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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/01985
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 04-19-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:01985

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THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Joining Forces celebrates first yearFirst lady Michelle Obama joined hundreds of military and civilian well wishers at NAS Jacksonville April 12 to celebrate the first anniversary of Joining Forces the ini tiative that Obama and Dr. Jill Biden launched in 2011 to recognize, honor and serve military families. The celebration included every thing youd never imagine in a Navy aircraft han gar a rock n roll band, Radio Disney Dancers, and a live feed to the Ellen DeGeneres Show. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders welcomed the enthusiastic audience of high school stu dents and parents. Today is a time for cel ebration, but its also a time to renew the call to action for Joining Forces. The outpour ing of support this past year for First Lady visits NAS Jax Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs), the Honorable Juan Garcia III, met with Sailors from Naval Air Station Jacksonville during a town hall meeting April 11. Garcia briefed the group on several key issues including the Navys Enlisted Retention Board (ERB), pay, retirement, tuition assistance, medi cal benefits, the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative and Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Retention in our military services is extreme ly high, maybe because of the economy or the compensation packages offered which now equal civilian employer benefits. This has caused many overmanned rates and we had to find a way to balance our force, so the ERB was created to ask one percent of our Sailors to transition to the next chapter of their lives while keeping as many as possible in the Reserve force, said Garcia. Our message to our Sailors is that we are not going to ERB again this year or next year. Our intention is to never ERB again. We will con tinue to make small adjustments to ensure we achieve the right balance. Garcia also stressed how the Navy is helping those Sailors who are being transitioned out of the service. We are trying to ensure that every Sailor who is being transitioned out of the Navy is aware of the benefits they can receive, including retire ment compensation for those who reach 15 years by Sept. 1, involuntary separation pay, health care options for six months up to 18 months, Navy Exchange and commissary privileges for two years, and job placement services, he said. Another goal the secretary discussed was the importance of keeping highly talented service members in the Naval Reserve. There is no way we could have gone through the last decade without our Reserve component. We mobilized 67,000 Individual Augmentees, VR-62 achieves safety milestoneThe VR-62 Nomads passed a major mile stone in March, when they logged more than 70,000 Class A mishap-free flight hours dur ing the logistics squadrons 26 years of ser vice. The Nomads were praised by Commanding Officer Cmdr. Alexander Ellermann and Executive Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino. Squadron members work to provide rapid response, global air logistics and support to U.S. maritime forces. The Navy Reserve squadron based at NAS Jax operates four of the Navys 19 C-130T Hercules aircraft, mak ing them a relevant, capable and robust part of the Fleet Logistics Support Wing. VR-62 recently returned from deployment in Bahrain, where they provided support for numerous missions. These logistics missions included passengers, parts and supplies, ammunition, ordnance and aircraft engines, as well as U.S. mail to boost morale and wel fare. They were an integral part of keep ing the essential supply lines established to numerous Navy and Marine Corps outposts in the 6th Fleet area of responsibility. The Nomads will detach to Atsugi, Japan in July, supporting Pacific Command with short-notice, high-priority air logistics throughout the Pacific theater. ASN Garcia briefs NAS Jax Sailors Main gate to close April 21The NAS Jax main gate at Yorktown Avenue and U.S. 17 will be closed Saturday from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. for mainte nance. Building 9 (Pass & ID Office) will be open for normal weekend operations. Drivers may access the base through the Birmingham Gate.

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012 April 19 1783 George Washington proclaims end of hostilities with Great Britain. 1861 President Lincoln orders blockade of Southern ports from South Carolina to Texas. 1917 Naval Armed Guard crew on board SS Mongolia engage and dam age a German U-boat. This was the first engagement of U.S. naval personnel against the enemy in World War I. 1955 Heavy cruiser USS Albany (CA 123) and destroyer USS William M. Wood (DD 715) provide disaster relief to citizens of Volos, Greece after cata strophic earthquake. April 20 1796 Congress authorizes comple tion of three frigates. 1861 Norfolk Navy Yard abandoned and burned by Union forces. 1914 In first call to action of naval aviators, a detachment on cruiser USS Birmingham (CL-2) sailed to Tampico, Mexico. 1915 First Navy contract for lighterthan-air craft awarded. 1942 USS Wasp (CV-7) launches 47 British aircraft to reinforce Malta. 1947 Navy Capt. L.O. Fox, supported by 80 Marines, accepted the surren der of Lt. Yamaguchi and 26 Japanese soldiers and sailors, two and one half years after the occupation of Peleliu and nearly 20 months after the surrender of Japan. 1953 USS New Jersey shells Wonsan, Korea from inside the harbor. 1964 USS Henry Clay (SSBN-625) launches a Polaris A-2 missile from the surface in first demonstration that Polaris submarines could launch mis siles from the surface as well as from beneath the ocean. Just 30 minutes later, the submarine launched another Polaris missile while submerged. April 21 1861 USS Saratoga captures slaver Nightingale. 1898 U.S. at war against Spain. 1906 Cmdr. Robert Peary discovered that supposed Arctic Continent did not exist. 1972 Moonwalk in the Descartes Highlands by Navy Capt. John Young, commander of Apollo 16. He was the ninth man to walk on the moon. Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Mattingly II, was the Command Module Pilot. Charles Duke was the Lunar Module Pilot. During the 11-day, onehour and 51-minute mission, 213 lbs. of lunar material was collected. Recovery accomplished by HC-1 helicopters from USS Ticonderoga (CVS-14). April 22 1778 Capt. John Paul Jones of the Continental Navy Sloop Ranger led landing party raid on Whitehaven, England. 1898 U.S. warships begin blockade of Cuba. 1987 U.S. Navy ordered to provide assistance requested by neutral vessels under Iranian attack outside the exclu sion zone. April 23 1917 Launching of USS New Mexico, first dreadnought with turboelectric drive. 1918 USS Stewart destroys German submarine off France. 1945 In only U.S. use of guided mis siles in World War II, two BAT missiles release at Balikiapan, Borneo. 1956 Project Vanguard, earth sat ellite launching program, assigned to DCNO (Air). April 24 1778 Continental Navy Sloop Ranger captures HMS Drake. 1862 Battle of New Orleans. Union Navy under David Farragut runs past forts into Mississippi River. 1884 Navy steamer USS Bear left New York Naval Shipyard as part of the Greely Arctic Relief Expedition. Steamers USS Thetis and USS Alert would join the mission a week later. Greely and six other survivors were found at Cape Sabine on June 23. 1906 Ceremonies at U.S. Naval Academy commemorate John Paul Jones, with President Theodore Roosevelt delivering keynote address. 1917 U.S. destroyer squadron departs Boston for European service. 1959 Organization of American States (OAS) asks U.S. to establish naval patrols off east coast of Panama to pre vent invasion of Cuban forces. 1974 Naval forces begin minesweep ing operations in the Suez Canal Zone. April 25 1862 Union naval forces occupy New Orleans, La. 1914 First combat observation mis sion by Navy aircraft (two Curtiss Model F flying boats) at Veracruz, Mexico. 1959 USS Eversole (DD 789) res cues 14 Nationalist Chinese fishermen from their sinking fishing trawler in the Formosa Strait. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS When I teach journalism, I begin by asking students three questions: 1) How many of you want a career in journalism? 2) How many of your parents have tried to talk you out of a career in journalism? 3) How many of you have a subscription to the local newspaper? The first two questions elicit knowing nods and anxious smiles. The third question often results in dead silence. I can tell by the students sideways glances that they expect a lecture: You want a career in journalism, but you dont subscribe to a newspa per? Theyve heard it all before how young people today dont care about the news, how tradi tional media is as dead as dino saurs. Its why their parents try to talk them out of a career in journalism. One time, a young-adult told me she doesnt follow the news because she doesnt have a television. That should make my broadcast journalism friends happy, but my newspa per heart died a thousand mor bid deaths that day. So the students are usually surprised when I tell them I didnt have a subscription to a newspaper when I was in col lege either. The college experi ence is life in a bubble. Leaving campus is like entering a for eign country. The passport: your roommates car. Eventually, however, the bubble bursts, and you end up like every other 30-something adult married with kids. This is when I walk the students through my typical day: my alarm went off, but because my preschooler has wet his pull-up. toaster breakfast Ive eaten for the past five years because its easy and allows me more time to make frozen waffles. boxes. Sign homework. them about their choice of clothes. mentary school doesnt call to tell me someone has gotten sick and needs to come home. dog. Wash dishes. Fold laundry. Argue with the kids about how long they should brush their teeth. dry. Fall asleep with book on my face. again. Increasingly, the students look nervous. So I share my one bright spot with them the local newspaper. My daily rou tine seldom changes, so I live vicariously through the news paper, where people and events are completely unpredictable. One day the headline is two lost dogs; the next day, a triple homicide. But when I have the news paper in my hand, its like an invisible force field. The kids wont touch it. They dont understand the newspaper. Theres nothing in the newspaper for them. My youngest cant even read. (Which is why I could tell you he wet his pull-up.) All I have to do is tell him, Its work, Honey, and he will go away. Indeed, the newspaper might be kid repellent. But that mat ters very little to college stu dents. Or maybe it matters a great deal. Either way, the newspaper is the last domain of adults. Sure, a brave student will sometimes say, I can get the local newspaper on my iPhone. Fair enough, but does the iPhone have a force field? The newspaper app should come with a warning: Reading our paper online does not guaran tee protection from pestering children. So when parents ask over Spring Break, Are you sure a career in print journalism is wise? Do newspapers even have a future with the next generation? The answer is Someday, my peers and I will lead very boring lives, so although we dont care about the newspa per right now, it will be all that we have on a Monday morning when the kids are fighting and the waffles are burning in the toaster. No, wait, wrong answer. Mom and Dad, local news papers cannot die because they are the only media report ing whats happening here in our city. The New York Times doesnt care about our high school football team. The Washington Post doesnt care about the jazz festival happen ing next weekend. People will always want to know whats happening around them, and therefore, local newspaper will not die. Also, you cant line the bottom of a bird cage with your iPhone.Hey, MoneyChic! Im 25 and currently putting money into my TSP every month but I can afford to save even more. What is the best option for me at my age? Should I consider starting a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA or just putting addition funds into my TSP? MoneyChic says: First, I am so glad to see that you are par ticipating in the TSP program provided by your work. Some companies, such as the federal government, provide matching funds (usually up to 5 percent) of those who participate in their program. Unfortunately, that deal is not offered to those who are active duty military. It makes obvious sense to kick in enough to receive the matching program because if you dont you are miss ing out on free money. Walter Updegrave at Moneymagazine sug gests you go with a Roth IRA. He says that if you fund aRoth IRA account by April 17 you can invest as much as $5,000 and have it count as your contribution for the 2011 tax year. Which will allow you to contribute up to $5,000 for the 2012 tax year, too. However if you decide to go the 401(k) route instead, the extra contribution will count toward the 2012 tax year, as you cant retroactively contribute money to a 401(k).By contributing to the Roth IRA for 2011 rather than boosting the amount you put into your 401(k), you may put an extra years contribution into your retirement plan. Hope this helps!Some thoughts on why newspapers wont die

