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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/01979
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 02-02-2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:01979

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2012 CFC Record Black HistoryTerminal Pros Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Army, Marines to downsizeSpending priorities in the forthcoming fiscal 2013 defense budget request call for reductions in the end strength of the Army and Marine Corps, an increase in special operations forces and maintaining the number of big-deck carriers, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said Jan. 26. The Pentagons budget request is set at $525 billion for fiscal 2013 with an additional $88.4 billion for over seas contingency operations -mostly in Afghanistan. This is down from $531 billion and $115 billion, respectively, in this fiscal year. Defense Department officials used the new defense strategy guidance that President Barack Obama announced earlier this month to shape the budget request, the secretary said. The budget seeks to minimize the impact of cuts on personnel accounts. Service members will receive their full pay raises in fiscal 2013 and 2014, Panetta said. We will achieve some cost savings by providing more limited pay raises beginning in 2015, he added. Health care is another important benefit, and one that has far outpaced inflation. Changes to health care will not affect active duty personnel or their families, Panetta said. We decided that to help control growth of health care costs, we are recommending increases in health care fees, co-pays and deductibles for retirees, he said. But let me be clear that even after these increas es, the cost borne by military retirees will remain below the levels in comparable private-sector plans. Overall, the request puts DoD on the path to save $259 billion over the next five years and $487 billion over the next 10. Panetta called the budget a bal anced, complete package that keeps the American military the pre-eminent force in the world. It is a balanced package, the secretary said, because while some programs are eliminated or delayed, others are increased. The budget looks to re-shape the military to be more agile, quick and flexible that incorporates the lessons learned in 10 years of war, he added. Increasing the number of special operations forc A dozen members of the Keep Jacksonville Beautiful (KJB) Commission toured NAS Jacksonville Jan. 25 to learn about the stations award-win ning environmental and energy initia tives, as well as its operational aviation assets. An affiliate of Keep America Beautiful, the KJB Commission is a grass roots community action and edu cation organization run by volunteer representatives from the public, pri vate and not-for-profit sectors who are appointed by the mayor of Jacksonville. NAS Jacksonville Environmental Director Kevin Gartland has been a KJB Commission member for four years. Its a great organization that supports community beautifica tion, enhances community pride and improves the quality of life in Jacksonville through educational out reach activities and programming, said Gartland. Since many KJB Commission mem bers had not been on board our station in a long time, we gave them a firsthand look at the many environmen tal and energy management initiatives NAS Jax recognizes Sailors of the QuarterNAS Jacksonville recognized nearly 100 of its top Sailors from the base and ten ant commands for the second quarter during the Sailor of the Quarter Luncheon at the NAS Jax Officers Club Jan. 26. Those in the Navy are dealing with a very hectic operational tempo through out the world so I am compelled to recognize some of our very own from NAS Jax who play an integral part in Americas interests in all fronts of the world. Our Sailors are deploying to accomplish Americas deeds, said NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SS) Brad Shepherd. We remain commit ted to carving out a lit tle of our time to recog nize the incredible con tributions and sacrifices of our sharpest Sailors. Sailors of the Quarter, this is your day. We are happy to have you here, to bring this upon you and to share this moment with you, he continued. The Navy Band Southeast A Cappella Quartet performed the national anthem and NAS Jacksonville Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore delivered the invocation. The events guest speaker was AC1(AW/SW) Larry Rose of the NAS Jax Air Operations Department. The Sailor of the Year program was established in 1972 by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo Zumwalt and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy John Whittet to recognize an individual Sailor who best represented the ever-growing group of dedicated professional Sailors at each command and ultimately the Navy, said Rose. Panetta announces budget priorities Keep Jacksonville Beautiful visits station

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Jan. 30 1862 Launching of USS Monitor, the first turreted war ship. Monitor was also the first ironclad warship commis sioned by the U.S. Navy during the American Civil War. 1968 Tet Offensive begins in Vietnam Jan. 31 1944 American amphibious landing on Kwajalein, Marshall Islands 1961 Lt. Cmdr. Samuel Lee Gravely Jr. becomes first African-American to command a combat ship, USS Falgout. 1981 Era of Enlisted Naval Aviators ends as last pilot retires. Feb. 1 1941 U.S. Fleet reorganized, reviving Atlantic and Pacific Fleets. 1942 USS Enterprise and USS Yorktown make first WW II air strike aagainst Japanese Marshall Islands. 1955 Operation Deep Freeze, a multinational research task force to Antarctica consisting of seven ships and 1,800 men, was begun in two stages. The first was to build an airfield at McMurdo Station. Feb. 2 1800 USS Constellation (Capt. Thomas Truxtun) defeats la Vengeance. 1862 USS Hartford, Capt. David G. Farragut, departs Hampton Roads for Mississippi River campaign against Confederate forces. Feb. 3 1801 Senate approves peace treaty with France end ing undeclared naval war that began in 1798. 1917 U.S. severs diplomatic relations with Germany. Feb. 4 1779 John Paul Jones takes command of Bonhomme Richard. 1959 Keel laying of USS Enterprise (CVN 65), first nuclear powered aircraft car rier, in Newport News, Va. Feb. 5 1854 Dedication of first cha pel built on Navy property in Annapolis, Md. 1941 Navy Chief Nurse Marion Olds and Nurse Leona Jackson arrive on Guam. 1971 Moon walk by Capt. Alan Shepherd Jr., commander of Apollo 14 and Cmdr. Edgar Mitchell, lunar module pilot. During the nine-day mis sion, 94 lbs. of lunar material was collected. Shepard also became the first person to hit a golf ball on the moon. Earth recovery was by helicopters from USS New Orleans (LPH11). This project began out of desperation. When my three boysages 5, 9 and 11 said it would be sad to see their Navy dads empty seat at the dinner table while he is away on a yearlong deploy ment, I set out to fill the void. I called it Dinner with the Smileys. For each week that Dad is gone, I told the boys, well invite a guest to fill his chair at the family table. We created a wish list of 52 guests from friends, family and school teach ers to musicians, authors and President Obamaand suddenly, a new dimen sion to the project was clear: Dinner with the Smileys will fill our weeks and mark the time until Dustin returns. I bought a calendar to keep track of the dinners, and our excitement grew when we scheduled guests for May and June and realized wed be halfway through the deployment by then. Yet, the fullness of this project what it could mean to us, and what it might mean to others was still mostly unrecognized. Indeed, one month into Dinner with the Smileys, Im only just beginning to appreciate its many layers. Military spouses around the country have written to say that theyd like to do a Smiley Project of their own when their loved one deploys. I hope that they will. If our first four dinners are any indication, there is much to be gained as a family and as a community. Here are a few notes from our January dinners: A Sense of Community Each week, our special dinners offer my boys the chance to connect with people in the community in a way they never could have if not for the family table. Only when youve passed home made lasagna to the mayor, or when your minister has helped your 5-yearold butter his bread, can you know these people in a way that goes beyond the small talk and pleasantries that usually fill our days. Sen. Collins knows my boys names. Shes seen their fish tank and Lego cre ations. Lindells preschool teacher has met his older brothers and learned their personalities. The mayor played Wii with the boys and listened to stories about their dad. Our minister helped break up a brawl in the living room. He saw the boys rooms. Met their dog. Now he knows where were coming from on Sunday morning. Learning to Give Back Our mayor took the boys in a limo to get 18 scoops of ice cream (Dysarts famous 18 Wheeler). He brought them hats and gifts from the Bangor airport (check out FlyBangor.com to see where we send Monty the Moose!). And Dysarts didnt let the boys leave without T-shirts and a trip to see the ice cream machine. At the end of the evening, one of my boys asked why people want to be so nice to us. It was an opportunity to tell them about Americans appreciation for the sacrifices of military families. All three boys were visibly proud to know that they are part of their dads serviceto-country, too. And then Ford said, I think we should find someone to be nice to also. If the idea had not come from their own overflowing cup, Im not sure the lesson would have stuck. (In February: Dinner with the Smileys hits the road to give back and help others.) But there have been other intangible or almost imperceptible gifts as well: The ministers talk about the impor tance of family. The way his wife lis tened intently to the boys stories. The preschool teachers handwritten, thoughtful note to Dustin. The senators time. The mayors baseball stories. Soon, these gifts will overflow, too. And they will be repaid in a way much like they were given that no one really notices except in hindsight. Anyone Can Do This I know what youre thinking: Not everyone can do this, Sarah. Yes you can. You dont have to invite a senator or the mayor, but you can invite someone. Dinner time is the loneliest part of the day for people separated from their loved ones, either by military service or death. If houses and apartments were like doll houses, with one side totally exposed, wed see plenty of people eat ing alone to the sound of a television. All you have to do is extend an invita tion. But, Sarah, my house is a mess, I dont cook, and my children have really bad manners. Did I mention that my older boys had a true, rolling-on-the-ground fight when our minister was over for dinner? Or that Im serving our guests things like lasagna, chicken and boiled noo dles, and broccoli that was left on the stove too long? There is nothing fancy or impressive about Dinner with the Smileys (well, except for that limo ride). Because its not about the food. Or the house. Its about the opportunity to know each other better. And sometimes that cant happen until one kid in a cloak has wielded his light saber against another kid in his Mario costume. Wondering whos coming next? Follow along at http://www.facebook. com/sarah.is.smiley where youll find pictures of past dinners and hints about who will be next. Renew your DoD sticker onlineFor those wishing to renew Department of Defense decals online, please go to: www.pid.cnic. navy.mil. You must ensure that you have your vehicle license number, drivers license number and all insurance information prior to starting the pro cess. Please follow up with the base security office by calling 542-4529/30. The Naval Legal Service Office Southeast/NAS Jacksonville Tax Resource Center is now open in Building 13 at the main gate for free self-service resources for active duty and retired personnel to prepare federal and state income tax returns. This year, the Navy is providing a self-service Tax Resource Center. The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA) center will be equipped with eight computer stations where customers prepare their own tax returns using free online programs with the assistance of volunteers. The recommended program for use by the U.S. Navy is Military OneSources H&R Block at Home. Unlike previous years, no electronic filing will be done on behalf of customers. Some of the websites include: Turbotax.intuit.com/Taxfeedom WWW.Taxslayer.com/Military/Default.aspx WWW.file2011taxes.newt/?cd=filing_Military Who is eligible to use the Tax Resource Center? all active-duty service members and their dependents all retirees and their dependents reservists on active duty for more than 30 days reservists within 30 days of demobilization and reservists involved in pre-mobilization What to bring to the Tax Resource Center: all 2011 W-2s and 1099s copies of social security cards for taxpayers and dependents taxpayer(s) military ID cards bank account numbers and routing numbers any other tax records including copies of 2010 tax returns if available Where and when: The resource Center is located in top of Building 13 (outside the Yorktown Gate).: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 8 a.m. 4 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Note: Computer access at the Tax Resource Center will be purely on a walk-in basis. For more information, call 542-8039. Dinner with the Smileys January recapFree tax preparation available on base 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Hey, MoneyChic! My wife and I are determined to pay our way out of debt in 2011. This is a goal we have discussed at length and are determined to make it happen. Do you have any tips that might help us stay on track? MoneyChic says: You have already taken the most important steps when it comes to climbing out of debt. First is identifying the problem itself and then decid ing to do something about it. I really like how you and your wife has discussed this matter. It sounds as if you are working at this debt-management goal as a team, which is imperative for success. Here are some tips from author Peter Walsh, who is a subject matter expert on honoring and respecting your relationship with money. thought about it for at least 48 hours. Ask yourself why you need to buy this and, more importantly, how youll pay for it. credit cards for emergencies only. example, that must be discussed with your partner. outright, then you dont need it. Make this a hard-andfast rule. Congrats on your mutual decision to become debt free! Thats my two cents. Another record set by givers to 2011 CFCThe 2011 Northeast Florida/Southeast Georgia Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) wrapped up Jan. 25 with a celebration at the NAS Jacksonville Officers Club. This years campaign generated $2.1 million in con tributions, which will be distributed among a variety of non-profit organizations. It was the 12th consecu tive year that the campaign generated more than $2 million. The ceremony began with comments by Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast. Id just like to thank everyone who participated this year those who contributed, as well as those who helped coordinate, Scorby said. The CFC is a program where a small, indi vidual con tribution can have a major impact through the combined efforts of many and Im proud to say we were able to accomplish that once more during this years cam paign. During the ceremony, CFC Regional Director John Smith presented certificates and plaques to commands that made significant contri butions. The leading contributor was NAS Jacksonville with more than $600,000 in contributions. While NAS Jacksonville is typically the leading con tributor due to its dense population of military and government employees, it was the combined effort of coordinators and contributors throughout the region that made the 2011 campaign a success. NAS Jacksonville is typically our biggest contribu tor, but we have program coordinators throughout the region whose efforts are monumental, Smith said. Theyre the ones who are going out there and asking for contributions, which is crucial because the main reason people dont give is because they are not asked. Each year, federal employees throughout the world come together to support more than 42,000 CFC-sponsored charities that contribute to a variety of causes ranging from animal rights to psychological research. All charities are verified taxexempt, non-profit organizations. The CFC is held from Sept. 1 through Dec. 15 and supports more than 2,400 national and international charities, and approximately 40,000 local charities. For more information about the Northeast Florida/ Southeast Georgia CFC, visit www.nefl-sega-cfc.org. For more information about the CFC in general, visit www.opm.gov/cfc. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012 For the 24 military mem bers working at the Air Mobility Command (AMC) Passenger Terminal aboard NAS Jacksonville, provid ing outstanding customer service is top priority. With approximately 33,600 people transiting through the termi nal each year on nearly 2,500 flights, the Sailors work hard to ensure passengers are pro cessed, screened and boarded efficiently as they continue on their journeys. We strive to provide the best customer service we can. This means keeping the termi nal clean, ensuring our equip ment is working properly, flight information is accurate and up to date and all the passen ger paperwork is complete, said ABH1(AW/SW) Nnamdi Emenogu of the NAS Jax Air Operations Department, who manages the terminal. I think the services they provide are just fine and the flights are usually on time. And, there are always people at the counter to assist you. The waiting area is nice and has vending machines, TVs and WiFi, said Lt. Mike Turanitza of Deployable Operation Group in Arlington, Va. We are open seven days as week, normally from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. and split our staff into two shifts. Many times we have late flights coming in so our second shift will cover those. We have a great team here. Everyone is trained to be independent enough to be able to run the terminal and know every job, he continued. Each morning, the Sailors pull up the flight schedule from message traffic from the Joint Operational Support Airlift Center (JOSAC) at Scott Air Force Base. JOSAC is the joint scheduling activ ity that arranges and coordi nates all airlift requests with in the Continental United States. They also check flight schedules from the Navy Air Logistics Office which handles overseas airlifts originating or terminating in the U.S. We look at three days out because the flights tend to change. Once we get a sched ule of what is coming and going from NAS Jax, we update the rolling screen in the terminal, telephone recordings and the website, said Emenogu. Then we input the flights into our system and input our Space A passenger lists. We also handle the rotator flights to and from NS Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. These are regularly scheduled flights that are contracted to commercial airlines. The rotator flights to Cuba originate in Baltimore or Norfolk, Va. and stop at NAS Jax every other Tuesday and each Saturday to pick up passengers and cargo. They fly back through those after noons, again picking up pas sengers headed north. Because they are contracted flights, there is a charge to fly unless on official military orders. The paperwork involved in handling these flights is quite extensive as we have to keep track of everyone and every thing on these aircraft. We are also responsible for collecting the fees. Last year, we took in $216,000 in flight fees, said Emenogu. All cargo including luggage for passengers is handled by a seven-man team from Empire Aircraft Services Inc (EASI). We palletize and handle all cargo on all the flights coming and going at NAS Jacksonville seven days a week. Its a busy job; we handle about 100,000 pounds of cargo monthly, said EASI Cargo Manager Sam Breen, who has worked here the past 15 years. Many military members, retirees and their families also travel for free on military aircraft on whats known as Space A (availability) flights. Anyone with a valid military ID card can hop on a military flight providing there is room, including cargo planes. It may not be the best idea for those on a strict time schedule, but if you have the time and a little NAS Jax Air Terminal staff keeps passengers moving

