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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/01982
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 02-23-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
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Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
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Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
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System ID: UF00028307:01982

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Top Sailors PTSD DogsHappy Notes Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com VP-10, VPU-1, HSL-42 selected Commander, Naval Air Forces (CNAF) announced the winners of the 2011Aviation Battle Efficiency (Battle E) awards Feb. 10. The aviation Battle E is the Navys top performance award presented to the aircraft car rier and aviation squadron in each competitive category that achieves the highest standards of performance readiness and efficiency. The award recogniz es a units training and oper ational achievements while including a balance that incen tivizes efficiency. USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) was the Battle E winner of the aircraft carrier category for the West Coast while the USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) won for the East Coast. The warfighting excel lence shown by these squad rons and the Vinson and the Bush proves them to be the best of the best. I am incred ibly proud of their accomplish ments, said Vice Adm. Al Myers, CNAF commander. In a time of increased demand and a constrained fiscal envi ronment, these Sailors, Officers and Aviators continue to deliv er combat effectiveness and to display the professionalism and pride that is the hallmark of naval aviation. In the aviation squadron competitions, each aviation Type-Commander selects a winner in every category, while CNAF selects the Navy-wide winners, resulting in three sets of recipients. One of the most coveted awards in the fleet, the Battle E competition is conducted to strengthen individual com mand performance, overall force readiness, and to recog nize outstanding performance within the naval aviation force. Grading metrics for attaining the Battle E award include: operational achievement, training, inspection accom plishments, material and per sonnel readiness, aviation safety, weapon systems and tactics development, and con tributions to the aviation com munity. Each member attached to a winning ship or squadron earns the right to wear the Battle E ribbon on their uni form, or if they already possess that ribbon, they can add an additional E device to the rib bon. Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFFC) Adm. John Harvey Jr. and USFFC Fleet Master Chief FLTCM(AW/NAC)Mike Stevens conducted a town hall meeting Feb. 15 at NAS Jacksonville with department heads and chief petty officers from the station and tenant commands. Topics of discus sion included leadership, trust, standards and training. Today, my focus is on you, our deckplate leaders which is where I always say, the rub ber meets the road and the chain of command looks to you to carry out the orders, uphold the standards and make the training real, said Harvey to the standing-room-only crowd in the VP-30 Auditorium. I read the overnight reports concerning the135, 000 people who work for me and like any large organization, we have some issues that detract from where we need to be. Whether youre a maintainer, pilot, air crew or NFO, the most impor tant question at the end of the day is how well did you lead the people who were placed in your charge. With more than 39 years of naval service, Harvey remind ed the audience that the funda mental elements of leadership havent changed much since the founding of Americas Navy in 1775. Trust is the glue that holds everything together. It means, that at the moment of truth, you will do the right thing according to Navy standards, whether people are or are not watching you. There are three primary reasons why you must earn the trust of your people in uniform. First, is your pro fessional competence. Next is your practical wisdom I call it common sense on when to follow rules to the letter or write a new rulebook according to the situation. And third, is your respect for those you lead. Just like you, todays young Sailors raised their right hands to take the oath to protect and defend the constitution of the United States against all ene mies with no conditions. And, we reaffirm that oath at every promotion ceremony. We talk a lot about the importance of standards and consistently enforcing them. Each is time tested and combat proven to drive how we oper ate, maintain, inspect and cer tify commands in every com munity. At the practical level, standards are about a Sailor knowing something is not right and then doing some thing about it because prob lems will not fix themselves. Thats why deckplate lead ers must develop smart, selfcorrecting Sailors who solve problems before they become major issues. When you look at successful squadrons and ships like our Battle E win ners, you see that they not only meet standards, but more like ly, they raise the bar for trust and training within their unit. President Barack Obama sent Congress a proposed defense budget of $613.9 billion for fiscal 2013, Feb. 13. The request for the Department of Defense (DoD) includes $525.4 billion in discretionary budget authority to fund base defense programs and $88.5 billion to support Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO), primarily in Afghanistan. Of the discretionary budget, $155.9 billion represents the Department of the Navys bud get request. This is a decrease of $1.4 billion from last years baseline appropriation. Rear Adm. Joseph Mulloy, deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for budget, briefed media at the Feb. 13 DoD budget press conference about the Navy portion of the budget. Mulloy said that during budget delibera tions, a premium was placed on the Navys presence in the Asia-Pacific region and the Middle East and took into account innovative methods to generate more forward presence with a smaller and leaner force while retaining the ability to surge as needed. Following the Defense Strategic Guidance, Mulloy said Navys budget was built by apply ing the tenets of war fighting first, operate for ward, and be ready. As a result, he believes the force will be leaner, agile, flexible, ready and technologically advanced while retaining core Navy-Marine Corps war fighting capabilities to operate forward, preserve the peace, respond to crises, and protect U.S. and allied interests. 2011 Aviation Battle E winners announced Harvey talks trust at town hall meetingDoD releases fiscal 2013 budget proposal

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 Often we cannot see things until they are reflected back at us. Trust me on this; six years ago I wrote a memoir with portrayals of others that annoyed friends and relatives. Seeing your self through the lens of another is jarring and sensitive, but ultimately, educational. I never fully understood my relationship with Dustin until I saw it in a snapshot from our wed ding 12 years ago. In the photo, which has a per manent spot on my dresser, Dustin and I are standing shoulder to shoulder. He is in his Navy dress whites. He has more hair, less body. I am in my wedding dress, and though I have the same amount of hair as I do now, in the pictures, I am thin and young. We are holding hands, but the image doesnt show it just our arms pressed together. I am smiling and laughing and looking just past Dustin. He is looking down and over at my pro file. He is smiling with his eyes. There is a certain twinkle in his expression. For years I couldnt describe what that twinkle meant. Then one day, while I was grabbing a pair of socks from the dresser draw er, it occurred to me. Dustin was adoring me . just as he has always done since we met. In life, I dance around Dustin while he stays steady. Or, in his words, Without Sarah, Id be more boring than I already am. All of this became clear to me in one snapshot. More recently, I am working with artist Andrea Hand, the photographer for Dinner With the Smileys, and on a weekly basis, my relationship with my three boys is reflected back at me. Andrea is not your typical photographer. Thats why I picked her. She is a storyteller. Her words are images. But when Andrea told me that she likes to capture the ordinary moments of a family, I grew a little concerned. There are few ordinary moments among my boys. Our moments usually involve lightsabers, tussles on the floor and fake Groucho Marx-like glasses and mustaches. Was Andrea prepared to see how weird my family really is? With patience, Andrea told me, I would see moments I never knew existed and that our mother-son relationship would unfold in the images. At our first session, the only thing I saw was Lindell crawling on the floor, acting like a dog. All of the boys needed a haircut and I was shocked and embarrassed that I had in fact let them wear old, stained t-shirts to Dinner With the Smileys. Then Andrea put several of the photos together in a sequence. She played them for me as a slide show. In the first image, Lindell was at the table with the family and our guest. In the next image, he was on the floor with the dog. The third and fourth images had him crawling into my lap, pet ting my face and laying his head on my shoulder. In the the last photograph, he was on the floor again with the dog. Its like theres a rubber band between the two of you, Andrea said. Lindell eats, leaves the table, comes back to my lap and then leaves again. Andrea had dozens of pictures of this same rou tine from different evenings. In my mind, I had it differently: Lindell left the table without asking and then bothered me in my lap while I was trying to talk. The pictures showed something else entirely. They showed a little boy who is begin ning to think about the larger world but who always comes back to the safety of his moth ers lap. The photographs dont show my older boys doing this. Indeed, someday the rubber band between me and Lindell will also snap. I usually hire photographers to capture the big moments, like at a wedding. Who knew that having one follow your family on a regular day could capture the even bigger moments? On a different night, Andrea showed me a slide show of Ford talking at the table. Ford always has had a larger-than-life presence. He can talk for hours if left unchallenged. So I try, as best I can, to manage his opportunities to talk and tell stories, leaving room for the other boys. Its a deli cate balance, but my fear has been that Owen will resent his older brother for stealing the spotlight. In Andreas slideshow, one-by-one, I saw some thing else. When Ford speaks, Owen looks at him adoringly. His eyes twinkle. He hangs on every word. He smiles uncontrollably. He waits patient ly for Ford to finish, whenever that might be. I had never given it much thought, but this is the way Ford and Owens relationship has always been. Ford takes center stage, and Owen loves him for it. Someday, Owen will probably marry someone alot like Ford. And he will look at his wife in the same way. He will be steady and patient, adoring her while she dances around him. His expression will give it all away. I wonder if they will ever see it? Hey, MoneyChic! What types of loans that I should avoid? I am working on getting my finances straightened out and am wondering which loans could be dangerous for my credit rating? MoneyChic says: In the last weeks column, we discussed pawn shop loans. Now we are going to discuss high-LTV (loan-to-value) home equity loans. According to Leah Glinjewicz of bankrate.com these are loans secured by the equity in your home but high LTV loans oblige you to pay more than what your equity is actually worth. Some home equity lenders allow the borrower to create a loan-to-value ratio as high as 125 percent. Taking out a loan for more than your property is worth is a real gamble especially in todays housing market where homes arent as valuable as they were just a couple of years ago. Right now, it is rare that a house ever sells for more then their fair market value. The interest rates on 125 percent LTV loans are usually higher than less-risky standard home equity loans, says Gerri Detweiler of Sarasota, Fla., author of Slash Your Debt. Also consider that all of the interest paid on the loan may not be tax deductible. To be upside down on your house and then having to move is really frightening, Detweiler says. Homeowners seldom think about all the things that can happen: divorce, a relocation or being forced to move before there is any equity in the home. Thats my two cents worth. I hope it helps steer you away from risky real estate loans. Pass & ID office gets new hoursThe Pass & ID office at the Yorktown gate will have new hours beginning March 4. Decals and badges will be issued: Monday through Thursday 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fridays 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday/Sunday 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. One-day passes will be issued when the Pass & ID office is not open. Renewal of decals can be accomplished 30 days in advance online at https://www.pid.cnic.navy.mil. You must ensure that you have your vehicle license num ber, drivers license number and insurance information prior to starting the process. For more info, contact the base secu rity office at 542-4529/30. Pictures show the little things

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Did You Know?Symptoms of DiabetesIf you notice one or more of the following symtoms, see a doctor immediately: Extreme thirst Frequent urination Drowsiness, lethargy Sugar in urine Sudden vision changes Increased appetite Sudden weight loss Fruity, sweet, or wine-like odor on breath Heavy, labored breathing Stupor, unconsciousness To learn more, call 800.533.CURE or visit jdrf.org.A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 3

