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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/01983
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 04-05-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
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Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:01983

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THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com More than 1,200 distinguished visitors and VIPs filled the VP-30 hangar at NAS Jacksonville March 28 to celebrate the first fleet delivery of the P-8A Poseidon multi-mission aircraft. VP-30 Commanding Officer and master of ceremonies Capt. Mark Stevens noted, In the same year that our maritime patrol and recon naissance force (MPRF) is celebrating 50 years of service for the P-3 Orion were also celebrating the fleet introduction of P-8 Poseidon. In his remarks, Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson said, The P-8 is the future of Navy maritime patrol. It will be a critical com ponent of our maritime security and the fleets eyes and ears for generations to come. While this aircraft is impressive, the strength of our Navy does not rest with technology alone. The real capability will reside in the men and women who fly and maintain this aircraft. In the hands of our great Sailors, it stands ready to meet the needs of the nation and challenges ahead as we continue to operate forward to reassure allies, deter aggression and, when needed, prevail in conflict. Under Secretary of the Navy Robert Work pro vided keynote remarks. As the Navys replacement platform for the P-3C Orion, the P-8A Poseidon is transforming how the Navys maritime patrol and reconnais sance force will man, train, operate and deploy. The P-8A is a network-enabled aircraft for the network age, and gives Sailors the added ben efits of working with manned and unmanned systems, said Work. The training and readiness concept for the Poseidon was designed around a high fidelity simulator solution to provide cost-wise warf ighting readiness. The P-8A Integrated Training Center includes leading-edge operational flight trainers, which will provide innovative and cut ting-edge training for todays warfighter, he continued. During his remarks he highlighted the part nership of the Navy and Americas industrial base, which made this day possible. On behalf of the Secretary of the Navy, I would like to thank the maritime patrol and reconnaissance community, veterans, industry, and the city of Jacksonville, he added. Thanks and gratitude goes to the city of Jacksonville, which has been such a great host An EA-6B Prowler electronic warfare aircraft will soon join the display of historic naval aircraft at NAS Jacksonville Heritage Park. The aircraft landed at the station March 27 after its trans-continental flight from VAQ-129 at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. It is being pre pared for display by artisans at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE). Cmdr. Jeff Mishak is the FRCSE Prowler production officer (and an EA-6B NFO) who supervises overhauls and modifications for the EA-6B program. We usually have about four to six Prowlers on the line. When the work is complete, the Prowlers will go to Marine Corps VAQ squadrons because the Navy is transitioning to the EA-18G Growler, explained Mishak. Until a few weeks ago, the plan for this aircraft was to become part of the Midway exhibit in San Diego. When that fell through, NAS Jax was next on the list so the Prowler was flown from NAS Whidbey Island to our station, where it will be prepared for exhibit at NAS Jax Heritage Park. The plane, stricken from the fleet inventory, will be prepared for exhibit by removing the engines and other internal parts. It features the World War II Battle of Midway paint scheme from the 2011 Centennial of Naval Aviation (CoNA). Look up the name at the left rear seat and Google it for an interest ing history lesson. Cmdr. Jay Burkette is executive officer of VAQ-129, the fleet replacement squadron for EA-6B Prowler electronic warfare aircraft flown by Navy and Marine Corps squadrons. I was born in Jacksonville when my dad was sta tioned here as an intelligence officer so being part of the crew delivering this aircraft to NAS Jacksonville is a great pleasure for me. Burkette, who is in his third tour at VAQ-129, said P-8A introduced at Roll-Out Ceremony Prowler to soon join naval aviation icons at Heritage Park Dozens of U.S. Navy Chief Petty Officers joined NAS Jacksonville Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/ SW) Brad Shepherd at the Building 1 flag pole April 2 to commemorate 119 years of the CPO Mess. After morning colors, Shepherd read the birthday message from MCPON(SS/ SW) Rick West that declared 2012 to be The Year of the Chief. Shepherd also added his perspective, Since 1893, in every conflict involving the United States, there have been chief petty officers engaged at the forefront of our Navys operations. Let me tell you about one of my heroes World War II Fleet Adm. William Bull Halsey. He was in a reception line at an event in Long Beach, Calif. right after the war. As he greeted a group of chief petty offi cers he winked at one specific chief. A reporter asked him how he knew that chief and he replied, Contrary to popu lar knowledge, the naval ships in Long Beach harbor do not float on water instead, they float on the backs of chief petty officers. The chief that I winked at has taught me more about ships and men, and had more impact on my career than any officer I can recall. Shepherd continued, Todays chief has to be forward-thinking. We value CPOs celebrate 119 years

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS I started graduate school at the University of Maine two-and-a-half years ago, after Dustin came home and told me about a new program through Military OneSource that offered tuition assistance for military spouses continuing their education. You might as well try it, Dustin said, since well have help with tuition. And one semester later, the tuition-assistance program changed its rules. I was no lon ger eligible. The problem: I was already hooked on school. Nine years as a work-at-home mom had deprived me of interests Id almost forgottenmain ly, teaching and learning. Someone would have to drag me out of graduate school kick ing and screaming. So I stayed. And I worked as a graduate assistant teaching journalism. I never really thought much about graduation. When I left home at 5 p.m. and shut the door on whiny children and a husband with no dinner plans, I actually looked forward to sit ting in a classroom for three hours. And when I left the university after a morning of teaching or a night of classes, Id often tell the other graduate assistants, Im off to my day job now. I wasnt joking. Going to school was the easy part, most ly because it was for me alone. Also, it didnt involve cleaning other peoples messes, making dinner, folding clothes or pack ing lunch boxes. There were, of course, many humbling aspects of graduate school along the way. The first of which was being a student ten years after receiving my bachelors degree. The second: realizing Im not much younger than my stu dents parents. But in the end, my age turned out to be more of an asset than a hindrance. Which is to say, if youre con sidering graduate school, the answer is, No, youre not too old. As is the case with most times in our lives, my routine at the university became quite com fortable. Everything from the smell of the stairwell to the sound of the heater was famil iar to me. My car knew the way from Bangor to Orono. I had found secret parking spots. Still, I didnt think about graduation. Sometimes, I brought the kids on campus. They tagged along while I checked out books in the library, paid bills at the Bursars office (Lindell: You have to pay to learn when youre a grown-up?), or attend ed Black Bear football and hockey games. These trips always sparked interesting observations and questions, such as the time one of my boys wanted to know if there is a fraternity for Star Wars fans. Seeing college through childrens eyes was both amusing and enlighten ing. One time, while Lindell, 5, and I were having a snack in the school cafeteria, I looked around the crowded, noisy room and said, What do you think about all these kids, Lindell? Lindell looked up from his cookie, glanced left, and then right, and said, Where are the kids? The word kids is so very relative. To be sure, stressful times also came along with gradu ate school. It wasnt easy bal ancing a career, three chil dren and homework. I read Hannah Arendts The Human Condition sitting on the bleachers at multiple Little League practices. I outlined a research paper while waiting in the school pick-up line. I wrote my masters thesis between the hours of 5 p.m. and 9 p.m. And after Dustin left for his deploy ment, sometimes I cried in my office because it all felt like too much. Now I was thinking about graduation, and I wasnt sure Id make it. I pressed on. Last week, Lindell went with me to buy my cap and gown at the university bookstore. I couldnt understand what the past two-and-a-half years really meant to me until I put on that robe, zipped it up, and . well, felt 18 all over again. Lindell looked at my reflection in the mirror and said, Youll be the prettiest graduater Ive ever seen. Previously, I had thought about skipping the graduation ceremony. However, when I saw the wonder in Lindells eyes that day, I knew attendance was the right decision. For five semesters, I divided my energy and focus between my family, my work and my education. I missed family dinners, soccer and baseball games, and bed time stories. Graduation would be the formal, tangible closure my kids needed. The night after I bought the cap and gown (See, Lindell, grown-ups pay to learn and to graduate), I spent alot of time thinking about Dustin. A jour ney that began with his casu al prompting you might as well was ending in his absence. My biggest fan would miss graduation. Yet I suspect Dustin will have plenty more ceremonies to attend in the future. In fact, just last night, when I asked Lindell what he wants to be when he grows up, he said, without hesi tation, A University of Maine Black Bear, of course.Graduation brings closure for children April 6 1776 Continental sloop-of-war Ranger, frigate Queen of France and frigate Warren capture British Hibernia and seven other vessels. 1862 Naval Gunfire from Tyler and Lexington help save Union troops at Battle of Shiloh. 1909 Cmdr. Robert E. Peary reports reaching the North Pole. 1917 U.S. declares war on Germany. 1945 First heavy kamikaze attack on ships near Okinawa. 1968 USS New Jersey (BB-62) recom missioned for shore bombardment duty in Vietnam. 1989 President orders DoD to assist in Exxon Valdez oil spill cleanup. 1993 Branch Navy Hospital Adak responds to crash of civilian Chinese airline providing life-saving treatment and medical evacuation of 89 injured passengers. Only one passenger out of 265 passengers died. April 7 1776 Continental brig Lexington captures British Edward. 1917 Navy takes control of all wire less radio stations in the U.S. 1942 Navy accepts AfricanAmericans for general service. 1945 First two Navy flight nurses land on an active battlefield (Iwo Jima), Ensign Jane Kendeigh and Lt. j.g. Ann Purvis. 1945 Carrier aircraft defeat last Japanese Navy sortie (Battle of East China Sea). Yamato, the worlds largest battleship, and five other ships were sunk. 1979 Launch of first Trident subma rine, USS Ohio (SSBN-726) at Groton, Conn. April 8 1925 First night landings on a car rier, USS Langley (CV-1), by VF-1. 1950 Unarmed Navy patrol aircraft shot down over Baltic Sea by USSR. 1951 First of four detonations for Operation Greenhouse nuclear test. April 9 1861 Second relief convoy for Fort Sumter leaves New York City. 1941 Commissioning of USS North Carolina (BB-55), which carried nine 16-inch guns. 1943 Re-establishment of Commodore rank. 1959 Selection of the first seven Mercury astronauts includes four naval aviators. April 10 1941 USS Niblack (DD-424), used depth charges against a German U-boat while conducting rescue operations for a torpedoed Dutch freighter. This was the first action by an American naval vessel against the Axis Powers. 1963 During diving tests, USS Thresher (SSN-593) was lost with all hands (112 crew and 12 civilians) east of Cape Cod, Mass. 1966 River Patrol Boats of River Patrol Force commenced operations on inland waters of South Vietnam. April 11 1783 Congress declares end of war with Great Britain. 1900 Navy accepts its first subma rine, USS Holland. 1970 Launch of Apollo 13, com manded by Navy Capt. James Lovell Jr. Former naval aviator Fred Haise Jr. was the Lunar Module Pilot. While 200,000 miles from Earth there was an explo sion on board which forced Apollo 13 to circle the moon without landing. Mission duration was 5 days, 22 hours and 54 minutes. Recovery was by HS-4 helicopters from USS Iwo Jima (LPH-2). 1991 U.N. ceasefire ends Persian Gulf War. Virginia Leary is one of the volun teers at the NAS Jacksonville Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS). For the past nine months, she has served as a client service associate and budget for baby instructor. Leary provides active duty service members and their families with coun seling and financial assistance. Born in Athens, Ga., Leary attended the University of Virginia where she received her degree in Spanish. While in school, she studied abroad in Valencia, Spain and met her husband, Richard. Now a military spouse and part of the P-3 family in Jacksonville, she is active within the Navy community and within her current spouses group. Currently a stay-at-home mom, Leary takes care of her 15-month-old and is expecting her second baby in March. Growing up as the youngest of six children, she has mastered the art of compromising and teamwork. She brings all of those skills and more to the NMCRS family. Want to learn more about volunteer opportunities? Please contact Chairman of Volunteers Amanda OConnell at 5423515 or mandivoc@gmail.com. 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012