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012 5 patience, a free flight to Europe, Asia or Hawaii might just be worth it. The process is relatively simple. Just check the flight schedule and sign up via the Space A form. Once a trav eler is in the system, they are assigned a category which prioritizes them for flights for both stateside and interna tional travel. There is a priority list with spe cific categories as to who gets to fly first. Active duty military members and their families on orders, and service members and civilians stationed over seas on emergency leave travel first, followed by active-duty, families and civilians on Environmen-tal and Morale Leave (EML) and DoD teachers during the school year. Category three is for active-duty members and their families on regu lar leave or house-hunt ing orders. Category four includes fam ily members over the age of 18 travel ing without a sponsor on EML and DoD teachers during sum mer break. Category five is for those on no-cost TAD orders and students whose spon sor is sta tioned in Alaska or Hawaii. Retirees and Reservists fall into the last category. Family members of active duty and retirees are also allowed to fly provid ed they are accompanied by a spon sor. Sponsors who register in person for family members traveling with them should present all required docu ments: identification cards, passports, immunization records, and visas when required by the DoD Foreign Clearance Guide. Travel documents must be presented when selected for travel. Uniforms are not required for military flights but pas sengers must be in appropriate civilian clothing. Passengers are allowed to check two pieces of baggage, 70 pounds each, and one carry on and one personal item. We abide by TSA guidelines on what passengers can take on a flight. Meals are not normally provided on mili tary flights so you may want to bring snacks, however liquids are limited, said Emenogu. Most AMC passenger terminals close at night. Space A travelers should be prepared to defray billeting expens es. Peak travel times are DecemberJanuary and during the summer so plan accordingly, have money in case you need to make alternative travel and be patient. Weve used Space A to travel all over the world. Its a great deal and the Navy is the best. They always provide great hospitality wherever we go. This is our first time in this area, and we are really impressed by the service the Sailors here have given us. The people who work here are always smiling and provide us with lots of information, said Army retiree Saturnino Castro and his wife, Irene, who are from Seattle. A lot of people dont know much about Space A traveling. Its a great benefit and its $free.99. We are here to help them get where they need to go they just need to call for information, said Emenogu. To check on flights flying in and out of NAS Jacksonville, call the Air Terminal at 542-3825/3956/8165 or go to: https:// www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville/About/ SpaceATravel/FlightSchedule/index. htm. TERMINAL: here to help them get where they need to go Photos by Kaylee LaRocque

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Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) has announced NAS Jacksonville and NAS Jacksonville Transient Personnel Unit/Pre-Trial Confinement Facility as winners of the 2011 CNIC Retention Excellence Award. This award is given to those commands earning two or more quarterly honor roll awards during the fiscal year or meeting annual benchmarks and achieving a passing grade of 85 points or better on the Career Development Program review. The annual reenlistment rate benchmarks were 59 per cent for Zone A, 66 percent for Zone B and 72 percent for Zone C and command attrition for Zone A must be equal or less than 5.5 percent. Zone A applies to first term ers or those who have been enlisted less than six years. Zone B applies to middle management or those who have been in the Navy from six to 10 years and Zone C are upper management or those who have been enlisted for 10-16 years. Every quarter, the Navy looks at installation reten tion statistics and we hit those marks throughout the year. The reason retention rates are so important is because new initiatives such as Enlisted Retention Board and Perform to Serve (PTS). As the Navy downsizes, Sailors have to work much harder to stay in, said NC1(AW) Natalie France of the NAS Jax Career Counselor Office. When they report on board, they sit down with the com mand master chief, command and departmental career coun selors to discuss their goals. We stress the importance of going to college, being competitive on their evals, staying out of trouble so they dont lose their security clearances, commu nity involvement and what the command expects from them, France continued. The base and department career counselors are part of a retention team and hold training monthly to discuss how they can better help their Sailors achieve their military goals. We try to keep the Sailors focused on their goals and help them become the best Sailors possible, said France. And, we rely on command leadership to be involved in their Sailors careers by guid ing them on the best path for advancement and retention. Last year, 95 Sailors were reenlisted at NAS Jax after obtaining PTS approval. Its gotten a lot tougher to stay in but we have a really great team here. This is a difficult award to achieve and weve done a really good job by keeping our reten tion team members current on new guidelines so they can better assist their Sailors and retain them, added France. According to CNIC Vice Adm. Michael Vitale, this award demonstrates the out standing teamwork by instal lations to positively support its Sailors in their military career endeavors. Your dedication and com mitment to career motivation and excellence not only exem plify your superb performance, but also attest to your concern for the personal and profes sional needs of our Sailors. Every member of your com mand can be justifiably proud of their achievements. Thank you for the great work that you are doing to make CNIC and our Navy organizations where people enjoy coming to work everyday, said Vitale in a message to the winning com mands. NAS Jacksonville honored for retention RAO keeps retirees updatedThe Retired Activities Office (RAO) mission is to assist military retirees, family members, survivors, and active military contemplating retirement. The NAS Jax RAO is located in the Fleet and Family Support Center at Enterprise Ave. and Child St. It serves North Florida military retirees and families. RAO provides assistance and counseling on current retiree related matters. The office is open from 10 a.m.2 p.m. weekdays and 1-4 p.m. on Wednesdays. For more information, call 542-5790. 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Teen dating violence is a serious problem in our community. Dating violence occurs between two people in a close relationship and can include physical, emotional or sexual violence. Many teens do not report it because they are afraid to tell friends and fam ily. This type of abuse usually starts with teasing and name-calling or things that teens may consider nor mal. Teens who are victims are more like ly to be depressed and perform poorly in school. They also may engage in unhealthy behaviors, such as using drugs or alcohol and are more likely to have eating disorders than youth that are not experiencing abuse. As a result of the abuse, some teens think about or attempt suicide. Unhealthy relationships can start early and last a lifetime. Statistics show that teens that are victimized in high school have a higher chance of being victimized in college. February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, but is an everyday issue so we should address it on a reg ular basis. The ultimate goal is to stop dating violence before it starts. If your child is dating and is in an unhealthy relationship or you need tools to help prevent dating violence, there are resources and informa tion available for you and your teen such as Choose Respect Initiative at www.cdc.gov/chooserespect, Dating Matters: Understanding Teen Dating Prevention at www.vetoviolence.org/ datingmatters. You may also seek counseling for your child at the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) by speaking with one of the domestic abuse victim advocates by calling 542-5745. The FFSC will be offering two briefs on teen dating violence the following days and times: Center; Conference Room. Everyone is welcome to attend. The Military Saves campaign is a growing net work of organizations and individuals committed to helping military members and their loved ones build personal savings arsenals to provide for their immedi ate and long-term financial needs, said NAS Jax FFSC Financial Educator Rufus Bundrige. Military Saves was developed and tested by its non-profit sponsor, Consumer Federation of America in partnership with the military services. Launched throughout the Department of Defense (DoD) in 2007, it is part of two larger campaigns the DoD Financial Readiness Campaign and the national America Saves campaign, he explained. While it is an ongoing campaign, the entire mili tary community comes together to focus on financial readiness during Military Saves Week in February. The campaigns lifeblood is in its partner orga nizations that see the value in working together to empower members, employees, customers, and cli ents to become financially stable through saving, debt reduction and wealth-building over time, concluded Bundrige. The following sessions will be offered at the VP-30 auditorium in support of Military Saves Week, Feb. 21-24: Tuesday, Feb. 21 9-9:15 a.m. Military Saves kick-off with Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. 9:15-9:45 a.m. Reduce your risks of foreclosure. 9:45-10:15 a.m. If you have to separate (What you and your Sailors need to know.) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Tuition assistance and the Post9/11 GI Bill. Wednesday, Feb. 22 9-9:45 a.m. How to exit the military with one mil lion dollars. 9:45-10:15 a.m. Paying less for loans through credit reporting. 10:15-10:45 a.m. Free money through budgeting. 3:30-4 p.m. Finances for youths (at Youth Activities Center.) Thursday, Feb. 23 9-9:45 a.m. Money Management 9:45-10:15 a.m. Investing for ages 20 and older. 10:15-10:45 a.m. Investing for ages 40 and older. 2:30-3 p.m. Story reading for pre-schoolers (at Child Development Center.) Friday, Feb. 25 9-9:45 a.m. Best deals in car buying. 9:45-10:30 a.m. Strategies for first-time home buy ers. For this new year, Im going to change something for the better in my diet. I decided to reduce my salt (sodium) intake. Did you know Feb. 1-7 is National Salt Awareness Week? You may not have appreciated how much good you can do for yourself by passing on the salt shaker. Q: How much salt should I eat every day? About one teaspoon is all the U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends. Eating one handful of pretzel sticks will give you about half of all the salt you should eat in a day. Q: Does it really make any difference if I eat a lot of salt? Short answer: YES. A decrease of 1 tea spoon of salt a day was associated with a 23 percent lower rate of strokes and up to 17 per cent less total cardiovascular disease accord ing to a recent Italian study. Americans typically eat about two tea spoons of salt a day, or nearly twice the rec ommended amount. The American Medical Association recommends a society wide approach to lowering salt intake. Awareness of the need to reduce salt is just starting to come to the surface. National Salt Awareness Week an example of the effort to get people to understand the problem with consuming excessive amounts of salt. Excessive salt intake increases blood pressure, which has a direct impact on car diovascular and stroke risk. So think seriously about removing the salt shaker from your dinner table. Look at what you eat and drink to ensure you are not consuming excessive amounts of salt. Its a small step but one that could be an important way to reduce your risk of cardiac problems. Military Saves events scheduled at VP-30 auditoriumTeen dating violence is serious issue Please dont pass the salt shaker JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012 7