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Patrick Powers and William Dodge were named Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Civilian of the Fourth Quarter 2011, respectively, Feb. 4. Powers, a mission sustain ment analyst, is a key mem ber of team ensuring that Region Southeast installations successfully execute their assigned missions Throughout the quarter, he coordinated with local, state, federal and non-governmental agencies, as well as installations, in an effort to develop strategies to protect important Navy opera tional capabilities. Pat Powers is a senior expert who takes pride in mentor ing junior Civilian Liaison Planning Officers (CPLOs) and staffers as they learn new skills, said Dave Dahl, CNRSE mission sustainment supervi sor. His achievements are rou tinely recognized by peers and supervisors alike. According to Powers, much of his success can be attribut ed to those who work around him. I try to give 100-percent every day because I dont want to let my boss or co-workers down, he said. We set a very high bar of task execution. Its a blessing to work each day with a supervisor and co-workers that are professional, dedicated and fun to be around. In earning the Junior Civilian of the Quarter award, Dodge served as the regional military working dog (MWD) trainer. He has spent count less hours developing MWD regional standard operating procedures and has established a new standard for regional program and instal lation MWD teams, said Bruce Toth, CNRSE Force Protection Program Director. In addition, he acts as a mentor to 49 Sailors and civilians and their MWDs throughout the region. Dodge also cited his coworkers as a major source of inspiration and claimed they have been instrumental to his success at CNRSE. Im very fortunate to be surrounded by subject matter experts who teach me, men tor me and guide me each and every day. Their person al initiative inspires me to be my best, and in turn, provide the CNRSE installations with the necessary tools to do their jobs, he said. According to Dodge, the most rewarding aspect of his work at the region is the impact he is able to have on junior Sailors who may someday fol low in his footsteps. I would like to think that I can encourage young Sailors to make the Navy a career like I did, he said. On my visits to installations, I always talk to the MWD handlers about what it takes to be a better handler and how that transfers over into being a model Sailor. In my three years at CNRSE, Ive helped a countless number of Sailors become dog handlers, MWD trainers and kennel masters. In the future, theyll be regional trainers, regional kennel masters and MWD pro gram managers. When I see these Sailors reach those mile stones in their careers, it makes me feel like Ive had some small part in their success. CNRSE announces Senior, Junior Civilians of the Fourth Quarter 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, encour ages Navy and Marine Corps officers to apply for the 2013 team and follow-on seasons. The Blue Angels team is seeking two Navy or Marine Corps F/A-18 demon stration pilots, a flight surgeon and one naval flight officer for the events coordi nator position, for the 2013 and followson seasons. The team is also seeking one Marine Corps C-130 demonstration pilot, a public affairs officer and a main tenance officer. We are looking for highly motivated career-oriented officers who desire an opportunity to represent the finest men and women of the United States Navy and Marine Corps, said Blue Angels Opposing Solo Pilot Lt. Dave Tickle. The opportunity to demonstrate the teamwork and dedication of our mili tary to citizens across the country is a rare and unique privilege, Tickle added. It is important the individuals selected are well rounded and proficient in their fields. Applying is easy, Tickle said. However, once we enter the deci sion-making process we take time to ensure the right applicants are selected to uphold the standards of excellence found throughout the fleet. Once individuals are considered active applicants, they are invited to attend any pre-show briefing during the normal show season and attend social functions at the air shows. This gives prospective members insight into the overall routine of the Blue Angels and allows team members to meet the appli cants. Future Blue Angels must have a strong work ethic, exceptional commu nication skills, the enthusiasm to rep resent the men and women of the Navy and Marine Corps and the desire to uphold the traditions of the Blue Angels organization. My favorite part about being on this team is having the opportunity to talk to children at the show sites and see their faces light up with enjoyment, said Blue Angels Lead Solo Pilot Lt. C.J Simonsen. Our hope is to inspire them to pursue careers in the Navy and Marine Corps and focus their studies in math, science and technology. Navy and Marine Corps F/A-18 dem onstration pilots and naval flight offi cers are required to have a minimum 1,250 tactical jet hours and be carri er-qualified. Marine Corps C-130 dem onstration pilots are required to have 1,200 flight hours and be an aircraft commander. The dedication and teamwork of the Blue Angels is absolutely amazing, said Blue Angels Flight Surgeon Lt. Cmdr. Jason Smith. Applicants, if selected, can expect a challenging and rewarding experience. Officers must be comfortable in deal ing with groups and individuals while demonstrating professionalism, moti vation and integrity. For information on how to apply visit the Blue Angels at www.blueangels. navy.mil. Adjustments to the active duty and full time support (FTS) Aviation Career Continuation Pay (ACCP) program were announced via Navy messages, Feb. 14. According to NAVADMINs 055/12 and 056/12, the ACCP program pro vides selected bonuses as an incentive to eligible pilots and naval flight officers (NFOs) through department head and command milestones. Fiscal year (FY) 2012 active duty department head retention bonus annual rates have changed from FY-11 in the following aviation communities and designators: $15,000 per year; pilots/helicopter maritime strike pilots, $5,000 per year; attack (VAQ) pilots, $25,000 per year; (VAW) and C-2 fleet logistics support (VRC) pilots, $10,000 per year; year; pilots, $15,000 per year; FTS annual rates vary by communi ty from $5,000 to $25,000 for squadron department head/wing staff. The avia tion commander command bonus has been removed. The Navy expects roughly 310 active duty and 75 FTS aviators to take advan tage of the ACCP program this year. Department head retention bonuses will be paid in equal annual install ments. Additionally, the FY-12 program continues to authorize the payment of five-year contracts one year prior to the completion of the active duty minimum service requirement (MSR). Long-term applicants are eligible if their MSR expires in FY-12 or FY-13. Payment will begin when an officer is within one year of completing their MSR. Active duty ACCP applications must be received before Aug. 31, 2012. FTS ACCP applications must be received before Sept. 24, 2012. For more details regarding eligibil ity, administrative procedures and the application letter format, visit the ACCP Bonus Web Page at: www.npc.navy.mil/ officer/Detailing/aviation/OCM/Pages/ ACCP.aspx. Blue Angels seek officersFY-12 aviation officer bonus rates released JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 From feel-good Dixieland tunes, traditional jazz and cer emonial fanfares to quintets of woodwinds and brass, as well as rock n roll and hip-hop, Navy Band Southeast (NBSE) brings inspiring music to the fleet and communities. NBSE is the musical repre sentative for Commander, Navy Region Southeast, and is one of the Navys 11 Fleet Bands. Established in 1995, the band provides musical support for Navy bases, tenant commands and community outreach events. Under the leadership of Director Lt. Mike Corbliss and Assistant Director MUCS Patrick Detroit, the units exceptional musicians display their talents through a full repertoire of con certs at community events, patri otic ceremonies and parades. They also play a dynamic role in supporting Navy recruitment. Corbliss assumed command in January and is in the midst of learning the bands personnel and schedule of events. Id like to take the band in a direction where we increase our impact on communities outside the gate especially with master class es to middle and high schools. In addition to supporting Fort Lauderdale Fleet Week in April, youll also see Navy Band Southeast performing at band shells in Jacksonville Beach, Green Cove Springs and Daytona Beach. Corbliss added, When you see our Sailors in uniform doing their jobs, they are total professionals who represent Navy excellence much like the Blue Angels. We are a dedicated, musically charged recruiting poster for the Navy. NBSE Leading Chief Petty Officer MUCS Kenny Oliver (who plays the trombone and tuba) is on his second tour at NAS Jacksonville. I served here from 2003 to 2008, then did a tour in San Diego, and returned to NAS Jax last spring. While the San Diego musicians are an out standing group of professionals Jacksonville seems more like home for me, said Oliver. And weve got a very deep pool of talent with this band. NBSE is billeted for 45 musi cians who perform in the tradi tional Ceremonial Band, as well as seven other smaller ensem bles. So when they are not per forming, theyre practicing with one of the small bands such as TGIF, VIP Combo, Fairwinds woodwind quintet, Windward Brass quintet, Orion, Pride, and the Wind Ensemble. Many of the musicians play more than one instrument, which enables them to contrib ute in a variety of musical for mats. Two of the most-requested small bands are the Dixieland band, TGIF, and the rock band, Pride. Oliver added, Rounding out Navy Band Southeast, are a

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 7 number of talented vocalists who perform as soloists and backup singers or as a capella harmonizers of songs such as the national anthem. They also perform as auxil iary percussionists. How are musicians recruited? Corbliss explained, The Navy looks for people with proven talent who have the desire to perform music as a career. And with todays uncertain economy, comparable civilian jobs such as middle school, high school and col lege band directors, as well as symphony orchestras are cutting back so Navy bands are an appealing alterna tive for career musicians. The Navy School of Music (of which Corbliss is a former director) is located aboard the Naval Amphibious Base in Little Creek, Va. The school is the primary means of training musicians accepted into the music rating, and serves as not only the A school for Navy musicians, but offers further training and development as C schools for more senior Sailors and chiefs. Oliver noted that the musician rating is one of the top three in the Navy for enlisted personnel who hold college diplomas. Many of our Sailors have masters degrees. Some, when they reach E-6, may go on to become bandmaster limited duty officers who command the Navys Fleet Bands. How do you book an NBSE event? The band takes requests up to 12 months prior to an event. Military band performances must also meet the following criteria: purposes is prohibited; prohibited; endorsement of commercial establishments, religious causes, products or political causes are prohibited. For more booking information, call 542-8059 or email charity.barron@navy.mil.

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Blue Angels announce enlisted opportunities for 2013The Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, encourage qualified Navy and Marine Corps enlisted personnel to apply for the 2013 and follow-on seasons. Navy E-5 and above, and outstanding E-4 Sailors from multiple aviation platforms are considered for this typetwo sea duty billet. Blue Angels Command Master Chief Yoshimi Core explained the Blue Angels team is not locked into select ing Sailors solely based on naval enlisted codes (NECs) or F/A-18 experience. However, Marine Corps applicants must be F/A-18 specific electricians, communication/ navigation (COMNAV), power plants or airframes. The squadrons Enlisted Applications Chief, AECS Patrick Hosterman, said the team has a variety of opportuni ties available for the following rates: aviation machin ists mate (AD), aviation electricians mate (AE), aviation structural mechanic (AM and AME), aviation ordnance man (AO), aviation support equipmentmen (AS), avia tion electronics technician (AT), aviation maintenance administrationman (AZ), aircrew survival equipment man (PR), mass communication specialist (MC), logistics specialist (LS), and yeoman (YN). The team is also looking for a hospital corpsman (HM) with an 8406 NEC and E-7s in aviation maintenance ratings. Core explained team members must have a strong work ethic, exceptional communication skills, the enthusiasm to represent the men and women of the Navy and Marine Corps and the desire to uphold the traditions of the Blue Angels organization. The Blue Angels Navy and Marine Corps members are all about team work, said Core. Ultimately, you can be the best technician in the world but if you do not thrive on teamwork you are not the right fit for this team. It is common to see Blue Angel HMs, YNs, MCs and LSs on the flight line servicing jets. Team members in differ ent work centers help other shops with heavier or higher priority workloads. Each member adds their skills to the team and they are refined in an intense training process. Prospective chief, limited duty officer and Seamen to Admiral candidates benefit from sustained superior per formance, and selection to the team is just another good bullet in their resume, said Core. The Blue Angels are a small sample of the best Sailors and Marines in the fleet. AMC (Safety Equipment) Brian Williamson, the Blue Angels detailer, says Sailors should not be concerned about getting penalized if they do not get picked for the team. They will be given one more look in Career Management System/Interactive Detailing (CMS/ID) before they are considered needs of the Navy. If you are accepted for the team, the exposure you get and the military bearing you learn will last the rest of your career, said Williamson. For more information on how to apply, visit the Blue Angels at www.blueangels. navy.mil or contact Hosterman at patrick.hosterman@ navy.mil. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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The $525.4 billion for the base DoD budget includes cuts and other initia tives that will reduce planned spend ing by $259 billion over the next five years and $487 billion over ten years, levels that are consistent with the Budget Control Act. The budget adjusts programs that develop and procure military equipment; begins to re-size ground forces; slows the growth of com pensation and benefit programs; con tinues to make better use of defense resources by reducing lower-priority programs, and restructures the defense organization to achieve more efficient approaches to doing business. Highlights of the Navy budget pro posal include: lion per year in shipbuilding, result across the Future Years Defense Plan (FYDP). Although a decrease from the strives to maintain a healthy industrial base. will result in a Navy fleet size of more than 280 ships by the end of the fiveyear plan. F. Kennedy (CVN 79) has not changed; signing of the detailed design and con schedule. The construction schedule will be moved back two years in order to decrease pressure on the ship-building budget without impacting force struc ture. CVN 79 is the numerical replace be delivered no later than 2022 in order ture. straints, procurement is slowed across one of each variant. impact is minimal since LHA 8 also has operational one year after delivery in the FY25 timeframe. ships will be retired before the end of their service lives which is consistent with working more efficiently and costeffectively in this resource-constrained environment. gram continue, but at reduced lev els. Virginia-class procurement was large undersea strike capacity lost when investing in research and development for the Virginia Payload Module. at sufficient levels to meet fielding and combat requirements with manage However, many programs have been delayed or reduced. reduced by nearly 50 percent across the reduced). ial vehicles has been reduced, it remains robust despite a delay in the Unmanned Carrier Launched Airborne development of new sea-based intel ligence, surveillance and reconnais departments commitment to taking and their families and continues the investments needed to ensure they remain the worlds premier maritime increase that reflects the economic con ditions of the country is proposed in achieve more control over personnel costs while also keeping pay competi tive. DoD: Fiscal 2013 budget proposal released JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 9

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Often a patient tells me they know about the risks of smok ing tobacco but are less con cerned about dipping or chew ing tobacco. About 1 in 10 American high school students start on a tough road to substance abuse by using smokeless tobacco. They probably dont know the risks of cancer associated with this habit, nor do they know the dangers of getting hooked on something that can only hurt them. Many service members get hooked while deployed, where friends often tolerate the dip. Find friends who dont want to become dependent on any kind of drug and ask them to help you stay off the dip. Bad hab its are never easy to change, but well worth the effort to be tobacco-free. The Great American Spit Out is Feb. 23 this year, when health professionals try our best to get the word out on the dangers of smokeless tobacco. Q: Whats the problem with smokeless tobacco, anyway? Smokeless tobacco is a sig nificant health risk and is not a safe substitute for smok ing cigarettes. Smokeless tobacco contains 28 cancercausing agents (carcinogens). Smokeless tobacco use can lead to nicotine addiction and dependence. Adolescents who use smoke less tobacco are more likely to become cigarette smokers. The two main types of smokeless tobacco in the U.S. are chewing tobacco and snuff. Chewing tobacco comes in the form of loose leaf, plug or twist. Snuff is finely ground tobac co that can be dry, moist or in sachets (like tea bags). Although some forms of snuff can be used by sniffing or inhaling into the nose, most smokeless tobacco users place the product in their cheek or between their gum and cheek. Users then suck on the tobacco and spit out the tobacco juice, which is why smokeless tobacco is often referred to as spit or spitting tobacco. Smokeless tobacco is a known cause of human cancer, as it increases the risk of devel oping cancer of the oral cavity. Its also a risk factor for cardio vascular diseases and nicotine addiction. Despite these adverse effects, smokeless tobacco is used commonly in the U.S. by young people, especially male high school students. Our dentists tell me the number of patients they see dipping tobacco is ris ing every year. Q: Whos at highest risk for problems with smokeless tobacco? Smokeless tobacco use in the United States is higher among young white males; American Indians/Alaska Natives; people living in southern and north central states; and people who are employed in blue collar occupations, service/laborer jobs, or are unemployed. Data suggest that smokeless tobacco use is predominantly a public health problem among men, young adults (aged 18 to 24 years), and those with a high school education or less. Nationally, an estimated three percent of adults are cur rent smokeless tobacco users. But the number of active duty Sailors and Marines using smokeless tobacco may be as high as 40 percent. Smokeless tobacco use is much higher among men (six percent) than women (less than one percent). Research suggests that per sons who use multiple tobacco products might have a more difficult time quitting, which might result in longer dura tion of product use and an increased likelihood of tobac co-related morbidity and mor tality. Worrisome data also shows more use among youth. An estimated eight percent of high school students are current smokeless tobacco users. Smokeless tobacco is more common among male (13.6 percent) than female high school students (2.2 percent). Estimates by race/ethnicity are 10.2 percent for white, 5.1 per cent for Hispanic, and 1.7 per cent for African-American high school students. An estimated three percent of middle school students are current smokeless tobacco users. Smokeless tobacco is more common among male (4 percent) than female (2 per cent) middle school students. Q: How can we prevent dependence on smokeless tobacco? Hopefully by clarifying that smokeless tobacco is not safe, we can help people make an informed decision about its use. School-based programs are an opportunity to discour age youth from using smoke less tobacco. The film industry can also influence the public by not glamorizing any form of tobac co use. More community-wide efforts aimed at preventing and stopping smokeless tobacco use among young people are needed. In addition, opportunities for intervention occur in all clinical settings and require knowledgeable and commit ted health care professionals. Training programs for health care providers should help make smokeless tobacco coun seling a higher priority. Recent tobacco indus try advertising has encour aged cigarette smokers to use smokeless tobacco as an alter native product in locations where cigarette smoking is pro hibited (e.g., smoke-free work places like submarines, airlines and theaters). Continued surveillance of the co-use of tobacco products is needed to determine the effect of such marketing mes sages and the reasons for the high prevalence of smokeless tobacco use among cigarette smokers in some states. Anti-tobacco media messag es, policies and other interven tions that prevent starting and encourage stopping of both products also are needed, par ticularly in states with a high prevalence of smokeless tobac co use and cigarette smoking. Dentists and dental hygien ists can be effective in identify ing smokeless tobacco use and advising users to quit. To encourage quitting, health care providersinclud ing dentists and dental hygien ists should: 1) ask patients about all forms of tobacco use, 2) advise them to quit using all forms of tobacco, 3) assess their willingness to quit, 4) assist them in quitting, and 5) arrange for follow-up con tacts with Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Wellness Centers. At Naval Hospital Jacksonville, were trying a few outside the box approaches to help our patients quit smok ing and quit smokeless tobac co. Our Central Appointments (904-542-4677) has an option for tobacco users to get the medical therapy they may need. With our electronic health records, we can screen patients by phone and help them get the care that really does help them quit. In 2011, over 5,600 patients made the decision to try to quit tobacco products with our help. Our quit rate is nearly 25 percent of those we enroll in our program. Give us a try. Call the Wellness Center at 542-5292. Remember, smoke less tobacco is not a safe alter native. Ask Dr. Joe: Great American Spit Out 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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The Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) announced Feb. 10 the 2012 Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) Hall of Honor inductees naming Cmdr. Scott Carpenter, Capt. Arnold J. Isbell and Rear Adm. Daniel J. Wolkensdorfer as this years honorees. Chosen from a list of nearly 30 highly accomplished community members, Carpenter, Isbell and Wolkensdorfer were deemed by their peers to have made a significant contribution to the MPRF both in their actions and leader ship. Reading the nomination submis sions for these heroes seems like a les son in history, said Lt. Cmdr. Andy Morrison, vice president of Symposium 2012 for MPA. Their accomplishments have received praise for everything from helping to build the framework of our aviation community to enriching research and development for the Navy and NASA. The MPRF Hall of Honor has set a precedent of honoring the men and women who have helped shape the her itage of this aviation community and/ or displayed acts of heroism in and out of combat, during the following eras: WWII, Korea, Vietnam, The Cold War, Post Cold War, and Global War on Terror. Beginning in 2011, individuals were honored in conjunction with the Centennial of Naval Aviation events. New inductees will now be honored annually at the Heritage Dinner during the MPA Symposium. During the inaugural 2011 Heritage Dinner at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117, six Navy aviators were inducted into the MPRF Hall of Honor: Capt. Fernald Anderson; Jay Beasley; AOC Carl Creamer; Capt. Norman Bus Miller, the most decorated naval aviator of WWII; Adm. Thomas Moorer and Vice Adm. Edward Waller. The 2012 MPA Symposium is March 27-30, aboard NAS Jacksonville. Symposium attendees can register for a host of events, including the P-8A Poseidon Roll-Out, Integrated Training Center dedication, a Flight Suit Social, golf tournament, 5K run, Heritage Dinner and others. The Heritage Dinner, which highlights the history and heritage of the last 50 years of the P-3 Orion aircraft, will also serve as a ceremony for three new MPRF Hall of Honor inductees from the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community. For more information about the 2012 MPA Symposium, as well as online reg istration, go to:www.maritimepatrolas sociation.org/2012symposium A 501(c)(3) Florida non-profit corpo ration established in 2011 and head quartered in Jacksonville, Fla., the Maritime Patrol Association is a pre mier professional organization repre senting the U.S. Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community by pro moting the use of the patrol and recon naissance aircraft in the U.S. Navy. For more information, contact Executive Director September Wilkerson at (904) 563-4036 orinfo@maritimepatrolasso ciation.org. Maritime Patrol Association announces 2012 Hall of Honor inductees JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 11