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Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast (NRSE), signed a sex ual assault awareness proclamation at NAS Jacksonville April 9. The decree proclaims April as NRSE Sexual Assault Awareness Month and emphasizes the regions commitment to the Navys Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) program. The sign ing coincides with National Sexual Assault Awareness Month, which runs through the end of April. The Navys Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program provides an opportuni ty for our installations to raise awareness and to promote the prevention of sexual vio lence, Scorby said. Sexual assault is a crime that erodes our operational readiness and leaders at all levels of the chain of command need to communi cate that we will not tolerate it! Prevention of sexual assault is everyones duty. According to Julie Mooney, NRSE creden tialing and program specialist, the region recorded 103 reports of sexual assault in 2011 and 118 in 2010. Leadership input is of the utmost impor tance with sexual assault awareness and pre vention efforts. The Secretary of the Navy established the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO) in 2009 and it has significantly raised awareness. In 2011, SAPRO hosted a SAPR summit with the pri mary focus of raising leaderships aware ness of sexual assaults that occur within the ranks and the need for increased prevention efforts. I am optimistic that support from leadership in regards to those prevention efforts will have a significant impact on the effectiveness of the Navys overall efforts, Mooney said. While raising awareness is one of the pri mary tools in preventing sexual assault, the Navy SAPR program also focuses on support ing victims. The Navy offers a variety of sup port services, including clinical counseling and legal services. Each installation has a 24-hour SAPR vic tim advocate line. These numbers are adver tised throughout the installations and may be dialed to ask questions, inquire about resources or report a sexual assault. In addition, each installation has a Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) locat ed at the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) to ensure victims receive the support services they need, Mooney said. People may also contact the DoD Safe Helpline at 1-877-995-5247 or via http:// www.safehelpline.org. Southeast Region commander signs Month of the Military Child, child abuse prevention proclamationCommander, Navy Region Southeast (NRSE)Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. signed a Month of the Military Child and National Child Abuse Prevention Month proclamation at NAS Jacksonville April 9. With the signing, Scorby proclaimed April as the Month of the Military Child and Child Abuse Prevention Month throughout the Southeast Region. National Child Abuse Prevention Month and the Month of the Military Child both run through the end of the month. This proclamation was intended to help recognize the role that children play in the armed forces community, as well as raise aware ness of child maltreatment prevention, Scorby said. Military children deal with a unique set of challenges as they con stantly adapt to their parents military obligations, and it is the respon sibility of many people throughout our communities, from schools to law enforcement agencies, to support parents and make sure our chil dren are raised in an engaged and supportive environment. According to Commander, Navy Installations Command, the Navy recorded more than 15,000 substantiated reports of child abuse during the last 10 years. While those numbers have been steadily decreasing, many incidents go unreported, said Jeannette Werby, NRSE counseling and advocacy coordinator. There are many reasons that abuse goes unreported, Werby said. Many people who know about abuse dont report it because they think its none of their business or are concerned about the stigma a report creates and the damage it may cause to ones career. In many other cases, injuries from abuse are not visible. Also, many children do not report abuse because they worry they will not be believed, have been told not to talk to anyone and have been threatened with physical harm, or simply feel responsible themselves for the abuse. According to Werby, the best way to combat child abuse is to raise awareness about it through educational programs and events like the proclamation signing. Raising awareness about child abuse underscores that the prob lem is still here and so are the people who care about its resolution. Affirming at the highest levels that child abuse has serious, long-term outcomes for children and their families adds a compelling dimension to the message that child abuse is unacceptable. Those in leadership roles set the tone and course for awareness, response and interven tion, she said. In addition to child abuse prevention, the proclamation is also intended to raise awareness about the sacrifices made by military children. According to Military K-12 Partners, there are more than 1.2 million military children today, and since 2001, approximately two million children have experienced the deployment of a parent. I would like to personally express my appreciation for the sacrifices our military children make, Scorby said. Despite the many challeng es they face, they remain strong and resilient. The Month of the Military Child was established in 1986 by former Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger to underscore the role mili tary children play in the armed forces community. To find out more about how you can help prevent child abuse or to report an incident of child abuse, contact your installations Fleet and Family Support Center. Rear Adm. Scorby proclaims April as sexual assault awareness month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012 5 Joining Forces proves that Americans want to help our military families and lay a solid foundation of support for years to come. Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. said, It was just one year ago that first lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden created Joining Forces, with the important goal of bringing Americans together to recognize, honor and take action to support veterans and military families. The initiative focuses on three key priority areas employment, education, and wellness while raising awareness about the service, sacrifice and needs of Americas veterans and military families. Today, the first lady of the United States is making a special trip to NAS Jacksonville so she can show her commitment to you and every other family member whos shared the sacrifices of their parents in service to our nation. Enjoy the show, said Scorby. High school senior Maddie Stevens, daughter of VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens and his wife, Sheila, introduced the first lady. Like all of you here today, Im so proud to be part of a military family. Weve all stepped up and served on the homefront when our dads or moms have been away. Now, theres an initiative that recognizes our service as well. Its called Joining Forces and is led by Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden. As a result, people all over America are stepping up to provide opportu nities for military kids like us. Thats why its now my pleasure to introduce the woman leading that charge, Americas first lady, Michelle Obama. Amid screams and applause, Obama took command of the stage. I want to start by thanking Maddie for her poise shes terrific. I also want to recognize all of the extraordinary men and women in uniform who are here today. Thank you for the service that youve given and the sacrifices that youve made. I also want to thank our guests of honor these amazing, beautiful, well-dressed, well-put-together young women who we are celebrating today. We are inspired by you and grateful for everything that you do for our country. Were talking about our military kids and our military families, because we know that when your parents are called to serve, you all serve right alongside them. And I know its even harder when your parents are deployed and you have to keep your spirits up through all those missed holidays, and missed birthdays, and times when you would give anything in the world to have them back home. And for some of you, when it comes time for the prom, your mom might not be there to help you pick out your dress. Dad might not be there to see you out on your date.But heres something else that I know.Through it all through all the moves that youve had to make and through all those difficult moments, you all have stayed strong.Ive seen it in so many kids like you across this country. You all have risen to the challenge.Youve become leaders in your schools.You excel in your classes.You get involved in all kinds of activities.Youve become leaders in your communities, finding all kinds of ways to volunteer. And many of you stepped up at home as well, juggling activities and homework with chores and housework. By working so hard at school and at home, and doing your part, you give your parents the peace of mind they need to focus on their mission. With your service, you make their service possible. And for that, we cant thank you enough. As military kids, you have learned lessons and had experiences that many people dont have in their entire lifetimes. Youve immersed yourselves in all kinds of communities and cultures. Youve made friends with people from all different backgrounds. And youve gained the wisdom and the perspective to appreciate what really matters in life. Obama then switched gears and asked the audience if they were ready for some fun. We have a special surprise guest that Im proud to call a friend and who is a supporter and admirer of veterans and military families. She then introduced, via a live TV connection, stand-up comedian and syndicated talk show host Ellen DeGeneres. The two engaged in lively banter and showed their prom pictures to the delight of the audience. DeGeneres interviewed three students about the Joining Forces initiative and then announced that JC Penney would provide all 300 students with a special prom-oriented gift bag, including a $250 gift card. To wrap up the event, Obama joined students on stage to learn the latest prom dance moves from Disney Channel Choreographer Rosero McCoy. She then expressed her gratitude to the audience once again and descended from the stage to shake hands before departing. For most of the young ladies it was an evening they will never forget. I think it was overwhelming and very exciting and it was a great opportunity to be part of all this. I loved listening to Mrs. Obama and thrilled that she is bringing attention to the hardships mili tary families face, said 16-year-old Jazarie Reddick, daughter of SHC(SW/AW) Jeffrey Reddick of Transient Personnel Unit/Pre-Trial Confinement Facility Jax, who accompanied her to the event. FIRST LADY: TV hookup with Ellen DeGeneres highlights event

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Twenty business representa tives from the Northeast Florida Regional Planning Council (NEFRPC) Leadership Academy toured NAS Jacksonville envi ronmental and energy projects April 11. NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander wel comed the group at Heritage Park. Our base is pleased to be associated with the Northeast Florida Regional Planning Council. Todays tour will pro vide you a better understanding of our commands and opera tions, as well as our successes executing major construction projects that are environmen tally sustainable and energy efficient, said Undersander. The council is a network of local governments that fosters public awareness of diverse regional issues in Baker, Clay, Duval, Flagler, Putnam, Nassau and St Johns Counties and their 27 municipalities. After the tour, NEFRPC Director of Policy Margo Moerhing said, We in Northeast Florida need to con tinue to recognize the strong regional partner we have in the Navy, celebrate their ethic of stewardship, and use the wide variety of innovative ways that they are building efficient, cost effective facilities and imple menting sustainable programs as models to learn from. We often bring Northeast Florida Regional Leadership Academy candidates to tour NAS Jacksonville because of the inspiration that the good environmental, financial and community stewardship of the base, and its people, pro vides. It reminds regional leaders of what is possible. NAS Jax Environmental Director Kevin Gartland hosted the tour. We greatly appreciated the opportunity to share with the council today the commitment and dedication of the men and women of NAS Jax to environ mental conservation and energy efficiency in our construction efforts and daily operations. We strive every day to be respon sible stewards of this historic naval installation including its outlying airfield and training ranges. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast are tried, with few excep tions, at NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport and NAS Pensacola. Therefore, the loca tion of where a court-martial was con vened does not necessarily correlate to the command that convened the courtmartial. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast recently heard the following cases: at NS Mayport, a petty officer second class pled guilty to conspiracy to com mit larceny of military property, two violations of a lawful general order, and larceny of military property of a value of $500 or less. The military judge sen tenced the accused to 100 days confine ment, reduction in rank to E-1, and a bad conduct discharge. convened at NS Mayport, a petty offi cer second class was found guilty of assault by threat with an unloaded fire arm. The members of the court-martial sentenced the accused to 30 days hard labor without confinement and reduc tion in rank to E-4. Martial convened at NCBC Gulfport, a petty officer third class was found guilty of violating a lawful general order. The members of the court-martial sen tenced the accused to no additional punishment beyond the conviction itself. at NS Mayport, a petty officer third class pled guilty to three specifications of assault. The military judge sentenced the accused to confinement for 10 months, reduction in rate to E-1 and a bad conduct Discharge. vened at NAS Jacksonville, an airman pled guilty to desertion, unauthorized absence, four specifications of failure to obey other lawful written orders, damaging non-military property of $500 or less, and drunk and disorderly conduct. The military judge sentenced the accused to 100 days confinement, reduction in rank to E-1 and a bad con duct discharge. Martial convened at NAS Jacksonville, a petty officer first class was acquitted of three specifications of assault. vened at NAS Jacksonville, a previous ly convicted Sailor currently serving confinement at a Navy brig was found guilty of attempt to communicate inde cent language to a child, attempt to mail obscene matters, and two specifications of failing to obey a lawful order. The military judge sentenced the accused to an additional seven years confine ment, with confinement in excess of two years suspended pursuant to a pretrial agreement with the convening authority. The confinement to be served is in addition to the sentence previously adjudged at an earlier court-martial. at NS Mayport, a petty officer second class was found guilty of damaging per sonal property and communicating a threat. The military judge sentenced the accused to 120 days confinement and reduction in rate to E-1. vened at NAS Jacksonville, a lieutenant commander pled guilty to five specifi cations of conduct unbecoming an offi cer, one specification of adultery, and one specification of attempted conduct unbecoming an officer. The court-mar tial members sentenced the accused to be confined for six months and to be reprimanded. Regional planners visit NAS Jacksonville 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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Federal and Navy programs can help Sailors and their families navigate potential financial pitfalls, officials said April 4. Were here to let [ser vice members] know what we can do, so we can help them make wise consumer decisions and help them avoid scams, said Holly Petraeus, assistant director, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), Office of Service Member Affairs. CFPB is a new federal agen cy focused on protecting con sumers. Petraeus division is dedicated to seeing that mili tary personnel and their fami lies get financial information to make informed consumer decisions. The agency also monitors their complaints against financial organizations and works with other federal and state agencies on con sumer protection measures for military personnel and their families. Petraeus met with Commander, Navy Personnel Command, Rear Adm. Cynthia Covell and other leaders in the Mid-South to raise awareness of the CFPB and to discuss strategies to educate Sailors and their families. Financial matters such as failure to pay bills, bad credit, bankruptcy and foreclosures can negatively impact a Sailors career, affect mission readiness and the Navys ability to trans fer or retain Sailors. A readiness issue we face today are those Sailors who are home owners facing finan cial difficulty because of the housing market, said Covell. In some cases Sailors transfer ring to new duty stations are choosing to leave their family behind and go unaccompanied because they feel leaving their home would result in severe financial impact. One of Petraeus jobs at CFPB is to raise awareness in Washington D.C. about that issue. I was very pleased to see in the recent settlement that was worked out by 49 of 50 [state] attorneys general, DOJ (Department of Justice) and the five largest banks that give mortgages. There were some military provisions in that set tlement. Petraeus is also working to raise awareness about highinterest loans and scams that take advantage of service members. The idea is to edu cate members against being taken advantage of before they sign a contract. I recently saw a loan some one had given a service mem ber that was an auto title loan at 400 percent interest, said Petraeus. The individual was borrow ing $1,600 with a repayment schedule of $585 a month for 32 months. At the loans end the member will have paid more than $15,000 in inter est and service charges on a $1,600 loan. That is outrageous. That should not happen, said Petraeus. Were going to do every thing we can to educate people not to sign those contracts. Petraeus, Covell and other Millington leaders dis cussed ways the Navy can help Sailors be proactive to protect their assets and their careers. Command finan cial specialists (CFS) provide financial education and train ing, counseling, and informa tion referral at the command level at no cost to Sailors and their families. Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) located worldwide provide financial education and counseling for Sailors and families as well. Petraeus suggests start ing with these organizations first when looking for financial guidance before taking on new debt and to determine if mili tary service qualifies the mem ber for lower interest rates on existing loans and credit. As a rule, any loan with an inter est rate higher than 36 percent should raise the alarm and is worth review by the CFS or FFSC, according to Petraeus. In some cases Sailors may qualify for interest-free loans from military relief societies, said Petraeus. Sailors experiencing finan cial challenges should notify their chain of command and work with their CFS to devel opment a budget and explore additional options such as mil itary relief societies, eligibility for interest rate reductions and other relief. Additionally, being upfront and trying to address the issue openly can work to a Sailors advantage if financial difficulties threaten a mem bers security clearance. Personal financial prepared ness is an important element of readiness, one of the areas of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative which con solidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resil iency and hone the most com bat-effective force in the his tory of the Navy and Marine Corps. Personal financial preparedness a critical component to military readiness JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012 7