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BUDGET: Secretary of State announces military cuts, realignmentsSOQ: Quarterly leaders recognized TOUR: Environmental group celebrates partnership with NAS Jaxes is key to the plan, Panetta said, and special operators will begin to shift back to their tra ditional pre-9/11 mission of instructing local forces. The request puts the Army on a path to drop to 490,000 soldiers and the Marine Corps to 182,000 Marines over five years. Currently, the two ser vices have 562,000 and 202,000 active-duty members, respec tively. The secretary noted this is still higher than the numbers on 9/11. The budget treats the reserve components very carefully, Panetta said. After a decade of being an integral part of Americas wars, the reserve components will not go back to being a strategic Cold War-era reserve. The reserves will be the nations hedge against the unexpected, the secretary said. We are making only mar ginal reductions in the Army Reserve and Army National Guard, and no reductions in the Marine Corps Reserve, the secretary said. The Air Force will make balanced reduc tions in the Air Guard that are consistent with reductions in the active component and Air Force Reserve. The request also calls for more base realignments and closures, and a BRAC-like authority to recommend changes to military retire ment. But the president and department have made clear that the retirement benefits of those who currently serve will be protected by grandfathering their benefits, Panetta said. The budget maintains the current U.S. focus in the Central Command region and increases American commit ment to the Pacific Command area of operations. The request looks to maintain the Navys current 11 aircraft carriers and 10 carrier air wings, Panetta said. It will also maintain the current Marine and Army pos ture in the Asia-Pacific region, and will base littoral com bat ships in Singapore and Bahrain. The budget will eliminate two forward-based Army heavy brigades in Europe. Instead, brigades will rotate in and out of the area. The United States and European allies also will look to share costs for new capabilities such as the alli ance ground surveillance pro gram. The Navy will retire seven older cruisers and two amphib ious ships early, and the Air Force will eliminate six tactical air squadrons. The budget sinks more money into technologies to prevail in an anti-access, aerial-denial scenario and will fund the next-generation bomber and modernization of the submarine fleet. The F-35 joint strike fighter is key to maintaining domain superiority, and the military remains committed to the pro gram, Panetta said. But in this budget, we have slowed pro curement to complete more testing and allow for develop mental changes before buying in significant quantities, he added. The budget will maintain all legs of the nuclear triad bombers, ICBMs and subma rines and will invest in sig nificantly more capability in the cyber world, Panetta said. Panetta stressed the budget is based on strategy and will shape the force for the future. While the pain of cuts will be felt across the country, he said, it will also ensure a strong, agile military for the future. The budget must pass Congress, and the secretary said he hopes members of Congress understand the strat egy and nuances of the budget. My hope is that when mem bers understand the sacri fice involved in reducing the defense budget by half a tril lion dollars, it will convince Congress to avoid sequestra tion, a further round of cuts that would inflict severe dam age to our national defense for generations, Panetta said. So what does this mean to me? Behind its title is the staggering weight of nearly 40 years of hard-charging Sailors illuminating a trail for others to follow. Its legacy is both professionally satisfying and a humbling bestowment; one that challenges those who already lean forward in the foxhole, to learn further. To give until there is nothing left, and then give more, he continued. This is not a personal accomplishment, however. Behind every achievement lies an incredible group of Sailors who stand the watch every day, setting the standard for NAS Jacksonville. These Sailors drive our division through a daily myriad of watch bills, assignments and on-the-spot tasks that would not be possible without their per severance and I am grateful to lead them. Receiving this award is an accomplishment of every ATC Division Sailor and I am proud to represent them, Rose stated. None of this would be possible without the support of my wife, Kim, and daughters, Reagan and Kadence. Through inspections, long hours and meetings, my family stood the watch ensuring the home front was safe and secure to that I may return every day to continue the mission, said Rose. Receiving this award gives voice to my familys contributions and sacrifices to my career and it is an honor to accept on their behalf. Following lunch, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders thanked the Sailors. You are leaders in your command. Once you get to the level where you are des ignated Sailor of the Quarter, you are now the pride of your command, he said. Your command leadership and the Sailors within your command are looking to each of you to change things for the better. So go forth and do great things! Sanders then presented each SOQ an envelope with a gift card from VyStar Credit Union. The event was sponsored by USAA and Navy Mutual Aid Association. I am so grateful to be here today and be recognized because we have a lot of patrol men who deserve this same honor. I love my command and really appreciate this, said NAS Jax Blue Jacket of the Quarter MASN Vernon Colbert. I think its wonderful to be honored. Ive never been part of something like this before and its nice to know that someone gave me the recognition for my hard work. Its wonderful to be here! added MM2(SW) Elizabeth CruzGarcia of Transient Personnel Unit/Pre-Trial Confinement Facility Jax. that the station has integrated into itsmission, operations and plan ning. He added, Our bus tour took them along the entire flight line before stopping at Hangar 1122, which is home to the anti-submarine warfare helicopter squadron HSL 42 Proud Warriors and whose Sailors supported the KJB cleanup of Hogans Creek last October. The leadership of NAS Jax and its tenant commands value our Sailors participation in this important environmental partner ship with the City of Jacksonville. Anna Dooley, executive director of Greenscape, said, This is my first visit to the base and I must admit that it was far more interest ing than I had imagined and I know we only visited a portion of the facility. She told Gartland, I applaud your environmental efforts. The personnel we interacted with today were most knowledgeable and inspiring for their environmental commitment. Today was enlight ening and exciting. My Dad was a sailor in World War II and now I feel that I can better understand the pride of our local Navy commu nity. Thank you for all you do for our city and our country. KJB Executive Coordinator Vivian Harrell commented, Keep Jacksonville Beautiful Commission members greatly enjoyed the tour today. We learned a lot and could relate to it both individually and collectively. All of you are passionate and gave us an excellent, professional tour. We appreciate everyone who participated in mak ing the tour a success. Were thankful for our military and proud of NAS Jacksonville personnel. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Lt. Myles McAllister, a pilot from VP-30, and his family recent ly spent a short stint at Wolfson Childrens Hospital where his newborn son was receiving care. Wolfson Childrens Hospital was opened in 1955 as a place for all children to be admitted and treat ed without regard to religion, race or financial position. That original mission remains in force today at the Jacksonville institution. Because of space constraints, the McAllisters were assigned a room on the fifth floor; the Oncology Department. Seeing children battle cancer and witnessing first-hand their courage and the strength of their families made a dramatic impression on McAllister. I cannot begin to tell you the struggle these children and their families face. I think we can make a difference in this fight, he explained to peers at his com mand. In an effort to reciprocate the goodwill his family received while staying at Wolfson, he orga nized a project to collect toys for children at the hospital. The junior officers of VP-30 accepted his chal lenge and collected a tri-wall full of toys in less than two weeks. Five members of the VP-30 Wardroom then teamed up to deliver the toys to Wolfson Childrens Hospital. The group loaded the toys into a truck and drove to the hospital, where a vol unteer welcomed them. The VP-30 pilots were given a tour through the oncology, respiratory, and gen eral care floors, where they were able to choose age and gender appropriate toys from the collec tion to present to patients. Lt. Mike Windham reflected on the experience. Visiting the chil dren and their families at Wolfson was a truly humbling experience. As a parent of a special needs child, Ive experienced firsthand the dedicated care and compas sion of the staff members and the resources they provide. A quick visit, even from a stranger in uni form, seemed well received by all, he said. The VP-30 representatives were very impressed with the facil ity, and good nature and energy of the hospital staff who manage to keep an upbeat attitude despite the challenges of their day to day work in the face of such debilitat ing afflictions. VP-30 aviators visit hospital, brighten childrens day JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012 9

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Dr. Carter G. Woodson lived and wrote in a time when America consid ered itself to be Anglo-White. AfricanAmericans were kept apart from the rest of American society. At best, they were treated as second-class citizens. Woodson, in combating such degra dation and to promote the value of African-American history, began pub lishing the Journal of Negro History in 1916. The observation of Negro History Week, an initiative led by Woodson to recognize the contributions of AfricanAmericans to our country, began in 1926. Its goal was to foster a better understanding of the African-American experience. He choose thesecond week of February to coincide with the birthdays of abolitionist Frederick Douglass and President Abraham Lincoln, two people who had dramatic impact on the lives of African-Americans. The observation was expanded to include the whole month in 1976, and has since become commonly referred to as Black History or African-American History Month. It is celebrated and rec ognized as a Department of Defense national observance. In Woodsons book, The MisEducation of the Negro (1933), he ten ders information about his life expe riences with some of his fellow edu cated negroes. He decried that some of his fellow African-Americans would not buy goods and services from black businessmen, because the educated African-American was taught that the black person had no value. Educated African-Americans went back to their community ill-equipped to teach each other, for they acquired a disdain for their own. Thus, they became miseducated. Woodson saw the education that the African-American practiced in his time as oppressive. He believed in self-reliance as a major component of self-respect, making the black person rise above their situation by their own merit, and developing the AfricanAmericans natural gifts whatever they may be. Only by becoming self-reliant and self-respecting would the black race be contributors to American soci ety. The American culture and the mili tary have made quite a transformation since Woodson published his first book in 1916. President Harry S. Truman implemented Executive Order 9981 in 1948, which desegregated the military. Today, the image of America is not a monolithic white-only culture but a multicultural pluralistic soci ety. Instead of melting other cultures into the melting pot to form one pre ferred culture, America has become a nation in which the various cultures are appreciated for their contribu tions to enhance our country. Now the American dream is open to all persons of various nationalities, races, cultures and creeds. Carter G. Woodsons impact on Black History Month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012 11

