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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/01981
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 02-16-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
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Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:01981

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2012 Military Saves Pedal PartyShaping Up Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Maintainers and weapon special ists at VP-30 aboard NAS Jacksonville recently achieved certification stan dards essential for the safe and effec tive operation of the new P-8A mari time patrol and reconnaissance air craft. It was all part of Naval Aviation Maintenance Program that helps standardize operations of naval avia tion commands. The training focused on the organi zational level (O-level) maintenance that is performed by a squadron on a day-by-day basis in support of its operations. The O-level mission is to maintain assigned aircraft and aeronautical equipment in a full mission-capable status. O-level functions include ser vicing, inspections, handling, onequipment corrective and preventive maintenance, record keeping and reports preparation. The P-8A test aircraft, designated T-5, was on loan Feb. 3-10 from VX-1 at NAS Patuxent River, Md. ATCS David Wood, of VP-30 mainte nance control, said that qualifications ranged from plane captain, move director, brake rider and wing walker to properly performing both daily and turnaround inspections. The VP-30 ordnance division also achieved its conventional weapons technical profi ciency inspection certification. There were a lot of lessons-learned this week on how to service and sup port this highly capable new aircraft, said Wood. Our next goal is setting up pro grams for our safe for flight inspec tion in March that requires specific qualifications from the maintenance department in order to safely operate the aircraft. By that time, the squadron expects to receive the first of its low-rate initial production (LRIP) P-8A aircraft from Boeing. The next seven LRIP aircraft will support VP-30 in its mission of delivering qualified Poseidon aircrew and maintainers to the fleet in 2013. The Navy plans to purchase 117 Boeing 737-based P-8A anti-subma rine warfare, anti-surface warfare, intelligence, surveillance and recon naissance aircraft to replace its aging P-3 Orion fleet. War Eagles fly with Singapore partnersSailors from the VP-16 War Eagles visited the Republic of Singapore to build goodwill and conduct a training exercise. The detachment ran from Jan. 29 through Feb. 2 and included mul tiple training flights in cooperation with the Singapore Armed Forces. The chance to work with our partners in Singapore is a great opportunity, said VP-16 Detachment Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr. Trey Walden. Strengthening our ties and increasing security in the area is beneficial to all. Aircrew from VP-16 completed several training flights during the exercise to increase maritime domain awareness in the waters near Singapore. The surveillance capabilities of P-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft make them ideal platforms to guard large areas of the ocean and keep commercial shipping safe. The War Eagles also teamed with submariners from the Republic of Singapore Navy for a familiariza tion flight. Several submarine offi cers attended a capabilities brief and went flying with VP-16 to get an aerial view of an anti-submarine mission. The familiarization flight was a good chance for naval profes sionals with different backgrounds to learn about the others commu nity. I really enjoyed the chance to visit Singapore, said Lt. Jeff Eller. It was very exciting to take several Singaporean submarine officers flying with us. The perspective that both sides brought to the table was very interesting U.S. Navy maritime patrol aircraft have teamed with the Singapore Armed Forces before. Last year, patrol aircraft from the Republic of Singapore Air Force completed a historic deployment to Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa, to conduct anti-piracy and maritime security operations. Singaporean crews worked closely with Navy P-3C Orions to patrol the pirateinfested waters off the coast of Somalia. Singapore is one of the largest ports in the world, and the stra tegic position of the island nation at the mouth of the Malacca Strait makes maritime security a prime concern. Piracy remains a problem in the Malacca Strait and nearby waters. With over 50,000 vessels and millions of barrels of oil pass ing through the strait each year, the importance of safe sea-lanes cannot be overstated. VP-16 is currently deployed to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. The squadron conducts security, surveillance, and reconnaissance missions in support of Commander, U.S. Seventh Fleet and is home based at NAS Jacksonville. Post-ERB brief focuses on transition assistanceThe Post-ERB Fleet Engagement Team from Navy Personnel Command presented a full day of transi tion assistance briefs Feb. 9 aboard NAS Jacksonville to Sailors not selected for retention by the FY 12 Enlisted Retention Board (ERB). Sailors no longer eligible for advancement must separate no later than Sept. 1. Because ERB is a unique action for the Navy, the Bureau of Naval Personnel (BUPERS) placed a prior ity on interfacing with the fleet to publicize the lat est policies, as well as bring questions about those policies back to BUPERS, said Capt. Steve Holmes, director of Military Community Management. In his opening brief to more than 75 Sailors and some of their family members, Holmes explained, Our visit at NAS Jacksonville is to complement your ongoing transition efforts. The more we increase your understanding of the post-board processes the better prepared youll be for a successful transition. With all due respect to the emotions involved with ERB, weve set the stage well enough so that Sailors understand that its time to focus on moving forward. Most of our audiences are very receptive to the infor mation on transitional benefits. Weve also had some very informative sessions with spouses because, obviously, theyre as emotionally vested as their ser vice member. One area of concern is protecting med ical benefits, which for the long-term may include affiliating with the Select Reserve, said Holmes. Most audience members raised their hands when asked if they were taking advantage of the Fleet and Family Support Center TAP (Transition Assistance Program) workshops. Also in attendance were two representatives from the outplacement firm of Challenger, Gray and Christmas Inc., which has contracted with the Navy to provide personalized career coaching and job search assistance. NCCM Mary Burroughs of U.S. Fleet Forces Command said, As the lead Navy career counselor for my command, I like the content of this brief. One of our Sailors big concerns are their spouse and their house and how transition benefits can help point them to a more secure future. As long as ERB-affected Sailors are proactive and engaged in utilizing their transition benefits, such as TAP and outplacement services, I believe theyll be well posi tioned to realize their next career move after separa tion. AE1 Melvin Young of HS-11 attended the brief with his wife, Mary Beth. They learned he would not be retained last November. Im still unhappy about our situation. Today, Id like to hear a better explanation of how the board determined eligibility and evaluated sustained superior performance. As for post-separation plans, well be moving to Tennessee, where I plan to use my G.I. Bill to finish my degree. Im also one of the fortunate few who qualify for the Temporary Early Retirement Authority (TERA) for Sailors who have completed at least 15 years of ser vice. TERA is a temporary, voluntary program that offers voluntary early retirement at a reduced monthly sti pend to eligible members with 15 to 20 years of active service. AT2 Sakima Haynes, of Southeast Regional Calibration Center, had more than 14 years in when notified of his ERB status. Like most everybody, I felt that I was unfairly designated by the board but thats water under the bridge now. Since then, I quali fied for TERA, completed my TAP workshops and am getting ready to move to Atlanta, where Ill attend Oglethorpe University. For more ERB information, contact the NPC Customer Support Center at 1-866-827-5672 or csc mailbox@navy.mil. Training up on Poseidon

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Feb. 13 1854 Adm. Perry anchors off Yokosuka, Japan to receive Emperors reply to treaty pro posal. 1913 Naval Radio Station, Arlington, Va. begins opera tions. 1945 First Navy units to enter Manila Bay since 1942. 1968 Operation Coronado XI begins in Mekong Delta. Feb. 14 1778 John Paul Jones in USS Ranger receives first official salute to U.S. Stars and Strips flag by European country, at Quiberon, France. 1813 USS Essex becomes first U.S. warship to round Cape Horn and enter the Pacific Ocean. 1814 USS Constitution cap tures British Lovely Ann and Pictou. 1840 Officers from USS Vincennes make first landing in Antarctica on floating ice. Feb. 15 1856 USS Supply, com manded by Lt. David Dixon Porter, sails from Smyrna, Syria, bound for Indianola, Texas, with a load of 21 camels intended for experimental use in the American desert west of the Rockies. 1898 Battleship USS Maine explodes in Havana Harbor. Feb. 16 1804 Lt. Stephen Decatur, with volunteers from frigate USS Constitution and schooner USS Enterprise, enters Tripoli harbor by night in the ketch USS Intrepid to burn the cap tured frigate USS Philadelphia. Decaturs raid succeeds with out American losses. Englands Lord Nelson calls this the most daring act of the age. 1815 USS Constitution cap tures HMS Susannah. 1967 Operation River Raider begins in Mekong Delta. Feb. 17 1864 Confederate subma rine H.L. Hunley sinks USS Housatonic in Charleston har bor. 1942 First Navy Construction Battalion (Seabees) arrives Bora Bora. 1944 Carrier aircraft strike Japanese fleet at Truk, sinks ships and destroys aircraft. Feb. 18 1846 General order on Port and Starboard because Larboard and Starboard sound confusingly similar, the word Port was substituted for Larboard. 1944 Amphibious force under Rear Adm. Hill lands troops on Engebi Island, Eniwetok. 1955 First of 14 detonations, Operation Teapot nuclear test. Feb. 19 1814 USS Constitution cap tures British brig Catherine. 1945 Marines with naval gunfire support land on Iwo Jima; island secured March 16. 1981 Fleet Replacement Squadron VFA-125 is the first squadron to receive the new F/A-18 Hornet strike fighter for training fleet operators. Feb. 20 1815 USS Constitution, under Capt. Charles Stewart, captures HMS Cyane and sloop-of-war Levant. 1962 USMC Lt. Col. John Glenn becomes first American to orbit Earth. His flight in Friendship 7 (Mercury 6) con sisted of 3 orbits in 88 minutes at a velocity of 17,544 mph. Recovery was by USS Noa (DD841). 1974 First Lockheed S-3A Viking ASW car rier jet is assigned to VS-41 Shamrocks. So far, Dinner with the Smileys has been about us and what we are going through while Dustin is away on deployment. My boys have met inter esting people who have given them unforgettable experiences and thought ful gifts. My boys are forever changed because of it. After the mayors surprise limo and trip to get ice cream, Ford wanted to know why everyone is being so nice to us. I explained to him that it feels good to do things for others and that treat ing the boys is for our guests a treat in itself. Ford decided it would be nice to do the same thing for someone else. For our fifth Dinner with the Smileys, I asked my friend Jenifer Lloyd to show the boys what philanthropy is all about. Jenifer is a seven-year breast cancer survivor. She works for Champion the Cure Challenge. She knows a thing or two about giving back all that has been given to you. Jenifer planned to take Ford, Owen and Lindell to the pediatric floor of our local hospital, where they could meet children who have cancer and other life-threatening illnesses. A trip like this, of course, requires some planning . and lots of warning. In the days leading up to our dinner, I talked to the boys about what they might see and how they should behave. I told them they might have questions, and if they did, either Jenifer or the nurses could help them understand. The boys were attentive and curi ous. They also were a little nervous. We decided to buy small gifts for the patients. Doing so helped the boys put themselves in the other childrens shoes: What would I want if I was in the hospital? Older kids, Ford decided, would want crossword puzzles. Younger kids, Lindell said, would want coloring books. I reminded the boys that our dinner guests had done the same thoughtful planning and questioning before they came to our house. We met Jenifer in the lobby and rode the elevator to the eighth floor. When the doors parted, the boys saw a light house and a mural of fish on the walls. This was not the hospital they had imagined. They hadnt seen anything yet. Inside the double swinging doors and down the hallway past the patient rooms was an atrium filled with toys, a foosball table, books, sofas and tables with umbrellas bathed in natural sun light from the glass ceiling. The boys were confused. Their faces said, So when do we get to the hospital? And in truth, Im not sure Lindell, who is only 5, ever really understood that we were inside a hospital. Hospitals have come a long way from the time when a childs only comfort was an old televi sion that played reruns of shows like Wheel of Fortune. Amid such a child-friendly envi ronment, my boys eased back into kid mode. Lindell rode on the stuffed dino saur. Ford and Owen checked out the foosball table. There was laughter and noise. Then a boy shuffled past in a hos pital gown. He was close in age to my older boys and like them in almost all respects. Except he was carrying a bag for his catheter. Now the boys remembered. They made crafts with the boy in the family resource room. Then he offered to help them pass out gifts to the other patients, some of whom we could not meet because of the nature of their ill nesses. After the hospital, it was time to have a meal with our dinner guest. Jenifer asked if she could share her cancer story with the boys. I wasnt sure how much the boys would understand. Do they even know what breasts are? But when Jenifer showed them pictures of herself being wheeled into surgery, they got it. The table was quiet for a couple minutes while Jenifer fiddled with her smart phone. She pulled up another picture, this one of her bald head and her natu rally bald husband wearing a wig meant for her. The boys looked at me as if for permission to laugh. But Jenifer beat them to it. When she laughed, they did, too. Its hard to know how much the boys absorbed from the day, but theyve been unusually quiet ever since. Did I show them too much? Did any of it make sense? Ill probably never know. Yet, as we left the cafe that night, Jenifer gave each of the boys a gift. It was a stuffed bear. Now, my older boys are past the age of stuffed animals, so I worried they might make a face. I held my breath. Then Owen read the card tied to the bears neck. All the proceeds from the stuffed animal go to Cancer Care of Maine. No one said a word. They stared at their bears. And my heart was glad because although everyone got a gift, I saw what my boys had come to know: It wasnt about them. DoD decal renewalFor those wishing to renew Department of Defense decals online, please go to: www.pid. cnic.navy.mil. You must ensure that you have your vehicle license number, drivers license number and all insurance information prior to starting the pro cess. Please follow up with the base security office by calling 542-4529/30.Dinner with the Smileys: Learning about cancer

