville announced the opening of artist Doug Engs Message in a Bottle public art installation on May 2 from5 9 p.m. at the downtown Main Street Park (located at the corner of Main and E. Duval streets). More than 15,000 bottles with hand-written mes sages of hope and appreciation for the military were transformed into a 170 feet wide by 6 feet high wall of light. The wall is constructed of individual empty bot tles arranged in 28 uniquely designed panels. As each bottle was collected, the words were recorded and presented at: www.messageinabottlejax.com. Since November, more than 40,000 words and 3,000 phrases of gratitude have been recorded. A message in a bottle is symbolic of hope. It is an individual act. When combined, all of our individual messages make up an illuminated collective voice this wall of light. It is our gift to the military. We want to tell them they are remembered and appreciated by the people of Jacksonville, explained Eng. We had the enthusiastic participation of thousands of people and groups who contributed bottles to the project, Eng added. We want our area service members to come out and see firsthand a project that was created for them. We want them to read the messages of appreciation for what they do. Our men and women in uniform will definitely feel appreciated.Military invited to view Message in a Bottle art installation Representatives from NAS Jacksonville participated in the City of Jacksonville Mayors Victim Assistance Advisory Council Kickoff Press Conference for National Victims Rights Week April 23. The event held at Jacksonvilles City Hall, began as Ann Dugger, executive director of the Justice Coalition, welcomed guests. We are here to kick off the 28th com memoration of National Crime Victims Rights Week. This years theme is, Extending the Vision of Each and Every Victim. We are continuing our efforts to shed light on crime victims. No one asks to be victimized by violence but when a crime occurs, victims need to be aware that they have rights, said Dugger. The history of the victims rights movement is a story of victims, victims advocates and countless other individuals who work together to bring hope to those victims, their families and communities harmed by crime. Today we are rededicating ourselves to making NAS Jax teams with City of Jacksonville for victims rights

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012 April 26 1869 The Good Conduct medal was authorized. 1952 USS Hobson (DMS-26)) sinks after collision with aircraft carrier USS Wasp (CV-18) in the North Atlantic 176 lives lost. April 27 1861 President Lincoln extended blockade of Confederacy to Virginia and North Carolina ports. 1865 Body of John Wilkes Booth brought to Washington Navy Yard. April 28 1862 Naval forces capture Forts Jackson and St. Philip in Louisiana. 1965 Dominican Republic intervention. 1944 Navy LSTs (Landing Ship, Tank) attacked during Operation Tiger. 1993 SECDEF memo orders armed forces to train and assign women on combat aircraft and most com bat ships, but not to ground combat positions. April 29 1814 Sloop-of-war USS Peacock (22 guns) captures the18-gun HMS Epervier. 1898 U.S. warships engage Spanish gunboats and shore batteries at Cienfuegos, Cuba. 1944 Fast carrier task force (12 carriers) commence two-day bombing of Truk. 1975 Operation Frequent Wind, the helicopter evacuation of American citizens from Saigon, begins. The last helicopter lifted off the roof of the United States Embassy at 7:52 p.m. carrying Marine security guards. April 30 1798 Congress establishes Department of the Navy. 1973 The last Marine Corps NAP (enlisted Naval Aviation Pilot) retired. Master Gunnery Sgt. Patrick ONeil enlisted during World War II and completed over 30 years of active duty. 1975 Saigon falls to North Vietnamese forces. May 1 1898 Battle of Manila Bay, Adm. Dewey defeats Spanish at Manila, Philippines. 1934 Lt. Akers demonstrates blind landing system at College Park, Md. in OJ-2 aircraft. 1945 Vice Adm. Barbey lands Australian troops on Tarakan Island, Borneo, supported by naval gunfire. 1951 VA-195 Skyraider aircraft from the aircraft carrier USS Princeton (CV-37) attack Hwachon Dam in Korea using aerial torpedoes. 1980 11 Navy ships begin operations assisting Coast Guard in rescuing Cuban refugees fleeing Cuba in overcrowded boats. May 2 1975 U.S. Navy departs Vietnamese waters at end of refugees evacuation. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Its been a tasty couple of months for Dinner with the Smileys. Before each dinner, I often won der, Was this a good idea? Will we have anything to talk about with the guest? Waiting for our 12th guest, graph ic illustrator Josh Alves, to arrive was no different. Although Josh and I have lived in the same town for nearly four years, I didnt really know him. And Id never met his wife, Amy. For someone like me someone who hates small talk and, as a result, isnt very good at it the dinner had the potential to be an awkward first (friend) date. Josh and Amy and their oldest daughter arrived at the house with freshly baked cookies and a burst of positive energy. The conversa tion that never waned during the four-hour visit. We had a lively din ner (four kids at the table always ensures liveliness) and an after-din ner game of Pictionary on the back porch, where it was still warm and sunny at 6 p.m. I was sad when the evening came to an end, and not just because the black permanent marker Lindell was using for Pictionary had exploded all over my white shirt. (Also not because Josh beat all of us at Pictionary.) Rather, I didnt want the Alves to leave. Josh left the boys with copies of his comic books and a series of books he illustrated called Zeke Meeks. Ford and Owen read all three books before bedtime. It was a surprise (and comfort) when they learned the main character, Zeke, has a father who is also on deploy ment. March and April brought dinners with two school teachers (always a highlight) along with visits to a local news station, where weatherman Steve McKay taught the boys how to use a green screen (Ford: If I cover my younger brother with a green blanket, will he disappear?) and to prove air exists (my thought: were breathing, but that wasnt the right answer). Later, on another unseasonably warm Maine Spring day, Dr. Scott Peterson, a baseball historian, took us out to a ballgame and taught the boys how to keep score using the method Henry Chadwick invent ed. We met the winning pitcher, DJ Voisine, and my youngest, Lindell, 5, dazzled him with this: DJ: What position do you boys play? Ford: I play second base. Owen: I hope to play shortstop. Lindell: Im hungry. Lunch, which consisted of hot dogs and popcorn and candy, quickly followed. One of our April dinners was supposed to be with an elderly friend who had sometimes served as a substitute grandmother for the boys. She came to their school events, sent them birthday cards and brought them goodies on Halloween and Christmas. She always waved to them on their way to school. And, on warm days, Lindell liked to sit with her on her front steps. Our friend had moved to an assisted living facility a few months ago, so we planned to have dinner with her there. When I called to confirm, I found out that she had passed away sev eral weeks earlier. I needed time to absorb that. Then I told the kids. Losing our friend before we had the chance to visit her for dinner emphasized a growing theme of this project: community matters more than any reason we have not to invite someone to dinner: My house is too small. I dont have time. My house is a mess. Im not a great cook. I could have had her over when the house was a mess and the kids were misbehaving. She wouldnt have cared. She would have been happy to be included, because its not about the house or the food. Its about being together. And, in the end, we have less time to be togeth er than we ever could ever imagine. At the boys suggestion, we will honor the missed dinner and the memory of our friend through a visit with a neighbor who is 94. As each month passes, the boys excitement for this project, as well as their understanding of its impor tance, grows. They enjoy looking at the pictures and reading your comments on Facebook. They also like to see your guesses to my hints about upcom ing guests. (Some of those guesses have given us ideas and prompted us to contact new guests.) Last week, we got permission from musician Josh Ritter to use his song Change of Time in a pro motional video for Dinner with the Smileys. You can see that video on YouTube at https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=QnrnJmkHrto. Hey, MoneyMan! My leading petty officer (LPO) and I were discussing the best way to spend my tax refund. He thinks I should use some of the refund to pay off some revolving credit lines and to save the rest for emergencies. My plan is to use the refund to pay cash for this awesome entertainment sys tem that Ive had my eye on for quite some time. What do you think? Moneyman says: I commend you for dis cussing this with your LPO. According to the IRS, the average tax refund last year was nearly $3,000. That is like getting an extra paycheck for sim ply filing your taxes! It is also like giving the government an extra $250 per month that you could use to pay your electric bill, groceries, rent, etcetera. If you would rather have that money go to your monthly budget instead of the govern ment talk to your command financial spe cialist about how to change the amount that is withheld from your paycheck for federal income taxes. Its very tempting to spend this money quickly on big tick et consumer items, but doing this can impact your family budget for the rest of the year. Your LPO gave you sound advice. Paying off revolving credit lines is a good idea as long as you dont use the greater avail able credit to buy that entertainment system or otherwise max out your credit cards so shortly after paying them off. Being in a dilemma about what to do with your refund check presents an excellent oppor tunity to take stock of your financial situation and develop a strategy for success. Do you have short, medium and long term financial goals? Are you on track to meet them? Do you have a monthly budget? If so, do you stick to it? You are doing the right thing by seeking advice from your chain of command. If you want to take the next step to achieve financial self-sufficiency, make an appointment to talk with a caseworker at the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society at 452-3515.Dinner with the Smileys

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012 3

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Base personnel came togeth er for a Days of Remembrance event to reflect on the tragedy of the Holocaust at the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf April 18. The event began as Master of Ceremonies NAS Jax Public Affairs Officer Miriam Gallet welcomed the group and intro duced Rabbi Jesse Olitzky of the Jacksonville Jewish Center who gave the benediction. I find it meaningful that a military base is holding a Holocaust remembrance event and we pay tribute to the men and women who are putting their lives on the line to ensure that something as devastating as the Holocaust never hap pens again to people of any faith. This day is a reminder of how fragile life is and how eas ily with the gift of free will the world can turn to evil and sin, said Olitzky before giving the blessing. Olitzky also lit a candle in remembrance of those who perished in the Holocaust. This candle memorializes the 11 million people bru tally killed by the Nazis. May the flicker of this flame unite a flame within all of us to remember all those who per ished. NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander also welcomed the guests and intro duced guest speaker Holocaust survivor Morris Bendit. It is an honor for us to host the first National Days of Remembrance event at NAS Jacksonville. It is important for us to remember events such as the Holocaust. It is a powerful lesson in fragility of freedom and reinforces the need for us to be engaged abroad, said Undersander. As Bendit took the podium he thanked the military mem bers for their service. I salute you for all the effort you put in to keeping our nation safe. Coming here, reminds me that we have something in common I was in the Israeli navy many years ago working on destroy ers and frigates, he said. We will always remember the 20th century as the best and the worst in history. It was known as the best for the tech nology, ingenuity, science and medical advances. All of these great advances by humans were also used for evil. Many dictators used the same sci ence and technology to carry out mass killings. In the past 100 years, more than 120 mil lion people were killed, Bendit continued. I hope and pray that in this new century we will learn from the past. Sixteen years ago when my mother passed away, I real ized that the World War II generation is disappearing fast and very soon there will not be anyone left to tell about the atrocities that took place from 1939-45. The Holocaust was the systematic, industri alized annihilation of six mil lion Jews by the Nazis, Bendit said. But until recently, many people only heard about the Nazis. However there were others the Ukrainians and Romanians. There will be wars between tribes and between nations but never on such a large scale as World War II. Bendit then told his person al story of how he was born in Chernovitz, Ukraine in 1941 as the Germans were teaming up with the Romanians to oust Jews from the city. During this time, my father was forced to enlist into the Russian Army to fight the Germans. During a transport, his train was attacked by German bombers and he was killed. In July 1941, the Romanians began killing Jews. By October, 50,000 Jews were taken from their homes and herded into a ghetto. From there, they were transported by cattle cars to a territory called Transnistria that was designat ed for the annihilation of Jews. Many were killed on the way. My family including my maternal grandparents, pater nal grandmother, mother, four uncles and an aunt stayed together. There were no bar racks or gas chambers just fields, killing fields. During the day, we were forced to march from village to village. My mother and grandmother car ried me. At night, we looked for a place to sleep in the bitter cold. Many people died from the cold and starvation if they werent shot, he stated. I have no idea how I survived. Before my fourth birthday, I suffered from typhus, malaria and scar let fever. My only nourishment was nursing from my starving mother. In 1944, the survivors in Transistria were liberated by the Russian Army. By then, the only surviving members of Bendits family were his moth er, maternal grandmother and his aunt. Of the Jews who had been deported to Transnistria, a total of 150,000, approximate ly 90,000 perished there. Bendits remaining fam ily members returned to their home in Chernovitz. A year later, they took what they could and moved to Romania in hopes of going to Israel. In 1949, they were given permis sion to immigrate to the new State of Israel. Bendit soon joined the Israeli navy at the age of 17. Shortly after finishing his military ser vice, he moved to Montreal, Canada. In 1965, he immi grated to the United States and moved to New York where he met his wife, Hanna. They have three daughters and five granddaughters and have lived in Jacksonville for the past 27 years. He spends his time with his family and speaks at various functions about the Holocaust. For many years, the older generation who survived the Holocaust did not talk about the past. I believe it should be told. Never forget because his tory always repeats itself. And, we cannot let those deniers win, they know what happened but they are persuading others to believe it never happened. We cannot fix the past, but we can improve the future. Living in the past is not healthy but remembering the past is essen tial, concluded Bendit. NAS Jax remembers the Holocaust 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012