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Pelicans represent P-3 community at Women in Aviation ConferenceDuring the week of March 7-11, three VP-45 Pelicans flew to Dallas to participate in the annu al Women in Aviation Conference (WIA) hosted by American Airlines. Lt. Maggie Doyle, a P-3 tactical coordinator, Lt. Chelsea Brunoehler, a P-3 plane command er and AWO2 Emily Simpson, a P-3 aviation warfare systems operator, were in attendance representing the maritime patrol and reconnais sance aircraft community. The purpose of the conference was to bring women (and men) who work in corporate, military, and recreational aviation together to share information, stories of suc cess, and discuss new opportuni ties for careers in the field of avia tion. More than 250 businesses were represented including several uni versities. Altogether, more than 3,300 people participated in the conference making it the most well attended conference in the history of WIA. This years conference kicked off with an impressive welcoming cer emony complete with a sixpiece Texas country band for entertain ment. The expo, or business fair, remained open before and after for socializing and sharing of informa tion. The next day, the Navy military members broke off from the main seminars to discuss topics such as improving retention of women in the military and the Navys policy on pregnancy during flying. Members from the Womens Policy Office in Washington, DC were present to share statistics on women in the military, primarily regarding percentages of women in aviation. There was also a presentation of new military flight gear designed specifically for women. Unfortunately, many of the items have not yet been approved for wear due to further testing require ments and budgetary constraints. The afternoon session for Navy women included a general/flag officer panel which was incredibly insightful regarding a long career in aviation, including the challeng es of breaking barriers and making personal sacrifices. After the panel spoke and answered general questions about their careers, the 30 Navy confer ence representatives were able to break into groups of five-six for speed-mentoring with each of the flag officers. This was really a highlight of the conference as it afforded these well respected officers the oppor tunity to share their stories and personal experiences in a more intimate setting with future avia tion leaders, said Doyle. Best advice of the conference? You can have everything . just not at the same time. The insight on having a family in the military was to take advan tage of the time you have with your family when you have it, and you serve the greater good when you cant be with them. The conference was a huge suc cess, greatly because it gave so many people an opportunity to network, share information and inspire each other. The Pelicans found inspiration in the women who were inducted to the Aviation Hall of Fame, espe cially the female ferrying and test pilots from WWII. Meeting them and having them autograph their book was like tak ing part in a piece of history. The Pelicans were able to see how women in the military and women with careers in aviation make a long commitment to their work and service by believing that what they do has a greater purpose. One female commanding offi cer said, Every time I feel sorry for myself or my three-year-old daugh ter, I remember how I felt respond ing to the earthquake in Japan last year, when I handed water to a three-year-old Japanese girl who hadnt been afforded clean drink ing water in more than a several days. Then I think how lucky my little girl is to have two parents that love her so much and to live in such a great country. Hopefully in future years more women and men will attend the Women in Aviation Conference. This event was a great way to celebrate Womens History Month and made a positive impact on the professional careers and aviation camaraderie of all in attendance. CNRSE, meet your ombudsmanCommander, Navy Region Southeast Ombudsman Kandi Debus has been married to Chris Debus for 10 years. He is an active duty Sailor, and is cur rently serving a tour in Bahrain. They have three children. She has experience with and understands the stressors of deployments and the family unit separation. While Chris served the Navy, Kandi served Navy families as an ombudsman for an afloat command, for an installation, an ombudsman assembly chair and in her current appointment as the regional ombudsman for the last three years. During the Navys response to families impacted by Hurricane Katrina, she was employed by the Fleet and Family Support Center as an emergency case manager. She has served as the regional indi vidual augmentee/case management coordinator for Southeast Region Family Readiness since 2006. As the regional ombudsman, her roll includes providing feedback to the regional commander on family issues and being available to mentor and provide support and assistance to any other ombudsman program personnel in the region. This includes active duty, reserve and recruiting command ombudsman and families. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012 to this base for more than 75 years, and whose citizens embody the values our Sailors fight to protect. The next phase for Poseidon will be its integration with the unmanned BAMS platform to create a cohe sive team that covers an even greater territory. Maritime patrol is the forward indicator of the U.S. presence around the globe. MPRF is often the first to respond to natural disasters and provide humanitar ian relief. These Sailors embody the CNOs guidance for executing the maritime strategy by demonstrating daily that our Navy is flexible, adaptable and ready to respond globally to preserve the peace. Thank you for allowing me to be part of todays ceremony. At the conclusion of Works remarks, Boeing President and CEO of Defense, Space and Security Dennis Muilenburg handed over the key for P-8A Poseidon LL 428 to Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Rear Adm. Michael Hewitt. He, in turn, gave the key to Stevens who ordered, Poseidon aircrew and maintenance department, pre pare LL 428 for flight operations. Following the roll out, Work, Brown and Hewitt answered questions from the media. Work was asked if every P-3 in the Navy would be replaced by the P-8A. As you know, the P-3 continues to fly after 50 years of service. Only two military aircraft have served lon ger the U-2 spy plane and the B-52 bomber. As the P-3 fleet begins to retire aircraft, they will be replaced by a combination of the P-8 and its new partner, the unmanned BAMS, said Work. Brown was queried about the importance of Jacksonvilles mayor being part of the ceremony. This is a historic occasion for our great city and northeast Florida. Weve been a military friendly city for a long time and I believe military affairs are an important part of our community. The P-8 shows the benefits of private/public partnerships for the Navy in their development and acquisition process. Were proud to be part of the P-3/P-8 transition and will sup port it in any way we can, replied Brown Hewitt fielded the question, How does this P-8 event help the Navy overall? This is a great day for our maritime patrol and reconnaissance force. We wouldnt be here today without bold leadership from the City of Jacksonville and the creativity of our industry partners. Its also a humbling day in that many MPRF squadrons are actively patrolling oceans and land areas around the world. So while many P-3s are on station protecting American interests, were proudly rolling out the for midable, new P-8 Poseidon, said Hewitt. It brings new technology and innovation to bear wherever our country needs us. Were also very proud of our young naval aircrew and maintainers who are bringing this aircraft to life. We know that the platform is new and important but its the men and women who fly it that makes it a naval asset to be reckoned with. After the roll-out event, attendees were invited across the street from VP-30 to the ribbon-cutting cer emony for the P-8A Integrated Training Center (ITC). Flight crew and mission specialists are assigned to the ITC where they undertake classroom instruction as well as full-motion, simulated exercises that present the highest degree of realism. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders welcomed a large crowd that seemed eager to tour the $38 million training facility. Thank you for being part of this history making day at NAS Jacksonville, said Sanders. Were proud you could join us and learn about the exciting future tak ing shape for the P-8A Poseidon within the maritime patrol and reconnaissance community. POSEIDON: Next phase is to team with BAMS platform for greater coverage

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012 5 Photos by Kaylee LaRocque and Clark Pierce

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Today is probably one of the most his toric events in our maritime patrol and reconnaissance community since the introduction of the P-3 Orion 50 years ago. And it may be another half-century before we experience another aircraft introduc tion like this. said Rear Adm. Sean Buck March 28 at the P-8A Poseidon roll-out event at NAS Jacksonville. Buck, with 29 years in naval aviation, currently serves as Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force 7th Fleet; Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force 5th Fleet; and Commander, Fleet Air Forward. He said the roll out was an especially sig nificant day for young aircrews and main tainers, because they get a close-up look at the airplane that will drive their futures for the next 20 to 30 years. The Navy plans to transition 12 VP squadrons to the P-8A. It all begins this summer when VP-16 comes home from deployment, turns in their P-3s and transitions to the P-8 Poseidon here at VP-30, the Navys fleet replacement squadron for the maritime patrol and reconnaissance force (MPRF). We estimate the P-3 to P-8 transition season will span about six years, so were planning to fly some P-3s through the end of this decade until the P-8 is fully inte grated into the fleet. That means VP-30 will support a hybrid force by simultane ously training Sailors on both platforms, said Buck. He explained that the Department of Defense will eventually fund the procure ment of 117 P-8A Poseidons for the fleet. Each operational squadron will initial ly be assigned two P-8s and ultimately receive their full complement of six air craft. There will be additional P-8s assigned to VP-30 for training, as well as additional aircraft used for research, development and testing for a total of 117 in the fleet. On April 13, Buck will relieve Rear Adm. Michael Hewitt as Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group. The Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Energy Tom Hicks gave remarks at the 2012 Energy Efficiency Forum in Orlando, Fla., March 28. The Alliance to Save Energy spon sored its fifth annual event to bring together professionals around the world to network and share ideas about the future of energy efficient technologies and innovations. Hicks highlighted the Department of the Navys energy program and goals and the reason the Navy is taking an aggressive approach at the way it looks at energy during the panel, The Great Green Fleet and Beyond: Military Adoption of Energy Efficiency. The Department of the Navy energy investments are not about advancing an environmental agenda or to be green, said Hicks. Our energy investments are about improving our combat capabili ties, increasing our mission effective ness, and reducing our vulnerabilities to foreign sources of fossil fuel. Other speakers on the panel included Thomas Grumbly, Lockheed Martins vice president of Civil and Homeland Security, and Barbara Humpton, senior vice president, Siemens Government Technologies. The moderator for the panel was Mark Brunner, national security advi sor, Office of U.S. Sen. Mark Warner. During Brunners opening remarks, he highlighted that the Department of Defense uses about 90 percent of all the fossil-fuel energy in the federal govern ment. He noted, by becoming more efficient even in small amounts about 10 to 15 percent can save tax dollars and these dollars could be used in other critical areas of the military. Hicks other key areas of focus were the Department of the Navys alter native energy, the Marine Corps Experimental Forward Operating Base initiative and the Department of the Navys goal of producing 50 per cent of its shore energy from alterna tive sources, the one gigawatt initiative, which was highlighted during President Barack Obamas State of the Union address Jan. 24. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus was unable to speak at the conference as scheduled when the plane he was traveling on experienced a mechanical problem en route to Orlando, and was forced to return to Joint Base Andrews, Md. In October 2009, Mabus laid out five aggressive energy goals to improve the Navys energy security and efficien cy, increase the Navys energy indepen dence, and help lead the nation toward a clean energy economy. Buck positive about MPRF transitionDASN Energy gives remarks at energy efficiency forum 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012

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An open letter from the Chief of Naval OperationsHello shipmates, The Secretary of the Navy recently announced our 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative, which pulls together a set of objectives, policies and pro grams, new and existing, to maximize personal and family readiness. Id like to cover one of the five areas in the initiative: readiness. More specifically, its a readiness problem that has grown at an alarming rate, and we have not been able to turn around sexual assault. Folks, weve got to face the factssexual assault is an attack on a Sailor. On average, these attacks take place every day. Yes, every day. These attacks include blue on blue Sailor on Sailorthink about that. Weve had a former commanding officer go to jail for ten years because he raped one of his Sailors and we have had junior officers and chiefs, who have also been charged and convicted of sexual assault. We have shipmates committing crimes against ship mates, and we all have to do something about it. This is my problem and this is your problem. Sexual assault is unacceptable and its roots need to stop at all levels; I cant tolerate it and you shouldnt either. It undermines our Navy Core Values and Ethos, and it undercuts safety and readiness. We need to address it for what it is a real danger. It is important that we support sexual assault vic tims and hold offenders accountable. But what we really need to do is prevent sexual assault before it occurs. Some call this getting to the left of the event. This means taking a hard look at command climate, and I need your help in this regard. We need to watch our humor, our language and ensure its appropri ate for the work place. We need to prevent the abuse of alcohol, which is a primary contributor to sexu al assaults. We need to promote responsibility for ourselves and each other. Sexual assault is not just happening at some commands, it is happening at your command. We need to commit, as a Navy, to not accept this crime at our commands and get rid of the myth that its just part of life. It is not. Its about changing attitudes. It is about leadership at every level getting engaged. Its about creating a safe environment of dignity and respect for our shipmates. Its about declaring and committing that we wont tolerate this in our Navy. And it is especially about by stander intervention, stepping in when you see one of our shipmates threatening another. We stand to gain confidence and trust in a Navy that cares about all of its Sailors. In short, everyone needs to do something about it! In the coming weeks you will hear from your leader ship on the prevention of sexual assault as we renew our emphasis Navy wide on this important issue. Lets face it together, there is no place for sexual assault in our Navy and I know we can resolve this with your effort and focus. Jonathan W. Greenert Admiral, U.S. Navy The Navy announced Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) and issued guidance to focus efforts on awareness and prevention of sexual violence through the use of special events and command-lev el education in NAVADMIN 106/12, released March 28. The Department of Defenses SAAM theme this year is, Hurts One, Affects All. Prevention of Sexual Assault is Everyones Duty. In addition to this overarching theme, the Navy will highlight complementary weekly themes throughout the month. Sexual assault prevention is a key aspect of the Navys 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative to increase the personal readiness of each and every Sailor within our Navy, said Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, chief of naval personnel and director of the Navys SAAM 2012 initiative. The weekly themes will underscore varying aspects of sexual assault and the Navys efforts to raise awareness in order to eliminate this crime. The four weekly themes are: Hurts One; Affects All; Prevention is Everyones Duty; and We Will Not Tolerate Sexual Assault. Our goal is to foster a command climate in which reporting assault is embraced and encouraged while providing sup port to vic tims, said Van Buskirk. We are also demand ing a strict zero-tolerance policy for sex ual assault and accountability of all offenders. Commands will host man datory edu cation ses sions to raise sexual assault awareness among Sailors. Commanding officers can either hold a single two-hour stand down or break the discussions into four 30-minute weekly sessions, according to the NAVADMIN. Scripts and videos for each weeks theme will be provided to commanding officers to help facili tate discussion throughout their commands. These engagement products, in addition to talking points, posters and other tools, will be posted to the Navy Personnel Commands Sexual Assault and Prevention website, http://www.sapr.navy.mil. Navy installations and commands around the world will be organizing activities to raise awareness of sexual assault throughout the month. All units are encouraged to participate and promote SAAM events in addition to the two-hour stand down in April, said Van Buskirk. Collectively, we can make a difference in prevent ing sexual assault by engaging all of our people in a meaningful manner to raise awareness to change behavior, said Van Buskirk. Sexual assault prevention is a key element in the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative, which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, to build resiliency and to hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Navy. Help raise awareness by joining the conversation on social media using #SAAM. Navy promotes sexual assault awareness month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012 7

