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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/01984
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 04-12-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:01984

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THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Holocaust survivor to speak at NAS JaxA National Days of Remembrance event will be held at the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf April 18 at 11:30 a.m. The guest speaker will be Morris Bendit, a Holocaust survivor who was born in Chernovitz, Ukraine during World War II. All hands are invited to attend the event. Bendit, 71, was two months old when his father was forced to enlist into the Russian Army to fight the German Nazis who were systematically tak ing over European countries. While en route his fathers train was attached by German bomb ers. His father did not survive. Four months later, Romanian troops entered Chernovitz. In October 1941, my family and I were deported to a province created by the Germans in Ukraine called Transnistria to annihilate the Ukrainian and Romanian Jews. Romania had become allies with Germany, said Bendit. I was with my maternal grandparents, paternal grandmother, mother, four uncles and an aunt. We were put on cattle cars and taken to the kill ing fields. Transistria means beyond the river. Many people were killed going over the river and those of us who did made it endured a horrible existence. There was no food, clothing and it was brutally cold. In the concentration camps it was a quick death, but here it was a slow death, Bendit continued. The Jews were put on marches from town to town as a way to kill people because they didnt want to waste bullets. My mother and grandmother carried me through the marches and my mother nursed me. At night they would search for shelter and food. One night my mother went to a farmers field to look for some scraps being fed to the pigs and a German soldier caught her and hit her in the head with his rifle. He thought she was dead but she survived and had that bump on her head until she died. Three years later, in 1944, the survivors in Transistria were liberated by the Russian Army. By then, the only surviving members of Bendits fam ily were his mother, maternal grandmother and his aunt. Of the Jews who had been deported to Transnistria (a total of 145,000 to 150,000) approxi mately 90,000 perished there. Out of the 300,000 local Ukrainian Jews, 185,000 were murdered. I have no idea how we survived. Entire families were killed. We were lucky, maybe because we stuck together and helped each other, he stated softly. I remember the day we were liberated and riding the train to go home to Chernovitz. Our neighbor had saved our house for us. My father had been a furniture maker and everything was still That is, the power of one C-130T Hercules transport aircraft on detachment from NAS Jacksonville to the Middle East. The Nomads of VR-62 ran continuous power plays with C-130T number 313. This one-aircraft detach ment recently flew 74 missions that totaled 441.2 flight hours in three and a half months, while deployed to U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT). During the detachment, the aircraft transported 2,086,436 pounds of cargo and 677 passengers. VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Alexander Ellermann said, I love it when a plan comes together. Actually, the men and women of VR-62 came together Swamp Foxes and Dusty Dogs mix it up in BahamasHSM-74 Detachment 3, con sisting of three MH-60R Seahawk helicopters, 16 pilots and aircrew men and 26 maintainers trav eled to the U.S. Navy Atlantic Undersea Testing and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) on Andros Island, Bahamas to hone their tactical pro ficiency and enhance interoper ability with the Dusty Dogs of HSC-7. Under the leadership of Detachment 3 Officer in Charge, Lt. Cmdr. Matt Baker, the Mad Foxes flew more 70 hours, com pleting numerous Air Combat Training Continuum (ACTC) event grade cards as they took advan tage of the unique surface warfare (SUW) and anti-submarine war fare (ASW) training opportunities available at AUTEC. HSM-74 aircrews participated in SUW captive air training mis sile (CATM) events, dual-dipper ASW exercises and helicopter Visit Board Search and Seizure (HVBSS) sorties. HSM-74 aircrews gained valu able experience operating the MH-60R Airborne Low Frequency Sonar (ALFS) and the Romeos enhanced acoustic processing sys tem for tracking submerged tar gets. During SUW and HVBSS train ing missions, HSM-74 and HSC-7 (flying the MH-60S) planned and executed several mixed-section events resulting in extremely valu able integrated tactical training. The extraordinary week of interoperability training would not have been possible without the tireless work of the HSM-74 Detachment 3 maintainers, led by Maintenance Officer Lt. Chad Harvey and Leading Chief Petty Officer AMC Michael Colon, who enabled an impressive 100 percent sortie completion rate while sus taining 100 percent fully missioncapable aircraft. HSM-74 and HSC-7 are two of the eight squadrons that comprise Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3. The air wing is preparing for deployment with the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Carrier Strike Group. TheMH-60R is capable of oper ating on frigates, destroyers, cruis ers and aircraft carriers in its mis sionto provide: command control and communications; anti-sub marine warfare (ASW); surface warfare (SUW); electronic warfare (EW) and search and rescue (SAR). The MH-60S is designed in an air transport configuration that is eas ily modified with mission kits, for example, mine countermeasures systems and combat search and rescue kits. The main cabin can accommo date up to 20 armed troops. The power of one .

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS April 12 1861 Civil War begins when Confederates fire on Fort Sumter, S.C. 1911 Lt. Theodore Ellyson qualifies as first naval aviator. 1962 U.S. Navy demonstrates new landing craft with retractable hydro foils, LCVP(H). 1975 Operation Eagle Pull evacua tion from Cambodia. 1981 First launch of re-useable Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-1) with all-Navy crew. Retired Capt. John Young com manded and Lt. Cmdr. Robert Crippen was the pilot. Mission duration was two days, six hours and 20 minutes. Sixteen of the shuttles heat-shielding silicon tiles were lost and 148 damaged during reentry. 1993 Aircraft from USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) and NATO forces begin enforcing the no-fly zone over Bosnia in Operation Deny Flight. April 13 1847 Naval forces begin five-day bat tle to capture several towns in Mexico. 1861 Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. 1960 Navy navigation satellite, Transit, placed into orbit from Cape Canaveral, Fla. and demonstrates abil ity to launch another satellite. April 14 1898 Commissioning of USS Solace, the first post-Civil War hospital ship. 1969 Over the Sea of Japan, North Korean aircraft shoots down a Navy EC-121 reconnaissance aircraft assigned to VQ-1. 1988 USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) strikes Iranian mine off Qatar. 1989 First Navy ship arrives to assist in Exxon Valdez oil spill cleanup. April 15 1885 Naval forces land at Panama to protect American interests during revolution. 1912 Scout cruisers USS Chester (CL-1) and USS Salem (CL-3) sail from Massachusetts to assist RMS Titanic survivors. 1918 First Marine Aviation Force formed at Marine Flying Field, Miami, Fla. 1961 Launch of first nuclear-pow ered frigate, USS Bainbridge (DDG 96), at Quincy, Mass. 1962 USS Princeton (LPH-5) deliv ers first Marine Corps helicopters to Vietnam. This was first Marine advisory unit to arrive in South Vietnam. 1986 Navy aircraft from USS America (CV-66) and USS Coral Sea (CV-43) attack Libya in conjunction with USAF aircraft after Libya was linked to the terrorist bombing of a West Berlin discotheque that killed one American and injured 78 people. April 16 1863 Union gunboats pass Confederate batteries at Vicksburg. 1924 Navy supports relief operations during Mississippi Valley floods, lasting until June 16. 1947 Act of Congress gives Navy Nurse Corps members commissioned rank. April 17 1778 The 18-gun Continental Navy sloop-of-war Ranger, with Capt. John Paul Jones in command, captures a British brig and sends the prize to France. April 18 1848 U.S. Navy expedition to explore the Dead Sea and the River Jordan, commanded by Lt. William Lynch, reaches the Dead Sea. 1906 Navy assists in relief operations during San Francisco earthquake and fire. 1942 USS Hornet CV-8) launches 16 of Lt. Col. James Doolittles B-25 Army Air Force bombers in the first attack on mainland Japan in World War II. 1988 Navy destroys two Iranian sur veillance platforms, sinks one frigate and one patrol ship, and severely dam ages a second frigate in retaliation for attack on guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58). Ever since debuting Dinner with the Smileys in January, Ive been providing obscure, teasing hints about upcoming guests for followers on Facebook. Some of the more popular clues have been: One of our upcoming guests wears gold. An April guest shared a stage with C3PO (and, no, its not R2D2). In June we will have dinner with a 37-foot-tall monster and his friends. Soon we will eat with savages and wild animals. One of our upcoming guests is not human. One of our upcoming guests designed logos for Comedy Central and Nickelodeon. Readers get excited when they figure out the answers to these clues. Readers also get excited when they know what those answers mean: The Smileys are going to have dinner with _________. But the truth is, some of the most antici pated dinners dont work well in a riddle. Thats because some of the most antici pated dinners are the ones that will be shared with someone who isnt a celeb rity: Namely, the boys teachers. In January, for instance, I could have used this hint, One of our upcoming guests can convince Lindell to put on his snow boots by himself. But it wouldnt have been super exciting yet the night Lindells preschool teacher came to din ner, youd have thought we were hosting the president. He was positively out of his mind with anticipation. Our older boys, who dont jump up and down on the couch, as Lindell did, or slap their cheeks because their so excit ed, are nonetheless visibly happy about their own teachers turn at Dinner with the Smileys. And when you think about it, why shouldnt they be? Once kids are school-age, they spend a greater percent age of their week with their teacher than they do at home. I remember knowing every sweater my second-grade teacher owned. I knew the smell of her perfume. And sitting in her classroom was like a second home. I was lucky, however, because my secondgrade teacher, Mrs. Katabian, was also my moms friend. We went to the beach together and my brothers were friends with her sons. Many years later, Mrs. Katabian came to my wedding and my first book signing. Today, this sort of relationship seems unacceptable, and even discouraged, between a teacher and a students family. Indeed, the relationship stops just short of a 10-minute parent-teacher conference twice a year and perhaps phone messag es delivered through the school secre tary. The culture surrounding families and teachers has changed so much, when friends heard that I was inviting the boys teachers, nearly all of them said, You can do that? I wasnt sure, but as it turned out, the dinners we have with teachers are extraordinarily dynamic and enrich ing. Here is someone who knows a whole other side to my child that I never see. Here is someone who has special insight into his development. And here is some one who probably shares many of my frustrations like this boys constant throat-clearing and that boys pencil-tap ping habit. In many ways, the teacher and I are a team. We are both invested in the best interest of my child. How could I not invite such an influential person in my sons life to dinner? The teachers have much to gain from their dinner, as well. They get a better sense of their students home life and influences from siblings and parents. They can finally meet the dog their stu dent writes about all the time. They can place the child in the context of his world. Perhaps my viewpoint will cause some educators to bang their head against a wall. Now everyone is going to invite us to dinner, theyll say. Or, to be more pre cise, theyll think, Uh-oh, if I get a Smiley boy next year, it looks like Ill have to do dinner. The teacher-student-family relation ship isnt for everyone. Not every teacher wants, or has the time, to visit with fami lies. But it seems to me that developing a relationship beyond the twice yearly, 10-minute conferences could be benefi cial on both sides. My boys will never forget having their teachers over for dinner. The experience has been so fulfilling, a reader and friend decided to invite her sons kindergar ten teacher to dinner this week. She will post about her experience at http://www. Facebook.com/DinnerWithTheSmileys. This month, reach out to someone influential in your childs life a teacher, a coach, a babysitter and invite them to dinner. Then tell us about it on the Dinner with the Smileys page.Hey, MoneyChic! Im getting killed at the gas station these days. How can I can reduce the amount of money I pour into my fuel tank? MoneyChic says: It doesnt look as though gas prices will be going down anytime soon.With many people taking to the road for vacations in the next couple of months, here are some tips to help your bucks go further. The first thing that savingsaccounts.com suggests is to change the way you drive. By planning your errands and other appointments into one trip, you can drive less and save money. Also avoid roads with lots of traffic lights, as well as drive the speed limit. It also helps to use cruise control as much as possible because the less you use the gas and brake pedals, the better. One thing that is simple to do is research on which local gas stations are selling the lowestpriced gas. Another idea is to find alter native transportation. If you are going somewhere close ride your bike rather then driv ing your car. Another idea is to work from home as much as possible. Many employers are allowing their employees to telecommute these days, so find out if your job allows you to do this. Finally, if you are driving further than your spouseand your car is less efficient you should consider switching vehicles. Thats my two cents worth.Dinner with teachers is enlightening

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VP-30 aircrewmen graduate, many promotedOn March 29, VP-30 Executive Officer Cmdr. Tony Parton recognized graduates of the P-3C CAT I (ini tial training syllabus) Acoustic and Non-Acoustic Operator Class 1201, Flight Engineer Class 1107, and In-flight Technician Class 1106. All graduating Sailors were advanced at the cer emony to their listed rank by Parton. These naval air crewmen will now report to their assigned operational squadrons to begin their initial sea tours. Class 1201 CAT I Acoustic Operator AWO2 Brook Wade AWO3 Cory Johnson AWO3 Derek Neukam AWO3 Jake Appel AWO3 John Dohoney AWO3 Jordan Szymanowski AWO3 Marlonjamie Aquino AWO3 Soloman Morse Class 1201 CAT I Non-acoustic Operator AWO2(NAC/AW) Timothy Moradi AWO2 Samuel Bingham AWO3 Conner Pendergrass AWO3 Forrest Herring AWO3 Elise Laub AWO3 Jeffrey Brown AWO3 Tiara Glover Class 1107 CAT I Flight Engineer AWF2(AW) Daniel Cornejo AWF2(AW) Terry Lamb AWF3 Joshua Garrou AWF3 Anita Goldbaum AWF3 Kori Henschen AWF3 Adam Platt AWF3 Shantel Reyes AWF3 Joshua Steffey Class 1106 CAT I In-flight Technician AWV3 Alexander Acree AWV3 Daniel Vanhooser AWV3 Dominic Marr AWV3 Sean Cureton AWV3 Stephen Lounsburry AWV3 Tremayne Holland JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012 3