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Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation (WOASF) is now accepting pre-qualification forms for its scholar ships. WOASF, a 501(c) (3) non-profit foundation, annually sponsors more than forty scholarships ranging from $2,000$10,000 to students who have chosen to pursue their undergraduate college education. Scholarship recipients are selected on the basis of scholastic merit, communi ty service and extracurricular activities. Last year, WOASF awarded over $85,000 and this year hopes to award $100,000. WOASF is a worldwide organization and has scholars from throughout the U.S. and abroad. Our mission is to provide college scholarships to dependent children and spouses of U.S. Navy personnel having service in naval aviation commands; officer and enlisted, active duty, retired, honorably discharged or deceased. The foundation has proudly awarded over $530,000 to outstanding students since 1987. The foundation is funded solely through the generous contributions of private and corporate sources. For more information on eligibil ity and application process, please visit www.wingsoveramerica.us or call 757671-3200 Ext. 2. The pre-qualification deadline is March 1 and the application deadline is April 1.Wings Over America scholarship available It was only a few short years after American Physicist Theodore Maiman developed the laser in 1960 that Gene Roddenberry created Star Trek, a futur istic television series set on the Starship Enterprise where laser pistols were standard issue. Today, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) is collabo rating with Northrop Grumman Laser Systems based in Apopka, Fla., to main tain, repair and upgrade lasers installed in Forward Looking InfraRed (FLIR) turrets on military aircraft to detect, identify and track tactical targets. FRCSE established a public-private partnership with Northrop Grumman in April 2010, which unites the inno vation and responsiveness of private industry with the expertise and capac ity at FRCSE. It also allows the U.S. gov ernment to maintain depot-level repair capabilities on Navy core weapons sys tems. Assistant Avionics Product Manager Chris Kopp said Northrop Grumman and FRCSE have dual repair capac ity to accelerate repair cycle times for improved support to the fleet. We want them to do well, and they want us to do well, he said. Yet, most manufacturers are hesitant to share proprietary technical data, which includes the enormous costs of research and development. The government cant afford to buy the datadrawings, test specifications, parts listings, maintenance manuals, engineering specificationsall the documentation a facility would need to repair a piece of gear, he said. Kopp said collaborating with Northrop Grumman allowed FRCSE access to the proprietary information. The relationship evolved over time into a win-win partnership that resulted in the formal alliance. It began in late 2009 when three FRCSE electronics mechanics trained for three months at the Northrop Grumman factory near Orlando. Dean Ramsey, Cathy Cornioli and Jeffrey Brown learned the skills needed to align, repair, assemble, and final test the makers laser assembly. Air Data Systems Supervisor Raymond Rivera said FRCSE created a controlled environment called the laser clean room. Technicians must wear Dacron polyester smocks sewn with synthetic thread, boots, hairnets and beard guards to prevent contaminat ing the laser. He said the technicians routinely check the rooms air quali ty to ensure particle readings are well below 10,000 particles per cubic foot, the approved standard. Electronics Mechanic Supervisor Bob Early said Northrop Grumman has asked FRCSE to process 12 lasers per month, up from 10 and expected to increase by years end. I think we are doing equal or a few more repairs than they are, and I only see it growing, he said. They are very satisfied with our work. Early said FLIR turrets made by Raytheon Company, also repaired at FRCSE, house the laser assemblies. The Navys H-60 helicopters utilize nosemounted AN/AAS-44 FLIR /laser des ignator systems. The Air Forces MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) utilize AN/AAS52 and the AN/DAS-1 Multispectral Targeting Systems (MTS) respectively, to aid with surveillance and reconnais sance missions. Jeff Means, Northrop Grumman MTS program manager, said it has been a very successful partnership. Northrop Grummans laser facility employs 14 technicians who provide the touch labor with nine of those working as laser technicians. The FRCSE tech nicians have repaired more than 100 lasers since the programs startup in April 2010. They have exceeded my expecta tions, and they continue to improve, said Means. Based on the plans going forward, Im looking at 120 to 130 repairs for 2012. The repair require ments are driven by the heavy use of UAV MTS systems but represent only a fraction of our annual laser production volume. FLIR systems determine the bearing, course and speed of a target by viewing the scene as an infrared image, regard less of weather conditions. This systems capabilities enhance night navigation, target detection and recognition, and search and rescue operations.FRCSE repairs lasers, improves turnaround time to fleet Working together for stronger, healthier babiesa CFC participant Provided as a public service marchofdimes.com 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Its a common misperception that the Navy Housing Program only serves those who either live in or who want to live in on-base housing. While that is a large part of its services, the program offers much more. Customer support for the Navy Housing Program is provided through the installation Housing Service Center (HSC) and is available to single and married service members, military families, and Department of Defense (DoD) civilians. The HSCs are staffed with trained professionals who are experts in pro viding housing services and locating homes and neighborhoods desired by the customer in the private sector, in privatized housing (PPV), or in govern ment owned or leased housing. Home-finding services offered by the HSC include community housing list ings, housing needs counseling, find ing homes to rent or buy, showing ser vices, roommate finder, lease and sales reviews, processing applications for government or privatized housing, and even translation services overseas. Its not too soon to start plan ning your next move, says Housing Management Specialist Lea Williford at Navy Region Southeast. Our staff can get information for you on your next duty station. If you are not sure of your next duty station, but you know there are three possibilities, we can provide you information on all three. Our goal is to make the housing process less stress ful. Beyond finding housing, the HSC offers assistance with landlord and ten ant disputes, complaint resolution, and PPV mediation. Think of the HSC staff as your advo cate, says Janice Thompson, housing management specialist at Navy Region Southeast. Our staff is trained to help you with both the small and big issues that might arise with the housing you are living in. For residents living in PPV housing, the HSC is available to assist with unre solved problems between the resident and the PPV property management partner. You always have options, according to Williford. If you are unhappy with the results of the partner to resolve your issues, contact the HSC for assistance. Additionally, the HSC provides infor mation about utility deposit waiver pro grams, local schools, and local Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) pro grams, services and events. Most HSCs in Navy Region Southeast are located on the installation and cus tomers are welcome to stop by during normal business hours. Additional information about Navy housing can be obtained on the Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) website at http://cnic.navy.mil/CNIC_HQ_Site/ WhatWeDo/FleetandFamilyReadiness/ Housing/index.htm.Navy Housing Program: your first resource for housing on and off base With the release of NAVADMIN 036/12 on Jan. 27, Sailors are reminded of eligibility requirements for Involuntary Separation Pay (ISP) that Navy Reserve requirements. Career counselors can assist Sailors on applying for affilia tion in conjunction with ISP. Sailors who apply for ISP must obligate in the Ready Reserve for a minimum of three years past their military service obligation. The Ready Reserve has two branches, the Selected Reserve (SELRES) and Individual Ready Reserve (IRR). The SELRES consists of drilling reservists and units. Reservists are available for recall to active duty status. SELRES typically fulfill the tra ditional service commitment of one weekend a month and two weeks a year. The IRR offers Reserve affili ation benefits without the SELRES drill requirements or Reserve pay. Sailors in the IRR have to maintain mobilization readi ness and must keep the Navy informed of address changes or conditions that may affect their readiness. SELRES billets are limited. ISP Sailors E3 through E6 can apply for a quota via Performto-Serve/Fleet RIDE. Once approved, contact the Career Transition Office to complete the process. If a quota is not available, Sailors can request to affiliate with the IRR. Sailors who affiliates with the IRR must have their com mand complete a NAVPERS 1070/613 form and send it to their personnel office. This must be accomplished before separating to ensure payment. If a signed Reserve affilia tion contract is not complet ed prior to separation, Sailors must petition the Board of Correction for Naval Records to receive ISP. Sailors who collect ISP and later qualify and collect a military retirement must repay their ISP upon retire ment. The Defense Finance and Accounting Service will reduce retirement pay until the amount is repaid.Involuntary separation pay eligibility requirements reminder for Sailors JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012 13

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Flight Line Caf team to participate in CNIC competition CS2(SW) Marnika Ash and CS2(SW) Alex Moleon of the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf, demon strated their passion, flair and culinary skills while participating in a culi nary competition train ing/cook-off at the First Coast Technical College Jan. 17-20. The training was held to prepare Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) culinary spe cialists in pay grades E-6 and below for the upcoming Commander, Navy Installation Commands fourth annual Performance Development Week and Culinary Competition. Teams from NS Guantanamo Bay Cuba, NS Mayport and NAS Jacksonville competed by preparing their best five-star meal to include a salad, appetizer and main course. The special ingredients used were shrimp and Cornish hen. As the first place win ners, the duo will repre sent CNRSE at the annu al competition in San Diego, March 4-10. Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their fami lies. Preregistration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handi capped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. For more information or to register, call 542-5745. Improve your life skills with free knowledge 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Commander, United States Fleet Forces (USFF) and Commander, Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM) will lead the East Coasts largest joint and multinational amphibious assault exercise in the past ten years, officials announced Jan. 25. Exercise Bold Alligator 2012 (BA12) will revitalize Navy and Marine Corps amphibious expeditionary tactics, tech niques and procedures, and reinvigo rate its culture of conducting combined Navy and Marine Corps operations from the sea. The exercise will run Jan. 30 through Feb. 12, ashore and afloat, in and off the coasts of Virginia, North Carolina and Florida. BA12 will be a live and synthetic, scenario-driven, simulation-sup ported exercise designed to train Expeditionary Strike Group 2 (ESG 2), 2d Marine Expeditionary Brigade (2d MEB) and Carrier Strike Group 12. Staffs will plan and execute a MEBsized amphibious assault from a sea base in a medium land-and-maritime threat environment to improve naval amphibious core competencies. Amphibious forces are a critical ele ment of maritime power projection that ought to be a high priority for support, even in a resource constrained environ ment, because they are a cost-effective option for accomplishing a wide range of military operations, said Adm. John Harvey, commander, USFF. Units involved include the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group (CSG), Expeditionary Strike Group 2 (ESG-2), 2d Marine Expeditionary Brigade (MEB), Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group (ARG), 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), Naval Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC) as well as various other ships and units. Nine countries are participating in exercise BA12, providing maritime, land and air units or observers. The countries participating with the U.S. forces are Australia, Canada, France, Italy, Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain and the United Kingdom. One of the exercises priorities is to incorporate lessons learned over the past 10 years of challenging combat operations, overseas contingency oper ations, humanitarian assistance/disas ter relief (HA/DR), noncombatant evac uation operations (NEO) and homeland defense. The exercise will focus on the funda mental aspects and roles of amphibious operations to improve amphibious force readiness and proficiency for executing the six core capabilities of the Maritime Strategy forward presence, deterrence, sea control, power projection, maritime security and humanitarian assistance/ disaster response. In todays world, the Navy-Marine Corps team must remain capable of gaining access to an operational area, and projecting and sustaining a siz able landing force ashore, said Lt. General Dennis Hejlik, Commander, MARFORCOM. We have the legislated responsibilities to be able to conduct these operations, and we certainly must be ready to do so beyond the ARG-MEU level where we routinely operate today. The culmination of Bold Alligator 2012 will include three large-scale events within the exercise: an amphibi ous assault at Camp Lejeune, N.C.; an aerial assault from the sea into Fort Pickett, Va.; and an amphibious raid on Fort Story, Va. Embedded within their participation in BA12 is the Enterprise CSGs Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX); the Iwo Jima (ARG) and 24th MEU certifica tion exercise (CERTEX); and Riverine Group 1 (RIVGRU 1) Maritime Security Operations Ready (MSO-R) certifica tion by Naval Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC). Enterprise CSG joins Bold Alligator 2012 amphibious exercise JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012 15

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Super Bowl Party Feb. 5 Pre-game events begin at 5 p.m. Food served at 6 p.m. $15 per person, includes door prizes and buffetFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. February Family Bowling for four special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $17 savings!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor pool hours Mon. Fri. 5:30 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 8 p.m. Weekend hours 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Valentines Day 5K Feb. 10 11:30 a.m. on Perimeter Rd. Pre-register by Feb. 3 at the base gym or fitness center Family Fitness Bootcamp with Ashley Monday & Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. Family Fitness Center above the Youth Center Gym Call (904) 778-9772I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. 22nd Annual ITT Travel Fair NEX Courtyard March 10, 9:30 a.m. 1 p.m. featuring ITT vendors and great door prizes! Harlem Globetrotters March 2 at Veterans Memorial Arena $26 Funk Fest May 11 & 12 at Metropolitan Park $57 Now booking all-inclusive Sandals Resorts vacations The Gaylord Palms Resort offers a preferred rate for ITT customers. The resort is located just one mile from Walt Disney World. Rates include Ice & Snow tickets. Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville First Orchestra seating avail able for Les Miserables. Valdosta, Georgia historic sites bus tour Feb. 11, $20 Includes admission to Crescent House, the Art Center and the Historical Museum ITT is now offering cruises aboard the Celebration Cruise Lines from $186.50 per person! Daytona 500 Feb. 18 26, $27 to $199 Monster Jam March 3, $25 $41 Daytona Bike Week March 10 & 17 $25 Phineas and Ferb tickets, March 10, 3:30 p.m. & 6:30 p.m. shows $13 each! Veterans Memorial Arena Disney on Ice featuring Toy Story 3 April 6, 7:30 p.m. April 7, 11:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. April 8, 1 & 5 p.m. Lower level seating for $13The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Free Paintball Trip Feb. 4 Departs Liberty at 9 a.m. Super Bowl Party Bud Brew House Feb. 5, 5 p.m. $10 per person *$5 savings Includes buffet and door prizes St. Augustine Trip Feb. 11 Free admission to the Alligator Farm and Ripleys Believe It or Not Departs Liberty at 10 a.m. Walt Disney World Weekend Trip March 24 $100 per person includes twonight lodging at Disneys All Star Sports Resort, one-day park hopper and transporta tion.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Feb. 7 & 21 for active duty Feb. 9 & 23 for retirees & DoD personnelMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto SKILLS CENTERCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recre ation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. and Tuesday & Thursday 4 7 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying ClubCall 777-8549 /6035 Ground School Feb. 27 April 4 $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012