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When AWVC(NAC/AW) John Markee adopted a rescue puppy through a Jacksonville animal adoption agency, little did he know that she would be the one rescuing him. After serving several tours in Afghanistan, Markee returned home with post-traumatic stress dis order (PTSD) which has impacted his 18-year naval career and home life. After being diagnosed, my doctor told me about some programs that pro vide free canine companions to service members. Our family had just adopted Daisy because we our basset hound, Dallas had passed away. We found out that The Animal Rescue and Adoption Agency here had some puppies they named the Dallas litter, after charac ters from the TV show. Daisy was origi nally named Lucy, said Markee. As he was researching programs on canine companions, Markee learned about K-9s For Warriors in Ponte Vedra Beach. I contacted them and asked if I could go through the program with Daisy. After submitting our application and meeting the trainers for an evaluation, Daisy and I were deemed trainable, he continued. The team spent five weeks living on site at the facility, trained so Daisy could become a certified service dog. We spent the mornings in obedience training and the afternoons going on outings to expose us to the public. It was a bit difficult at first because Daisy was not very attentive and we were both uncomfortable but we graduated on Veterans Day 2011 and make a great team, Markee added. Daisy is trained to keep Markee calm in stressful situations and provide com fort. Shes always there and can sense when something is going on with me. Shes a rescue dog but its a question of who rescued who. I think she rescued me more than I rescued her, he said. Markee is also quick to praise K-9s For Warriors which was started in 2010 by Shari Duval after she volunteered with the Wounded Warrior Project help ing those with PTSD and her seeing her son, an Army contractor bomb dog han dler, return home after a tour in Iraq with PTSD. After working closely with the Wounded Warrior Project, and seeing the amount of disabled warriors return home the conflicts of the wars suffering from PTSD, our family decided start an academy to train service canines to aid veterans in their recovery, said Duval. We spent two years researching canine assistance for PTSD and decided the best way to help was to start a non-profit organization to train and give service canines to assist our warriors efforts to return to civilian life with dignity and independence. The academy is operated by Duval, her son-in-law, Todd Galley who serves as director of canine operations and Dog Training Specialists Brett Simon, who served two tours in Iraq as a dog handler contractor for the Army, and Bob Hammesfahr, a military veteran. My whole experience at K-9s For Warriors has changed my life for the better. Youre there with other vets so you have a support network. Shari takes care of us like we are her sons and Brett was in Iraq so he can relate to what we are going through. Its like we are part of the family, said Markee. The program is available to any mili tary member either active duty of hon orably discharged who has been diag nosed with PTSD as a result of the wars since 9/11. After submitting an applica tion, including medical records and a doctors letter of recommendation and they are approved for the program, they are scheduled into a class. Applicants live at our facility where they train their canines with our certi fied trainers. We believe that involving the warrior in the training of their new partner is helping them be part of their own recovery. We provide housing, a canine, training, equipment, meals, and full assistance with their issues and provide resources as necessary. Their only cost is getting to and from our facility, said Duval. Most of the dogs are rescue dogs that are also carefully screened before entering the program. Once they are accepted, the dogs are trained prior to be placed with a service member. After talking with each warrior per sonally and evaluating their individ ual needs, we are in a better position to determine the type of canine they require. We take into account their liv ing arrangements, family, children, other pets, climate, etc. It is rare that the warrior does not approve of the canine we choose for them, however, we are prepared with other canines should this situation occur, Duval continued. So far, 15 service member/dog teams have gone through the program with 14 successful placements. Many continue to return for refresher training or just because they enjoy visiting. Daisy and I go out to the dog house quite often to help out or just visit our friends who continually offer us sup port, said Markee. This is an outstanding program. Its been life changing in the right direction spiritually, mentally, physical the full spectrum. I dont think Id be where Im at in my treatment now without K9s For Warriors. Service canines are a medically prov en recovery aid for warriors suffering from PTSD. These dogs are considered medical equipment and are recognized by the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division, and the American Disability Act of 1990 which means they are allowed into all public facilities. For more information on K9s For Warriors, go to www.k9sforwarriors.org. K-9 companions assist Sailors with daily routines 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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In an unassuming and unmarked Quonset hut lining Yorktown Road at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Sailors assigned to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) are ensuring U.S. military aircrews have the firepower needed to deter, defend and defeat the enemy. In the FRCSE Aircraft Armament Equipment (AAE) Division, 18 Sailors inspect, troubleshoot and repair SH-60R/S Helicopter Hellfire Missile Launchers, P-3 Orion Bomb Rack Units (BRU) and other AAE for the Fleet. AAE includes all equipment designed to suspend, release and launch ordnance from an aircraft. The ordnance maintenance function includes equipment inspection, calibration, corrosion treatment, wiring harness and cable repair, preservation, storage, inven tory control and recordkeeping. It cant be armed without us and without us, its just another airliner, said AO1 Matthew Vock of the aircraft. He said Lockheed Martin discovered a discrepancy with some card racks installed in Hellfire M299 Missile Launcher Electronics Assemblies (LEAs) that could potentially cause a failure. AAE Sailors pulled the dis crepant LEAs from inventory and shipped them to Lockheed in June 2011. There technicians made repairs and returned the LEAs to FRCSE in November for final testing. In response to a Lockheed Martin request, AAE division Sailors inspected and tested 15 Hellfire M299 Missile LEAs at the end of 2011. We put the LEAs in the launchers and tested them with CRALTS (Common Rack and Launcher Test Sets) to make sure they were RFI (Ready For Issue), said Vock. The M299 Hellfire Missile Launcher is procured by the Navy through the Army Joint Attack Munitions Systems (JAMS) Project Office in Huntsville, Ala. Lockheed Martin, who builds the LEA, the brains of the M299 launcher, discovered a discrepancy during production, said Bob Buckley, assistant program man ager for AAE logistics, Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) Precision Strike Weapons program, PMA201. Sailors from FRCSE and representatives from Lockheed Martin, with coordination between the Army JAMS office and logistics specialists from NAVAIR PMA-201, identified, staged and conducted repairs. On another project, FRCSE Sailors also assisted Lockheed Martin and PMA-201, the program respon sible for armament equipment, to repair, inspect and return to service 45 BRU-14. They completed 29 units in 2010 and 16 units in 2011. Tim Zimmer with PMA-201 AAE logistics said these units are slated for new production MH-60S and MH-60R helicopters at Lockheed Martins facility in Owego, N.Y. where the BRU-14 will be integrated onto the aircraft. During Fiscal Year 2011, the AAE division also repaired for its Fleet customers about 50 standard and Maverick weapons pylon assemblies used on P-3 Orion Maritime Patrol Aircraft. FRCSE is the only facility to repair these particular assemblies. The shop fields numerous calls from the Fleet requesting technical information and assistance. AAE Division Officer Chief Warrant Officer Keith Turnipseed said the Sailors he serves with are amaz ing. They never get behind, they never have rework, and they are keeping the squadrons happy, he stated. FRCSE Sailors repair armament equipment to protect war fighters JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 13