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An F/A-18D Hornet assigned to VFA106 crashed in Virginia Beach, Va. April 6. Initial reports indicate that at approximately 12:05 p.m., the jet crashed just after takeoff at a location just off of the base. Both aircrew safely ejected from the aircraft. The Navy is coordinating with local authorities. Adm. John C. Harvey, Jr., command er, U.S. Fleet Forces released the fol lowing statement: My thoughts and prayers are with our citizens and families who have been impacted by the tragic crash today in Virginia Beach by an aircraft from NAS Oceana. I deeply regret that some in our community have lost their homes, and I, like many, pray for the well-being of all. I must also offer my deepest grati tude to the citizens of Virginia Beach and the Mayfair Mews Apartments, as well as Virginia Beachs first respond ers, for their immediate and heroic response to take care of our aircrew after they ejected, and all responders at the scene of the mishap. I have spoken with Mayor Sessoms, and all the resources of the Navy in Hampton Roads are being made avail able to the City of Virginia Beach as we all deal with the impacts and recovery from this terrible mishap. We will continue to work directly with the City of Virginia Beach and continue to provide all possible assis tance. We will conduct a complete investigation into the cause of this mishap and share all information we have as soon as we are able to do so, said Harvey. VFA-106 is based at Naval Air Station Oceana, and serves as the East Coast Fleet Replacement Squadron. Their mission is to train Navy and Marine Corps F/A-18 replacement pilots and weapon systems officers to support fleet commitments. USFF releases statement on F/A-18 crash in Virginia Beach Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert joined U.S. Congressman Ander Crenshaw at Naval Station Mayport April 3 to view current military construction projects and meet with local and state representatives. Greenert and Crenshaw also attended a lunch meeting with the Jacksonville Area Ship Repair Association to dis cuss defense issues and the future of the Navy. Mayport is a hub and a strategic area for the Navy. Its a southern command that is very important to us. Look how fast you can get out to sea from here, said Greenert. Jacksonville is the center of excellence for maritime patrol. Crenshaw explained that there are plans in the works to increase naval fortitude in and around the city of Jacksonville. I think its important to recognize the Navy just built a hangar for the P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft at NAS Jacksonville. Its the larg est hangar the Navy has ever constructed, said Crenshaw. That hangar is where all the P-8As on the East Coast are going to be headquartered. Its a sophisticated air craft. So clearly, I think Northeast Florida is quickly becoming a cen ter of excellence, not only for naval aircraft, but for the Navy in general. Greenert spoke of the Navys expansion plans in areas other than Jacksonville. Greenert also expressed the importance of certain oversea locations and the benefits that they would offer to our global defense capabilities. We want to move four destroyers (DDG) to Rota, Spain. That will give us is four DDGs in the Mediterranean for ballistic-missile defense, said Greenert. Rota, Sigonella (Italy), Naples (Italy), Souda Bay (Greece), the Suez Canal (Egypt), Djibouti and Bahrain all have big parts in the Navys future. Greenert expressed his thanks to the people of Jacksonville. I want to thank Jacksonville for taking care of our Sailors and families. This is a great place to be stationed, said Greenert.CNO visits Naval Station Mayport 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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The United States Navy Memorial hosted the offi cial kick-off of the Year of the Chief and the 119th birthday celebration of the chief petty officer during a ceremony April 2. For the first time in history, the Navy Memorial is casting a spotlight on the history, heri tage and contributions of chief petty officers. The guest speaker for the event was Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert. Remarks were also given by Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON)(SS/SW) Rick West and former MCPON James Herdt. Former MCPON Duane Bushey was also in attendance. The chief is the center of grav ity, said Greenert. There is not a seaman, petty officer or officer out there who can not turn and say, I had a chief petty officer take care of me and get me where I am today. The ceremony was attend ed by chiefs from across the nation who came not only to be a part of the official kick-off, but also to see the Memorial transformed into a Chiefs Mess, resplendent with history and memorabilia spanning 119 years. We are becoming a part of history today, said West. I see retired veterans in our midst and I am proud to carry on down a path theyve laid for us so long ago. I couldnt be more pleased to be spending this day with representatives from so many commands. To stand in front of a sea of fouled anchors as your MCPON, and know that we are as much making history as we are a part of it . I am truly humbled. After the ceremony, guests were invited into the Memorial for the cake cutting.Visitors were then encouraged to tour the Memorial, which has been decorated to reflect historic uniforms, anchors and other iconic symbols from the color ful heritage of CPOs. Happy birthday chief petty officers, youve earned it, said Greenert. Absorb the moment, have a great year, remember your legacy and what got you here. West added his expectations and appreciation for chiefs serving today. You are bold and accountable, executing the Navys mission around the globe, and developing our next generation of Sailors, West said. Thank you, shipmates including those who have gone before us and those who are no longer with us you have served your country well and will continue to do so as long as we sail the seven seas. Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville (FACSFACJAX) celebrated its 35th anniversary April 1. Upon establishment of FACSFACJAX, the mission assumed was initial ly assigned to Commander, Fleet Air Jacksonville (COMFAIRJAX) until June 30, 1973. On July 1, 1973, upon disestablish ment of COMFAIRJAX, four members of COMFAIRJAX staff were transferred to NAS Jacksonville for administrative support and co-located with the Navy Ground Control Intercept Site (NGCI) to continue the mission as the Jacksonville Operating Area Coordination Center (JOACC). This was the first small step toward combining the individual func tions associated with scheduling and control of the Jacksonville fleet operat ing areas. Since 1973, the mission performed by JOACC steadily increased in scope and complexity. In July 1974, the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) veri fied the operational requirement for the establishment of a Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility at NAS Jacksonville and the JOACC and NGCI site were scheduled for expan sion into an interim FACSFAC. To fulfill this ever-increasing need for coordi nating military and civilian use of the Jacksonville fleet areas, the CNO direct ed in August 1976 that FACSFACJAX be established as a separate command effective April 1, 1977. Today FACSFACJAX is responsible for the scheduling and control of offshore fleet operating areas, military special use airspace, land target and electron ic warfare missions. FACSFACJAX is also the military coordinator with the Federal Aviation Agency and other cog nizant agencies for the liaison required by fleet users for operations in the FACSFACJAX area of responsibility to assure safe and optimum use. FACSFACJAX has been designated by the Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces to be the southeast area coordina tor and scheduler for Department of Defense/Navy offshore air and sur face areas, and overland for special use airspaceand military training routes. Operationally, FACSFACJAX has three components, Sealord, which provides air traffic control services, Bristol, which provides surface unit tracking and air intercept control services, and Schedules, which provides scheduling services for special use airspace or tar gets in the Pinecastle Range Complex. FACSFACJAX has responsibility for the operating areasand warning areas from Charleston,S.C. to Daytona Beach,Fla. and is a subordinate command of Commander, Naval Air Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jax celebrates 35th anniversary Year of the Chief kicks off JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012 More than 400 service members, retirees, civilians and family members turned out for the seventh annual Capt. Chuck Cornett 10K Run and 5K Walk April 7 at NAS Jacksonville. In addition to the 10-kilometer competitive run and five-kilometer walk, there was a run ners shoe and apparel fair in the Navy Exchange parking lot. Once the runners received their packages with their numbers and tim ing chips, they stretched and mingled with friends and family as Navy Band Southeast played patriotic music near the starting line. After observing morning colors, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders welcomed the runners and then joined them to await the starting gun. What a beautiful day for a run this morning. I want to welcome you to the Capt. Chuck Cornett Run, former ly known as the Navy Run. We have a record turnout today and I want to wish you the best of luck and thank you all for being here today, said Sanders. With a shotgun start, the runners headed down Child Street with a base security vehicle leading the way. This is such a wonderful event and great for our community to come together and promote physical fitness, said NAS Jax Athletic Director Tanya Henigman, who coordinated the run. Of course, we couldnt pull this off without the help of our volunteers and sponsors. Its a team effort to organize this event. We have about 30 volunteers out here helping out to ensure every thing runs smoothly. Im actually going to start working on next years run this week when I do our after action report because that helps us improve the event each year. The first runner to cross the 5K finish line was Calvin Kramps with a time of 28:36, followed by Justin Cowell coming in at 28:42 and Trevor Morris at 29:35. The overall winner and first man to cross the 10K finish line was Lt. j.g. Kyle Hooker of VP-30 at 36:04, followed by Aaron Long with a time of 37:28 and Theo Lundy at 38:41. The first woman to cross the 10K line was Lisa Adams with a time of 42:10. Susan Miller placed second in the women overall with a time of 45:30 and Colleen Bierbach came in third with a time of 47:10. Other winners in their age categories were: Master Men and Women (Overall) Joe Rivera, 38:56 Ann Krause, 49:16 Men and Women 3-10 Max Licht, 1:00 Grace Adams, 1:04 Men and Women 11-14 Gabriel Moran, 39:03 Lindsey Averitt, 1:05 Men and Women 15-19 Gary Diaz, 46:11 Rachel Dimonda, 54:18 Men and Women 20-24 Andrew Smith, 38:57 Angela Grove, 48:05 Men and Women 25-29 Alexei Pukrischkin, 38:46 Deniz Bayakan, 51:23 Men and Women 30-34 Justin Weakland, 46:50 Lindsey McCulley, 48:08 Men and Women 35-39 Rodriquez Williams, 42:27 Leslie Kindling, 47:59 Men and Women 40-44 Mark Edelson, 40:57 Andrea Petrovanie, 51:18 Men and Women 45-49 Juan Echegaray, 45:10 Mayumi Pierce, 51:32 Men and Women 50-54 George Thompson, 44:25 Joanne Harris, 52:02 Men and Women 55-59 Paul Geiger, 43:35 Kim Crist, 52:28 Men and Women 60-64 Gene Bridges, 47:37 Barbara Scott, 1:20 Men and Women 65-69 Frank Frazier, 48:55 Gail Rucker, 1:19 Men 70-74 Matt Ross, 1:00 Men 75 & Up Pat Gallagher, 1:26 This is a great run the course is well marked and the event is well orga nized. I really enjoyed participating in todays run, said Lt. Kyle Hooker of VP-30 and member of the All-Navy Triathlon member. Originally called the Navy Run, the event was renamed after the 2004 death of Cornett, a former NAS Jax executive officer and avid runner. Cornett par ticipated in 96 marathons, including the Boston and Marine Corps marathons. A co-founder of the Florida Striders run ning club in 1978, he retired from the U.S. Navy as a captain in 1980 after 30 years of service. I hope everyone will come out to participate in this run again next year. It just keeps getting bigger and better every year and we continue to make upgrades to ensure everyone enjoys this event, said Henigman. Annual Navy Run attracts hundreds of athletes CAPT. CHU C K CORNETT 10 K RUN AND 5 K WALK

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012 7 PHOTOS BY KAYLEE LAROCQUE, CLA RK PIE R CE AND SHANNON LEONA R D