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active and Reserve, for core and noncore missions, stated Garcia. As we wrap up in Iraq and draw down in Afghanistan we dont want to lose those highly-skilled Sailors. We need the best talent available. The 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative was also promoted dur ing the town hall meeting. This new initiative focuses on five pillar areas including physical fitness, inclusion, readiness, safety and continuum of service. The Navy wants a culture of fit ness, where Sailors stay at the top of their game year-round, said Garcia. We also need better options to retain women in uniform so we are creating new programs making military ser vice conducive to raising a family. Two of these initiatives include a 12-month operational deferment for new moth ers and the Career Intermission Pilot Program which allows men and women to transfer to the IRR for up to three years with a stipend of their sal ary and benefits. When they return to active duty there will be no penalties to their career path. Garcia also talked about readiness and how sexual assault cases impact the workplace. The Navy continues to emphasize sexual assault aware ness training for our troops, sup port sexual assault victims and hold offenders accountable. Prevention is the key. Nowhere is the correlation tighter than between sexual assault cases, suicide rates and alcohol use. Were hoping to change the culture and one way is by using breathalyzers in commands as a tool, not as a puni tive means, but to help our Sailors and head off a tragedy before it happens, he added. Several Sailors in the audience asked questions about increasing the fleet concentration in the Jacksonville area to allow them and their families more home-basing opportunities. The Navy remains committed to strategic disbursement. We know we cant have all our assets in one place where they are exposed to terrorist acts or natural disasters. The Navy will continue to increase the footprint here with a new fleet of P-8A aircraft, amphibious ready groups and the lit toral combat ships at Naval Station Mayport. This area will remain a fleet concentration center and a key corner stone for the Navy. ASN: Garcia brings message to NAS Jax Farewell to Master Chief PrindleFleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 58 celebrated the retirement of CMDCM(AW/SW) Frederick Prindle April 14 after 30 years of service. The ceremony took place at the VP-30 Auditorium. Prindle began his Navy career as a Boiler Technician in 1982. His subsequent assignments included Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Center Akron, Ohio and Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activity (SIMA) at Newport, R.I. Upon completion of his tour at SIMA, Prindle reported to Machinery Repairman A School. During this tour, he completed his conversion to Machinery Repairman. From July 1993 to February 1997, he served Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activity Ingleside, Texas, working in the Ship Superintendent Office. In 1997, he reported to the aircraft carrier USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) as the Machine Shop Chief Petty Officer. During this tour, he also supervised the Hull Technician Weld, Lock Key and Trouble Call shops. From December 1999 to April 2003, he served the Naval Reserve Center Louisville, Ky., as the senior enlisted advisor. In April 2003, he served as assistant quality assurance officer with Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activity Ingleside, Texas. Following the decommissioning of SIMA Ingleside in September 2004, he served as the repair two division offi cer and command training officer with South Central Regional Maintenance Center Ingleside, Texas. During this tour, he entered into the Command Master Chief program in May 2006. In June 2006, Prindle reported to the Jaguars of Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) 60 at Naval Station Mayport, where he served as command master chief until June 2009. His final assignment was as VR-58 Command Master Chief at NAS Jacksonville. Prindle and his beautiful wife, Mary, have been married to for 30 years. They have two daughters, Jessica and Megan. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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There is no place for sexual assault in our Navy and efforts are underway to eradicate it from our ranks, said the director of Navys 2012 Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) initiative April 4. We can get this right in our service. We can set the example of what is really acceptable behavior; what is a good professional command climate, how we set the right environment for the right behavior to occur and we can really get to a zero incidence, said Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, chief of naval personnel and SAAM director. Approximately 600 sexual assaults were reported in the Navy last year according to Van Buskirk, But no incident of sexual assault is acceptable in our Navy. Department of Defense (DoD) defines sexual assault as intentional sexual contact characterized by use of force, threats, intimidation or abuse of authority or when the victim does not or cannot consent. Sexual assault includes rape, forcible sodomy (oral or anal sex), and other unwanted sexual contact that is aggravated, abusive or wrongful (including unwanted and inappropriate sexual contact), or attempts to commit these acts. According to Van Buskirk, about half of the sexual assaults reported last year were alcohol related and the Navy is introducing new training to better educate Sailors, Marines and their families to affect behavior and raise awareness. We have this opportunity here to leverage sexual assault awareness month to really hit home about how important it is for us to become more aware and more educated about sexual assault in our Navy and Marine Corps, said Van Buskirk. Were going to take the time in April to stand down, to stop all work so we can have a good opportunity to make ourselves more aware and edu cated about this, said Van Buskirk. The Navy will focus on four themes during SAAM: Hurts One, Affects All, Prevention is Everyones Duty, and We Will Not Tolerate Sexual Assault. According to Van Buskirk, training will include a seg ment on bystander intervention, a DoD strategy to engage all hands in preventing sexual assault. Under the strat egy, active bystanders take the initiative to help someone who may be targeted for a sexual assault in ways that are intended to avoid verbal or physical conflict. Active bystanders take the initiative to help friends, who are not thinking clearly or whose judgment may be clouded from the effects of alcohol or other substances, from becoming victims or offenders of crime. Intervention does not mean that you directly intervene to stop a crime in progress, rather, these steps are early intervention before the crime begins to occur, said Van Buskirk. Scripts and videos for each weeks theme, engagement products, posters and other tools, are available on the Navy Personnel Command Sexual Assault and Prevention website, http://www.sapr.navy.mil. Van Buskirk said his goal is to establish a baseline of education, training and awareness for the entire Navy that is sustainable year after year until we can eradicate this problem from our ranks. Well leverage this month as a prelude to continuing our robust program which we already have established in our Navy, said Van Buskirk. Talking about it, being aware about it isnt enough. We have to stop it. We have to be willing to intervene. We have to be willing to speak up. We have to be willing to act. That is what my expectations are of each and every one of you. Sexual Assault Prevention and Response is an impor tant element of the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative that consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Navy and Marine Corps. The Department of the Navy is working to aggressively to prevent sexual assaults, to support sexual assault victims, and to hold offenders accountable. NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville recognized LaShawn Brown as the Acquisition Advocate for Small Business Concerns for fiscal year 2012, first quarter. Brown began her career in gov ernment contracting in the Naval Acquisition Intern Program (NAIP) at NAVSUP FLC Norfolk in 2005. In May of last year, she transferred to NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville as a contracting officer to the InterService Supply Support Operations Program (ISSOP) Division. She has a masters degree in public administration with a concentration in government contracting from Troy University. She received her Level III certification in the Acquisition Career Field of Contracting in less than five years. Brown provides contractual sup port for Commander Naval Reserve Forces Command, Naval Air Station Pensacola, Naval Air Station Key West, SUPSHIP Gulf Coast, Naval Operations Medical Institute, and Center for Information Dominance, Education & Training. Her contribution to NAVSUP FLCJ in achieving its mandated socio-econom ic goals for small business awards is impressive. From Oct. 1, 2011 to Dec. 31, 2011, Brown awarded a myriad of contracts with the major ity being acquired by small business concerns; to include service-disabled veteran and women-owned small business concerns for a total of $1.6 million. Proficient, knowledgeable and considerate are just a few attributes that have been used to describe her work ethic. Navy sets zero tolerance for sexual assault NAVSUP recognizes small business advocate JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012 9

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While many were home still sleeping Saturday morning, 76 anglers headed to the Mulberry Cove Marina to participate in the 30th annual NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Bass Tournament, Relocating Confused Bass Since 1982. The event held on the St. Johns River, was open to all active duty members, reserv ists, retirees and Department of Defense civilians. Teams con sisted of two members per boat and they fished from first light until late into the afternoon. The St. Johns River was smooth as silk this morn ing, then the wind picked up 20 knots and made this one of the roughest tournaments we have ever had, said MWR Marina Manager Phil Collins. The St. Johns Bass Anglers Club returned for another year as event officials. In the afternoon, as each teams catch was weighed, a crowd began to gather around the scoreboard. The lead changed many times as everyone enjoyed free food and beverages provided by MWR. This was a hard day of fishing with all the wind. We hit a big wave really hard on the way back in and I nearly broke my neck. We had reached our fish limit early and culled four bass. All in all a very successful day, said angler Billy Roberts. All participants received a free tournament shirt and sponsor bag with promotional items. Thanks to the very generous support from area businesses, the anglers received more than $3,000 in door prizes and gift certificates. We owe a big thanks to all of the hard working volunteers and sponsors that make this event possible for us to host. The sponsors contribute valuable door prizes and we get so many awesome prizes.We try to make this tournament fun for every one, said Collins. NAS Jacksonville MWR thanks the many volunteers and sponsors that made this event a success: North Florida Sales, Pure Fishing, Jacksonville Suns Baseball Team, Fort George Surf Shop, NAS Jax Commissary, Subway and VyStar Credit Union. Disclaimer: Neither NAS Jax, MWR, or the Jax Air News nor any part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or their products or services. Anglers hit St. Johns River in search of biggest bass JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012 11

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included April Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor pool hours Mon. Fri. 5:30 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 8 p.m. Weekend hours 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. Family Fitness Bootcamp with Ashley Monday & Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. Family Fitness Center above the Youth Center Gym Call (904) 778-9772 Outdoor Pool Open Weekends Beginning May 5 & 6, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DoD civil ians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session one begins June 18 $40 military, $45 DoD Sign-up at the base gym May 12 811 a.m. military only, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. all eligible patronsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Disney World Orlando FL 4 day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Disney World Orlando FL Resident 3 day $98.25, 3 day hopper $125.25, 4 day $127.75, 4 day hopper $154.50 Funk Fest May 11 & 12 at Metropolitan Park $57 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 St. Augustine Scenic Cruise Day Trip May 5, 9:30 a.m. 5 p.m. $20 per personThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Dave & Busters Trip April 19 at 6 p.m. Free $10 game card, 20 percent off food & beverage and unlim ited simulator play! Kayaking Trip Amelia Island April 21 at 9 a.m. Outdoor Movie At the Vault recreation center April 25 at duskNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees April 24 for active duty April 26 for retirees & DoD per sonnel Ladies Golf Clinics Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. $10 per person Pre-registration required, signup in the pro shop Senior Military Invitational April 30 & May 1 9 a.m. shotgun start $65 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Shoreline Clean-up May 4 at 8:30 a.m. Free lunch! Call (904) 542-2709 or e-mail angela.glass@navy.mil to signup Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recre ation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more infor mation. Month of the Military Child Carnival April 21, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Fields Free games, food and prizes! 2012 Adventure Summer Registration Dates: Current School-Age Care par ticipants Now Single & Dual Active Duty Now Other Active Duty Now through April 20 DoD Civilians April 23 27 Registration Packets available for pick up at the Youth Center. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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NAS Jax Energy Team to participate in Earth Day events Earth Day will be celebrated on April 20. This is a day and time to reflect on our planets health and stewardship. The NAS Jax Energy Team will be participating in the event by setting up visual displays from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Navy Exchange Food Court. This event should be considered as an everyday requirement that we all need to be conscious of and what effect were having on the earths future. The team will answer questions on what the base is doing to achieve reductions in energy intensity and present ideas that consumers can take to reduce consumption and save money. They will also hand out pam phlets providing information on ways to not only save energy dollars but to also reduce our carbon footprint. Also on display will be the solar-powered Global Electric Motor-vehicle (GEM) that is powered solely from sunlight. This vehicle has not been plugged in to the electrical grid for over two years. Due in part to the recently installed energy projects, NAS Jacksonville is realizing significant reductions in both energy and water consumption. The NAS Jax Energy Team appreciates the effort taken by all of the on-base personnel (both military and civilian) as we work to achieve our goal of a 30 percent reduction in electrical intensity and a 20 percent reduction in water consumption by 2015. The NAS Jacksonville Energy Team thanks every one for their efforts in reducing utility consump tion. Be sure to thank your building energy monitor for their vigilance in making energy reduction one of their top priorities and if you see something that would further this reduction, by all means let them know and they will engage the energy team for review. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012 13