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Call 542-3521 Play Bingo at lunch Mon. Fri. at 11:15 a.m. Play Bingo at dinner Sun. Tues. and Thurs. at 6:30 p.m. Cash prizes February evening bingo special Buy one paper package and receive one for free! Limit one promotional package per person DJ entertainment at the Bud Brew House Feb. 24, 8 10 p.m. Food & beverage specials Call 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 2 sessions, 7 9 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. midnight $11 per person, includes shoe rental February Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 4 10 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $17 savings!Call 542-2930 Indoor pool hours Mon. Fri. 5:30 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 8 p.m. Weekend hours 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Leprechaun Dash 5K March 16 11:30 a.m. on Perimeter Rd. Pre-register by March 9 at the base gym or fitness center Family Fitness Bootcamp with Ashley Monday & Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. Family Fitness Center above the Youth Center Gym Call (904) 778-9772 7th Annual Captain Chuck Cornett Navy 10K Run and 5K Walk April 7 at 8 a.m. $15 military, $20 authorized base personnel, $25 race day Race events Zumba Demonstration April 5, 11 a.m. & 4:15 p.m. NEX Convenience Store Parking Lot Hummve Pull April 5, 2 p.m. NEX Convenience Store Parking Lot Sign-ups begin at noon Health Fair April 6, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. NEX Convenience Store Parking Lot Athletic shoe & apparel sale April 5 7, 9 a.m. 6 p.m. NEX Convenience Store Parking Lot Free give-a-ways, beverages and entertainment by the Navy Band Southeast after the race! Sign-up in the base gym or fit ness center. Call (904) 542-2930/3239 for additional infotmationCall 542-3318. 22nd Annual ITT Travel Fair NEX Courtyard March 10, 9:30 a.m. 1 p.m. featuring ITT vendors and great door prizes! Harlem Globetrotters March 2 at Veterans Memorial Arena $26 Funk Fest May 11 & 12 at Metropolitan Park $57 Now booking all-inclusive Sandals Resorts vacations The Gaylord Palms Resort offers a preferred rate for ITT customers. The resort is located just one mile from Walt Disney World. Rates include Ice & Snow tickets. Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville First Orchestra seating avail able for Les Miserables. Valdosta, Georgia historic sites bus tour Feb. 11, $20 Includes admission to Crescent House, the Art Center and the Historical Museum Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person Gatornationals March 9, 10 & 11 $10 $51 ITT is now offering cruises aboard the Celebration Cruise Lines from $186.50 per person! Daytona 500 Feb. 18 26, $27 to $199 Monster Jam March 3, $25 $41 Daytona Bike Week March 10 & 17 $25 Blue Man Group in Orlando $48, includes CityWalk venue Phineas and Ferb tickets, March 10, 3:30 p.m. & 6:30 p.m. shows $13 each! Veterans Memorial Arena Disney on Ice featuring Toy Story 3 April 6, 7:30 p.m. April 7, 11:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. April 8, 1 & 5 p.m. Lower level seating for $13 Orlando Magic all home games $22.50 $383 Disney World Orlando, FL 4day hopper Armed Forces Ticket $135.50 $162 Universal Circus $19.50 Tampa Zoo $19 adult, $17.50 child Trips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Learn to Fly February 26 at 8 a.m. Free introductory lesson at the Navy Jax Flying Club Walt Disney World Weekend Trip March 24 $100 per person includes 2-night lodging at Disneys All Star Sports Resort, 1-day park hopper and transportation. Free Mall & Movie Trip Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater March 9 at 6 p.m. Free Adventure Landing Trip March 10 at 9 a.m.Golf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees March 6 & 20 for active duty March 8 & 22 for retirees & DoD personnel February Golf Specials Monday & Tuesday play 18 holes for $20 Monday Friday after 12 p.m., play 18 holes for $17 Cart and green fees included Not applicable on holidays Twilight Golf League March 20 Aug. 30 $20 entry fee Rosters due by March 16Call 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Call 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recre ation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. and Tuesday & Thursday 4 7 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more infor mation. Call 777-8549 /6035 Ground School Feb. 27 April 4 $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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Harvey also addressed what he called the increasing levels of uncertainty surrounding todays Navy. Weve seen it by going through the involuntary sepa ration process known as ERB (Enlisted Retention Board). Naturally, retained Sailors are looking at each other and wondering, Whos next? And whats next? Theres additional uncertainty about pay scales, retirement benefits and our force structure. So, I urge you to keep your Sailors focused on what they can control work hard, get qualified, build trust and stay out of trouble. Stevens relieved one point of uncertainty when he announced there would be no ERB in FY 13 or FY 14. He also spoke of chiefs messes taking advantage of training to polish their leadership and communi cation skills. Its important for senior enlisted to reenergize their focus on CPO responsibili ties, team building and leader development. Key elements include: teamwork within the mess; communication with the wardroom; how chiefs can mentor junior officers; and how chiefs are managing key per sonnel programs, explained Stevens. After the town hall meet ing, Harveys group visited the HSM-70 Spartans, CPRW-11 Mobile Tactical Operations Center, the P-8A Integrated Training Center and the VP-10 Red Lancers. Harvey and Stevens also dined with command master chiefs at the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf. U.S. Fleet Forces Command supports both the Chief of Naval Operations and Combatant Commanders worldwide by providing responsive, relevant, sustain able Naval forces that are ready for tasking. Additionally, USFFC serves as the CNOs designated execu tive agent for Anti-Terrorism/ Force Protection, Individual Augmentees and Sea Basing.HARVEY: Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command pays visit For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR website at www. cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook. com nasjaxmwr JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 The Navy contract for job search and assistance to help Sailors separating by the Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) is well underway, an official said Feb. 17. Navy has contract ed Challenger, Gray and Christmas Inc. (CGC), an out placement service company, to personally coach and assist ERB-separating Sailors transi tion to the civilian workforce, said Capt. Kate Janac, transi tion assistance program man ager. The Sept. 1 separation date is approaching and ERB Sailors should immediately contact CGC via the toll-free number or email to begin their job place ment process. An employment outplace ment service assists clients in making the transition to reem ployment. Founded in the early 1960s, CGC has more than four decades of experience in the career transition industry. The CGC team provides Sailors with individualized career assessment and pro fessional resume writing, job search and preparation for interviews. The company assigns each Sailor a civilian coach who proactively works their case through each step of the process. The coach is also a prior-military advisor to help in the transition. Our goal is to connect every ERB separating Sailor to this service. Command leadership needs to encourage and pro vide Sailors the opportunity to enroll and move forward, said Janac. Those stationed overseas or deployed should also initiate contact and will receive support tailored to their unique situations. What really stands out is the high level of individual, professional service our Sailors will receive, said Janac. Sailors can engage with their coach to learn the skills needed to develop a personal market ing plan customized to their expertise and specific goals. CGC began contacting ERB Sailors via email in December. Approximately 1,000 Sailors are using services provided by CGC, one third of eligible recipients. CGC representatives have joined Navy Personnel Commands Fleet Engagement Team during its briefs in fleet concentration areas to facili tate enrollment. ERB separating Sailors should contact CGC via their toll free number 1-800-9714288 or email CGCUSNavy@ challengergray.com. For too long, synthetic THC (the hallucinogenic chemi cal in marijuana) known as Spice, K2, and Blaze, as well as the synthetic stimu lants commonly called bath salts or plant food, have plagued our military. Over the past several months, the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) has used its emergency schedul ing authority to designate five synthetic THC chemicals and three synthetic stimulants as Schedule I controlled sub stances making their sale, pos session and use illegal in the United States. As most of the Navy already knows, use or possession of these substances by Navy per sonnel is forbidden and could possibly subject a Sailor to NJP, administrative separation, or even court-martial under UCMJ Art. 112a or UCMJ Art. 92 (for violation of OPNAVINST 5350.4D, SECNAVINST 5300.28E and/or NAVADMIN 108/10). However, in addition to the possible severe legal consequences, individual Sailors and Navy leadership should understand the harm ful and potentially deadly effects of using these drugs. Many people have heard of a Schedule I substance but dont know what it really means. A Schedule I sub stance is considered by the DEA to be the most restrictive category and is only reserved for unsafe and highly abused substances with no medical usage. Moreover, the DEA gen erally only uses its emergency scheduling authority to ban substances it believes could cause an imminent public health crisis. The DEA states that they have received an increasing number of reports from poi son control centers, hospitals and law enforcement that indi viduals using synthetic THC have experienced serious side effects such as convulsions, anxiety attacks, dangerously elevated heart rates, increased blood pressure, vomiting, and disorientation. Moreover, when discussing the side effects of synthetic marijuana, the Navy Surgeon General, Vice Adm. Adam M. Robinson, Jr., stat ed that, Serious side effects have been reported after its use including tremors, panic attacks, delirium, impaired coordination, seizures, para noid hallucinations, and psy chotic symptoms that can last for days, even months in some cases. With regard to bath salts the reported side effects include agitation, paranoia, high blood pressure, hallucina tions, chest pain, suicidality, and even psychosis! Sailors should be aware that ingesting these synthetic drugs can lead to strange reactions and deadly results. Police in West Virginia recently arrest ed a man after they found him dressed in womens clothing, standing with his pants down over a blood-soaked goat that he allegedly stole and killed he blamed his bizarre action on bath salts use. Worse, Reuters News Agency report ed claims from the European Union that mephedrone, a chemical often found in bath salts, was directly linked to the deaths of two people and is possibly tied to the deaths of 37 more! A quick search on the Internet will reveal many simi lar stories. Given these potential conse quences, its also important for Sailors to know that ingesting these synthetic compounds is like playing Russian Roulette. Even the manufacturers them selves label most, if not all, of these substances as not fit for human consumption! Very few studies have been done on these synthetic drugs so the immediate and long term affects on the body and human brain are mostly unknown. Studies have shown that JWH018, the compound generally found in Spice, is more potent and efficacious than THC. This means that lower concentra tions of JWH-018 can have a greater and higher maxi mal psychological effect on the brain than that of THC. A recent article written by the Navy Surgeon General states that, Spice-type products are more potent to the brain and other organs because they bind themselves more permanently to receptors. Spice could have multiple unknown chemicals including harmful metal resi dues, with unknown potency potentially 5-200 times more potent than the THC in mari juana. What makes the problem worse is that most of the prod ucts sold are simply plant mat ter soaked in the synthetic compounds so its impossible for the Sailor to know how much of the synthetic drug he or she is actually ingesting. A scary thought when you con sider that researchers admit that we know essentially noth ing about the absorption and distribution kinetics of JWH018! The point is that Sailors need to understand that they are not getting away with abus ing these drugs simply because they may not get caught by the Navys urinalysis program. Its obviously important for Sailors and command leadership to understand the legal ramifi cations of drug abuse; but its equally, if not more important for Sailors to know the risks they take when putting these chemicals in their bodies, and for leadership to educate them on the potentially disastrous affects it may have on their career and their lives. Scholarships available The Navy Wives Club of America offers numerous scholarships to assist Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard enlisted spouses and children of active duty, retir ees or deceased service members to con tinue their education. These scholarships are awarded to assist eligible applicants in obtaining a college education, vocational training, business or other training. For more information or to download an application, go to: www.navywives clubofamerica.org/scholarships. U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, of Floridas 4th Congressional District, announced Feb. 6 that his office is accepting applications for the class of 2017 to the nations service academies. The application deadline is October 13. I strongly encourage interested stu dents to reach out to my Jacksonville office for more information on how they can be a part of one of our nations finest educational insti tutions. Attending the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, the U.S. Air Force Academy at Colorado Springs, or U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point is a distinct honor that can help lead a student down a path of success in life and to being a good citi zen, said Crenshaw. Our service academies are vital in preparing todays youth to assume the responsibility and leadership required to become our future military leaders. Northeast Florida students have been some of the best and the brightest, and I am always proud to nominate them to attend our nations service acad emies. Details of the application pro cess can be found on Congressman Crenshaws official web site at www. crenshaw.house.gov or by calling his Jacksonville office at 904-598-0481 and asking for District Representative Nathan Riska. Congressman Crenshaws Military Academy Selection Committee will interview candidates in November. Selected nominees will be notified by the end of the year, and nomina tions will then be submitted to the academies. service academy admis sions officers then review nominees applications and select appointments in late spring. Note: No nomination is required to attend the U.S. Coast Guard Academy at New London, Conn. ERB transition benefits Outplacement firm helps Sailors launch new careers Spice and bath salts: Bad news for abusers Crenshaw accepting service academy nominations Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.800-822-6344 www.stjude.org

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The Naval Legal Service Office Southeast/NAS Jacksonville Tax Resource Center is now open in Building 13 at the main gate for free self-service resources for active duty and retired personnel to prepare fed eral and state income tax returns. This year, the Navy is providing a self-service Tax Resource Center. The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA) center will be equipped with eight computer stations where customers prepare their own tax returns using free online programs with the assistance of volunteers. The recommended program for use by the U.S. Navy is Military OneSources H&R Block at Home. Unlike previous years, no electronic filing will be done on behalf of custom ers. Some of the websites include: Turbotax.intuit.com/Taxfeedom WWW.Taxslayer.com/Military/ Default.aspx WWW.file2011taxes. newt/?cd=filing_Military Who is eligible to use the Tax Resource Center? and their dependents than 30 days bilization mobilization What to bring to the Tax Resource Center: taxpayers and dependents numbers copies of 2010 tax returns if available Where and when: The resource Center is located in top of Building 13 (outside the Yorktown Gate).: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 8 a.m. 4 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Note: Computer access at the Tax Resource Center will be purely on a walk-in basis. For more information, call 542-8039. Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their fami lies. Preregistration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. 27-29 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), May 14-17 (5:30-10 p.m.), Aug. 13-15 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Nov. 13-16 (5:30-10 p.m.) (TAP) Separation Workshop March 12-16, April 9-13, May 7-11, June 4-8, July 9-13. (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) Feb. 27March 2, March 26-30, April 23-27, May 21-25, June 18-22, July 23-27. O-5 & above (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) July 30-Aug. 2. a.m.-noon) March 21, April 18, May 3, June 1, July 19, Aug. 3, Sept. 5, Oct. 12, Nov. 14. Workshop (8-9:30 a.m.) March 19, May 2, July 18, Sept. 4, Nov. 19. (9:40 a.m.-noon) March 19, May 2, July 18, Sept. 4, Nov. 19. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) April 30-May 1, Aug. 27-28, Nov. 20-21. Training (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) March 5-6, June 11-15, Sept. 17-21, Dec. 10-14. Workshop (8-11 a.m.) April 20, July 16, Oct. 3. Buyers (1-3:30 p.m.) March 20, May 30, Sept. 6. Buying (9-10:30 a.m.) May 4, Aug. 29, Nov. 13. Apr. 3, June 5, Aug. 7, Oct. 2, Dec. 4. 4 p.m.) March 13, May 8, July 10, Sept. 13, Nov. 11, Nov. 13. March 28 (5-7 p.m.), May 19 (10a.m.noon), July 16 (1-3 p.m.), Sept. 12 (5-7 p.m.), Nov. 17 (10 a.m.-noon). March 12, April 9, May 14, June 11, July 9, Aug. 6, Sept. 10, Oct. 15, Nov. 19, Dec. 10. (9-10 a.m.) March 7, April 4, May 2, June 6, July 11, Aug. 1, Sept. 5, Oct. 3, Nov. 7, Dec. 5. a.m.-noon) March 20, April 17, May 15, June 19, July 17, Aug. 21, Sept. 18, Oct. 16, Nov. 20, Dec. 18. For more information or to register, call 542-5745. Free tax preparation centerImprove your life skills with free knowledge JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 17

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Editors note Beginning in April and continuing through 2015, the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard will commemorate the Bicentennial of the War of 1812 and The Star Spangled Banner. The Navy has partnered with the International Council of Air Shows, the Navy League, the Naval Historical Foundation, and Operation Sail to create world-class events around the country, with signature events in New York, Baltimore, Norfolk, New Orleans, Boston, Chicago and Cleveland, and smaller events in other cities. These events will include Blue Angels air shows, visits by ships of the U.S. Navy and international navies, parades of tall ships and Galley Wars cooking events.The War of 1812 was a watershed moment in the nations development of a strong national defense system, a military historian said this week, as it provided justification for building up the Navy and changed the nations atti tude toward strengthening the central government. Michael Crawford, a senior histori an at the Naval History and Heritage Command, made that observation Feb. 7 during a DoD Live bloggers round table. Crawford said the United States declared war against the United Kingdom because It wanted to end impressments of its citizens into the Royal Navy. recognition of the maritime rights of its merchantmen against illegal blockades, searches and seizures, and it wanted to stop British support of hostile Native Americans against the United States, he said. At the time, President James Madison and his war planners developed a strat egy to achieve these goals. That strategy largely focused on a land-troop invasion of British-owned Canada, ignoring a naval strategy. It was expected to be a quick and decisive victory for the Americans, Crawford said, as British attention was focused on engagements with Napoleon. But as the Canadian campaign began, it became clear that it wouldnt go as Madison and his war planners had hoped it would. By 1815, two and a half years after the initial engagement, all attempts to invade and occupy Canada had failed. During that time, Crawford said, the United States adopted a largely defen sive posture against the British. The U.S. military had repulsed major inva sions at Plattsburgh, N.Y, and in New Orleans. But the United States suffered a rav aging of the shores of the Chesapeake Bay, a major agricultural region, and the capture and burning of our capital, Crawford said. Furthermore, he added, a tight British blockade of the American coast had brought the U.S. government to the brink of financial collapse. The war eventually ended with the signing of the Treaty of Ghent, which restored America to its prewar condi tions with no loss or gain, Crawford said, and the conversation turned toward the role The War of 1812 played in strengthening the Navy. At the onset of the war, he said, the Navy had a small fleet and focused largely on harbor defense. However, he added, it became increasingly apparent that the United States needed to devel op naval power to avoid defeat. Early in the war, we lost an army, Crawford said. And so the people in Washington the war planners quick ly came to understand that the conquest of Canada depended on control of the waterways, especially Lake Ontario. The result was a build-up of Navy ves sels on the Great Lakes. By late 1814, the Navy had 400 men on ships at sea and 10,000 men on ships on the Great Lakes. This buildup allowed for some impor tant victories during the war, Crawford said, but those victories also drew attention to losses that that resulted from insufficient naval power. He cited conflicts at Lake Champlain and along the Chesapeake Bay as examples. The British had an army of 10,000 invading upstate New York. An American naval victory in Lake Champlain threw that army back into Canada, Crawford said, because with out control of Lake Champlain, British supply lines were vulnerable. But a lack of U.S. naval power allowed the British to wreak destruction up and down the Chesapeake Bay, he added. All of these events convinced the nations leaders, as well as the nations people, that we needed both an ade quate navy and an adequate army if we wanted to be an adequate nation, he said. But before the end of the war, con gressional Republicans didnt support building a strong Navy, Crawford said, believing that an ocean-going Navy would draw the United States into war unnecessarily and require high taxes that would corrupt the political system, benefit mainly financiers, and hurt the common people. But by the end of the war, he said, people of all political stripes witnessed the importance of having a strong, cen trally controlled military. Many Republicans and all Federalists were committed to a strong Navy, an adequate, professional Army, and the financial reforms necessary to support them, Crawford said. After the war, Congress ... approved an ambitious naval expansion program and a regular Army of 10,000 men, he continued. They raised taxes to pay for these, and they created the Second National Bank as a tool for government financing. The War of 1812 also changed the U.S. position on the global stage, Crawford said. Before the war, he explained, the United Kingdom considered the United States to be a commercial rival and potential enemy, to be thwarted through confrontation wherever pos sible. After the war, the United Kingdom sought accommodation with the United States, considering the friendship of the United States as something to be cur ried as an asset. This change in thinking, Crawford said, was a direct result of the British recognizing that the United States had newfound political unity, a strong Army and Navy, and sound fiscal underpin nings. Historian explains War of 1812s impact on national defense 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012