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and produced fantastic outcomes to support Commander Combined Task Force (CTF) 53 and its customers. I am especially proud of our maintain ers and aircrews for making this plan happen. Operating out of Naval Support Activity Bahrain, Nomad 313 fulfilled the short-notice, high-priority cargo and people requirements of CTF-53. The Nomads also provided lifts in sup port of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) and USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) carrier strike groups. The lone VR-62 Hercules also supported Operations Eager Lion, Eastern Maverick, New Dawn, Vigilant Mariner and Enduring Freedom. During the detachment, Nomads flew into 26 unique airfields in and around NAVCENT, while maintain ing a 97 percent mission completion rate. The Nomads were an integral part of keeping the essential supply lines operating to numerous Navy and Marine Corps outposts in the NAVCENT area of responsibility. Following a three-month break in attached theater operations at NAS Jacksonville, the Nomads will detach to Atsugi, Japan in July. They will support Pacific Command with short-notice, high-priority air logis tics throughout the Pacific theater. VR-62 is a Navy Reserve squadron that operates four of the Navys 19 C-130T Hercules aircraft from its home base at NAS Jacksonville, NAVCENT is responsible for an area of approximately 2.5 million square miles, including the Arabian Gulf, Red Sea, Gulf of Oman, parts of the Indian Ocean and 20 countries. The U.S. 5th Fleets mission is to conduct mari time security operations, defeat vio lent extremism and strengthen part ner nations maritime capabilities in order to promote security and stability in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility.VR-62: Nomad 313 up to taskthere -but we wanted to leave and go to Palestine (now Israel). A year later, the family took what they could and moved to Romania in hopes of going to Israel. Four years later in 1949, they were given permis sion to immigrate to the new State of Israel. Bendit soon joined the Israeli navy at the age of 17 for a 30-month tour. By then, his mother had remar ried and moved to Montreal, Canada where Bendits great uncle had relo cated before the war. After completing his military service, Bendit moved to Canada finding a job in a machine shop. I wanted to better myself so I went to Long Island, N.Y. and opened my own precision metal fabrication business. In 1969, I met my wife, Hanna, also an immigrant from Israel and we had three daughters, said Bendit. After closing his business in 1980, the family moved to Nashville and then to Jacksonville where Bendit started an antique repair and restoration business. Today, Bendit spends time with his fam ily, including five grandchildren, and repairing furniture on the side. He also talks about his past to those who are interested in listening. I think its important to tell my fam ilies story because I realize how fast future generations forget what hap pened in World War II. Soon there wont be anyone left to talk about what hap pened and people need to know, he stated. Unfortunately, the only items I have from that time are a couple of photos of my parents when they were married that my great uncle saved and a news paper picture of when my father, his cousin and a friend tried to ride their bicycles from the Ukraine to Palestine in 1932. There werent allowed to con tinue from Turkey, but a Romanian newspaper ran a photo and my uncle in Canada gave it to me. Its all I have left from the father I never had the chance to know.HOLOCAUST: Survivor to speak The Players will continue its policy of providing free or affordable access to the tournament for men and women of the Armed Services. There are two mili tary ticket policies: military personnel along with their dependents receive complimentary admission to the tournament all day, every day. Free tickets are available online via a link to TicketMaster from The Players Web site (PGATOUR.COM/ THEPLAYERS); these are print-at-home tickets and military personnel and their dependents will be asked to present the paper ticket amd valid military ID at the gate for free admission. The Players is proud to partner with Veterans Advantage to distribute dis counted tickets to military veterans and their families. Available to those carry ing the Veterans Advantage VetRewards Card, discounted tickets can be pur chased online through a special link, and then redeemed at the admissions gate with proof of a valid Veterans Advantage VetRewards Card. Visit PGATOUR.COM/THEPLAYERS (click on 2012 Tickets) for more information. On site parking is free (for all fans) Monday-Wednesday, but parking pass es must be purchased in advance for Thursday through Sunday. Once again in 2012, The Players will offer hospitality to active, Reserve and retired military and dependents at the Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost, located on the hill between No. 16 and No. 18 fairways. The Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost, provides complimentary food, beverages and interactive activities and is open Wednesday-Sunday. Military ID is required for admit tance. USO Centers do not have tickets or sell parking passes, which are available online. 2012 Players honors military with free tickets and events 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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NAS Jax Sailors and civilians attended a training session to promote awareness about sexual assault prevention April 3 at the NAS Jax Officers Club. The event was kicked off by NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander. Thank you all for being here today. This program was previously called Sexual Assault Victim Intervention and has been renamed Sexual Assault Prevention and Response. This change was made to focus your thinking on preventing sexual assault, said Undersander. Last year, the NAS Jax commanding officer was at a conference and heard our guest speaker conducting a presen tation. He enlisted our Fleet and Family Support Center staff to contact the organization so we could provide you this informational presentation with the hopes that if we educate people on sexual assault issues, this issue will be eliminated in our society, he contin ued. Undersander then introduced guest speaker Dr. Gail Stern, co-owner and director of consulting, education and training for Catharsis Productions based in Chicago. Im here today to talk about how each of us can play a role in ending sex ual violence and supporting victims of rape. My presentation discusses about how we challenge victim blaming atti tudes where so often we talk about creating culture change and making it a culture that supports victims of rape, but no one ever breaks down the nittygritty on how you do that, said Stern. And, the fact is that the only way we are going to reduce sexual violence is if we all take an active role in challenging the beliefs that provide cover for people who perpetrate, continued Stern. I break down where victim blam ing comes from, what the arguments are, and how we respond to those argu ments. This gets people to indirectly and directly challenge their own beliefs and learn how to challenge the beliefs of others. Stern used humor to get her message across, challenging the audience with topics and questions about stuff we dont want to talk about such as how women and men are perceived if they are raped and how society often blames the victim. She also had the audience volunteer the ways men and women protect them selves from being raped. Many of the men in the audience were surprised to learn of some of the precautions women take on a daily basis. Most men dont think about all this, but for women, the fear of being raped is part of every day reality, said Stern. She also told the audience that 85 percent of people who are raped are attacked by someone they know and trust. Rapists make choices to hurt people and they need to be held responsible for the crime. In our society, the way we treat rape victims often makes them afraid to disclose the crime. Rape is not wrong because its a crime, its a crime because its wrong, Stern stressed. As Stern concluded her presentation many in the crowd were a bit stunned of what they had just learned. It was one of the most eye-opening presentations Ive ever attended. I never really realized the way men and women think about these issues. Our society really does think bad of people in a lot of different ways. It really made me think about how we treat one another as a whole, said YN1(SS) James Forbus of NAS Jax. Sailors learn how to beat the blame game 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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The VP-10 Red Lancers recently announced their Senior, Junior and Blue Jacket Sailors of the First Quarter. Sailor of the Quarter. A native of Barlow, Ohio, Duvall has been in the Navy for 16 years and at VP-10 since April 2011. He is the safety department Leading Petty Officer (LPO) who manages the training, standardiza tion and evaluation of 144 aviators and aircrew. I am honored to be chosen as Senior Sailor of the Quarter among all the highly professional first class petty officers here at VP-10, Duvall said. Safety/NATOPS Department Leading Chief Petty Officer (LCPO) AWFC Jesse Olmstead said I am proud of Duvalls accomplishments, he was consistently sought by junior officers in the upgrading process to Patrol Plane Pilot and Patrol Plane Commander for his aircraft knowledge and experience. Duvalls off time is spent volunteering as assistant scout leader and Eagle Scout advisor for Pack/Troop 425 in Middleburg, Fla. Junior Sailor of the Quarter. A native of Colorado Springs, Colo., Harrison has eight years in the Navy and has been at VP-10 since February 2010, working Sailors in the information systems technician (IT) and cryptologic technician networks (CTN) ratings now have the opportunity to apply for enrollment in a cyber masters degree program at Naval Postgraduate School, according to NAVADMIN 117/12, released April 5. IT and CTN Sailors selected for the 12-month, Navy funded program will be assigned as full time students at NPS starting in September 2012. Upon completion, Sailors will receive a Master of Science degree in Cyber Systems and Operations: Security and Technology. Cyber security is an area of critical importance to our Navy and our nation, said Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk. Cyber exper tise is essential in assuring the Navys warfighting superiority across the full spectrum of operations. With this program, we are preparing our Sailors to bring these ever-important capabilities to the Fleet. The Navy will select up to five active duty and full-time support Sailors to enroll in the pro gram. Applicants must be an E-6 or above, possess a bachelor of science degree in a relevant technical field, hold or be eligible for a TS/SCI security clear ance, and be eligible for CONUS/shore assignment between April and December 2012. NAVADMIN 117/12 outlines full eligibility criteria. Additionally, Sailors selected for the program will incur a five-year active service obligation upon enroll ment. After completion of their degree, Sailors will be assigned based on the needs of the Navy, with priority given to the National Security Agency, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/10th Fleet, Navy Information Operations Command, and Navy Cyber Defense Operations Command. Sailors interested in applying for this degree pro gram should forward a written request via their com manding officer by May 15. Additionally, Sailors must be conditionally accepted by NPS in order to be eli gible. Detailed application instructions are contained in the NAVADMIN. Naval Postgraduate School education opportuni ties support the personal and professional growth of Sailors making them invaluable assets to the Navy. Its an important part of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative that consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Department of the Navy. New graduate school opportunity for cyber SailorsVP-10 announces Sailors of the Quarter JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012 11

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April is a celebration of the mili tary child and the U.S. Department of Agricultures new nutritional guide line, Choose My Plate, includes sup port for parents as the most important influence on their children. Although peers and media are also factors, par ents can start their kids eating a vari ety of healthy, nutrient-rich foods when theyre young and set up life-long healthy eating habits. Choose My Plate offers 10 tips for par ents. Step one: Lead by example. Eat veg etables, fruit and whole grains. Instead of grabbing a junky snack food, grab something healthy. Kids brought up this way are likely to have less of a sweet tooth when they grow up. Step two: Grocery shop together. This is your time to teach kids about food and nutrition. Discuss where veg etables, fruits, grains, dairy and protein foods come from. Give them healthy options from which to choose. Step three: Get creative in the kitch en. Cut food into fun shapes with cook ie cutters. Name a food for the child who helps make it serve Angelas Salad or Antonios Sweet Potatoes. Encourage kids to invent new snacks. This can be anything from homemade pizza, cookie cutter-shaped sandwich es, homemade trail mix (dry wholegrain, low-sugar cereal and dried fruit), to ants on a log (celery, peanut butter and raisins). Step four: Offer the same foods to everyone instead of being a shortorder cook by making different dishes to please children. Its easier to plan family meals when everyone eats the same food. Step five: Reward with attention, not food. Show love with hugs and kisses. Comfort with hugs and talks. Choose not to offer sweets as rewards. Rewarding with sweets lets kids think sweets are better than other foods. When meals arent eaten, kids dont need junk food as a replacement. Step six: Focus on each other at the table. Talk about fun and happy things at meal time. Turn off the television. Take phone calls later. Make eating a stress-free time. Step seven: Listen to your child. When he or she is hungry, offer a small healthy snack, even if its not a sched uled time to eat. Ask, Which would you like for dinner: broccoli or cauliflower? instead of Do you want broccoli for dinner? Step eight: Allow no more than two hours a day of screen timeon tele vision, computers, game systems and smart phones. Get up and move during commercials or take breaks to get some physical activity. Step nine: Involve kids in the plan ning of physical activity for the whole family. Walk, run and play with the kids instead of sitting on the sidelines. Set an example by being physically active and using safety gear like bike helmets. Step ten: Be a good food role model. Try new foods yourself. Offer one new food at a time. Serve something the kids like along with the new food. Offer new foods at the beginning of a meal, when everyone is hungry. Try not to lec ture and dont force kids to eat. Finally, heres a fun and healthy rec ipe for Arctic Oranges thats great for play dates. The ingredients are simple: four oranges, four cups orange juice and four cherries. Cut the tops off the oranges in a zigzag pattern. Hollow out the insides, remove the seeds and combine in a blender with the juice. Set the rinds in a muffin tin and fill with the mixture. Drop a cherry inside each orange. Freeze for two to three hours. Soften the treats for five minutes and serve. For more good food ideas, go online to www.choosemyplate.gov or call the Naval Hospital Jacksonville Wellness Center at 542-5292. Call 778-9772 for more information MONTH OF THE MILITARY CHILD CARNIVAL April 21 11 a.m. 2 p.m. FREE ADMISSION! FREE games, activities and prizes! Alleghany Softball Field Parents as healthy food role models 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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NAS Jax hosts MPRF Reunion/ SymposiumThe fourth Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) Reunion and Symposium took place March 2630 at NAS Jacksonville, host ed by Patrol Squadron (VP) 30 and Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11. More than 500 active duty, reserve and retired maritime patrol personnel from around the world gathered to share ideas and experiences, as well as to catch up with former squadron mates. All Navy MPRF commands were repre sented, along with Maritime Patrol Forces from Canada, the United Kingdom and Australia. Admiral John Harvey Jr., com mander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command was the symposium guest speaker. This years reunion focused on recognizing the commu nitys historical contributions while looking forward to its bright future. The event was unique in that it also marked the much anticipated roll-out of the first operational P-8A Poseidon aircraft which is set to replace the venerable P-3C Orion. VP-30 Commanding Officer and master of ceremo nies for the Fleet Introduction, Capt. Mark Stevens, captured the importance of this his toric event, In the same year that our Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force is cel ebrating 50 years of service for the P-3 Orion were also cel ebrating the Fleet Introduction of P-8 Poseidon. The reunion kicked off with the Commanders Conference that was followed by a variety of briefs, discussions, round tables and panels geared towards exchanging com munity experiences, cur rent operations and ideas. Wednesdays P-8A roll-out and the ribbon-cutting for the P-8A Integrated Training Center were highlights of the week. These events drew national media attention and the guest list included Under Secretary of the Navy Robert Work, Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson, Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and Boeing President and CEO of Defense, Space and Security Dennis Muilenburg. Throughout the week, out side of the briefs and meetings, participants were able to enjoy gatherings that included the Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) Heritage Dinner, MPA Golf Tournament and the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) Luncheon. A popular event for many was the Flight Suit Social that capped the week of festivities at the NAS Jacksonville Officers Club. Old squadron mates had the opportunity to reflect on their MPA heritage, mingle with old friends and swap sea stories in a relaxed atmosphere. Another highlight of the week was the MPA Technology Expo in the VP-30 Hangar, where visitors explored exhibits host ed by Boeing, ASEC, WYLE, MOAA, Carley, LockheedMartin, and the local MTOC 7 team. Also on display was a full-scale BAMS Demonstration model, a P-8A flight simulator and the Boeing P-8A trailer that included a fully functional tac tical crew simulator. In their remarks on the sym posiums final day, both Adm. Harvey and Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Rear Adm. Michael Hewitt spoke to the communitys his tory and future. They praised the personnel who fly and fight these aircraft, and remarked about the responsibilities placed on the shoulders of these Sailors to carry MPRF heritage into the future. Fittingly, the MOAA recog nized one such leader, VP-30 Executive Officer Cmdr. Tony Parton, with the 2012 MPRF Lifetime Leadership Award for his career-long advancement of the community and all of those with whom hes worked during his distinguished career. Additional recognition for excellence was given to the Combat Aircrews (CAC) who participated in the 2012 Antisubmarine Warfare (ASW) Fleet Challenge. The Fleet Challenge is an opportunity for the top CACs from each squadron to demonstrate their ASW prow ess. Hewitt announced this years champion, CAC 1 of VP-4 from MCBH Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. Participants at the 2012 MPRF Reunion and Symposium returned to their commands to share with the rest of the community the information they gathered and to pass on the messages from the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Community leadership. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012 13