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Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast, signed a proclamation declaring his sup port of Military Saves campaign Feb. 9. Military Saves is a national campaign Feb. 19-26 to persuade, motivate and encourage Sailors and fami lies to save money every month, and to convince lead ers and organizations to be aggressive in promoting automatic savings. Scorby addressed team members of the Fleet Readiness Division before signing the declaration sharing how important he thinks financial readiness is to the career of Sailors and civilians. I am so supportive of these kinds of programs. Im an economics major with a background in finance, so from what Ive seen throughout my career, theres nothing worse than seeing our young Sailors and civilians get into trouble financially, he said. Anything we can do to promote saving is extraor dinarily important, especially in the U.S. today where we have a negative savings rate. It changes a little bit each year, but historically weve had a one or two percent savings to negative which means people are spending more than their savings. Supporting things which we have in place like sav ings bonds or Thrift Savings Plans, which Im a huge supporter of, and using good practices like getting financial counseling, I think is really, really impor tant, added Scorby. Rufus Bundrige, a personal financial manager and financial educator at NAS Jacksonvilles Fleet and Family Support Center, agreed that being financially stable is key to success at work and at home. The objective is to increase wealth and decrease debt, said Bundrige. No matter how you do it, just do the right thing to try to eliminate debt and have some sort of retirement or financial plan for the future. Financial readiness can alleviate much of the stress on the homefront. It allows you to do your job without worrying about the financial end of paying your creditors on time or with living paycheck to paycheck, added Bundrige. You know that when you deploy your family mem bers are securely taken care of in a financial aspect. It can eliminate those things that add pressures on you. Since the Military Saves program began in 2007, more than 99,000 people have enrolled and more than 200 defense credit unions and military banks now participate in a wide variety of activities to promote personal financial readiness each year. DoD active duty, National Guard and Reserve, Coast Guard, as well as civilians, retirees, veterans, defense contractors, and family members of all ages are eli gible to sign up for the campaign. To learn more about Military Saves, go to www.mili tarysaves.org. Scorby signs Military Saves proclamation A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 Command fitness leaders (CFLs) from Navy Region Southeast bases spent the week of Feb. 6-10 at NAS Jacksonville participating in a five-day, 40-hour CFL class to become certified to run their command physical readiness programs. CFLs play an integral part in the overall fitness and readiness of Sailors. This course provides the skills, educa tion and motivation CFLs need to lead a successful PT program to help Sailors stay healthy, stay fit and stay Navy. Each command is required to have one certified CFL and one assistant CFL (ACFL) for every 25 military personnel. These CFLs are trained to conduct a safe and constructive PRT program to keep Sailors mission ready, said NAS Jax Fitness Director Tanya Henigman. CFLs are instructed about safety guidelines, injury prevention, exer cise physiology, nutrition, clothing guidelines and how to design a fitness program whether its cardio, circuit, strength training, muscle endurance or a combination of these. After participating in a PRT test the first morning, the participants head Command fitness leaders train at NAS Jacksonville

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 5 ed to the classroom where they were greeted by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders. Its not just enough anymore to pass the PRT twice a year. The Navy is getting a lot more serious about physical fitness and thats where you come in. Its got to be a mindset that people actually want to go out and PT every day. Thats where leadership comes in and we look to our command fitness leaders to facilitate our com mands PRT programs, he said. Its up to you to motivate our Sailors to help them get in shape. At NAS Jax, we take physical fitness very seriously which is proven by a reduction in PRT failures, people loos ing weight and getting in bet ter shape. Its a lifestyle change. And it starts with you. The course consists of class room work to learn about instructions, safety guidelines, medical screenings, waiv ers, nutrition, weight management, administration actions, the Physical Readiness Information Management System and the Navy Operational Fitness and Fueling System (NOFFS). There are a lot of changes regarding PRT instructions and waivers. This is the first time weve taught this material with the new OPNAV 6110.1 which describes the Navys Physical Readiness Program, issues pro gram requirements, defines the responsibilities for compliance, and establishes required mini mum standards of physical fit ness, Henigman continued. We also promote the NOFFS which is the new standard of fitness that the Navy is lean ing towards because its more focused on injury prevention. NOFFS is broken down into a series of exercises based on three different levels. It can be used in confined spaces on board ships and submarines, as an individual or group work out. Its versatile and balances exercise with proper nutrition. The program is built on a five pillars eat clean, eat often, hydrate, recover and mindset. Participants also got handson training including strength conditioning, cardiovascular conditioning and circuit train ing. This hands-on training is the meat, muscle and grind of the course. We also train our CFLs on how to safely con duct a TRX and spin class so if we cant provide an instruc tor, they can teach a class uti lizing our equipment, added Henigman. Throughout the week, the 24 participants enthusiastically tried a variety of new exercises at the base gym including the TRX suspension training which was new to most of the class members. This is an outstanding course and were getting a lot of good information. I think this will make our command PT program 10 times better, said SHCS(AW/SW) Craig Freeman of Naval Hospital Jacksonville. Weve learned different types of drills, circuit train ing and how to incorporate the NOFFS into our daily routines. This will be part of our Fitness Enhancement Program when we get back to work next week. I also gained a lot of knowl edge from the classroom por tion that Ill implement into our program at the hospital. This course has been abso lutely amazing. Ive learned about the many resources available on this base and throughout big Navy and will take this knowledge back to my Sailors and utilize this information in my command, added AO1 Robin Anton of VR-62. Its been a great week learn ing all these new workouts and Ill incorporate them into our commands PRT program. Henigman also stressed that the fitness staff is always avail able to help. We give the CFLs a lot of information about our pro grams at the Fitness Source, base gym and Naval Hospital Jax Wellness Center. We want them to know we are here to help and our main focus is to get Sailors healthy, fit and help them stay Navy. Photos by Kaylee LaRocque FITNESS: Its got to be a mindset that people actually want to go out and PT every day

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The Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville announced its Sailors and Instructors of the Year for 2011. Instructor of the Year, CY-11. Benson provided 1,040 hours of training to 90 students while decreasing flight engi neer attrition from 18 percent in FY-10 to an unprecedented five percent in FY-11. Additionally, he led the development of curriculum for the Acoustic Receiver Technology System course, which saved the Navy over $300,000. His professional attitude, personal motivation, strong work ethic and dedication to student success make him an invaluable asset to CNATTU Jax. Year, FY-11. Stovall served as an H-60 Electrical Systems instructor where he personally trained more than 453 Sailors and Marines on the upkeep, troubleshooting, and maintenance of the H-60 aircraft. Stovall also served as the commands medical readiness representative. His constant monitor ing of the commands medical readi ness led to the command having a 92 percent medical readiness rate for 2011. Additionally, Stovall served as the Maintenance Training Unit (MTU) 1005 Instructional Systems Development (ISD) representative. As the ISD repre sentative, Stovall ensured the quality of instructional courses taught at MTU 1005 consistently exceeded the standard set by Naval Education and Training Command. Stovalls consistent profes sionalism and persistent initiative make him a tremendous asset to CNATTU Jax. the Year, CY-11. As the T56-A-14 First Degree Intermediate and 54H6077 Prop Intermediate Maintenance Training Unit 1011 Lead Power Plant instructor, she personally provided over 1,250 hours of instruction for more than 110 students while upholding an impressive 100 percent graduation rate. Foster also served as the president of the commands Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Committee, where she orga nized countless fundraisers that direct ly resulted in raising over $8,000 for the command holiday party. Her superb leadership and inspirational guidance have made a lasting impression on CNATTU Jax. Sailor of the Year, FY-11. He serves as an instructor where he teaches personnel on the upkeep and maintenance of P-3 Life Support Systems. He also serves as the CETARS testing team lead where he was responsible for the incorpora tion of over 11,900 questions and the creation of 297 online tests that enabled the implementation of an online testing program for CNATTU Jax. Additionally, as CNATTU Jax command fire warden, Acosta led 10 assistant fire wardens in providing maintenance and upkeep of sprinkler systems, emergency exit lighting, and 76 fire extinguishers in five buildings while coordinating all required drills with the NAS Jax Fire Department. Instructor of the Year, FY-11. Romero personally provided over 1,176 hours of P-3 aircraft weapons system and weap ons loading training for 46 students and achieved a 100 percent completion rate while maintaining an impressive 98.6 grade point average. His techni cal expertise and curriculum develop ment skills had a positive impact during major revisions for both the Initial and Career P-3C Weapon Systems courses. Romeros superb leadership and inspi rational guidance have made a lasting impression on CNATTU Jax. Year, CY-11. Kong personally trained more than 250 Sailors and Marines in the upkeep, maintenance, and trouble shooting of aviation support equip ment at MTU 3032 while maintaining an impressive 100 percent pass rate. Additionally, Kong earned his Black Belt in the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program and successfully trained and certified eight Sailors and 56 Marines. Kongs dynamic professional perfor mance and unwavering dedication to duty have made him invaluable asset to CNATTU Jaxs team of professionals. The Navys past successful efforts to balance the officer corps resulted in the need to conduct a selective early retire ment (SER) board for only two communities in the restricted line and staff corps this year as announced in NAVADMIN 048/12, Feb 7. Because of the force man agement efforts used over the past few years, the unrestricted line, and most of the restrict ed line and staff corps officers communities are within their manpower requirements at the senior levels. Due to high reten tion and low attrition, the Oceanographer and Supply Corps officer communities are over their requirements at senior ranks. The Navy does not plan to conduct any further SER boards for the officer commu nities for fiscal year 2013. The restricted line and staff corps communities, in Oceanography (1800 designa tor) and Supply Corps (3100 designator) will be part of the fiscal year 13 SER Board con ducted in July 2012. This board will help ensure balance of these two commu nities and bring the number of O-5s and O-6s in line with the number authorized to meet the manpower requirement. This action is required because of the high retention rates for active Oceanography/ Supply O-5 and Oceanography O-6 officers. Current projections indi cate the SER board will select for early retirement approxi mately two captains and three commanders from the Oceanography community and 14 Supply Corps commanders. These numbers may be adjusted based on the num ber of voluntary retirement requests received prior to the board. The SER board will consider the records of all active duty restricted line (Oceanography) captains, with at least four years time in grade as of July 1, 2012 and whose names are not on a list of officers recom mended for promotion. In addition, Oceanography and Supply Corps command ers who have twice failed for promotion to O-6 and whose names are not on a list of offi cers recommended for promo tion will be reviewed by the board. Officers who wish to be exempted from consideration by the SER board may submit a voluntary retirement request no later than May 25, with a requested retirement date of Sept. 1, 2013 or earlier. Once the voluntary retire ment request is approved, the officer will be removed from consideration by the board. For those officers selected for early retirement, they must, by law, retire no later than the first day of the seventh month following Secretary of the Navy approval of the board recommendations. The target date for this approval is Sept. 1, 2012. Officer force management efforts lead to smaller FY13 SER boardCNATTU Jax announces staff awards 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012

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NC1(SW) Jason Davis was recog nized as Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior Sailor of the First Quarter 2012. As the regional career counselor, Davis over sees the career programs of 16 major installations, which comprises 22 indi vidual counselors, more than 200 departmental counselors and an excess of 100,000 Southeast Region Sailors. He recently took the lead in assessing and nominating command programs throughout the region for the 2011 Commander, Naval Installations Command Retention Excellence Awards. He has enjoyed a tremendous amount of success here at CNRSE because of his dedication to the Sailors in the region, said Chief Aviation Administrationman (AW/SW) Eugene Burns, Davis supervisor. Davis said he was hon ored to be selected and that he could not have done it alone. Its humbling in that no Sailor gets to this point without the sup port of every Sailor in our Navy. The fact that I have been given this honor is a testament to the dedica tion to duty of all of the Sailors that I work with, he said. Davis added that Southeast Region Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Mac Ellis played a major role in his suc cess at CNRSE. We have a tremen dous support network with our leadership and an outstanding com mand master chief who never fails to support not only me, but every Sailor in the region. Davis said another key to his suc cess is his drive to main tain focus on the mission at hand. Keep working hard, even if you think no one is watching, he said. Do what you do for your country, your ship mates and for the mis sions. Never seek person al glory that will come from a job well done. OS2(SW) Brandon Doctor was named CNRSE Junior Sailor of the First Quarter 2012. While serving as regional watch spe cialist in the Regional Operations Center, Doctor processed more than 100 messages for 17 installations in support of real-world incident responses. In addition, he is currently taking online courses at Columbia College. In the short time he has been here, hes prov en himself to be a valu able asset to the com mand and the Navy as a whole, said QMC(SW) Steven Davis, Doctors immediate supervisor. He embodies every thing that you could ask for in a Sailor. From his outer appearance, work ethic, drive and determi nation to succeed, he is well on his way to accom plishing great things for the Navy. Receipt of the award was a source of satisfac tion for both Doctor and his family. Its a great honor to be selected. This is my first time, although Ine been nominated a few times in my career, he said. Being selected gives me a sense of relief and sets a new standard in my personal accomplish ments. And itsgreat plea sure to see my wifes reac tion to this achievement. While winning the award is a significant individual achievement, Doctor attributed his suc cess to the support of his peers, supervisors and family. I owe my success here at CNRSE to the support of my chain of command and to the support and encouragement of my wife. Without their posi tivity, I dont think any of this would be possible, he said. According to Doctor, a major factor to his suc cess has been his willing ness to constantly chal lenge himself and that junior Sailors who would like to follow in his foot steps should do the same. The U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) fleet master chief visited NAS Jacksonville Feb. 9 as part of an east coast tour to gather information and ideas from mas ter chief petty officers at various commands here. FLTCM(AW/NAC) Mike Stevens was accompanied by FORCM(AW/SW) Garry McClure of Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic, FORCM(SW/AW) James Williams of Commander, Naval Surface Forces, U.S. Atlantic Fleet and AVCM(AW) Bill White also of USFF. Im here today to discuss a few issues that are going on within our chief messes in our Navy. I believe our chiefs and senior chiefs have a role and by and large they are executing that role and doing a good job, said Stevens. The success of the command is driven by the success of our chiefs mess. I also believe that you cannot have a successful chiefs mess unless you have master chiefs leading the effort. You are the influencers within your mess. Stevens continued, I am here because Im looking for feedback on how our CPO messes can do better on handling their internal issues and Sailor readiness. An accomplished mission takes equipment and weapons systems to be up and running but it also takes Sailors to be mission ready. You cant be successful with one and not the other. Weve identified some core funda mental programs in the fleet and found that when our chiefs messes are engaged in them, you can accomplish missions effectively and efficiently. Stevens then turned the spotlight over to McClure CNRSE announces Sailors of the First Quarter Fleet Forces master chief visits NAS Jax to share ideas JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 7