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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2012 CFC Record Black HistoryTerminal Pros Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Army, Marines to downsizeSpending priorities in the forthcoming fiscal 2013 defense budget request call for reductions in the end strength of the Army and Marine Corps, an increase in special operations forces and maintaining the number of big-deck carriers, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said Jan. 26. The Pentagons budget request is set at $525 billion for fiscal 2013 with an additional $88.4 billion for overseas contingency operations -mostly in Afghanistan. This is down from $531 billion and $115 billion, respectively, in this fiscal year. Defense Department officials used the new defense strategy guidance that President Barack Obama announced earlier this month to shape the budget request, the secretary said. The budget seeks to minimize the impact of cuts on personnel accounts. Service members will receive their full pay raises in fiscal 2013 and 2014, Panetta said. We will achieve some cost savings by providing more limited pay raises beginning in 2015, he added. Health care is another important benefit, and one that has far outpaced inflation. Changes to health care will not affect active duty personnel or their families, Panetta said. We decided that to help control growth of health care costs, we are recommending increases in health care fees, co-pays and deductibles for retirees, he said. But let me be clear that even after these increases, the cost borne by military retirees will remain below the levels in comparable private-sector plans. Overall, the request puts DoD on the path to save $259 billion over the next five years and $487 billion over the next 10. Panetta called the budget a bal anced, complete package that keeps the American military the pre-eminent force in the world. It is a balanced package, the secretary said, because while some programs are eliminated or delayed, others are increased. The budget looks to re-shape the military to be more agile, quick and flexible that incorporates the lessons learned in 10 years of war, he added. Increasing the number of special operations forc A dozen members of the Keep Jacksonville Beautiful (KJB) Commission toured NAS Jacksonville Jan. 25 to learn about the stations award-win ning environmental and energy initia tives, as well as its operational aviation assets. An affiliate of Keep America Beautiful, the KJB Commission is a grass roots community action and education organization run by volunteer representatives from the public, pri vate and not-for-profit sectors who are appointed by the mayor of Jacksonville. NAS Jacksonville Environmental Director Kevin Gartland has been a KJB Commission member for four years. Its a great organization that supports community beautifica tion, enhances community pride and improves the quality of life in Jacksonville through educational out reach activities and programming, said Gartland. Since many KJB Commission members had not been on board our station in a long time, we gave them a firsthand look at the many environmen tal and energy management initiatives NAS Jax recognizes Sailors of the QuarterNAS Jacksonville recognized nearly 100 of its top Sailors from the base and tenant commands for the second quarter during the Sailor of the Quarter Luncheon at the NAS Jax Officers Club Jan. 26. Those in the Navy are dealing with a very hectic operational tempo throughout the world so I am compelled to recognize some of our very own from NAS Jax who play an integral part in Americas interests in all fronts of the world. Our Sailors are deploying to accomplish Americas deeds, said NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SS) Brad Shepherd. We remain commit ted to carving out a lit tle of our time to recognize the incredible contributions and sacrifices of our sharpest Sailors. Sailors of the Quarter, this is your day. We are happy to have you here, to bring this upon you and to share this moment with you, he continued. The Navy Band Southeast A Cappella Quartet performed the national anthem and NAS Jacksonville Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore delivered the invocation. The events guest speaker was AC1(AW/SW) Larry Rose of the NAS Jax Air Operations Department. The Sailor of the Year program was established in 1972 by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo Zumwalt and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy John Whittet to recognize an individual Sailor who best represented the ever-growing group of dedicated professional Sailors at each command and ultimately the Navy, said Rose. Panetta announces budget priorities Keep Jacksonville Beautiful visits station

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Jan. 30 1862 Launching of USS Monitor, the first turreted warship. Monitor was also the first ironclad warship commis sioned by the U.S. Navy during the American Civil War. 1968 Tet Offensive begins in Vietnam Jan. 31 1944 American amphibious landing on Kwajalein, Marshall Islands 1961 Lt. Cmdr. Samuel Lee Gravely Jr. becomes first African-American to command a combat ship, USS Falgout. 1981 Era of Enlisted Naval Aviators ends as last pilot retires. Feb. 1 1941 U.S. Fleet reorganized, reviving Atlantic and Pacific Fleets. 1942 USS Enterprise and USS Yorktown make first WW II air strike aagainst Japanese Marshall Islands. 1955 Operation Deep Freeze, a multinational research task force to Antarctica consisting of seven ships and 1,800 men, was begun in two stages. The first was to build an airfield at McMurdo Station. Feb. 2 1800 USS Constellation (Capt. Thomas Truxtun) defeats la Vengeance. 1862 USS Hartford, Capt. David G. Farragut, departs Hampton Roads for Mississippi River campaign against Confederate forces. Feb. 3 1801 Senate approves peace treaty with France end ing undeclared naval war that began in 1798. 1917 U.S. severs diplomatic relations with Germany. Feb. 4 1779 John Paul Jones takes command of Bonhomme Richard. 1959 Keel laying of USS Enterprise (CVN 65), first nuclear powered aircraft car rier, in Newport News, Va. Feb. 5 1854 Dedication of first chapel built on Navy property in Annapolis, Md. 1941 Navy Chief Nurse Marion Olds and Nurse Leona Jackson arrive on Guam. 1971 Moon walk by Capt. Alan Shepherd Jr., commander of Apollo 14 and Cmdr. Edgar Mitchell, lunar module pilot. During the nine-day mis sion, 94 lbs. of lunar material was collected. Shepard also became the first person to hit a golf ball on the moon. Earth recovery was by helicopters from USS New Orleans (LPH11). This project began out of desperation. When my three boysages 5, 9 and 11 said it would be sad to see their Navy dads empty seat at the dinner table while he is away on a yearlong deployment, I set out to fill the void. I called it Dinner with the Smileys. For each week that Dad is gone, I told the boys, well invite a guest to fill his chair at the family table. We created a wish list of 52 guests from friends, family and school teach ers to musicians, authors and President Obamaand suddenly, a new dimen sion to the project was clear: Dinner with the Smileys will fill our weeks and mark the time until Dustin returns. I bought a calendar to keep track of the dinners, and our excitement grew when we scheduled guests for May and June and realized wed be halfway through the deployment by then. Yet, the fullness of this project what it could mean to us, and what it might mean to others was still mostly unrecognized. Indeed, one month into Dinner with the Smileys, Im only just beginning to appreciate its many layers. Military spouses around the country have written to say that theyd like to do a Smiley Project of their own when their loved one deploys. I hope that they will. If our first four dinners are any indication, there is much to be gained as a family and as a community. Here are a few notes from our January dinners: A Sense of Community Each week, our special dinners offer my boys the chance to connect with people in the community in a way they never could have if not for the family table. Only when youve passed home made lasagna to the mayor, or when your minister has helped your 5-yearold butter his bread, can you know these people in a way that goes beyond the small talk and pleasantries that usually fill our days. Sen. Collins knows my boys names. Shes seen their fish tank and Lego creations. Lindells preschool teacher has met his older brothers and learned their personalities. The mayor played Wii with the boys and listened to stories about their dad. Our minister helped break up a brawl in the living room. He saw the boys rooms. Met their dog. Now he knows where were coming from on Sunday morning. Learning to Give Back Our mayor took the boys in a limo to get 18 scoops of ice cream (Dysarts famous 18 Wheeler). He brought them hats and gifts from the Bangor airport (check out FlyBangor.com to see where we send Monty the Moose!). And Dysarts didnt let the boys leave without T-shirts and a trip to see the ice cream machine. At the end of the evening, one of my boys asked why people want to be so nice to us. It was an opportunity to tell them about Americans appreciation for the sacrifices of military families. All three boys were visibly proud to know that they are part of their dads serviceto-country, too. And then Ford said, I think we should find someone to be nice to also. If the idea had not come from their own overflowing cup, Im not sure the lesson would have stuck. (In February: Dinner with the Smileys hits the road to give back and help others.) But there have been other intangible or almost imperceptible gifts as well: The ministers talk about the impor tance of family. The way his wife lis tened intently to the boys stories. The preschool teachers handwritten, thoughtful note to Dustin. The senators time. The mayors baseball stories. Soon, these gifts will overflow, too. And they will be repaid in a way much like they were given that no one really notices except in hindsight. Anyone Can Do This I know what youre thinking: Not everyone can do this, Sarah. Yes you can. You dont have to invite a senator or the mayor, but you can invite someone. Dinner time is the loneliest part of the day for people separated from their loved ones, either by military service or death. If houses and apartments were like doll houses, with one side totally exposed, wed see plenty of people eating alone to the sound of a television. All you have to do is extend an invita tion. But, Sarah, my house is a mess, I dont cook, and my children have really bad manners. Did I mention that my older boys had a true, rolling-on-the-ground fight when our minister was over for dinner? Or that Im serving our guests things like lasagna, chicken and boiled noo dles, and broccoli that was left on the stove too long? There is nothing fancy or impressive about Dinner with the Smileys (well, except for that limo ride). Because its not about the food. Or the house. Its about the opportunity to know each other better. And sometimes that cant happen until one kid in a cloak has wielded his light saber against another kid in his Mario costume. Wondering whos coming next? Follow along at http://www.facebook. com/sarah.is.smiley where youll find pictures of past dinners and hints about who will be next. Renew your DoD sticker onlineFor those wishing to renew Department of Defense decals online, please go to: www.pid.cnic. navy.mil. You must ensure that you have your vehicle license number, drivers license number and all insurance information prior to starting the process. Please follow up with the base security office by calling 542-4529/30. The Naval Legal Service Office Southeast/NAS Jacksonville Tax Resource Center is now open in Building 13 at the main gate for free self-service resources for active duty and retired personnel to prepare federal and state income tax returns. This year, the Navy is providing a self-service Tax Resource Center. The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA) center will be equipped with eight computer stations where customers prepare their own tax returns using free online programs with the assistance of volunteers. The recommended program for use by the U.S. Navy is Military OneSources H&R Block at Home. Unlike previous years, no electronic filing will be done on behalf of customers. Some of the websites include: Turbotax.intuit.com/Taxfeedom WWW.Taxslayer.com/Military/Default.aspx WWW.file2011taxes.newt/?cd=filing_Military Who is eligible to use the Tax Resource Center? all active-duty service members and their dependents all retirees and their dependents reservists on active duty for more than 30 days reservists within 30 days of demobilization and reservists involved in pre-mobilization What to bring to the Tax Resource Center: all 2011 W-2s and 1099s copies of social security cards for taxpayers and dependents taxpayer(s) military ID cards bank account numbers and routing numbers any other tax records including copies of 2010 tax returns if available Where and when: The resource Center is located in top of Building 13 (outside the Yorktown Gate).: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 8 a.m. 4 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Note: Computer access at the Tax Resource Center will be purely on a walk-in basis. For more information, call 542-8039. Dinner with the Smileys January recapFree tax preparation available on base 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Hey, MoneyChic! My wife and I are determined to pay our way out of debt in 2011. This is a goal we have discussed at length and are determined to make it happen. Do you have any tips that might help us stay on track? MoneyChic says: You have already taken the most important steps when it comes to climbing out of debt. First is identifying the problem itself and then decid ing to do something about it. I really like how you and your wife has discussed this matter. It sounds as if you are working at this debt-management goal as a team, which is imperative for success. Here are some tips from author Peter Walsh, who is a subject matter expert on honoring and respecting your relationship with money. thought about it for at least 48 hours. Ask yourself why you need to buy this and, more importantly, how youll pay for it. credit cards for emergencies only. example, that must be discussed with your partner. outright, then you dont need it. Make this a hard-andfast rule. Congrats on your mutual decision to become debt free! Thats my two cents. Another record set by givers to 2011 CFCThe 2011 Northeast Florida/Southeast Georgia Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) wrapped up Jan. 25 with a celebration at the NAS Jacksonville Officers Club. This years campaign generated $2.1 million in contributions, which will be distributed among a variety of non-profit organizations. It was the 12th consecutive year that the campaign generated more than $2 million. The ceremony began with comments by Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast. Id just like to thank everyone who participated this year those who contributed, as well as those who helped coordinate, Scorby said. The CFC is a program where a small, indi vidual con tribution can have a major impact through the combined efforts of many and Im proud to say we were able to accomplish that once more during this years cam paign. During the ceremony, CFC Regional Director John Smith presented certificates and plaques to commands that made significant contributions. The leading contributor was NAS Jacksonville with more than $600,000 in contributions. While NAS Jacksonville is typically the leading contributor due to its dense population of military and government employees, it was the combined effort of coordinators and contributors throughout the region that made the 2011 campaign a success. NAS Jacksonville is typically our biggest contribu tor, but we have program coordinators throughout the region whose efforts are monumental, Smith said. Theyre the ones who are going out there and asking for contributions, which is crucial because the main reason people dont give is because they are not asked. Each year, federal employees throughout the world come together to support more than 42,000 CFC-sponsored charities that contribute to a variety of causes ranging from animal rights to psychological research. All charities are verified taxexempt, non-profit organizations. The CFC is held from Sept. 1 through Dec. 15 and supports more than 2,400 national and international charities, and approximately 40,000 local charities. For more information about the Northeast Florida/ Southeast Georgia CFC, visit www.nefl-sega-cfc.org. For more information about the CFC in general, visit www.opm.gov/cfc. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012 For the 24 military mem bers working at the Air Mobility Command (AMC) Passenger Terminal aboard NAS Jacksonville, provid ing outstanding customer service is top priority. With approximately 33,600 people transiting through the termi nal each year on nearly 2,500 flights, the Sailors work hard to ensure passengers are pro cessed, screened and boarded efficiently as they continue on their journeys. We strive to provide the best customer service we can. This means keeping the terminal clean, ensuring our equip ment is working properly, flight information is accurate and up to date and all the passen ger paperwork is complete, said ABH1(AW/SW) Nnamdi Emenogu of the NAS Jax Air Operations Department, who manages the terminal. I think the services they provide are just fine and the flights are usually on time. And, there are always people at the counter to assist you. The waiting area is nice and has vending machines, TVs and WiFi, said Lt. Mike Turanitza of Deployable Operation Group in Arlington, Va. We are open seven days as week, normally from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. and split our staff into two shifts. Many times we have late flights coming in so our second shift will cover those. We have a great team here. Everyone is trained to be independent enough to be able to run the terminal and know every job, he continued. Each morning, the Sailors pull up the flight schedule from message traffic from the Joint Operational Support Airlift Center (JOSAC) at Scott Air Force Base. JOSAC is the joint scheduling activ ity that arranges and coordi nates all airlift requests with in the Continental United States. They also check flight schedules from the Navy Air Logistics Office which handles overseas airlifts originating or terminating in the U.S. We look at three days out because the flights tend to change. Once we get a sched ule of what is coming and going from NAS Jax, we update the rolling screen in the terminal, telephone recordings and the website, said Emenogu. Then we input the flights into our system and input our Space A passenger lists. We also handle the rotator flights to and from NS Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. These are regularly scheduled flights that are contracted to commercial airlines. The rotator flights to Cuba originate in Baltimore or Norfolk, Va. and stop at NAS Jax every other Tuesday and each Saturday to pick up passengers and cargo. They fly back through those after noons, again picking up pas sengers headed north. Because they are contracted flights, there is a charge to fly unless on official military orders. The paperwork involved in handling these flights is quite extensive as we have to keep track of everyone and every thing on these aircraft. We are also responsible for collecting the fees. Last year, we took in $216,000 in flight fees, said Emenogu. All cargo including luggage for passengers is handled by a seven-man team from Empire Aircraft Services Inc (EASI). We palletize and handle all cargo on all the flights coming and going at NAS Jacksonville seven days a week. Its a busy job; we handle about 100,000 pounds of cargo monthly, said EASI Cargo Manager Sam Breen, who has worked here the past 15 years. Many military members, retirees and their families also travel for free on military aircraft on whats known as Space A (availability) flights. Anyone with a valid military ID card can hop on a military flight providing there is room, including cargo planes. It may not be the best idea for those on a strict time schedule, but if you have the time and a little NAS Jax Air Terminal staff keeps passengers moving