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Repairing: As long as the flag is serviceable, it is acceptable to repair minor damages. While it is per mitted to do repairs yourself, taking your flag to a seamstress may be a safer option. Its important that the repairs are not noticeable, and that the dimen sions of the flag arent altered. Flags with large tears or excessive fraying should be retired. To avoid damage to your flag, bring it inside in bad weather, and make sure your flagpole or staff is in good condition. Rust can corrode your flag. If you are putting a flag into storage, make sure it is dry and the bag or container locks out moisture. Mold and mildew can grow on damp fabric. Washing: If your American flag is beginning to look dirty or dingy, washing it may save it from an early retirement. The Flag Code does not prohibit wash ing flags. In fact washing your flag on a regular basis can prolong its life. Most outdoor flags can be handwashed with a mild laundry detergent. If youre not sure if your flag can be washed, or of the proper wash ing procedure, take it to the dry cleaners. Many offer free flag-cleaning services, especially in the month of July. Despite the common myth, flags that touch the ground do not need to be destroyed. If your flag does touch the ground, and it gets dirty, simply wash it. Allowing a flag to touch the ground is disrespectful to the flag, but of course accidents do happen. Just try to prevent it from happening again. As long as the flag is serviceable, it is acceptable to repair minor damages. While it is permitted to do repairs yourself, taking your flag to a seamstress may be a safer option. Its important that the repairs are not noticeable, and that the dimensions of the flag arent altered. Flags with large tears or excessive fraying should be retired. To avoid damage to your flag, bring it inside in bad weather, and make sure your flagpole or staff is in good condition. Rust can corrode your flag. If you are putting a flag into storage, make sure it is dry and the bag or container locks out moisture. Mold and mildew can grow on damp fabric. Disposal: According to the Flag Code, any American flag that is worn, damaged or tattered beyond repair should be retired in a respectful and dignified manner. The preferred method is burning. This may shock some, since it is a well-known fact that burning the flag is illegal. This, however, is an excep tion to the rule. You can burn the flag yourself, mak ing sure it is done in a discreet and professional man ner, or many organizations like the American Legion, the Boy Scouts Council and the Girl Scouts Council will perform a flag retirement ceremony and burn your flag for you. In this case, burning signifies purifi cation and rebirth. Although burning is the preferred method, it is also acceptable to seal your old flag in a box or bag and bury it. The most important factor is showing respect to the flag during its disposal. Thursday May 3 2012 Meet at the Marina at 8:30 a.m. Lunch at 11 :30 a.m. R S V P by April 19 to 5422798 or e mail: angela.glass@navy.mil MWR Marina to provide boats, life vests, food and drinks after clean up and a prize for The Most Unusual Piece of Trash Visit your MWR for fishing tackle, free range bait, snacks, cold beverages, rental boats, camping supplies and much more. Contact the Marina at 542 -3260, end of Ranger Rd, Bldg. 1072 NAS JAX Proper repair, disposal of the American flag 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Monday Pizza Madness $5 for a 14 one-topping 2:30 9 p.m., dine-in or carry out Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included April Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 4 10 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of one-lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor pool hours Mon. Fri. 5:30 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 8 p.m. Weekend hours 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group train ing Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information contact Melissa Luehrs at 542-3518/4238. Family Fitness Bootcamp with Ashley Mon. & Wed. at 9:30 a.m. Family Fitness Center above the Youth Center Gym Call (904) 778-9772 Outdoor Pool Open Weekends Begins May 5 & 6, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session one begins June 18 $40 military, $45 DoDI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Disney World Orlando 4day hopper Armed Forces Ticket $135.50 $162 Disney World Orlando: Resident 3-day $98.25, 3-day hopper $125.25, 4-day $127.75, 4-day hopper $154.50 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Funk Fest May 11 & 12 at Metropolitan Park $57 Now booking all-inclusive Sandals Resorts vacations The Gaylord Palms Resort offers pre ferred rate for ITT customers. The resort is just one mile from Walt Disney World. ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Blue Man Group in Orlando $59, includes City Walk venue Orlando Magic all home games $22.50 $383 Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 St. Augustine Scenic Cruise Day Trip May 5, 9:30 a.m. 5 p.m. $20 per person Stone Mountain, Ga. $21.25 Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Superclubs Resorts vacationsThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Free Mall & Movie Trip Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater April 13 at 6 p.m. April 14 at 7 p.m. $20 Dave & Busters April 19 at 6 p.m. Free $10 game card, 20% off food & bev erage and unlimited simulator play.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees April 24 for active duty April 12 & 26 for retirees & DoD person nel Ladies Golf Clinics Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. $10 per person Pre-registration required, sign-up in the pro shop Senior Military Invitational April 30 & May 1 9 a.m. shotgun start $65 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty 30th Bass Tournament April 14 at first light $60 per two-person team Sign-up at the marina Shoreline Clean-up May 4 at 8:30 a.m. Free lunch! Call 542-2709 or e-mail angela.glass@ navy.mil to sign-up Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding. ASE-certified mechanic onsite.Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Month of the Military Child Carnival April 21, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Fields Free games, food and prizes! 2012 Adventure Summer Registration: Current School-Age Care participants Now Single & Dual Active Duty Now through April 13 Other Active Duty April 16 20 DoD Civilians April 23 27 Registration Packets available for pick up at the Youth Center.Flying Club Call 777-8549 /6035 Ground School April 16 May 23 June 4 July 16 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012 15

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Battle of MidwayCommemorative Dinner June 9, 2012WorlD Golf Village Renaissance ResortDinner 6:00 p.m. Keynote: Adm. Jonathan Greenert, CNOActive Duty E6 and below $25E7 to O3 $35 O4 to O5 $45O6 & above, civilians & retirees $60For more information, contact Bob Price At (904) 246-9982, e-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net or Bill Dudley at (904) 806-4712, E-mail: anuday00@aol.com. Tickets may also be purchased at www. midwaydinner.orgUniform for O4 and above is dinner dress white jacket. For O3 and below, dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional. Civilian is black tie or business attirewww.midwaydinner.org Sponsored by 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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in the Red Lancers Maintenance Department. I feel that I am representing VP-10 and showing others that through hard work you will get recognized, Harrison said. Maintenance Administration I think that Harrison is very deserving of this award. He is an outstanding worker, hard char ger and great at his job. selected as VP-10 Blue Jacket of the Quarter. A native of Butler, Indiana, Link has been in the Navy for four years and at VP-10 since May 2009, where he works in the Red Lancers maintenance department. Its nice to be recognized for my hard work and achievements. I feel really good about it and thank my shipmates for their support, Link said. Work Center 220 LPO AE1 Amanda Overstreet said, He is strides above any other petty officer in the work center, con stantly asking what else he can do to be better. I wish I had more motivated sailors like him; he is truly a rarity. Link is currently involved with volunteer work at Clay Countys Special Olympics taking place at Ridgeview High School. The primary mission of VP-10 is maritime patrol and antisubmarine warfare (ASW). The squadrons crews are trained to search, localize, track and ulti mately attack hostile diesel or nuclear powered submarines. The Red Lancers numerous col lateral missions include: antisurface warfare (ASUW), pre cision strike targeting, surface search and interdiction, strike group support, mine warfare, high resolution intelligence pho tography, search and rescue, counter-narcotics, and logistics support. VP-10: SOQs named For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil. Junior Red Cross volunteers must apply by May 1 The American Red Cross at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is currently recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volunteers. This offers an excellent opportunity for students interested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine professionals physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and technicians as well as contribute to creating a posi tive expe rience for NH Jacksonville patients. The program is open to a limited number of high school stu dents age 16 to 18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the hospi tal, and receive CPR training. Applications can be picked up at NH Jacksonvilles American Red Cross office (Room 1404, next to Physical Therapy & Occupational Therapy) and must be sub mitted by May 1. Selectees are required to attend the June 9 kick-off event from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., that includes an interview, in the hospitals central tower second deck con ference room. For more about this opportunity, call Junior Red Cross Volunteer Chairman Terry Miles at 542-7525 or e-mail terry. miles2@med.navy.mil. Experience Navy Medicine first-hand for your summer JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012 17

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Synthetic drug testing operating guide availableNavy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention (NADAP) office posted the new Synthetic Drug Testing Operating Guide on the NADAP website, officials said April 5. The Navys zero-tolerance policy towards drug use is a key contributor to the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine. This initiative, which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combateffective force in the history of the Department of the Navy. The operating guide provides commands easy access to the procedures of synthetic drug testing, said Dorice Favorite, director, NADAP. It is important that the samples are collected, documented and pro cessed correctly. The operating guide will help units do that. Navy announced it would begin testing for syn thetic drugs in NAVADMIN 082/12, released March 12. According to the NAVADMIN, this testing is separate and distinct from the urinalysis program directed by OPNAVINST 5350.4D. Commanders may take appro priate actions related to health, safety and security based on a positive result. During fiscal year 2012, the Navy will invest $1.73 million to test for synthetic chemical compounds and expects to increase that amount to $2.9 million in fis cal year 2013. Synthetic chemical compound drug use impacts a Sailors career, their family life and overall well-being while also impacting Fleet readiness. If a Sailor makes the wrong choice and uses these types of drugs, they need to know there will be conse quences, emphasized Favorite. Navy has zero tolerance for drug use, including the use of designer and synthetic chemical compounds, such as Spice, said Favorite. Our efforts are twofold: we will continue to educate Sailors on the dangers of drug use including new and designer drugs and at the same time identify those who use or possess the substances and hold them accountable. 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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Public Defender provides critical help to veteransAfter the Veterans Administration (VA) denied his claim seven years ago and failed to get him a primary care appoint ment more than one year ago, Duval County defendant known in court as Mr. Alvin is now on the fast track to receive the longawaited treatment options he was promised by the Navy back in the early 1970s. Though he only served a short time during the Vietnam Era, Alvin has earned the distinction of being Duval Countys firstever Veterans Treatment Court (VTC) defendant. On March 2 in a 5th floor courtroom of the Duval County Courthouse, Magistrate John Sampson called to order the inaugural Veterans Treatment Court Track of Adult Drug Court. Present with Alvin was his attor ney, Assistant Public Defender Richard Gordon, his Veteran Mentor John Holzbaur (A retired Navy Lt. Cmdr. and Director of Veterans Affairs for Office of the Public Defender) and Veterans Justice Outreach Coordinator Charlotte Matthews from the VA. In short order, Sampson wel comed all parties, indicated his support of this new court function and released Alvin to Matthews who connected the veteran with the long-awaited benefits he was entitled from the VA. The pro ceeding took 15 minutes. The Duval County VTC began to take shape in March of 2011, when Public Defender Matt Shirk called for such a system noting the tremendously low recidivism rate being realized in the few other VTCs operating around the country. Following that announcement, Shirk dedicated staff to coordinat ing the function and invited vet eran mentors to sign up with the VTC. Because the VTC is brand new to Duval County, there is no way to predict how successful it will be, said Public Defender Matt Shirk. Here are the facts we identified more than 500 admitted veterans in the local criminal jus tice system in the last six months of 2011. This defines a significant need. He explained that other juris dictions (approximately 80 around the country) that operate a VTC are reporting a recidivism rate as low as a zero, while all others proudly say that very few partici pants re-offend. He added that VA benefits will eventually cover the cost of those adjudicated in VTC and take that burden off local taxpayers. Shirk continued, American servicemen and women are com ing home from overseas con flicts in large numbers and that affects military communities like Jacksonville. The transition back to civil ian life can be difficult for some, especially those who knowingly or unknowingly suffer from ser vice-related injuries like Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). As we have seen in the past and in other jurisdictions, this can lead some into legal troubles. It is only fair to those who put their lives on the line for America that we extend them this common courtesy of assistance when they need it most. Alvin noted that he couldnt recall a time that he had gotten this much attention. The VAs Matthews secured his long-await ed, primary care appointment and will resubmit his service disability claim after that takes place. Veterans Treatment Court now available in Duval County 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012