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MCPON: Happy 119TH birthday, CPOs!Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) (SS/SW) Rick West released the following Chief Petty Officer birthday message to the fleet March 28. My fellow Chief Petty Officers, on April 1, our entire mess will pause to celebrate 119 years of the United States Navy Chief Petty Officer, our honored mess tra ditions and heritage, and look to our future. But were not just celebrating another year of chiefs serving the Navy; were celebrating everything it means to be the chief. Our anchors are the symbol of a culture and a way of life. Since 1893, Chiefs have been charged with the responsibility of ensuring our Sailors are the best in the world, ready to carry out our Navys mission when our nation calls. We welcome that responsibility and lead by example with pride, character and loyalty, a strong commit ment to leadership, our core values and the Navy ethos. Our Navy is the best it has ever been and we must continue to build upon the strong legacy that our mess was founded on as we look to our future. 2012 is a significant year for us all as the United States Navy Memorial hosts the Year of the Chief. The Year of the Chief is a worldwide spotlight on the history and contributions of the Navy CPO mess. The Year of the Chief will officially be launched on our birthday with a kick-off event held April 2 at the Navy Memorial. For more information on the ear of the Chief, visit the Navy Memorial website. Happy birthday shipmates. I truly appreciate your leadership and the hard work you do every day. Anchor up and Hoo-Yah Navy Chiefs! the squadron currently teaches two platforms the EA-6B that has served the fleet since 1971 and the EA-18G that went operational in 2009. For many years, VAQ-129 has trained U.S. Marine Corps pilots and electronic countermea sures officers for the EA-6B Prowler. But, with the Navy moving to the EA-18G Growler, the Marine Corps EA-6B training will transition to MCAS Cherry Point, N.C. over the next two years. Flying beside Burkette was instructor pilot Maj. Steve Nelson, a Marine Corps Reservist whose civilian job is providing EA-6B ground training at VAQ-129. Ive flown the Prowler since 1999, including two tours at MCAS Cherry Point. Then, I joined VAQ-129 at NAS Whidbey Island as an instructor in 2005. I went into the reserves in 2010 and am now a defense contractor who can still put on a flight suit and impart my knowledge with students. In one of the back seats was Lt. j.g. Matt ODonnell, a brand new student who logged his first nine hours in a Prowler on this cross-country flight. Burkette said that it was a great way for him to gain his initial familiarization of this aircraft. The EA-6B Prowler is a unique part of naval aviations storied traditions. Developed from the A-6 Intruder, its distinctive side-by-side cockpit arrangement sets it apart from other Northrup Grumman designs. The Prowler has been continually upgraded over the years, with many Improved Capability (ICAP) electronic warfare sets being installed by FRCSE at NAS Jacksonville. Burkette said, Theres always some nostalgia watching an aircraft go into retirement. Thats why it was important for our squadron to cele brate the Prowler during its last full year of flying during CoNA. Were also glad to bring it to NAS Jacksonville where it will be a great addition to the other historic Navy aircraft at Heritage Park. PROWLER: Vintage EA-6B arrives from NAS Whidbey Island, bound for Heritage Parkour history and traditions because you cant move for ward if you dont know where youve been. However, todays chief has many challenges. To maintain the vitality of the CPO Mess, your charge is reach back and bring to the forefront that Sailor who will take your place. NAS Jacksonville CPOs are the best Ive seen because you know how to balance your responsibili ties always providing the right amount of attention to our officers, as well as our E-6 and below. Thank you all for your service and leadership. And happy birthday. After reciting the CPO Creed, Shepherd request ed the presence of NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders. Ive served a lot of COs in my career and Ill say that our skipper has been the biggest supporter of the Chiefs Mess at NAS Jax. When we implemented CPO 365, he stood right next to me and we drove the bus together along with you. On numerous other mat ters, he never fails to ask me to check the pulse of the chiefs. His respect for the Chiefs Mess helps position our base as the best in our region for supporting our warfighters, said Shepherd. Today, Im pleased to designate Capt. Sanders an honorary chief of the NAS Jacksonville Chiefs Mess for his exceptional and outstanding support of the CPO Mess from 2010 to 2012. Sanders expressed his surprise and pleasure. I was wondering what master chief was up to, espe cially when my wife arrived a few minutes ago. Ive got almost 25 years in our Navy and have taken part in a lot of ceremonies but today is one of the proudest moments in my career. Thank you for your trust and for your support. Happy birthday to you all.CPO: NAS Jax recognizes 119TH birthday 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012

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Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki says VA is on track toward meeting one of the top priorities he set on arrival at the department three years ago: breaking the back of the disability claims backlog. VA spent the last two years creating an automated tool to make claims determinations faster and more accurate, he said. Our intent is to have no claim over 125 days, Shinseki told American Forces Press Service. And every claims decision that we put out the door [will be] at a 98 percent quality mark. Toward that end, VA has been testing the new Veterans Benefit Management System in Providence, R.I., and Salt Lake City. Shinseki told Congress last month he believes this technology is helping VA approach the tipping point in ending the backlog in disability claims. He stopped by the Salt Lake City office last week to assess progress there as the depart ment prepares to take the sys tem nationwide beginning this fall. The rollout will begin at 16 regional offices in September, with all 56 VA regional offices to receive it by the end of fis cal 2013, Shinseki said. This advance is expected to go a long way in helping VA reduce the time veterans must wait for disability claims decisions, the secretary said. We know we can do it man ually, Shinseki said. But we plan to layer this automation tool on top of that, and have the people who did the man ual work now armed with an automation tool. I think we will be able to improve our productivity in ways that we will be able to take that backlog down quickly. Shinseki noted the monu mental challenge VA has been up against. During 2009, VA produced 900,000 claims deci sions, but also received 1 mil lion new claims. The next year, VA increased its claims deci sions to 1 million, but received 1.2 million new claims. Last year, we produced another 1 million claims deci sions and got 1.3 million claims in, Shinseki said. So the backlog isnt static. The back log is a bigger number than we would like, but it is not the same number as three years ago. Once the automated system is in place, Shinseki said, he believes the 125-day, 98-per cent accuracy goals he set are achievable. There is a lot on the line here, he said. And that is why this rollout in September is an important one. His confidence, he said, comes from the successes hes seen automation bring to VAs processing of Post-9/11 GI Bill claims. Shinseki recalled arriving at VA in 2009 just as the new pro gram was being launched and having to implement it on the fly, with no automation tools. Within about nine months, he said, VA was able to prepare the manual process of get ting about 173,000 people into schools by the fall 2009 term. It was pretty rocky, he acknowledged. But today, with the process now automated, VA is able to process more than 600,000 Post-9/11 GI Bill claims faster, and with fewer mistakes, the secretary said. That experi ence demonstrated the impor tance of keeping manual pro cessing going as automation is being rolled in, then gradu ally moving all the processes toward automation, he added. The lessons we got out of that were tremendously impor tant, he said. It educated our efforts with the automation tool for the [disability] claims process, and we are doing the same things, step-by-step, that we learned how to do through with the [Post-9/11 GI Bill]. The new system is just one initiative VA has taken to break the claims backlog. Another effort focuses on fundamentally changing the relationship between vet erans and VA, making VA an advocate in putting together a strong claims package. VA began giving veterans a check list of whats needed to file a claim, and also did its own dig ging to produce whatever doc umentation veterans couldnt find. This effort reduces the time needed to put a claims package together. Another pilot program focus es on making claims process ing more efficient by simplify ing the process and improving communication among the entities that process a claim to reduce procedural delays, the secretary said. Shinseki said he wanted to focus on getting the bugs out of the claims process before increasing automation. We didnt want to automate bad processes and just get lousy decisions faster, he told a Paralyzed Veterans of America gathering. So we broke the complex, convoluted claims process down into its compo nent pieces to improve each part before putting them back together.Shinseki: VA on track to break claims backlog JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012 9

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012 13 NPC site: One-stop shop for everything NavyThe Navy Personnel Command (NPC) website, hosted at www.npc.navy.mil, contains links to guidance and policy, programs, pay and benefits, Navy messages, stories and much more, officials reminded Sailors March 28. Our objective is to provide Sailors and their families with a one-stop shop for all Navy-related information and to get answers to their questions in a centralized location, said Lt. Jon Williams, functional website manager, NPC communica tions. The NPC website provides information and guidance vital to Sailors from boot camp to retire ment and beyond. According to Williams, the NPC website is the second most visited Navy website and more than 85 percent of the Navys web content can only be found here. The website contains more than 2,500 pages, 15,000 documents and registers near ly one million visits per month. The Reference Library section, which contains U.S. Navy forms and instructions and DoD direc tives and publications, receives the most active visits every month. In February, the NAVADMIN 2012 page was the most popular page accessed on the website and received more than 100,000 views. The Knowledge Base is another valuable feature on the NPC website and was created to supple ment the NPC Customer Service Center (CSC). A Sailor can always call or email the CSC for infor mation, but also has the ability to go to www.npc. navy.mil to research and answer his or her own questions online 24/7. The Knowledge Base can be accessed from anywhere in the world. Sailors, retirees and their families can ask any question they want to about the Navy. The system uses key words to generate a solution to their question. Sailors can access the Knowledge Base by visit ing the NPC website and clicking on the Ask NPC a Question icon in the upper right corner of the page. Our ultimate goal is to provide Sailors and their families with current and reliable web con tent, so they can make informed career and life decisions, said Williams. For more information or to view the website, visit www.npc.navy.mil or call NPC customer ser vice center at 1-866-U-ASK-NPC, (1-866-827-5672) or e-mail at CSCMailbox@navy.mil. Junior Red Cross volunteers must apply by May 1 The American Red Cross at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is currently recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volunteers. This offers an excellent opportunity for students inter ested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine professionals phy sicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and technicians as well as contribute to creat ing a positive experience for NH Jacksonville patients. The program is open to a limited number of high school students age 16 to 18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the hospital, and receive CPR training. Applications can be picked up at NH Jacksonvilles American Red Cross office (Room 1404, next to Physical Therapy & Occupational Therapy) and must be submit ted by May 1. Selectees are required to attend the June 9 kick-off event from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., that includes an interview, in the hospitals central tower second deck conference room. For more about this oppor tunity, call Junior Red Cross Volunteer Chairman Terry Miles at 542-7525 or e-mail terry.miles2@med.navy.mil. Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles American Red Cross volunteers are appreciated In his American Red Cross Month proclamation in March, President Obama stated, After more than 130 years of providing humanitarian relief at home and abroad, the American Red Cross remains a reflection of the com passion and generosity central to our national identity . let us resolve to preserve and renew that humanitar ian impulse to save, to serve, and to build, and carry it forward in the year to come. The American Red Cross has played a vital role in relief efforts and emer gency services around the world since 1881. Today there are approximately 1.2 million American Red Cross volun teers young and old easing the pain and suffering of disaster victims and U.S. armed forces wherever, whenever needed. For Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles 215,000 patients, a selfless team of 60 American Red Cross volunteers (con tributing about 16,000 hours per year) provides care, an open hand and hope. At any given time, one might find Red Cross volunteers helping with emer gency leave arrangements, providing comfort to relatives of an ill patient, dis tributing cookies, driving the parking lot shuttle or dispensing numbers at the pharmacy. Volunteers have long served as hos pital ambassadors, providing informa tion while lifting the spirits of countless patients and visitors with friendly con versation. Then theres American Red Cross Chair Helen Donahoe and Co-Chair Anne Owen. Donahoe has given 40 years of her life as a Red Cross volun teer. She is a recipient of HandsOn Jacksonvilles Young at Heart Award and The Presidents Volunteer Service Award. Like Donahoe, Owen has also received numerous accolades for her selfless contributions. Next time you see an American Red Cross volunteer take the time to extend your hand in thanks for all they do for our war fighters and Americans everywhere, said Naval Hospital Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Lynn Welling. Naval Hospital Jacksonville has a robust volunteer program comprised of American Red Cross, Retiree Liaisons and the Canine Corps (pet visitation therapy). And applications for the sum mer Junior Red Cross pro gram (for 16 to 18 year-olds) will be accepted through May 1. The American Red Cross is always look ing for new volunteers. To get involved, volunteers need to be able to commit four hours per week, successfully com plete a security background screening, and be friendly and caring. Call 542-7525 to learn more. Helping patients since 1941 Experience Navy Medicine first-hand this summer