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who talked about some of the issues hes involved in. One issue Im working on is to review the number of Sailors I have working outside the flight line in special programs such as recruiting, instruc tor billets and recruit com pany commanders. These are also considered Sailorization tours. I am fully aware of the benefits of being assigned to a Sailorization billet however, we need more of our journeyman Sailors back in the fleet on the flight lines turning wrenches and inspecting aircraft. I am sure that we can find an equal balance between special pro grams and the deckplate in the fleet. We have a large num ber of Sailors who are in high demand doing great things in these billets but they are also good wrench turners and we need them back in the shops, said McClure. He also stressed the need for senior enlisted members to participate in the selection board process. I need more of you participating in selec tion boards. I want an aviation rated master chief from every AOR under my claimency on a selection board. I want com mand master chiefs to be edu cated on sitting on selection boards. Our master chiefs have to be educated in the selec tion board process so they can train and mentor the Sailors in their commands. Knowledge is power, McClure continued. After a short break, White presented a refresher course called Brilliant on the Basics which covered such topics as the command sponsor pro gram, mentoring, career devel opment boards, indoctrination, the ombudsmen program and recognition of Sailors for their accomplishments. Stevens closed out the brief by emphasizing the impor tance of communication. I want all of you to have one-onone conversations with your chiefs. When we start looking for ways of doing things more efficiently and start removing the human element, we still deliver the material but its not face-to-face. Your direct inter vention is what has the most influence on that person, said Stevens. Leadership is hard and requires extraordinary effort at an extraordinary level on a continuous basis. It needs to be hard. Its about influencing and changing peoples lives. Im asking you to take the time every day to have a personal conversation with someone in your mess to build that rapport and respect. You need to show them that you are investing in them and that they have a future in the Navy, he contin ued. After lunch, the group visited several P-3 Orion and helicop ter squadrons aboard the sta tion to meet with Sailors and learn about daily operations. FLTCM: Our master chiefs have to be educated in the selection board process 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012

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NWCA college scholarships availableThe Navy Wives Clubs of America (NWCA) Scholarship Foundation announced Feb. 6 that 30 scholarship grants will be awarded in 2012 in amounts from $1,000 to $1,500. NWCA Scholarship Director Linda Hedden said those eligible for the grants are the natural born, legally adopted, or stepson/stepdaughter of an enlist ed member of the Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard on active duty, retired with pay, or the son/daughter of a deceased member in these categories. The applicant must have a valid dependent ID card, show financial need, have at least a 2.5 gradepoint-average, and be a high school graduate or its equivilent or qualify for graduation prior to begin ning eligibility, said Hedden. The grants may be used for tuition, room and board, books and fees. Applications may be downloaded from: www.navy wivesclubsofamerica.org. The deadline for applica tions is May 30. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 9

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February marks Childrens Dental Health Monthan opportunity for par ents to help their children brush up on good oral hygiene. This includes brushing twice daily to remove plaque, eating healthy foods and visiting a dentist regularly for cleanings and checkups. For older children, flossing, seal ants and wearing mouth guards during sports activities are additional ways of maintaining healthy teeth and gums over the long term. In recognition of the occasion, a team from Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Dental ClinicCmdr. Samira Meymand, Lt. Darien Lazaro, Jill Burnsed and DT2 Olymphia Saincois and DT2 Guy Leppry visited the NAS Jacksonville Child Development Center Feb. 3 to help ensure the dental health of about 40 preschoolers there. To the delight of the kids, the visit included Burnsed dressed as the tooth fairy and Saincois costumed as a giant tooth demonstrating good oral hygiene in a fun way. Children got to practice tooth-brush ing with the characters, and received donated toothbrushes, toothpaste and Navy pencils to mark the day. It was a great to be able to reach out to our service members children and help them understand the importance of oral hygiene in an entertaining way, said Meymand, oral and maxillofacial surgeon and head of NH Jacksonvilles Dental Clinic. Children who develop good habits including caring for their teeth every daytypically maintain those healthy habits as adults. Lots of smiles kick off childrens dental health month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 11

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The Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) has launched its online registration for the 2012 Symposium, building the anticipation for three days of events that will celebrate 50 Years of the P 3 Orion the last week of March. The 2012 MPA Symposium will take place March 27 30 at NAS Jacksonville. Symposium attendees can register for a sev eral events, including the P 8A Poseidon Roll Out, Integrated Training Center dedication, a Flight Suit Social, golf tourna ment, 5K, Heritage Dinner, and others. The Heritage Dinner, which will highlight the history and heritage of the last 50 years of the P 3 aircraft, will also serve as a ceremony for three new Hall of Honor inductees from the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community. Combining the history of the last 50 years of the P 3, and the introduction of a new aircraft, has created a definite sense of pride, accomplish ment, and appreciation, said Capt. Trey Wheeler, president of MPA. We look forward to celebrat ing our rich heritage as we look to a promising future with all our symposium attendees in March. It will be the event of year for NAS Jacksonville, said Wheeler. Interested parties can receive more information about the 2012 Symposium, as well as register online, by going to: www.maritimepatrolasso ciation.org/2012symposium. Maritime Patrol Association opens registration for 2012 Symposium 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012

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High energy tunes and moti vating beats provide an energet ic backdrop to Ebony Solomons Spin-Flex Sculpt class. Solomon, an accounting technician for Commander, Navy Region Southeast, is a volunteer instruc tor of the popular class at the NAS Jacksonville Fitness Source. After attending six years of spin classes, Solomon became a certi fied instructor in 2006. I cant use my lunch hour to just sit around. I went over to the gym and asked if they needed any Spinning instruc tors. Solomon said. I enjoy it. I like to motivate the class and it also helps me stay in shape. I use music to inspire and push people to do their best. Its not about killing yourself. Its about getting a good workout and enjoying it. Solomon stresses the importance of keeping exercise fun. I try to make my class different. If it is the same thing day after day, people get bored with it and quit. It was with this in mind that Solomon created her Spin-Flex Sculpt class, a combination of cycling and weights, to offer alongside her reg ular spin class. Its not for beginners, Solomon says, But if you have been coming to spin class awhile, then this will help you build your core. Her students are enthusiastic about her classes. You cant cheat yourself, comments AT2 Dan Pike, She always pushes you. Its nice to participate in a class where you get a good workout without feeling like you are train ing for a triathalon. said Rachel Rangel. Ebony maximizes my indoor cycling experience. She is passion ate and ensures participants get the maximum benefit from each class. It is invigorating to have an instructor who brings fun and joy to a 45-minute workout, stated Miriam Gallet, who has attended spin classes at Fitness Center for more than seven years. Solomon said, I give spe cial thanks to Bruce Grenier, region program director for Fleet and Family Readiness, as well as Fitness Director Tanya Henigman, for allowing my participation in the Civilian Employee Physical Fitness Program as an MWR spin instructor. She instructs the Spin-Flex Sculpt class Wednesday, 11:15 a.m. to noon. For more information, call 542-3518. It goes without saying that the heart remains a very important organ in the center of our chest. We all know that heart disease remains the leading cause of natural death as we age. Heart disease has been studied very well, and we know it to be a disease that starts when we are children, and most heart disease is the result of poor choices made by smoking tobac co or by overeating and not exercising enough. Men, women and chil dren are at risk of heart disease. Recent guide lines from the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends providers check children for high cholesterol levels start ing at age 11. Children should be screened for high blood sugar lev els, thyroid disease and cholesterol if they are overweight or obese. At Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, your pro vider can give you a chart which plots your childs body mass index, which tells us overweight status for children. At NH Jacksonville, I care for many women as part of both maternity care and well-woman care. Often I get looks of surprise during exams when I ask women ques tions about their heart health. Its still not well known that heart dis ease is the leading killer of women. Many women dont take the time to look closely at their risks and take action to stay heart healthy. National Red Dress Day was Feb. 3, when we publicly empha size womens heart health. Q. Why are women and children being fol lowed more closely now for their risk of develop ing heart disease? Increasing rates of dia betes and obesity, espe cially among younger women, is expected to raise the numbers of women and their chil dren who have heart problems at earlier ages. Right now at NH Jacksonville, nearly one in five women who give birth has gestational diabetesthis gives a woman about a 50-50 chance of developing full blown diabetes as she ages. The risks of stroke and heart attack go up significantly for diabetic patients. Women need to understand the risks of gaining too much weight during pregnancy. Weve set up a program to more carefully follow our ges tational diabetic patients through pregnancy and follow them as they age. Statistics also show that children of obese mothers have a tenden cy to grow up with extra weight, which raises their risks of early stage heart disease. Providers should check these children for obesity, using the body mass index. Ask your doctor to tell you your childs BMIrecent stud ies show that most pro viders fail to discuss this important vital sign with parents of overweight children. The data also shows that most parents fail to recognize when their children are over weight. Prevention is the key to control of the obe sity epidemic. Fitness source instructor offers spin-tastic workout February is National Heart Month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 13

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Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Feb. 10 that the next Independence-variant littoral combat ship (LCS) will be named USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10) to honor the former congresswoman from Tucson, Ariz. who is known for supporting the military and veterans, advocating for renew able energy and championing border security. Giffords recently resigned from Congress to recover from wounds she sustained in an assassination attempt in 2011. The Navy motto is Semper Fortis, Always Courageous, said Mabus during a cer emony held in the Pentagon Courtyard. Unwavering cour age has defined the Navy for 236 years and it is what we expect, what we demand of our Sailors every single day. So its very appropriate that LCS 10 be named for someone who has become synonymous with courage, who has inspired the nation with remarkable resil iency and showed the possibili ties of the human spirit. Mabus also announced the ships sponsor will be Roxanna Green, the mother of ChristinaTaylor Green, the nine-yearold girl who was killed while attending the meeting of con stituents where Giffords was shot. A ships sponsor plays an important role in the life of the ship, naval tradition holds that her spirit and presence guide the ship throughout its service life. On that dark, tragic day now more than a year ago, Christina-Taylor Green was taken from us. A nine-year-old who had just been elected to the student council, she want ed to become a more active participant in our democracy. Her mother, Roxanna Green, continues to express her daughters hope for the future and, as the President said, of a nation as good as she imag ined. I am pleased to honor Gabrielle Giffords and the peo ple of Arizona with the naming of this ship, said Mabus. Giffords and the ships sponsor, Roxanna Green, are sources of great inspiration and represent the Navy and Marine Corps qualities of overcoming, adapting and coming out victo rious despite great challenges. The ship is part of a dual block buy of LCS class ships announced by Mabus in December 2010. By procur ing both versions of the LCS Lockheed Martins semiplaning monohull and General Dynamics aluminum trima ran the Navy is stabilizing the LCS program and the indus trial base with an award of 20 ships each, because the two designs provides operational flexibility. USS Gabrielle Giffords is designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access in the coastal waters. The LCS provides warfighting capabilities and operational flexibility to execute focused missions close to the shore, such as mine warfare, antisubmarine warfare and surface warfare. The LCS class of ships will be outfitted with recon figurable payloads, called mis sion packages, which can be changed out quickly as combat needs demand. Gabrielle Giffords will be 419 feet in length, have a water line beam of 103 feet, displace approximately 3,000 tons, and make speed in excess of 40 knots. The construction will be led by Austal Shipbuilding in Mobile, Ala. This is the 16th ship to be named for a woman and the 13th ship to be named for a living person since 1850. On Dec. 19, 2011, an American flag was raised above the Pentagon, just as it is every morning. Except on that morning the flag was raised to honor NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville employee Darryle Hutchens upon his retirement after 30 years of federal service. As a trib ute to Hutch, his long-time friend and onetime supervi sor, Gary Bright arranged to have the flag flown for one day over the Pentagon. I wanted to do something to show my appreciation and the appreciation of the federal govern ment for a life well spent in the service of this great country, said Bright of his gift. After the American flag was retired at sunset, it was boxed up and sent to Hutch with a certificate of authenticity. Hutchens 30-year federal service career began in 1968 when he joined the Marine Corps and began boot camp at Paris Island, S.C. Shortly thereafter, he deployed to Vietnam as part of the 1st Marine Division, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, India Company. Hutch fought as an infantryman in Hue City and the A Shau Valley alongside his fellow Marines. Following the receipt of his honorable discharge from the Marine Corps, Navy names littoral combat ship Gabrielle Giffords Flag flown over Pentagon honors retiring FLC employee 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012