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Ten pairs of culinary spe cialists threw down their best breadbutter-cheese and other ingredients recipes April 12 at the NAS Jacksonville Flight Line Caf culinary competition recogniz ing National Grilled Cheese Day. These are not your mothers grilled cheese sandwiches, said CSCM Michael Carter of Navy Food Management Team Mayport, who organized the event with CSCS Paulette Williams. This competition stresses creativity, so there is no limit on ingredients or the types of cheese or bread that chefs may include in their recipes, said Carter, a former White House chef. From what Ive seen, competitors may be using ingredients such as black for est ham, cucumber, spinach, basil pesto, bacon, olives, avocado and roasted red peppers items not typically seen in a traditional grilled cheese sandwich, explained Carter. This is an excellent opportunity for Navy culinary specialists to display their talents and to add to their cheese reper toire, as well as incorporating ingredi ents like artisan breads, fruit and unique spreads, said NAS Jax Food Services Division Officer CWO4 Kathy Wiseman. Teams from NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport and four Mayport-based ships took part in the competition. The teams were given one hour to cre ate their good-and-gooey sandwich that was presented to the judges panel, consist ing of: NAVSUP FLC Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Head; NAVSUP FLC Jax Executive Officer Cmdr. Tom Dailey; NAVSUP FLC Executive Director Mitch Palmquist; Lt. Cmdr. Chris Pressler and Navy spouse Dawn Lancaster. First place went to CS2 Rasheen Maxwell and CS2 Cortez Brown of NS Mayport, second place went to CS2 Paula Prine and CS2 Marnika Ash of NAS Jax, and third was awarded to CS3Wilmer Ringold and CS3 Michael Mainer of NS Mayport.Saluting the iconic grilled cheese sandwich 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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Heritage Dinner puts spotlight on P-3, Hall of Honor inductees The Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) celebrated 50 years of the P-3 Orion at the annual Heritage Dinner March 28 at NAS Jacksonville by honor ing the strength and commit ment of the many members, past and present, who have helped shape the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community. Last year we celebrated the Centennial of Naval Aviation in which we noted that mari time patrol has played a key role in the U.S. military aviation operations since the very begin ning, said Rear Adm. Michael Hewitt, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group. And tonight, we are here to toast a major accomplishment within our own community; the service of the P-3 Orion for the last 50 years. The milestone anniversary of the celebrated aircraft attracted a crowd of nearly 450 guests in historic Hangar 117. One of the many distinguished attendees, guest speaker Vice Adm. Harry Harris, assistant to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and a former Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) member, spoke about the leaders who had helped mold the aviation community. He singled out dozens of active duty and retired mem bers of the MPRF, many of them seated in the audience, who had played key roles in leadership and antisubmarine warfare (ASW), the critical mission of maritime patrol. It was clear that these people cre ated the foundation upon which the community is currently run. Included in that group were three individuals inducted into the MPRF Hall of Honor during the dinner. Cmdr. Scott Carpenter, USN (Ret.), one of the original Mercury astronauts and a former VP pilot (VP-6), flew aboard the MercuryAtlas 7 mission, becoming the fourth American in space and the second to orbit the earth. After the completion of his astronaut tour, Carpenter later joined the Navy SEALAB program, which made him the only person ever desig nated as an astronaut and an aqua naut. Capt. Arnold Isbell (deceased) was the commanding officer of VP-11 during World War II, during which time he faced a hurricane while surveying military base sites in Newfoundland and skillfully maneuvered his aircraft to make an emergency night landing. Isbell later commanded the escort carri er Card (CVE-11), and coordinated action that destroyed eight U-boats in a two-month period in 1943. He then took his knowledge and expe rience to Washington, DC where he set-up an ASW tactical research and development department. In March 1945, while en route to take command of the Yorktown (CV-10), Isbell was killed when a Japanese plane scored two bomb hits on the carrier in which he was embarked as a passenger. Rear Adm. Daniel Wolkensdorfer (deceased) served in several VP squadrons throughout his career, commanding both VP-47 and VP-30. Hailed for his dedication to the maritime patrol community, he was noted most for his service to the development of ASW and tac tics during the Cold War. Among other positions, Wolkensdorfer served as head of the Air Branch of the Antisubmarine Warfare Division of the Antisubmarine Warfare and Ocean Surveillance Program Office for the Chief of Naval Operations. Wolkensdorfer spent much of his 35-year career in ASW planning, acquisition, test ing and operations, which helped shape much of current day ASW tactics. Selected for shaping the heri tage of the community and/ or for bravery in combat, the awards for Carpenter, Isbell and Wolkensdorfer were accepted by family members and colleagues. Also attending were nine retired officers who were members of the original P-3C delivery crew in 1969 and/or instructors from VP-30 at the time of the aircrafts arrival. The self-named Det Burbank Crew, recalled their infamous trip home with the first P-3C. When we arrived at NATC Pax River there was a large crowd gathering around to see the new Junior Red Cross volunteers must apply by May 1The American Red Cross at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is currently recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volunteers. This offers an excellent opportunity for students interested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine profession als physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and technicians as well as contribute to creating a posi tive experience for NH Jacksonville patients. The program is open to a limited number of high school students age 16 to 18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the hospital, and receive CPR training. Applications can be picked up at NH Jacksonvilles American Red Cross office (Room 1404, next to Physical Therapy & Occupational Therapy) and must be submitted by May 1. Selectees are required to attend the June 9 kickoff event from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., that includes an interview, in the hospitals central tower second deck conference room. For more about this opportunity, call Junior Red Cross Volunteer Chairman Terry Miles at 542-7525 or e-mail terry.miles2@med.navy.mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012 15

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baby, recalled Capt. Ron Martin, USN (Ret.), VP-30s first P-3C project officer who delivered the first P-3C aircraft to the fleet from the assembly line in Burbank, Calif. Would you believe the new fancy electronic ladder wouldnt work? The primary aircraft of the U.S. Navy MPRF, the P-3 Orion, has aided in anti-submarine warfare since the early 1960s when it was introduced to the aviation community by aeronau tics corporation Lockheed Martin. The P-3 turboprop was an answer to a late 1950s request by the Chief of Naval Operations for an aircraft with more cabin space, a larger radius and a lon ger endurance than its predecessor, the P-2 Neptune. In August 1962, VP-8 took possession of the first P-3, and then in 1969, the final revamp of the Orion, the first P-3C, came online. From a tactical standpoint, this new Charlie was a quantum leap in improved sensors, data processing, tac tical displays, weapons delivery, and decision making assistance over any P-3 system flying at that time, said Martin. We all knew Maritime Patrol was about to become a force to be reck oned with. A half century later, the celebration of the P-3C Orion comes at both a historic and pivotal point in the MPRFs future. In June of this year, VP-16 will receive the first P-8A Poseidon, a multi-mission maritime aircraft developed by Boeing. It will be the first jet-powered maritime patrol aircraft commandeered by the US Navy. Integration of the P-8A into the entire MPRF fleet, however, will take a mini mum of six years. Until then, the P-3 Orion will continue to play an impor tant role in the critical mission of the U.S. maritime patrol community. There are very few airplanes in the world that can tout the distinct honor of being in service for 50 years. This is tes tament to the ingenuity and innovation of the designers, manufacturers and assemblers who created the P-3 Orion, said Lockheed Martin Vice President of P-3 Programs and Greenville Operations Ray Burick. The P-3 is the world standard in maritime patrol and reconnaissance and will continue to serve opera tors around the globe for many more decades to come. As a token of appreciation to the community, Burick presented the first of 755 copies of a limited edition P-3 lithograph to Hewitt. The lithograph is inlaid with 21 roundels representing all P-3 operators, past and present. The number of lithographs being produced, represents the number of P-3s built by Lockheed Martin worldwide over the last half-century.DINNER: Celebrates P-3s service Navy personnel are busy preparing to teach the next generation of Sailors how to maintain and fly the newest mili tary aircraft, the F-35C Lightening II Joint Strike Fighter as Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101 readies for its stand-up ceremony at Eglin Air Force Base May 1. The F-35 is a single seat, multi-role fighter aircraft with the capability to perform ground attack, reconnaissance and air defense missions. The aircraft is in full production at the Lockheed Martin plant in Fort Worth, Texas. The F-35 is designed to eventually replace the F/A-18 Hornet and AV-8B Harrier tactical fighter aircraft. It was planned with a common design, but three unique service variants, to keep devel opment, production and operating costs down. This is brand new aircraft platform from tooth to tail, said Cmdr. Scott Kartvedt, commanding officer of VFA101. Were not parlaying off any Navy stealth legacy programs or support systems. This will be the first new stealth and carrier-based tactical fighter air craft since the introduction of the F/A18 some 29 years ago. The original VF-101, nicknamed the Grim Reapers, was established May 1, 1952 and flew various models of fighter aircraft including the F-4 Phantom and F-14 Tomcat. With the retirement of the F-14, VF-101 was disestablished in 2005. To support the new Navy version of the F-35, VFA-101 will be reestablished May 1 at a new hangar and training facility on Eglin AFB and will serve as the Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS), training pilots and maintainers for the fleet. The first Sailors to stand up VFA-101 will receive VFA-101 Plank Owner cer tificates for their assistance with the new aircraft, new training facilities and reestablished squadron. As per Navy tradition, plank owners are individuals who were members of the crew of a ship when that ship was placed in commis sion. Im learning a lot and really enjoy working with other services, said Senior Chief Logistics Specialist (AW/ SW) Mirtha Martinez, the material con trol department leading chief petty offi cer for the squadron. Id love to come back in five years and see the squadron fully functioning. Marine Col. Arthur Tomassetti, vice commander of the 33rd Fighter Wing, said establishing a squadron to train and work with the F-35 aircraft has not been easy, but the leadership has taken charge and is working towards building the best facilities possible to work with this new aircraft. The concept was simple; establish an initial training center for pilots and maintainers for the F-35 weapon sys tem, said Tomassetti. Bringing that concept to reality will continue to be complicated and challenging. So the first step is you start with the best peo ple you can find, put them together, and say go. Over the past two-and-one-half years, those carefully selected people have put together a strategy, developed plans, adapted to the dynamic and ever changing environment and schedule, and continued to track towards the goal of establishing a training center for F-35 pilots and maintainers. The maintainers of the Navy F-35C will initially be taught by Lockheed Martin personnel to Navy instructors, who will then begin teaching students after completing instructor certifica tion. Students are expected to arrive for maintenance instruction in 2015, with the first F-35s scheduled for deploy ment 2017-2018. The Navys version of the F-35, the C model is distinct from the F-35A and F-35B versions with larg er wing surfaces and reinforced landing gear for greater control in the demand ing carrier take-off and landing envi ronment. Sailors in the majority of aviation rates are eligible to attend the F-35 course of instruction, including avia tion ordnancemen, aviation structural mechanics, aviation machinists mates, aviation electronics technicians, avia tion electricians mates, aviation struc tural mechanics and aircrew survival equipmentmen. VFA-101 is a part of the 33rd Fighter Wing, a joint-service graduate flying and maintenance training wing respon sible for F-35 A/B/C pilot and mainte nance training for the Navy, Marine Corps and the Air Force. Initially, 59 aircraft and three squadrons, one for each services aircraft variant will be based at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The F-35 Academic Training Center serves as the schoolhouse, where wing per sonnel expect to train more than 2,000 maintenance students and 100 pilots each year. Navys newest squadron prepares for new F-35 fighters 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012