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included April Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor pool hours Mon. Fri. 5:30 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 8 p.m. Weekend hours 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. Family Fitness Bootcamp with Ashley Monday & Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. Family Fitness Center above the Youth Center Gym Call (904) 778-9772 7th Annual Captain Chuck Cornett Navy 10K Run and 5K Walk April 7 at 8 a.m. $25 race day entry fee, patrons must have base access Race events Zumba Demonstration April 5, 11 a.m. & 4:15 p.m. NEX Convenience Store Parking Lot Hummve Pull April 5, 2 p.m. NEX Convenience Store Parking Lot Signups begin at noon Health Fair April 6, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. NEX Convenience Store Parking Lot Athletic shoe & apparel sale April 5 7, 9 a.m. 6 p.m. NEX Convenience Store Parking Lot Free give-a-ways, beverages and entertainment by the Navy Band Southeast after the race! Sign-up in the base gym or fitness center. Call (904) 542-2930/3239 for additional informationI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Disney World 4-day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Disney World Florida resident 3-day $98.25, 3-day hopper $125.25, 4-day $127.75, 4-day hopper $154.50 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Funk Fest May 11 & 12 at Metropolitan Park $57 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person St. Augustine Scenic Cruise Day Trip May 5, 9:30 a.m. $20 per person Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 The Vault Liberty Recreation Center Trips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Indoor Rock Climbing March 30 Departs Liberty at 6 p.m. Scuba Diving Introductory Class April 10 at 5:30 p.m. Indoor Pool Free Mall & Movie Trip Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater April 13 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees April 10 & 24 for active duty April 12 & 26 for retirees & DoD personnel Ladies Golf Clinics Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. $10 per person Pre-registration required, sign-up in the pro shop Senior Military Invitational April 30 & May 1 9 a.m. shotgun start $65 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty 30th Annual Bass Tournament April 14 at first light $60 per two person team Sign-up at the marina Shoreline Clean-up May 4 at 8:30 a.m. Free lunch! Call (904) 542-2709 or e-mail angela. glass@navy.mil to sign-up Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Easter Egg Hunt April 5 at 7 p.m. McCaffrey ball fields Month of the Military Child Carnival April 21, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Fields Free games, food and prizes! 2012 Adventure Summer Registration Dates: Current School-Age Care participants Now through April 6 Single & Dual Active Duty April 9 13 Other Active Duty April 16-20 DoD Civilians April 23-27 Registration Packets available for pick up at the Youth Center.Flying Club Call 777-8549 /6035 Ground School April 16 May 23 June 4 July 16 $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012

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Estimated costs for the F-35 joint strike fighter have increased over the life of the program, but the Defense Department is working to con tain cost growth and remains committed to the fifth-gener ation fighter, defense officials said March 29. Frank Kendall III said during confirmation testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee that cost overruns for the stealth fighter are about $150 billion. Kendall is acting undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics, and if confirmed will assume that position officially. We are doing everything we can to drive down the cost of the joint strike fighter, Kendall told committee members. He noted the program is still in testing, with about 20 per cent of that process complete. We are finding design issues as we go through the test pro gram that we have to correct, he acknowledged. So there are some cost adjustments associ ated with that. Kendall outlined the depart ments actions to rein in the programs price tag. We are attacking the pro duction costs by putting strong incentives on the contractor to control costs, to get the chang es that have to be made cut in quickly, he said. Concurrent engineering design is one issue that has raised costs, he told the panel. In that approach, which is intended to develop a finished product faster, a new system may simultaneously be in engineering, production and testing processes, he explained. Most programs start pro duction before they have com pletely finished their devel opmental tests, he said. The question is how much. The joint strike fighter was an extreme example of con currency, he said, pointing out that production was started more than a year before the first flight tests. Lessons learned during the F-35s development are now being applied to other sys tems, Kendall said. What we are doing now is setting up exit criteria so that we dont make that production commitment until we are confident that the design is reasonably stable, he added. Kendall cautioned, however, that the joint tactical vehicle and ground combat vehicle could experience cost over runs. Given the design complex ity and the urgency common to new defense equipment requirements, I am not confi dent that any defense program will not experience overruns, he said. The department now sets targets early for programs, Kendall said, which should help to force the supplier and the customer to meet target cost caps by making any nec essary tradeoffs between cost and capability. Kendall said he and his team also are working to contain sustainment costs, which are larger actually than the pro duction costs. Those costs represent the greatest poten tial cost cuts, he said, and the department will continue to pursue those savings. I do think that the strike fighter is getting under con trol, he added. Kendall signed an acqui sition decision memoran dum yesterday on the F-35, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little told reporters today. Little said in keeping with the Defense Departments better buying power initia tive, which requires track ing affordability targets and costs associated with acquisi tion programs, the memoran dum sets the current outlook for F-35 final per-unit costs in 2019, when the fifth-generation fighter is scheduled to reach full production. In todays dollars, that cost is estimated at $81.4 million per aircraft, which when adjusted for inflation is estimated at $94.9 million in 2019 dollars, Little said. Overall operating and sup port costs of the program are estimated at $1.1 trillion, up from last years estimate of $1 trillion, the press secretary added. Little noted some of that long-term increase comes from the departments deci sion, reflected in the 2013 defense budget request, to help in meeting requirements for short-term spending cuts by postponing purchase of some of the fighter aircraft. We remain fully com mitted to the F-35 program, Little said, echoing Defense Secretary Leon Panettas remarks March 27 during a visit to Canadas capital of Ottawa. Its very important to our capabilities [and] to our alliances. The United Kingdom, Italy, the Netherlands, Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway, Turkey, Israel and Singapore are partners or participants in the aircrafts development program, and the Japanese government announced in December it will buy 42 of the fighters. We are taking steps to ensure that we maintain fis cal discipline inside the pro gram, Little said. Panetta has said Kendall and the depart ments acquisition, technology and logistics team have done an outstanding job working to contain costs for the stealth fighter, he added. This is a fifth-generation fighter, Little noted. Its important for a variety of rea sons: to maintain the U.S. mil itarys technological edge, to increase interoperability with our allies, and . for a range of other purposes. This is a time of transition for the U.S. military and part of that change requires service members to immerse them selves in the study of their pro fession, said Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff on March 30. Dempsey took time during his recent travels to Colombia and Brazil to talk to reporters about the transitions he sees coming. In his letter to the force upon taking office in October, Dempsey stressed the need for service members to study their profession. Were not a profession sim ply because we say were a pro fession, he wrote. We must continue to learn, to understand, and to promote the knowledge, skills, attri butes and behaviors that define us as a profession. Dempsey said he gets a lot of affirmation on his position. Most agree that we need to look inside this profession of ours and make sure we have the attributes right, the gener al said in an interview aboard a C-17 en route to Colombia. Are we developing the right attributes in our new leaders? Some of those attributes are enduring, but there are some new ones. But there are a number of service members, he said, who question the need for this study. There are some who say, Cmon. Look how good were doing. If it aint broke, dont fix it, Dempsey said. To me, thats the formula for losing our credentials as a learning organization. The military has been through 10 years of conflict and service members have made many deployments. How can we think that hasnt had some effect? It seems to me to be a bit nave, the general said. Dempsey said he isnt sug gesting the military is broken. Morale is high, he said, and the spirit in the force is good. I am suggesting that we ought to have the conversa tion, the general said. The U.S. military has had these sorts of discussions throughout its existence. As the military faces its lat est transition, Dempsey said, it is a good time to see what is needed to maintain the best military on the globe. And this discussion is not limited to officers. We have been putting more emphasis on the noncommissioned offi cer as an integral part of the profession, Dempsey said. Thats kind of a new thing. Twenty years ago, the profes sion was defined by officer corps and then the NCOs were held accountable to go out and deliver it. But NCOs have to be part of the discussion on what it means to be a Soldier, Sailor, Airman or Marine, the chair man said. How do you see yourselves as leaders in the profession? he said. They are at the point of the spear on this in terms of deal ing with all the issues weve uncovered in the past 10 years. We have continually said to them rightly that they are what make us great; that they are the backbone of the profes sion. But being the backbone means continuing to grow and to be strong enough to support the body, the general said. Ten years of war, Dempsey said, has affected all aspects of the force. NCOs have typically been handed a training checklist, for example, to get troops ready for war. Now they are reaching a point where noncommissioned officers are going to have to think about what it means to train their organizations, he said, to deliver an outcome and to re-instill those small disciplines training manage ment, command supply dis cipline, barracks discipline those small disciplines that in a war sometimes are over looked because they are so darn busy. Now we are going to have to hold the NCOs accountable for bringing that [discipline] back, he added, and I think sometimes they underestimate the challenge. The Navys High Year Tenure (HYT) program is a force management tool used to size and shape the active-duty and Reserve enlisted force, officials said March 26. HYT sets the maximum num ber of years an enlisted Sailor may serve based on rank before he or she must advance, separate or if eligible, retire. High Year Tenure assists in force man agement by limiting the number of years a Sailor may serve without showing pro fessional growth via the advancement system, said Senior Chief Personnel Specialist John Gigliotti, Navy Total Force Policy Advancement Planning for HYT Policy, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. By limiting how long Sailors can remain in the Navy, the HYT program increases advancement opportunity for high-performing Sailors across pay grades and Length of Service (LOS). HYT policy recognizes Sailor perfor mance by separating Sailors who have not advanced after a set amount of time, said Gigliotti. This gives other Sailors who are per forming at or above Navy standards bet ter advancement opportunities, because the Navy advances Sailors to fill openings in the next higher rank. Actively working towards advancement to the next higher pay grade is critical, because advancing is the only way a Sailor can maximize the length of their career. The following HYT LOS gates have been established based on pay grade: E1/E2 Active-duty/Full-Time Support (FTS), 4 years; Reserve, 6 years; E3 Active-duty/FTS, 5 years; Reserve, 10 years; E4 Active-duty/FTS, 8 years; Reserve, 12 years; E5 Active-duty/FTS, 14 years; Reserve, 20 years; E6 Active-duty/FTS, 20 years; Reserve, 22 years; E7 Active-duty/FTS/Reserve, 24 years; E8 Active-duty/FTS/Reserve, 26 years; E9 Active-duty/FTS/Reserve, 30 years. Command master chiefs may exceed 30 years of service with certain provi sions, according to Gigliotti. Continuing beyond 30 years isnt associated with the advancement system like E1 to E9, but with professional growth and increased responsibility for senior enlisted lead ers in command leadership positions for flag/general officers. Officers are not subject to HYT, but instead limited to statutory service lim its by paygrade. In addition, the Navy uses other force-shaping initiatives to manage the officer community, including the Selective Early Retirement Board and Probationary Officer Continuation and Redesignation Boards. HYT waiver requests are considered on a case-by-case basis for approval. Requests to continue beyond a Sailors current HYT date in support of an urgent and immediate operational requirement, in a deployed or soon to be deployed unit, or in an undermanned rating have the best chance of being approved. All waiver requests for active-duty and Reserve Sailors must arrive at Navy Personnel Command (NPC) ten months prior to the service members HYT date. Gigliotti encourages Sailors to take advantage of every advancement oppor tunity possible. Command career counselors can advise Sailors on whats required to be advancement eligible, show them how to study and assist them with getting the study material they need for their rate and pay grade. MILPERSMAN 1160-120 is a revision of the HYT policy that will incorporate both active-duty and Reserve policy, and will be effective July 1, 2012. Officials reaffirm Pentagons commitment to F-35 Joint Chiefs Chairman: Service members must prepare for transitionUnderstand high year tenure to maximize your career JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012 15

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. Family Service Center 542-5745 Better Business Bureau 721-2288 State Attorneys Office Consumer Mediation 630-2075 City of Jacksonville/ Consumer Affairs Division 630-3467 Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation 1-850-4871395Got a consumer problem? Heres who to call 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012

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Join your shipmates and co-workers at these on-base blood donation sites: April 9 Hangar 1000 10 a.m. 5 p.m. April 16 Building 1 8:30 a.m. 1 p.m. April 17 NAVFAC 10 a.m. 3 p.m. If you are retiring or separating from active duty and need assistance with submitting your claim for disability and compensation to the Veterans Administration (VA), you can start up to one year prior to retiring/separating with getting our medical information in order. AMVETS is the Veterans Service Organization advocate for separating or retiring service members and their families providing assistance with sub mission of claims to the VA for benefits, disabilities and compensation. AMVETS is a national Veterans Service Organization authorized to submit claims to the VA and advocate for veterans and their families with the VA nationwide. All assistance is free of charge and you are not required to become a member of AMVETS to use their services. For more information and to make an appointment, call David Sanders at 542-2834 or e-mail david.d.sanders@navy.mil. VA disability assistance availableSave a life! Join the Blood Alliance JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012 17