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Red Lancers perform flyover for Jacksonville Suns season opener On April 5, the VP-10 Red Lancers helped kick off the opening day for the Jacksonville Suns with a fly over of the Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville Stadium. It was a significant event for the Suns and the Red Lancers. The Suns are celebrating their 50th season as a team and the Red Lancers their 50th year anniversary flying the P-3C aircraft. The Jacksonville Suns defeated The Huntsville Stars in a defensive battle resulting in a 2-0 win for the Suns. The VP-10 crew consisted of Lt. Seth Squyres, Lt. j.g. Tom Canny, Lt. j.g. Mike Enriquez, Lt. j.g. Tony Thomsen, Lt. j.g. Sam Urato, AWF1 Matthew Wells and AWO1 Chad Bowles. The crew was very humbled by the welcome they had received from the fans and staff that were at the game. It was so exciting seeing everyone cheering when we flew over the field, said Enriquez. The warm welcome we received from the Suns staff and fans was very much appreciated. Like many of the crew, this was Enriquezs first time flying as part of a flyover. After their flight, the Red Lancers landed at NAS Jacksonville and drove to catch the remaining innings of the ball game. Each member of the crew was introduced on the field during the sixth inning and were given a stand ing ovation. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012 Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) is mak ing depot-level repairs and modifications to the Beechcraft T-44A and C model Pegasus King Air fleet used to train Navy and Marine Corps aviators on multi-engine aircraft at NAS Corpus Christi, Texas. The FRCSE T-44 Advanced Multi-Engine Trainer Team is overseeing a major rewire, Aircraft Condition Inspection (ACI), wing spar replacement and an upgrade to the avionics system with digital display converting the aircraft from an A to C model. This is a huge effort involving FRCSE production and manufacturing, our engineering and production support teams, CNATRA (Chief of Naval Air Training), NAVAIR (Naval Air Systems Command), and PMA (Program Manager Air) 273, said Bill Connelly, the FRCSE program manager for trainer aircraft. This was not an easy undertaking. The aging trainer fleet of 54 aircraft, each flying for more than 32 years, supports CNATRAs vital training mission. Connelly said FRCSE provides one-stop shopping for work previously performed by multiple contrac tors, a situation that increased service costs and slowed down the aviator pipeline with aircraft being out of service more frequently. He credits the profes sionalism, skill level and work ethic of the FRCSE artisans who provide the touch labor for the trainer platform. Connelly said they are returning a high quality product to CNATRA with increasingly shorter turnaround times as the artisans gain experience and become more efficient. FRCSE inducted the first T-44C trainer on April 1, 2010, which came to the depot for a left-hand wing spar replacement and Attitude Heading and Reference Systems (AHRS) relocation. Artisans relocated the AHRS box from directly behind the pilots seat on top of the floor to four feet aft and under the floor pan els. This new configuration eliminated the need to remove the AHRS boxes and mounts when pulling the cabin floorboards for routine inspection of the under lying aircraft structure. It also eliminated the require ment to re-level the box electronically by leveling the plane on jacks followed by performing a softwareleveling procedure. Relocating the AHRS box caused another trouble some issue with the aircraft. Multiple T-44C trainers were experiencing numerous failures of the AHRS on takeoff and in flight posing safety concerns requir ing termination of training flights under Visual Flight Rules. Pilot and co-pilot displays were blanking out, eliminating all information without warning to the pilots. CNATRA Fleet Support Team (FST) engineers evalu ated the AHRS failures and discovered the relocated AHRS box was susceptible to propeller harmonicsinduced vibrations affecting the Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs) contained within. The FST designed a mounting plate assembly to reduce the effects of rota tional harmonics, a frequency problem commonly encountered with propellers. FRCSE machinists fab ricated the new assemblies that maintainers are retro fitting on the T-44C fleet in Texas. Engineering Team Lead David Pfeffer said the CNATRA FST and the FRCSE T-44 production team worked closely with NAVAIR PMA 273 to bring the work back to the military depot. Pfeffer said the T-44 fleet is plagued with a similar wiring concern that has affected many Navy aircraft over the years, that being the extensive use of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) encased wiring, also known as Kapton wiring. The heat from the engine exhaust is causing the insulation around the wire to become brittle along the wing leading edge creating a potential for fire, he said. PVC smokes profusely and produces toxic fumes. Its a big concern. The team launched an extensive reverse-engineer ing effort utilizing a rewired T-44C trainer provided by CNATRA with avionics upgrades already incorporated on the aircraft. They developed detailed work instruc tions, manufacturing and installation drawings, and bills of materials consisting of thousands of compo nents. Electronics Engineer Charlotte Faulk, the avion ics team lead, headed efforts to reverse engineer the wiring harnesses that run the length of the airframe. She created manufacturing drawings from the exist ing wiring diagrams and worked closely with FRCSE Cable Shop personnel who provided real-time feed back. We had five sets of harnesses from the vendor, said Faulk. The cable shop verified that the har nesses were built correctly. They worked closely with engineering and the T-44 line artisans to create rewire harnesses that ran from wingtip to wingtip. The Avionics System Upgrade (ASU) replaces the T-44A analog steam gauge instrument panel and cor responding wire harnesses with a Rockwell Collins Pro-Line 21 avionics suite incorporating modern mul tifunctional color displays, AHRS and an Emergency Locator Transmitter. Additionally, the T-44 team is conducting the depotlevel ACI required at 5-year intervals that includes the latest aircraft configuration updates. Parts acquisition continues to prove challenging for the team given the trainer aircraft were commercially supported for the life of the plane until 2010. Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) does not stock the parts, which causes long delays when contracting with commercial vendors. FRCSE artisans have completed 13 aircraft involving a variety of repairs and upgrades. They are currently working seven T-44 aircraft, four of those are ASU with rewire modifications required for the A to C model conversion with two scheduled for completion in mid-April. An additional three aircraft are undergo ing ACI with wiring modifications. The FRCSE T-44 team is uncovering and correcting the effects of years of wear and tear on an aircraft that operates in harsh environments. These repairs and upgrades will not only reduce future maintenance costs and improve mission readiness of the T-44 plat form, but also ensure the pipeline of Naval aviators will continue far into the future. The trainer fleet must continue to maintain airwor thiness through its planned sundown in 2025. Trainer repair team ensures future aviator pipeline

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Squadron personnel have earned seven Joint Meritorious Unit awards, six Navy Unit Commendations, seven Meritorious Unit Commendations, seven Navy Battle E awards and var ious other unit, service and campaign awards. Several Old Buzzards alumni are in town for the disestablishment events that include the Buzzard Ball, a golf tournament and Buzzard Night at the Jacksonville Suns Ballpark. As part of the Friday ceremony, Cmdr. Lee Boyer, the last Old Buzzards commanding officer, will lower the command pennant and dis miss the squadron for the final time. Its definitely going to be a bittersweet ceremony. On one hand, it is sad to see such a great squadron being retired but on the other hand, disestablish ment has renewed the bond between every generation of Old Buzzards. I have truly been humbled by the sup port and the obvious attachment that former and retired Old Buzzards have for this squadron, Boyer stated. Cmdr. Chris McDowell, the former VPU-1 executive officer and now com manding officer of VPU-2 at MCAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii had these thoughts on the events.The Old Buzzards of VPU-1, and the dedicated professionals, families and friends who support us, repeatedly accomplished some amazing things over the past 40 years. With several current Old Buzzards destined to continue our fine tradition of mission accomplish ment as members of our sister squadron, VPU-2, I look forward to carrying our unrivaled capabilities forward.VPU-1: Old Buzzards disestablisingvictims rights, protection and services a reality. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown also addressed the importance of supporting victims of crimes. There are a number of people to thank and acknowledge today from the law enforcement personnel in our com munity on the front line to elected offi cials who work policy to protect us, said Brown. But this is also about the victims who we should be focused on. Were not here to honor you or put you on a pedestal, were here to support you because you are people, fellow human beings negoti ating a nightmare. Even when an arrest was made and the headlines say guilty, we know your journey will continue. We know that crime hurts and threatens but together we remain strong. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders was also in attendance to stress how the Navy supports crime vic tims and educates military personnel on sexual assault prevention. Throughout the month of April, the Navy is making an all-out effort towards promoting sexual assault awareness. The number of sexual assaults in the Navy is unacceptable. As part of this campaign, we are also addressing vic tims rights, said Sanders. The Navy Victim and Witness Assistance Program is designed to ensure victims and witnesses of crime are treated with fairness and dignity and afforded their rights throughout the criminal justice process. At NAS Jax, victims always have sup port from their chain of command, legal system and Fleet and Family Support Center. Our counselors are fully trained to assist victims and witnesses and ensure they receive comprehensive care and counseling and are treated with dignity and the utmost respect, contin ued Sanders. The Navy has a zero tolerance policy on sexual assault and sexual harass ment. City of Jacksonville Victims Rights Week Chairperson and NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center Domestic Abuse Victim Advocate Latresa Henderson echoed Sanders remarks. At the NAS Jax FFSC, we have sexu al assault response coordinators who are responsible for training advocates in every command on the installa tion. They provide support to victims of sexual assault. We also have numer ous partnerships with Naval Hospital Jacksonville and outside agencies. We are here to help victims with any ser vices they might need, said Henderson. VICTIM: Awareness week gets supportthroughout the regions installations, the consolidation will also provide some technological advantages, accord ing to Fasanello. The RDC also has an advanced com puter-aided dispatch system that auto mates the exact response recommenda tion based on the nature and location of the emergency. It also provides a mapped location of the caller. In addition, RDC dispatchers are certified to administer emergency medical instructions prior to the arrival of emergency medical technicians to the scene, added Fasanello. While the time frame for the consoli dation will vary depending on location, the RDC will make public awareness a priority, Fasanello said. At about two months out, we will begin to work very closely with the installation and coordinate an agreesi ve public awareness campaign, he said.RDC: Coverage to include 13 installations Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012