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012 5 patience, a free flight to Europe, Asia or Hawaii might just be worth it. The process is relatively simple. Just check the flight schedule and sign up via the Space A form. Once a trav eler is in the system, they are assigned a category which prioritizes them for flights for both stateside and interna tional travel. There is a priority list with spe cific categories as to who gets to fly first. Active duty military members and their families on orders, and service members and civilians stationed over seas on emergency leave travel first, followed by active-duty, families and civilians on Environmen-tal and Morale Leave (EML) and DoD teachers during the school year. Category three is for active-duty members and their families on regu lar leave or house-hunt ing orders. Category four includes fam ily members over the age of 18 travel ing without a sponsor on EML and DoD teachers during sum mer break. Category five is for those on no-cost TAD orders and students whose spon sor is sta tioned in Alaska or Hawaii. Retirees and Reservists fall into the last category. Family members of active duty and retirees are also allowed to fly provid ed they are accompanied by a spon sor. Sponsors who register in person for family members traveling with them should present all required documents: identification cards, passports, immunization records, and visas when required by the DoD Foreign Clearance Guide. Travel documents must be presented when selected for travel. Uniforms are not required for military flights but passengers must be in appropriate civilian clothing. Passengers are allowed to check two pieces of baggage, 70 pounds each, and one carry on and one personal item. We abide by TSA guidelines on what passengers can take on a flight. Meals are not normally provided on mili tary flights so you may want to bring snacks, however liquids are limited, said Emenogu. Most AMC passenger terminals close at night. Space A travelers should be prepared to defray billeting expens es. Peak travel times are DecemberJanuary and during the summer so plan accordingly, have money in case you need to make alternative travel and be patient. Weve used Space A to travel all over the world. Its a great deal and the Navy is the best. They always provide great hospitality wherever we go. This is our first time in this area, and we are really impressed by the service the Sailors here have given us. The people who work here are always smiling and provide us with lots of information, said Army retiree Saturnino Castro and his wife, Irene, who are from Seattle. A lot of people dont know much about Space A traveling. Its a great benefit and its $free.99. We are here to help them get where they need to go they just need to call for information, said Emenogu. To check on flights flying in and out of NAS Jacksonville, call the Air Terminal at 542-3825/3956/8165 or go to: https:// www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville/About/ SpaceATravel/FlightSchedule/index. htm. TERMINAL: here to help them get where they need to go Photos by Kaylee LaRocque

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Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) has announced NAS Jacksonville and NAS Jacksonville Transient Personnel Unit/Pre-Trial Confinement Facility as winners of the 2011 CNIC Retention Excellence Award. This award is given to those commands earning two or more quarterly honor roll awards during the fiscal year or meeting annual benchmarks and achieving a passing grade of 85 points or better on the Career Development Program review. The annual reenlistment rate benchmarks were 59 per cent for Zone A, 66 percent for Zone B and 72 percent for Zone C and command attrition for Zone A must be equal or less than 5.5 percent. Zone A applies to first termers or those who have been enlisted less than six years. Zone B applies to middle management or those who have been in the Navy from six to 10 years and Zone C are upper management or those who have been enlisted for 10-16 years. Every quarter, the Navy looks at installation reten tion statistics and we hit those marks throughout the year. The reason retention rates are so important is because new initiatives such as Enlisted Retention Board and Perform to Serve (PTS). As the Navy downsizes, Sailors have to work much harder to stay in, said NC1(AW) Natalie France of the NAS Jax Career Counselor Office. When they report on board, they sit down with the com mand master chief, command and departmental career counselors to discuss their goals. We stress the importance of going to college, being competitive on their evals, staying out of trouble so they dont lose their security clearances, commu nity involvement and what the command expects from them, France continued. The base and department career counselors are part of a retention team and hold training monthly to discuss how they can better help their Sailors achieve their military goals. We try to keep the Sailors focused on their goals and help them become the best Sailors possible, said France. And, we rely on command leadership to be involved in their Sailors careers by guid ing them on the best path for advancement and retention. Last year, 95 Sailors were reenlisted at NAS Jax after obtaining PTS approval. Its gotten a lot tougher to stay in but we have a really great team here. This is a difficult award to achieve and weve done a really good job by keeping our retention team members current on new guidelines so they can better assist their Sailors and retain them, added France. According to CNIC Vice Adm. Michael Vitale, this award demonstrates the out standing teamwork by instal lations to positively support its Sailors in their military career endeavors. Your dedication and com mitment to career motivation and excellence not only exemplify your superb performance, but also attest to your concern for the personal and profes sional needs of our Sailors. Every member of your com mand can be justifiably proud of their achievements. Thank you for the great work that you are doing to make CNIC and our Navy organizations where people enjoy coming to work everyday, said Vitale in a message to the winning com mands. NAS Jacksonville honored for retention RAO keeps retirees updatedThe Retired Activities Office (RAO) mission is to assist military retirees, family members, survivors, and active military contemplating retirement. The NAS Jax RAO is located in the Fleet and Family Support Center at Enterprise Ave. and Child St. It serves North Florida military retirees and families. RAO provides assistance and counseling on current retiree related matters. The office is open from 10 a.m.2 p.m. weekdays and 1-4 p.m. on Wednesdays. For more information, call 542-5790. 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Teen dating violence is a serious problem in our community. Dating violence occurs between two people in a close relationship and can include physical, emotional or sexual violence. Many teens do not report it because they are afraid to tell friends and family. This type of abuse usually starts with teasing and name-calling or things that teens may consider nor mal. Teens who are victims are more likely to be depressed and perform poorly in school. They also may engage in unhealthy behaviors, such as using drugs or alcohol and are more likely to have eating disorders than youth that are not experiencing abuse. As a result of the abuse, some teens think about or attempt suicide. Unhealthy relationships can start early and last a lifetime. Statistics show that teens that are victimized in high school have a higher chance of being victimized in college. February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, but is an everyday issue so we should address it on a regular basis. The ultimate goal is to stop dating violence before it starts. If your child is dating and is in an unhealthy relationship or you need tools to help prevent dating violence, there are resources and informa tion available for you and your teen such as Choose Respect Initiative at www.cdc.gov/chooserespect, Dating Matters: Understanding Teen Dating Prevention at www.vetoviolence.org/ datingmatters. You may also seek counseling for your child at the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) by speaking with one of the domestic abuse victim advocates by calling 542-5745. The FFSC will be offering two briefs on teen dating violence the following days and times: Center; Conference Room. Everyone is welcome to attend. The Military Saves campaign is a growing net work of organizations and individuals committed to helping military members and their loved ones build personal savings arsenals to provide for their immediate and long-term financial needs, said NAS Jax FFSC Financial Educator Rufus Bundrige. Military Saves was developed and tested by its non-profit sponsor, Consumer Federation of America in partnership with the military services. Launched throughout the Department of Defense (DoD) in 2007, it is part of two larger campaigns the DoD Financial Readiness Campaign and the national America Saves campaign, he explained. While it is an ongoing campaign, the entire mili tary community comes together to focus on financial readiness during Military Saves Week in February. The campaigns lifeblood is in its partner orga nizations that see the value in working together to empower members, employees, customers, and cli ents to become financially stable through saving, debt reduction and wealth-building over time, concluded Bundrige. The following sessions will be offered at the VP-30 auditorium in support of Military Saves Week, Feb. 21-24: Tuesday, Feb. 21 9-9:15 a.m. Military Saves kick-off with Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. 9:15-9:45 a.m. Reduce your risks of foreclosure. 9:45-10:15 a.m. If you have to separate (What you and your Sailors need to know.) 10:15-10:45 a.m. Tuition assistance and the Post9/11 GI Bill. Wednesday, Feb. 22 9-9:45 a.m. How to exit the military with one million dollars. 9:45-10:15 a.m. Paying less for loans through credit reporting. 10:15-10:45 a.m. Free money through budgeting. 3:30-4 p.m. Finances for youths (at Youth Activities Center.) Thursday, Feb. 23 9-9:45 a.m. Money Management 9:45-10:15 a.m. Investing for ages 20 and older. 10:15-10:45 a.m. Investing for ages 40 and older. 2:30-3 p.m. Story reading for pre-schoolers (at Child Development Center.) Friday, Feb. 25 9-9:45 a.m. Best deals in car buying. 9:45-10:30 a.m. Strategies for first-time home buyers. For this new year, Im going to change something for the better in my diet. I decided to reduce my salt (sodium) intake. Did you know Feb. 1-7 is National Salt Awareness Week? You may not have appreciated how much good you can do for yourself by passing on the salt shaker. Q: How much salt should I eat every day? About one teaspoon is all the U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends. Eating one handful of pretzel sticks will give you about half of all the salt you should eat in a day. Q: Does it really make any difference if I eat a lot of salt? Short answer: YES. A decrease of 1 tea spoon of salt a day was associated with a 23 percent lower rate of strokes and up to 17 percent less total cardiovascular disease according to a recent Italian study. Americans typically eat about two tea spoons of salt a day, or nearly twice the rec ommended amount. The American Medical Association recommends a society wide approach to lowering salt intake. Awareness of the need to reduce salt is just starting to come to the surface. National Salt Awareness Week an example of the effort to get people to understand the problem with consuming excessive amounts of salt. Excessive salt intake increases blood pressure, which has a direct impact on cardiovascular and stroke risk. So think seriously about removing the salt shaker from your dinner table. Look at what you eat and drink to ensure you are not consuming excessive amounts of salt. Its a small step but one that could be an important way to reduce your risk of cardiac problems. Military Saves events scheduled at VP-30 auditoriumTeen dating violence is serious issue Please dont pass the salt shaker JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012 7