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Top Sailors PTSD DogsHappy Notes Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com VP-10, VPU-1, HSL-42 selected Commander, Naval Air Forces (CNAF) announced the winners of the 2011Aviation Battle Efficiency (Battle E) awards Feb. 10. The aviation Battle E is the Navys top performance award presented to the aircraft car rier and aviation squadron in each competitive category that achieves the highest standards of performance readiness and efficiency. The award recognizes a units training and oper ational achievements while including a balance that incentivizes efficiency. USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) was the Battle E winner of the aircraft carrier category for the West Coast while the USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) won for the East Coast. The warfighting excel lence shown by these squad rons and the Vinson and the Bush proves them to be the best of the best. I am incred ibly proud of their accomplishments, said Vice Adm. Al Myers, CNAF commander. In a time of increased demand and a constrained fiscal envi ronment, these Sailors, Officers and Aviators continue to deliver combat effectiveness and to display the professionalism and pride that is the hallmark of naval aviation. In the aviation squadron competitions, each aviation Type-Commander selects a winner in every category, while CNAF selects the Navy-wide winners, resulting in three sets of recipients. One of the most coveted awards in the fleet, the Battle E competition is conducted to strengthen individual com mand performance, overall force readiness, and to recog nize outstanding performance within the naval aviation force. Grading metrics for attaining the Battle E award include: operational achievement, training, inspection accom plishments, material and per sonnel readiness, aviation safety, weapon systems and tactics development, and con tributions to the aviation com munity. Each member attached to a winning ship or squadron earns the right to wear the Battle E ribbon on their uniform, or if they already possess that ribbon, they can add an additional E device to the ribbon. Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFFC) Adm. John Harvey Jr. and USFFC Fleet Master Chief FLTCM(AW/NAC)Mike Stevens conducted a town hall meeting Feb. 15 at NAS Jacksonville with department heads and chief petty officers from the station and tenant commands. Topics of discus sion included leadership, trust, standards and training. Today, my focus is on you, our deckplate leaders which is where I always say, the rubber meets the road and the chain of command looks to you to carry out the orders, uphold the standards and make the training real, said Harvey to the standing-room-only crowd in the VP-30 Auditorium. I read the overnight reports concerning the135, 000 people who work for me and like any large organization, we have some issues that detract from where we need to be. Whether youre a maintainer, pilot, air crew or NFO, the most impor tant question at the end of the day is how well did you lead the people who were placed in your charge. With more than 39 years of naval service, Harvey remind ed the audience that the fundamental elements of leadership havent changed much since the founding of Americas Navy in 1775. Trust is the glue that holds everything together. It means, that at the moment of truth, you will do the right thing according to Navy standards, whether people are or are not watching you. There are three primary reasons why you must earn the trust of your people in uniform. First, is your pro fessional competence. Next is your practical wisdom I call it common sense on when to follow rules to the letter or write a new rulebook according to the situation. And third, is your respect for those you lead. Just like you, todays young Sailors raised their right hands to take the oath to protect and defend the constitution of the United States against all ene mies with no conditions. And, we reaffirm that oath at every promotion ceremony. We talk a lot about the importance of standards and consistently enforcing them. Each is time tested and combat proven to drive how we oper ate, maintain, inspect and cer tify commands in every com munity. At the practical level, standards are about a Sailor knowing something is not right and then doing some thing about it because prob lems will not fix themselves. Thats why deckplate lead ers must develop smart, selfcorrecting Sailors who solve problems before they become major issues. When you look at successful squadrons and ships like our Battle E win ners, you see that they not only meet standards, but more likely, they raise the bar for trust and training within their unit. President Barack Obama sent Congress a proposed defense budget of $613.9 billion for fiscal 2013, Feb. 13. The request for the Department of Defense (DoD) includes $525.4 billion in discretionary budget authority to fund base defense programs and $88.5 billion to support Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO), primarily in Afghanistan. Of the discretionary budget, $155.9 billion represents the Department of the Navys bud get request. This is a decrease of $1.4 billion from last years baseline appropriation. Rear Adm. Joseph Mulloy, deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for budget, briefed media at the Feb. 13 DoD budget press conference about the Navy portion of the budget. Mulloy said that during budget delibera tions, a premium was placed on the Navys presence in the Asia-Pacific region and the Middle East and took into account innovative methods to generate more forward presence with a smaller and leaner force while retaining the ability to surge as needed. Following the Defense Strategic Guidance, Mulloy said Navys budget was built by apply ing the tenets of war fighting first, operate forward, and be ready. As a result, he believes the force will be leaner, agile, flexible, ready and technologically advanced while retaining core Navy-Marine Corps war fighting capabilities to operate forward, preserve the peace, respond to crises, and protect U.S. and allied interests. 2011 Aviation Battle E winners announced Harvey talks trust at town hall meetingDoD releases fiscal 2013 budget proposal

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 Often we cannot see things until they are reflected back at us. Trust me on this; six years ago I wrote a memoir with portrayals of others that annoyed friends and relatives. Seeing yourself through the lens of another is jarring and sensitive, but ultimately, educational. I never fully understood my relationship with Dustin until I saw it in a snapshot from our wedding 12 years ago. In the photo, which has a permanent spot on my dresser, Dustin and I are standing shoulder to shoulder. He is in his Navy dress whites. He has more hair, less body. I am in my wedding dress, and though I have the same amount of hair as I do now, in the pictures, I am thin and young. We are holding hands, but the image doesnt show it just our arms pressed together. I am smiling and laughing and looking just past Dustin. He is looking down and over at my profile. He is smiling with his eyes. There is a certain twinkle in his expression. For years I couldnt describe what that twinkle meant. Then one day, while I was grabbing a pair of socks from the dresser draw er, it occurred to me. Dustin was adoring me . just as he has always done since we met. In life, I dance around Dustin while he stays steady. Or, in his words, Without Sarah, Id be more boring than I already am. All of this became clear to me in one snapshot. More recently, I am working with artist Andrea Hand, the photographer for Dinner With the Smileys, and on a weekly basis, my relationship with my three boys is reflected back at me. Andrea is not your typical photographer. Thats why I picked her. She is a storyteller. Her words are images. But when Andrea told me that she likes to capture the ordinary moments of a family, I grew a little concerned. There are few ordinary moments among my boys. Our moments usually involve lightsabers, tussles on the floor and fake Groucho Marx-like glasses and mustaches. Was Andrea prepared to see how weird my family really is? With patience, Andrea told me, I would see moments I never knew existed and that our mother-son relationship would unfold in the images. At our first session, the only thing I saw was Lindell crawling on the floor, acting like a dog. All of the boys needed a haircut and I was shocked and embarrassed that I had in fact let them wear old, stained t-shirts to Dinner With the Smileys. Then Andrea put several of the photos together in a sequence. She played them for me as a slideshow. In the first image, Lindell was at the table with the family and our guest. In the next image, he was on the floor with the dog. The third and fourth images had him crawling into my lap, petting my face and laying his head on my shoulder. In the the last photograph, he was on the floor again with the dog. Its like theres a rubber band between the two of you, Andrea said. Lindell eats, leaves the table, comes back to my lap and then leaves again. Andrea had dozens of pictures of this same routine from different evenings. In my mind, I had it differently: Lindell left the table without asking and then bothered me in my lap while I was trying to talk. The pictures showed something else entirely. They showed a little boy who is begin ning to think about the larger world but who always comes back to the safety of his mothers lap. The photographs dont show my older boys doing this. Indeed, someday the rubber band between me and Lindell will also snap. I usually hire photographers to capture the big moments, like at a wedding. Who knew that having one follow your family on a regular day could capture the even bigger moments? On a different night, Andrea showed me a slideshow of Ford talking at the table. Ford always has had a larger-than-life presence. He can talk for hours if left unchallenged. So I try, as best I can, to manage his opportunities to talk and tell stories, leaving room for the other boys. Its a delicate balance, but my fear has been that Owen will resent his older brother for stealing the spotlight. In Andreas slideshow, one-by-one, I saw something else. When Ford speaks, Owen looks at him adoringly. His eyes twinkle. He hangs on every word. He smiles uncontrollably. He waits patiently for Ford to finish, whenever that might be. I had never given it much thought, but this is the way Ford and Owens relationship has always been. Ford takes center stage, and Owen loves him for it. Someday, Owen will probably marry someone alot like Ford. And he will look at his wife in the same way. He will be steady and patient, adoring her while she dances around him. His expression will give it all away. I wonder if they will ever see it? Hey, MoneyChic! What types of loans that I should avoid? I am working on getting my finances straightened out and am wondering which loans could be dangerous for my credit rating? MoneyChic says: In the last weeks column, we discussed pawn shop loans. Now we are going to discuss high-LTV (loan-to-value) home equity loans. According to Leah Glinjewicz of bankrate.com these are loans secured by the equity in your home but high LTV loans oblige you to pay more than what your equity is actually worth. Some home equity lenders allow the borrower to create a loan-to-value ratio as high as 125 percent. Taking out a loan for more than your property is worth is a real gamble especially in todays housing market where homes arent as valuable as they were just a couple of years ago. Right now, it is rare that a house ever sells for more then their fair market value. The interest rates on 125 percent LTV loans are usually higher than less-risky standard home equity loans, says Gerri Detweiler of Sarasota, Fla., author of Slash Your Debt. Also consider that all of the interest paid on the loan may not be tax deductible. To be upside down on your house and then having to move is really frightening, Detweiler says. Homeowners seldom think about all the things that can happen: divorce, a relocation or being forced to move before there is any equity in the home. Thats my two cents worth. I hope it helps steer you away from risky real estate loans. Pass & ID office gets new hoursThe Pass & ID office at the Yorktown gate will have new hours beginning March 4. Decals and badges will be issued: Monday through Thursday 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fridays 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday/Sunday 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. One-day passes will be issued when the Pass & ID office is not open. Renewal of decals can be accomplished 30 days in advance online at https://www.pid.cnic.navy.mil. You must ensure that you have your vehicle license num ber, drivers license number and insurance information prior to starting the process. For more info, contact the base security office at 542-4529/30. Pictures show the little things

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Did You Know?Symptoms of DiabetesIf you notice one or more of the following symtoms, see a doctor immediately: Extreme thirst Frequent urination Drowsiness, lethargy Sugar in urine Sudden vision changes Increased appetite Sudden weight loss Fruity, sweet, or wine-like odor on breath Heavy, labored breathing Stupor, unconsciousness To learn more, call 800.533.CURE or visit jdrf.org.A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 3