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THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Joining Forces celebrates first yearFirst lady Michelle Obama joined hundreds of military and civilian well wishers at NAS Jacksonville April 12 to celebrate the first anniversary of Joining Forces the ini tiative that Obama and Dr. Jill Biden launched in 2011 to recognize, honor and serve military families. The celebration included every thing youd never imagine in a Navy aircraft hangar a rock n roll band, Radio Disney Dancers, and a live feed to the Ellen DeGeneres Show. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders welcomed the enthusiastic audience of high school stu dents and parents. Today is a time for cel ebration, but its also a time to renew the call to action for Joining Forces. The outpour ing of support this past year for First Lady visits NAS Jax Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs), the Honorable Juan Garcia III, met with Sailors from Naval Air Station Jacksonville during a town hall meeting April 11. Garcia briefed the group on several key issues including the Navys Enlisted Retention Board (ERB), pay, retirement, tuition assistance, medical benefits, the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative and Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Retention in our military services is extremely high, maybe because of the economy or the compensation packages offered which now equal civilian employer benefits. This has caused many overmanned rates and we had to find a way to balance our force, so the ERB was created to ask one percent of our Sailors to transition to the next chapter of their lives while keeping as many as possible in the Reserve force, said Garcia. Our message to our Sailors is that we are not going to ERB again this year or next year. Our intention is to never ERB again. We will con tinue to make small adjustments to ensure we achieve the right balance. Garcia also stressed how the Navy is helping those Sailors who are being transitioned out of the service. We are trying to ensure that every Sailor who is being transitioned out of the Navy is aware of the benefits they can receive, including retire ment compensation for those who reach 15 years by Sept. 1, involuntary separation pay, health care options for six months up to 18 months, Navy Exchange and commissary privileges for two years, and job placement services, he said. Another goal the secretary discussed was the importance of keeping highly talented service members in the Naval Reserve. There is no way we could have gone through the last decade without our Reserve component. We mobilized 67,000 Individual Augmentees, VR-62 achieves safety milestoneThe VR-62 Nomads passed a major milestone in March, when they logged more than 70,000 Class A mishap-free flight hours during the logistics squadrons 26 years of ser vice. The Nomads were praised by Commanding Officer Cmdr. Alexander Ellermann and Executive Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino. Squadron members work to provide rapid response, global air logistics and support to U.S. maritime forces. The Navy Reserve squadron based at NAS Jax operates four of the Navys 19 C-130T Hercules aircraft, making them a relevant, capable and robust part of the Fleet Logistics Support Wing. VR-62 recently returned from deployment in Bahrain, where they provided support for numerous missions. These logistics missions included passengers, parts and supplies, ammunition, ordnance and aircraft engines, as well as U.S. mail to boost morale and welfare. They were an integral part of keep ing the essential supply lines established to numerous Navy and Marine Corps outposts in the 6th Fleet area of responsibility. The Nomads will detach to Atsugi, Japan in July, supporting Pacific Command with short-notice, high-priority air logistics throughout the Pacific theater. ASN Garcia briefs NAS Jax Sailors Main gate to close April 21The NAS Jax main gate at Yorktown Avenue and U.S. 17 will be closed Saturday from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. for mainte nance. Building 9 (Pass & ID Office) will be open for normal weekend operations. Drivers may access the base through the Birmingham Gate.

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012 April 19 1783 George Washington proclaims end of hostilities with Great Britain. 1861 President Lincoln orders blockade of Southern ports from South Carolina to Texas. 1917 Naval Armed Guard crew on board SS Mongolia engage and dam age a German U-boat. This was the first engagement of U.S. naval personnel against the enemy in World War I. 1955 Heavy cruiser USS Albany (CA 123) and destroyer USS William M. Wood (DD 715) provide disaster relief to citizens of Volos, Greece after cata strophic earthquake. April 20 1796 Congress authorizes comple tion of three frigates. 1861 Norfolk Navy Yard abandoned and burned by Union forces. 1914 In first call to action of naval aviators, a detachment on cruiser USS Birmingham (CL-2) sailed to Tampico, Mexico. 1915 First Navy contract for lighterthan-air craft awarded. 1942 USS Wasp (CV-7) launches 47 British aircraft to reinforce Malta. 1947 Navy Capt. L.O. Fox, supported by 80 Marines, accepted the surren der of Lt. Yamaguchi and 26 Japanese soldiers and sailors, two and one half years after the occupation of Peleliu and nearly 20 months after the surrender of Japan. 1953 USS New Jersey shells Wonsan, Korea from inside the harbor. 1964 USS Henry Clay (SSBN-625) launches a Polaris A-2 missile from the surface in first demonstration that Polaris submarines could launch mis siles from the surface as well as from beneath the ocean. Just 30 minutes later, the submarine launched another Polaris missile while submerged. April 21 1861 USS Saratoga captures slaver Nightingale. 1898 U.S. at war against Spain. 1906 Cmdr. Robert Peary discovered that supposed Arctic Continent did not exist. 1972 Moonwalk in the Descartes Highlands by Navy Capt. John Young, commander of Apollo 16. He was the ninth man to walk on the moon. Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Mattingly II, was the Command Module Pilot. Charles Duke was the Lunar Module Pilot. During the 11-day, onehour and 51-minute mission, 213 lbs. of lunar material was collected. Recovery accomplished by HC-1 helicopters from USS Ticonderoga (CVS-14). April 22 1778 Capt. John Paul Jones of the Continental Navy Sloop Ranger led landing party raid on Whitehaven, England. 1898 U.S. warships begin blockade of Cuba. 1987 U.S. Navy ordered to provide assistance requested by neutral vessels under Iranian attack outside the exclu sion zone. April 23 1917 Launching of USS New Mexico, first dreadnought with turboelectric drive. 1918 USS Stewart destroys German submarine off France. 1945 In only U.S. use of guided missiles in World War II, two BAT missiles release at Balikiapan, Borneo. 1956 Project Vanguard, earth sat ellite launching program, assigned to DCNO (Air). April 24 1778 Continental Navy Sloop Ranger captures HMS Drake. 1862 Battle of New Orleans. Union Navy under David Farragut runs past forts into Mississippi River. 1884 Navy steamer USS Bear left New York Naval Shipyard as part of the Greely Arctic Relief Expedition. Steamers USS Thetis and USS Alert would join the mission a week later. Greely and six other survivors were found at Cape Sabine on June 23. 1906 Ceremonies at U.S. Naval Academy commemorate John Paul Jones, with President Theodore Roosevelt delivering keynote address. 1917 U.S. destroyer squadron departs Boston for European service. 1959 Organization of American States (OAS) asks U.S. to establish naval patrols off east coast of Panama to prevent invasion of Cuban forces. 1974 Naval forces begin minesweeping operations in the Suez Canal Zone. April 25 1862 Union naval forces occupy New Orleans, La. 1914 First combat observation mis sion by Navy aircraft (two Curtiss Model F flying boats) at Veracruz, Mexico. 1959 USS Eversole (DD 789) res cues 14 Nationalist Chinese fishermen from their sinking fishing trawler in the Formosa Strait. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS When I teach journalism, I begin by asking students three questions: 1) How many of you want a career in journalism? 2) How many of your parents have tried to talk you out of a career in journalism? 3) How many of you have a subscription to the local newspaper? The first two questions elicit knowing nods and anxious smiles. The third question often results in dead silence. I can tell by the students sideways glances that they expect a lecture: You want a career in journalism, but you dont subscribe to a newspa per? Theyve heard it all before how young people today dont care about the news, how traditional media is as dead as dinosaurs. Its why their parents try to talk them out of a career in journalism. One time, a young-adult told me she doesnt follow the news because she doesnt have a television. That should make my broadcast journalism friends happy, but my newspaper heart died a thousand morbid deaths that day. So the students are usually surprised when I tell them I didnt have a subscription to a newspaper when I was in col lege either. The college experience is life in a bubble. Leaving campus is like entering a for eign country. The passport: your roommates car. Eventually, however, the bubble bursts, and you end up like every other 30-something adult married with kids. This is when I walk the students through my typical day: my alarm went off, but because my preschooler has wet his pull-up. toaster breakfast Ive eaten for the past five years because its easy and allows me more time to make frozen waffles. boxes. Sign homework. them about their choice of clothes. mentary school doesnt call to tell me someone has gotten sick and needs to come home. dog. Wash dishes. Fold laundry. Argue with the kids about how long they should brush their teeth. dry. Fall asleep with book on my face. again. Increasingly, the students look nervous. So I share my one bright spot with them the local newspaper. My daily routine seldom changes, so I live vicariously through the news paper, where people and events are completely unpredictable. One day the headline is two lost dogs; the next day, a triple homicide. But when I have the news paper in my hand, its like an invisible force field. The kids wont touch it. They dont understand the newspaper. Theres nothing in the newspaper for them. My youngest cant even read. (Which is why I could tell you he wet his pull-up.) All I have to do is tell him, Its work, Honey, and he will go away. Indeed, the newspaper might be kid repellent. But that mat ters very little to college stu dents. Or maybe it matters a great deal. Either way, the newspaper is the last domain of adults. Sure, a brave student will sometimes say, I can get the local newspaper on my iPhone. Fair enough, but does the iPhone have a force field? The newspaper app should come with a warning: Reading our paper online does not guarantee protection from pestering children. So when parents ask over Spring Break, Are you sure a career in print journalism is wise? Do newspapers even have a future with the next generation? The answer is Someday, my peers and I will lead very boring lives, so although we dont care about the newspa per right now, it will be all that we have on a Monday morning when the kids are fighting and the waffles are burning in the toaster. No, wait, wrong answer. Mom and Dad, local news papers cannot die because they are the only media reporting whats happening here in our city. The New York Times doesnt care about our high school football team. The Washington Post doesnt care about the jazz festival happening next weekend. People will always want to know whats happening around them, and therefore, local newspaper will not die. Also, you cant line the bottom of a bird cage with your iPhone.Hey, MoneyChic! Im 25 and currently putting money into my TSP every month but I can afford to save even more. What is the best option for me at my age? Should I consider starting a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA or just putting addition funds into my TSP? MoneyChic says: First, I am so glad to see that you are par ticipating in the TSP program provided by your work. Some companies, such as the federal government, provide matching funds (usually up to 5 percent) of those who participate in their program. Unfortunately, that deal is not offered to those who are active duty military. It makes obvious sense to kick in enough to receive the matching program because if you dont you are missing out on free money. Walter Updegrave at Moneymagazine suggests you go with a Roth IRA. He says that if you fund aRoth IRA account by April 17 you can invest as much as $5,000 and have it count as your contribution for the 2011 tax year. Which will allow you to contribute up to $5,000 for the 2012 tax year, too. However if you decide to go the 401(k) route instead, the extra contribution will count toward the 2012 tax year, as you cant retroactively contribute money to a 401(k).By contributing to the Roth IRA for 2011 rather than boosting the amount you put into your 401(k), you may put an extra years contribution into your retirement plan. Hope this helps!Some thoughts on why newspapers wont die