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41 military moms-to-be will celebrate Operation ShowerThey may not be golfers, but 41 local military moms-to-be will enjoy a spe cial experience during the PGA TOURs 2012 THE PLAYERS Championship at TPC Sawgrass. The women, whose spouses are deployed members of the U.S. Navy and Army National Guard, will be hon ored during an Operation Shower group baby shower presented by Birdies for the Brave and the PGA TOUR May 6, at 11 a.m. in the Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost located on THE PLAYERS Stadium Course at TPC Sawgrass. For military wives who are expecting a baby and whose spouses are deployed or soon to be deployed, the impending arrival of a child can be both exciting and stressful, said Operation Shower Founder and Chief Shower Officer LeAnn Morrissey. Operation Shower was created specifically because typically mili tary moms are the ones who hold it all together at home. Without their spouses by their side, deployed to another part of the world, these moms deserve our support, our thanks, our love and an opportunity to celebrate together. During the Celebration Fore Babythemed event, the moms will enjoy lunch and an opportunity to share sto ries and gain comfort from other mili tary moms-to-be in the same situation, as well as the highlight of the event the presentation of Operation Showers signature Shower in a Box. Each mom will receive an array of unique, high quality products and gift items for mothers and babies that have been donated by numerous companies. The Operation Shower event is just one of many military and communi ty outreach activities that will be held before and during THE PLAYERS, May 7-13. In addition to providing active duty, retired and Reserve members of the military and their dependents with complimentary tournament admission all week as well as discounted tickets for veterans, THE PLAYERS will host a mil itary job fair May 7, as well as Military Appreciation Day May 9, featuring a ceremony beginning at 5:30 p.m. with military pageantry; a flyover by F-15 fighter jets from the 125th Fighter Wing of the Florida National Guard; and a performance by country music artist Luke Bryan. Additionally, military guests attend ing THE PLAYERS will enjoy compli mentary food and beverages all week in the Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost military hospitality chalet, located on the hill between the No. 16 and No. 18 fairways. THE PLAYERS will continue its policy of providing free or affordable access to the tournament for men and women of the Armed Services. There are two military ticket policies: sonnel along with their dependents receive compli mentary admission to the tournament all day, every day. Free tickets are available online via a link to TicketMaster from THE PLAYERS website (PGATOUR. COM/THEPLAYERS); these are print-at-home tickets and military personnel and their dependents will be asked to present the paper ticket amd valid military ID at the gate for free admission. Advantage to distribute discounted tickets to mili tary veterans and their families. Available to those carrying the Veterans Advantage VetRewards Card, discounted tickets can be purchased online through a special link, and then redeemed at the admissions gate with proof of a valid Veterans Advantage VetRewards Card. Visit PGATOUR.COM/ THEPLAYERS (click on 2012 Tickets) for more infor mation. Wednesday, but parking passes must be purchased in advance for Thursday through Sunday. Once again in 2012, THE PLAYERS will offer hos pitality to active, Reserve and retired military and dependents at the Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost, located on the hill between No. 16 and No. 18 fairways. The Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost, provides complimentary food, beverages and interactive activi ties and is open Wednesday-Sunday. Military ID is required for admittance. USO Centers do not have tickets or sell parking passes, which are available online.The Players to honor motherhoodThe Players honors military with free tickets and events NAS Jax Acting Fire Chief Mark Brusoe and Fire Training Chief David Rickel traveled to Deltona, Fla. April 13 to notify the Navys first fire marshal, Douglas Thomas that he had been inducted into the Navys Fire and Emergency Hall of Fame. They also presented him with a firefighters helmet as his wife, Rennae, looked on. Thomas began his fire service career in 1941 as a firefighter at the Washington Navy Yard. After joining the U.S. Marine Corps in 1942, he was sta tioned at Beaufort, S.C. and Quantico, Va. and then served in the Pacific Theatre at Iwo Jima with the 5th Marine Division. The unit fought from Feb. 19 to March 18, 1945 where 1,098 Marines were killed and 2,974 were injured. After the war, Thomas returned to the NAS Anacostia Fire Department and where he eventu ally advanced to assistant fire chief. In 1963, he was appointed fire chief of a consolidated Navy fire department for NAS Anacostia, Washington Navy Yard and the Naval Research Laboratory. In 1976, Thomas became the first Navy Fire Marshal Program administrator, serving in the position until he retired in 1976. Navys first fire marshal honored 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012

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In the past couple of weeks, Jackson-ville area resi dents have experienced the effects of brush fires in North Florida. Whether its the decreased visibility as we transit between home and work or our activities have been hampered as a result of the quality of air we breathe. The area is currently in a drought and the dryness of the soil and duff layers increase each day without rain (the amount of increase depends on the daily high temperature) and decreases when it rains. The range of the index is determined by assuming that there are eight inches of moisture in a saturated soil that is readily available to the vegetation. During a drought, conditions are favorable for the occurrence and spread of wildfires, but drought is not by itself a prerequisite for wildfires. Other weather factors, such as wind, temperature, relative humidity and atmospheric stability, play a major role in determining the actual fire danger. It is estimated that approximately 1,000 wildfires per year have their origins traced to an improperly discarded cigarette. Most of these wildfires are relatively small and con trolled easily. However, a few quickly expand into multi-million dollar events causing widespread destruction of prop erty and sometimes loss of human lives. Combine the current drought indexes in North Florida with the breezy conditions weve been expe riencing and an improperly discarded cigarette; a simple mulch fire could easily evolve into a danger ous, fast moving major wildfire. Peer pressure on our shipmates for improper dis posal of cigarettes will greatly reduce the likelihood of a wildfire aboard the installation and our surrounding communities. Please help us, help you stay safe!Take care, with conditions favorable for wildfires across North Florida area NAS Jax Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) volunteers were honored during a spring tea event for knitters April 12 and a luncheon for office volunteers April 19. Thank you all for coming today. I especially want to thank Kathy Sanders for hosting our tea event this year. Its an honor to be here today to celebrate those who volunteer and do so much for our military mem bers and their families, said NAS Jax NMCRS Director Dave Faraldo. Better known as Blanket Babes, these women donate their time knit ting and crocheting baby blankets for the baby seabags that are distributed to new parents attending the NMCRS Budget for Baby classes. The following volunteers were recog nized: Ayako White, 350 hours; Priscilla Bellefeuille, 360 hours; Frances Dalton, 1,112 hours; Genevieve Brynildsen, 2,265 hours; Marilyn Nielsen, 3,945 hours; Bridget Russell, 5,174 hours; Margaret Wright, 11,886 hours; and Delores Leisy, 25,304. NAS Jax NMCRS Chairman of Volunteers Amanda OConnell coordi nated the event. During the awards luncheon many new volunteers were recognized, including: Alison Craig, Arica Goulet, Ryan Goulet, Sheila Stevens, Kathy Sanders, Kristen Hager, Daniela Hines, Maddie Stevens and Lindsay Yager. Volunteers were also presented with tokens of appreciation for donating their time to support service members and their families. Those recognized were: Ryan Goulet, Stephanie Gruber, Virginia Leary, Arica Goulet, and Laura Tucker for 100 hours; Diane Eastman, Pauline Ebersole, Virginia Leary, Kim Seligman, Chuck Tamblyn, Gi Teevan, and Delores Wise for 300 hours; Pauline Ebersole, Alicia Merlino, Kim Seligman, Delores Wise, Denise Foster, and Chuck Tamblyn for 500 hours; Denise Foster, Pauline Ebersole, Alicia Merlino, and Ashley Dostie for 600 hours; Melissa Schade and Chris Scorby for 1,000 hours; Melissa Schade and Amanda OConnell for 1,500 hours. NMCRS employee Monika Woods was also recognized for being with the soci ety for five years. These are the most awards that weve ever presented. We welcome our new volunteers and thank this out standing team for donating their time to help our military members in need and for everything they do each and every day! said OConnell. If you are interested in volunteering at NMCRS, please call 542-3515 or e-mail mandivoc@gmail.com. NMCRS Jacksonville volunteers honored JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012 11

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National Infant Immunization Week is April 21-28. It is a week set aside to help parents everywhere understand the importance of protecting infants and toddlers from vaccine-preventable diseases. Myths and misinformation about vaccine safety often confuse par ents. To be clear, vaccines save lives. And the United States currently has the safest, most effective vaccine supply in history. Years of testing are required by law before a vaccine is licensed and they are continually monitored for safety and effectiveness. Like any medica tion, vaccines can cause side effects. Its important to know that serious side effects are extremely rare. And the ben efits of getting vaccines far outweigh possible side effects for almost all chil dren. Vaccines can protect infants and children from 14 diseases. And thanks to vaccines, some diseases are almost gone in the U.S. The elimination of polio and smallpox in the U.S. are pow erful examples of why we vaccinate. Immunization can also save fami lies time and money. Children with vaccine-preventable diseases may not be allowed to go to school or daycare. Some vaccine-preventable diseases require hospitalization, cause perma nent disabilities and can also really take a financial toll. Immunization also protects future generations. Birth defects associated with rubellaGerman measlesare no longer seen in the U.S. By continuing to vaccinate now, some of todays diseases will no longer be around to harm our children . our grandchildren . and their grandchildren. What happens if we stop vaccinating? By taking away this protection, more and more people would be infected, become sick and spread disease to oth ers. We would undo the progress we have made over the years with the elim ination of diseases. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a 2010 outbreak of pertussiswhooping coughkilled 10 infants in California. And measles takes the lives of more than 100,000 children around the world each year. Pertussis and the measles are among the 14 vaccine-preventable diseases. More information is available at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/ infants-toddlers or by calling the CDC Contact Center at 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) Changes are on the way in how commissaries handle coupons and product returns without receipts, among other things, as the Defense Commissary Agency enacts customer service policy chang es to protect the commissary benefit. The average coupon user might not notice the policy changes because they are aimed at preventing possible misuse of the commissary ben efit primarily using coupons to get large amounts of cash back, said Joseph Jeu, DeCA director and CEO. Commissary shoppers are big users of coupons, as evidenced by DeCAs consistent rank ing among the top 10 grocery retailers in coupon redemp tions over the past several years. Commissaries welcome coupon usage, and to acquaint customers with the changes in the coupon acceptance pol icy, it has been posted on the agencys website at http://www. commissaries.com/inside_ deca/publications/directives/ DeCAD40_6_PC_3.pdf and on Facebook at www.Facebook. com/YourCommissary. Key changes, which go into effect May 1, include: to a customer, in conjunction with cash, whenever a transac tion total reflects $25 or more is owed to the customer due to coupon overages (when the face value of the coupon exceeds the selling price of the item purchased and the trans action results in a negative bal ance). customers, in conjunction with cash, for refunds of $25 or more when a receipt is presented showing the merchandise was originally purchased with gift cards. customers, in conjunction with cash, for refunds of $25 or more when a receipt is not presented suspected privilege abuse. tance policy that clarifies dotscan barcode requirements and pin requirements for unique numbering, that photocopies and counterfeit coupons are not accepted, and that coupons must be printed in English. The changes harness the scope of the new commissary gift card, which has been in use since last summer. Available only in denominations of $25 and $50, issuing gift cards as an alternative to paying out large sums of cash brings DeCA in line with other retailers prac tices and ensures DeCAs cash flow is not adversely impacted. Amounts under $25 will be in cash. Commissaries are providers of a benefit that sell groceries at cost, and using the gift cards to cover certain refunds and coupon overages discourages practices contrary to DeCAs mission, Jeu noted. We value coupon usage because it helps our customers boost their savings, Jeu said. These changes are in the best interest of all concerned to help ensure that coupons con tinue to be a great source of sav ings for our customers.Infant immunizations save livesCommissaries announce coupon policy changes 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012

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Month of the Military Child celebrated with annual carnivalLaughter and excitement filled the air as hundreds of kids and their parents came out to enjoy the annual Month of the Military Child Carnival Saturday at the Allegheny Softball Fields. The free event is put on each year by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Departments Youth Activities Center (YAC) to show military chil dren how much they are appreciated. Were here today to recognize mili tary children and the sacrifices they make. This our way of saying thank-you for all they do and to show how much we appreciate them, said YAC Director Aaron Long. The event featured numerous inflatables that pro vided lots of jumping, sliding and bouncing, a rock climbing wall, jousting, games, face painting by the staff of the Fleet and Family Support Center, free pop corn and cotton candy. Before every event, we review what attractions JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012 13