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Patrick Powers and William Dodge were named Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Civilian of the Fourth Quarter 2011, respectively, Feb. 4. Powers, a mission sustain ment analyst, is a key mem ber of team ensuring that Region Southeast installations successfully execute their assigned missions Throughout the quarter, he coordinated with local, state, federal and non-governmental agencies, as well as installations, in an effort to develop strategies to protect important Navy operational capabilities. Pat Powers is a senior expert who takes pride in mentor ing junior Civilian Liaison Planning Officers (CPLOs) and staffers as they learn new skills, said Dave Dahl, CNRSE mission sustainment supervi sor. His achievements are routinely recognized by peers and supervisors alike. According to Powers, much of his success can be attribut ed to those who work around him. I try to give 100-percent every day because I dont want to let my boss or co-workers down, he said. We set a very high bar of task execution. Its a blessing to work each day with a supervisor and co-workers that are professional, dedicated and fun to be around. In earning the Junior Civilian of the Quarter award, Dodge served as the regional military working dog (MWD) trainer. He has spent count less hours developing MWD regional standard operating procedures and has established a new standard for regional program and instal lation MWD teams, said Bruce Toth, CNRSE Force Protection Program Director. In addition, he acts as a mentor to 49 Sailors and civilians and their MWDs throughout the region. Dodge also cited his coworkers as a major source of inspiration and claimed they have been instrumental to his success at CNRSE. Im very fortunate to be surrounded by subject matter experts who teach me, men tor me and guide me each and every day. Their person al initiative inspires me to be my best, and in turn, provide the CNRSE installations with the necessary tools to do their jobs, he said. According to Dodge, the most rewarding aspect of his work at the region is the impact he is able to have on junior Sailors who may someday fol low in his footsteps. I would like to think that I can encourage young Sailors to make the Navy a career like I did, he said. On my visits to installations, I always talk to the MWD handlers about what it takes to be a better handler and how that transfers over into being a model Sailor. In my three years at CNRSE, Ive helped a countless number of Sailors become dog handlers, MWD trainers and kennel masters. In the future, theyll be regional trainers, regional kennel masters and MWD program managers. When I see these Sailors reach those milestones in their careers, it makes me feel like Ive had some small part in their success. CNRSE announces Senior, Junior Civilians of the Fourth Quarter 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, encour ages Navy and Marine Corps officers to apply for the 2013 team and follow-on seasons. The Blue Angels team is seeking two Navy or Marine Corps F/A-18 demon stration pilots, a flight surgeon and one naval flight officer for the events coordinator position, for the 2013 and followson seasons. The team is also seeking one Marine Corps C-130 demonstration pilot, a public affairs officer and a maintenance officer. We are looking for highly motivated career-oriented officers who desire an opportunity to represent the finest men and women of the United States Navy and Marine Corps, said Blue Angels Opposing Solo Pilot Lt. Dave Tickle. The opportunity to demonstrate the teamwork and dedication of our mili tary to citizens across the country is a rare and unique privilege, Tickle added. It is important the individuals selected are well rounded and proficient in their fields. Applying is easy, Tickle said. However, once we enter the deci sion-making process we take time to ensure the right applicants are selected to uphold the standards of excellence found throughout the fleet. Once individuals are considered active applicants, they are invited to attend any pre-show briefing during the normal show season and attend social functions at the air shows. This gives prospective members insight into the overall routine of the Blue Angels and allows team members to meet the applicants. Future Blue Angels must have a strong work ethic, exceptional commu nication skills, the enthusiasm to rep resent the men and women of the Navy and Marine Corps and the desire to uphold the traditions of the Blue Angels organization. My favorite part about being on this team is having the opportunity to talk to children at the show sites and see their faces light up with enjoyment, said Blue Angels Lead Solo Pilot Lt. C.J Simonsen. Our hope is to inspire them to pursue careers in the Navy and Marine Corps and focus their studies in math, science and technology. Navy and Marine Corps F/A-18 dem onstration pilots and naval flight offi cers are required to have a minimum 1,250 tactical jet hours and be carri er-qualified. Marine Corps C-130 demonstration pilots are required to have 1,200 flight hours and be an aircraft commander. The dedication and teamwork of the Blue Angels is absolutely amazing, said Blue Angels Flight Surgeon Lt. Cmdr. Jason Smith. Applicants, if selected, can expect a challenging and rewarding experience. Officers must be comfortable in dealing with groups and individuals while demonstrating professionalism, moti vation and integrity. For information on how to apply visit the Blue Angels at www.blueangels. navy.mil. Adjustments to the active duty and full time support (FTS) Aviation Career Continuation Pay (ACCP) program were announced via Navy messages, Feb. 14. According to NAVADMINs 055/12 and 056/12, the ACCP program pro vides selected bonuses as an incentive to eligible pilots and naval flight officers (NFOs) through department head and command milestones. Fiscal year (FY) 2012 active duty department head retention bonus annual rates have changed from FY-11 in the following aviation communities and designators: $15,000 per year; pilots/helicopter maritime strike pilots, $5,000 per year; attack (VAQ) pilots, $25,000 per year; (VAW) and C-2 fleet logistics support (VRC) pilots, $10,000 per year; year; pilots, $15,000 per year; FTS annual rates vary by communi ty from $5,000 to $25,000 for squadron department head/wing staff. The avia tion commander command bonus has been removed. The Navy expects roughly 310 active duty and 75 FTS aviators to take advantage of the ACCP program this year. Department head retention bonuses will be paid in equal annual install ments. Additionally, the FY-12 program continues to authorize the payment of five-year contracts one year prior to the completion of the active duty minimum service requirement (MSR). Long-term applicants are eligible if their MSR expires in FY-12 or FY-13. Payment will begin when an officer is within one year of completing their MSR. Active duty ACCP applications must be received before Aug. 31, 2012. FTS ACCP applications must be received before Sept. 24, 2012. For more details regarding eligibil ity, administrative procedures and the application letter format, visit the ACCP Bonus Web Page at: www.npc.navy.mil/ officer/Detailing/aviation/OCM/Pages/ ACCP.aspx. Blue Angels seek officersFY-12 aviation officer bonus rates released JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 From feel-good Dixieland tunes, traditional jazz and cer emonial fanfares to quintets of woodwinds and brass, as well as rock n roll and hip-hop, Navy Band Southeast (NBSE) brings inspiring music to the fleet and communities. NBSE is the musical repre sentative for Commander, Navy Region Southeast, and is one of the Navys 11 Fleet Bands. Established in 1995, the band provides musical support for Navy bases, tenant commands and community outreach events. Under the leadership of Director Lt. Mike Corbliss and Assistant Director MUCS Patrick Detroit, the units exceptional musicians display their talents through a full repertoire of con certs at community events, patriotic ceremonies and parades. They also play a dynamic role in supporting Navy recruitment. Corbliss assumed command in January and is in the midst of learning the bands personnel and schedule of events. Id like to take the band in a direction where we increase our impact on communities outside the gate especially with master class es to middle and high schools. In addition to supporting Fort Lauderdale Fleet Week in April, youll also see Navy Band Southeast performing at band shells in Jacksonville Beach, Green Cove Springs and Daytona Beach. Corbliss added, When you see our Sailors in uniform doing their jobs, they are total professionals who represent Navy excellence much like the Blue Angels. We are a dedicated, musically charged recruiting poster for the Navy. NBSE Leading Chief Petty Officer MUCS Kenny Oliver (who plays the trombone and tuba) is on his second tour at NAS Jacksonville. I served here from 2003 to 2008, then did a tour in San Diego, and returned to NAS Jax last spring. While the San Diego musicians are an out standing group of professionals Jacksonville seems more like home for me, said Oliver. And weve got a very deep pool of talent with this band. NBSE is billeted for 45 musi cians who perform in the tradi tional Ceremonial Band, as well as seven other smaller ensem bles. So when they are not per forming, theyre practicing with one of the small bands such as TGIF, VIP Combo, Fairwinds woodwind quintet, Windward Brass quintet, Orion, Pride, and the Wind Ensemble. Many of the musicians play more than one instrument, which enables them to contrib ute in a variety of musical for mats. Two of the most-requested small bands are the Dixieland band, TGIF, and the rock band, Pride. Oliver added, Rounding out Navy Band Southeast, are a

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 7 number of talented vocalists who perform as soloists and backup singers or as a capella harmonizers of songs such as the national anthem. They also perform as auxiliary percussionists. How are musicians recruited? Corbliss explained, The Navy looks for people with proven talent who have the desire to perform music as a career. And with todays uncertain economy, comparable civilian jobs such as middle school, high school and college band directors, as well as symphony orchestras are cutting back so Navy bands are an appealing alterna tive for career musicians. The Navy School of Music (of which Corbliss is a former director) is located aboard the Naval Amphibious Base in Little Creek, Va. The school is the primary means of training musicians accepted into the music rating, and serves as not only the A school for Navy musicians, but offers further training and development as C schools for more senior Sailors and chiefs. Oliver noted that the musician rating is one of the top three in the Navy for enlisted personnel who hold college diplomas. Many of our Sailors have masters degrees. Some, when they reach E-6, may go on to become bandmaster limited duty officers who command the Navys Fleet Bands. How do you book an NBSE event? The band takes requests up to 12 months prior to an event. Military band performances must also meet the following criteria: purposes is prohibited; prohibited; endorsement of commercial establishments, religious causes, products or political causes are prohibited. For more booking information, call 542-8059 or email charity.barron@navy.mil.

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Blue Angels announce enlisted opportunities for 2013The Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, encourage qualified Navy and Marine Corps enlisted personnel to apply for the 2013 and follow-on seasons. Navy E-5 and above, and outstanding E-4 Sailors from multiple aviation platforms are considered for this typetwo sea duty billet. Blue Angels Command Master Chief Yoshimi Core explained the Blue Angels team is not locked into selecting Sailors solely based on naval enlisted codes (NECs) or F/A-18 experience. However, Marine Corps applicants must be F/A-18 specific electricians, communication/ navigation (COMNAV), power plants or airframes. The squadrons Enlisted Applications Chief, AECS Patrick Hosterman, said the team has a variety of opportuni ties available for the following rates: aviation machin ists mate (AD), aviation electricians mate (AE), aviation structural mechanic (AM and AME), aviation ordnance man (AO), aviation support equipmentmen (AS), avia tion electronics technician (AT), aviation maintenance administrationman (AZ), aircrew survival equipment man (PR), mass communication specialist (MC), logistics specialist (LS), and yeoman (YN). The team is also looking for a hospital corpsman (HM) with an 8406 NEC and E-7s in aviation maintenance ratings. Core explained team members must have a strong work ethic, exceptional communication skills, the enthusiasm to represent the men and women of the Navy and Marine Corps and the desire to uphold the traditions of the Blue Angels organization. The Blue Angels Navy and Marine Corps members are all about team work, said Core. Ultimately, you can be the best technician in the world but if you do not thrive on teamwork you are not the right fit for this team. It is common to see Blue Angel HMs, YNs, MCs and LSs on the flight line servicing jets. Team members in different work centers help other shops with heavier or higher priority workloads. Each member adds their skills to the team and they are refined in an intense training process. Prospective chief, limited duty officer and Seamen to Admiral candidates benefit from sustained superior per formance, and selection to the team is just another good bullet in their resume, said Core. The Blue Angels are a small sample of the best Sailors and Marines in the fleet. AMC (Safety Equipment) Brian Williamson, the Blue Angels detailer, says Sailors should not be concerned about getting penalized if they do not get picked for the team. They will be given one more look in Career Management System/Interactive Detailing (CMS/ID) before they are considered needs of the Navy. If you are accepted for the team, the exposure you get and the military bearing you learn will last the rest of your career, said Williamson. For more information on how to apply, visit the Blue Angels at www.blueangels. navy.mil or contact Hosterman at patrick.hosterman@ navy.mil. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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The $525.4 billion for the base DoD budget includes cuts and other initia tives that will reduce planned spend ing by $259 billion over the next five years and $487 billion over ten years, levels that are consistent with the Budget Control Act. The budget adjusts programs that develop and procure military equipment; begins to re-size ground forces; slows the growth of compensation and benefit programs; con tinues to make better use of defense resources by reducing lower-priority programs, and restructures the defense organization to achieve more efficient approaches to doing business. Highlights of the Navy budget pro posal include: lion per year in shipbuilding, result across the Future Years Defense Plan (FYDP). Although a decrease from the strives to maintain a healthy industrial base. will result in a Navy fleet size of more than 280 ships by the end of the fiveyear plan. F. Kennedy (CVN 79) has not changed; signing of the detailed design and conschedule. The construction schedule will be moved back two years in order to decrease pressure on the ship-building budget without impacting force struc ture. CVN 79 is the numerical replace be delivered no later than 2022 in order ture. straints, procurement is slowed across one of each variant. impact is minimal since LHA 8 also has operational one year after delivery in the FY25 timeframe. ships will be retired before the end of their service lives which is consistent with working more efficiently and costeffectively in this resource-constrained environment. gram continue, but at reduced lev els. Virginia-class procurement was large undersea strike capacity lost when investing in research and development for the Virginia Payload Module. at sufficient levels to meet fielding and combat requirements with manage However, many programs have been delayed or reduced. reduced by nearly 50 percent across the reduced). ial vehicles has been reduced, it remains robust despite a delay in the Unmanned Carrier Launched Airborne development of new sea-based intel ligence, surveillance and reconnais departments commitment to taking and their families and continues the investments needed to ensure they remain the worlds premier maritime increase that reflects the economic conditions of the country is proposed in achieve more control over personnel costs while also keeping pay competi tive. DoD: Fiscal 2013 budget proposal released JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 9

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Often a patient tells me they know about the risks of smok ing tobacco but are less con cerned about dipping or chewing tobacco. About 1 in 10 American high school students start on a tough road to substance abuse by using smokeless tobacco. They probably dont know the risks of cancer associated with this habit, nor do they know the dangers of getting hooked on something that can only hurt them. Many service members get hooked while deployed, where friends often tolerate the dip. Find friends who dont want to become dependent on any kind of drug and ask them to help you stay off the dip. Bad hab its are never easy to change, but well worth the effort to be tobacco-free. The Great American Spit Out is Feb. 23 this year, when health professionals try our best to get the word out on the dangers of smokeless tobacco. Q: Whats the problem with smokeless tobacco, anyway? Smokeless tobacco is a sig nificant health risk and is not a safe substitute for smok ing cigarettes. Smokeless tobacco contains 28 cancercausing agents (carcinogens). Smokeless tobacco use can lead to nicotine addiction and dependence. Adolescents who use smoke less tobacco are more likely to become cigarette smokers. The two main types of smokeless tobacco in the U.S. are chewing tobacco and snuff. Chewing tobacco comes in the form of loose leaf, plug or twist. Snuff is finely ground tobac co that can be dry, moist or in sachets (like tea bags). Although some forms of snuff can be used by sniffing or inhaling into the nose, most smokeless tobacco users place the product in their cheek or between their gum and cheek. Users then suck on the tobacco and spit out the tobacco juice, which is why smokeless tobacco is often referred to as spit or spitting tobacco. Smokeless tobacco is a known cause of human cancer, as it increases the risk of developing cancer of the oral cavity. Its also a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and nicotine addiction. Despite these adverse effects, smokeless tobacco is used commonly in the U.S. by young people, especially male high school students. Our dentists tell me the number of patients they see dipping tobacco is rising every year. Q: Whos at highest risk for problems with smokeless tobacco? Smokeless tobacco use in the United States is higher among young white males; American Indians/Alaska Natives; people living in southern and north central states; and people who are employed in blue collar occupations, service/laborer jobs, or are unemployed. Data suggest that smokeless tobacco use is predominantly a public health problem among men, young adults (aged 18 to 24 years), and those with a high school education or less. Nationally, an estimated three percent of adults are current smokeless tobacco users. But the number of active duty Sailors and Marines using smokeless tobacco may be as high as 40 percent. Smokeless tobacco use is much higher among men (six percent) than women (less than one percent). Research suggests that per sons who use multiple tobacco products might have a more difficult time quitting, which might result in longer dura tion of product use and an increased likelihood of tobac co-related morbidity and mor tality. Worrisome data also shows more use among youth. An estimated eight percent of high school students are current smokeless tobacco users. Smokeless tobacco is more common among male (13.6 percent) than female high school students (2.2 percent). Estimates by race/ethnicity are 10.2 percent for white, 5.1 per cent for Hispanic, and 1.7 per cent for African-American high school students. An estimated three percent of middle school students are current smokeless tobacco users. Smokeless tobacco is more common among male (4 percent) than female (2 per cent) middle school students. Q: How can we prevent dependence on smokeless tobacco? Hopefully by clarifying that smokeless tobacco is not safe, we can help people make an informed decision about its use. School-based programs are an opportunity to discourage youth from using smoke less tobacco. The film industry can also influence the public by not glamorizing any form of tobacco use. More community-wide efforts aimed at preventing and stopping smokeless tobacco use among young people are needed. In addition, opportunities for intervention occur in all clinical settings and require knowledgeable and commit ted health care professionals. Training programs for health care providers should help make smokeless tobacco counseling a higher priority. Recent tobacco indus try advertising has encour aged cigarette smokers to use smokeless tobacco as an alter native product in locations where cigarette smoking is prohibited (e.g., smoke-free work places like submarines, airlines and theaters). Continued surveillance of the co-use of tobacco products is needed to determine the effect of such marketing mes sages and the reasons for the high prevalence of smokeless tobacco use among cigarette smokers in some states. Anti-tobacco media messag es, policies and other interventions that prevent starting and encourage stopping of both products also are needed, particularly in states with a high prevalence of smokeless tobac co use and cigarette smoking. Dentists and dental hygien ists can be effective in identifying smokeless tobacco use and advising users to quit. To encourage quitting, health care providersinclud ing dentists and dental hygienists should: 1) ask patients about all forms of tobacco use, 2) advise them to quit using all forms of tobacco, 3) assess their willingness to quit, 4) assist them in quitting, and 5) arrange for follow-up con tacts with Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Wellness Centers. At Naval Hospital Jacksonville, were trying a few outside the box approaches to help our patients quit smoking and quit smokeless tobac co. Our Central Appointments (904-542-4677) has an option for tobacco users to get the medical therapy they may need. With our electronic health records, we can screen patients by phone and help them get the care that really does help them quit. In 2011, over 5,600 patients made the decision to try to quit tobacco products with our help. Our quit rate is nearly 25 percent of those we enroll in our program. Give us a try. Call the Wellness Center at 542-5292. Remember, smoke less tobacco is not a safe alternative. Ask Dr. Joe: Great American Spit Out 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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The Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) announced Feb. 10 the 2012 Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) Hall of Honor inductees naming Cmdr. Scott Carpenter, Capt. Arnold J. Isbell and Rear Adm. Daniel J. Wolkensdorfer as this years honorees. Chosen from a list of nearly 30 highly accomplished community members, Carpenter, Isbell and Wolkensdorfer were deemed by their peers to have made a significant contribution to the MPRF both in their actions and leadership. Reading the nomination submis sions for these heroes seems like a lesson in history, said Lt. Cmdr. Andy Morrison, vice president of Symposium 2012 for MPA. Their accomplishments have received praise for everything from helping to build the framework of our aviation community to enriching research and development for the Navy and NASA. The MPRF Hall of Honor has set a precedent of honoring the men and women who have helped shape the heritage of this aviation community and/ or displayed acts of heroism in and out of combat, during the following eras: WWII, Korea, Vietnam, The Cold War, Post Cold War, and Global War on Terror. Beginning in 2011, individuals were honored in conjunction with the Centennial of Naval Aviation events. New inductees will now be honored annually at the Heritage Dinner during the MPA Symposium. During the inaugural 2011 Heritage Dinner at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117, six Navy aviators were inducted into the MPRF Hall of Honor: Capt. Fernald Anderson; Jay Beasley; AOC Carl Creamer; Capt. Norman Bus Miller, the most decorated naval aviator of WWII; Adm. Thomas Moorer and Vice Adm. Edward Waller. The 2012 MPA Symposium is March 27-30, aboard NAS Jacksonville. Symposium attendees can register for a host of events, including the P-8A Poseidon Roll-Out, Integrated Training Center dedication, a Flight Suit Social, golf tournament, 5K run, Heritage Dinner and others. The Heritage Dinner, which highlights the history and heritage of the last 50 years of the P-3 Orion aircraft, will also serve as a ceremony for three new MPRF Hall of Honor inductees from the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community. For more information about the 2012 MPA Symposium, as well as online registration, go to:www.maritimepatrolassociation.org/2012symposium A 501(c)(3) Florida non-profit corpo ration established in 2011 and head quartered in Jacksonville, Fla., the Maritime Patrol Association is a pre mier professional organization repre senting the U.S. Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community by pro moting the use of the patrol and reconnaissance aircraft in the U.S. Navy. For more information, contact Executive Director September Wilkerson at (904) 563-4036 orinfo@maritimepatrolasso ciation.org. Maritime Patrol Association announces 2012 Hall of Honor inductees JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 11