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Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast (NRSE), signed a sexual assault awareness proclamation at NAS Jacksonville April 9. The decree proclaims April as NRSE Sexual Assault Awareness Month and emphasizes the regions commitment to the Navys Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) program. The sign ing coincides with National Sexual Assault Awareness Month, which runs through the end of April. The Navys Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program provides an opportuni ty for our installations to raise awareness and to promote the prevention of sexual violence, Scorby said. Sexual assault is a crime that erodes our operational readiness and leaders at all levels of the chain of command need to communicate that we will not tolerate it! Prevention of sexual assault is everyones duty. According to Julie Mooney, NRSE creden tialing and program specialist, the region recorded 103 reports of sexual assault in 2011 and 118 in 2010. Leadership input is of the utmost impor tance with sexual assault awareness and pre vention efforts. The Secretary of the Navy established the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO) in 2009 and it has significantly raised awareness. In 2011, SAPRO hosted a SAPR summit with the pri mary focus of raising leaderships aware ness of sexual assaults that occur within the ranks and the need for increased prevention efforts. I am optimistic that support from leadership in regards to those prevention efforts will have a significant impact on the effectiveness of the Navys overall efforts, Mooney said. While raising awareness is one of the pri mary tools in preventing sexual assault, the Navy SAPR program also focuses on supporting victims. The Navy offers a variety of support services, including clinical counseling and legal services. Each installation has a 24-hour SAPR vic tim advocate line. These numbers are advertised throughout the installations and may be dialed to ask questions, inquire about resources or report a sexual assault. In addition, each installation has a Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) locat ed at the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) to ensure victims receive the support services they need, Mooney said. People may also contact the DoD Safe Helpline at 1-877-995-5247 or via http:// www.safehelpline.org. Southeast Region commander signs Month of the Military Child, child abuse prevention proclamationCommander, Navy Region Southeast (NRSE)Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. signed a Month of the Military Child and National Child Abuse Prevention Month proclamation at NAS Jacksonville April 9. With the signing, Scorby proclaimed April as the Month of the Military Child and Child Abuse Prevention Month throughout the Southeast Region. National Child Abuse Prevention Month and the Month of the Military Child both run through the end of the month. This proclamation was intended to help recognize the role that children play in the armed forces community, as well as raise awareness of child maltreatment prevention, Scorby said. Military children deal with a unique set of challenges as they constantly adapt to their parents military obligations, and it is the respon sibility of many people throughout our communities, from schools to law enforcement agencies, to support parents and make sure our children are raised in an engaged and supportive environment. According to Commander, Navy Installations Command, the Navy recorded more than 15,000 substantiated reports of child abuse during the last 10 years. While those numbers have been steadily decreasing, many incidents go unreported, said Jeannette Werby, NRSE counseling and advocacy coordinator. There are many reasons that abuse goes unreported, Werby said. Many people who know about abuse dont report it because they think its none of their business or are concerned about the stigma a report creates and the damage it may cause to ones career. In many other cases, injuries from abuse are not visible. Also, many children do not report abuse because they worry they will not be believed, have been told not to talk to anyone and have been threatened with physical harm, or simply feel responsible themselves for the abuse. According to Werby, the best way to combat child abuse is to raise awareness about it through educational programs and events like the proclamation signing. Raising awareness about child abuse underscores that the prob lem is still here and so are the people who care about its resolution. Affirming at the highest levels that child abuse has serious, long-term outcomes for children and their families adds a compelling dimension to the message that child abuse is unacceptable. Those in leadership roles set the tone and course for awareness, response and interven tion, she said. In addition to child abuse prevention, the proclamation is also intended to raise awareness about the sacrifices made by military children. According to Military K-12 Partners, there are more than 1.2 million military children today, and since 2001, approximately two million children have experienced the deployment of a parent. I would like to personally express my appreciation for the sacrifices our military children make, Scorby said. Despite the many challenges they face, they remain strong and resilient. The Month of the Military Child was established in 1986 by former Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger to underscore the role mili tary children play in the armed forces community. To find out more about how you can help prevent child abuse or to report an incident of child abuse, contact your installations Fleet and Family Support Center. Rear Adm. Scorby proclaims April as sexual assault awareness month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012 3

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012 5 Joining Forces proves that Americans want to help our military families and lay a solid foundation of support for years to come. Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. said, It was just one year ago that first lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden created Joining Forces, with the important goal of bringing Americans together to recognize, honor and take action to support veterans and military families. The initiative focuses on three key priority areas employment, education, and wellness while raising awareness about the service, sacrifice and needs of Americas veterans and military families. Today, the first lady of the United States is making a special trip to NAS Jacksonville so she can show her commitment to you and every other family member whos shared the sacrifices of their parents in service to our nation. Enjoy the show, said Scorby. High school senior Maddie Stevens, daughter of VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens and his wife, Sheila, introduced the first lady. Like all of you here today, Im so proud to be part of a military family. Weve all stepped up and served on the homefront when our dads or moms have been away. Now, theres an initiative that recognizes our service as well. Its called Joining Forces and is led by Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden. As a result, people all over America are stepping up to provide opportu nities for military kids like us. Thats why its now my pleasure to introduce the woman leading that charge, Americas first lady, Michelle Obama. Amid screams and applause, Obama took command of the stage. I want to start by thanking Maddie for her poise shes terrific. I also want to recognize all of the extraordinary men and women in uniform who are here today. Thank you for the service that youve given and the sacrifices that youve made. I also want to thank our guests of honor these amazing, beautiful, well-dressed, well-put-together young women who we are celebrating today. We are inspired by you and grateful for everything that you do for our country. Were talking about our military kids and our military families, because we know that when your parents are called to serve, you all serve right alongside them. And I know its even harder when your parents are deployed and you have to keep your spirits up through all those missed holidays, and missed birthdays, and times when you would give anything in the world to have them back home. And for some of you, when it comes time for the prom, your mom might not be there to help you pick out your dress. Dad might not be there to see you out on your date.But heres something else that I know.Through it all through all the moves that youve had to make and through all those difficult moments, you all have stayed strong.Ive seen it in so many kids like you across this country. You all have risen to the challenge.Youve become leaders in your schools.You excel in your classes.You get involved in all kinds of activities.Youve become leaders in your communities, finding all kinds of ways to volunteer. And many of you stepped up at home as well, juggling activities and homework with chores and housework. By working so hard at school and at home, and doing your part, you give your parents the peace of mind they need to focus on their mission. With your service, you make their service possible. And for that, we cant thank you enough. As military kids, you have learned lessons and had experiences that many people dont have in their entire lifetimes. Youve immersed yourselves in all kinds of communities and cultures. Youve made friends with people from all different backgrounds. And youve gained the wisdom and the perspective to appreciate what really matters in life. Obama then switched gears and asked the audience if they were ready for some fun. We have a special surprise guest that Im proud to call a friend and who is a supporter and admirer of veterans and military families. She then introduced, via a live TV connection, stand-up comedian and syndicated talk show host Ellen DeGeneres. The two engaged in lively banter and showed their prom pictures to the delight of the audience. DeGeneres interviewed three students about the Joining Forces initiative and then announced that JC Penney would provide all 300 students with a special prom-oriented gift bag, including a $250 gift card. To wrap up the event, Obama joined students on stage to learn the latest prom dance moves from Disney Channel Choreographer Rosero McCoy. She then expressed her gratitude to the audience once again and descended from the stage to shake hands before departing. For most of the young ladies it was an evening they will never forget. I think it was overwhelming and very exciting and it was a great opportunity to be part of all this. I loved listening to Mrs. Obama and thrilled that she is bringing attention to the hardships mili tary families face, said 16-year-old Jazarie Reddick, daughter of SHC(SW/AW) Jeffrey Reddick of Transient Personnel Unit/Pre-Trial Confinement Facility Jax, who accompanied her to the event. FIRST LADY: TV hookup with Ellen DeGeneres highlights event

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Twenty business representa tives from the Northeast Florida Regional Planning Council (NEFRPC) Leadership Academy toured NAS Jacksonville envi ronmental and energy projects April 11. NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander wel comed the group at Heritage Park. Our base is pleased to be associated with the Northeast Florida Regional Planning Council. Todays tour will pro vide you a better understanding of our commands and opera tions, as well as our successes executing major construction projects that are environmen tally sustainable and energy efficient, said Undersander. The council is a network of local governments that fosters public awareness of diverse regional issues in Baker, Clay, Duval, Flagler, Putnam, Nassau and St Johns Counties and their 27 municipalities. After the tour, NEFRPC Director of Policy Margo Moerhing said, We in Northeast Florida need to con tinue to recognize the strong regional partner we have in the Navy, celebrate their ethic of stewardship, and use the wide variety of innovative ways that they are building efficient, cost effective facilities and imple menting sustainable programs as models to learn from. We often bring Northeast Florida Regional Leadership Academy candidates to tour NAS Jacksonville because of the inspiration that the good environmental, financial and community stewardship of the base, and its people, pro vides. It reminds regional leaders of what is possible. NAS Jax Environmental Director Kevin Gartland hosted the tour. We greatly appreciated the opportunity to share with the council today the commitment and dedication of the men and women of NAS Jax to environ mental conservation and energy efficiency in our construction efforts and daily operations. We strive every day to be respon sible stewards of this historic naval installation including its outlying airfield and training ranges. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast are tried, with few excep tions, at NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport and NAS Pensacola. Therefore, the location of where a court-martial was con vened does not necessarily correlate to the command that convened the courtmartial. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast recently heard the following cases: at NS Mayport, a petty officer second class pled guilty to conspiracy to com mit larceny of military property, two violations of a lawful general order, and larceny of military property of a value of $500 or less. The military judge sentenced the accused to 100 days confinement, reduction in rank to E-1, and a bad conduct discharge. convened at NS Mayport, a petty offi cer second class was found guilty of assault by threat with an unloaded firearm. The members of the court-martial sentenced the accused to 30 days hard labor without confinement and reduc tion in rank to E-4. Martial convened at NCBC Gulfport, a petty officer third class was found guilty of violating a lawful general order. The members of the court-martial sen tenced the accused to no additional punishment beyond the conviction itself. at NS Mayport, a petty officer third class pled guilty to three specifications of assault. The military judge sentenced the accused to confinement for 10 months, reduction in rate to E-1 and a bad conduct Discharge. vened at NAS Jacksonville, an airman pled guilty to desertion, unauthorized absence, four specifications of failure to obey other lawful written orders, damaging non-military property of $500 or less, and drunk and disorderly conduct. The military judge sentenced the accused to 100 days confinement, reduction in rank to E-1 and a bad conduct discharge. Martial convened at NAS Jacksonville, a petty officer first class was acquitted of three specifications of assault. vened at NAS Jacksonville, a previous ly convicted Sailor currently serving confinement at a Navy brig was found guilty of attempt to communicate indecent language to a child, attempt to mail obscene matters, and two specifications of failing to obey a lawful order. The military judge sentenced the accused to an additional seven years confine ment, with confinement in excess of two years suspended pursuant to a pretrial agreement with the convening authority. The confinement to be served is in addition to the sentence previously adjudged at an earlier court-martial. at NS Mayport, a petty officer second class was found guilty of damaging personal property and communicating a threat. The military judge sentenced the accused to 120 days confinement and reduction in rate to E-1. vened at NAS Jacksonville, a lieutenant commander pled guilty to five specifi cations of conduct unbecoming an officer, one specification of adultery, and one specification of attempted conduct unbecoming an officer. The court-martial members sentenced the accused to be confined for six months and to be reprimanded. Regional planners visit NAS Jacksonville 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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Federal and Navy programs can help Sailors and their families navigate potential financial pitfalls, officials said April 4. Were here to let [ser vice members] know what we can do, so we can help them make wise consumer decisions and help them avoid scams, said Holly Petraeus, assistant director, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), Office of Service Member Affairs. CFPB is a new federal agen cy focused on protecting con sumers. Petraeus division is dedicated to seeing that mili tary personnel and their fami lies get financial information to make informed consumer decisions. The agency also monitors their complaints against financial organizations and works with other federal and state agencies on con sumer protection measures for military personnel and their families. Petraeus met with Commander, Navy Personnel Command, Rear Adm. Cynthia Covell and other leaders in the Mid-South to raise awareness of the CFPB and to discuss strategies to educate Sailors and their families. Financial matters such as failure to pay bills, bad credit, bankruptcy and foreclosures can negatively impact a Sailors career, affect mission readiness and the Navys ability to transfer or retain Sailors. A readiness issue we face today are those Sailors who are home owners facing finan cial difficulty because of the housing market, said Covell. In some cases Sailors transferring to new duty stations are choosing to leave their family behind and go unaccompanied because they feel leaving their home would result in severe financial impact. One of Petraeus jobs at CFPB is to raise awareness in Washington D.C. about that issue. I was very pleased to see in the recent settlement that was worked out by 49 of 50 [state] attorneys general, DOJ (Department of Justice) and the five largest banks that give mortgages. There were some military provisions in that settlement. Petraeus is also working to raise awareness about highinterest loans and scams that take advantage of service members. The idea is to edu cate members against being taken advantage of before they sign a contract. I recently saw a loan some one had given a service mem ber that was an auto title loan at 400 percent interest, said Petraeus. The individual was borrowing $1,600 with a repayment schedule of $585 a month for 32 months. At the loans end the member will have paid more than $15,000 in inter est and service charges on a $1,600 loan. That is outrageous. That should not happen, said Petraeus. Were going to do every thing we can to educate people not to sign those contracts. Petraeus, Covell and other Millington leaders dis cussed ways the Navy can help Sailors be proactive to protect their assets and their careers. Command finan cial specialists (CFS) provide financial education and train ing, counseling, and informa tion referral at the command level at no cost to Sailors and their families. Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) located worldwide provide financial education and counseling for Sailors and families as well. Petraeus suggests start ing with these organizations first when looking for financial guidance before taking on new debt and to determine if mili tary service qualifies the member for lower interest rates on existing loans and credit. As a rule, any loan with an inter est rate higher than 36 percent should raise the alarm and is worth review by the CFS or FFSC, according to Petraeus. In some cases Sailors may qualify for interest-free loans from military relief societies, said Petraeus. Sailors experiencing finan cial challenges should notify their chain of command and work with their CFS to devel opment a budget and explore additional options such as military relief societies, eligibility for interest rate reductions and other relief. Additionally, being upfront and trying to address the issue openly can work to a Sailors advantage if financial difficulties threaten a mem bers security clearance. Personal financial prepared ness is an important element of readiness, one of the areas of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative which con solidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the his tory of the Navy and Marine Corps. Personal financial preparedness a critical component to military readiness JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012 7