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BUDGET: Secretary of State announces military cuts, realignmentsSOQ: Quarterly leaders recognized TOUR: Environmental group celebrates partnership with NAS Jaxes is key to the plan, Panetta said, and special operators will begin to shift back to their traditional pre-9/11 mission of instructing local forces. The request puts the Army on a path to drop to 490,000 soldiers and the Marine Corps to 182,000 Marines over five years. Currently, the two ser vices have 562,000 and 202,000 active-duty members, respec tively. The secretary noted this is still higher than the numbers on 9/11. The budget treats the reserve components very carefully, Panetta said. After a decade of being an integral part of Americas wars, the reserve components will not go back to being a strategic Cold War-era reserve. The reserves will be the nations hedge against the unexpected, the secretary said. We are making only mar ginal reductions in the Army Reserve and Army National Guard, and no reductions in the Marine Corps Reserve, the secretary said. The Air Force will make balanced reduc tions in the Air Guard that are consistent with reductions in the active component and Air Force Reserve. The request also calls for more base realignments and closures, and a BRAC-like authority to recommend changes to military retire ment. But the president and department have made clear that the retirement benefits of those who currently serve will be protected by grandfathering their benefits, Panetta said. The budget maintains the current U.S. focus in the Central Command region and increases American commit ment to the Pacific Command area of operations. The request looks to maintain the Navys current 11 aircraft carriers and 10 carrier air wings, Panetta said. It will also maintain the current Marine and Army posture in the Asia-Pacific region, and will base littoral com bat ships in Singapore and Bahrain. The budget will eliminate two forward-based Army heavy brigades in Europe. Instead, brigades will rotate in and out of the area. The United States and European allies also will look to share costs for new capabilities such as the alli ance ground surveillance pro gram. The Navy will retire seven older cruisers and two amphibious ships early, and the Air Force will eliminate six tactical air squadrons. The budget sinks more money into technologies to prevail in an anti-access, aerial-denial scenario and will fund the next-generation bomber and modernization of the submarine fleet. The F-35 joint strike fighter is key to maintaining domain superiority, and the military remains committed to the program, Panetta said. But in this budget, we have slowed pro curement to complete more testing and allow for develop mental changes before buying in significant quantities, he added. The budget will maintain all legs of the nuclear triad bombers, ICBMs and subma rines and will invest in sig nificantly more capability in the cyber world, Panetta said. Panetta stressed the budget is based on strategy and will shape the force for the future. While the pain of cuts will be felt across the country, he said, it will also ensure a strong, agile military for the future. The budget must pass Congress, and the secretary said he hopes members of Congress understand the strategy and nuances of the budget. My hope is that when members understand the sacri fice involved in reducing the defense budget by half a tril lion dollars, it will convince Congress to avoid sequestra tion, a further round of cuts that would inflict severe dam age to our national defense for generations, Panetta said. So what does this mean to me? Behind its title is the staggering weight of nearly 40 years of hard-charging Sailors illuminating a trail for others to follow. Its legacy is both professionally satisfying and a humbling bestowment; one that challenges those who already lean forward in the foxhole, to learn further. To give until there is nothing left, and then give more, he continued. This is not a personal accomplishment, however. Behind every achievement lies an incredible group of Sailors who stand the watch every day, setting the standard for NAS Jacksonville. These Sailors drive our division through a daily myriad of watch bills, assignments and on-the-spot tasks that would not be possible without their perseverance and I am grateful to lead them. Receiving this award is an accomplishment of every ATC Division Sailor and I am proud to represent them, Rose stated. None of this would be possible without the support of my wife, Kim, and daughters, Reagan and Kadence. Through inspections, long hours and meetings, my family stood the watch ensuring the home front was safe and secure to that I may return every day to continue the mission, said Rose. Receiving this award gives voice to my familys contributions and sacrifices to my career and it is an honor to accept on their behalf. Following lunch, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders thanked the Sailors. You are leaders in your command. Once you get to the level where you are designated Sailor of the Quarter, you are now the pride of your command, he said. Your command leadership and the Sailors within your command are looking to each of you to change things for the better. So go forth and do great things! Sanders then presented each SOQ an envelope with a gift card from VyStar Credit Union. The event was sponsored by USAA and Navy Mutual Aid Association. I am so grateful to be here today and be recognized because we have a lot of patrol men who deserve this same honor. I love my command and really appreciate this, said NAS Jax Blue Jacket of the Quarter MASN Vernon Colbert. I think its wonderful to be honored. Ive never been part of something like this before and its nice to know that someone gave me the recognition for my hard work. Its wonderful to be here! added MM2(SW) Elizabeth CruzGarcia of Transient Personnel Unit/Pre-Trial Confinement Facility Jax. that the station has integrated into itsmission, operations and planning. He added, Our bus tour took them along the entire flight line before stopping at Hangar 1122, which is home to the anti-submarine warfare helicopter squadron HSL 42 Proud Warriors and whose Sailors supported the KJB cleanup of Hogans Creek last October. The leadership of NAS Jax and its tenant commands value our Sailors participation in this important environmental partner ship with the City of Jacksonville. Anna Dooley, executive director of Greenscape, said, This is my first visit to the base and I must admit that it was far more interesting than I had imagined and I know we only visited a portion of the facility. She told Gartland, I applaud your environmental efforts. The personnel we interacted with today were most knowledgeable and inspiring for their environmental commitment. Today was enlight ening and exciting. My Dad was a sailor in World War II and now I feel that I can better understand the pride of our local Navy community. Thank you for all you do for our city and our country. KJB Executive Coordinator Vivian Harrell commented, Keep Jacksonville Beautiful Commission members greatly enjoyed the tour today. We learned a lot and could relate to it both individually and collectively. All of you are passionate and gave us an excellent, professional tour. We appreciate everyone who participated in making the tour a success. Were thankful for our military and proud of NAS Jacksonville personnel. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Lt. Myles McAllister, a pilot from VP-30, and his family recently spent a short stint at Wolfson Childrens Hospital where his newborn son was receiving care. Wolfson Childrens Hospital was opened in 1955 as a place for all children to be admitted and treated without regard to religion, race or financial position. That original mission remains in force today at the Jacksonville institution. Because of space constraints, the McAllisters were assigned a room on the fifth floor; the Oncology Department. Seeing children battle cancer and witnessing first-hand their courage and the strength of their families made a dramatic impression on McAllister. I cannot begin to tell you the struggle these children and their families face. I think we can make a difference in this fight, he explained to peers at his com mand. In an effort to reciprocate the goodwill his family received while staying at Wolfson, he orga nized a project to collect toys for children at the hospital. The junior officers of VP-30 accepted his challenge and collected a tri-wall full of toys in less than two weeks. Five members of the VP-30 Wardroom then teamed up to deliver the toys to Wolfson Childrens Hospital. The group loaded the toys into a truck and drove to the hospital, where a volunteer welcomed them. The VP-30 pilots were given a tour through the oncology, respiratory, and general care floors, where they were able to choose age and gender appropriate toys from the collec tion to present to patients. Lt. Mike Windham reflected on the experience. Visiting the chil dren and their families at Wolfson was a truly humbling experience. As a parent of a special needs child, Ive experienced firsthand the dedicated care and compas sion of the staff members and the resources they provide. A quick visit, even from a stranger in uni form, seemed well received by all, he said. The VP-30 representatives were very impressed with the facil ity, and good nature and energy of the hospital staff who manage to keep an upbeat attitude despite the challenges of their day to day work in the face of such debilitat ing afflictions. VP-30 aviators visit hospital, brighten childrens day JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012 9

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Dr. Carter G. Woodson lived and wrote in a time when America consid ered itself to be Anglo-White. AfricanAmericans were kept apart from the rest of American society. At best, they were treated as second-class citizens. Woodson, in combating such degra dation and to promote the value of African-American history, began pub lishing the Journal of Negro History in 1916. The observation of Negro History Week, an initiative led by Woodson to recognize the contributions of AfricanAmericans to our country, began in 1926. Its goal was to foster a better understanding of the African-American experience. He choose thesecond week of February to coincide with the birthdays of abolitionist Frederick Douglass and President Abraham Lincoln, two people who had dramatic impact on the lives of African-Americans. The observation was expanded to include the whole month in 1976, and has since become commonly referred to as Black History or African-American History Month. It is celebrated and recognized as a Department of Defense national observance. In Woodsons book, The MisEducation of the Negro (1933), he ten ders information about his life expe riences with some of his fellow edu cated negroes. He decried that some of his fellow African-Americans would not buy goods and services from black businessmen, because the educated African-American was taught that the black person had no value. Educated African-Americans went back to their community ill-equipped to teach each other, for they acquired a disdain for their own. Thus, they became miseducated. Woodson saw the education that the African-American practiced in his time as oppressive. He believed in self-reliance as a major component of self-respect, making the black person rise above their situation by their own merit, and developing the AfricanAmericans natural gifts whatever they may be. Only by becoming self-reliant and self-respecting would the black race be contributors to American soci ety. The American culture and the mili tary have made quite a transformation since Woodson published his first book in 1916. President Harry S. Truman implemented Executive Order 9981 in 1948, which desegregated the military. Today, the image of America is not a monolithic white-only culture but a multicultural pluralistic soci ety. Instead of melting other cultures into the melting pot to form one pre ferred culture, America has become a nation in which the various cultures are appreciated for their contribu tions to enhance our country. Now the American dream is open to all persons of various nationalities, races, cultures and creeds. Carter G. Woodsons impact on Black History Month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012 11