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THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2012 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com More than 1,200 distinguished visitors and VIPs filled the VP-30 hangar at NAS Jacksonville March 28 to celebrate the first fleet delivery of the P-8A Poseidon multi-mission aircraft. VP-30 Commanding Officer and master of ceremonies Capt. Mark Stevens noted, In the same year that our maritime patrol and reconnaissance force (MPRF) is celebrating 50 years of service for the P-3 Orion were also celebrating the fleet introduction of P-8 Poseidon. In his remarks, Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson said, The P-8 is the future of Navy maritime patrol. It will be a critical component of our maritime security and the fleets eyes and ears for generations to come. While this aircraft is impressive, the strength of our Navy does not rest with technology alone. The real capability will reside in the men and women who fly and maintain this aircraft. In the hands of our great Sailors, it stands ready to meet the needs of the nation and challenges ahead as we continue to operate forward to reassure allies, deter aggression and, when needed, prevail in conflict. Under Secretary of the Navy Robert Work provided keynote remarks. As the Navys replacement platform for the P-3C Orion, the P-8A Poseidon is transforming how the Navys maritime patrol and reconnais sance force will man, train, operate and deploy. The P-8A is a network-enabled aircraft for the network age, and gives Sailors the added ben efits of working with manned and unmanned systems, said Work. The training and readiness concept for the Poseidon was designed around a high fidelity simulator solution to provide cost-wise warf ighting readiness. The P-8A Integrated Training Center includes leading-edge operational flight trainers, which will provide innovative and cutting-edge training for todays warfighter, he continued. During his remarks he highlighted the part nership of the Navy and Americas industrial base, which made this day possible. On behalf of the Secretary of the Navy, I would like to thank the maritime patrol and reconnaissance community, veterans, industry, and the city of Jacksonville, he added. Thanks and gratitude goes to the city of Jacksonville, which has been such a great host An EA-6B Prowler electronic warfare aircraft will soon join the display of historic naval aircraft at NAS Jacksonville Heritage Park. The aircraft landed at the station March 27 after its trans-continental flight from VAQ-129 at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. It is being prepared for display by artisans at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE). Cmdr. Jeff Mishak is the FRCSE Prowler production officer (and an EA-6B NFO) who supervises overhauls and modifications for the EA-6B program. We usually have about four to six Prowlers on the line. When the work is complete, the Prowlers will go to Marine Corps VAQ squadrons because the Navy is transitioning to the EA-18G Growler, explained Mishak. Until a few weeks ago, the plan for this aircraft was to become part of the Midway exhibit in San Diego. When that fell through, NAS Jax was next on the list so the Prowler was flown from NAS Whidbey Island to our station, where it will be prepared for exhibit at NAS Jax Heritage Park. The plane, stricken from the fleet inventory, will be prepared for exhibit by removing the engines and other internal parts. It features the World War II Battle of Midway paint scheme from the 2011 Centennial of Naval Aviation (CoNA). Look up the name at the left rear seat and Google it for an interesting history lesson. Cmdr. Jay Burkette is executive officer of VAQ-129, the fleet replacement squadron for EA-6B Prowler electronic warfare aircraft flown by Navy and Marine Corps squadrons. I was born in Jacksonville when my dad was sta tioned here as an intelligence officer so being part of the crew delivering this aircraft to NAS Jacksonville is a great pleasure for me. Burkette, who is in his third tour at VAQ-129, said P-8A introduced at Roll-Out Ceremony Prowler to soon join naval aviation icons at Heritage Park Dozens of U.S. Navy Chief Petty Officers joined NAS Jacksonville Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/ SW) Brad Shepherd at the Building 1 flag pole April 2 to commemorate 119 years of the CPO Mess. After morning colors, Shepherd read the birthday message from MCPON(SS/ SW) Rick West that declared 2012 to be The Year of the Chief. Shepherd also added his perspective, Since 1893, in every conflict involving the United States, there have been chief petty officers engaged at the forefront of our Navys operations. Let me tell you about one of my heroes World War II Fleet Adm. William Bull Halsey. He was in a reception line at an event in Long Beach, Calif. right after the war. As he greeted a group of chief petty officers he winked at one specific chief. A reporter asked him how he knew that chief and he replied, Contrary to popular knowledge, the naval ships in Long Beach harbor do not float on water instead, they float on the backs of chief petty officers. The chief that I winked at has taught me more about ships and men, and had more impact on my career than any officer I can recall. Shepherd continued, Todays chief has to be forward-thinking. We value CPOs celebrate 119 years

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS I started graduate school at the University of Maine two-and-a-half years ago, after Dustin came home and told me about a new program through Military OneSource that offered tuition assistance for military spouses continuing their education. You might as well try it, Dustin said, since well have help with tuition. And one semester later, the tuition-assistance program changed its rules. I was no longer eligible. The problem: I was already hooked on school. Nine years as a work-at-home mom had deprived me of interests Id almost forgottenmain ly, teaching and learning. Someone would have to drag me out of graduate school kicking and screaming. So I stayed. And I worked as a graduate assistant teaching journalism. I never really thought much about graduation. When I left home at 5 p.m. and shut the door on whiny children and a husband with no dinner plans, I actually looked forward to sitting in a classroom for three hours. And when I left the university after a morning of teaching or a night of classes, Id often tell the other graduate assistants, Im off to my day job now. I wasnt joking. Going to school was the easy part, mostly because it was for me alone. Also, it didnt involve cleaning other peoples messes, making dinner, folding clothes or packing lunch boxes. There were, of course, many humbling aspects of graduate school along the way. The first of which was being a student ten years after receiving my bachelors degree. The second: realizing Im not much younger than my stu dents parents. But in the end, my age turned out to be more of an asset than a hindrance. Which is to say, if youre con sidering graduate school, the answer is, No, youre not too old. As is the case with most times in our lives, my routine at the university became quite com fortable. Everything from the smell of the stairwell to the sound of the heater was famil iar to me. My car knew the way from Bangor to Orono. I had found secret parking spots. Still, I didnt think about graduation. Sometimes, I brought the kids on campus. They tagged along while I checked out books in the library, paid bills at the Bursars office (Lindell: You have to pay to learn when youre a grown-up?), or attended Black Bear football and hockey games. These trips always sparked interesting observations and questions, such as the time one of my boys wanted to know if there is a fraternity for Star Wars fans. Seeing college through childrens eyes was both amusing and enlighten ing. One time, while Lindell, 5, and I were having a snack in the school cafeteria, I looked around the crowded, noisy room and said, What do you think about all these kids, Lindell? Lindell looked up from his cookie, glanced left, and then right, and said, Where are the kids? The word kids is so very relative. To be sure, stressful times also came along with gradu ate school. It wasnt easy bal ancing a career, three chil dren and homework. I read Hannah Arendts The Human Condition sitting on the bleachers at multiple Little League practices. I outlined a research paper while waiting in the school pick-up line. I wrote my masters thesis between the hours of 5 p.m. and 9 p.m. And after Dustin left for his deploy ment, sometimes I cried in my office because it all felt like too much. Now I was thinking about graduation, and I wasnt sure Id make it. I pressed on. Last week, Lindell went with me to buy my cap and gown at the university bookstore. I couldnt understand what the past two-and-a-half years really meant to me until I put on that robe, zipped it up, and . well, felt 18 all over again. Lindell looked at my reflection in the mirror and said, Youll be the prettiest graduater Ive ever seen. Previously, I had thought about skipping the graduation ceremony. However, when I saw the wonder in Lindells eyes that day, I knew attendance was the right decision. For five semesters, I divided my energy and focus between my family, my work and my education. I missed family dinners, soccer and baseball games, and bed time stories. Graduation would be the formal, tangible closure my kids needed. The night after I bought the cap and gown (See, Lindell, grown-ups pay to learn and to graduate), I spent alot of time thinking about Dustin. A jour ney that began with his casu al prompting you might as well was ending in his absence. My biggest fan would miss graduation. Yet I suspect Dustin will have plenty more ceremonies to attend in the future. In fact, just last night, when I asked Lindell what he wants to be when he grows up, he said, without hesitation, A University of Maine Black Bear, of course.Graduation brings closure for children April 6 1776 Continental sloop-of-war Ranger, frigate Queen of France and frigate Warren capture British Hibernia and seven other vessels. 1862 Naval Gunfire from Tyler and Lexington help save Union troops at Battle of Shiloh. 1909 Cmdr. Robert E. Peary reports reaching the North Pole. 1917 U.S. declares war on Germany. 1945 First heavy kamikaze attack on ships near Okinawa. 1968 USS New Jersey (BB-62) recommissioned for shore bombardment duty in Vietnam. 1989 President orders DoD to assist in Exxon Valdez oil spill cleanup. 1993 Branch Navy Hospital Adak responds to crash of civilian Chinese airline providing life-saving treatment and medical evacuation of 89 injured passengers. Only one passenger out of 265 passengers died. April 7 1776 Continental brig Lexington captures British Edward. 1917 Navy takes control of all wireless radio stations in the U.S. 1942 Navy accepts AfricanAmericans for general service. 1945 First two Navy flight nurses land on an active battlefield (Iwo Jima), Ensign Jane Kendeigh and Lt. j.g. Ann Purvis. 1945 Carrier aircraft defeat last Japanese Navy sortie (Battle of East China Sea). Yamato, the worlds largest battleship, and five other ships were sunk. 1979 Launch of first Trident submarine, USS Ohio (SSBN-726) at Groton, Conn. April 8 1925 First night landings on a car rier, USS Langley (CV-1), by VF-1. 1950 Unarmed Navy patrol aircraft shot down over Baltic Sea by USSR. 1951 First of four detonations for Operation Greenhouse nuclear test. April 9 1861 Second relief convoy for Fort Sumter leaves New York City. 1941 Commissioning of USS North Carolina (BB-55), which carried nine 16-inch guns. 1943 Re-establishment of Commodore rank. 1959 Selection of the first seven Mercury astronauts includes four naval aviators. April 10 1941 USS Niblack (DD-424), used depth charges against a German U-boat while conducting rescue operations for a torpedoed Dutch freighter. This was the first action by an American naval vessel against the Axis Powers. 1963 During diving tests, USS Thresher (SSN-593) was lost with all hands (112 crew and 12 civilians) east of Cape Cod, Mass. 1966 River Patrol Boats of River Patrol Force commenced operations on inland waters of South Vietnam. April 11 1783 Congress declares end of war with Great Britain. 1900 Navy accepts its first subma rine, USS Holland. 1970 Launch of Apollo 13, com manded by Navy Capt. James Lovell Jr. Former naval aviator Fred Haise Jr. was the Lunar Module Pilot. While 200,000 miles from Earth there was an explo sion on board which forced Apollo 13 to circle the moon without landing. Mission duration was 5 days, 22 hours and 54 minutes. Recovery was by HS-4 helicopters from USS Iwo Jima (LPH-2). 1991 U.N. ceasefire ends Persian Gulf War. Virginia Leary is one of the volun teers at the NAS Jacksonville Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS). For the past nine months, she has served as a client service associate and budget for baby instructor. Leary provides active duty service members and their families with coun seling and financial assistance. Born in Athens, Ga., Leary attended the University of Virginia where she received her degree in Spanish. While in school, she studied abroad in Valencia, Spain and met her husband, Richard. Now a military spouse and part of the P-3 family in Jacksonville, she is active within the Navy community and within her current spouses group. Currently a stay-at-home mom, Leary takes care of her 15-month-old and is expecting her second baby in March. Growing up as the youngest of six children, she has mastered the art of compromising and teamwork. She brings all of those skills and more to the NMCRS family. Want to learn more about volunteer opportunities? Please contact Chairman of Volunteers Amanda OConnell at 5423515 or mandivoc@gmail.com. 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012