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active and Reserve, for core and noncore missions, stated Garcia. As we wrap up in Iraq and draw down in Afghanistan we dont want to lose those highly-skilled Sailors. We need the best talent available. The 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative was also promoted dur ing the town hall meeting. This new initiative focuses on five pillar areas including physical fitness, inclusion, readiness, safety and continuum of service. The Navy wants a culture of fit ness, where Sailors stay at the top of their game year-round, said Garcia. We also need better options to retain women in uniform so we are creating new programs making military ser vice conducive to raising a family. Two of these initiatives include a 12-month operational deferment for new moth ers and the Career Intermission Pilot Program which allows men and women to transfer to the IRR for up to three years with a stipend of their salary and benefits. When they return to active duty there will be no penalties to their career path. Garcia also talked about readiness and how sexual assault cases impact the workplace. The Navy continues to emphasize sexual assault aware ness training for our troops, sup port sexual assault victims and hold offenders accountable. Prevention is the key. Nowhere is the correlation tighter than between sexual assault cases, suicide rates and alcohol use. Were hoping to change the culture and one way is by using breathalyzers in commands as a tool, not as a punitive means, but to help our Sailors and head off a tragedy before it happens, he added. Several Sailors in the audience asked questions about increasing the fleet concentration in the Jacksonville area to allow them and their families more home-basing opportunities. The Navy remains committed to strategic disbursement. We know we cant have all our assets in one place where they are exposed to terrorist acts or natural disasters. The Navy will continue to increase the footprint here with a new fleet of P-8A aircraft, amphibious ready groups and the lit toral combat ships at Naval Station Mayport. This area will remain a fleet concentration center and a key cornerstone for the Navy. ASN: Garcia brings message to NAS Jax Farewell to Master Chief PrindleFleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 58 celebrated the retirement of CMDCM(AW/SW) Frederick Prindle April 14 after 30 years of service. The ceremony took place at the VP-30 Auditorium. Prindle began his Navy career as a Boiler Technician in 1982. His subsequent assignments included Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Center Akron, Ohio and Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activity (SIMA) at Newport, R.I. Upon completion of his tour at SIMA, Prindle reported to Machinery Repairman A School. During this tour, he completed his conversion to Machinery Repairman. From July 1993 to February 1997, he served Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activity Ingleside, Texas, working in the Ship Superintendent Office. In 1997, he reported to the aircraft carrier USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) as the Machine Shop Chief Petty Officer. During this tour, he also supervised the Hull Technician Weld, Lock Key and Trouble Call shops. From December 1999 to April 2003, he served the Naval Reserve Center Louisville, Ky., as the senior enlisted advisor. In April 2003, he served as assistant quality assurance officer with Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activity Ingleside, Texas. Following the decommissioning of SIMA Ingleside in September 2004, he served as the repair two division offi cer and command training officer with South Central Regional Maintenance Center Ingleside, Texas. During this tour, he entered into the Command Master Chief program in May 2006. In June 2006, Prindle reported to the Jaguars of Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) 60 at Naval Station Mayport, where he served as command master chief until June 2009. His final assignment was as VR-58 Command Master Chief at NAS Jacksonville. Prindle and his beautiful wife, Mary, have been married to for 30 years. They have two daughters, Jessica and Megan. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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There is no place for sexual assault in our Navy and efforts are underway to eradicate it from our ranks, said the director of Navys 2012 Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) initiative April 4. We can get this right in our service. We can set the example of what is really acceptable behavior; what is a good professional command climate, how we set the right environment for the right behavior to occur and we can really get to a zero incidence, said Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, chief of naval personnel and SAAM director. Approximately 600 sexual assaults were reported in the Navy last year according to Van Buskirk, But no incident of sexual assault is acceptable in our Navy. Department of Defense (DoD) defines sexual assault as intentional sexual contact characterized by use of force, threats, intimidation or abuse of authority or when the victim does not or cannot consent. Sexual assault includes rape, forcible sodomy (oral or anal sex), and other unwanted sexual contact that is aggravated, abusive or wrongful (including unwanted and inappropriate sexual contact), or attempts to commit these acts. According to Van Buskirk, about half of the sexual assaults reported last year were alcohol related and the Navy is introducing new training to better educate Sailors, Marines and their families to affect behavior and raise awareness. We have this opportunity here to leverage sexual assault awareness month to really hit home about how important it is for us to become more aware and more educated about sexual assault in our Navy and Marine Corps, said Van Buskirk. Were going to take the time in April to stand down, to stop all work so we can have a good opportunity to make ourselves more aware and edu cated about this, said Van Buskirk. The Navy will focus on four themes during SAAM: Hurts One, Affects All, Prevention is Everyones Duty, and We Will Not Tolerate Sexual Assault. According to Van Buskirk, training will include a seg ment on bystander intervention, a DoD strategy to engage all hands in preventing sexual assault. Under the strat egy, active bystanders take the initiative to help someone who may be targeted for a sexual assault in ways that are intended to avoid verbal or physical conflict. Active bystanders take the initiative to help friends, who are not thinking clearly or whose judgment may be clouded from the effects of alcohol or other substances, from becoming victims or offenders of crime. Intervention does not mean that you directly intervene to stop a crime in progress, rather, these steps are early intervention before the crime begins to occur, said Van Buskirk. Scripts and videos for each weeks theme, engagement products, posters and other tools, are available on the Navy Personnel Command Sexual Assault and Prevention website, http://www.sapr.navy.mil. Van Buskirk said his goal is to establish a baseline of education, training and awareness for the entire Navy that is sustainable year after year until we can eradicate this problem from our ranks. Well leverage this month as a prelude to continuing our robust program which we already have established in our Navy, said Van Buskirk. Talking about it, being aware about it isnt enough. We have to stop it. We have to be willing to intervene. We have to be willing to speak up. We have to be willing to act. That is what my expectations are of each and every one of you. Sexual Assault Prevention and Response is an impor tant element of the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative that consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Navy and Marine Corps. The Department of the Navy is working to aggressively to prevent sexual assaults, to support sexual assault victims, and to hold offenders accountable. NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville recognized LaShawn Brown as the Acquisition Advocate for Small Business Concerns for fiscal year 2012, first quarter. Brown began her career in gov ernment contracting in the Naval Acquisition Intern Program (NAIP) at NAVSUP FLC Norfolk in 2005. In May of last year, she transferred to NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville as a contracting officer to the InterService Supply Support Operations Program (ISSOP) Division. She has a masters degree in public administration with a concentration in government contracting from Troy University. She received her Level III certification in the Acquisition Career Field of Contracting in less than five years. Brown provides contractual sup port for Commander Naval Reserve Forces Command, Naval Air Station Pensacola, Naval Air Station Key West, SUPSHIP Gulf Coast, Naval Operations Medical Institute, and Center for Information Dominance, Education & Training. Her contribution to NAVSUP FLCJ in achieving its mandated socio-economic goals for small business awards is impressive. From Oct. 1, 2011 to Dec. 31, 2011, Brown awarded a myriad of contracts with the majority being acquired by small business concerns; to include service-disabled veteran and women-owned small business concerns for a total of $1.6 million. Proficient, knowledgeable and considerate are just a few attributes that have been used to describe her work ethic. Navy sets zero tolerance for sexual assault NAVSUP recognizes small business advocate JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012 9

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While many were home still sleeping Saturday morning, 76 anglers headed to the Mulberry Cove Marina to participate in the 30th annual NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Bass Tournament, Relocating Confused Bass Since 1982. The event held on the St. Johns River, was open to all active duty members, reserv ists, retirees and Department of Defense civilians. Teams con sisted of two members per boat and they fished from first light until late into the afternoon. The St. Johns River was smooth as silk this morn ing, then the wind picked up 20 knots and made this one of the roughest tournaments we have ever had, said MWR Marina Manager Phil Collins. The St. Johns Bass Anglers Club returned for another year as event officials. In the afternoon, as each teams catch was weighed, a crowd began to gather around the scoreboard. The lead changed many times as everyone enjoyed free food and beverages provided by MWR. This was a hard day of fishing with all the wind. We hit a big wave really hard on the way back in and I nearly broke my neck. We had reached our fish limit early and culled four bass. All in all a very successful day, said angler Billy Roberts. All participants received a free tournament shirt and sponsor bag with promotional items. Thanks to the very generous support from area businesses, the anglers received more than $3,000 in door prizes and gift certificates. We owe a big thanks to all of the hard working volunteers and sponsors that make this event possible for us to host. The sponsors contribute valuable door prizes and we get so many awesome prizes.We try to make this tournament fun for every one, said Collins. NAS Jacksonville MWR thanks the many volunteers and sponsors that made this event a success: North Florida Sales, Pure Fishing, Jacksonville Suns Baseball Team, Fort George Surf Shop, NAS Jax Commissary, Subway and VyStar Credit Union. Disclaimer: Neither NAS Jax, MWR, or the Jax Air News nor any part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or their products or services. Anglers hit St. Johns River in search of biggest bass JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012 11

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included April Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor pool hours Mon. Fri. 5:30 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 8 p.m. Weekend hours 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. Family Fitness Bootcamp with Ashley Monday & Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. Family Fitness Center above the Youth Center Gym Call (904) 778-9772 Outdoor Pool Open Weekends Beginning May 5 & 6, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session one begins June 18 $40 military, $45 DoD Sign-up at the base gym May 12 811 a.m. military only, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. all eligible patronsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Disney World Orlando FL 4 day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Disney World Orlando FL Resident 3 day $98.25, 3 day hopper $125.25, 4 day $127.75, 4 day hopper $154.50 Funk Fest May 11 & 12 at Metropolitan Park $57 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 St. Augustine Scenic Cruise Day Trip May 5, 9:30 a.m. 5 p.m. $20 per personThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Dave & Busters Trip April 19 at 6 p.m. Free $10 game card, 20 percent off food & beverage and unlimited simulator play! Kayaking Trip Amelia Island April 21 at 9 a.m. Outdoor Movie At the Vault recreation center April 25 at duskNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees April 24 for active duty April 26 for retirees & DoD personnel Ladies Golf Clinics Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. $10 per person Pre-registration required, signup in the pro shop Senior Military Invitational April 30 & May 1 9 a.m. shotgun start $65 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Shoreline Clean-up May 4 at 8:30 a.m. Free lunch! Call (904) 542-2709 or e-mail angela.glass@navy.mil to signup Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Month of the Military Child Carnival April 21, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Fields Free games, food and prizes! 2012 Adventure Summer Registration Dates: Current School-Age Care participants Now Single & Dual Active Duty Now Other Active Duty Now through April 20 DoD Civilians April 23 27 Registration Packets available for pick up at the Youth Center. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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NAS Jax Energy Team to participate in Earth Day events Earth Day will be celebrated on April 20. This is a day and time to reflect on our planets health and stewardship. The NAS Jax Energy Team will be participating in the event by setting up visual displays from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Navy Exchange Food Court. This event should be considered as an everyday requirement that we all need to be conscious of and what effect were having on the earths future. The team will answer questions on what the base is doing to achieve reductions in energy intensity and present ideas that consumers can take to reduce consumption and save money. They will also hand out pamphlets providing information on ways to not only save energy dollars but to also reduce our carbon footprint. Also on display will be the solar-powered Global Electric Motor-vehicle (GEM) that is powered solely from sunlight. This vehicle has not been plugged in to the electrical grid for over two years. Due in part to the recently installed energy projects, NAS Jacksonville is realizing significant reductions in both energy and water consumption. The NAS Jax Energy Team appreciates the effort taken by all of the on-base personnel (both military and civilian) as we work to achieve our goal of a 30 percent reduction in electrical intensity and a 20 percent reduction in water consumption by 2015. The NAS Jacksonville Energy Team thanks everyone for their efforts in reducing utility consump tion. Be sure to thank your building energy monitor for their vigilance in making energy reduction one of their top priorities and if you see something that would further this reduction, by all means let them know and they will engage the energy team for review. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012 13