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and activities have worked in the past and what are not so popular. We come up with new ideas and try to bring in things that will keep the children and families entertained. And, through the generosity of our sponsors, we keep adding to the event, continued Long. Long also commended those who assisted to bring the event together by setting up, manning the booths and games and would help with the clean up. Nothing beats the heart of our vol unteers who came out to help us even when we thought the weather was going to be bad. It speaks true to their characters and we certainly appreciate them, he said. Luckily, despite the forecast for thun derstorms, the weather held steady and contributed a hefty amount of sunshine for the event as the families spent some time enjoying the different activities. Weve come to this event every year, since Ive been stationed here. Its a great opportunity to let the kids have some fun and its free. Its really a great event put on by MWR, said OS1(SW) Rollin George of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven who brought his two young boys to the event. This is really fun because they have bouncy houses and I get to eat cotton candy and popcorn, added eight-yearold Karla Mill, who was a bit nervous as she waited in line to climb the rock wall. This years sponsors were VyStar Credit Union, USAA, Allied American University, Navy Mutual Aid Association, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, First Command Financial Services, University of Phoenix and Everest University.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government offi cially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.CARNIVAL: Celebrating military children R ecreationalSafety Rodeo Commissary Parking Lot Tuesday, May 8 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Battle of MidwayCommemorative Dinner June 9, 2012WorlD Golf Village Renaissance ResortDinner 6:00 p.m. Keynote: Adm. Jonathan Greenert, CNOActive Duty E6 and below $25E7 to O3 $35 O4 to O5 $45O6 & above, civilians & retirees $60For more information, contact Bob Price At (904) 246-9982, e-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net or Bill Dudley at (904) 806-4712, E-mail: anuday00@aol.com. Tickets may also be purchased at www. midwaydinner.orgUniform for O4 and above is dinner dress white jacket. For O3 and below, dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional. Civilian is black tie or business attirewww.midwaydinner.org Sponsored by Some veterans covered under the Veterans Group Life Insurance program (VGLI) now have the opportunity to increase their coverage to the current maximum coverage under the Service members Group Life Insurance (SGLI) program. Currently, 70 percent of the veter ans covered under VGLI are under age 60, have less than $400,000 of cover age, and will greatly benefit from this law change, said Allison Hickey, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) under secretary for benefits. Under the Veterans Benefits Act of 2010, enacted on Oct. 13, 2010, veterans can increase their coverage by $25,000 at each five-year anniversary date of their policy to the current legislated maximum SGLI coverage, presently, $400,000. The VGLI program allows newly dis charged veterans to convert their SGLI coverage they had while in the service to a civilian program. Before enactment of this law, veterans could not have more VGLI than the amount of SGLI they had at the time of separation from service. For example, those who got out of the service prior to Sept. 1, 2005, when the maximum SGLI coverage was $250,000, were limited to $250,000 in VGLI cover age. Now on their first five-year anni versary, these veterans can elect to increase their coverage to $275,000. On their next five-year anniversary, they can increase the coverage to $300,000, and so forth. The additional coverage can be issued regardless of the veterans health. To be eligible to purchase this additional coverage, the veteran must: Have active VGLI coverage, Have less than the current legislated maximum coverage of $400,000, Request the additional coverage dur ing the 120-day period prior to each five-year anniversary date, and Be less than 60 years of age on the five-year anniversary date of his or her coverage. Eligible veterans are notified of this opportunity a week before the start of the 120-day period prior to their anni versary date, and twice more before the actual anniversary date. For more information about VAs Insurance Program or other VA ben efits, go to www.va.gov or call 1-800827-1000.Law change increases insurance coverage 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012 15

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included April Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor pool hours Mon. Fri. 5:30 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 8 p.m. Weekend hours 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. Family Fitness Bootcamp with Ashley Monday & Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. Family Fitness Center above the Youth Center Gym Call (904) 778-9772 Outdoor Pool Open Weekends Beginning May 5 & 6, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Open weekdays beginning June 11 Free for military and DoD civil ians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session one begins June 18 $40 military, $45 DoD Sign-up at the base gym on Saturday, May 12 8 11 a.m. military only, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. all eligible patronsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. 2012 13 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguars tickets coming soon! Disney World Orlando FL 4 day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Disney World Orlando FL Resident 3 day $98.25, 3 day hopper $125.25, 4 day $127.75, 4 day hopper $154.50 Funk Fest May 11 & 12 at Metropolitan Park $57 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 St. Augustine Scenic Cruise Day Trip May 5, 9:30 a.m. 5 p.m. $20 per person The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Paintball Trip GTF in Yulee May 5 at 9 a.m. Free Scuba Class May 8 at 5:30 p.m. Indoor pool Barracks Bash Luau May 10, 4 8 p.m. Free food, entertainment, games and great prizes!NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees May 8 & 22 for active duty May 10 & 24 for retirees & DoD personnel Ladies Golf Clinics Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. $10 per person Pre-registration required, signup in the pro shop Senior Military Invitational April 30 & May 1 9 a.m. shotgun start $65 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Shoreline Clean-up May 4 at 8:30 a.m. Free lunch! Call 542-2709 or e-mail angela. glass@navy.mil to sign-up Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recre ation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more infor mation. 2012 Adventure Summer Registration Dates: Current School-Age Care par ticipants Now Single & Dual Active Duty NowOther Active Duty Now DoD Civilians Now through April 27 Registration Packets available for pick up at the Youth Center.Flying Club Call 777-8549 /6035 Ground School June 4 July 16 $500 per person 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Summer is quickly approaching and with it, the appeal of outdoor activities and family involvement in sports. The rate of sports-related accidents that result in a trip to the emergency room or doctors office increases exponentially during the summer. Injuries can be as simple as a scrape or cut on the face, to more complicated injuries such as facial fractures, broken teeth or concussions. And theres the additional dan ger of UV rays from increased sun exposure. According to Safe Kids USA and the American Academy of Pediatrics, more than 30 million U.S. chil dren ages five to14 participate in sports each year. Of those, 3.5 million will receive medical treatment, with more than 775,000 ending up in emergency rooms. In a national survey, 33 percent of parents admitted they often dont enforce the same safety precautions during their childs practices as they do for games. No wonder, then, that 62 percent of sports-related injuries occur during practice. The Consumer Product Safety Commission offers an annual breakdown on emergency room visits caused by sports injuries to youth under age 15. By far the most common are bicycle-related, with 239,795 inju ries (34% associated with the head). Next is baseball, with 84,878 injuries (49% associated with the head), skateboarding (65,130 injuries), football (51,953 inju ries), kick scooters (37,574 injuries), ATVs (32,875 inju ries), roller skating (28,559 injuries), softball (27,510 injuries), in-line skating (18,712 injuries), and lacrosse (5,393 injuries). Taking basic precautions such as wearing proper safety gear can go a long way in preventing sportsrelated accidents. If involved with cycling or motor cycles, always wear a helmet. Make sure to wear the chinstrap as well. Every sport is different, but ensure that participants wear the right protective equipment for the activ ity (helmets, padding, shin guards, eye and mouth guards). A simple bump or blow to the head during a game or practice can cause a concussion (brain inju ry). Even a small ding or slight bump to the head can be serious. If a child might have a concussion, seek medical attention right away and keep the child out of play so the concussion can heal. Look for the following signs and symptoms of a concussion: headache or pressure in the head; nausea or vomiting; balance problems or dizziness; double or blurry vision; sensitivity to light; sensitivity to noise; concentration or memory problems; confusion; feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy or groggy; or just not feeling right. For sports like football, baseball, volleyball, hockey or basketball, its important to wear a mouth guard. The American Dental Association estimates that mouth guards prevent more than 200,000 oral/facial injuries per year, including tooth loss and jaw frac -Prevent head injuries JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012 17

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The world is full of threats, and the United States must be prepared for them, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta told CNNs Wolf Blitzer in an April 19 interview. Blitzer traveled to a NATO meeting in Brussels with Panetta and interviewed the defense secretary and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. Panetta said he is concerned about North Korea, Iran, Syria and the tur moil in the Middle East. Beyond that, he added, he also worries about threats posed by cyber war, weapons of mass destruction and rising powers. All of those things are threats that the United States faces in todays world, he said. On Syria, Clinton said the U.S. goal is to see Bashir al-Assads government stop killing its own people. The goal right now is if the Assad regime were to say, OK, we agree, were going to do everything that [United Nations envoy] Kofi Annan asks us to do, that will be our focus -not some future, maybe unlikely, outcome in terms of criminal accountability, she said. What Im interested in is Lets stop the violence and lets start the political transition. The United States stands ready to do what the international community decides on Syria, she added. The administration has taken a firm stand on North Korea and the provoca tive behavior of its new ruler Kim Jong Un, Panetta said. Were within an inch of war almost every day in that part of the world, he said. And you just have to be very care ful about what we say and what we do. The U.S. alliance with South Korea is strong, Panetta said, and more than 28,000 U.S. service members are based in the country, providing a tangible example of U.S. commitment to peace in Northeast Asia. Provocations such as North Koreas recent failed rocket launch and threats of testing a nuclear weapon should stop, Panetta said. The fact is it was provocative, and we have made it very clear to them that they should not take any additional, provocative actions, he said. The defense secretary stressed that this is not just a U.S. wish, but that the international community wants North Korea to end its provocations. Clinton, Panetta discuss diplomatic, defense policies A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012

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tures. Dentists, pharmacies and sporting goods stores all offer mouth guards. Do the right thing be proactive in preventing sports and outdoor injuries and wear a helmet, mouth guard and other protective gear. If activi ties are outside, dont forget UV protection with sunscreen and remember to re-apply frequently if sweating or swimming. In addition, its Oral Cancer Awareness Month, which is a good reminder to get regular check-ups by a dental professional. Each year almost 40,000 people are diagnosed with cancer of the mouth or throat, resulting in more than 8,000 deaths, according to the Oral Cancer Foundation. Alcohol and tobacco, along with certain infec tions such as human papilloma virus (HPV-16), contribute to these cancers. A physical exam of the mouth, to check for signs of cancer, is an important part of the dental check-up. For more, talk to a dental provider or see the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons website at www.aaoms.org. SPORTS: Prevent head injuries JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012 19

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The Navy Former Spouse Protection Act Coordinator Office (PERS-314) determines sponsor and family eligibility for ID Card authorized military benefits. This includes determining authorization for ID Cards for former spouses under the Former Spouse Protection Act. When the former spouse applies for an ID Card after a divorce, the dependent spouses ID must be surren dered and application for a Former Spouse ID Card must be made. As part of the initial issuance of the Former Spouse ID Card, the following documents and information are required in order for PERS-314 to make a deter mination of the eligibility for the ID Card privileges and benefits under the Former Spouse Protection Act (Public Law 97-252 and amendments ): Grade, Service Branch, Sponsors Status (Retired/ Active/Deceased), Sponsors Retirement Date, Sponsors Address and Phone Number (Home and/or Work) remarried since the divorce sponsored health care insurance and Phone Numbers (Home and Work or Cell as Applicable) PERS-314 will review the application for eligibility and send the applicant a letter of authorization based on the former spouses level of benefits. The former spouse will need to show this letter of approval to the ID issuing facility every time an ID card needs to be renewed and/or reissued. The American Red Cross at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is cur rently recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volunteers. This offers an excel lent opportunity for students interested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine profession als physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and technicians as well as contribute to cre ating a positive experi ence for NH Jacksonville patients. The program is open to a limited number of high school students age 16 to 18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the hospital, and receive CPR training. Applications can be picked up at NH Jacksonvilles American Red Cross office (Room 1404, next to Physical Therapy & Occupational Therapy) and must be submitted by May 1. Selectees are required to attend the June 9 kickoff event from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., that includes an interview, in the hos pitals central tower sec ond deck conference room. For more information, call Junior Red Cross Volunteer Chairman Terry Miles at 542-7525 or e-mail terry.miles2@ med.navy.mil.Former spouse ID card renewal procedures outlinedJunior Red Cross volunteers must apply by May 1 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012