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THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Holocaust survivor to speak at NAS JaxA National Days of Remembrance event will be held at the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf April 18 at 11:30 a.m. The guest speaker will be Morris Bendit, a Holocaust survivor who was born in Chernovitz, Ukraine during World War II. All hands are invited to attend the event. Bendit, 71, was two months old when his father was forced to enlist into the Russian Army to fight the German Nazis who were systematically tak ing over European countries. While en route his fathers train was attached by German bomb ers. His father did not survive. Four months later, Romanian troops entered Chernovitz. In October 1941, my family and I were deported to a province created by the Germans in Ukraine called Transnistria to annihilate the Ukrainian and Romanian Jews. Romania had become allies with Germany, said Bendit. I was with my maternal grandparents, paternal grandmother, mother, four uncles and an aunt. We were put on cattle cars and taken to the kill ing fields. Transistria means beyond the river. Many people were killed going over the river and those of us who did made it endured a horrible existence. There was no food, clothing and it was brutally cold. In the concentration camps it was a quick death, but here it was a slow death, Bendit continued. The Jews were put on marches from town to town as a way to kill people because they didnt want to waste bullets. My mother and grandmother carried me through the marches and my mother nursed me. At night they would search for shelter and food. One night my mother went to a farmers field to look for some scraps being fed to the pigs and a German soldier caught her and hit her in the head with his rifle. He thought she was dead but she survived and had that bump on her head until she died. Three years later, in 1944, the survivors in Transistria were liberated by the Russian Army. By then, the only surviving members of Bendits fam ily were his mother, maternal grandmother and his aunt. Of the Jews who had been deported to Transnistria (a total of 145,000 to 150,000) approximately 90,000 perished there. Out of the 300,000 local Ukrainian Jews, 185,000 were murdered. I have no idea how we survived. Entire families were killed. We were lucky, maybe because we stuck together and helped each other, he stated softly. I remember the day we were liberated and riding the train to go home to Chernovitz. Our neighbor had saved our house for us. My father had been a furniture maker and everything was still That is, the power of one C-130T Hercules transport aircraft on detachment from NAS Jacksonville to the Middle East. The Nomads of VR-62 ran continuous power plays with C-130T number 313. This one-aircraft detach ment recently flew 74 missions that totaled 441.2 flight hours in three and a half months, while deployed to U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT). During the detachment, the aircraft transported 2,086,436 pounds of cargo and 677 passengers. VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Alexander Ellermann said, I love it when a plan comes together. Actually, the men and women of VR-62 came together Swamp Foxes and Dusty Dogs mix it up in BahamasHSM-74 Detachment 3, con sisting of three MH-60R Seahawk helicopters, 16 pilots and aircrew men and 26 maintainers trav eled to the U.S. Navy Atlantic Undersea Testing and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) on Andros Island, Bahamas to hone their tactical proficiency and enhance interoper ability with the Dusty Dogs of HSC-7. Under the leadership of Detachment 3 Officer in Charge, Lt. Cmdr. Matt Baker, the Mad Foxes flew more 70 hours, com pleting numerous Air Combat Training Continuum (ACTC) event grade cards as they took advan tage of the unique surface warfare (SUW) and anti-submarine war fare (ASW) training opportunities available at AUTEC. HSM-74 aircrews participated in SUW captive air training mis sile (CATM) events, dual-dipper ASW exercises and helicopter Visit Board Search and Seizure (HVBSS) sorties. HSM-74 aircrews gained valu able experience operating the MH-60R Airborne Low Frequency Sonar (ALFS) and the Romeos enhanced acoustic processing sys tem for tracking submerged tar gets. During SUW and HVBSS train ing missions, HSM-74 and HSC-7 (flying the MH-60S) planned and executed several mixed-section events resulting in extremely valuable integrated tactical training. The extraordinary week of interoperability training would not have been possible without the tireless work of the HSM-74 Detachment 3 maintainers, led by Maintenance Officer Lt. Chad Harvey and Leading Chief Petty Officer AMC Michael Colon, who enabled an impressive 100 percent sortie completion rate while sus taining 100 percent fully missioncapable aircraft. HSM-74 and HSC-7 are two of the eight squadrons that comprise Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3. The air wing is preparing for deployment with the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Carrier Strike Group. TheMH-60R is capable of oper ating on frigates, destroyers, cruisers and aircraft carriers in its missionto provide: command control and communications; anti-sub marine warfare (ASW); surface warfare (SUW); electronic warfare (EW) and search and rescue (SAR). The MH-60S is designed in an air transport configuration that is easily modified with mission kits, for example, mine countermeasures systems and combat search and rescue kits. The main cabin can accommo date up to 20 armed troops. The power of one .

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS April 12 1861 Civil War begins when Confederates fire on Fort Sumter, S.C. 1911 Lt. Theodore Ellyson qualifies as first naval aviator. 1962 U.S. Navy demonstrates new landing craft with retractable hydro foils, LCVP(H). 1975 Operation Eagle Pull evacua tion from Cambodia. 1981 First launch of re-useable Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-1) with all-Navy crew. Retired Capt. John Young com manded and Lt. Cmdr. Robert Crippen was the pilot. Mission duration was two days, six hours and 20 minutes. Sixteen of the shuttles heat-shielding silicon tiles were lost and 148 damaged during reentry. 1993 Aircraft from USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) and NATO forces begin enforcing the no-fly zone over Bosnia in Operation Deny Flight. April 13 1847 Naval forces begin five-day battle to capture several towns in Mexico. 1861 Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. 1960 Navy navigation satellite, Transit, placed into orbit from Cape Canaveral, Fla. and demonstrates abil ity to launch another satellite. April 14 1898 Commissioning of USS Solace, the first post-Civil War hospital ship. 1969 Over the Sea of Japan, North Korean aircraft shoots down a Navy EC-121 reconnaissance aircraft assigned to VQ-1. 1988 USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) strikes Iranian mine off Qatar. 1989 First Navy ship arrives to assist in Exxon Valdez oil spill cleanup. April 15 1885 Naval forces land at Panama to protect American interests during revolution. 1912 Scout cruisers USS Chester (CL-1) and USS Salem (CL-3) sail from Massachusetts to assist RMS Titanic survivors. 1918 First Marine Aviation Force formed at Marine Flying Field, Miami, Fla. 1961 Launch of first nuclear-pow ered frigate, USS Bainbridge (DDG 96), at Quincy, Mass. 1962 USS Princeton (LPH-5) deliv ers first Marine Corps helicopters to Vietnam. This was first Marine advisory unit to arrive in South Vietnam. 1986 Navy aircraft from USS America (CV-66) and USS Coral Sea (CV-43) attack Libya in conjunction with USAF aircraft after Libya was linked to the terrorist bombing of a West Berlin discotheque that killed one American and injured 78 people. April 16 1863 Union gunboats pass Confederate batteries at Vicksburg. 1924 Navy supports relief operations during Mississippi Valley floods, lasting until June 16. 1947 Act of Congress gives Navy Nurse Corps members commissioned rank. April 17 1778 The 18-gun Continental Navy sloop-of-war Ranger, with Capt. John Paul Jones in command, captures a British brig and sends the prize to France. April 18 1848 U.S. Navy expedition to explore the Dead Sea and the River Jordan, commanded by Lt. William Lynch, reaches the Dead Sea. 1906 Navy assists in relief operations during San Francisco earthquake and fire. 1942 USS Hornet CV-8) launches 16 of Lt. Col. James Doolittles B-25 Army Air Force bombers in the first attack on mainland Japan in World War II. 1988 Navy destroys two Iranian surveillance platforms, sinks one frigate and one patrol ship, and severely damages a second frigate in retaliation for attack on guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58). Ever since debuting Dinner with the Smileys in January, Ive been providing obscure, teasing hints about upcoming guests for followers on Facebook. Some of the more popular clues have been: One of our upcoming guests wears gold. An April guest shared a stage with C3PO (and, no, its not R2D2). In June we will have dinner with a 37-foot-tall monster and his friends. Soon we will eat with savages and wild animals. One of our upcoming guests is not human. One of our upcoming guests designed logos for Comedy Central and Nickelodeon. Readers get excited when they figure out the answers to these clues. Readers also get excited when they know what those answers mean: The Smileys are going to have dinner with _________. But the truth is, some of the most anticipated dinners dont work well in a riddle. Thats because some of the most antici pated dinners are the ones that will be shared with someone who isnt a celeb rity: Namely, the boys teachers. In January, for instance, I could have used this hint, One of our upcoming guests can convince Lindell to put on his snow boots by himself. But it wouldnt have been super exciting yet the night Lindells preschool teacher came to din ner, youd have thought we were hosting the president. He was positively out of his mind with anticipation. Our older boys, who dont jump up and down on the couch, as Lindell did, or slap their cheeks because their so excit ed, are nonetheless visibly happy about their own teachers turn at Dinner with the Smileys. And when you think about it, why shouldnt they be? Once kids are school-age, they spend a greater percentage of their week with their teacher than they do at home. I remember knowing every sweater my second-grade teacher owned. I knew the smell of her perfume. And sitting in her classroom was like a second home. I was lucky, however, because my secondgrade teacher, Mrs. Katabian, was also my moms friend. We went to the beach together and my brothers were friends with her sons. Many years later, Mrs. Katabian came to my wedding and my first book signing. Today, this sort of relationship seems unacceptable, and even discouraged, between a teacher and a students family. Indeed, the relationship stops just short of a 10-minute parent-teacher conference twice a year and perhaps phone messages delivered through the school secre tary. The culture surrounding families and teachers has changed so much, when friends heard that I was inviting the boys teachers, nearly all of them said, You can do that? I wasnt sure, but as it turned out, the dinners we have with teachers are extraordinarily dynamic and enrich ing. Here is someone who knows a whole other side to my child that I never see. Here is someone who has special insight into his development. And here is someone who probably shares many of my frustrations like this boys constant throat-clearing and that boys pencil-tapping habit. In many ways, the teacher and I are a team. We are both invested in the best interest of my child. How could I not invite such an influential person in my sons life to dinner? The teachers have much to gain from their dinner, as well. They get a better sense of their students home life and influences from siblings and parents. They can finally meet the dog their stu dent writes about all the time. They can place the child in the context of his world. Perhaps my viewpoint will cause some educators to bang their head against a wall. Now everyone is going to invite us to dinner, theyll say. Or, to be more precise, theyll think, Uh-oh, if I get a Smiley boy next year, it looks like Ill have to do dinner. The teacher-student-family relation ship isnt for everyone. Not every teacher wants, or has the time, to visit with families. But it seems to me that developing a relationship beyond the twice yearly, 10-minute conferences could be benefi cial on both sides. My boys will never forget having their teachers over for dinner. The experience has been so fulfilling, a reader and friend decided to invite her sons kindergar ten teacher to dinner this week. She will post about her experience at http://www. Facebook.com/DinnerWithTheSmileys. This month, reach out to someone influential in your childs life a teacher, a coach, a babysitter and invite them to dinner. Then tell us about it on the Dinner with the Smileys page.Hey, MoneyChic! Im getting killed at the gas station these days. How can I can reduce the amount of money I pour into my fuel tank? MoneyChic says: It doesnt look as though gas prices will be going down anytime soon.With many people taking to the road for vacations in the next couple of months, here are some tips to help your bucks go further. The first thing that savingsaccounts.com suggests is to change the way you drive. By planning your errands and other appointments into one trip, you can drive less and save money. Also avoid roads with lots of traffic lights, as well as drive the speed limit. It also helps to use cruise control as much as possible because the less you use the gas and brake pedals, the better. One thing that is simple to do is research on which local gas stations are selling the lowestpriced gas. Another idea is to find alter native transportation. If you are going somewhere close ride your bike rather then driving your car. Another idea is to work from home as much as possible. Many employers are allowing their employees to telecommute these days, so find out if your job allows you to do this. Finally, if you are driving further than your spouseand your car is less efficient you should consider switching vehicles. Thats my two cents worth.Dinner with teachers is enlightening

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VP-30 aircrewmen graduate, many promotedOn March 29, VP-30 Executive Officer Cmdr. Tony Parton recognized graduates of the P-3C CAT I (ini tial training syllabus) Acoustic and Non-Acoustic Operator Class 1201, Flight Engineer Class 1107, and In-flight Technician Class 1106. All graduating Sailors were advanced at the cer emony to their listed rank by Parton. These naval aircrewmen will now report to their assigned operational squadrons to begin their initial sea tours. Class 1201 CAT I Acoustic Operator AWO2 Brook Wade AWO3 Cory Johnson AWO3 Derek Neukam AWO3 Jake Appel AWO3 John Dohoney AWO3 Jordan Szymanowski AWO3 Marlonjamie Aquino AWO3 Soloman Morse Class 1201 CAT I Non-acoustic Operator AWO2(NAC/AW) Timothy Moradi AWO2 Samuel Bingham AWO3 Conner Pendergrass AWO3 Forrest Herring AWO3 Elise Laub AWO3 Jeffrey Brown AWO3 Tiara Glover Class 1107 CAT I Flight Engineer AWF2(AW) Daniel Cornejo AWF2(AW) Terry Lamb AWF3 Joshua Garrou AWF3 Anita Goldbaum AWF3 Kori Henschen AWF3 Adam Platt AWF3 Shantel Reyes AWF3 Joshua Steffey Class 1106 CAT I In-flight Technician AWV3 Alexander Acree AWV3 Daniel Vanhooser AWV3 Dominic Marr AWV3 Sean Cureton AWV3 Stephen Lounsburry AWV3 Tremayne Holland JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012 3