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Pelicans represent P-3 community at Women in Aviation ConferenceDuring the week of March 7-11, three VP-45 Pelicans flew to Dallas to participate in the annu al Women in Aviation Conference (WIA) hosted by American Airlines. Lt. Maggie Doyle, a P-3 tactical coordinator, Lt. Chelsea Brunoehler, a P-3 plane commander and AWO2 Emily Simpson, a P-3 aviation warfare systems operator, were in attendance representing the maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft community. The purpose of the conference was to bring women (and men) who work in corporate, military, and recreational aviation together to share information, stories of success, and discuss new opportuni ties for careers in the field of avia tion. More than 250 businesses were represented including several universities. Altogether, more than 3,300 people participated in the conference making it the most well attended conference in the history of WIA. This years conference kicked off with an impressive welcoming ceremony complete with a sixpiece Texas country band for entertain ment. The expo, or business fair, remained open before and after for socializing and sharing of information. The next day, the Navy military members broke off from the main seminars to discuss topics such as improving retention of women in the military and the Navys policy on pregnancy during flying. Members from the Womens Policy Office in Washington, DC were present to share statistics on women in the military, primarily regarding percentages of women in aviation. There was also a presentation of new military flight gear designed specifically for women. Unfortunately, many of the items have not yet been approved for wear due to further testing requirements and budgetary constraints. The afternoon session for Navy women included a general/flag officer panel which was incredibly insightful regarding a long career in aviation, including the challenges of breaking barriers and making personal sacrifices. After the panel spoke and answered general questions about their careers, the 30 Navy confer ence representatives were able to break into groups of five-six for speed-mentoring with each of the flag officers. This was really a highlight of the conference as it afforded these well respected officers the oppor tunity to share their stories and personal experiences in a more intimate setting with future avia tion leaders, said Doyle. Best advice of the conference? You can have everything . just not at the same time. The insight on having a family in the military was to take advan tage of the time you have with your family when you have it, and you serve the greater good when you cant be with them. The conference was a huge suc cess, greatly because it gave so many people an opportunity to network, share information and inspire each other. The Pelicans found inspiration in the women who were inducted to the Aviation Hall of Fame, especially the female ferrying and test pilots from WWII. Meeting them and having them autograph their book was like taking part in a piece of history. The Pelicans were able to see how women in the military and women with careers in aviation make a long commitment to their work and service by believing that what they do has a greater purpose. One female commanding offi cer said, Every time I feel sorry for myself or my three-year-old daughter, I remember how I felt responding to the earthquake in Japan last year, when I handed water to a three-year-old Japanese girl who hadnt been afforded clean drink ing water in more than a several days. Then I think how lucky my little girl is to have two parents that love her so much and to live in such a great country. Hopefully in future years more women and men will attend the Women in Aviation Conference. This event was a great way to celebrate Womens History Month and made a positive impact on the professional careers and aviation camaraderie of all in attendance. CNRSE, meet your ombudsmanCommander, Navy Region Southeast Ombudsman Kandi Debus has been married to Chris Debus for 10 years. He is an active duty Sailor, and is currently serving a tour in Bahrain. They have three children. She has experience with and understands the stressors of deployments and the family unit separation. While Chris served the Navy, Kandi served Navy families as an ombudsman for an afloat command, for an installation, an ombudsman assembly chair and in her current appointment as the regional ombudsman for the last three years. During the Navys response to families impacted by Hurricane Katrina, she was employed by the Fleet and Family Support Center as an emergency case manager. She has served as the regional individual augmentee/case management coordinator for Southeast Region Family Readiness since 2006. As the regional ombudsman, her roll includes providing feedback to the regional commander on family issues and being available to mentor and provide support and assistance to any other ombudsman program personnel in the region. This includes active duty, reserve and recruiting command ombudsman and families. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012 to this base for more than 75 years, and whose citizens embody the values our Sailors fight to protect. The next phase for Poseidon will be its integration with the unmanned BAMS platform to create a cohesive team that covers an even greater territory. Maritime patrol is the forward indicator of the U.S. presence around the globe. MPRF is often the first to respond to natural disasters and provide humanitarian relief. These Sailors embody the CNOs guidance for executing the maritime strategy by demonstrating daily that our Navy is flexible, adaptable and ready to respond globally to preserve the peace. Thank you for allowing me to be part of todays ceremony. At the conclusion of Works remarks, Boeing President and CEO of Defense, Space and Security Dennis Muilenburg handed over the key for P-8A Poseidon LL 428 to Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Rear Adm. Michael Hewitt. He, in turn, gave the key to Stevens who ordered, Poseidon aircrew and maintenance department, prepare LL 428 for flight operations. Following the roll out, Work, Brown and Hewitt answered questions from the media. Work was asked if every P-3 in the Navy would be replaced by the P-8A. As you know, the P-3 continues to fly after 50 years of service. Only two military aircraft have served longer the U-2 spy plane and the B-52 bomber. As the P-3 fleet begins to retire aircraft, they will be replaced by a combination of the P-8 and its new partner, the unmanned BAMS, said Work. Brown was queried about the importance of Jacksonvilles mayor being part of the ceremony. This is a historic occasion for our great city and northeast Florida. Weve been a military friendly city for a long time and I believe military affairs are an important part of our community. The P-8 shows the benefits of private/public partnerships for the Navy in their development and acquisition process. Were proud to be part of the P-3/P-8 transition and will support it in any way we can, replied Brown Hewitt fielded the question, How does this P-8 event help the Navy overall? This is a great day for our maritime patrol and reconnaissance force. We wouldnt be here today without bold leadership from the City of Jacksonville and the creativity of our industry partners. Its also a humbling day in that many MPRF squadrons are actively patrolling oceans and land areas around the world. So while many P-3s are on station protecting American interests, were proudly rolling out the formidable, new P-8 Poseidon, said Hewitt. It brings new technology and innovation to bear wherever our country needs us. Were also very proud of our young naval aircrew and maintainers who are bringing this aircraft to life. We know that the platform is new and important but its the men and women who fly it that makes it a naval asset to be reckoned with. After the roll-out event, attendees were invited across the street from VP-30 to the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the P-8A Integrated Training Center (ITC). Flight crew and mission specialists are assigned to the ITC where they undertake classroom instruction as well as full-motion, simulated exercises that present the highest degree of realism. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders welcomed a large crowd that seemed eager to tour the $38 million training facility. Thank you for being part of this history making day at NAS Jacksonville, said Sanders. Were proud you could join us and learn about the exciting future taking shape for the P-8A Poseidon within the maritime patrol and reconnaissance community. POSEIDON: Next phase is to team with BAMS platform for greater coverage

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012 5 Photos by Kaylee LaRocque and Clark Pierce

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Today is probably one of the most his toric events in our maritime patrol and reconnaissance community since the introduction of the P-3 Orion 50 years ago. And it may be another half-century before we experience another aircraft introduc tion like this. said Rear Adm. Sean Buck March 28 at the P-8A Poseidon roll-out event at NAS Jacksonville. Buck, with 29 years in naval aviation, currently serves as Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force 7th Fleet; Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force 5th Fleet; and Commander, Fleet Air Forward. He said the roll out was an especially significant day for young aircrews and maintainers, because they get a close-up look at the airplane that will drive their futures for the next 20 to 30 years. The Navy plans to transition 12 VP squadrons to the P-8A. It all begins this summer when VP-16 comes home from deployment, turns in their P-3s and transitions to the P-8 Poseidon here at VP-30, the Navys fleet replacement squadron for the maritime patrol and reconnaissance force (MPRF). We estimate the P-3 to P-8 transition season will span about six years, so were planning to fly some P-3s through the end of this decade until the P-8 is fully inte grated into the fleet. That means VP-30 will support a hybrid force by simultane ously training Sailors on both platforms, said Buck. He explained that the Department of Defense will eventually fund the procure ment of 117 P-8A Poseidons for the fleet. Each operational squadron will initial ly be assigned two P-8s and ultimately receive their full complement of six air craft. There will be additional P-8s assigned to VP-30 for training, as well as additional aircraft used for research, development and testing for a total of 117 in the fleet. On April 13, Buck will relieve Rear Adm. Michael Hewitt as Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group. The Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Energy Tom Hicks gave remarks at the 2012 Energy Efficiency Forum in Orlando, Fla., March 28. The Alliance to Save Energy spon sored its fifth annual event to bring together professionals around the world to network and share ideas about the future of energy efficient technologies and innovations. Hicks highlighted the Department of the Navys energy program and goals and the reason the Navy is taking an aggressive approach at the way it looks at energy during the panel, The Great Green Fleet and Beyond: Military Adoption of Energy Efficiency. The Department of the Navy energy investments are not about advancing an environmental agenda or to be green, said Hicks. Our energy investments are about improving our combat capabili ties, increasing our mission effective ness, and reducing our vulnerabilities to foreign sources of fossil fuel. Other speakers on the panel included Thomas Grumbly, Lockheed Martins vice president of Civil and Homeland Security, and Barbara Humpton, senior vice president, Siemens Government Technologies. The moderator for the panel was Mark Brunner, national security advi sor, Office of U.S. Sen. Mark Warner. During Brunners opening remarks, he highlighted that the Department of Defense uses about 90 percent of all the fossil-fuel energy in the federal government. He noted, by becoming more efficient even in small amounts about 10 to 15 percent can save tax dollars and these dollars could be used in other critical areas of the military. Hicks other key areas of focus were the Department of the Navys alter native energy, the Marine Corps Experimental Forward Operating Base initiative and the Department of the Navys goal of producing 50 per cent of its shore energy from alterna tive sources, the one gigawatt initiative, which was highlighted during President Barack Obamas State of the Union address Jan. 24. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus was unable to speak at the conference as scheduled when the plane he was traveling on experienced a mechanical problem en route to Orlando, and was forced to return to Joint Base Andrews, Md. In October 2009, Mabus laid out five aggressive energy goals to improve the Navys energy security and efficiency, increase the Navys energy independence, and help lead the nation toward a clean energy economy. Buck positive about MPRF transitionDASN Energy gives remarks at energy efficiency forum 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012

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An open letter from the Chief of Naval OperationsHello shipmates, The Secretary of the Navy recently announced our 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative, which pulls together a set of objectives, policies and pro grams, new and existing, to maximize personal and family readiness. Id like to cover one of the five areas in the initiative: readiness. More specifically, its a readiness problem that has grown at an alarming rate, and we have not been able to turn around sexual assault. Folks, weve got to face the factssexual assault is an attack on a Sailor. On average, these attacks take place every day. Yes, every day. These attacks include blue on blue Sailor on Sailorthink about that. Weve had a former commanding officer go to jail for ten years because he raped one of his Sailors and we have had junior officers and chiefs, who have also been charged and convicted of sexual assault. We have shipmates committing crimes against shipmates, and we all have to do something about it. This is my problem and this is your problem. Sexual assault is unacceptable and its roots need to stop at all levels; I cant tolerate it and you shouldnt either. It undermines our Navy Core Values and Ethos, and it undercuts safety and readiness. We need to address it for what it is a real danger. It is important that we support sexual assault vic tims and hold offenders accountable. But what we really need to do is prevent sexual assault before it occurs. Some call this getting to the left of the event. This means taking a hard look at command climate, and I need your help in this regard. We need to watch our humor, our language and ensure its appropri ate for the work place. We need to prevent the abuse of alcohol, which is a primary contributor to sexu al assaults. We need to promote responsibility for ourselves and each other. Sexual assault is not just happening at some commands, it is happening at your command. We need to commit, as a Navy, to not accept this crime at our commands and get rid of the myth that its just part of life. It is not. Its about changing attitudes. It is about leadership at every level getting engaged. Its about creating a safe environment of dignity and respect for our shipmates. Its about declaring and committing that we wont tolerate this in our Navy. And it is especially about by stander intervention, stepping in when you see one of our shipmates threatening another. We stand to gain confidence and trust in a Navy that cares about all of its Sailors. In short, everyone needs to do something about it! In the coming weeks you will hear from your leadership on the prevention of sexual assault as we renew our emphasis Navy wide on this important issue. Lets face it together, there is no place for sexual assault in our Navy and I know we can resolve this with your effort and focus. Jonathan W. Greenert Admiral, U.S. Navy The Navy announced Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) and issued guidance to focus efforts on awareness and prevention of sexual violence through the use of special events and command-level education in NAVADMIN 106/12, released March 28. The Department of Defenses SAAM theme this year is, Hurts One, Affects All. Prevention of Sexual Assault is Everyones Duty. In addition to this overarching theme, the Navy will highlight complementary weekly themes throughout the month. Sexual assault prevention is a key aspect of the Navys 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative to increase the personal readiness of each and every Sailor within our Navy, said Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, chief of naval personnel and director of the Navys SAAM 2012 initiative. The weekly themes will underscore varying aspects of sexual assault and the Navys efforts to raise awareness in order to eliminate this crime. The four weekly themes are: Hurts One; Affects All; Prevention is Everyones Duty; and We Will Not Tolerate Sexual Assault. Our goal is to foster a command climate in which reporting assault is embraced and encouraged while providing sup port to vic tims, said Van Buskirk. We are also demand ing a strict zero-tolerance policy for sex ual assault and accountability of all offenders. Commands will host man datory edu cation ses sions to raise sexual assault awareness among Sailors. Commanding officers can either hold a single two-hour stand down or break the discussions into four 30-minute weekly sessions, according to the NAVADMIN. Scripts and videos for each weeks theme will be provided to commanding officers to help facili tate discussion throughout their commands. These engagement products, in addition to talking points, posters and other tools, will be posted to the Navy Personnel Commands Sexual Assault and Prevention website, http://www.sapr.navy.mil. Navy installations and commands around the world will be organizing activities to raise awareness of sexual assault throughout the month. All units are encouraged to participate and promote SAAM events in addition to the two-hour stand down in April, said Van Buskirk. Collectively, we can make a difference in preventing sexual assault by engaging all of our people in a meaningful manner to raise awareness to change behavior, said Van Buskirk. Sexual assault prevention is a key element in the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative, which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, to build resiliency and to hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Navy. Help raise awareness by joining the conversation on social media using #SAAM. Navy promotes sexual assault awareness month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012 7