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THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Special Projects Patrol Squadron (VPU) 1 will hold its disestablishment ceremo ny April 27 at 10 a.m. at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117. The Old Buzzards trace their lineage back 40 years when the Chief of Naval Operations requested the cre ation of a specially trained maritime patrol unit possess ing the necessary expertise, flexibility and quick reaction capability to respond to immediate tasking from the Joint Chiefs of Staff. As a result, a unique special projects detachment of P-3s was formed from operationally proven aircrew and mainte nance professionals. As the demand for P-3 Special Projects assets increased, the detachment became an independent unit under the command of its first officer-in-charge. During this period, the Sailors of VPU-1 continued their proud tradition of operational maritime patrol expertise, rapid response and professionalism. The Old Buzzards served during the Cold War, in Operation Desert Shield/ Storm, as well as numerous other military operations and crises. In March 1996, the unit was formally established as a patrol squadron under the command of Cmdr. Walter Kreitler. For more than 16 years the Old Buzzards upheld the high est standards of the U.S. Navy and the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force. The squadron, flying at least two specially equipped Orions, has operated from NAS Jax since July 2009 when they relocated from NAS Brunswick, Maine. VPU-1 Old Buzzards to disestablish RDC coverage to expandNavy Region Southeast (NRSE) is consolidating installation emergency dispatch services including police, fire and emergency medical into a single 911 call center. By the end of 2013, dispactch services for 13 installations will be centralized to the Region Dispatch Center (RDC) on board NAS Jacksonville. These efforts will include every installation throughout the region except for Naval Station (NS) Guantanamo Bay and Naval Support Activity (NSA) Orlando. The consolidation is part of a larger, Navy wide movement to consolidate each regions emergency dispatch services into a single dispatch center located at regional headquarters. According to Tom Fasanello, NRSE dispatch manager, the changes will help standardize the system. Previously, each installation had its own dispatch center to respond to 911 and emergency service requests, he said. Additionally, the emergency numbers were not necessarily 911, depending on the location. As part of the RDC consolidation, a new 911 telephone routing system is being deployed. The RDC currently dispatches for five installations, including NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, NSA Panama City, Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport and NAS Meridian. Residents at these loca tions will continue to dial 911 for emergency services after the consoli dation. For those installations yet to consolidate, instructions for emergency notification procedures will be distributed prior to any changes. In addition to standardizing the emergency notification process The Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville announced the opening of artist Doug Engs Message in a Bottle public art installation on May 2 from5 9 p.m. at the downtown Main Street Park (located at the corner of Main and E. Duval streets). More than 15,000 bottles with hand-written mes sages of hope and appreciation for the military were transformed into a 170 feet wide by 6 feet high wall of light. The wall is constructed of individual empty bottles arranged in 28 uniquely designed panels. As each bottle was collected, the words were recorded and presented at: www.messageinabottlejax.com. Since November, more than 40,000 words and 3,000 phrases of gratitude have been recorded. A message in a bottle is symbolic of hope. It is an individual act. When combined, all of our individual messages make up an illuminated collective voice this wall of light. It is our gift to the military. We want to tell them they are remembered and appreciated by the people of Jacksonville, explained Eng. We had the enthusiastic participation of thousands of people and groups who contributed bottles to the project, Eng added. We want our area service members to come out and see firsthand a project that was created for them. We want them to read the messages of appreciation for what they do. Our men and women in uniform will definitely feel appreciated.Military invited to view Message in a Bottle art installation Representatives from NAS Jacksonville participated in the City of Jacksonville Mayors Victim Assistance Advisory Council Kickoff Press Conference for National Victims Rights Week April 23. The event held at Jacksonvilles City Hall, began as Ann Dugger, executive director of the Justice Coalition, welcomed guests. We are here to kick off the 28th com memoration of National Crime Victims Rights Week. This years theme is, Extending the Vision of Each and Every Victim. We are continuing our efforts to shed light on crime victims. No one asks to be victimized by violence but when a crime occurs, victims need to be aware that they have rights, said Dugger. The history of the victims rights movement is a story of victims, victims advocates and countless other individuals who work together to bring hope to those victims, their families and communities harmed by crime. Today we are rededicating ourselves to making NAS Jax teams with City of Jacksonville for victims rights

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012 April 26 1869 The Good Conduct medal was authorized. 1952 USS Hobson (DMS-26)) sinks after collision with aircraft carrier USS Wasp (CV-18) in the North Atlantic 176 lives lost. April 27 1861 President Lincoln extended blockade of Confederacy to Virginia and North Carolina ports. 1865 Body of John Wilkes Booth brought to Washington Navy Yard. April 28 1862 Naval forces capture Forts Jackson and St. Philip in Louisiana. 1965 Dominican Republic intervention. 1944 Navy LSTs (Landing Ship, Tank) attacked during Operation Tiger. 1993 SECDEF memo orders armed forces to train and assign women on combat aircraft and most combat ships, but not to ground combat positions. April 29 1814 Sloop-of-war USS Peacock (22 guns) captures the18-gun HMS Epervier. 1898 U.S. warships engage Spanish gunboats and shore batteries at Cienfuegos, Cuba. 1944 Fast carrier task force (12 carriers) commence two-day bombing of Truk. 1975 Operation Frequent Wind, the helicopter evacuation of American citizens from Saigon, begins. The last helicopter lifted off the roof of the United States Embassy at 7:52 p.m. carrying Marine security guards. April 30 1798 Congress establishes Department of the Navy. 1973 The last Marine Corps NAP (enlisted Naval Aviation Pilot) retired. Master Gunnery Sgt. Patrick ONeil enlisted during World War II and completed over 30 years of active duty. 1975 Saigon falls to North Vietnamese forces. May 1 1898 Battle of Manila Bay, Adm. Dewey defeats Spanish at Manila, Philippines. 1934 Lt. Akers demonstrates blind landing system at College Park, Md. in OJ-2 aircraft. 1945 Vice Adm. Barbey lands Australian troops on Tarakan Island, Borneo, supported by naval gunfire. 1951 VA-195 Skyraider aircraft from the aircraft carrier USS Princeton (CV-37) attack Hwachon Dam in Korea using aerial torpedoes. 1980 11 Navy ships begin operations assisting Coast Guard in rescuing Cuban refugees fleeing Cuba in overcrowded boats. May 2 1975 U.S. Navy departs Vietnamese waters at end of refugees evacuation. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Its been a tasty couple of months for Dinner with the Smileys. Before each dinner, I often won der, Was this a good idea? Will we have anything to talk about with the guest? Waiting for our 12th guest, graphic illustrator Josh Alves, to arrive was no different. Although Josh and I have lived in the same town for nearly four years, I didnt really know him. And Id never met his wife, Amy. For someone like me someone who hates small talk and, as a result, isnt very good at it the dinner had the potential to be an awkward first (friend) date. Josh and Amy and their oldest daughter arrived at the house with freshly baked cookies and a burst of positive energy. The conversa tion that never waned during the four-hour visit. We had a lively dinner (four kids at the table always ensures liveliness) and an after-dinner game of Pictionary on the back porch, where it was still warm and sunny at 6 p.m. I was sad when the evening came to an end, and not just because the black permanent marker Lindell was using for Pictionary had exploded all over my white shirt. (Also not because Josh beat all of us at Pictionary.) Rather, I didnt want the Alves to leave. Josh left the boys with copies of his comic books and a series of books he illustrated called Zeke Meeks. Ford and Owen read all three books before bedtime. It was a surprise (and comfort) when they learned the main character, Zeke, has a father who is also on deploy ment. March and April brought dinners with two school teachers (always a highlight) along with visits to a local news station, where weatherman Steve McKay taught the boys how to use a green screen (Ford: If I cover my younger brother with a green blanket, will he disappear?) and to prove air exists (my thought: were breathing, but that wasnt the right answer). Later, on another unseasonably warm Maine Spring day, Dr. Scott Peterson, a baseball historian, took us out to a ballgame and taught the boys how to keep score using the method Henry Chadwick invent ed. We met the winning pitcher, DJ Voisine, and my youngest, Lindell, 5, dazzled him with this: DJ: What position do you boys play? Ford: I play second base. Owen: I hope to play shortstop. Lindell: Im hungry. Lunch, which consisted of hot dogs and popcorn and candy, quickly followed. One of our April dinners was supposed to be with an elderly friend who had sometimes served as a substitute grandmother for the boys. She came to their school events, sent them birthday cards and brought them goodies on Halloween and Christmas. She always waved to them on their way to school. And, on warm days, Lindell liked to sit with her on her front steps. Our friend had moved to an assisted living facility a few months ago, so we planned to have dinner with her there. When I called to confirm, I found out that she had passed away sev eral weeks earlier. I needed time to absorb that. Then I told the kids. Losing our friend before we had the chance to visit her for dinner emphasized a growing theme of this project: community matters more than any reason we have not to invite someone to dinner: My house is too small. I dont have time. My house is a mess. Im not a great cook. I could have had her over when the house was a mess and the kids were misbehaving. She wouldnt have cared. She would have been happy to be included, because its not about the house or the food. Its about being together. And, in the end, we have less time to be together than we ever could ever imagine. At the boys suggestion, we will honor the missed dinner and the memory of our friend through a visit with a neighbor who is 94. As each month passes, the boys excitement for this project, as well as their understanding of its importance, grows. They enjoy looking at the pictures and reading your comments on Facebook. They also like to see your guesses to my hints about upcom ing guests. (Some of those guesses have given us ideas and prompted us to contact new guests.) Last week, we got permission from musician Josh Ritter to use his song Change of Time in a promotional video for Dinner with the Smileys. You can see that video on YouTube at https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=QnrnJmkHrto. Hey, MoneyMan! My leading petty officer (LPO) and I were discussing the best way to spend my tax refund. He thinks I should use some of the refund to pay off some revolving credit lines and to save the rest for emergencies. My plan is to use the refund to pay cash for this awesome entertainment sys tem that Ive had my eye on for quite some time. What do you think? Moneyman says: I commend you for dis cussing this with your LPO. According to the IRS, the average tax refund last year was nearly $3,000. That is like getting an extra paycheck for simply filing your taxes! It is also like giving the government an extra $250 per month that you could use to pay your electric bill, groceries, rent, etcetera. If you would rather have that money go to your monthly budget instead of the govern ment talk to your command financial spe cialist about how to change the amount that is withheld from your paycheck for federal income taxes. Its very tempting to spend this money quickly on big tick et consumer items, but doing this can impact your family budget for the rest of the year. Your LPO gave you sound advice. Paying off revolving credit lines is a good idea as long as you dont use the greater avail able credit to buy that entertainment system or otherwise max out your credit cards so shortly after paying them off. Being in a dilemma about what to do with your refund check presents an excellent opportunity to take stock of your financial situation and develop a strategy for success. Do you have short, medium and long term financial goals? Are you on track to meet them? Do you have a monthly budget? If so, do you stick to it? You are doing the right thing by seeking advice from your chain of command. If you want to take the next step to achieve financial self-sufficiency, make an appointment to talk with a caseworker at the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society at 452-3515.Dinner with the Smileys