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When AWVC(NAC/AW) John Markee adopted a rescue puppy through a Jacksonville animal adoption agency, little did he know that she would be the one rescuing him. After serving several tours in Afghanistan, Markee returned home with post-traumatic stress dis order (PTSD) which has impacted his 18-year naval career and home life. After being diagnosed, my doctor told me about some programs that provide free canine companions to service members. Our family had just adopted Daisy because we our basset hound, Dallas had passed away. We found out that The Animal Rescue and Adoption Agency here had some puppies they named the Dallas litter, after charac ters from the TV show. Daisy was originally named Lucy, said Markee. As he was researching programs on canine companions, Markee learned about K-9s For Warriors in Ponte Vedra Beach. I contacted them and asked if I could go through the program with Daisy. After submitting our application and meeting the trainers for an evaluation, Daisy and I were deemed trainable, he continued. The team spent five weeks living on site at the facility, trained so Daisy could become a certified service dog. We spent the mornings in obedience training and the afternoons going on outings to expose us to the public. It was a bit difficult at first because Daisy was not very attentive and we were both uncomfortable but we graduated on Veterans Day 2011 and make a great team, Markee added. Daisy is trained to keep Markee calm in stressful situations and provide comfort. Shes always there and can sense when something is going on with me. Shes a rescue dog but its a question of who rescued who. I think she rescued me more than I rescued her, he said. Markee is also quick to praise K-9s For Warriors which was started in 2010 by Shari Duval after she volunteered with the Wounded Warrior Project helping those with PTSD and her seeing her son, an Army contractor bomb dog handler, return home after a tour in Iraq with PTSD. After working closely with the Wounded Warrior Project, and seeing the amount of disabled warriors return home the conflicts of the wars suffering from PTSD, our family decided start an academy to train service canines to aid veterans in their recovery, said Duval. We spent two years researching canine assistance for PTSD and decided the best way to help was to start a non-profit organization to train and give service canines to assist our warriors efforts to return to civilian life with dignity and independence. The academy is operated by Duval, her son-in-law, Todd Galley who serves as director of canine operations and Dog Training Specialists Brett Simon, who served two tours in Iraq as a dog handler contractor for the Army, and Bob Hammesfahr, a military veteran. My whole experience at K-9s For Warriors has changed my life for the better. Youre there with other vets so you have a support network. Shari takes care of us like we are her sons and Brett was in Iraq so he can relate to what we are going through. Its like we are part of the family, said Markee. The program is available to any military member either active duty of hon orably discharged who has been diag nosed with PTSD as a result of the wars since 9/11. After submitting an application, including medical records and a doctors letter of recommendation and they are approved for the program, they are scheduled into a class. Applicants live at our facility where they train their canines with our certi fied trainers. We believe that involving the warrior in the training of their new partner is helping them be part of their own recovery. We provide housing, a canine, training, equipment, meals, and full assistance with their issues and provide resources as necessary. Their only cost is getting to and from our facility, said Duval. Most of the dogs are rescue dogs that are also carefully screened before entering the program. Once they are accepted, the dogs are trained prior to be placed with a service member. After talking with each warrior per sonally and evaluating their individ ual needs, we are in a better position to determine the type of canine they require. We take into account their living arrangements, family, children, other pets, climate, etc. It is rare that the warrior does not approve of the canine we choose for them, however, we are prepared with other canines should this situation occur, Duval continued. So far, 15 service member/dog teams have gone through the program with 14 successful placements. Many continue to return for refresher training or just because they enjoy visiting. Daisy and I go out to the dog house quite often to help out or just visit our friends who continually offer us sup port, said Markee. This is an outstanding program. Its been life changing in the right direction spiritually, mentally, physical the full spectrum. I dont think Id be where Im at in my treatment now without K9s For Warriors. Service canines are a medically proven recovery aid for warriors suffering from PTSD. These dogs are considered medical equipment and are recognized by the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division, and the American Disability Act of 1990 which means they are allowed into all public facilities. For more information on K9s For Warriors, go to www.k9sforwarriors.org. K-9 companions assist Sailors with daily routines 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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In an unassuming and unmarked Quonset hut lining Yorktown Road at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Sailors assigned to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) are ensuring U.S. military aircrews have the firepower needed to deter, defend and defeat the enemy. In the FRCSE Aircraft Armament Equipment (AAE) Division, 18 Sailors inspect, troubleshoot and repair SH-60R/S Helicopter Hellfire Missile Launchers, P-3 Orion Bomb Rack Units (BRU) and other AAE for the Fleet. AAE includes all equipment designed to suspend, release and launch ordnance from an aircraft. The ordnance maintenance function includes equipment inspection, calibration, corrosion treatment, wiring harness and cable repair, preservation, storage, inventory control and recordkeeping. It cant be armed without us and without us, its just another airliner, said AO1 Matthew Vock of the aircraft. He said Lockheed Martin discovered a discrepancy with some card racks installed in Hellfire M299 Missile Launcher Electronics Assemblies (LEAs) that could potentially cause a failure. AAE Sailors pulled the discrepant LEAs from inventory and shipped them to Lockheed in June 2011. There technicians made repairs and returned the LEAs to FRCSE in November for final testing. In response to a Lockheed Martin request, AAE division Sailors inspected and tested 15 Hellfire M299 Missile LEAs at the end of 2011. We put the LEAs in the launchers and tested them with CRALTS (Common Rack and Launcher Test Sets) to make sure they were RFI (Ready For Issue), said Vock. The M299 Hellfire Missile Launcher is procured by the Navy through the Army Joint Attack Munitions Systems (JAMS) Project Office in Huntsville, Ala. Lockheed Martin, who builds the LEA, the brains of the M299 launcher, discovered a discrepancy during production, said Bob Buckley, assistant program manager for AAE logistics, Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) Precision Strike Weapons program, PMA201. Sailors from FRCSE and representatives from Lockheed Martin, with coordination between the Army JAMS office and logistics specialists from NAVAIR PMA-201, identified, staged and conducted repairs. On another project, FRCSE Sailors also assisted Lockheed Martin and PMA-201, the program respon sible for armament equipment, to repair, inspect and return to service 45 BRU-14. They completed 29 units in 2010 and 16 units in 2011. Tim Zimmer with PMA-201 AAE logistics said these units are slated for new production MH-60S and MH-60R helicopters at Lockheed Martins facility in Owego, N.Y. where the BRU-14 will be integrated onto the aircraft. During Fiscal Year 2011, the AAE division also repaired for its Fleet customers about 50 standard and Maverick weapons pylon assemblies used on P-3 Orion Maritime Patrol Aircraft. FRCSE is the only facility to repair these particular assemblies. The shop fields numerous calls from the Fleet requesting technical information and assistance. AAE Division Officer Chief Warrant Officer Keith Turnipseed said the Sailors he serves with are amaz ing. They never get behind, they never have rework, and they are keeping the squadrons happy, he stated. FRCSE Sailors repair armament equipment to protect war fighters JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 13