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MCPON: Happy 119TH birthday, CPOs!Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) (SS/SW) Rick West released the following Chief Petty Officer birthday message to the fleet March 28. My fellow Chief Petty Officers, on April 1, our entire mess will pause to celebrate 119 years of the United States Navy Chief Petty Officer, our honored mess traditions and heritage, and look to our future. But were not just celebrating another year of chiefs serving the Navy; were celebrating everything it means to be the chief. Our anchors are the symbol of a culture and a way of life. Since 1893, Chiefs have been charged with the responsibility of ensuring our Sailors are the best in the world, ready to carry out our Navys mission when our nation calls. We welcome that responsibility and lead by example with pride, character and loyalty, a strong commit ment to leadership, our core values and the Navy ethos. Our Navy is the best it has ever been and we must continue to build upon the strong legacy that our mess was founded on as we look to our future. 2012 is a significant year for us all as the United States Navy Memorial hosts the Year of the Chief. The Year of the Chief is a worldwide spotlight on the history and contributions of the Navy CPO mess. The Year of the Chief will officially be launched on our birthday with a kick-off event held April 2 at the Navy Memorial. For more information on the ear of the Chief, visit the Navy Memorial website. Happy birthday shipmates. I truly appreciate your leadership and the hard work you do every day. Anchor up and Hoo-Yah Navy Chiefs! the squadron currently teaches two platforms the EA-6B that has served the fleet since 1971 and the EA-18G that went operational in 2009. For many years, VAQ-129 has trained U.S. Marine Corps pilots and electronic countermea sures officers for the EA-6B Prowler. But, with the Navy moving to the EA-18G Growler, the Marine Corps EA-6B training will transition to MCAS Cherry Point, N.C. over the next two years. Flying beside Burkette was instructor pilot Maj. Steve Nelson, a Marine Corps Reservist whose civilian job is providing EA-6B ground training at VAQ-129. Ive flown the Prowler since 1999, including two tours at MCAS Cherry Point. Then, I joined VAQ-129 at NAS Whidbey Island as an instructor in 2005. I went into the reserves in 2010 and am now a defense contractor who can still put on a flight suit and impart my knowledge with students. In one of the back seats was Lt. j.g. Matt ODonnell, a brand new student who logged his first nine hours in a Prowler on this cross-country flight. Burkette said that it was a great way for him to gain his initial familiarization of this aircraft. The EA-6B Prowler is a unique part of naval aviations storied traditions. Developed from the A-6 Intruder, its distinctive side-by-side cockpit arrangement sets it apart from other Northrup Grumman designs. The Prowler has been continually upgraded over the years, with many Improved Capability (ICAP) electronic warfare sets being installed by FRCSE at NAS Jacksonville. Burkette said, Theres always some nostalgia watching an aircraft go into retirement. Thats why it was important for our squadron to cele brate the Prowler during its last full year of flying during CoNA. Were also glad to bring it to NAS Jacksonville where it will be a great addition to the other historic Navy aircraft at Heritage Park. PROWLER: Vintage EA-6B arrives from NAS Whidbey Island, bound for Heritage Parkour history and traditions because you cant move forward if you dont know where youve been. However, todays chief has many challenges. To maintain the vitality of the CPO Mess, your charge is reach back and bring to the forefront that Sailor who will take your place. NAS Jacksonville CPOs are the best Ive seen because you know how to balance your responsibilities always providing the right amount of attention to our officers, as well as our E-6 and below. Thank you all for your service and leadership. And happy birthday. After reciting the CPO Creed, Shepherd request ed the presence of NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders. Ive served a lot of COs in my career and Ill say that our skipper has been the biggest supporter of the Chiefs Mess at NAS Jax. When we implemented CPO 365, he stood right next to me and we drove the bus together along with you. On numerous other mat ters, he never fails to ask me to check the pulse of the chiefs. His respect for the Chiefs Mess helps position our base as the best in our region for supporting our warfighters, said Shepherd. Today, Im pleased to designate Capt. Sanders an honorary chief of the NAS Jacksonville Chiefs Mess for his exceptional and outstanding support of the CPO Mess from 2010 to 2012. Sanders expressed his surprise and pleasure. I was wondering what master chief was up to, espe cially when my wife arrived a few minutes ago. Ive got almost 25 years in our Navy and have taken part in a lot of ceremonies but today is one of the proudest moments in my career. Thank you for your trust and for your support. Happy birthday to you all.CPO: NAS Jax recognizes 119TH birthday 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012

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Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki says VA is on track toward meeting one of the top priorities he set on arrival at the department three years ago: breaking the back of the disability claims backlog. VA spent the last two years creating an automated tool to make claims determinations faster and more accurate, he said. Our intent is to have no claim over 125 days, Shinseki told American Forces Press Service. And every claims decision that we put out the door [will be] at a 98 percent quality mark. Toward that end, VA has been testing the new Veterans Benefit Management System in Providence, R.I., and Salt Lake City. Shinseki told Congress last month he believes this technology is helping VA approach the tipping point in ending the backlog in disability claims. He stopped by the Salt Lake City office last week to assess progress there as the depart ment prepares to take the sys tem nationwide beginning this fall. The rollout will begin at 16 regional offices in September, with all 56 VA regional offices to receive it by the end of fis cal 2013, Shinseki said. This advance is expected to go a long way in helping VA reduce the time veterans must wait for disability claims decisions, the secretary said. We know we can do it manually, Shinseki said. But we plan to layer this automation tool on top of that, and have the people who did the man ual work now armed with an automation tool. I think we will be able to improve our productivity in ways that we will be able to take that backlog down quickly. Shinseki noted the monu mental challenge VA has been up against. During 2009, VA produced 900,000 claims deci sions, but also received 1 mil lion new claims. The next year, VA increased its claims deci sions to 1 million, but received 1.2 million new claims. Last year, we produced another 1 million claims deci sions and got 1.3 million claims in, Shinseki said. So the backlog isnt static. The back log is a bigger number than we would like, but it is not the same number as three years ago. Once the automated system is in place, Shinseki said, he believes the 125-day, 98-per cent accuracy goals he set are achievable. There is a lot on the line here, he said. And that is why this rollout in September is an important one. His confidence, he said, comes from the successes hes seen automation bring to VAs processing of Post-9/11 GI Bill claims. Shinseki recalled arriving at VA in 2009 just as the new program was being launched and having to implement it on the fly, with no automation tools. Within about nine months, he said, VA was able to prepare the manual process of get ting about 173,000 people into schools by the fall 2009 term. It was pretty rocky, he acknowledged. But today, with the process now automated, VA is able to process more than 600,000 Post-9/11 GI Bill claims faster, and with fewer mistakes, the secretary said. That experience demonstrated the impor tance of keeping manual pro cessing going as automation is being rolled in, then gradu ally moving all the processes toward automation, he added. The lessons we got out of that were tremendously important, he said. It educated our efforts with the automation tool for the [disability] claims process, and we are doing the same things, step-by-step, that we learned how to do through with the [Post-9/11 GI Bill]. The new system is just one initiative VA has taken to break the claims backlog. Another effort focuses on fundamentally changing the relationship between vet erans and VA, making VA an advocate in putting together a strong claims package. VA began giving veterans a checklist of whats needed to file a claim, and also did its own digging to produce whatever documentation veterans couldnt find. This effort reduces the time needed to put a claims package together. Another pilot program focuses on making claims process ing more efficient by simplify ing the process and improving communication among the entities that process a claim to reduce procedural delays, the secretary said. Shinseki said he wanted to focus on getting the bugs out of the claims process before increasing automation. We didnt want to automate bad processes and just get lousy decisions faster, he told a Paralyzed Veterans of America gathering. So we broke the complex, convoluted claims process down into its compo nent pieces to improve each part before putting them back together.Shinseki: VA on track to break claims backlog JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012 9

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012 13 NPC site: One-stop shop for everything NavyThe Navy Personnel Command (NPC) website, hosted at www.npc.navy.mil, contains links to guidance and policy, programs, pay and benefits, Navy messages, stories and much more, officials reminded Sailors March 28. Our objective is to provide Sailors and their families with a one-stop shop for all Navy-related information and to get answers to their questions in a centralized location, said Lt. Jon Williams, functional website manager, NPC communica tions. The NPC website provides information and guidance vital to Sailors from boot camp to retirement and beyond. According to Williams, the NPC website is the second most visited Navy website and more than 85 percent of the Navys web content can only be found here. The website contains more than 2,500 pages, 15,000 documents and registers nearly one million visits per month. The Reference Library section, which contains U.S. Navy forms and instructions and DoD directives and publications, receives the most active visits every month. In February, the NAVADMIN 2012 page was the most popular page accessed on the website and received more than 100,000 views. The Knowledge Base is another valuable feature on the NPC website and was created to supple ment the NPC Customer Service Center (CSC). A Sailor can always call or email the CSC for infor mation, but also has the ability to go to www.npc. navy.mil to research and answer his or her own questions online 24/7. The Knowledge Base can be accessed from anywhere in the world. Sailors, retirees and their families can ask any question they want to about the Navy. The system uses key words to generate a solution to their question. Sailors can access the Knowledge Base by visiting the NPC website and clicking on the Ask NPC a Question icon in the upper right corner of the page. Our ultimate goal is to provide Sailors and their families with current and reliable web con tent, so they can make informed career and life decisions, said Williams. For more information or to view the website, visit www.npc.navy.mil or call NPC customer service center at 1-866-U-ASK-NPC, (1-866-827-5672) or e-mail at CSCMailbox@navy.mil. Junior Red Cross volunteers must apply by May 1 The American Red Cross at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is currently recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volunteers. This offers an excellent opportunity for students interested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine professionals physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and technicians as well as contribute to creat ing a positive experience for NH Jacksonville patients. The program is open to a limited number of high school students age 16 to 18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the hospital, and receive CPR training. Applications can be picked up at NH Jacksonvilles American Red Cross office (Room 1404, next to Physical Therapy & Occupational Therapy) and must be submit ted by May 1. Selectees are required to attend the June 9 kick-off event from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., that includes an interview, in the hospitals central tower second deck conference room. For more about this oppor tunity, call Junior Red Cross Volunteer Chairman Terry Miles at 542-7525 or e-mail terry.miles2@med.navy.mil. Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles American Red Cross volunteers are appreciated In his American Red Cross Month proclamation in March, President Obama stated, After more than 130 years of providing humanitarian relief at home and abroad, the American Red Cross remains a reflection of the com passion and generosity central to our national identity . let us resolve to preserve and renew that humanitar ian impulse to save, to serve, and to build, and carry it forward in the year to come. The American Red Cross has played a vital role in relief efforts and emer gency services around the world since 1881. Today there are approximately 1.2 million American Red Cross volun teers young and old easing the pain and suffering of disaster victims and U.S. armed forces wherever, whenever needed. For Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles 215,000 patients, a selfless team of 60 American Red Cross volunteers (con tributing about 16,000 hours per year) provides care, an open hand and hope. At any given time, one might find Red Cross volunteers helping with emer gency leave arrangements, providing comfort to relatives of an ill patient, distributing cookies, driving the parking lot shuttle or dispensing numbers at the pharmacy. Volunteers have long served as hos pital ambassadors, providing informa tion while lifting the spirits of countless patients and visitors with friendly conversation. Then theres American Red Cross Chair Helen Donahoe and Co-Chair Anne Owen. Donahoe has given 40 years of her life as a Red Cross volun teer. She is a recipient of HandsOn Jacksonvilles Young at Heart Award and The Presidents Volunteer Service Award. Like Donahoe, Owen has also received numerous accolades for her selfless contributions. Next time you see an American Red Cross volunteer take the time to extend your hand in thanks for all they do for our war fighters and Americans everywhere, said Naval Hospital Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Lynn Welling. Naval Hospital Jacksonville has a robust volunteer program comprised of American Red Cross, Retiree Liaisons and the Canine Corps (pet visitation therapy). And applications for the sum mer Junior Red Cross pro gram (for 16 to 18 year-olds) will be accepted through May 1. The American Red Cross is always looking for new volunteers. To get involved, volunteers need to be able to commit four hours per week, successfully com plete a security background screening, and be friendly and caring. Call 542-7525 to learn more. Helping patients since 1941 Experience Navy Medicine first-hand this summer