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Hutchens worked different jobs before being hired for a position in 1982 at NAS Jacksonville. His career began in inventory, but one year later, he was transferred to security where he worked for the rest of his career. When asked what he will miss the most about working security for NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville he said simply, I will miss the peo ple. Ive made friends here. Gary Bright and Ed Howard were former supervisors of mine. They are my best friends still, said Hutchens while looking at a group picture of the three of them together. I also am very appreciative for the sup port of J. T. Langone, NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville security manager and the fellowship of Alphonso Victor, security colleague, he said. Former co-workers remember Hutchens with fondness. Hutch is the go-getter, never-say-die type. He attacks a problem head on and work it through resolution, stated Bright, remembering their time together in security. My fondest memory is of Hutch taking peoples (unsecured government) keys from their unsecured desk and leaving them Post-it-Notes telling them to call him for their keys. Another colleague, Director of Corporate Communications Daphne Cassani, recalls Hutchens as a man who loves his country. I cant be sure if Hutch would bleed red, white and blue or Marine Corps green but I know he has a deep-rooted passion for both America and the Corps. Ive always found that devotion inspirational, said Cassani. For retirement, Hutchens plans to travel the United States with his wife. First were going to travel the continental U.S. in our RV, then Im gonna fly her first class to Hawaii, said Hutchens with a smile. He also has international travel on his mind. He has a dream of reuniting with his fellow Marines from India Company and return ing to the places where they fought in Vietnam. Those who know Hutchens know he is Semper Fi to the core. Even though I didnt retire from the Marine Corps, Im a full-blooded Marine. I love my country, said Hutchens, and he demonstrated that love by serving with commit ment for 30 years. Q. What are the low hanging fruit, the easiest first steps someone can take to start living a more heart-healthy life? First off, we need to recognize that tobacco use and obesity are the No. 1 and 2 issues that cause the majority of heart problems in our country. At NH Jacksonville, including the branch health clinics, our Wellness Centers and Health Promotions can help you quit smoking. We offer a full range of care that we try to make as easy to get as buying a pack of cigarettes at the store! Almost 6,000 patients enrolled in our tobacco cessation program in 2011, and our 12-month quit rate is over 25 percent. People who go cold turkey on their own have a quit rate of under 5 percent. Walk in to our Wellness Center or any branch health clinic and well get you started on a program to quit tobacco. Cigarettes cost more than $5 a pack on base. The money spent on a pack a day habit is roughly equivalent to an E-4 losing a month of pay every year. We offer a new Healthy Weight program with internet-guided follow-up to track your progress as you lose weight. Diet and exercise are both impor tant factors in weight loss. Were starting a new exercise program for our pregnant and postpar tum moms on base. Contact our Wellness Center (542-5292) or OB/GYN Clinic (542-7419) to learn more. Even parking your car at the outer edge of the commissary parking lot and walking in briskly is a great step forward to help keep your heart healthy. Exercising without a healthy diet is, however, futile. Just 10 types of food account for nearly half of the nations excessive sodium intake, government researchers have found. Excess sodium has been linked to heart attacks and strokes. About 44 per cent of Americans daily sodium consumption almost 3,300 milligramscomes from breads, cold cuts, pizza, poultry, soups, sandwiches, cheese, pasta dishes, meat dishes and snacks such as pop corn and chips. The American Dietetic Association promotes the concept of whole foodsfoods that are not processed. Whole foods contain more nutri ents, vitamins and fiber. Avoid canned vegetables. juice products that are sweetened and stripped of fiber, and out-of-season foodstheyre often grown by artificial means and grown far away so travel time has robbed them of flavor and nutrients. Watch your portion sizes. Fast food and other res taurants have increasingly served larger portions through the years. Picture the food on a plate; how does it fill up the plate? And dont eat straight out of a packagepour your portion into a small bowl and be content to finish that. Celebrate your heart. Ask questions about getting your cholesterol and fasting blood sugar checked for diabetes next time you see your provider. Make sure your provider can show you on a graph how your child is trending toward or away from over weight or obesity. Be your own advocate. And remember a heart only goes around once. DR. JOE: Celebrating February as Heart Health MonthFLC RETIREMENT: I will miss the people a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org The annual Valentines Day 5K brought out 227 runners Feb. 10. The NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department sponsored the run. Placing first overall and first in the mens 45-49 category was retired Sgt. Maj. Joe Rivera with a time of 18:31. Nicole Amador of Navy Operational Support Command Jax took first in the womens 30-37 cat egory and was the first female to cross the finish line with a time of 25:16. Other winners were: Upcoming MWR-sponsored runs include the Leprechaun Dash March 16 at 11:30 a.m. and the Capt. Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 7. Volunteers are needed for the Navy Run. For more informa tion, call 542-3239/3518. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com nasjaxmwr. Annual Valentines Day 5K brings out the runners JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Play Bingo at lunch Mon. Fri. at 11:15 a.m. Play Bingo at dinner Sun. Tues. and Thurs. at 6:30 p.m. Cash prizes DJ entertainment at the Bud Brew House Feb. 24, 8 10 p.m. Food & beverage specials 9-Ball Tournament Feb. 21, 4 p.m. practice, 5 p.m. tournament begins $5 entry fee, gift cards awarded as prizes Open to all handsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 2 sessions, 7 9 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. midnight $11 per person, includes shoe rental February Family Bowling for Four Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $17 savings!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor pool hours Mon. Fri. 5:30 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 8 p.m. Weekend hours 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Leprechaun Dash 5K March 16 11:30 a.m. on Perimeter Rd. Pre-register by March 9 at the base gym or fitness center Family Fitness Bootcamp with Ashley Monday & Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. Family Fitness Center above the Youth Center Gym Call (904) 778-9772I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. 22nd Annual ITT Travel Fair NEX Courtyard March 10, 9:30 a.m. 1 p.m. featuring ITT vendors and great door prizes! Harlem Globetrotters March 2 at Veterans Memorial Arena $26 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville First Orchestra seating avail able for Les Miserables. Valdosta, Georgia historic sites bus tour Feb. 11, $20 Includes admission to Crescent House, the Art Center and the Historical Museum Jacksonville Sharks $26 per person Daytona 500 Feb. 18 26, $27 to $199 Monster Jam March 3, $25 $41 Phineas and Ferb tickets, March 10, 3:30 p.m. & 6:30 p.m. shows $13 each! Veterans Memorial Arena Disney on Ice featuring Toy Story 3 April 6, 7:30 p.m. April 7, 11:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. April 8, 1 & 5 p.m. Lower level seating for $13 Disney World Orlando, FL 4day hopper Armed Forces Ticket $135.50 $162 Universal Circus $19.50 Tampa Zoo $19 adult, $17.50 childThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Jacksonville International Car Show Feb. 18 at 11 a.m. Learn to Fly Feb. 26 at 8 a.m. Free introductory lesson at the Navy Jax Flying Club Walt Disney World Weekend Trip March 24 $100 per person includes 2-night lodging at Disneys All Star Sports Resort, 1-day park hopper and transportation.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Feb. 21 for active duty Feb. 23 for retirees & DoD per sonnel February Golf Specials Monday & Tuesday play 18 holes for $20 Monday Friday after 12 p.m., play 18 holes for $17 Cart and green fees included Not applicable on holidays Twilight Golf League March 20 Aug. 30 $20 entry fee Rosters due by March 16Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recre ation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. and Tuesday & Thursday 4 7 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more infor mation.Flying Club Call 777-8549 /6035 Ground School Feb. 27 April 4 $500 per person The results of the Navy Exchange Service Commands (NEXCOM) most recent market bas ket survey shows custom ers save an average of 23 percent below civilian retail prices, not including sales tax, when they shop at their Navy Exchange (NEX). This is a one per cent higher savings over the 2011 survey results. Shoppers have a pleth ora of choices out there . our focus is to make sure our customers think about the NEX first, said Tess Paquette, NEXCOM senior vice president chief mer chandising officer. Being able to show cus tomers that we save them an average of 23 percent on the merchandise they purchase is very gratify ing, especially in these tough economic times. Each fall, NEXCOM hires an outside com pany, RetailData, to do a price survey in different areas of the United States to obtain an average per centage number for how much customers save when shopping NEX. To determine the percentage of savings, the same items were surveyed from region to region. The items included major applianc es, consumer electronics, furniture, clothing, house wares, sporting goods and more. The different stores shopped for comparison prices included discount stores, mass merchants, full-line department stores and category-killer stores. The survey compared prices on approximately 350 branded items in the NEX inventory against major retailers across the continental United States and Hawaii. The survey proved NEX customers saved 10.74 percent over Wal-Mart; 15.15 percent over Target; 30.56 percent over Walgreens; 39.36 per cent over JCPenney; 34.61 over Advance Auto and 15.87 percent over Bed Bath and Beyond. The survey also deter mined customers savings in each of the eight dif ferent areas of the coun try surveyed. Customers in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, save Pearl Harbor 28.87 percent; customers in Everett, Wash., save 23.58 percent; customers in San Diego save 23.20 percent; customers in Bethesda, Md., save 22.90 percent; customers in Norfolk, Va., save 22.35 percent; cus tomers in Great Lakes, Ill., save 22.30 percent; cus tomers in Jacksonville, Fla., save 21.61 per cent and customers in Pensacola, Fla., save 19.69 percent. Many NEX departments offer significant savings to customers including domestics at 48.22 per cent; boys at 37.02 per cent; girls at 34.72 percent; automotive at 24.79 per cent; house wares at 25.47 percent; and ladies at 21.23 percent. We want our customers to know that we are doing everything we can to have the products they need at a savings, said Paquette. That is our mission and the reason why we do what we do. NEX customers save an average of 23 percent

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 17 The Defense Department announced changes to its assignment policy Feb. 9 that will result in more than 14,000 additional positions being opened to women. Women are contributing in unprecedented ways to the militarys mission. Through their courage, sacrifice, patri otism and great skill, women have proven their ability to serve in an expanding num ber of roles on and off the bat tlefield, Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta said. We will continue to open as many posi tions as possible to women so that anyone qualified to serve can have the opportunity to do so. In a report required by the 2011 National Defense Authorization Act, the depart ment notified Congress today it intends to make two chang es to rules in place since 1994 governing the service of female members of the armed forces. First, occupations will no longer be closed to women solely because the positions are required to be co-located with ground combat units. Second, a sizable number of positions will be opened to women at the battalion level in select direct ground combat units in spe cific occupations. The services also will continuously assess their experience with these changes to help determine future changes to the 1994 rules. The services will con tinue to review positions and requirements to determine what additional positions may be opened, ensuring the mis sion is met with the best quali fied and most capable, regard less of gender, Panetta said. The 1994 Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule articulated five basic elements inform ing decisions on the service of women in the military: direct ground combat; berthing and privacy; co-location; long range reconnaissance and special operations forces; and physi cally demanding tasks. The 1994 DoD policy allowed women to be restricted from some occupational specialties if those specialties were physi cally co-located with direct ground combat units. Because the modern-day battlefield is non-linear and fluid, with no clearly defined front line or safer rear area, combat sup port operations are dispersed throughout the battlespace. Removal of the co-location exclusion will result in 13,139 Army positions being opened to women, in specialties such as tank mechanic and field artillery radar operator. Additionally, the 1994 policy prohibited women from being assigned below brigade level to units whose principal mission was to engage in combat. The Army, Marines and Navy have been granted exceptions to policy to allow select positions at the battalion level in special ties already open to women, opening 1,186 additional posi tions. These exceptions to pol icy will help the services assess the suitability and relevance of the direct ground combat unit assignment prohibition, and inform future policy decisions. Regarding other policy restrictions, the department recognizes there are practical barriers that require time to resolve to ensure the services maximize the safety and priva cy of all service members while maintaining military readi ness. Building upon analysis and experience, the services will develop gender-neutral physical standards for use by all members. Gender-neutral physical standards ensure all mem bers can meet the physical demands of the duties they are assigned, ultimately contribut ing to higher states of readiness through an increased under standing of the demands we place upon our members and by preventing injuries, acting Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Jo Ann Rooney said. Panetta directed the services to update him in six months on assignment policy imple mentation and the progress made developing gender-neu tral physical standards. As required by law, these changes to policy will take effect after 30 days of continuous session of Congress, which is expected to occur later this spring. Make motor vehicle safety your top priority According to Naval Safety Center (NAVSAFECEN), Fiscal year 2011 was the safest on record in terms of four-wheel motor vehicle fatalities. Car and truck operators did a great job of managing the risks of driv ing. However, mid-way through the second quarter of FY 2012, fatalities are in danger of creeping back up. As of Feb. 1, four Sailors lost their lives in four-wheel personal motor vehicle fatalities compared to one for the same time in 2011. Motorcycle fatality rates are static, with three so far this fiscal year the same as last year at this time. NAVSAFECENs Command Master Chief Dominick Torchia recently released a Safety Broadcast, a onepage fact sheet outlining timely information about various trending topics. His most recent covers PMV statistics, risk factors and resources for improvement. While we made big strides in reducing the number of four-wheel motor vehicle fatalities last year, this is no time to declare victory, Torchia said. Be aware of the biggest risk factors speed, alcohol, fatigue, ejec tion and distractions and do everything you can to manage those risks. Those risk factors account for the vast majority of motor vehicle mishaps in the Navy and nationwide. Motorcycle fatalities are also a continuing concern, with their own set of risk factors. However, the biggest risk factor Sailors face is completely within their con trol training. The biggest challenge we face is closing the last tactical mile with regard to advanced motorcycle training, Torchia said. Every sportbike rider is required to take the Military Sportbike Rider Course (MSRC), but right now there are about 2,000 sportbike riders who have not completed it. This training has proven value. Nine out of 12 sportbike riders who died in FY11 had not attended the course. Torchia said the MSRC is provided at no cost to Sailors and is designed to be completed during the workday. No leave is required to attend the course. It covers both the different physical handling character istics and the required mental attitudes for safe opera tion of these high-performance machines. The MSRC was created after a spike in motorcycle fatalities in 2008, when 33 Sailors lost their lives while riding. After an initial training push, the number fell to 13 in FY2010, but crept up to 16 in FY11. All Hands Club nearing completionConstruction on the NAS Jacksonville All Hands Club, originally slated for completion in late August, is ahead of schedule. According to Public Works Department (PWD) Project Manager Nick Bloomer, The project is approx imately 70 percent complete and is expected to be fin ished sometime late spring. The $6.5 million project will feature a spacious ban quet and conference hall, a casual dining restaurant and lounge, an Irish-style Chief Petty Officers pub, and an outdoor performance area. The 25,000-sq.-ft facility will accommodate around 700 guests as well as support staff and will replace The Zone. The building has an unusual profile, designed to mimic aircraft wings. Incorporated in that design are several environmentally friendly features which meet the requirements for silver Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification. The park ing lot will use permeable pavers to allow for storm water drainage and collection. The building itself incorporates natural lighting and is walled with insulated concrete forms, which pro vide added insulation, in order to conserve energy. Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to ser vice members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. For more information or to register, call 542-5745. More military positions opened to women Improve your life skills with free knowledge Beginner Rider Course Experienced Rider Course Military Sportbike Rider Course Call for class dates NAS Jax Safety Office 542-2584