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Base personnel came together for a Days of Remembrance event to reflect on the tragedy of the Holocaust at the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf April 18. The event began as Master of Ceremonies NAS Jax Public Affairs Officer Miriam Gallet welcomed the group and introduced Rabbi Jesse Olitzky of the Jacksonville Jewish Center who gave the benediction. I find it meaningful that a military base is holding a Holocaust remembrance event and we pay tribute to the men and women who are putting their lives on the line to ensure that something as devastating as the Holocaust never hap pens again to people of any faith. This day is a reminder of how fragile life is and how easily with the gift of free will the world can turn to evil and sin, said Olitzky before giving the blessing. Olitzky also lit a candle in remembrance of those who perished in the Holocaust. This candle memorializes the 11 million people bru tally killed by the Nazis. May the flicker of this flame unite a flame within all of us to remember all those who per ished. NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander also welcomed the guests and introduced guest speaker Holocaust survivor Morris Bendit. It is an honor for us to host the first National Days of Remembrance event at NAS Jacksonville. It is important for us to remember events such as the Holocaust. It is a powerful lesson in fragility of freedom and reinforces the need for us to be engaged abroad, said Undersander. As Bendit took the podium he thanked the military mem bers for their service. I salute you for all the effort you put in to keeping our nation safe. Coming here, reminds me that we have something in common I was in the Israeli navy many years ago working on destroy ers and frigates, he said. We will always remember the 20th century as the best and the worst in history. It was known as the best for the technology, ingenuity, science and medical advances. All of these great advances by humans were also used for evil. Many dictators used the same sci ence and technology to carry out mass killings. In the past 100 years, more than 120 mil lion people were killed, Bendit continued. I hope and pray that in this new century we will learn from the past. Sixteen years ago when my mother passed away, I real ized that the World War II generation is disappearing fast and very soon there will not be anyone left to tell about the atrocities that took place from 1939-45. The Holocaust was the systematic, industri alized annihilation of six mil lion Jews by the Nazis, Bendit said. But until recently, many people only heard about the Nazis. However there were others the Ukrainians and Romanians. There will be wars between tribes and between nations but never on such a large scale as World War II. Bendit then told his person al story of how he was born in Chernovitz, Ukraine in 1941 as the Germans were teaming up with the Romanians to oust Jews from the city. During this time, my father was forced to enlist into the Russian Army to fight the Germans. During a transport, his train was attacked by German bombers and he was killed. In July 1941, the Romanians began killing Jews. By October, 50,000 Jews were taken from their homes and herded into a ghetto. From there, they were transported by cattle cars to a territory called Transnistria that was designated for the annihilation of Jews. Many were killed on the way. My family including my maternal grandparents, pater nal grandmother, mother, four uncles and an aunt stayed together. There were no bar racks or gas chambers just fields, killing fields. During the day, we were forced to march from village to village. My mother and grandmother car ried me. At night, we looked for a place to sleep in the bitter cold. Many people died from the cold and starvation if they werent shot, he stated. I have no idea how I survived. Before my fourth birthday, I suffered from typhus, malaria and scarlet fever. My only nourishment was nursing from my starving mother. In 1944, the survivors in Transistria were liberated by the Russian Army. By then, the only surviving members of Bendits family were his mother, maternal grandmother and his aunt. Of the Jews who had been deported to Transnistria, a total of 150,000, approximately 90,000 perished there. Bendits remaining fam ily members returned to their home in Chernovitz. A year later, they took what they could and moved to Romania in hopes of going to Israel. In 1949, they were given permis sion to immigrate to the new State of Israel. Bendit soon joined the Israeli navy at the age of 17. Shortly after finishing his military service, he moved to Montreal, Canada. In 1965, he immi grated to the United States and moved to New York where he met his wife, Hanna. They have three daughters and five granddaughters and have lived in Jacksonville for the past 27 years. He spends his time with his family and speaks at various functions about the Holocaust. For many years, the older generation who survived the Holocaust did not talk about the past. I believe it should be told. Never forget because his tory always repeats itself. And, we cannot let those deniers win, they know what happened but they are persuading others to believe it never happened. We cannot fix the past, but we can improve the future. Living in the past is not healthy but remembering the past is essential, concluded Bendit. NAS Jax remembers the Holocaust 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012

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Red Lancers perform flyover for Jacksonville Suns season opener On April 5, the VP-10 Red Lancers helped kick off the opening day for the Jacksonville Suns with a fly over of the Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville Stadium. It was a significant event for the Suns and the Red Lancers. The Suns are celebrating their 50th season as a team and the Red Lancers their 50th year anniversary flying the P-3C aircraft. The Jacksonville Suns defeated The Huntsville Stars in a defensive battle resulting in a 2-0 win for the Suns. The VP-10 crew consisted of Lt. Seth Squyres, Lt. j.g. Tom Canny, Lt. j.g. Mike Enriquez, Lt. j.g. Tony Thomsen, Lt. j.g. Sam Urato, AWF1 Matthew Wells and AWO1 Chad Bowles. The crew was very humbled by the welcome they had received from the fans and staff that were at the game. It was so exciting seeing everyone cheering when we flew over the field, said Enriquez. The warm welcome we received from the Suns staff and fans was very much appreciated. Like many of the crew, this was Enriquezs first time flying as part of a flyover. After their flight, the Red Lancers landed at NAS Jacksonville and drove to catch the remaining innings of the ball game. Each member of the crew was introduced on the field during the sixth inning and were given a standing ovation. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012 Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) is mak ing depot-level repairs and modifications to the Beechcraft T-44A and C model Pegasus King Air fleet used to train Navy and Marine Corps aviators on multi-engine aircraft at NAS Corpus Christi, Texas. The FRCSE T-44 Advanced Multi-Engine Trainer Team is overseeing a major rewire, Aircraft Condition Inspection (ACI), wing spar replacement and an upgrade to the avionics system with digital display converting the aircraft from an A to C model. This is a huge effort involving FRCSE production and manufacturing, our engineering and production support teams, CNATRA (Chief of Naval Air Training), NAVAIR (Naval Air Systems Command), and PMA (Program Manager Air) 273, said Bill Connelly, the FRCSE program manager for trainer aircraft. This was not an easy undertaking. The aging trainer fleet of 54 aircraft, each flying for more than 32 years, supports CNATRAs vital training mission. Connelly said FRCSE provides one-stop shopping for work previously performed by multiple contrac tors, a situation that increased service costs and slowed down the aviator pipeline with aircraft being out of service more frequently. He credits the professionalism, skill level and work ethic of the FRCSE artisans who provide the touch labor for the trainer platform. Connelly said they are returning a high quality product to CNATRA with increasingly shorter turnaround times as the artisans gain experience and become more efficient. FRCSE inducted the first T-44C trainer on April 1, 2010, which came to the depot for a left-hand wing spar replacement and Attitude Heading and Reference Systems (AHRS) relocation. Artisans relocated the AHRS box from directly behind the pilots seat on top of the floor to four feet aft and under the floor pan els. This new configuration eliminated the need to remove the AHRS boxes and mounts when pulling the cabin floorboards for routine inspection of the underlying aircraft structure. It also eliminated the requirement to re-level the box electronically by leveling the plane on jacks followed by performing a softwareleveling procedure. Relocating the AHRS box caused another trouble some issue with the aircraft. Multiple T-44C trainers were experiencing numerous failures of the AHRS on takeoff and in flight posing safety concerns requir ing termination of training flights under Visual Flight Rules. Pilot and co-pilot displays were blanking out, eliminating all information without warning to the pilots. CNATRA Fleet Support Team (FST) engineers evaluated the AHRS failures and discovered the relocated AHRS box was susceptible to propeller harmonicsinduced vibrations affecting the Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs) contained within. The FST designed a mounting plate assembly to reduce the effects of rotational harmonics, a frequency problem commonly encountered with propellers. FRCSE machinists fab ricated the new assemblies that maintainers are retrofitting on the T-44C fleet in Texas. Engineering Team Lead David Pfeffer said the CNATRA FST and the FRCSE T-44 production team worked closely with NAVAIR PMA 273 to bring the work back to the military depot. Pfeffer said the T-44 fleet is plagued with a similar wiring concern that has affected many Navy aircraft over the years, that being the extensive use of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) encased wiring, also known as Kapton wiring. The heat from the engine exhaust is causing the insulation around the wire to become brittle along the wing leading edge creating a potential for fire, he said. PVC smokes profusely and produces toxic fumes. Its a big concern. The team launched an extensive reverse-engineering effort utilizing a rewired T-44C trainer provided by CNATRA with avionics upgrades already incorporated on the aircraft. They developed detailed work instructions, manufacturing and installation drawings, and bills of materials consisting of thousands of compo nents. Electronics Engineer Charlotte Faulk, the avion ics team lead, headed efforts to reverse engineer the wiring harnesses that run the length of the airframe. She created manufacturing drawings from the existing wiring diagrams and worked closely with FRCSE Cable Shop personnel who provided real-time feed back. We had five sets of harnesses from the vendor, said Faulk. The cable shop verified that the har nesses were built correctly. They worked closely with engineering and the T-44 line artisans to create rewire harnesses that ran from wingtip to wingtip. The Avionics System Upgrade (ASU) replaces the T-44A analog steam gauge instrument panel and corresponding wire harnesses with a Rockwell Collins Pro-Line 21 avionics suite incorporating modern multifunctional color displays, AHRS and an Emergency Locator Transmitter. Additionally, the T-44 team is conducting the depotlevel ACI required at 5-year intervals that includes the latest aircraft configuration updates. Parts acquisition continues to prove challenging for the team given the trainer aircraft were commercially supported for the life of the plane until 2010. Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) does not stock the parts, which causes long delays when contracting with commercial vendors. FRCSE artisans have completed 13 aircraft involving a variety of repairs and upgrades. They are currently working seven T-44 aircraft, four of those are ASU with rewire modifications required for the A to C model conversion with two scheduled for completion in mid-April. An additional three aircraft are undergoing ACI with wiring modifications. The FRCSE T-44 team is uncovering and correcting the effects of years of wear and tear on an aircraft that operates in harsh environments. These repairs and upgrades will not only reduce future maintenance costs and improve mission readiness of the T-44 platform, but also ensure the pipeline of Naval aviators will continue far into the future. The trainer fleet must continue to maintain airworthiness through its planned sundown in 2025. Trainer repair team ensures future aviator pipeline

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Squadron personnel have earned seven Joint Meritorious Unit awards, six Navy Unit Commendations, seven Meritorious Unit Commendations, seven Navy Battle E awards and various other unit, service and campaign awards. Several Old Buzzards alumni are in town for the disestablishment events that include the Buzzard Ball, a golf tournament and Buzzard Night at the Jacksonville Suns Ballpark. As part of the Friday ceremony, Cmdr. Lee Boyer, the last Old Buzzards commanding officer, will lower the command pennant and dismiss the squadron for the final time. Its definitely going to be a bittersweet ceremony. On one hand, it is sad to see such a great squadron being retired but on the other hand, disestablish ment has renewed the bond between every generation of Old Buzzards. I have truly been humbled by the support and the obvious attachment that former and retired Old Buzzards have for this squadron, Boyer stated. Cmdr. Chris McDowell, the former VPU-1 executive officer and now commanding officer of VPU-2 at MCAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii had these thoughts on the events.The Old Buzzards of VPU-1, and the dedicated professionals, families and friends who support us, repeatedly accomplished some amazing things over the past 40 years. With several current Old Buzzards destined to continue our fine tradition of mission accomplish ment as members of our sister squadron, VPU-2, I look forward to carrying our unrivaled capabilities forward.VPU-1: Old Buzzards disestablisingvictims rights, protection and services a reality. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown also addressed the importance of supporting victims of crimes. There are a number of people to thank and acknowledge today from the law enforcement personnel in our com munity on the front line to elected officials who work policy to protect us, said Brown. But this is also about the victims who we should be focused on. Were not here to honor you or put you on a pedestal, were here to support you because you are people, fellow human beings negotiating a nightmare. Even when an arrest was made and the headlines say guilty, we know your journey will continue. We know that crime hurts and threatens but together we remain strong. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders was also in attendance to stress how the Navy supports crime victims and educates military personnel on sexual assault prevention. Throughout the month of April, the Navy is making an all-out effort towards promoting sexual assault awareness. The number of sexual assaults in the Navy is unacceptable. As part of this campaign, we are also addressing vic tims rights, said Sanders. The Navy Victim and Witness Assistance Program is designed to ensure victims and witnesses of crime are treated with fairness and dignity and afforded their rights throughout the criminal justice process. At NAS Jax, victims always have support from their chain of command, legal system and Fleet and Family Support Center. Our counselors are fully trained to assist victims and witnesses and ensure they receive comprehensive care and counseling and are treated with dignity and the utmost respect, continued Sanders. The Navy has a zero tolerance policy on sexual assault and sexual harass ment. City of Jacksonville Victims Rights Week Chairperson and NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center Domestic Abuse Victim Advocate Latresa Henderson echoed Sanders remarks. At the NAS Jax FFSC, we have sexu al assault response coordinators who are responsible for training advocates in every command on the installa tion. They provide support to victims of sexual assault. We also have numer ous partnerships with Naval Hospital Jacksonville and outside agencies. We are here to help victims with any ser vices they might need, said Henderson. VICTIM: Awareness week gets supportthroughout the regions installations, the consolidation will also provide some technological advantages, according to Fasanello. The RDC also has an advanced computer-aided dispatch system that auto mates the exact response recommendation based on the nature and location of the emergency. It also provides a mapped location of the caller. In addition, RDC dispatchers are certified to administer emergency medical instructions prior to the arrival of emergency medical technicians to the scene, added Fasanello. While the time frame for the consoli dation will vary depending on location, the RDC will make public awareness a priority, Fasanello said. At about two months out, we will begin to work very closely with the installation and coordinate an agreesive public awareness campaign, he said.RDC: Coverage to include 13 installations Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012