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An F/A-18D Hornet assigned to VFA106 crashed in Virginia Beach, Va. April 6. Initial reports indicate that at approximately 12:05 p.m., the jet crashed just after takeoff at a location just off of the base. Both aircrew safely ejected from the aircraft. The Navy is coordinating with local authorities. Adm. John C. Harvey, Jr., commander, U.S. Fleet Forces released the fol lowing statement: My thoughts and prayers are with our citizens and families who have been impacted by the tragic crash today in Virginia Beach by an aircraft from NAS Oceana. I deeply regret that some in our community have lost their homes, and I, like many, pray for the well-being of all. I must also offer my deepest grati tude to the citizens of Virginia Beach and the Mayfair Mews Apartments, as well as Virginia Beachs first respond ers, for their immediate and heroic response to take care of our aircrew after they ejected, and all responders at the scene of the mishap. I have spoken with Mayor Sessoms, and all the resources of the Navy in Hampton Roads are being made available to the City of Virginia Beach as we all deal with the impacts and recovery from this terrible mishap. We will continue to work directly with the City of Virginia Beach and continue to provide all possible assistance. We will conduct a complete investigation into the cause of this mishap and share all information we have as soon as we are able to do so, said Harvey. VFA-106 is based at Naval Air Station Oceana, and serves as the East Coast Fleet Replacement Squadron. Their mission is to train Navy and Marine Corps F/A-18 replacement pilots and weapon systems officers to support fleet commitments. USFF releases statement on F/A-18 crash in Virginia Beach Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert joined U.S. Congressman Ander Crenshaw at Naval Station Mayport April 3 to view current military construction projects and meet with local and state representatives. Greenert and Crenshaw also attended a lunch meeting with the Jacksonville Area Ship Repair Association to discuss defense issues and the future of the Navy. Mayport is a hub and a strategic area for the Navy. Its a southern command that is very important to us. Look how fast you can get out to sea from here, said Greenert. Jacksonville is the center of excellence for maritime patrol. Crenshaw explained that there are plans in the works to increase naval fortitude in and around the city of Jacksonville. I think its important to recognize the Navy just built a hangar for the P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft at NAS Jacksonville. Its the largest hangar the Navy has ever constructed, said Crenshaw. That hangar is where all the P-8As on the East Coast are going to be headquartered. Its a sophisticated air craft. So clearly, I think Northeast Florida is quickly becoming a cen ter of excellence, not only for naval aircraft, but for the Navy in general. Greenert spoke of the Navys expansion plans in areas other than Jacksonville. Greenert also expressed the importance of certain oversea locations and the benefits that they would offer to our global defense capabilities. We want to move four destroyers (DDG) to Rota, Spain. That will give us is four DDGs in the Mediterranean for ballistic-missile defense, said Greenert. Rota, Sigonella (Italy), Naples (Italy), Souda Bay (Greece), the Suez Canal (Egypt), Djibouti and Bahrain all have big parts in the Navys future. Greenert expressed his thanks to the people of Jacksonville. I want to thank Jacksonville for taking care of our Sailors and families. This is a great place to be stationed, said Greenert.CNO visits Naval Station Mayport 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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The United States Navy Memorial hosted the offi cial kick-off of the Year of the Chief and the 119th birthday celebration of the chief petty officer during a ceremony April 2. For the first time in history, the Navy Memorial is casting a spotlight on the history, heritage and contributions of chief petty officers. The guest speaker for the event was Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert. Remarks were also given by Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON)(SS/SW) Rick West and former MCPON James Herdt. Former MCPON Duane Bushey was also in attendance. The chief is the center of gravity, said Greenert. There is not a seaman, petty officer or officer out there who can not turn and say, I had a chief petty officer take care of me and get me where I am today. The ceremony was attend ed by chiefs from across the nation who came not only to be a part of the official kick-off, but also to see the Memorial transformed into a Chiefs Mess, resplendent with history and memorabilia spanning 119 years. We are becoming a part of history today, said West. I see retired veterans in our midst and I am proud to carry on down a path theyve laid for us so long ago. I couldnt be more pleased to be spending this day with representatives from so many commands. To stand in front of a sea of fouled anchors as your MCPON, and know that we are as much making history as we are a part of it . I am truly humbled. After the ceremony, guests were invited into the Memorial for the cake cutting.Visitors were then encouraged to tour the Memorial, which has been decorated to reflect historic uniforms, anchors and other iconic symbols from the colorful heritage of CPOs. Happy birthday chief petty officers, youve earned it, said Greenert. Absorb the moment, have a great year, remember your legacy and what got you here. West added his expectations and appreciation for chiefs serving today. You are bold and accountable, executing the Navys mission around the globe, and developing our next generation of Sailors, West said. Thank you, shipmates including those who have gone before us and those who are no longer with us you have served your country well and will continue to do so as long as we sail the seven seas. Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville (FACSFACJAX) celebrated its 35th anniversary April 1. Upon establishment of FACSFACJAX, the mission assumed was initial ly assigned to Commander, Fleet Air Jacksonville (COMFAIRJAX) until June 30, 1973. On July 1, 1973, upon disestablish ment of COMFAIRJAX, four members of COMFAIRJAX staff were transferred to NAS Jacksonville for administrative support and co-located with the Navy Ground Control Intercept Site (NGCI) to continue the mission as the Jacksonville Operating Area Coordination Center (JOACC). This was the first small step toward combining the individual functions associated with scheduling and control of the Jacksonville fleet operating areas. Since 1973, the mission performed by JOACC steadily increased in scope and complexity. In July 1974, the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) veri fied the operational requirement for the establishment of a Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility at NAS Jacksonville and the JOACC and NGCI site were scheduled for expan sion into an interim FACSFAC. To fulfill this ever-increasing need for coordi nating military and civilian use of the Jacksonville fleet areas, the CNO directed in August 1976 that FACSFACJAX be established as a separate command effective April 1, 1977. Today FACSFACJAX is responsible for the scheduling and control of offshore fleet operating areas, military special use airspace, land target and electron ic warfare missions. FACSFACJAX is also the military coordinator with the Federal Aviation Agency and other cognizant agencies for the liaison required by fleet users for operations in the FACSFACJAX area of responsibility to assure safe and optimum use. FACSFACJAX has been designated by the Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces to be the southeast area coordina tor and scheduler for Department of Defense/Navy offshore air and sur face areas, and overland for special use airspaceand military training routes. Operationally, FACSFACJAX has three components, Sealord, which provides air traffic control services, Bristol, which provides surface unit tracking and air intercept control services, and Schedules, which provides scheduling services for special use airspace or tar gets in the Pinecastle Range Complex. FACSFACJAX has responsibility for the operating areasand warning areas from Charleston,S.C. to Daytona Beach,Fla. and is a subordinate command of Commander, Naval Air Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jax celebrates 35th anniversary Year of the Chief kicks off JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012 More than 400 service members, retirees, civilians and family members turned out for the seventh annual Capt. Chuck Cornett 10K Run and 5K Walk April 7 at NAS Jacksonville. In addition to the 10-kilometer competitive run and five-kilometer walk, there was a run ners shoe and apparel fair in the Navy Exchange parking lot. Once the runners received their packages with their numbers and tim ing chips, they stretched and mingled with friends and family as Navy Band Southeast played patriotic music near the starting line. After observing morning colors, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders welcomed the runners and then joined them to await the starting gun. What a beautiful day for a run this morning. I want to welcome you to the Capt. Chuck Cornett Run, former ly known as the Navy Run. We have a record turnout today and I want to wish you the best of luck and thank you all for being here today, said Sanders. With a shotgun start, the runners headed down Child Street with a base security vehicle leading the way. This is such a wonderful event and great for our community to come together and promote physical fitness, said NAS Jax Athletic Director Tanya Henigman, who coordinated the run. Of course, we couldnt pull this off without the help of our volunteers and sponsors. Its a team effort to organize this event. We have about 30 volunteers out here helping out to ensure every thing runs smoothly. Im actually going to start working on next years run this week when I do our after action report because that helps us improve the event each year. The first runner to cross the 5K finish line was Calvin Kramps with a time of 28:36, followed by Justin Cowell coming in at 28:42 and Trevor Morris at 29:35. The overall winner and first man to cross the 10K finish line was Lt. j.g. Kyle Hooker of VP-30 at 36:04, followed by Aaron Long with a time of 37:28 and Theo Lundy at 38:41. The first woman to cross the 10K line was Lisa Adams with a time of 42:10. Susan Miller placed second in the women overall with a time of 45:30 and Colleen Bierbach came in third with a time of 47:10. Other winners in their age categories were: Master Men and Women (Overall) Joe Rivera, 38:56 Ann Krause, 49:16 Men and Women 3-10 Max Licht, 1:00 Grace Adams, 1:04 Men and Women 11-14 Gabriel Moran, 39:03 Lindsey Averitt, 1:05 Men and Women 15-19 Gary Diaz, 46:11 Rachel Dimonda, 54:18 Men and Women 20-24 Andrew Smith, 38:57 Angela Grove, 48:05 Men and Women 25-29 Alexei Pukrischkin, 38:46 Deniz Bayakan, 51:23 Men and Women 30-34 Justin Weakland, 46:50 Lindsey McCulley, 48:08 Men and Women 35-39 Rodriquez Williams, 42:27 Leslie Kindling, 47:59 Men and Women 40-44 Mark Edelson, 40:57 Andrea Petrovanie, 51:18 Men and Women 45-49 Juan Echegaray, 45:10 Mayumi Pierce, 51:32 Men and Women 50-54 George Thompson, 44:25 Joanne Harris, 52:02 Men and Women 55-59 Paul Geiger, 43:35 Kim Crist, 52:28 Men and Women 60-64 Gene Bridges, 47:37 Barbara Scott, 1:20 Men and Women 65-69 Frank Frazier, 48:55 Gail Rucker, 1:19 Men 70-74 Matt Ross, 1:00 Men 75 & Up Pat Gallagher, 1:26 This is a great run the course is well marked and the event is well organized. I really enjoyed participating in todays run, said Lt. Kyle Hooker of VP-30 and member of the All-Navy Triathlon member. Originally called the Navy Run, the event was renamed after the 2004 death of Cornett, a former NAS Jax executive officer and avid runner. Cornett par ticipated in 96 marathons, including the Boston and Marine Corps marathons. A co-founder of the Florida Striders run ning club in 1978, he retired from the U.S. Navy as a captain in 1980 after 30 years of service. I hope everyone will come out to participate in this run again next year. It just keeps getting bigger and better every year and we continue to make upgrades to ensure everyone enjoys this event, said Henigman. Annual Navy Run attracts hundreds of athletes CAPT. CHU CK CORNETT 10 K RUN AND 5 K WALK

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012 7 PHOTOS BY KAYLEE LAROCQUE, CLA RK PIE R CE AND SHANNON LEONA RD