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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2012 Military Saves Pedal PartyShaping Up Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Maintainers and weapon special ists at VP-30 aboard NAS Jacksonville recently achieved certification stan dards essential for the safe and effec tive operation of the new P-8A mari time patrol and reconnaissance air craft. It was all part of Naval Aviation Maintenance Program that helps standardize operations of naval avia tion commands. The training focused on the organizational level (O-level) maintenance that is performed by a squadron on a day-by-day basis in support of its operations. The O-level mission is to maintain assigned aircraft and aeronautical equipment in a full mission-capable status. O-level functions include ser vicing, inspections, handling, onequipment corrective and preventive maintenance, record keeping and reports preparation. The P-8A test aircraft, designated T-5, was on loan Feb. 3-10 from VX-1 at NAS Patuxent River, Md. ATCS David Wood, of VP-30 maintenance control, said that qualifications ranged from plane captain, move director, brake rider and wing walker to properly performing both daily and turnaround inspections. The VP-30 ordnance division also achieved its conventional weapons technical profi ciency inspection certification. There were a lot of lessons-learned this week on how to service and sup port this highly capable new aircraft, said Wood. Our next goal is setting up pro grams for our safe for flight inspec tion in March that requires specific qualifications from the maintenance department in order to safely operate the aircraft. By that time, the squadron expects to receive the first of its low-rate initial production (LRIP) P-8A aircraft from Boeing. The next seven LRIP aircraft will support VP-30 in its mission of delivering qualified Poseidon aircrew and maintainers to the fleet in 2013. The Navy plans to purchase 117 Boeing 737-based P-8A anti-subma rine warfare, anti-surface warfare, intelligence, surveillance and recon naissance aircraft to replace its aging P-3 Orion fleet. War Eagles fly with Singapore partnersSailors from the VP-16 War Eagles visited the Republic of Singapore to build goodwill and conduct a training exercise. The detachment ran from Jan. 29 through Feb. 2 and included mul tiple training flights in cooperation with the Singapore Armed Forces. The chance to work with our partners in Singapore is a great opportunity, said VP-16 Detachment Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr. Trey Walden. Strengthening our ties and increasing security in the area is beneficial to all. Aircrew from VP-16 completed several training flights during the exercise to increase maritime domain awareness in the waters near Singapore. The surveillance capabilities of P-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft make them ideal platforms to guard large areas of the ocean and keep commercial shipping safe. The War Eagles also teamed with submariners from the Republic of Singapore Navy for a familiariza tion flight. Several submarine offi cers attended a capabilities brief and went flying with VP-16 to get an aerial view of an anti-submarine mission. The familiarization flight was a good chance for naval professionals with different backgrounds to learn about the others commu nity. I really enjoyed the chance to visit Singapore, said Lt. Jeff Eller. It was very exciting to take several Singaporean submarine officers flying with us. The perspective that both sides brought to the table was very interesting U.S. Navy maritime patrol aircraft have teamed with the Singapore Armed Forces before. Last year, patrol aircraft from the Republic of Singapore Air Force completed a historic deployment to Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa, to conduct anti-piracy and maritime security operations. Singaporean crews worked closely with Navy P-3C Orions to patrol the pirateinfested waters off the coast of Somalia. Singapore is one of the largest ports in the world, and the stra tegic position of the island nation at the mouth of the Malacca Strait makes maritime security a prime concern. Piracy remains a problem in the Malacca Strait and nearby waters. With over 50,000 vessels and millions of barrels of oil pass ing through the strait each year, the importance of safe sea-lanes cannot be overstated. VP-16 is currently deployed to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. The squadron conducts security, surveillance, and reconnaissance missions in support of Commander, U.S. Seventh Fleet and is home based at NAS Jacksonville. Post-ERB brief focuses on transition assistanceThe Post-ERB Fleet Engagement Team from Navy Personnel Command presented a full day of transi tion assistance briefs Feb. 9 aboard NAS Jacksonville to Sailors not selected for retention by the FY 12 Enlisted Retention Board (ERB). Sailors no longer eligible for advancement must separate no later than Sept. 1. Because ERB is a unique action for the Navy, the Bureau of Naval Personnel (BUPERS) placed a priority on interfacing with the fleet to publicize the lat est policies, as well as bring questions about those policies back to BUPERS, said Capt. Steve Holmes, director of Military Community Management. In his opening brief to more than 75 Sailors and some of their family members, Holmes explained, Our visit at NAS Jacksonville is to complement your ongoing transition efforts. The more we increase your understanding of the post-board processes the better prepared youll be for a successful transition. With all due respect to the emotions involved with ERB, weve set the stage well enough so that Sailors understand that its time to focus on moving forward. Most of our audiences are very receptive to the information on transitional benefits. Weve also had some very informative sessions with spouses because, obviously, theyre as emotionally vested as their service member. One area of concern is protecting med ical benefits, which for the long-term may include affiliating with the Select Reserve, said Holmes. Most audience members raised their hands when asked if they were taking advantage of the Fleet and Family Support Center TAP (Transition Assistance Program) workshops. Also in attendance were two representatives from the outplacement firm of Challenger, Gray and Christmas Inc., which has contracted with the Navy to provide personalized career coaching and job search assistance. NCCM Mary Burroughs of U.S. Fleet Forces Command said, As the lead Navy career counselor for my command, I like the content of this brief. One of our Sailors big concerns are their spouse and their house and how transition benefits can help point them to a more secure future. As long as ERB-affected Sailors are proactive and engaged in utilizing their transition benefits, such as TAP and outplacement services, I believe theyll be well positioned to realize their next career move after separation. AE1 Melvin Young of HS-11 attended the brief with his wife, Mary Beth. They learned he would not be retained last November. Im still unhappy about our situation. Today, Id like to hear a better explanation of how the board determined eligibility and evaluated sustained superior performance. As for post-separation plans, well be moving to Tennessee, where I plan to use my G.I. Bill to finish my degree. Im also one of the fortunate few who qualify for the Temporary Early Retirement Authority (TERA) for Sailors who have completed at least 15 years of ser vice. TERA is a temporary, voluntary program that offers voluntary early retirement at a reduced monthly stipend to eligible members with 15 to 20 years of active service. AT2 Sakima Haynes, of Southeast Regional Calibration Center, had more than 14 years in when notified of his ERB status. Like most everybody, I felt that I was unfairly designated by the board but thats water under the bridge now. Since then, I qualified for TERA, completed my TAP workshops and am getting ready to move to Atlanta, where Ill attend Oglethorpe University. For more ERB information, contact the NPC Customer Support Center at 1-866-827-5672 or csc mailbox@navy.mil. Training up on Poseidon

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Feb. 13 1854 Adm. Perry anchors off Yokosuka, Japan to receive Emperors reply to treaty pro posal. 1913 Naval Radio Station, Arlington, Va. begins opera tions. 1945 First Navy units to enter Manila Bay since 1942. 1968 Operation Coronado XI begins in Mekong Delta. Feb. 14 1778 John Paul Jones in USS Ranger receives first official salute to U.S. Stars and Strips flag by European country, at Quiberon, France. 1813 USS Essex becomes first U.S. warship to round Cape Horn and enter the Pacific Ocean. 1814 USS Constitution cap tures British Lovely Ann and Pictou. 1840 Officers from USS Vincennes make first landing in Antarctica on floating ice. Feb. 15 1856 USS Supply, com manded by Lt. David Dixon Porter, sails from Smyrna, Syria, bound for Indianola, Texas, with a load of 21 camels intended for experimental use in the American desert west of the Rockies. 1898 Battleship USS Maine explodes in Havana Harbor. Feb. 16 1804 Lt. Stephen Decatur, with volunteers from frigate USS Constitution and schooner USS Enterprise, enters Tripoli harbor by night in the ketch USS Intrepid to burn the cap tured frigate USS Philadelphia. Decaturs raid succeeds with out American losses. Englands Lord Nelson calls this the most daring act of the age. 1815 USS Constitution captures HMS Susannah. 1967 Operation River Raider begins in Mekong Delta. Feb. 17 1864 Confederate subma rine H.L. Hunley sinks USS Housatonic in Charleston har bor. 1942 First Navy Construction Battalion (Seabees) arrives Bora Bora. 1944 Carrier aircraft strike Japanese fleet at Truk, sinks ships and destroys aircraft. Feb. 18 1846 General order on Port and Starboard because Larboard and Starboard sound confusingly similar, the word Port was substituted for Larboard. 1944 Amphibious force under Rear Adm. Hill lands troops on Engebi Island, Eniwetok. 1955 First of 14 detonations, Operation Teapot nuclear test. Feb. 19 1814 USS Constitution cap tures British brig Catherine. 1945 Marines with naval gunfire support land on Iwo Jima; island secured March 16. 1981 Fleet Replacement Squadron VFA-125 is the first squadron to receive the new F/A-18 Hornet strike fighter for training fleet operators. Feb. 20 1815 USS Constitution, under Capt. Charles Stewart, captures HMS Cyane and sloop-of-war Levant. 1962 USMC Lt. Col. John Glenn becomes first American to orbit Earth. His flight in Friendship 7 (Mercury 6) con sisted of 3 orbits in 88 minutes at a velocity of 17,544 mph. Recovery was by USS Noa (DD841). 1974 First Lockheed S-3A Viking ASW car rier jet is assigned to VS-41 Shamrocks. So far, Dinner with the Smileys has been about us and what we are going through while Dustin is away on deployment. My boys have met inter esting people who have given them unforgettable experiences and thoughtful gifts. My boys are forever changed because of it. After the mayors surprise limo and trip to get ice cream, Ford wanted to know why everyone is being so nice to us. I explained to him that it feels good to do things for others and that treat ing the boys is for our guests a treat in itself. Ford decided it would be nice to do the same thing for someone else. For our fifth Dinner with the Smileys, I asked my friend Jenifer Lloyd to show the boys what philanthropy is all about. Jenifer is a seven-year breast cancer survivor. She works for Champion the Cure Challenge. She knows a thing or two about giving back all that has been given to you. Jenifer planned to take Ford, Owen and Lindell to the pediatric floor of our local hospital, where they could meet children who have cancer and other life-threatening illnesses. A trip like this, of course, requires some planning . and lots of warning. In the days leading up to our dinner, I talked to the boys about what they might see and how they should behave. I told them they might have questions, and if they did, either Jenifer or the nurses could help them understand. The boys were attentive and curi ous. They also were a little nervous. We decided to buy small gifts for the patients. Doing so helped the boys put themselves in the other childrens shoes: What would I want if I was in the hospital? Older kids, Ford decided, would want crossword puzzles. Younger kids, Lindell said, would want coloring books. I reminded the boys that our dinner guests had done the same thoughtful planning and questioning before they came to our house. We met Jenifer in the lobby and rode the elevator to the eighth floor. When the doors parted, the boys saw a light house and a mural of fish on the walls. This was not the hospital they had imagined. They hadnt seen anything yet. Inside the double swinging doors and down the hallway past the patient rooms was an atrium filled with toys, a foosball table, books, sofas and tables with umbrellas bathed in natural sun light from the glass ceiling. The boys were confused. Their faces said, So when do we get to the hospital? And in truth, Im not sure Lindell, who is only 5, ever really understood that we were inside a hospital. Hospitals have come a long way from the time when a childs only comfort was an old televi sion that played reruns of shows like Wheel of Fortune. Amid such a child-friendly envi ronment, my boys eased back into kid mode. Lindell rode on the stuffed dinosaur. Ford and Owen checked out the foosball table. There was laughter and noise. Then a boy shuffled past in a hos pital gown. He was close in age to my older boys and like them in almost all respects. Except he was carrying a bag for his catheter. Now the boys remembered. They made crafts with the boy in the family resource room. Then he offered to help them pass out gifts to the other patients, some of whom we could not meet because of the nature of their illnesses. After the hospital, it was time to have a meal with our dinner guest. Jenifer asked if she could share her cancer story with the boys. I wasnt sure how much the boys would understand. Do they even know what breasts are? But when Jenifer showed them pictures of herself being wheeled into surgery, they got it. The table was quiet for a couple minutes while Jenifer fiddled with her smart phone. She pulled up another picture, this one of her bald head and her naturally bald husband wearing a wig meant for her. The boys looked at me as if for permission to laugh. But Jenifer beat them to it. When she laughed, they did, too. Its hard to know how much the boys absorbed from the day, but theyve been unusually quiet ever since. Did I show them too much? Did any of it make sense? Ill probably never know. Yet, as we left the cafe that night, Jenifer gave each of the boys a gift. It was a stuffed bear. Now, my older boys are past the age of stuffed animals, so I worried they might make a face. I held my breath. Then Owen read the card tied to the bears neck. All the proceeds from the stuffed animal go to Cancer Care of Maine. No one said a word. They stared at their bears. And my heart was glad because although everyone got a gift, I saw what my boys had come to know: It wasnt about them. DoD decal renewalFor those wishing to renew Department of Defense decals online, please go to: www.pid. cnic.navy.mil. You must ensure that you have your vehicle license number, drivers license number and all insurance information prior to starting the pro cess. Please follow up with the base security office by calling 542-4529/30.Dinner with the Smileys: Learning about cancer