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41 military moms-to-be will celebrate Operation ShowerThey may not be golfers, but 41 local military moms-to-be will enjoy a spe cial experience during the PGA TOURs 2012 THE PLAYERS Championship at TPC Sawgrass. The women, whose spouses are deployed members of the U.S. Navy and Army National Guard, will be honored during an Operation Shower group baby shower presented by Birdies for the Brave and the PGA TOUR May 6, at 11 a.m. in the Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost located on THE PLAYERS Stadium Course at TPC Sawgrass. For military wives who are expecting a baby and whose spouses are deployed or soon to be deployed, the impending arrival of a child can be both exciting and stressful, said Operation Shower Founder and Chief Shower Officer LeAnn Morrissey. Operation Shower was created specifically because typically mili tary moms are the ones who hold it all together at home. Without their spouses by their side, deployed to another part of the world, these moms deserve our support, our thanks, our love and an opportunity to celebrate together. During the Celebration Fore Babythemed event, the moms will enjoy lunch and an opportunity to share sto ries and gain comfort from other mili tary moms-to-be in the same situation, as well as the highlight of the event the presentation of Operation Showers signature Shower in a Box. Each mom will receive an array of unique, high quality products and gift items for mothers and babies that have been donated by numerous companies. The Operation Shower event is just one of many military and communi ty outreach activities that will be held before and during THE PLAYERS, May 7-13. In addition to providing active duty, retired and Reserve members of the military and their dependents with complimentary tournament admission all week as well as discounted tickets for veterans, THE PLAYERS will host a military job fair May 7, as well as Military Appreciation Day May 9, featuring a ceremony beginning at 5:30 p.m. with military pageantry; a flyover by F-15 fighter jets from the 125th Fighter Wing of the Florida National Guard; and a performance by country music artist Luke Bryan. Additionally, military guests attend ing THE PLAYERS will enjoy compli mentary food and beverages all week in the Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost military hospitality chalet, located on the hill between the No. 16 and No. 18 fairways. THE PLAYERS will continue its policy of providing free or affordable access to the tournament for men and women of the Armed Services. There are two military ticket policies: sonnel along with their dependents receive compli mentary admission to the tournament all day, every day. Free tickets are available online via a link to TicketMaster from THE PLAYERS website (PGATOUR. COM/THEPLAYERS); these are print-at-home tickets and military personnel and their dependents will be asked to present the paper ticket amd valid military ID at the gate for free admission. Advantage to distribute discounted tickets to mili tary veterans and their families. Available to those carrying the Veterans Advantage VetRewards Card, discounted tickets can be purchased online through a special link, and then redeemed at the admissions gate with proof of a valid Veterans Advantage VetRewards Card. Visit PGATOUR.COM/ THEPLAYERS (click on 2012 Tickets) for more infor mation. Wednesday, but parking passes must be purchased in advance for Thursday through Sunday. Once again in 2012, THE PLAYERS will offer hos pitality to active, Reserve and retired military and dependents at the Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost, located on the hill between No. 16 and No. 18 fairways. The Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost, provides complimentary food, beverages and interactive activities and is open Wednesday-Sunday. Military ID is required for admittance. USO Centers do not have tickets or sell parking passes, which are available online.The Players to honor motherhoodThe Players honors military with free tickets and events NAS Jax Acting Fire Chief Mark Brusoe and Fire Training Chief David Rickel traveled to Deltona, Fla. April 13 to notify the Navys first fire marshal, Douglas Thomas that he had been inducted into the Navys Fire and Emergency Hall of Fame. They also presented him with a firefighters helmet as his wife, Rennae, looked on. Thomas began his fire service career in 1941 as a firefighter at the Washington Navy Yard. After joining the U.S. Marine Corps in 1942, he was stationed at Beaufort, S.C. and Quantico, Va. and then served in the Pacific Theatre at Iwo Jima with the 5th Marine Division. The unit fought from Feb. 19 to March 18, 1945 where 1,098 Marines were killed and 2,974 were injured. After the war, Thomas returned to the NAS Anacostia Fire Department and where he eventually advanced to assistant fire chief. In 1963, he was appointed fire chief of a consolidated Navy fire department for NAS Anacostia, Washington Navy Yard and the Naval Research Laboratory. In 1976, Thomas became the first Navy Fire Marshal Program administrator, serving in the position until he retired in 1976. Navys first fire marshal honored 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012

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In the past couple of weeks, Jackson-ville area residents have experienced the effects of brush fires in North Florida. Whether its the decreased visibility as we transit between home and work or our activities have been hampered as a result of the quality of air we breathe. The area is currently in a drought and the dryness of the soil and duff layers increase each day without rain (the amount of increase depends on the daily high temperature) and decreases when it rains. The range of the index is determined by assuming that there are eight inches of moisture in a saturated soil that is readily available to the vegetation. During a drought, conditions are favorable for the occurrence and spread of wildfires, but drought is not by itself a prerequisite for wildfires. Other weather factors, such as wind, temperature, relative humidity and atmospheric stability, play a major role in determining the actual fire danger. It is estimated that approximately 1,000 wildfires per year have their origins traced to an improperly discarded cigarette. Most of these wildfires are relatively small and controlled easily. However, a few quickly expand into multi-million dollar events causing widespread destruction of property and sometimes loss of human lives. Combine the current drought indexes in North Florida with the breezy conditions weve been expe riencing and an improperly discarded cigarette; a simple mulch fire could easily evolve into a danger ous, fast moving major wildfire. Peer pressure on our shipmates for improper dis posal of cigarettes will greatly reduce the likelihood of a wildfire aboard the installation and our surrounding communities. Please help us, help you stay safe!Take care, with conditions favorable for wildfires across North Florida area NAS Jax Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) volunteers were honored during a spring tea event for knitters April 12 and a luncheon for office volunteers April 19. Thank you all for coming today. I especially want to thank Kathy Sanders for hosting our tea event this year. Its an honor to be here today to celebrate those who volunteer and do so much for our military members and their families, said NAS Jax NMCRS Director Dave Faraldo. Better known as Blanket Babes, these women donate their time knit ting and crocheting baby blankets for the baby seabags that are distributed to new parents attending the NMCRS Budget for Baby classes. The following volunteers were recog nized: Ayako White, 350 hours; Priscilla Bellefeuille, 360 hours; Frances Dalton, 1,112 hours; Genevieve Brynildsen, 2,265 hours; Marilyn Nielsen, 3,945 hours; Bridget Russell, 5,174 hours; Margaret Wright, 11,886 hours; and Delores Leisy, 25,304. NAS Jax NMCRS Chairman of Volunteers Amanda OConnell coordi nated the event. During the awards luncheon many new volunteers were recognized, including: Alison Craig, Arica Goulet, Ryan Goulet, Sheila Stevens, Kathy Sanders, Kristen Hager, Daniela Hines, Maddie Stevens and Lindsay Yager. Volunteers were also presented with tokens of appreciation for donating their time to support service members and their families. Those recognized were: Ryan Goulet, Stephanie Gruber, Virginia Leary, Arica Goulet, and Laura Tucker for 100 hours; Diane Eastman, Pauline Ebersole, Virginia Leary, Kim Seligman, Chuck Tamblyn, Gi Teevan, and Delores Wise for 300 hours; Pauline Ebersole, Alicia Merlino, Kim Seligman, Delores Wise, Denise Foster, and Chuck Tamblyn for 500 hours; Denise Foster, Pauline Ebersole, Alicia Merlino, and Ashley Dostie for 600 hours; Melissa Schade and Chris Scorby for 1,000 hours; Melissa Schade and Amanda OConnell for 1,500 hours. NMCRS employee Monika Woods was also recognized for being with the society for five years. These are the most awards that weve ever presented. We welcome our new volunteers and thank this out standing team for donating their time to help our military members in need and for everything they do each and every day! said OConnell. If you are interested in volunteering at NMCRS, please call 542-3515 or e-mail mandivoc@gmail.com. NMCRS Jacksonville volunteers honored JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012 11

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National Infant Immunization Week is April 21-28. It is a week set aside to help parents everywhere understand the importance of protecting infants and toddlers from vaccine-preventable diseases. Myths and misinformation about vaccine safety often confuse parents. To be clear, vaccines save lives. And the United States currently has the safest, most effective vaccine supply in history. Years of testing are required by law before a vaccine is licensed and they are continually monitored for safety and effectiveness. Like any medica tion, vaccines can cause side effects. Its important to know that serious side effects are extremely rare. And the benefits of getting vaccines far outweigh possible side effects for almost all children. Vaccines can protect infants and children from 14 diseases. And thanks to vaccines, some diseases are almost gone in the U.S. The elimination of polio and smallpox in the U.S. are powerful examples of why we vaccinate. Immunization can also save fami lies time and money. Children with vaccine-preventable diseases may not be allowed to go to school or daycare. Some vaccine-preventable diseases require hospitalization, cause perma nent disabilities and can also really take a financial toll. Immunization also protects future generations. Birth defects associated with rubellaGerman measlesare no longer seen in the U.S. By continuing to vaccinate now, some of todays diseases will no longer be around to harm our children . our grandchildren . and their grandchildren. What happens if we stop vaccinating? By taking away this protection, more and more people would be infected, become sick and spread disease to others. We would undo the progress we have made over the years with the elimination of diseases. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a 2010 outbreak of pertussiswhooping coughkilled 10 infants in California. And measles takes the lives of more than 100,000 children around the world each year. Pertussis and the measles are among the 14 vaccine-preventable diseases. More information is available at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/ infants-toddlers or by calling the CDC Contact Center at 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) Changes are on the way in how commissaries handle coupons and product returns without receipts, among other things, as the Defense Commissary Agency enacts customer service policy chang es to protect the commissary benefit. The average coupon user might not notice the policy changes because they are aimed at preventing possible misuse of the commissary ben efit primarily using coupons to get large amounts of cash back, said Joseph Jeu, DeCA director and CEO. Commissary shoppers are big users of coupons, as evidenced by DeCAs consistent rank ing among the top 10 grocery retailers in coupon redemp tions over the past several years. Commissaries welcome coupon usage, and to acquaint customers with the changes in the coupon acceptance pol icy, it has been posted on the agencys website at http://www. commissaries.com/inside_ deca/publications/directives/ DeCAD40_6_PC_3.pdf and on Facebook at www.Facebook. com/YourCommissary. Key changes, which go into effect May 1, include: to a customer, in conjunction with cash, whenever a transac tion total reflects $25 or more is owed to the customer due to coupon overages (when the face value of the coupon exceeds the selling price of the item purchased and the trans action results in a negative bal ance). customers, in conjunction with cash, for refunds of $25 or more when a receipt is presented showing the merchandise was originally purchased with gift cards. customers, in conjunction with cash, for refunds of $25 or more when a receipt is not presented suspected privilege abuse. tance policy that clarifies dotscan barcode requirements and pin requirements for unique numbering, that photocopies and counterfeit coupons are not accepted, and that coupons must be printed in English. The changes harness the scope of the new commissary gift card, which has been in use since last summer. Available only in denominations of $25 and $50, issuing gift cards as an alternative to paying out large sums of cash brings DeCA in line with other retailers prac tices and ensures DeCAs cash flow is not adversely impacted. Amounts under $25 will be in cash. Commissaries are providers of a benefit that sell groceries at cost, and using the gift cards to cover certain refunds and coupon overages discourages practices contrary to DeCAs mission, Jeu noted. We value coupon usage because it helps our customers boost their savings, Jeu said. These changes are in the best interest of all concerned to help ensure that coupons con tinue to be a great source of savings for our customers.Infant immunizations save livesCommissaries announce coupon policy changes 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012

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Month of the Military Child celebrated with annual carnivalLaughter and excitement filled the air as hundreds of kids and their parents came out to enjoy the annual Month of the Military Child Carnival Saturday at the Allegheny Softball Fields. The free event is put on each year by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Departments Youth Activities Center (YAC) to show military chil dren how much they are appreciated. Were here today to recognize mili tary children and the sacrifices they make. This our way of saying thank-you for all they do and to show how much we appreciate them, said YAC Director Aaron Long. The event featured numerous inflatables that pro vided lots of jumping, sliding and bouncing, a rock climbing wall, jousting, games, face painting by the staff of the Fleet and Family Support Center, free popcorn and cotton candy. Before every event, we review what attractions JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012 13