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and produced fantastic outcomes to support Commander Combined Task Force (CTF) 53 and its customers. I am especially proud of our maintain ers and aircrews for making this plan happen. Operating out of Naval Support Activity Bahrain, Nomad 313 fulfilled the short-notice, high-priority cargo and people requirements of CTF-53. The Nomads also provided lifts in support of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) and USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) carrier strike groups. The lone VR-62 Hercules also supported Operations Eager Lion, Eastern Maverick, New Dawn, Vigilant Mariner and Enduring Freedom. During the detachment, Nomads flew into 26 unique airfields in and around NAVCENT, while maintain ing a 97 percent mission completion rate. The Nomads were an integral part of keeping the essential supply lines operating to numerous Navy and Marine Corps outposts in the NAVCENT area of responsibility. Following a three-month break in attached theater operations at NAS Jacksonville, the Nomads will detach to Atsugi, Japan in July. They will support Pacific Command with short-notice, high-priority air logis tics throughout the Pacific theater. VR-62 is a Navy Reserve squadron that operates four of the Navys 19 C-130T Hercules aircraft from its home base at NAS Jacksonville, NAVCENT is responsible for an area of approximately 2.5 million square miles, including the Arabian Gulf, Red Sea, Gulf of Oman, parts of the Indian Ocean and 20 countries. The U.S. 5th Fleets mission is to conduct mari time security operations, defeat vio lent extremism and strengthen part ner nations maritime capabilities in order to promote security and stability in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility.VR-62: Nomad 313 up to taskthere -but we wanted to leave and go to Palestine (now Israel). A year later, the family took what they could and moved to Romania in hopes of going to Israel. Four years later in 1949, they were given permis sion to immigrate to the new State of Israel. Bendit soon joined the Israeli navy at the age of 17 for a 30-month tour. By then, his mother had remar ried and moved to Montreal, Canada where Bendits great uncle had relo cated before the war. After completing his military service, Bendit moved to Canada finding a job in a machine shop. I wanted to better myself so I went to Long Island, N.Y. and opened my own precision metal fabrication business. In 1969, I met my wife, Hanna, also an immigrant from Israel and we had three daughters, said Bendit. After closing his business in 1980, the family moved to Nashville and then to Jacksonville where Bendit started an antique repair and restoration business. Today, Bendit spends time with his family, including five grandchildren, and repairing furniture on the side. He also talks about his past to those who are interested in listening. I think its important to tell my families story because I realize how fast future generations forget what hap pened in World War II. Soon there wont be anyone left to talk about what hap pened and people need to know, he stated. Unfortunately, the only items I have from that time are a couple of photos of my parents when they were married that my great uncle saved and a news paper picture of when my father, his cousin and a friend tried to ride their bicycles from the Ukraine to Palestine in 1932. There werent allowed to con tinue from Turkey, but a Romanian newspaper ran a photo and my uncle in Canada gave it to me. Its all I have left from the father I never had the chance to know.HOLOCAUST: Survivor to speak The Players will continue its policy of providing free or affordable access to the tournament for men and women of the Armed Services. There are two military ticket policies: military personnel along with their dependents receive complimentary admission to the tournament all day, every day. Free tickets are available online via a link to TicketMaster from The Players Web site (PGATOUR.COM/ THEPLAYERS); these are print-at-home tickets and military personnel and their dependents will be asked to present the paper ticket amd valid military ID at the gate for free admission. The Players is proud to partner with Veterans Advantage to distribute dis counted tickets to military veterans and their families. Available to those carry ing the Veterans Advantage VetRewards Card, discounted tickets can be pur chased online through a special link, and then redeemed at the admissions gate with proof of a valid Veterans Advantage VetRewards Card. Visit PGATOUR.COM/THEPLAYERS (click on 2012 Tickets) for more information. On site parking is free (for all fans) Monday-Wednesday, but parking pass es must be purchased in advance for Thursday through Sunday. Once again in 2012, The Players will offer hospitality to active, Reserve and retired military and dependents at the Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost, located on the hill between No. 16 and No. 18 fairways. The Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost, provides complimentary food, beverages and interactive activities and is open Wednesday-Sunday. Military ID is required for admit tance. USO Centers do not have tickets or sell parking passes, which are available online. 2012 Players honors military with free tickets and events 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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NAS Jax Sailors and civilians attended a training session to promote awareness about sexual assault prevention April 3 at the NAS Jax Officers Club. The event was kicked off by NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander. Thank you all for being here today. This program was previously called Sexual Assault Victim Intervention and has been renamed Sexual Assault Prevention and Response. This change was made to focus your thinking on preventing sexual assault, said Undersander. Last year, the NAS Jax commanding officer was at a conference and heard our guest speaker conducting a presentation. He enlisted our Fleet and Family Support Center staff to contact the organization so we could provide you this informational presentation with the hopes that if we educate people on sexual assault issues, this issue will be eliminated in our society, he contin ued. Undersander then introduced guest speaker Dr. Gail Stern, co-owner and director of consulting, education and training for Catharsis Productions based in Chicago. Im here today to talk about how each of us can play a role in ending sexual violence and supporting victims of rape. My presentation discusses about how we challenge victim blaming atti tudes where so often we talk about creating culture change and making it a culture that supports victims of rape, but no one ever breaks down the nittygritty on how you do that, said Stern. And, the fact is that the only way we are going to reduce sexual violence is if we all take an active role in challenging the beliefs that provide cover for people who perpetrate, continued Stern. I break down where victim blam ing comes from, what the arguments are, and how we respond to those arguments. This gets people to indirectly and directly challenge their own beliefs and learn how to challenge the beliefs of others. Stern used humor to get her message across, challenging the audience with topics and questions about stuff we dont want to talk about such as how women and men are perceived if they are raped and how society often blames the victim. She also had the audience volunteer the ways men and women protect themselves from being raped. Many of the men in the audience were surprised to learn of some of the precautions women take on a daily basis. Most men dont think about all this, but for women, the fear of being raped is part of every day reality, said Stern. She also told the audience that 85 percent of people who are raped are attacked by someone they know and trust. Rapists make choices to hurt people and they need to be held responsible for the crime. In our society, the way we treat rape victims often makes them afraid to disclose the crime. Rape is not wrong because its a crime, its a crime because its wrong, Stern stressed. As Stern concluded her presentation many in the crowd were a bit stunned of what they had just learned. It was one of the most eye-opening presentations Ive ever attended. I never really realized the way men and women think about these issues. Our society really does think bad of people in a lot of different ways. It really made me think about how we treat one another as a whole, said YN1(SS) James Forbus of NAS Jax. Sailors learn how to beat the blame game 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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The VP-10 Red Lancers recently announced their Senior, Junior and Blue Jacket Sailors of the First Quarter. Sailor of the Quarter. A native of Barlow, Ohio, Duvall has been in the Navy for 16 years and at VP-10 since April 2011. He is the safety department Leading Petty Officer (LPO) who manages the training, standardization and evaluation of 144 aviators and aircrew. I am honored to be chosen as Senior Sailor of the Quarter among all the highly professional first class petty officers here at VP-10, Duvall said. Safety/NATOPS Department Leading Chief Petty Officer (LCPO) AWFC Jesse Olmstead said I am proud of Duvalls accomplishments, he was consistently sought by junior officers in the upgrading process to Patrol Plane Pilot and Patrol Plane Commander for his aircraft knowledge and experience. Duvalls off time is spent volunteering as assistant scout leader and Eagle Scout advisor for Pack/Troop 425 in Middleburg, Fla. Junior Sailor of the Quarter. A native of Colorado Springs, Colo., Harrison has eight years in the Navy and has been at VP-10 since February 2010, working Sailors in the information systems technician (IT) and cryptologic technician networks (CTN) ratings now have the opportunity to apply for enrollment in a cyber masters degree program at Naval Postgraduate School, according to NAVADMIN 117/12, released April 5. IT and CTN Sailors selected for the 12-month, Navy funded program will be assigned as full time students at NPS starting in September 2012. Upon completion, Sailors will receive a Master of Science degree in Cyber Systems and Operations: Security and Technology. Cyber security is an area of critical importance to our Navy and our nation, said Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk. Cyber expertise is essential in assuring the Navys warfighting superiority across the full spectrum of operations. With this program, we are preparing our Sailors to bring these ever-important capabilities to the Fleet. The Navy will select up to five active duty and full-time support Sailors to enroll in the pro gram. Applicants must be an E-6 or above, possess a bachelor of science degree in a relevant technical field, hold or be eligible for a TS/SCI security clear ance, and be eligible for CONUS/shore assignment between April and December 2012. NAVADMIN 117/12 outlines full eligibility criteria. Additionally, Sailors selected for the program will incur a five-year active service obligation upon enrollment. After completion of their degree, Sailors will be assigned based on the needs of the Navy, with priority given to the National Security Agency, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/10th Fleet, Navy Information Operations Command, and Navy Cyber Defense Operations Command. Sailors interested in applying for this degree pro gram should forward a written request via their commanding officer by May 15. Additionally, Sailors must be conditionally accepted by NPS in order to be eli gible. Detailed application instructions are contained in the NAVADMIN. Naval Postgraduate School education opportuni ties support the personal and professional growth of Sailors making them invaluable assets to the Navy. Its an important part of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative that consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Department of the Navy. New graduate school opportunity for cyber SailorsVP-10 announces Sailors of the Quarter JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012 11

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April is a celebration of the mili tary child and the U.S. Department of Agricultures new nutritional guide line, Choose My Plate, includes sup port for parents as the most important influence on their children. Although peers and media are also factors, par ents can start their kids eating a vari ety of healthy, nutrient-rich foods when theyre young and set up life-long healthy eating habits. Choose My Plate offers 10 tips for parents. Step one: Lead by example. Eat vegetables, fruit and whole grains. Instead of grabbing a junky snack food, grab something healthy. Kids brought up this way are likely to have less of a sweet tooth when they grow up. Step two: Grocery shop together. This is your time to teach kids about food and nutrition. Discuss where vegetables, fruits, grains, dairy and protein foods come from. Give them healthy options from which to choose. Step three: Get creative in the kitch en. Cut food into fun shapes with cookie cutters. Name a food for the child who helps make it serve Angelas Salad or Antonios Sweet Potatoes. Encourage kids to invent new snacks. This can be anything from homemade pizza, cookie cutter-shaped sandwich es, homemade trail mix (dry wholegrain, low-sugar cereal and dried fruit), to ants on a log (celery, peanut butter and raisins). Step four: Offer the same foods to everyone instead of being a shortorder cook by making different dishes to please children. Its easier to plan family meals when everyone eats the same food. Step five: Reward with attention, not food. Show love with hugs and kisses. Comfort with hugs and talks. Choose not to offer sweets as rewards. Rewarding with sweets lets kids think sweets are better than other foods. When meals arent eaten, kids dont need junk food as a replacement. Step six: Focus on each other at the table. Talk about fun and happy things at meal time. Turn off the television. Take phone calls later. Make eating a stress-free time. Step seven: Listen to your child. When he or she is hungry, offer a small healthy snack, even if its not a sched uled time to eat. Ask, Which would you like for dinner: broccoli or cauliflower? instead of Do you want broccoli for dinner? Step eight: Allow no more than two hours a day of screen timeon tele vision, computers, game systems and smart phones. Get up and move during commercials or take breaks to get some physical activity. Step nine: Involve kids in the plan ning of physical activity for the whole family. Walk, run and play with the kids instead of sitting on the sidelines. Set an example by being physically active and using safety gear like bike helmets. Step ten: Be a good food role model. Try new foods yourself. Offer one new food at a time. Serve something the kids like along with the new food. Offer new foods at the beginning of a meal, when everyone is hungry. Try not to lecture and dont force kids to eat. Finally, heres a fun and healthy rec ipe for Arctic Oranges thats great for play dates. The ingredients are simple: four oranges, four cups orange juice and four cherries. Cut the tops off the oranges in a zigzag pattern. Hollow out the insides, remove the seeds and combine in a blender with the juice. Set the rinds in a muffin tin and fill with the mixture. Drop a cherry inside each orange. Freeze for two to three hours. Soften the treats for five minutes and serve. For more good food ideas, go online to www.choosemyplate.gov or call the Naval Hospital Jacksonville Wellness Center at 542-5292. Call 778-9772 for more information MONTH OF THE MILITARY CHILD CARNIVAL April 21 11 a.m. 2 p.m. FREE ADMISSION! FREE games, activities and prizes! Alleghany Softball Field Parents as healthy food role models 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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NAS Jax hosts MPRF Reunion/ SymposiumThe fourth Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) Reunion and Symposium took place March 2630 at NAS Jacksonville, hosted by Patrol Squadron (VP) 30 and Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11. More than 500 active duty, reserve and retired maritime patrol personnel from around the world gathered to share ideas and experiences, as well as to catch up with former squadron mates. All Navy MPRF commands were repre sented, along with Maritime Patrol Forces from Canada, the United Kingdom and Australia. Admiral John Harvey Jr., com mander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command was the symposium guest speaker. This years reunion focused on recognizing the commu nitys historical contributions while looking forward to its bright future. The event was unique in that it also marked the much anticipated roll-out of the first operational P-8A Poseidon aircraft which is set to replace the venerable P-3C Orion. VP-30 Commanding Officer and master of ceremo nies for the Fleet Introduction, Capt. Mark Stevens, captured the importance of this his toric event, In the same year that our Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force is cel ebrating 50 years of service for the P-3 Orion were also cel ebrating the Fleet Introduction of P-8 Poseidon. The reunion kicked off with the Commanders Conference that was followed by a variety of briefs, discussions, round tables and panels geared towards exchanging com munity experiences, cur rent operations and ideas. Wednesdays P-8A roll-out and the ribbon-cutting for the P-8A Integrated Training Center were highlights of the week. These events drew national media attention and the guest list included Under Secretary of the Navy Robert Work, Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson, Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and Boeing President and CEO of Defense, Space and Security Dennis Muilenburg. Throughout the week, out side of the briefs and meetings, participants were able to enjoy gatherings that included the Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) Heritage Dinner, MPA Golf Tournament and the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) Luncheon. A popular event for many was the Flight Suit Social that capped the week of festivities at the NAS Jacksonville Officers Club. Old squadron mates had the opportunity to reflect on their MPA heritage, mingle with old friends and swap sea stories in a relaxed atmosphere. Another highlight of the week was the MPA Technology Expo in the VP-30 Hangar, where visitors explored exhibits host ed by Boeing, ASEC, WYLE, MOAA, Carley, LockheedMartin, and the local MTOC 7 team. Also on display was a full-scale BAMS Demonstration model, a P-8A flight simulator and the Boeing P-8A trailer that included a fully functional tac tical crew simulator. In their remarks on the sym posiums final day, both Adm. Harvey and Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Rear Adm. Michael Hewitt spoke to the communitys his tory and future. They praised the personnel who fly and fight these aircraft, and remarked about the responsibilities placed on the shoulders of these Sailors to carry MPRF heritage into the future. Fittingly, the MOAA recog nized one such leader, VP-30 Executive Officer Cmdr. Tony Parton, with the 2012 MPRF Lifetime Leadership Award for his career-long advancement of the community and all of those with whom hes worked during his distinguished career. Additional recognition for excellence was given to the Combat Aircrews (CAC) who participated in the 2012 Antisubmarine Warfare (ASW) Fleet Challenge. The Fleet Challenge is an opportunity for the top CACs from each squadron to demonstrate their ASW prow ess. Hewitt announced this years champion, CAC 1 of VP-4 from MCBH Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. Participants at the 2012 MPRF Reunion and Symposium returned to their commands to share with the rest of the community the information they gathered and to pass on the messages from the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Community leadership. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012 13