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Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast, signed a proclamation declaring his sup port of Military Saves campaign Feb. 9. Military Saves is a national campaign Feb. 19-26 to persuade, motivate and encourage Sailors and fami lies to save money every month, and to convince leaders and organizations to be aggressive in promoting automatic savings. Scorby addressed team members of the Fleet Readiness Division before signing the declaration sharing how important he thinks financial readiness is to the career of Sailors and civilians. I am so supportive of these kinds of programs. Im an economics major with a background in finance, so from what Ive seen throughout my career, theres nothing worse than seeing our young Sailors and civilians get into trouble financially, he said. Anything we can do to promote saving is extraordinarily important, especially in the U.S. today where we have a negative savings rate. It changes a little bit each year, but historically weve had a one or two percent savings to negative which means people are spending more than their savings. Supporting things which we have in place like savings bonds or Thrift Savings Plans, which Im a huge supporter of, and using good practices like getting financial counseling, I think is really, really impor tant, added Scorby. Rufus Bundrige, a personal financial manager and financial educator at NAS Jacksonvilles Fleet and Family Support Center, agreed that being financially stable is key to success at work and at home. The objective is to increase wealth and decrease debt, said Bundrige. No matter how you do it, just do the right thing to try to eliminate debt and have some sort of retirement or financial plan for the future. Financial readiness can alleviate much of the stress on the homefront. It allows you to do your job without worrying about the financial end of paying your creditors on time or with living paycheck to paycheck, added Bundrige. You know that when you deploy your family members are securely taken care of in a financial aspect. It can eliminate those things that add pressures on you. Since the Military Saves program began in 2007, more than 99,000 people have enrolled and more than 200 defense credit unions and military banks now participate in a wide variety of activities to promote personal financial readiness each year. DoD active duty, National Guard and Reserve, Coast Guard, as well as civilians, retirees, veterans, defense contractors, and family members of all ages are eli gible to sign up for the campaign. To learn more about Military Saves, go to www.militarysaves.org. Scorby signs Military Saves proclamation A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 Command fitness leaders (CFLs) from Navy Region Southeast bases spent the week of Feb. 6-10 at NAS Jacksonville participating in a five-day, 40-hour CFL class to become certified to run their command physical readiness programs. CFLs play an integral part in the overall fitness and readiness of Sailors. This course provides the skills, educa tion and motivation CFLs need to lead a successful PT program to help Sailors stay healthy, stay fit and stay Navy. Each command is required to have one certified CFL and one assistant CFL (ACFL) for every 25 military personnel. These CFLs are trained to conduct a safe and constructive PRT program to keep Sailors mission ready, said NAS Jax Fitness Director Tanya Henigman. CFLs are instructed about safety guidelines, injury prevention, exer cise physiology, nutrition, clothing guidelines and how to design a fitness program whether its cardio, circuit, strength training, muscle endurance or a combination of these. After participating in a PRT test the first morning, the participants head Command fitness leaders train at NAS Jacksonville

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 5 ed to the classroom where they were greeted by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders. Its not just enough anymore to pass the PRT twice a year. The Navy is getting a lot more serious about physical fitness and thats where you come in. Its got to be a mindset that people actually want to go out and PT every day. Thats where leadership comes in and we look to our command fitness leaders to facilitate our com mands PRT programs, he said. Its up to you to motivate our Sailors to help them get in shape. At NAS Jax, we take physical fitness very seriously which is proven by a reduction in PRT failures, people loos ing weight and getting in bet ter shape. Its a lifestyle change. And it starts with you. The course consists of class room work to learn about instructions, safety guidelines, medical screenings, waiv ers, nutrition, weight management, administration actions, the Physical Readiness Information Management System and the Navy Operational Fitness and Fueling System (NOFFS). There are a lot of changes regarding PRT instructions and waivers. This is the first time weve taught this material with the new OPNAV 6110.1 which describes the Navys Physical Readiness Program, issues program requirements, defines the responsibilities for compliance, and establishes required mini mum standards of physical fit ness, Henigman continued. We also promote the NOFFS which is the new standard of fitness that the Navy is lean ing towards because its more focused on injury prevention. NOFFS is broken down into a series of exercises based on three different levels. It can be used in confined spaces on board ships and submarines, as an individual or group workout. Its versatile and balances exercise with proper nutrition. The program is built on a five pillars eat clean, eat often, hydrate, recover and mindset. Participants also got handson training including strength conditioning, cardiovascular conditioning and circuit training. This hands-on training is the meat, muscle and grind of the course. We also train our CFLs on how to safely con duct a TRX and spin class so if we cant provide an instruc tor, they can teach a class uti lizing our equipment, added Henigman. Throughout the week, the 24 participants enthusiastically tried a variety of new exercises at the base gym including the TRX suspension training which was new to most of the class members. This is an outstanding course and were getting a lot of good information. I think this will make our command PT program 10 times better, said SHCS(AW/SW) Craig Freeman of Naval Hospital Jacksonville. Weve learned different types of drills, circuit train ing and how to incorporate the NOFFS into our daily routines. This will be part of our Fitness Enhancement Program when we get back to work next week. I also gained a lot of knowl edge from the classroom por tion that Ill implement into our program at the hospital. This course has been abso lutely amazing. Ive learned about the many resources available on this base and throughout big Navy and will take this knowledge back to my Sailors and utilize this information in my command, added AO1 Robin Anton of VR-62. Its been a great week learning all these new workouts and Ill incorporate them into our commands PRT program. Henigman also stressed that the fitness staff is always available to help. We give the CFLs a lot of information about our pro grams at the Fitness Source, base gym and Naval Hospital Jax Wellness Center. We want them to know we are here to help and our main focus is to get Sailors healthy, fit and help them stay Navy. Photos by Kaylee LaRocque FITNESS: Its got to be a mindset that people actually want to go out and PT every day

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The Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville announced its Sailors and Instructors of the Year for 2011. Instructor of the Year, CY-11. Benson provided 1,040 hours of training to 90 students while decreasing flight engi neer attrition from 18 percent in FY-10 to an unprecedented five percent in FY-11. Additionally, he led the development of curriculum for the Acoustic Receiver Technology System course, which saved the Navy over $300,000. His professional attitude, personal motivation, strong work ethic and dedication to student success make him an invaluable asset to CNATTU Jax. Year, FY-11. Stovall served as an H-60 Electrical Systems instructor where he personally trained more than 453 Sailors and Marines on the upkeep, troubleshooting, and maintenance of the H-60 aircraft. Stovall also served as the commands medical readiness representative. His constant monitor ing of the commands medical readi ness led to the command having a 92 percent medical readiness rate for 2011. Additionally, Stovall served as the Maintenance Training Unit (MTU) 1005 Instructional Systems Development (ISD) representative. As the ISD repre sentative, Stovall ensured the quality of instructional courses taught at MTU 1005 consistently exceeded the standard set by Naval Education and Training Command. Stovalls consistent profes sionalism and persistent initiative make him a tremendous asset to CNATTU Jax. the Year, CY-11. As the T56-A-14 First Degree Intermediate and 54H6077 Prop Intermediate Maintenance Training Unit 1011 Lead Power Plant instructor, she personally provided over 1,250 hours of instruction for more than 110 students while upholding an impressive 100 percent graduation rate. Foster also served as the president of the commands Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Committee, where she organized countless fundraisers that directly resulted in raising over $8,000 for the command holiday party. Her superb leadership and inspirational guidance have made a lasting impression on CNATTU Jax. Sailor of the Year, FY-11. He serves as an instructor where he teaches personnel on the upkeep and maintenance of P-3 Life Support Systems. He also serves as the CETARS testing team lead where he was responsible for the incorpora tion of over 11,900 questions and the creation of 297 online tests that enabled the implementation of an online testing program for CNATTU Jax. Additionally, as CNATTU Jax command fire warden, Acosta led 10 assistant fire wardens in providing maintenance and upkeep of sprinkler systems, emergency exit lighting, and 76 fire extinguishers in five buildings while coordinating all required drills with the NAS Jax Fire Department. Instructor of the Year, FY-11. Romero personally provided over 1,176 hours of P-3 aircraft weapons system and weap ons loading training for 46 students and achieved a 100 percent completion rate while maintaining an impressive 98.6 grade point average. His techni cal expertise and curriculum develop ment skills had a positive impact during major revisions for both the Initial and Career P-3C Weapon Systems courses. Romeros superb leadership and inspi rational guidance have made a lasting impression on CNATTU Jax. Year, CY-11. Kong personally trained more than 250 Sailors and Marines in the upkeep, maintenance, and trouble shooting of aviation support equip ment at MTU 3032 while maintaining an impressive 100 percent pass rate. Additionally, Kong earned his Black Belt in the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program and successfully trained and certified eight Sailors and 56 Marines. Kongs dynamic professional perfor mance and unwavering dedication to duty have made him invaluable asset to CNATTU Jaxs team of professionals. The Navys past successful efforts to balance the officer corps resulted in the need to conduct a selective early retirement (SER) board for only two communities in the restricted line and staff corps this year as announced in NAVADMIN 048/12, Feb 7. Because of the force man agement efforts used over the past few years, the unrestricted line, and most of the restrict ed line and staff corps officers communities are within their manpower requirements at the senior levels. Due to high reten tion and low attrition, the Oceanographer and Supply Corps officer communities are over their requirements at senior ranks. The Navy does not plan to conduct any further SER boards for the officer commu nities for fiscal year 2013. The restricted line and staff corps communities, in Oceanography (1800 designa tor) and Supply Corps (3100 designator) will be part of the fiscal year 13 SER Board con ducted in July 2012. This board will help ensure balance of these two commu nities and bring the number of O-5s and O-6s in line with the number authorized to meet the manpower requirement. This action is required because of the high retention rates for active Oceanography/ Supply O-5 and Oceanography O-6 officers. Current projections indi cate the SER board will select for early retirement approxi mately two captains and three commanders from the Oceanography community and 14 Supply Corps commanders. These numbers may be adjusted based on the num ber of voluntary retirement requests received prior to the board. The SER board will consider the records of all active duty restricted line (Oceanography) captains, with at least four years time in grade as of July 1, 2012 and whose names are not on a list of officers recom mended for promotion. In addition, Oceanography and Supply Corps command ers who have twice failed for promotion to O-6 and whose names are not on a list of officers recommended for promo tion will be reviewed by the board. Officers who wish to be exempted from consideration by the SER board may submit a voluntary retirement request no later than May 25, with a requested retirement date of Sept. 1, 2013 or earlier. Once the voluntary retire ment request is approved, the officer will be removed from consideration by the board. For those officers selected for early retirement, they must, by law, retire no later than the first day of the seventh month following Secretary of the Navy approval of the board recommendations. The target date for this approval is Sept. 1, 2012. Officer force management efforts lead to smaller FY13 SER boardCNATTU Jax announces staff awards 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012

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NC1(SW) Jason Davis was recog nized as Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior Sailor of the First Quarter 2012. As the regional career counselor, Davis over sees the career programs of 16 major installations, which comprises 22 indi vidual counselors, more than 200 departmental counselors and an excess of 100,000 Southeast Region Sailors. He recently took the lead in assessing and nominating command programs throughout the region for the 2011 Commander, Naval Installations Command Retention Excellence Awards. He has enjoyed a tremendous amount of success here at CNRSE because of his dedication to the Sailors in the region, said Chief Aviation Administrationman (AW/SW) Eugene Burns, Davis supervisor. Davis said he was hon ored to be selected and that he could not have done it alone. Its humbling in that no Sailor gets to this point without the sup port of every Sailor in our Navy. The fact that I have been given this honor is a testament to the dedica tion to duty of all of the Sailors that I work with, he said. Davis added that Southeast Region Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Mac Ellis played a major role in his suc cess at CNRSE. We have a tremen dous support network with our leadership and an outstanding com mand master chief who never fails to support not only me, but every Sailor in the region. Davis said another key to his suc cess is his drive to main tain focus on the mission at hand. Keep working hard, even if you think no one is watching, he said. Do what you do for your country, your ship mates and for the mis sions. Never seek personal glory that will come from a job well done. OS2(SW) Brandon Doctor was named CNRSE Junior Sailor of the First Quarter 2012. While serving as regional watch spe cialist in the Regional Operations Center, Doctor processed more than 100 messages for 17 installations in support of real-world incident responses. In addition, he is currently taking online courses at Columbia College. In the short time he has been here, hes prov en himself to be a valu able asset to the com mand and the Navy as a whole, said QMC(SW) Steven Davis, Doctors immediate supervisor. He embodies every thing that you could ask for in a Sailor. From his outer appearance, work ethic, drive and determi nation to succeed, he is well on his way to accomplishing great things for the Navy. Receipt of the award was a source of satisfac tion for both Doctor and his family. Its a great honor to be selected. This is my first time, although Ine been nominated a few times in my career, he said. Being selected gives me a sense of relief and sets a new standard in my personal accomplish ments. And itsgreat plea sure to see my wifes reac tion to this achievement. While winning the award is a significant individual achievement, Doctor attributed his success to the support of his peers, supervisors and family. I owe my success here at CNRSE to the support of my chain of command and to the support and encouragement of my wife. Without their posi tivity, I dont think any of this would be possible, he said. According to Doctor, a major factor to his suc cess has been his willingness to constantly chal lenge himself and that junior Sailors who would like to follow in his foot steps should do the same. The U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) fleet master chief visited NAS Jacksonville Feb. 9 as part of an east coast tour to gather information and ideas from master chief petty officers at various commands here. FLTCM(AW/NAC) Mike Stevens was accompanied by FORCM(AW/SW) Garry McClure of Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic, FORCM(SW/AW) James Williams of Commander, Naval Surface Forces, U.S. Atlantic Fleet and AVCM(AW) Bill White also of USFF. Im here today to discuss a few issues that are going on within our chief messes in our Navy. I believe our chiefs and senior chiefs have a role and by and large they are executing that role and doing a good job, said Stevens. The success of the command is driven by the success of our chiefs mess. I also believe that you cannot have a successful chiefs mess unless you have master chiefs leading the effort. You are the influencers within your mess. Stevens continued, I am here because Im looking for feedback on how our CPO messes can do better on handling their internal issues and Sailor readiness. An accomplished mission takes equipment and weapons systems to be up and running but it also takes Sailors to be mission ready. You cant be successful with one and not the other. Weve identified some core fundamental programs in the fleet and found that when our chiefs messes are engaged in them, you can accomplish missions effectively and efficiently. Stevens then turned the spotlight over to McClure CNRSE announces Sailors of the First Quarter Fleet Forces master chief visits NAS Jax to share ideas JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 7