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Learn and improve your skillsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 7 p.m. midnight $11 per person for two hours of bowling Shoe rental included April Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $25 savings! Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages available including bowling, shoe rental, kids meal, cake, balloons and much more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor pool hours Mon. Fri. 5:30 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 8 p.m. Weekend hours 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238. Family Fitness Bootcamp with Ashley Monday & Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. Family Fitness Center above the Youth Center Gym Call (904) 778-9772 7th Annual Captain Chuck Cornett Navy 10K Run and 5K Walk April 7 at 8 a.m. $25 race day entry fee, patrons must have base access Race events Zumba Demonstration April 5, 11 a.m. & 4:15 p.m. NEX Convenience Store Parking Lot Hummve Pull April 5, 2 p.m. NEX Convenience Store Parking Lot Signups begin at noon Health Fair April 6, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. NEX Convenience Store Parking Lot Athletic shoe & apparel sale April 5 7, 9 a.m. 6 p.m. NEX Convenience Store Parking Lot Free give-a-ways, beverages and entertainment by the Navy Band Southeast after the race! Sign-up in the base gym or fitness center. Call (904) 542-2930/3239 for additional informationI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Disney World 4-day Hopper Armed Forces Salute ticket$135.50$162 Disney World Florida resident 3-day $98.25, 3-day hopper $125.25, 4-day $127.75, 4-day hopper $154.50 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Funk Fest May 11 & 12 at Metropolitan Park $57 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person St. Augustine Scenic Cruise Day Trip May 5, 9:30 a.m. $20 per person Jacksonville Suns $5.50-$11.50 The Vault Liberty Recreation Center Trips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Indoor Rock Climbing March 30 Departs Liberty at 6 p.m. Scuba Diving Introductory Class April 10 at 5:30 p.m. Indoor Pool Free Mall & Movie Trip Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater April 13 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees April 10 & 24 for active duty April 12 & 26 for retirees & DoD personnel Ladies Golf Clinics Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. $10 per person Pre-registration required, sign-up in the pro shop Senior Military Invitational April 30 & May 1 9 a.m. shotgun start $65 per personMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty 30th Annual Bass Tournament April 14 at first light $60 per two person team Sign-up at the marina Shoreline Clean-up May 4 at 8:30 a.m. Free lunch! Call (904) 542-2709 or e-mail angela. glass@navy.mil to sign-up Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Easter Egg Hunt April 5 at 7 p.m. McCaffrey ball fields Month of the Military Child Carnival April 21, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Fields Free games, food and prizes! 2012 Adventure Summer Registration Dates: Current School-Age Care participants Now through April 6 Single & Dual Active Duty April 9 13 Other Active Duty April 16-20 DoD Civilians April 23-27 Registration Packets available for pick up at the Youth Center.Flying Club Call 777-8549 /6035 Ground School April 16 May 23 June 4 July 16 $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012

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Estimated costs for the F-35 joint strike fighter have increased over the life of the program, but the Defense Department is working to con tain cost growth and remains committed to the fifth-gener ation fighter, defense officials said March 29. Frank Kendall III said during confirmation testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee that cost overruns for the stealth fighter are about $150 billion. Kendall is acting undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics, and if confirmed will assume that position officially. We are doing everything we can to drive down the cost of the joint strike fighter, Kendall told committee members. He noted the program is still in testing, with about 20 per cent of that process complete. We are finding design issues as we go through the test pro gram that we have to correct, he acknowledged. So there are some cost adjustments associ ated with that. Kendall outlined the depart ments actions to rein in the programs price tag. We are attacking the pro duction costs by putting strong incentives on the contractor to control costs, to get the changes that have to be made cut in quickly, he said. Concurrent engineering design is one issue that has raised costs, he told the panel. In that approach, which is intended to develop a finished product faster, a new system may simultaneously be in engineering, production and testing processes, he explained. Most programs start pro duction before they have completely finished their devel opmental tests, he said. The question is how much. The joint strike fighter was an extreme example of con currency, he said, pointing out that production was started more than a year before the first flight tests. Lessons learned during the F-35s development are now being applied to other sys tems, Kendall said. What we are doing now is setting up exit criteria so that we dont make that production commitment until we are confident that the design is reasonably stable, he added. Kendall cautioned, however, that the joint tactical vehicle and ground combat vehicle could experience cost over runs. Given the design complex ity and the urgency common to new defense equipment requirements, I am not confi dent that any defense program will not experience overruns, he said. The department now sets targets early for programs, Kendall said, which should help to force the supplier and the customer to meet target cost caps by making any nec essary tradeoffs between cost and capability. Kendall said he and his team also are working to contain sustainment costs, which are larger actually than the pro duction costs. Those costs represent the greatest poten tial cost cuts, he said, and the department will continue to pursue those savings. I do think that the strike fighter is getting under con trol, he added. Kendall signed an acqui sition decision memoran dum yesterday on the F-35, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little told reporters today. Little said in keeping with the Defense Departments better buying power initia tive, which requires track ing affordability targets and costs associated with acquisi tion programs, the memoran dum sets the current outlook for F-35 final per-unit costs in 2019, when the fifth-generation fighter is scheduled to reach full production. In todays dollars, that cost is estimated at $81.4 million per aircraft, which when adjusted for inflation is estimated at $94.9 million in 2019 dollars, Little said. Overall operating and sup port costs of the program are estimated at $1.1 trillion, up from last years estimate of $1 trillion, the press secretary added. Little noted some of that long-term increase comes from the departments deci sion, reflected in the 2013 defense budget request, to help in meeting requirements for short-term spending cuts by postponing purchase of some of the fighter aircraft. We remain fully com mitted to the F-35 program, Little said, echoing Defense Secretary Leon Panettas remarks March 27 during a visit to Canadas capital of Ottawa. Its very important to our capabilities [and] to our alliances. The United Kingdom, Italy, the Netherlands, Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway, Turkey, Israel and Singapore are partners or participants in the aircrafts development program, and the Japanese government announced in December it will buy 42 of the fighters. We are taking steps to ensure that we maintain fis cal discipline inside the pro gram, Little said. Panetta has said Kendall and the depart ments acquisition, technology and logistics team have done an outstanding job working to contain costs for the stealth fighter, he added. This is a fifth-generation fighter, Little noted. Its important for a variety of rea sons: to maintain the U.S. mil itarys technological edge, to increase interoperability with our allies, and . for a range of other purposes. This is a time of transition for the U.S. military and part of that change requires service members to immerse them selves in the study of their profession, said Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff on March 30. Dempsey took time during his recent travels to Colombia and Brazil to talk to reporters about the transitions he sees coming. In his letter to the force upon taking office in October, Dempsey stressed the need for service members to study their profession. Were not a profession sim ply because we say were a profession, he wrote. We must continue to learn, to understand, and to promote the knowledge, skills, attri butes and behaviors that define us as a profession. Dempsey said he gets a lot of affirmation on his position. Most agree that we need to look inside this profession of ours and make sure we have the attributes right, the general said in an interview aboard a C-17 en route to Colombia. Are we developing the right attributes in our new leaders? Some of those attributes are enduring, but there are some new ones. But there are a number of service members, he said, who question the need for this study. There are some who say, Cmon. Look how good were doing. If it aint broke, dont fix it, Dempsey said. To me, thats the formula for losing our credentials as a learning organization. The military has been through 10 years of conflict and service members have made many deployments. How can we think that hasnt had some effect? It seems to me to be a bit nave, the general said. Dempsey said he isnt sug gesting the military is broken. Morale is high, he said, and the spirit in the force is good. I am suggesting that we ought to have the conversa tion, the general said. The U.S. military has had these sorts of discussions throughout its existence. As the military faces its lat est transition, Dempsey said, it is a good time to see what is needed to maintain the best military on the globe. And this discussion is not limited to officers. We have been putting more emphasis on the noncommissioned offi cer as an integral part of the profession, Dempsey said. Thats kind of a new thing. Twenty years ago, the profes sion was defined by officer corps and then the NCOs were held accountable to go out and deliver it. But NCOs have to be part of the discussion on what it means to be a Soldier, Sailor, Airman or Marine, the chair man said. How do you see yourselves as leaders in the profession? he said. They are at the point of the spear on this in terms of deal ing with all the issues weve uncovered in the past 10 years. We have continually said to them rightly that they are what make us great; that they are the backbone of the profession. But being the backbone means continuing to grow and to be strong enough to support the body, the general said. Ten years of war, Dempsey said, has affected all aspects of the force. NCOs have typically been handed a training checklist, for example, to get troops ready for war. Now they are reaching a point where noncommissioned officers are going to have to think about what it means to train their organizations, he said, to deliver an outcome and to re-instill those small disciplines training manage ment, command supply dis cipline, barracks discipline those small disciplines that in a war sometimes are over looked because they are so darn busy. Now we are going to have to hold the NCOs accountable for bringing that [discipline] back, he added, and I think sometimes they underestimate the challenge. The Navys High Year Tenure (HYT) program is a force management tool used to size and shape the active-duty and Reserve enlisted force, officials said March 26. HYT sets the maximum number of years an enlisted Sailor may serve based on rank before he or she must advance, separate or if eligible, retire. High Year Tenure assists in force management by limiting the number of years a Sailor may serve without showing professional growth via the advancement system, said Senior Chief Personnel Specialist John Gigliotti, Navy Total Force Policy Advancement Planning for HYT Policy, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. By limiting how long Sailors can remain in the Navy, the HYT program increases advancement opportunity for high-performing Sailors across pay grades and Length of Service (LOS). HYT policy recognizes Sailor perfor mance by separating Sailors who have not advanced after a set amount of time, said Gigliotti. This gives other Sailors who are per forming at or above Navy standards bet ter advancement opportunities, because the Navy advances Sailors to fill openings in the next higher rank. Actively working towards advancement to the next higher pay grade is critical, because advancing is the only way a Sailor can maximize the length of their career. The following HYT LOS gates have been established based on pay grade: E1/E2 Active-duty/Full-Time Support (FTS), 4 years; Reserve, 6 years; E3 Active-duty/FTS, 5 years; Reserve, 10 years; E4 Active-duty/FTS, 8 years; Reserve, 12 years; E5 Active-duty/FTS, 14 years; Reserve, 20 years; E6 Active-duty/FTS, 20 years; Reserve, 22 years; E7 Active-duty/FTS/Reserve, 24 years; E8 Active-duty/FTS/Reserve, 26 years; E9 Active-duty/FTS/Reserve, 30 years. Command master chiefs may exceed 30 years of service with certain provi sions, according to Gigliotti. Continuing beyond 30 years isnt associated with the advancement system like E1 to E9, but with professional growth and increased responsibility for senior enlisted lead ers in command leadership positions for flag/general officers. Officers are not subject to HYT, but instead limited to statutory service lim its by paygrade. In addition, the Navy uses other force-shaping initiatives to manage the officer community, including the Selective Early Retirement Board and Probationary Officer Continuation and Redesignation Boards. HYT waiver requests are considered on a case-by-case basis for approval. Requests to continue beyond a Sailors current HYT date in support of an urgent and immediate operational requirement, in a deployed or soon to be deployed unit, or in an undermanned rating have the best chance of being approved. All waiver requests for active-duty and Reserve Sailors must arrive at Navy Personnel Command (NPC) ten months prior to the service members HYT date. Gigliotti encourages Sailors to take advantage of every advancement oppor tunity possible. Command career counselors can advise Sailors on whats required to be advancement eligible, show them how to study and assist them with getting the study material they need for their rate and pay grade. MILPERSMAN 1160-120 is a revision of the HYT policy that will incorporate both active-duty and Reserve policy, and will be effective July 1, 2012. Officials reaffirm Pentagons commitment to F-35 Joint Chiefs Chairman: Service members must prepare for transitionUnderstand high year tenure to maximize your career JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012 15

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. Family Service Center 542-5745 Better Business Bureau 721-2288 State Attorneys Office Consumer Mediation 630-2075 City of Jacksonville/ Consumer Affairs Division 630-3467 Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation 1-850-4871395Got a consumer problem? Heres who to call 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012

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Join your shipmates and co-workers at these on-base blood donation sites: April 9 Hangar 1000 10 a.m. 5 p.m. April 16 Building 1 8:30 a.m. 1 p.m. April 17 NAVFAC 10 a.m. 3 p.m. If you are retiring or separating from active duty and need assistance with submitting your claim for disability and compensation to the Veterans Administration (VA), you can start up to one year prior to retiring/separating with getting our medical information in order. AMVETS is the Veterans Service Organization advocate for separating or retiring service members and their families providing assistance with sub mission of claims to the VA for benefits, disabilities and compensation. AMVETS is a national Veterans Service Organization authorized to submit claims to the VA and advocate for veterans and their families with the VA nationwide. All assistance is free of charge and you are not required to become a member of AMVETS to use their services. For more information and to make an appointment, call David Sanders at 542-2834 or e-mail david.d.sanders@navy.mil. VA disability assistance availableSave a life! Join the Blood Alliance JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 5, 2012 17