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Call 542-3521 Play Bingo at lunch Mon. Fri. at 11:15 a.m. Play Bingo at dinner Sun. Tues. and Thurs. at 6:30 p.m. Cash prizes February evening bingo special Buy one paper package and receive one for free! Limit one promotional package per person DJ entertainment at the Bud Brew House Feb. 24, 8 10 p.m. Food & beverage specials Call 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 2 sessions, 7 9 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. midnight $11 per person, includes shoe rental February Family Bowling for 4 Special Thursday, 4 10 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $17 savings!Call 542-2930 Indoor pool hours Mon. Fri. 5:30 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 8 p.m. Weekend hours 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Leprechaun Dash 5K March 16 11:30 a.m. on Perimeter Rd. Pre-register by March 9 at the base gym or fitness center Family Fitness Bootcamp with Ashley Monday & Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. Family Fitness Center above the Youth Center Gym Call (904) 778-9772 7th Annual Captain Chuck Cornett Navy 10K Run and 5K Walk April 7 at 8 a.m. $15 military, $20 authorized base personnel, $25 race day Race events Zumba Demonstration April 5, 11 a.m. & 4:15 p.m. NEX Convenience Store Parking Lot Hummve Pull April 5, 2 p.m. NEX Convenience Store Parking Lot Sign-ups begin at noon Health Fair April 6, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. NEX Convenience Store Parking Lot Athletic shoe & apparel sale April 5 7, 9 a.m. 6 p.m. NEX Convenience Store Parking Lot Free give-a-ways, beverages and entertainment by the Navy Band Southeast after the race! Sign-up in the base gym or fitness center. Call (904) 542-2930/3239 for additional infotmationCall 542-3318. 22nd Annual ITT Travel Fair NEX Courtyard March 10, 9:30 a.m. 1 p.m. featuring ITT vendors and great door prizes! Harlem Globetrotters March 2 at Veterans Memorial Arena $26 Funk Fest May 11 & 12 at Metropolitan Park $57 Now booking all-inclusive Sandals Resorts vacations The Gaylord Palms Resort offers a preferred rate for ITT customers. The resort is located just one mile from Walt Disney World. Rates include Ice & Snow tickets. Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville First Orchestra seating available for Les Miserables. Valdosta, Georgia historic sites bus tour Feb. 11, $20 Includes admission to Crescent House, the Art Center and the Historical Museum Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person Gatornationals March 9, 10 & 11 $10 $51 ITT is now offering cruises aboard the Celebration Cruise Lines from $186.50 per person! Daytona 500 Feb. 18 26, $27 to $199 Monster Jam March 3, $25 $41 Daytona Bike Week March 10 & 17 $25 Blue Man Group in Orlando $48, includes CityWalk venue Phineas and Ferb tickets, March 10, 3:30 p.m. & 6:30 p.m. shows $13 each! Veterans Memorial Arena Disney on Ice featuring Toy Story 3 April 6, 7:30 p.m. April 7, 11:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. April 8, 1 & 5 p.m. Lower level seating for $13 Orlando Magic all home games $22.50 $383 Disney World Orlando, FL 4day hopper Armed Forces Ticket $135.50 $162 Universal Circus $19.50 Tampa Zoo $19 adult, $17.50 child Trips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Learn to Fly February 26 at 8 a.m. Free introductory lesson at the Navy Jax Flying Club Walt Disney World Weekend Trip March 24 $100 per person includes 2-night lodging at Disneys All Star Sports Resort, 1-day park hopper and transportation. Free Mall & Movie Trip Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater March 9 at 6 p.m. Free Adventure Landing Trip March 10 at 9 a.m.Golf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees March 6 & 20 for active duty March 8 & 22 for retirees & DoD personnel February Golf Specials Monday & Tuesday play 18 holes for $20 Monday Friday after 12 p.m., play 18 holes for $17 Cart and green fees included Not applicable on holidays Twilight Golf League March 20 Aug. 30 $20 entry fee Rosters due by March 16Call 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Call 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. and Tuesday & Thursday 4 7 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Call 777-8549 /6035 Ground School Feb. 27 April 4 $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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Harvey also addressed what he called the increasing levels of uncertainty surrounding todays Navy. Weve seen it by going through the involuntary sepa ration process known as ERB (Enlisted Retention Board). Naturally, retained Sailors are looking at each other and wondering, Whos next? And whats next? Theres additional uncertainty about pay scales, retirement benefits and our force structure. So, I urge you to keep your Sailors focused on what they can control work hard, get qualified, build trust and stay out of trouble. Stevens relieved one point of uncertainty when he announced there would be no ERB in FY 13 or FY 14. He also spoke of chiefs messes taking advantage of training to polish their leadership and communication skills. Its important for senior enlisted to reenergize their focus on CPO responsibili ties, team building and leader development. Key elements include: teamwork within the mess; communication with the wardroom; how chiefs can mentor junior officers; and how chiefs are managing key per sonnel programs, explained Stevens. After the town hall meet ing, Harveys group visited the HSM-70 Spartans, CPRW-11 Mobile Tactical Operations Center, the P-8A Integrated Training Center and the VP-10 Red Lancers. Harvey and Stevens also dined with command master chiefs at the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf. U.S. Fleet Forces Command supports both the Chief of Naval Operations and Combatant Commanders worldwide by providing responsive, relevant, sustain able Naval forces that are ready for tasking. Additionally, USFFC serves as the CNOs designated executive agent for Anti-Terrorism/ Force Protection, Individual Augmentees and Sea Basing.HARVEY: Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command pays visit For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR website at www. cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook. com nasjaxmwr JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 The Navy contract for job search and assistance to help Sailors separating by the Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) is well underway, an official said Feb. 17. Navy has contract ed Challenger, Gray and Christmas Inc. (CGC), an out placement service company, to personally coach and assist ERB-separating Sailors transi tion to the civilian workforce, said Capt. Kate Janac, transi tion assistance program man ager. The Sept. 1 separation date is approaching and ERB Sailors should immediately contact CGC via the toll-free number or email to begin their job place ment process. An employment outplace ment service assists clients in making the transition to reemployment. Founded in the early 1960s, CGC has more than four decades of experience in the career transition industry. The CGC team provides Sailors with individualized career assessment and pro fessional resume writing, job search and preparation for interviews. The company assigns each Sailor a civilian coach who proactively works their case through each step of the process. The coach is also a prior-military advisor to help in the transition. Our goal is to connect every ERB separating Sailor to this service. Command leadership needs to encourage and pro vide Sailors the opportunity to enroll and move forward, said Janac. Those stationed overseas or deployed should also initiate contact and will receive support tailored to their unique situations. What really stands out is the high level of individual, professional service our Sailors will receive, said Janac. Sailors can engage with their coach to learn the skills needed to develop a personal market ing plan customized to their expertise and specific goals. CGC began contacting ERB Sailors via email in December. Approximately 1,000 Sailors are using services provided by CGC, one third of eligible recipients. CGC representatives have joined Navy Personnel Commands Fleet Engagement Team during its briefs in fleet concentration areas to facili tate enrollment. ERB separating Sailors should contact CGC via their toll free number 1-800-9714288 or email CGCUSNavy@ challengergray.com. For too long, synthetic THC (the hallucinogenic chemi cal in marijuana) known as Spice, K2, and Blaze, as well as the synthetic stimu lants commonly called bath salts or plant food, have plagued our military. Over the past several months, the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) has used its emergency schedul ing authority to designate five synthetic THC chemicals and three synthetic stimulants as Schedule I controlled sub stances making their sale, possession and use illegal in the United States. As most of the Navy already knows, use or possession of these substances by Navy per sonnel is forbidden and could possibly subject a Sailor to NJP, administrative separation, or even court-martial under UCMJ Art. 112a or UCMJ Art. 92 (for violation of OPNAVINST 5350.4D, SECNAVINST 5300.28E and/or NAVADMIN 108/10). However, in addition to the possible severe legal consequences, individual Sailors and Navy leadership should understand the harm ful and potentially deadly effects of using these drugs. Many people have heard of a Schedule I substance but dont know what it really means. A Schedule I sub stance is considered by the DEA to be the most restrictive category and is only reserved for unsafe and highly abused substances with no medical usage. Moreover, the DEA generally only uses its emergency scheduling authority to ban substances it believes could cause an imminent public health crisis. The DEA states that they have received an increasing number of reports from poi son control centers, hospitals and law enforcement that individuals using synthetic THC have experienced serious side effects such as convulsions, anxiety attacks, dangerously elevated heart rates, increased blood pressure, vomiting, and disorientation. Moreover, when discussing the side effects of synthetic marijuana, the Navy Surgeon General, Vice Adm. Adam M. Robinson, Jr., stat ed that, Serious side effects have been reported after its use including tremors, panic attacks, delirium, impaired coordination, seizures, para noid hallucinations, and psy chotic symptoms that can last for days, even months in some cases. With regard to bath salts the reported side effects include agitation, paranoia, high blood pressure, hallucinations, chest pain, suicidality, and even psychosis! Sailors should be aware that ingesting these synthetic drugs can lead to strange reactions and deadly results. Police in West Virginia recently arrest ed a man after they found him dressed in womens clothing, standing with his pants down over a blood-soaked goat that he allegedly stole and killed he blamed his bizarre action on bath salts use. Worse, Reuters News Agency report ed claims from the European Union that mephedrone, a chemical often found in bath salts, was directly linked to the deaths of two people and is possibly tied to the deaths of 37 more! A quick search on the Internet will reveal many similar stories. Given these potential consequences, its also important for Sailors to know that ingesting these synthetic compounds is like playing Russian Roulette. Even the manufacturers them selves label most, if not all, of these substances as not fit for human consumption! Very few studies have been done on these synthetic drugs so the immediate and long term affects on the body and human brain are mostly unknown. Studies have shown that JWH018, the compound generally found in Spice, is more potent and efficacious than THC. This means that lower concentra tions of JWH-018 can have a greater and higher maxi mal psychological effect on the brain than that of THC. A recent article written by the Navy Surgeon General states that, Spice-type products are more potent to the brain and other organs because they bind themselves more permanently to receptors. Spice could have multiple unknown chemicals including harmful metal resi dues, with unknown potency potentially 5-200 times more potent than the THC in mari juana. What makes the problem worse is that most of the products sold are simply plant matter soaked in the synthetic compounds so its impossible for the Sailor to know how much of the synthetic drug he or she is actually ingesting. A scary thought when you con sider that researchers admit that we know essentially noth ing about the absorption and distribution kinetics of JWH018! The point is that Sailors need to understand that they are not getting away with abus ing these drugs simply because they may not get caught by the Navys urinalysis program. Its obviously important for Sailors and command leadership to understand the legal ramifi cations of drug abuse; but its equally, if not more important for Sailors to know the risks they take when putting these chemicals in their bodies, and for leadership to educate them on the potentially disastrous affects it may have on their career and their lives. Scholarships available The Navy Wives Club of America offers numerous scholarships to assist Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard enlisted spouses and children of active duty, retirees or deceased service members to continue their education. These scholarships are awarded to assist eligible applicants in obtaining a college education, vocational training, business or other training. For more information or to download an application, go to: www.navywives clubofamerica.org/scholarships. U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, of Floridas 4th Congressional District, announced Feb. 6 that his office is accepting applications for the class of 2017 to the nations service academies. The application deadline is October 13. I strongly encourage interested students to reach out to my Jacksonville office for more information on how they can be a part of one of our nations finest educational insti tutions. Attending the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, the U.S. Air Force Academy at Colorado Springs, or U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point is a distinct honor that can help lead a student down a path of success in life and to being a good citizen, said Crenshaw. Our service academies are vital in preparing todays youth to assume the responsibility and leadership required to become our future military leaders. Northeast Florida students have been some of the best and the brightest, and I am always proud to nominate them to attend our nations service acad emies. Details of the application pro cess can be found on Congressman Crenshaws official web site at www. crenshaw.house.gov or by calling his Jacksonville office at 904-598-0481 and asking for District Representative Nathan Riska. Congressman Crenshaws Military Academy Selection Committee will interview candidates in November. Selected nominees will be notified by the end of the year, and nomina tions will then be submitted to the academies. service academy admis sions officers then review nominees applications and select appointments in late spring. Note: No nomination is required to attend the U.S. Coast Guard Academy at New London, Conn. ERB transition benefits Outplacement firm helps Sailors launch new careers Spice and bath salts: Bad news for abusers Crenshaw accepting service academy nominations Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.800-822-6344 www.stjude.org

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The Naval Legal Service Office Southeast/NAS Jacksonville Tax Resource Center is now open in Building 13 at the main gate for free self-service resources for active duty and retired personnel to prepare fed eral and state income tax returns. This year, the Navy is providing a self-service Tax Resource Center. The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA) center will be equipped with eight computer stations where customers prepare their own tax returns using free online programs with the assistance of volunteers. The recommended program for use by the U.S. Navy is Military OneSources H&R Block at Home. Unlike previous years, no electronic filing will be done on behalf of customers. Some of the websites include: Turbotax.intuit.com/Taxfeedom WWW.Taxslayer.com/Military/ Default.aspx WWW.file2011taxes. newt/?cd=filing_Military Who is eligible to use the Tax Resource Center? and their dependents than 30 days bilization mobilization What to bring to the Tax Resource Center: taxpayers and dependents numbers copies of 2010 tax returns if available Where and when: The resource Center is located in top of Building 13 (outside the Yorktown Gate).: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 8 a.m. 4 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Note: Computer access at the Tax Resource Center will be purely on a walk-in basis. For more information, call 542-8039. Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. 27-29 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), May 14-17 (5:30-10 p.m.), Aug. 13-15 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Nov. 13-16 (5:30-10 p.m.) (TAP) Separation Workshop March 12-16, April 9-13, May 7-11, June 4-8, July 9-13. (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) Feb. 27March 2, March 26-30, April 23-27, May 21-25, June 18-22, July 23-27. O-5 & above (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) July 30-Aug. 2. a.m.-noon) March 21, April 18, May 3, June 1, July 19, Aug. 3, Sept. 5, Oct. 12, Nov. 14. Workshop (8-9:30 a.m.) March 19, May 2, July 18, Sept. 4, Nov. 19. (9:40 a.m.-noon) March 19, May 2, July 18, Sept. 4, Nov. 19. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) April 30-May 1, Aug. 27-28, Nov. 20-21. Training (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) March 5-6, June 11-15, Sept. 17-21, Dec. 10-14. Workshop (8-11 a.m.) April 20, July 16, Oct. 3. Buyers (1-3:30 p.m.) March 20, May 30, Sept. 6. Buying (9-10:30 a.m.) May 4, Aug. 29, Nov. 13. Apr. 3, June 5, Aug. 7, Oct. 2, Dec. 4. 4 p.m.) March 13, May 8, July 10, Sept. 13, Nov. 11, Nov. 13. March 28 (5-7 p.m.), May 19 (10a.m.noon), July 16 (1-3 p.m.), Sept. 12 (5-7 p.m.), Nov. 17 (10 a.m.-noon). March 12, April 9, May 14, June 11, July 9, Aug. 6, Sept. 10, Oct. 15, Nov. 19, Dec. 10. (9-10 a.m.) March 7, April 4, May 2, June 6, July 11, Aug. 1, Sept. 5, Oct. 3, Nov. 7, Dec. 5. a.m.-noon) March 20, April 17, May 15, June 19, July 17, Aug. 21, Sept. 18, Oct. 16, Nov. 20, Dec. 18. For more information or to register, call 542-5745. Free tax preparation centerImprove your life skills with free knowledge JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012 17

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Editors note Beginning in April and continuing through 2015, the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard will commemorate the Bicentennial of the War of 1812 and The Star Spangled Banner. The Navy has partnered with the International Council of Air Shows, the Navy League, the Naval Historical Foundation, and Operation Sail to create world-class events around the country, with signature events in New York, Baltimore, Norfolk, New Orleans, Boston, Chicago and Cleveland, and smaller events in other cities. These events will include Blue Angels air shows, visits by ships of the U.S. Navy and international navies, parades of tall ships and Galley Wars cooking events.The War of 1812 was a watershed moment in the nations development of a strong national defense system, a military historian said this week, as it provided justification for building up the Navy and changed the nations attitude toward strengthening the central government. Michael Crawford, a senior histori an at the Naval History and Heritage Command, made that observation Feb. 7 during a DoD Live bloggers roundtable. Crawford said the United States declared war against the United Kingdom because It wanted to end impressments of its citizens into the Royal Navy. recognition of the maritime rights of its merchantmen against illegal blockades, searches and seizures, and it wanted to stop British support of hostile Native Americans against the United States, he said. At the time, President James Madison and his war planners developed a strategy to achieve these goals. That strategy largely focused on a land-troop invasion of British-owned Canada, ignoring a naval strategy. It was expected to be a quick and decisive victory for the Americans, Crawford said, as British attention was focused on engagements with Napoleon. But as the Canadian campaign began, it became clear that it wouldnt go as Madison and his war planners had hoped it would. By 1815, two and a half years after the initial engagement, all attempts to invade and occupy Canada had failed. During that time, Crawford said, the United States adopted a largely defen sive posture against the British. The U.S. military had repulsed major inva sions at Plattsburgh, N.Y, and in New Orleans. But the United States suffered a ravaging of the shores of the Chesapeake Bay, a major agricultural region, and the capture and burning of our capital, Crawford said. Furthermore, he added, a tight British blockade of the American coast had brought the U.S. government to the brink of financial collapse. The war eventually ended with the signing of the Treaty of Ghent, which restored America to its prewar condi tions with no loss or gain, Crawford said, and the conversation turned toward the role The War of 1812 played in strengthening the Navy. At the onset of the war, he said, the Navy had a small fleet and focused largely on harbor defense. However, he added, it became increasingly apparent that the United States needed to develop naval power to avoid defeat. Early in the war, we lost an army, Crawford said. And so the people in Washington the war planners quickly came to understand that the conquest of Canada depended on control of the waterways, especially Lake Ontario. The result was a build-up of Navy vessels on the Great Lakes. By late 1814, the Navy had 400 men on ships at sea and 10,000 men on ships on the Great Lakes. This buildup allowed for some important victories during the war, Crawford said, but those victories also drew attention to losses that that resulted from insufficient naval power. He cited conflicts at Lake Champlain and along the Chesapeake Bay as examples. The British had an army of 10,000 invading upstate New York. An American naval victory in Lake Champlain threw that army back into Canada, Crawford said, because with out control of Lake Champlain, British supply lines were vulnerable. But a lack of U.S. naval power allowed the British to wreak destruction up and down the Chesapeake Bay, he added. All of these events convinced the nations leaders, as well as the nations people, that we needed both an ade quate navy and an adequate army if we wanted to be an adequate nation, he said. But before the end of the war, con gressional Republicans didnt support building a strong Navy, Crawford said, believing that an ocean-going Navy would draw the United States into war unnecessarily and require high taxes that would corrupt the political system, benefit mainly financiers, and hurt the common people. But by the end of the war, he said, people of all political stripes witnessed the importance of having a strong, centrally controlled military. Many Republicans and all Federalists were committed to a strong Navy, an adequate, professional Army, and the financial reforms necessary to support them, Crawford said. After the war, Congress ... approved an ambitious naval expansion program and a regular Army of 10,000 men, he continued. They raised taxes to pay for these, and they created the Second National Bank as a tool for government financing. The War of 1812 also changed the U.S. position on the global stage, Crawford said. Before the war, he explained, the United Kingdom considered the United States to be a commercial rival and potential enemy, to be thwarted through confrontation wherever pos sible. After the war, the United Kingdom sought accommodation with the United States, considering the friendship of the United States as something to be cur ried as an asset. This change in thinking, Crawford said, was a direct result of the British recognizing that the United States had newfound political unity, a strong Army and Navy, and sound fiscal underpin nings. Historian explains War of 1812s impact on national defense 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 23, 2012