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Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation (WOASF) is now accepting pre-qualification forms for its scholar ships. WOASF, a 501(c) (3) non-profit foundation, annually sponsors more than forty scholarships ranging from $2,000$10,000 to students who have chosen to pursue their undergraduate college education. Scholarship recipients are selected on the basis of scholastic merit, community service and extracurricular activities. Last year, WOASF awarded over $85,000 and this year hopes to award $100,000. WOASF is a worldwide organization and has scholars from throughout the U.S. and abroad. Our mission is to provide college scholarships to dependent children and spouses of U.S. Navy personnel having service in naval aviation commands; officer and enlisted, active duty, retired, honorably discharged or deceased. The foundation has proudly awarded over $530,000 to outstanding students since 1987. The foundation is funded solely through the generous contributions of private and corporate sources. For more information on eligibil ity and application process, please visit www.wingsoveramerica.us or call 757671-3200 Ext. 2. The pre-qualification deadline is March 1 and the application deadline is April 1.Wings Over America scholarship available It was only a few short years after American Physicist Theodore Maiman developed the laser in 1960 that Gene Roddenberry created Star Trek, a futuristic television series set on the Starship Enterprise where laser pistols were standard issue. Today, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) is collabo rating with Northrop Grumman Laser Systems based in Apopka, Fla., to maintain, repair and upgrade lasers installed in Forward Looking InfraRed (FLIR) turrets on military aircraft to detect, identify and track tactical targets. FRCSE established a public-private partnership with Northrop Grumman in April 2010, which unites the inno vation and responsiveness of private industry with the expertise and capacity at FRCSE. It also allows the U.S. government to maintain depot-level repair capabilities on Navy core weapons systems. Assistant Avionics Product Manager Chris Kopp said Northrop Grumman and FRCSE have dual repair capac ity to accelerate repair cycle times for improved support to the fleet. We want them to do well, and they want us to do well, he said. Yet, most manufacturers are hesitant to share proprietary technical data, which includes the enormous costs of research and development. The government cant afford to buy the datadrawings, test specifications, parts listings, maintenance manuals, engineering specificationsall the documentation a facility would need to repair a piece of gear, he said. Kopp said collaborating with Northrop Grumman allowed FRCSE access to the proprietary information. The relationship evolved over time into a win-win partnership that resulted in the formal alliance. It began in late 2009 when three FRCSE electronics mechanics trained for three months at the Northrop Grumman factory near Orlando. Dean Ramsey, Cathy Cornioli and Jeffrey Brown learned the skills needed to align, repair, assemble, and final test the makers laser assembly. Air Data Systems Supervisor Raymond Rivera said FRCSE created a controlled environment called the laser clean room. Technicians must wear Dacron polyester smocks sewn with synthetic thread, boots, hairnets and beard guards to prevent contaminat ing the laser. He said the technicians routinely check the rooms air quali ty to ensure particle readings are well below 10,000 particles per cubic foot, the approved standard. Electronics Mechanic Supervisor Bob Early said Northrop Grumman has asked FRCSE to process 12 lasers per month, up from 10 and expected to increase by years end. I think we are doing equal or a few more repairs than they are, and I only see it growing, he said. They are very satisfied with our work. Early said FLIR turrets made by Raytheon Company, also repaired at FRCSE, house the laser assemblies. The Navys H-60 helicopters utilize nosemounted AN/AAS-44 FLIR /laser des ignator systems. The Air Forces MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) utilize AN/AAS52 and the AN/DAS-1 Multispectral Targeting Systems (MTS) respectively, to aid with surveillance and reconnaissance missions. Jeff Means, Northrop Grumman MTS program manager, said it has been a very successful partnership. Northrop Grummans laser facility employs 14 technicians who provide the touch labor with nine of those working as laser technicians. The FRCSE tech nicians have repaired more than 100 lasers since the programs startup in April 2010. They have exceeded my expecta tions, and they continue to improve, said Means. Based on the plans going forward, Im looking at 120 to 130 repairs for 2012. The repair require ments are driven by the heavy use of UAV MTS systems but represent only a fraction of our annual laser production volume. FLIR systems determine the bearing, course and speed of a target by viewing the scene as an infrared image, regardless of weather conditions. This systems capabilities enhance night navigation, target detection and recognition, and search and rescue operations.FRCSE repairs lasers, improves turnaround time to fleet Working together for stronger, healthier babiesa CFC participant Provided as a public service marchofdimes.com 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Its a common misperception that the Navy Housing Program only serves those who either live in or who want to live in on-base housing. While that is a large part of its services, the program offers much more. Customer support for the Navy Housing Program is provided through the installation Housing Service Center (HSC) and is available to single and married service members, military families, and Department of Defense (DoD) civilians. The HSCs are staffed with trained professionals who are experts in pro viding housing services and locating homes and neighborhoods desired by the customer in the private sector, in privatized housing (PPV), or in govern ment owned or leased housing. Home-finding services offered by the HSC include community housing list ings, housing needs counseling, find ing homes to rent or buy, showing ser vices, roommate finder, lease and sales reviews, processing applications for government or privatized housing, and even translation services overseas. Its not too soon to start plan ning your next move, says Housing Management Specialist Lea Williford at Navy Region Southeast. Our staff can get information for you on your next duty station. If you are not sure of your next duty station, but you know there are three possibilities, we can provide you information on all three. Our goal is to make the housing process less stressful. Beyond finding housing, the HSC offers assistance with landlord and tenant disputes, complaint resolution, and PPV mediation. Think of the HSC staff as your advocate, says Janice Thompson, housing management specialist at Navy Region Southeast. Our staff is trained to help you with both the small and big issues that might arise with the housing you are living in. For residents living in PPV housing, the HSC is available to assist with unresolved problems between the resident and the PPV property management partner. You always have options, according to Williford. If you are unhappy with the results of the partner to resolve your issues, contact the HSC for assistance. Additionally, the HSC provides information about utility deposit waiver programs, local schools, and local Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) pro grams, services and events. Most HSCs in Navy Region Southeast are located on the installation and customers are welcome to stop by during normal business hours. Additional information about Navy housing can be obtained on the Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) website at http://cnic.navy.mil/CNIC_HQ_Site/ WhatWeDo/FleetandFamilyReadiness/ Housing/index.htm.Navy Housing Program: your first resource for housing on and off base With the release of NAVADMIN 036/12 on Jan. 27, Sailors are reminded of eligibility requirements for Involuntary Separation Pay (ISP) that Navy Reserve requirements. Career counselors can assist Sailors on applying for affilia tion in conjunction with ISP. Sailors who apply for ISP must obligate in the Ready Reserve for a minimum of three years past their military service obligation. The Ready Reserve has two branches, the Selected Reserve (SELRES) and Individual Ready Reserve (IRR). The SELRES consists of drilling reservists and units. Reservists are available for recall to active duty status. SELRES typically fulfill the traditional service commitment of one weekend a month and two weeks a year. The IRR offers Reserve affiliation benefits without the SELRES drill requirements or Reserve pay. Sailors in the IRR have to maintain mobilization readi ness and must keep the Navy informed of address changes or conditions that may affect their readiness. SELRES billets are limited. ISP Sailors E3 through E6 can apply for a quota via Performto-Serve/Fleet RIDE. Once approved, contact the Career Transition Office to complete the process. If a quota is not available, Sailors can request to affiliate with the IRR. Sailors who affiliates with the IRR must have their com mand complete a NAVPERS 1070/613 form and send it to their personnel office. This must be accomplished before separating to ensure payment. If a signed Reserve affilia tion contract is not complet ed prior to separation, Sailors must petition the Board of Correction for Naval Records to receive ISP. Sailors who collect ISP and later qualify and collect a military retirement must repay their ISP upon retire ment. The Defense Finance and Accounting Service will reduce retirement pay until the amount is repaid.Involuntary separation pay eligibility requirements reminder for Sailors JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012 13

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Flight Line Caf team to participate in CNIC competition CS2(SW) Marnika Ash and CS2(SW) Alex Moleon of the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf, demonstrated their passion, flair and culinary skills while participating in a culi nary competition train ing/cook-off at the First Coast Technical College Jan. 17-20. The training was held to prepare Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) culinary spe cialists in pay grades E-6 and below for the upcoming Commander, Navy Installation Commands fourth annual Performance Development Week and Culinary Competition. Teams from NS Guantanamo Bay Cuba, NS Mayport and NAS Jacksonville competed by preparing their best five-star meal to include a salad, appetizer and main course. The special ingredients used were shrimp and Cornish hen. As the first place win ners, the duo will repre sent CNRSE at the annu al competition in San Diego, March 4-10. Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handi capped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. For more information or to register, call 542-5745. Improve your life skills with free knowledge 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Commander, United States Fleet Forces (USFF) and Commander, Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM) will lead the East Coasts largest joint and multinational amphibious assault exercise in the past ten years, officials announced Jan. 25. Exercise Bold Alligator 2012 (BA12) will revitalize Navy and Marine Corps amphibious expeditionary tactics, techniques and procedures, and reinvigo rate its culture of conducting combined Navy and Marine Corps operations from the sea. The exercise will run Jan. 30 through Feb. 12, ashore and afloat, in and off the coasts of Virginia, North Carolina and Florida. BA12 will be a live and synthetic, scenario-driven, simulation-sup ported exercise designed to train Expeditionary Strike Group 2 (ESG 2), 2d Marine Expeditionary Brigade (2d MEB) and Carrier Strike Group 12. Staffs will plan and execute a MEBsized amphibious assault from a sea base in a medium land-and-maritime threat environment to improve naval amphibious core competencies. Amphibious forces are a critical ele ment of maritime power projection that ought to be a high priority for support, even in a resource constrained environment, because they are a cost-effective option for accomplishing a wide range of military operations, said Adm. John Harvey, commander, USFF. Units involved include the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group (CSG), Expeditionary Strike Group 2 (ESG-2), 2d Marine Expeditionary Brigade (MEB), Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group (ARG), 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), Naval Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC) as well as various other ships and units. Nine countries are participating in exercise BA12, providing maritime, land and air units or observers. The countries participating with the U.S. forces are Australia, Canada, France, Italy, Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain and the United Kingdom. One of the exercises priorities is to incorporate lessons learned over the past 10 years of challenging combat operations, overseas contingency operations, humanitarian assistance/disaster relief (HA/DR), noncombatant evacuation operations (NEO) and homeland defense. The exercise will focus on the fundamental aspects and roles of amphibious operations to improve amphibious force readiness and proficiency for executing the six core capabilities of the Maritime Strategy forward presence, deterrence, sea control, power projection, maritime security and humanitarian assistance/ disaster response. In todays world, the Navy-Marine Corps team must remain capable of gaining access to an operational area, and projecting and sustaining a siz able landing force ashore, said Lt. General Dennis Hejlik, Commander, MARFORCOM. We have the legislated responsibilities to be able to conduct these operations, and we certainly must be ready to do so beyond the ARG-MEU level where we routinely operate today. The culmination of Bold Alligator 2012 will include three large-scale events within the exercise: an amphibious assault at Camp Lejeune, N.C.; an aerial assault from the sea into Fort Pickett, Va.; and an amphibious raid on Fort Story, Va. Embedded within their participation in BA12 is the Enterprise CSGs Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX); the Iwo Jima (ARG) and 24th MEU certifica tion exercise (CERTEX); and Riverine Group 1 (RIVGRU 1) Maritime Security Operations Ready (MSO-R) certifica tion by Naval Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC). Enterprise CSG joins Bold Alligator 2012 amphibious exercise JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012 15

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Super Bowl Party Feb. 5 Pre-game events begin at 5 p.m. Food served at 6 p.m. $15 per person, includes door prizes and buffetFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. February Family Bowling for four special Thursday, 410 p.m. $39.95 includes, 2 hours of 1 lane bowling, rental shoes, 4 hot dogs, 2 large nachos and 4 medium drinks. $17 savings!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor pool hours Mon. Fri. 5:30 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 8 p.m. Weekend hours 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 8 a.m. in the base gym 45-minute, high-intensity group training Valentines Day 5K Feb. 10 11:30 a.m. on Perimeter Rd. Pre-register by Feb. 3 at the base gym or fitness center Family Fitness Bootcamp with Ashley Monday & Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. Family Fitness Center above the Youth Center Gym Call (904) 778-9772I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. 22nd Annual ITT Travel Fair NEX Courtyard March 10, 9:30 a.m. 1 p.m. featuring ITT vendors and great door prizes! Harlem Globetrotters March 2 at Veterans Memorial Arena $26 Funk Fest May 11 & 12 at Metropolitan Park $57 Now booking all-inclusive Sandals Resorts vacations The Gaylord Palms Resort offers a preferred rate for ITT customers. The resort is located just one mile from Walt Disney World. Rates include Ice & Snow tickets. Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Zoo Train & Carousel now available at ITT! MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville First Orchestra seating available for Les Miserables. Valdosta, Georgia historic sites bus tour Feb. 11, $20 Includes admission to Crescent House, the Art Center and the Historical Museum ITT is now offering cruises aboard the Celebration Cruise Lines from $186.50 per person! Daytona 500 Feb. 18 26, $27 to $199 Monster Jam March 3, $25 $41 Daytona Bike Week March 10 & 17 $25 Phineas and Ferb tickets, March 10, 3:30 p.m. & 6:30 p.m. shows $13 each! Veterans Memorial Arena Disney on Ice featuring Toy Story 3 April 6, 7:30 p.m. April 7, 11:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. April 8, 1 & 5 p.m. Lower level seating for $13The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Free Paintball Trip Feb. 4 Departs Liberty at 9 a.m. Super Bowl Party Bud Brew House Feb. 5, 5 p.m. $10 per person *$5 savings Includes buffet and door prizes St. Augustine Trip Feb. 11 Free admission to the Alligator Farm and Ripleys Believe It or Not Departs Liberty at 10 a.m. Walt Disney World Weekend Trip March 24 $100 per person includes twonight lodging at Disneys All Star Sports Resort, one-day park hopper and transportation.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Feb. 7 & 21 for active duty Feb. 9 & 23 for retirees & DoD personnelMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto SKILLS CENTERCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. and Tuesday & Thursday 4 7 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying ClubCall 777-8549 /6035 Ground School Feb. 27 April 4 $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 2, 2012