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Ten pairs of culinary spe cialists threw down their best breadbutter-cheese and other ingredients recipes April 12 at the NAS Jacksonville Flight Line Caf culinary competition recogniz ing National Grilled Cheese Day. These are not your mothers grilled cheese sandwiches, said CSCM Michael Carter of Navy Food Management Team Mayport, who organized the event with CSCS Paulette Williams. This competition stresses creativity, so there is no limit on ingredients or the types of cheese or bread that chefs may include in their recipes, said Carter, a former White House chef. From what Ive seen, competitors may be using ingredients such as black for est ham, cucumber, spinach, basil pesto, bacon, olives, avocado and roasted red peppers items not typically seen in a traditional grilled cheese sandwich, explained Carter. This is an excellent opportunity for Navy culinary specialists to display their talents and to add to their cheese reper toire, as well as incorporating ingredi ents like artisan breads, fruit and unique spreads, said NAS Jax Food Services Division Officer CWO4 Kathy Wiseman. Teams from NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport and four Mayport-based ships took part in the competition. The teams were given one hour to cre ate their good-and-gooey sandwich that was presented to the judges panel, consisting of: NAVSUP FLC Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Head; NAVSUP FLC Jax Executive Officer Cmdr. Tom Dailey; NAVSUP FLC Executive Director Mitch Palmquist; Lt. Cmdr. Chris Pressler and Navy spouse Dawn Lancaster. First place went to CS2 Rasheen Maxwell and CS2 Cortez Brown of NS Mayport, second place went to CS2 Paula Prine and CS2 Marnika Ash of NAS Jax, and third was awarded to CS3Wilmer Ringold and CS3 Michael Mainer of NS Mayport.Saluting the iconic grilled cheese sandwich 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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Heritage Dinner puts spotlight on P-3, Hall of Honor inductees The Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) celebrated 50 years of the P-3 Orion at the annual Heritage Dinner March 28 at NAS Jacksonville by honor ing the strength and commit ment of the many members, past and present, who have helped shape the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community. Last year we celebrated the Centennial of Naval Aviation in which we noted that mari time patrol has played a key role in the U.S. military aviation operations since the very begin ning, said Rear Adm. Michael Hewitt, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group. And tonight, we are here to toast a major accomplishment within our own community; the service of the P-3 Orion for the last 50 years. The milestone anniversary of the celebrated aircraft attracted a crowd of nearly 450 guests in historic Hangar 117. One of the many distinguished attendees, guest speaker Vice Adm. Harry Harris, assistant to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and a former Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) member, spoke about the leaders who had helped mold the aviation community. He singled out dozens of active duty and retired mem bers of the MPRF, many of them seated in the audience, who had played key roles in leadership and antisubmarine warfare (ASW), the critical mission of maritime patrol. It was clear that these people cre ated the foundation upon which the community is currently run. Included in that group were three individuals inducted into the MPRF Hall of Honor during the dinner. Cmdr. Scott Carpenter, USN (Ret.), one of the original Mercury astronauts and a former VP pilot (VP-6), flew aboard the MercuryAtlas 7 mission, becoming the fourth American in space and the second to orbit the earth. After the completion of his astronaut tour, Carpenter later joined the Navy SEALAB program, which made him the only person ever desig nated as an astronaut and an aquanaut. Capt. Arnold Isbell (deceased) was the commanding officer of VP-11 during World War II, during which time he faced a hurricane while surveying military base sites in Newfoundland and skillfully maneuvered his aircraft to make an emergency night landing. Isbell later commanded the escort carrier Card (CVE-11), and coordinated action that destroyed eight U-boats in a two-month period in 1943. He then took his knowledge and experience to Washington, DC where he set-up an ASW tactical research and development department. In March 1945, while en route to take command of the Yorktown (CV-10), Isbell was killed when a Japanese plane scored two bomb hits on the carrier in which he was embarked as a passenger. Rear Adm. Daniel Wolkensdorfer (deceased) served in several VP squadrons throughout his career, commanding both VP-47 and VP-30. Hailed for his dedication to the maritime patrol community, he was noted most for his service to the development of ASW and tac tics during the Cold War. Among other positions, Wolkensdorfer served as head of the Air Branch of the Antisubmarine Warfare Division of the Antisubmarine Warfare and Ocean Surveillance Program Office for the Chief of Naval Operations. Wolkensdorfer spent much of his 35-year career in ASW planning, acquisition, testing and operations, which helped shape much of current day ASW tactics. Selected for shaping the heri tage of the community and/ or for bravery in combat, the awards for Carpenter, Isbell and Wolkensdorfer were accepted by family members and colleagues. Also attending were nine retired officers who were members of the original P-3C delivery crew in 1969 and/or instructors from VP-30 at the time of the aircrafts arrival. The self-named Det Burbank Crew, recalled their infamous trip home with the first P-3C. When we arrived at NATC Pax River there was a large crowd gathering around to see the new Junior Red Cross volunteers must apply by May 1The American Red Cross at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is currently recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volunteers. This offers an excellent opportunity for students interested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine professionals physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and technicians as well as contribute to creating a positive experience for NH Jacksonville patients. The program is open to a limited number of high school students age 16 to 18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the hospital, and receive CPR training. Applications can be picked up at NH Jacksonvilles American Red Cross office (Room 1404, next to Physical Therapy & Occupational Therapy) and must be submitted by May 1. Selectees are required to attend the June 9 kickoff event from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., that includes an interview, in the hospitals central tower second deck conference room. For more about this opportunity, call Junior Red Cross Volunteer Chairman Terry Miles at 542-7525 or e-mail terry.miles2@med.navy.mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012 15

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baby, recalled Capt. Ron Martin, USN (Ret.), VP-30s first P-3C project officer who delivered the first P-3C aircraft to the fleet from the assembly line in Burbank, Calif. Would you believe the new fancy electronic ladder wouldnt work? The primary aircraft of the U.S. Navy MPRF, the P-3 Orion, has aided in anti-submarine warfare since the early 1960s when it was introduced to the aviation community by aeronau tics corporation Lockheed Martin. The P-3 turboprop was an answer to a late 1950s request by the Chief of Naval Operations for an aircraft with more cabin space, a larger radius and a lon ger endurance than its predecessor, the P-2 Neptune. In August 1962, VP-8 took possession of the first P-3, and then in 1969, the final revamp of the Orion, the first P-3C, came online. From a tactical standpoint, this new Charlie was a quantum leap in improved sensors, data processing, tactical displays, weapons delivery, and decision making assistance over any P-3 system flying at that time, said Martin. We all knew Maritime Patrol was about to become a force to be reckoned with. A half century later, the celebration of the P-3C Orion comes at both a historic and pivotal point in the MPRFs future. In June of this year, VP-16 will receive the first P-8A Poseidon, a multi-mission maritime aircraft developed by Boeing. It will be the first jet-powered maritime patrol aircraft commandeered by the US Navy. Integration of the P-8A into the entire MPRF fleet, however, will take a mini mum of six years. Until then, the P-3 Orion will continue to play an impor tant role in the critical mission of the U.S. maritime patrol community. There are very few airplanes in the world that can tout the distinct honor of being in service for 50 years. This is testament to the ingenuity and innovation of the designers, manufacturers and assemblers who created the P-3 Orion, said Lockheed Martin Vice President of P-3 Programs and Greenville Operations Ray Burick. The P-3 is the world standard in maritime patrol and reconnaissance and will continue to serve opera tors around the globe for many more decades to come. As a token of appreciation to the community, Burick presented the first of 755 copies of a limited edition P-3 lithograph to Hewitt. The lithograph is inlaid with 21 roundels representing all P-3 operators, past and present. The number of lithographs being produced, represents the number of P-3s built by Lockheed Martin worldwide over the last half-century.DINNER: Celebrates P-3s service Navy personnel are busy preparing to teach the next generation of Sailors how to maintain and fly the newest mili tary aircraft, the F-35C Lightening II Joint Strike Fighter as Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101 readies for its stand-up ceremony at Eglin Air Force Base May 1. The F-35 is a single seat, multi-role fighter aircraft with the capability to perform ground attack, reconnaissance and air defense missions. The aircraft is in full production at the Lockheed Martin plant in Fort Worth, Texas. The F-35 is designed to eventually replace the F/A-18 Hornet and AV-8B Harrier tactical fighter aircraft. It was planned with a common design, but three unique service variants, to keep development, production and operating costs down. This is brand new aircraft platform from tooth to tail, said Cmdr. Scott Kartvedt, commanding officer of VFA101. Were not parlaying off any Navy stealth legacy programs or support systems. This will be the first new stealth and carrier-based tactical fighter air craft since the introduction of the F/A18 some 29 years ago. The original VF-101, nicknamed the Grim Reapers, was established May 1, 1952 and flew various models of fighter aircraft including the F-4 Phantom and F-14 Tomcat. With the retirement of the F-14, VF-101 was disestablished in 2005. To support the new Navy version of the F-35, VFA-101 will be reestablished May 1 at a new hangar and training facility on Eglin AFB and will serve as the Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS), training pilots and maintainers for the fleet. The first Sailors to stand up VFA-101 will receive VFA-101 Plank Owner certificates for their assistance with the new aircraft, new training facilities and reestablished squadron. As per Navy tradition, plank owners are individuals who were members of the crew of a ship when that ship was placed in commission. Im learning a lot and really enjoy working with other services, said Senior Chief Logistics Specialist (AW/ SW) Mirtha Martinez, the material control department leading chief petty officer for the squadron. Id love to come back in five years and see the squadron fully functioning. Marine Col. Arthur Tomassetti, vice commander of the 33rd Fighter Wing, said establishing a squadron to train and work with the F-35 aircraft has not been easy, but the leadership has taken charge and is working towards building the best facilities possible to work with this new aircraft. The concept was simple; establish an initial training center for pilots and maintainers for the F-35 weapon sys tem, said Tomassetti. Bringing that concept to reality will continue to be complicated and challenging. So the first step is you start with the best people you can find, put them together, and say go. Over the past two-and-one-half years, those carefully selected people have put together a strategy, developed plans, adapted to the dynamic and ever changing environment and schedule, and continued to track towards the goal of establishing a training center for F-35 pilots and maintainers. The maintainers of the Navy F-35C will initially be taught by Lockheed Martin personnel to Navy instructors, who will then begin teaching students after completing instructor certifica tion. Students are expected to arrive for maintenance instruction in 2015, with the first F-35s scheduled for deploy ment 2017-2018. The Navys version of the F-35, the C model is distinct from the F-35A and F-35B versions with larger wing surfaces and reinforced landing gear for greater control in the demanding carrier take-off and landing envi ronment. Sailors in the majority of aviation rates are eligible to attend the F-35 course of instruction, including avia tion ordnancemen, aviation structural mechanics, aviation machinists mates, aviation electronics technicians, avia tion electricians mates, aviation structural mechanics and aircrew survival equipmentmen. VFA-101 is a part of the 33rd Fighter Wing, a joint-service graduate flying and maintenance training wing responsible for F-35 A/B/C pilot and mainte nance training for the Navy, Marine Corps and the Air Force. Initially, 59 aircraft and three squadrons, one for each services aircraft variant will be based at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The F-35 Academic Training Center serves as the schoolhouse, where wing per sonnel expect to train more than 2,000 maintenance students and 100 pilots each year. Navys newest squadron prepares for new F-35 fighters 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 19, 2012