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Repairing: As long as the flag is serviceable, it is acceptable to repair minor damages. While it is per mitted to do repairs yourself, taking your flag to a seamstress may be a safer option. Its important that the repairs are not noticeable, and that the dimen sions of the flag arent altered. Flags with large tears or excessive fraying should be retired. To avoid damage to your flag, bring it inside in bad weather, and make sure your flagpole or staff is in good condition. Rust can corrode your flag. If you are putting a flag into storage, make sure it is dry and the bag or container locks out moisture. Mold and mildew can grow on damp fabric. Washing: If your American flag is beginning to look dirty or dingy, washing it may save it from an early retirement. The Flag Code does not prohibit wash ing flags. In fact washing your flag on a regular basis can prolong its life. Most outdoor flags can be handwashed with a mild laundry detergent. If youre not sure if your flag can be washed, or of the proper washing procedure, take it to the dry cleaners. Many offer free flag-cleaning services, especially in the month of July. Despite the common myth, flags that touch the ground do not need to be destroyed. If your flag does touch the ground, and it gets dirty, simply wash it. Allowing a flag to touch the ground is disrespectful to the flag, but of course accidents do happen. Just try to prevent it from happening again. As long as the flag is serviceable, it is acceptable to repair minor damages. While it is permitted to do repairs yourself, taking your flag to a seamstress may be a safer option. Its important that the repairs are not noticeable, and that the dimensions of the flag arent altered. Flags with large tears or excessive fraying should be retired. To avoid damage to your flag, bring it inside in bad weather, and make sure your flagpole or staff is in good condition. Rust can corrode your flag. If you are putting a flag into storage, make sure it is dry and the bag or container locks out moisture. Mold and mildew can grow on damp fabric. Disposal: According to the Flag Code, any American flag that is worn, damaged or tattered beyond repair should be retired in a respectful and dignified manner. The preferred method is burning. This may shock some, since it is a well-known fact that burning the flag is illegal. This, however, is an exception to the rule. You can burn the flag yourself, mak ing sure it is done in a discreet and professional manner, or many organizations like the American Legion, the Boy Scouts Council and the Girl Scouts Council will perform a flag retirement ceremony and burn your flag for you. In this case, burning signifies purification and rebirth. Although burning is the preferred method, it is also acceptable to seal your old flag in a box or bag and bury it. The most important factor is showing respect to the flag during its disposal. Thursday May 3, 2012 Meet at the Marina at 8:30 a.m. Lunch at 11 :30 a.m. R.S.V. P by April 19 to 5422798 or email: angela.glass@navy.mil MWR Marina to provide boats, life vests, food and drinks after clean up and a prize for The Most Unusual Piece of Trash Visit your MWR for fishing tackle, free range bait, snacks, cold beverages, rental boats, camping supplies and much more. Contact the Marina at 542 -3260, end of Ranger Rd, Bldg. 1072 NAS JAX Proper repair, disposal of the American flag 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Monday Pizza Madness $5 for a 14 one-topping 2:30 9 p.m., dine-in or carry out Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included April Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 4 10 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of one-lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor pool hours Mon. Fri. 5:30 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 8 p.m. Weekend hours 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information contact Melissa Luehrs at 542-3518/4238. Family Fitness Bootcamp with Ashley Mon. & Wed. at 9:30 a.m. Family Fitness Center above the Youth Center Gym Call (904) 778-9772 Outdoor Pool Open Weekends Begins May 5 & 6, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free for military and DoD civilians, $3 for guests Learn to swim session one begins June 18 $40 military, $45 DoDI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Disney World Orlando 4day hopper Armed Forces Ticket $135.50 $162 Disney World Orlando: Resident 3-day $98.25, 3-day hopper $125.25, 4-day $127.75, 4-day hopper $154.50 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Funk Fest May 11 & 12 at Metropolitan Park $57 Now booking all-inclusive Sandals Resorts vacations The Gaylord Palms Resort offers preferred rate for ITT customers. The resort is just one mile from Walt Disney World. ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Blue Man Group in Orlando $59, includes City Walk venue Orlando Magic all home games $22.50 $383 Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 St. Augustine Scenic Cruise Day Trip May 5, 9:30 a.m. 5 p.m. $20 per person Stone Mountain, Ga. $21.25 Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Superclubs Resorts vacationsThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Free Mall & Movie Trip Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater April 13 at 6 p.m. April 14 at 7 p.m. $20 Dave & Busters April 19 at 6 p.m. Free $10 game card, 20% off food & beverage and unlimited simulator play.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees April 24 for active duty April 12 & 26 for retirees & DoD personnel Ladies Golf Clinics Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. $10 per person Pre-registration required, sign-up in the pro shop Senior Military Invitational April 30 & May 1 9 a.m. shotgun start $65 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty 30th Bass Tournament April 14 at first light $60 per two-person team Sign-up at the marina Shoreline Clean-up May 4 at 8:30 a.m. Free lunch! Call 542-2709 or e-mail angela.glass@ navy.mil to sign-up Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding. ASE-certified mechanic onsite.Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Month of the Military Child Carnival April 21, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Fields Free games, food and prizes! 2012 Adventure Summer Registration: Current School-Age Care participants Now Single & Dual Active Duty Now through April 13 Other Active Duty April 16 20 DoD Civilians April 23 27 Registration Packets available for pick up at the Youth Center.Flying Club Call 777-8549 /6035 Ground School April 16 May 23 June 4 July 16 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012 15

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Battle of MidwayCommemorative Dinner June 9, 2012WorlD Golf Village Renaissance ResortDinner 6:00 p.m. Keynote: Adm. Jonathan Greenert, CNOActive Duty E6 and below $25E7 to O3 $35 O4 to O5 $45O6 & above, civilians & retirees $60For more information, contact Bob Price At (904) 246-9982, e-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net or Bill Dudley at (904) 806-4712, E-mail: anuday00@aol.com. Tickets may also be purchased at www. midwaydinner.orgUniform for O4 and above is dinner dress white jacket. For O3 and below, dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional. Civilian is black tie or business attirewww.midwaydinner.org Sponsored by 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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in the Red Lancers Maintenance Department. I feel that I am representing VP-10 and showing others that through hard work you will get recognized, Harrison said. Maintenance Administration I think that Harrison is very deserving of this award. He is an outstanding worker, hard char ger and great at his job. selected as VP-10 Blue Jacket of the Quarter. A native of Butler, Indiana, Link has been in the Navy for four years and at VP-10 since May 2009, where he works in the Red Lancers maintenance department. Its nice to be recognized for my hard work and achievements. I feel really good about it and thank my shipmates for their support, Link said. Work Center 220 LPO AE1 Amanda Overstreet said, He is strides above any other petty officer in the work center, con stantly asking what else he can do to be better. I wish I had more motivated sailors like him; he is truly a rarity. Link is currently involved with volunteer work at Clay Countys Special Olympics taking place at Ridgeview High School. The primary mission of VP-10 is maritime patrol and antisubmarine warfare (ASW). The squadrons crews are trained to search, localize, track and ulti mately attack hostile diesel or nuclear powered submarines. The Red Lancers numerous collateral missions include: antisurface warfare (ASUW), pre cision strike targeting, surface search and interdiction, strike group support, mine warfare, high resolution intelligence photography, search and rescue, counter-narcotics, and logistics support. VP-10: SOQs named For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil. Junior Red Cross volunteers must apply by May 1 The American Red Cross at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is currently recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volunteers. This offers an excellent opportunity for students interested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine professionals physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and technicians as well as contribute to creating a positive expe rience for NH Jacksonville patients. The program is open to a limited number of high school stu dents age 16 to 18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the hospital, and receive CPR training. Applications can be picked up at NH Jacksonvilles American Red Cross office (Room 1404, next to Physical Therapy & Occupational Therapy) and must be submitted by May 1. Selectees are required to attend the June 9 kick-off event from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., that includes an interview, in the hospitals central tower second deck conference room. For more about this opportunity, call Junior Red Cross Volunteer Chairman Terry Miles at 542-7525 or e-mail terry. miles2@med.navy.mil. Experience Navy Medicine first-hand for your summer JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012 17

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Synthetic drug testing operating guide availableNavy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention (NADAP) office posted the new Synthetic Drug Testing Operating Guide on the NADAP website, officials said April 5. The Navys zero-tolerance policy towards drug use is a key contributor to the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine. This initiative, which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combateffective force in the history of the Department of the Navy. The operating guide provides commands easy access to the procedures of synthetic drug testing, said Dorice Favorite, director, NADAP. It is important that the samples are collected, documented and processed correctly. The operating guide will help units do that. Navy announced it would begin testing for syn thetic drugs in NAVADMIN 082/12, released March 12. According to the NAVADMIN, this testing is separate and distinct from the urinalysis program directed by OPNAVINST 5350.4D. Commanders may take appropriate actions related to health, safety and security based on a positive result. During fiscal year 2012, the Navy will invest $1.73 million to test for synthetic chemical compounds and expects to increase that amount to $2.9 million in fiscal year 2013. Synthetic chemical compound drug use impacts a Sailors career, their family life and overall well-being while also impacting Fleet readiness. If a Sailor makes the wrong choice and uses these types of drugs, they need to know there will be consequences, emphasized Favorite. Navy has zero tolerance for drug use, including the use of designer and synthetic chemical compounds, such as Spice, said Favorite. Our efforts are twofold: we will continue to educate Sailors on the dangers of drug use including new and designer drugs and at the same time identify those who use or possess the substances and hold them accountable. 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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Public Defender provides critical help to veteransAfter the Veterans Administration (VA) denied his claim seven years ago and failed to get him a primary care appointment more than one year ago, Duval County defendant known in court as Mr. Alvin is now on the fast track to receive the longawaited treatment options he was promised by the Navy back in the early 1970s. Though he only served a short time during the Vietnam Era, Alvin has earned the distinction of being Duval Countys firstever Veterans Treatment Court (VTC) defendant. On March 2 in a 5th floor courtroom of the Duval County Courthouse, Magistrate John Sampson called to order the inaugural Veterans Treatment Court Track of Adult Drug Court. Present with Alvin was his attor ney, Assistant Public Defender Richard Gordon, his Veteran Mentor John Holzbaur (A retired Navy Lt. Cmdr. and Director of Veterans Affairs for Office of the Public Defender) and Veterans Justice Outreach Coordinator Charlotte Matthews from the VA. In short order, Sampson wel comed all parties, indicated his support of this new court function and released Alvin to Matthews who connected the veteran with the long-awaited benefits he was entitled from the VA. The pro ceeding took 15 minutes. The Duval County VTC began to take shape in March of 2011, when Public Defender Matt Shirk called for such a system noting the tremendously low recidivism rate being realized in the few other VTCs operating around the country. Following that announcement, Shirk dedicated staff to coordinating the function and invited vet eran mentors to sign up with the VTC. Because the VTC is brand new to Duval County, there is no way to predict how successful it will be, said Public Defender Matt Shirk. Here are the facts we identified more than 500 admitted veterans in the local criminal justice system in the last six months of 2011. This defines a significant need. He explained that other juris dictions (approximately 80 around the country) that operate a VTC are reporting a recidivism rate as low as a zero, while all others proudly say that very few partici pants re-offend. He added that VA benefits will eventually cover the cost of those adjudicated in VTC and take that burden off local taxpayers. Shirk continued, American servicemen and women are coming home from overseas con flicts in large numbers and that affects military communities like Jacksonville. The transition back to civil ian life can be difficult for some, especially those who knowingly or unknowingly suffer from ser vice-related injuries like Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). As we have seen in the past and in other jurisdictions, this can lead some into legal troubles. It is only fair to those who put their lives on the line for America that we extend them this common courtesy of assistance when they need it most. Alvin noted that he couldnt recall a time that he had gotten this much attention. The VAs Matthews secured his long-await ed, primary care appointment and will resubmit his service disability claim after that takes place. Veterans Treatment Court now available in Duval County 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 12, 2012