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who talked about some of the issues hes involved in. One issue Im working on is to review the number of Sailors I have working outside the flight line in special programs such as recruiting, instruc tor billets and recruit com pany commanders. These are also considered Sailorization tours. I am fully aware of the benefits of being assigned to a Sailorization billet however, we need more of our journeyman Sailors back in the fleet on the flight lines turning wrenches and inspecting aircraft. I am sure that we can find an equal balance between special pro grams and the deckplate in the fleet. We have a large number of Sailors who are in high demand doing great things in these billets but they are also good wrench turners and we need them back in the shops, said McClure. He also stressed the need for senior enlisted members to participate in the selection board process. I need more of you participating in selec tion boards. I want an aviation rated master chief from every AOR under my claimency on a selection board. I want com mand master chiefs to be educated on sitting on selection boards. Our master chiefs have to be educated in the selec tion board process so they can train and mentor the Sailors in their commands. Knowledge is power, McClure continued. After a short break, White presented a refresher course called Brilliant on the Basics which covered such topics as the command sponsor pro gram, mentoring, career development boards, indoctrination, the ombudsmen program and recognition of Sailors for their accomplishments. Stevens closed out the brief by emphasizing the impor tance of communication. I want all of you to have one-onone conversations with your chiefs. When we start looking for ways of doing things more efficiently and start removing the human element, we still deliver the material but its not face-to-face. Your direct inter vention is what has the most influence on that person, said Stevens. Leadership is hard and requires extraordinary effort at an extraordinary level on a continuous basis. It needs to be hard. Its about influencing and changing peoples lives. Im asking you to take the time every day to have a personal conversation with someone in your mess to build that rapport and respect. You need to show them that you are investing in them and that they have a future in the Navy, he contin ued. After lunch, the group visited several P-3 Orion and helicopter squadrons aboard the sta tion to meet with Sailors and learn about daily operations. FLTCM: Our master chiefs have to be educated in the selection board process 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012

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NWCA college scholarships availableThe Navy Wives Clubs of America (NWCA) Scholarship Foundation announced Feb. 6 that 30 scholarship grants will be awarded in 2012 in amounts from $1,000 to $1,500. NWCA Scholarship Director Linda Hedden said those eligible for the grants are the natural born, legally adopted, or stepson/stepdaughter of an enlisted member of the Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard on active duty, retired with pay, or the son/daughter of a deceased member in these categories. The applicant must have a valid dependent ID card, show financial need, have at least a 2.5 gradepoint-average, and be a high school graduate or its equivilent or qualify for graduation prior to begin ning eligibility, said Hedden. The grants may be used for tuition, room and board, books and fees. Applications may be downloaded from: www.navywivesclubsofamerica.org. The deadline for applica tions is May 30. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 9

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February marks Childrens Dental Health Monthan opportunity for parents to help their children brush up on good oral hygiene. This includes brushing twice daily to remove plaque, eating healthy foods and visiting a dentist regularly for cleanings and checkups. For older children, flossing, seal ants and wearing mouth guards during sports activities are additional ways of maintaining healthy teeth and gums over the long term. In recognition of the occasion, a team from Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Dental ClinicCmdr. Samira Meymand, Lt. Darien Lazaro, Jill Burnsed and DT2 Olymphia Saincois and DT2 Guy Leppry visited the NAS Jacksonville Child Development Center Feb. 3 to help ensure the dental health of about 40 preschoolers there. To the delight of the kids, the visit included Burnsed dressed as the tooth fairy and Saincois costumed as a giant tooth demonstrating good oral hygiene in a fun way. Children got to practice tooth-brush ing with the characters, and received donated toothbrushes, toothpaste and Navy pencils to mark the day. It was a great to be able to reach out to our service members children and help them understand the importance of oral hygiene in an entertaining way, said Meymand, oral and maxillofacial surgeon and head of NH Jacksonvilles Dental Clinic. Children who develop good habits including caring for their teeth every daytypically maintain those healthy habits as adults. Lots of smiles kick off childrens dental health month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 11

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The Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) has launched its online registration for the 2012 Symposium, building the anticipation for three days of events that will celebrate 50 Years of the P 3 Orion the last week of March. The 2012 MPA Symposium will take place March 27 30 at NAS Jacksonville. Symposium attendees can register for a several events, including the P 8A Poseidon Roll Out, Integrated Training Center dedication, a Flight Suit Social, golf tournament, 5K, Heritage Dinner, and others. The Heritage Dinner, which will highlight the history and heritage of the last 50 years of the P 3 aircraft, will also serve as a ceremony for three new Hall of Honor inductees from the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community. Combining the history of the last 50 years of the P 3, and the introduction of a new aircraft, has created a definite sense of pride, accomplish ment, and appreciation, said Capt. Trey Wheeler, president of MPA. We look forward to celebrating our rich heritage as we look to a promising future with all our symposium attendees in March. It will be the event of year for NAS Jacksonville, said Wheeler. Interested parties can receive more information about the 2012 Symposium, as well as register online, by going to: www.maritimepatrolasso ciation.org/2012symposium. Maritime Patrol Association opens registration for 2012 Symposium 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012

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High energy tunes and moti vating beats provide an energet ic backdrop to Ebony Solomons Spin-Flex Sculpt class. Solomon, an accounting technician for Commander, Navy Region Southeast, is a volunteer instruc tor of the popular class at the NAS Jacksonville Fitness Source. After attending six years of spin classes, Solomon became a certi fied instructor in 2006. I cant use my lunch hour to just sit around. I went over to the gym and asked if they needed any Spinning instructors. Solomon said. I enjoy it. I like to motivate the class and it also helps me stay in shape. I use music to inspire and push people to do their best. Its not about killing yourself. Its about getting a good workout and enjoying it. Solomon stresses the importance of keeping exercise fun. I try to make my class different. If it is the same thing day after day, people get bored with it and quit. It was with this in mind that Solomon created her Spin-Flex Sculpt class, a combination of cycling and weights, to offer alongside her regular spin class. Its not for beginners, Solomon says, But if you have been coming to spin class awhile, then this will help you build your core. Her students are enthusiastic about her classes. You cant cheat yourself, comments AT2 Dan Pike, She always pushes you. Its nice to participate in a class where you get a good workout without feeling like you are train ing for a triathalon. said Rachel Rangel. Ebony maximizes my indoor cycling experience. She is passionate and ensures participants get the maximum benefit from each class. It is invigorating to have an instructor who brings fun and joy to a 45-minute workout, stated Miriam Gallet, who has attended spin classes at Fitness Center for more than seven years. Solomon said, I give spe cial thanks to Bruce Grenier, region program director for Fleet and Family Readiness, as well as Fitness Director Tanya Henigman, for allowing my participation in the Civilian Employee Physical Fitness Program as an MWR spin instructor. She instructs the Spin-Flex Sculpt class Wednesday, 11:15 a.m. to noon. For more information, call 542-3518. It goes without saying that the heart remains a very important organ in the center of our chest. We all know that heart disease remains the leading cause of natural death as we age. Heart disease has been studied very well, and we know it to be a disease that starts when we are children, and most heart disease is the result of poor choices made by smoking tobac co or by overeating and not exercising enough. Men, women and chil dren are at risk of heart disease. Recent guide lines from the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends providers check children for high cholesterol levels start ing at age 11. Children should be screened for high blood sugar lev els, thyroid disease and cholesterol if they are overweight or obese. At Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, your pro vider can give you a chart which plots your childs body mass index, which tells us overweight status for children. At NH Jacksonville, I care for many women as part of both maternity care and well-woman care. Often I get looks of surprise during exams when I ask women ques tions about their heart health. Its still not well known that heart dis ease is the leading killer of women. Many women dont take the time to look closely at their risks and take action to stay heart healthy. National Red Dress Day was Feb. 3, when we publicly emphasize womens heart health. Q. Why are women and children being fol lowed more closely now for their risk of developing heart disease? Increasing rates of dia betes and obesity, espe cially among younger women, is expected to raise the numbers of women and their chil dren who have heart problems at earlier ages. Right now at NH Jacksonville, nearly one in five women who give birth has gestational diabetesthis gives a woman about a 50-50 chance of developing full blown diabetes as she ages. The risks of stroke and heart attack go up significantly for diabetic patients. Women need to understand the risks of gaining too much weight during pregnancy. Weve set up a program to more carefully follow our ges tational diabetic patients through pregnancy and follow them as they age. Statistics also show that children of obese mothers have a tenden cy to grow up with extra weight, which raises their risks of early stage heart disease. Providers should check these children for obesity, using the body mass index. Ask your doctor to tell you your childs BMIrecent studies show that most pro viders fail to discuss this important vital sign with parents of overweight children. The data also shows that most parents fail to recognize when their children are over weight. Prevention is the key to control of the obesity epidemic. Fitness source instructor offers spin-tastic workout February is National Heart Month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 13

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Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Feb. 10 that the next Independence-variant littoral combat ship (LCS) will be named USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10) to honor the former congresswoman from Tucson, Ariz. who is known for supporting the military and veterans, advocating for renewable energy and championing border security. Giffords recently resigned from Congress to recover from wounds she sustained in an assassination attempt in 2011. The Navy motto is Semper Fortis, Always Courageous, said Mabus during a cer emony held in the Pentagon Courtyard. Unwavering cour age has defined the Navy for 236 years and it is what we expect, what we demand of our Sailors every single day. So its very appropriate that LCS 10 be named for someone who has become synonymous with courage, who has inspired the nation with remarkable resil iency and showed the possibilities of the human spirit. Mabus also announced the ships sponsor will be Roxanna Green, the mother of ChristinaTaylor Green, the nine-yearold girl who was killed while attending the meeting of con stituents where Giffords was shot. A ships sponsor plays an important role in the life of the ship, naval tradition holds that her spirit and presence guide the ship throughout its service life. On that dark, tragic day now more than a year ago, Christina-Taylor Green was taken from us. A nine-year-old who had just been elected to the student council, she want ed to become a more active participant in our democracy. Her mother, Roxanna Green, continues to express her daughters hope for the future and, as the President said, of a nation as good as she imag ined. I am pleased to honor Gabrielle Giffords and the people of Arizona with the naming of this ship, said Mabus. Giffords and the ships sponsor, Roxanna Green, are sources of great inspiration and represent the Navy and Marine Corps qualities of overcoming, adapting and coming out victorious despite great challenges. The ship is part of a dual block buy of LCS class ships announced by Mabus in December 2010. By procur ing both versions of the LCS Lockheed Martins semiplaning monohull and General Dynamics aluminum trima ran the Navy is stabilizing the LCS program and the indus trial base with an award of 20 ships each, because the two designs provides operational flexibility. USS Gabrielle Giffords is designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access in the coastal waters. The LCS provides warfighting capabilities and operational flexibility to execute focused missions close to the shore, such as mine warfare, antisubmarine warfare and surface warfare. The LCS class of ships will be outfitted with recon figurable payloads, called mis sion packages, which can be changed out quickly as combat needs demand. Gabrielle Giffords will be 419 feet in length, have a water line beam of 103 feet, displace approximately 3,000 tons, and make speed in excess of 40 knots. The construction will be led by Austal Shipbuilding in Mobile, Ala. This is the 16th ship to be named for a woman and the 13th ship to be named for a living person since 1850. On Dec. 19, 2011, an American flag was raised above the Pentagon, just as it is every morning. Except on that morning the flag was raised to honor NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville employee Darryle Hutchens upon his retirement after 30 years of federal service. As a trib ute to Hutch, his long-time friend and onetime supervi sor, Gary Bright arranged to have the flag flown for one day over the Pentagon. I wanted to do something to show my appreciation and the appreciation of the federal govern ment for a life well spent in the service of this great country, said Bright of his gift. After the American flag was retired at sunset, it was boxed up and sent to Hutch with a certificate of authenticity. Hutchens 30-year federal service career began in 1968 when he joined the Marine Corps and began boot camp at Paris Island, S.C. Shortly thereafter, he deployed to Vietnam as part of the 1st Marine Division, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, India Company. Hutch fought as an infantryman in Hue City and the A Shau Valley alongside his fellow Marines. Following the receipt of his honorable discharge from the Marine Corps, Navy names littoral combat ship Gabrielle Giffords Flag flown over Pentagon honors retiring FLC employee 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012