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and activities have worked in the past and what are not so popular. We come up with new ideas and try to bring in things that will keep the children and families entertained. And, through the generosity of our sponsors, we keep adding to the event, continued Long. Long also commended those who assisted to bring the event together by setting up, manning the booths and games and would help with the clean up. Nothing beats the heart of our volunteers who came out to help us even when we thought the weather was going to be bad. It speaks true to their characters and we certainly appreciate them, he said. Luckily, despite the forecast for thunderstorms, the weather held steady and contributed a hefty amount of sunshine for the event as the families spent some time enjoying the different activities. Weve come to this event every year, since Ive been stationed here. Its a great opportunity to let the kids have some fun and its free. Its really a great event put on by MWR, said OS1(SW) Rollin George of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven who brought his two young boys to the event. This is really fun because they have bouncy houses and I get to eat cotton candy and popcorn, added eight-yearold Karla Mill, who was a bit nervous as she waited in line to climb the rock wall. This years sponsors were VyStar Credit Union, USAA, Allied American University, Navy Mutual Aid Association, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, First Command Financial Services, University of Phoenix and Everest University.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government offi cially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.CARNIVAL: Celebrating military children R ecreationalSafety Rodeo Commissary Parking Lot Tuesday, May 8 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Battle of MidwayCommemorative Dinner June 9, 2012WorlD Golf Village Renaissance ResortDinner 6:00 p.m. Keynote: Adm. Jonathan Greenert, CNOActive Duty E6 and below $25E7 to O3 $35 O4 to O5 $45O6 & above, civilians & retirees $60For more information, contact Bob Price At (904) 246-9982, e-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net or Bill Dudley at (904) 806-4712, E-mail: anuday00@aol.com. Tickets may also be purchased at www. midwaydinner.orgUniform for O4 and above is dinner dress white jacket. For O3 and below, dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional. Civilian is black tie or business attirewww.midwaydinner.org Sponsored by Some veterans covered under the Veterans Group Life Insurance program (VGLI) now have the opportunity to increase their coverage to the current maximum coverage under the Service members Group Life Insurance (SGLI) program. Currently, 70 percent of the veter ans covered under VGLI are under age 60, have less than $400,000 of cover age, and will greatly benefit from this law change, said Allison Hickey, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) under secretary for benefits. Under the Veterans Benefits Act of 2010, enacted on Oct. 13, 2010, veterans can increase their coverage by $25,000 at each five-year anniversary date of their policy to the current legislated maximum SGLI coverage, presently, $400,000. The VGLI program allows newly discharged veterans to convert their SGLI coverage they had while in the service to a civilian program. Before enactment of this law, veterans could not have more VGLI than the amount of SGLI they had at the time of separation from service. For example, those who got out of the service prior to Sept. 1, 2005, when the maximum SGLI coverage was $250,000, were limited to $250,000 in VGLI coverage. Now on their first five-year anni versary, these veterans can elect to increase their coverage to $275,000. On their next five-year anniversary, they can increase the coverage to $300,000, and so forth. The additional coverage can be issued regardless of the veterans health. To be eligible to purchase this additional coverage, the veteran must: Have active VGLI coverage, Have less than the current legislated maximum coverage of $400,000, Request the additional coverage during the 120-day period prior to each five-year anniversary date, and Be less than 60 years of age on the five-year anniversary date of his or her coverage. Eligible veterans are notified of this opportunity a week before the start of the 120-day period prior to their anni versary date, and twice more before the actual anniversary date. For more information about VAs Insurance Program or other VA ben efits, go to www.va.gov or call 1-800827-1000.Law change increases insurance coverage 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included April Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more! Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor pool hours Mon. Fri. 5:30 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 8 p.m. Weekend hours 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. Family Fitness Bootcamp with Ashley Monday & Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. Family Fitness Center above the Youth Center Gym Call (904) 778-9772 Outdoor Pool Open Weekends Beginning May 5 & 6, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Open weekdays beginning June 11 Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session one begins June 18 $40 military, $45 DoD Sign-up at the base gym on Saturday, May 12 8 11 a.m. military only, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. all eligible patronsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. 2012 13 Live Broadway Series West Side Story Dec. 8 Mary Poppins Jan. 26 Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Jacksonville Jaguars tickets coming soon! Disney World Orlando FL 4 day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Disney World Orlando FL Resident 3 day $98.25, 3 day hopper $125.25, 4 day $127.75, 4 day hopper $154.50 Funk Fest May 11 & 12 at Metropolitan Park $57 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 St. Augustine Scenic Cruise Day Trip May 5, 9:30 a.m. 5 p.m. $20 per person The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Paintball Trip GTF in Yulee May 5 at 9 a.m. Free Scuba Class May 8 at 5:30 p.m. Indoor pool Barracks Bash Luau May 10, 4 8 p.m. Free food, entertainment, games and great prizes!NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees May 8 & 22 for active duty May 10 & 24 for retirees & DoD personnel Ladies Golf Clinics Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. $10 per person Pre-registration required, signup in the pro shop Senior Military Invitational April 30 & May 1 9 a.m. shotgun start $65 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Shoreline Clean-up May 4 at 8:30 a.m. Free lunch! Call 542-2709 or e-mail angela. glass@navy.mil to sign-up Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. 2012 Adventure Summer Registration Dates: Current School-Age Care participants Now Single & Dual Active Duty NowOther Active Duty Now DoD Civilians Now through April 27 Registration Packets available for pick up at the Youth Center.Flying Club Call 777-8549 /6035 Ground School June 4 July 16 $500 per person 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Summer is quickly approaching and with it, the appeal of outdoor activities and family involvement in sports. The rate of sports-related accidents that result in a trip to the emergency room or doctors office increases exponentially during the summer. Injuries can be as simple as a scrape or cut on the face, to more complicated injuries such as facial fractures, broken teeth or concussions. And theres the additional danger of UV rays from increased sun exposure. According to Safe Kids USA and the American Academy of Pediatrics, more than 30 million U.S. children ages five to14 participate in sports each year. Of those, 3.5 million will receive medical treatment, with more than 775,000 ending up in emergency rooms. In a national survey, 33 percent of parents admitted they often dont enforce the same safety precautions during their childs practices as they do for games. No wonder, then, that 62 percent of sports-related injuries occur during practice. The Consumer Product Safety Commission offers an annual breakdown on emergency room visits caused by sports injuries to youth under age 15. By far the most common are bicycle-related, with 239,795 injuries (34% associated with the head). Next is baseball, with 84,878 injuries (49% associated with the head), skateboarding (65,130 injuries), football (51,953 inju ries), kick scooters (37,574 injuries), ATVs (32,875 injuries), roller skating (28,559 injuries), softball (27,510 injuries), in-line skating (18,712 injuries), and lacrosse (5,393 injuries). Taking basic precautions such as wearing proper safety gear can go a long way in preventing sportsrelated accidents. If involved with cycling or motor cycles, always wear a helmet. Make sure to wear the chinstrap as well. Every sport is different, but ensure that participants wear the right protective equipment for the activ ity (helmets, padding, shin guards, eye and mouth guards). A simple bump or blow to the head during a game or practice can cause a concussion (brain injury). Even a small ding or slight bump to the head can be serious. If a child might have a concussion, seek medical attention right away and keep the child out of play so the concussion can heal. Look for the following signs and symptoms of a concussion: headache or pressure in the head; nausea or vomiting; balance problems or dizziness; double or blurry vision; sensitivity to light; sensitivity to noise; concentration or memory problems; confusion; feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy or groggy; or just not feeling right. For sports like football, baseball, volleyball, hockey or basketball, its important to wear a mouth guard. The American Dental Association estimates that mouth guards prevent more than 200,000 oral/facial injuries per year, including tooth loss and jaw frac -Prevent head injuries JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012 17

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The world is full of threats, and the United States must be prepared for them, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta told CNNs Wolf Blitzer in an April 19 interview. Blitzer traveled to a NATO meeting in Brussels with Panetta and interviewed the defense secretary and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. Panetta said he is concerned about North Korea, Iran, Syria and the tur moil in the Middle East. Beyond that, he added, he also worries about threats posed by cyber war, weapons of mass destruction and rising powers. All of those things are threats that the United States faces in todays world, he said. On Syria, Clinton said the U.S. goal is to see Bashir al-Assads government stop killing its own people. The goal right now is if the Assad regime were to say, OK, we agree, were going to do everything that [United Nations envoy] Kofi Annan asks us to do, that will be our focus -not some future, maybe unlikely, outcome in terms of criminal accountability, she said. What Im interested in is Lets stop the violence and lets start the political transition. The United States stands ready to do what the international community decides on Syria, she added. The administration has taken a firm stand on North Korea and the provocative behavior of its new ruler Kim Jong Un, Panetta said. Were within an inch of war almost every day in that part of the world, he said. And you just have to be very careful about what we say and what we do. The U.S. alliance with South Korea is strong, Panetta said, and more than 28,000 U.S. service members are based in the country, providing a tangible example of U.S. commitment to peace in Northeast Asia. Provocations such as North Koreas recent failed rocket launch and threats of testing a nuclear weapon should stop, Panetta said. The fact is it was provocative, and we have made it very clear to them that they should not take any additional, provocative actions, he said. The defense secretary stressed that this is not just a U.S. wish, but that the international community wants North Korea to end its provocations. Clinton, Panetta discuss diplomatic, defense policies A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012

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tures. Dentists, pharmacies and sporting goods stores all offer mouth guards. Do the right thing be proactive in preventing sports and outdoor injuries and wear a helmet, mouth guard and other protective gear. If activities are outside, dont forget UV protection with sunscreen and remember to re-apply frequently if sweating or swimming. In addition, its Oral Cancer Awareness Month, which is a good reminder to get regular check-ups by a dental professional. Each year almost 40,000 people are diagnosed with cancer of the mouth or throat, resulting in more than 8,000 deaths, according to the Oral Cancer Foundation. Alcohol and tobacco, along with certain infec tions such as human papilloma virus (HPV-16), contribute to these cancers. A physical exam of the mouth, to check for signs of cancer, is an important part of the dental check-up. For more, talk to a dental provider or see the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons website at www.aaoms.org. SPORTS: Prevent head injuries JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012 19

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The Navy Former Spouse Protection Act Coordinator Office (PERS-314) determines sponsor and family eligibility for ID Card authorized military benefits. This includes determining authorization for ID Cards for former spouses under the Former Spouse Protection Act. When the former spouse applies for an ID Card after a divorce, the dependent spouses ID must be surrendered and application for a Former Spouse ID Card must be made. As part of the initial issuance of the Former Spouse ID Card, the following documents and information are required in order for PERS-314 to make a deter mination of the eligibility for the ID Card privileges and benefits under the Former Spouse Protection Act (Public Law 97-252 and amendments ): Grade, Service Branch, Sponsors Status (Retired/ Active/Deceased), Sponsors Retirement Date, Sponsors Address and Phone Number (Home and/or Work) remarried since the divorce sponsored health care insurance and Phone Numbers (Home and Work or Cell as Applicable) PERS-314 will review the application for eligibility and send the applicant a letter of authorization based on the former spouses level of benefits. The former spouse will need to show this letter of approval to the ID issuing facility every time an ID card needs to be renewed and/or reissued. The American Red Cross at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is currently recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volunteers. This offers an excel lent opportunity for students interested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine profession als physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and technicians as well as contribute to creating a positive experi ence for NH Jacksonville patients. The program is open to a limited number of high school students age 16 to 18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the hospital, and receive CPR training. Applications can be picked up at NH Jacksonvilles American Red Cross office (Room 1404, next to Physical Therapy & Occupational Therapy) and must be submitted by May 1. Selectees are required to attend the June 9 kickoff event from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., that includes an interview, in the hos pitals central tower sec ond deck conference room. For more information, call Junior Red Cross Volunteer Chairman Terry Miles at 542-7525 or e-mail terry.miles2@ med.navy.mil.Former spouse ID card renewal procedures outlinedJunior Red Cross volunteers must apply by May 1 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 26, 2012