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Hutchens worked different jobs before being hired for a position in 1982 at NAS Jacksonville. His career began in inventory, but one year later, he was transferred to security where he worked for the rest of his career. When asked what he will miss the most about working security for NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville he said simply, I will miss the peo ple. Ive made friends here. Gary Bright and Ed Howard were former supervisors of mine. They are my best friends still, said Hutchens while looking at a group picture of the three of them together. I also am very appreciative for the sup port of J. T. Langone, NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville security manager and the fellowship of Alphonso Victor, security colleague, he said. Former co-workers remember Hutchens with fondness. Hutch is the go-getter, never-say-die type. He attacks a problem head on and work it through resolution, stated Bright, remembering their time together in security. My fondest memory is of Hutch taking peoples (unsecured government) keys from their unsecured desk and leaving them Post-it-Notes telling them to call him for their keys. Another colleague, Director of Corporate Communications Daphne Cassani, recalls Hutchens as a man who loves his country. I cant be sure if Hutch would bleed red, white and blue or Marine Corps green but I know he has a deep-rooted passion for both America and the Corps. Ive always found that devotion inspirational, said Cassani. For retirement, Hutchens plans to travel the United States with his wife. First were going to travel the continental U.S. in our RV, then Im gonna fly her first class to Hawaii, said Hutchens with a smile. He also has international travel on his mind. He has a dream of reuniting with his fellow Marines from India Company and return ing to the places where they fought in Vietnam. Those who know Hutchens know he is Semper Fi to the core. Even though I didnt retire from the Marine Corps, Im a full-blooded Marine. I love my country, said Hutchens, and he demonstrated that love by serving with commit ment for 30 years. Q. What are the low hanging fruit, the easiest first steps someone can take to start living a more heart-healthy life? First off, we need to recognize that tobacco use and obesity are the No. 1 and 2 issues that cause the majority of heart problems in our country. At NH Jacksonville, including the branch health clinics, our Wellness Centers and Health Promotions can help you quit smoking. We offer a full range of care that we try to make as easy to get as buying a pack of cigarettes at the store! Almost 6,000 patients enrolled in our tobacco cessation program in 2011, and our 12-month quit rate is over 25 percent. People who go cold turkey on their own have a quit rate of under 5 percent. Walk in to our Wellness Center or any branch health clinic and well get you started on a program to quit tobacco. Cigarettes cost more than $5 a pack on base. The money spent on a pack a day habit is roughly equivalent to an E-4 losing a month of pay every year. We offer a new Healthy Weight program with internet-guided follow-up to track your progress as you lose weight. Diet and exercise are both important factors in weight loss. Were starting a new exercise program for our pregnant and postpar tum moms on base. Contact our Wellness Center (542-5292) or OB/GYN Clinic (542-7419) to learn more. Even parking your car at the outer edge of the commissary parking lot and walking in briskly is a great step forward to help keep your heart healthy. Exercising without a healthy diet is, however, futile. Just 10 types of food account for nearly half of the nations excessive sodium intake, government researchers have found. Excess sodium has been linked to heart attacks and strokes. About 44 per cent of Americans daily sodium consumption almost 3,300 milligramscomes from breads, cold cuts, pizza, poultry, soups, sandwiches, cheese, pasta dishes, meat dishes and snacks such as popcorn and chips. The American Dietetic Association promotes the concept of whole foodsfoods that are not processed. Whole foods contain more nutrients, vitamins and fiber. Avoid canned vegetables. juice products that are sweetened and stripped of fiber, and out-of-season foodstheyre often grown by artificial means and grown far away so travel time has robbed them of flavor and nutrients. Watch your portion sizes. Fast food and other restaurants have increasingly served larger portions through the years. Picture the food on a plate; how does it fill up the plate? And dont eat straight out of a packagepour your portion into a small bowl and be content to finish that. Celebrate your heart. Ask questions about getting your cholesterol and fasting blood sugar checked for diabetes next time you see your provider. Make sure your provider can show you on a graph how your child is trending toward or away from over weight or obesity. Be your own advocate. And remember a heart only goes around once. DR. JOE: Celebrating February as Heart Health MonthFLC RETIREMENT: I will miss the people a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org The annual Valentines Day 5K brought out 227 runners Feb. 10. The NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department sponsored the run. Placing first overall and first in the mens 45-49 category was retired Sgt. Maj. Joe Rivera with a time of 18:31. Nicole Amador of Navy Operational Support Command Jax took first in the womens 30-37 category and was the first female to cross the finish line with a time of 25:16. Other winners were: Upcoming MWR-sponsored runs include the Leprechaun Dash March 16 at 11:30 a.m. and the Capt. Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 7. Volunteers are needed for the Navy Run. For more informa tion, call 542-3239/3518. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com nasjaxmwr. Annual Valentines Day 5K brings out the runners JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Play Bingo at lunch Mon. Fri. at 11:15 a.m. Play Bingo at dinner Sun. Tues. and Thurs. at 6:30 p.m. Cash prizes DJ entertainment at the Bud Brew House Feb. 24, 8 10 p.m. Food & beverage specials 9-Ball Tournament Feb. 21, 4 p.m. practice, 5 p.m. tournament begins $5 entry fee, gift cards awarded as prizes Open to all handsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 2 sessions, 7 9 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. midnight $11 per person, includes shoe rental February Family Bowling for Four Special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $17 savings!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor pool hours Mon. Fri. 5:30 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 8 p.m. Weekend hours 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Leprechaun Dash 5K March 16 11:30 a.m. on Perimeter Rd. Pre-register by March 9 at the base gym or fitness center Family Fitness Bootcamp with Ashley Monday & Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. Family Fitness Center above the Youth Center Gym Call (904) 778-9772I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. 22nd Annual ITT Travel Fair NEX Courtyard March 10, 9:30 a.m. 1 p.m. featuring ITT vendors and great door prizes! Harlem Globetrotters March 2 at Veterans Memorial Arena $26 Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville First Orchestra seating available for Les Miserables. Valdosta, Georgia historic sites bus tour Feb. 11, $20 Includes admission to Crescent House, the Art Center and the Historical Museum Jacksonville Sharks $26 per person Daytona 500 Feb. 18 26, $27 to $199 Monster Jam March 3, $25 $41 Phineas and Ferb tickets, March 10, 3:30 p.m. & 6:30 p.m. shows $13 each! Veterans Memorial Arena Disney on Ice featuring Toy Story 3 April 6, 7:30 p.m. April 7, 11:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. April 8, 1 & 5 p.m. Lower level seating for $13 Disney World Orlando, FL 4day hopper Armed Forces Ticket $135.50 $162 Universal Circus $19.50 Tampa Zoo $19 adult, $17.50 childThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Jacksonville International Car Show Feb. 18 at 11 a.m. Learn to Fly Feb. 26 at 8 a.m. Free introductory lesson at the Navy Jax Flying Club Walt Disney World Weekend Trip March 24 $100 per person includes 2-night lodging at Disneys All Star Sports Resort, 1-day park hopper and transportation.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Feb. 21 for active duty Feb. 23 for retirees & DoD personnel February Golf Specials Monday & Tuesday play 18 holes for $20 Monday Friday after 12 p.m., play 18 holes for $17 Cart and green fees included Not applicable on holidays Twilight Golf League March 20 Aug. 30 $20 entry fee Rosters due by March 16Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. and Tuesday & Thursday 4 7 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Flying Club Call 777-8549 /6035 Ground School Feb. 27 April 4 $500 per person The results of the Navy Exchange Service Commands (NEXCOM) most recent market bas ket survey shows custom ers save an average of 23 percent below civilian retail prices, not including sales tax, when they shop at their Navy Exchange (NEX). This is a one per cent higher savings over the 2011 survey results. Shoppers have a plethora of choices out there . our focus is to make sure our customers think about the NEX first, said Tess Paquette, NEXCOM senior vice president chief mer chandising officer. Being able to show customers that we save them an average of 23 percent on the merchandise they purchase is very gratify ing, especially in these tough economic times. Each fall, NEXCOM hires an outside com pany, RetailData, to do a price survey in different areas of the United States to obtain an average per centage number for how much customers save when shopping NEX. To determine the percentage of savings, the same items were surveyed from region to region. The items included major applianc es, consumer electronics, furniture, clothing, house wares, sporting goods and more. The different stores shopped for comparison prices included discount stores, mass merchants, full-line department stores and category-killer stores. The survey compared prices on approximately 350 branded items in the NEX inventory against major retailers across the continental United States and Hawaii. The survey proved NEX customers saved 10.74 percent over Wal-Mart; 15.15 percent over Target; 30.56 percent over Walgreens; 39.36 percent over JCPenney; 34.61 over Advance Auto and 15.87 percent over Bed Bath and Beyond. The survey also deter mined customers savings in each of the eight dif ferent areas of the coun try surveyed. Customers in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, save Pearl Harbor 28.87 percent; customers in Everett, Wash., save 23.58 percent; customers in San Diego save 23.20 percent; customers in Bethesda, Md., save 22.90 percent; customers in Norfolk, Va., save 22.35 percent; cus tomers in Great Lakes, Ill., save 22.30 percent; cus tomers in Jacksonville, Fla., save 21.61 per cent and customers in Pensacola, Fla., save 19.69 percent. Many NEX departments offer significant savings to customers including domestics at 48.22 per cent; boys at 37.02 per cent; girls at 34.72 percent; automotive at 24.79 percent; house wares at 25.47 percent; and ladies at 21.23 percent. We want our customers to know that we are doing everything we can to have the products they need at a savings, said Paquette. That is our mission and the reason why we do what we do. NEX customers save an average of 23 percent

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 16, 2012 17 The Defense Department announced changes to its assignment policy Feb. 9 that will result in more than 14,000 additional positions being opened to women. Women are contributing in unprecedented ways to the militarys mission. Through their courage, sacrifice, patri otism and great skill, women have proven their ability to serve in an expanding num ber of roles on and off the battlefield, Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta said. We will continue to open as many positions as possible to women so that anyone qualified to serve can have the opportunity to do so. In a report required by the 2011 National Defense Authorization Act, the depart ment notified Congress today it intends to make two chang es to rules in place since 1994 governing the service of female members of the armed forces. First, occupations will no longer be closed to women solely because the positions are required to be co-located with ground combat units. Second, a sizable number of positions will be opened to women at the battalion level in select direct ground combat units in spe cific occupations. The services also will continuously assess their experience with these changes to help determine future changes to the 1994 rules. The services will con tinue to review positions and requirements to determine what additional positions may be opened, ensuring the mis sion is met with the best qualified and most capable, regardless of gender, Panetta said. The 1994 Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule articulated five basic elements inform ing decisions on the service of women in the military: direct ground combat; berthing and privacy; co-location; long range reconnaissance and special operations forces; and physi cally demanding tasks. The 1994 DoD policy allowed women to be restricted from some occupational specialties if those specialties were physically co-located with direct ground combat units. Because the modern-day battlefield is non-linear and fluid, with no clearly defined front line or safer rear area, combat sup port operations are dispersed throughout the battlespace. Removal of the co-location exclusion will result in 13,139 Army positions being opened to women, in specialties such as tank mechanic and field artillery radar operator. Additionally, the 1994 policy prohibited women from being assigned below brigade level to units whose principal mission was to engage in combat. The Army, Marines and Navy have been granted exceptions to policy to allow select positions at the battalion level in specialties already open to women, opening 1,186 additional posi tions. These exceptions to policy will help the services assess the suitability and relevance of the direct ground combat unit assignment prohibition, and inform future policy decisions. Regarding other policy restrictions, the department recognizes there are practical barriers that require time to resolve to ensure the services maximize the safety and privacy of all service members while maintaining military readi ness. Building upon analysis and experience, the services will develop gender-neutral physical standards for use by all members. Gender-neutral physical standards ensure all mem bers can meet the physical demands of the duties they are assigned, ultimately contribut ing to higher states of readiness through an increased under standing of the demands we place upon our members and by preventing injuries, acting Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Jo Ann Rooney said. Panetta directed the services to update him in six months on assignment policy imple mentation and the progress made developing gender-neu tral physical standards. As required by law, these changes to policy will take effect after 30 days of continuous session of Congress, which is expected to occur later this spring. Make motor vehicle safety your top priority According to Naval Safety Center (NAVSAFECEN), Fiscal year 2011 was the safest on record in terms of four-wheel motor vehicle fatalities. Car and truck operators did a great job of managing the risks of driving. However, mid-way through the second quarter of FY 2012, fatalities are in danger of creeping back up. As of Feb. 1, four Sailors lost their lives in four-wheel personal motor vehicle fatalities compared to one for the same time in 2011. Motorcycle fatality rates are static, with three so far this fiscal year the same as last year at this time. NAVSAFECENs Command Master Chief Dominick Torchia recently released a Safety Broadcast, a onepage fact sheet outlining timely information about various trending topics. His most recent covers PMV statistics, risk factors and resources for improvement. While we made big strides in reducing the number of four-wheel motor vehicle fatalities last year, this is no time to declare victory, Torchia said. Be aware of the biggest risk factors speed, alcohol, fatigue, ejec tion and distractions and do everything you can to manage those risks. Those risk factors account for the vast majority of motor vehicle mishaps in the Navy and nationwide. Motorcycle fatalities are also a continuing concern, with their own set of risk factors. However, the biggest risk factor Sailors face is completely within their control training. The biggest challenge we face is closing the last tactical mile with regard to advanced motorcycle training, Torchia said. Every sportbike rider is required to take the Military Sportbike Rider Course (MSRC), but right now there are about 2,000 sportbike riders who have not completed it. This training has proven value. Nine out of 12 sportbike riders who died in FY11 had not attended the course. Torchia said the MSRC is provided at no cost to Sailors and is designed to be completed during the workday. No leave is required to attend the course. It covers both the different physical handling characteristics and the required mental attitudes for safe operation of these high-performance machines. The MSRC was created after a spike in motorcycle fatalities in 2008, when 33 Sailors lost their lives while riding. After an initial training push, the number fell to 13 in FY2010, but crept up to 16 in FY11. All Hands Club nearing completionConstruction on the NAS Jacksonville All Hands Club, originally slated for completion in late August, is ahead of schedule. According to Public Works Department (PWD) Project Manager Nick Bloomer, The project is approximately 70 percent complete and is expected to be finished sometime late spring. The $6.5 million project will feature a spacious banquet and conference hall, a casual dining restaurant and lounge, an Irish-style Chief Petty Officers pub, and an outdoor performance area. The 25,000-sq.-ft facility will accommodate around 700 guests as well as support staff and will replace The Zone. The building has an unusual profile, designed to mimic aircraft wings. Incorporated in that design are several environmentally friendly features which meet the requirements for silver Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification. The parking lot will use permeable pavers to allow for storm water drainage and collection. The building itself incorporates natural lighting and is walled with insulated concrete forms, which pro vide added insulation, in order to conserve energy. Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to ser vice members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. For more information or to register, call 542-5745. More military positions opened to women Improve your life skills with free knowledge Beginner Rider Course Experienced Rider Course Military Sportbike Rider Course Call for class dates NAS Jax Safety Office 542-2584