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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/01977
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 12-08-2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
Classification:
System ID: UF00028307:01977

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Navy partners with Duval schools to mentor studentsA ceremony was held Nov. 29 at Nathan B. Forrest High School to kick off Project Navy Appreciating and Valuing Youth (N.A.V.Y.), a pilot program which pro motes mentorship to students by Navy personnel. Sailors from NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport commands are partnering with four Duval County schools Forrest High School, Ribault Middle School, Stillwell Middle School and George Washington Carver Elementary School to connect with students and provide positive role models. The event began with the playing of the nation al anthem by Navy Band Southeast and presenta tion of colors by members of the Forrest High School AFROTC Unit. Forrest High School student and AFROTC member James Stevens then led the audi ence in the Pledge of Allegiance. Duval County Public Schools Superintendent Ed Pratt-Dannals thanked those in attendance and offered his remarks. We are very fortunate that the Navy has chosen these schools to partner with. Navy personnel are exemplary citizens and outstanding role models in providing service to our community and to our country and will be great mentors to our students, said Dannals. A mentor can have a significant positive impact on someones life, students typically have better grades and attendance, are more focused and have great goals. And to have a person next to them to help move Remembering Pearl Harbor ~ Dec. 7, 1941 ~ The road to war between Japan and the United States began in the 1930s when differences over China drove the two nations apart. In 1931 Japan conquered Manchuria, which until then had been part of China. In 1937 Japan began a long and ulti mately unsuccessful campaign to conquer the rest of China. In 1940, the Japanese govern ment allied their country with Nazi Germany in the Axis Alliance, and soon occupied all of Indochina. The United States was alarmed by Japans moves so it increased military and financial aid to China, embarked on a program of strengthening its own military power in the Pacific, and cut off the shipment of oil and other raw materials to Japan. Because Japan was poor in natu ral resources, its government viewed these steps especially the embargo on oil as a threat to the nations sur vival. To neutralize the danger posed by the U.S. Pacific Fleet based at Pearl Harbor, Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, commander of the Japanese fleet, devised a plan to destroy the U.S. fleet at the outset of the war through a surprise attack. In October 1941 the naval gen eral staff gave final approval to Yamamotos plan, which called for the formation of an attack force com manded by Vice Admiral Chuichi Nagumo. It centered around six heavy aircraft carriers accompanied by 24 supporting vessels. A separate group of submarines was to sink any American warships that escaped the Japanese carrier Force. Nagumos fleet departed in strict est secrecy for Hawaii on Nov. 26, 1941. The ships route crossed the North Pacific and avoided nor mal shipping lanes. At dawn on Dec. 7, the Japanese task force had approached undetected to a point slightly more than 200 miles north of Oahu. Fortunately, the U.S. aircraft car riers were not at Pearl Harbor at this time. On Nov. 28, Adm. Kimmel sent USS Enterprise under Rear Admiral William Halsey to deliver Marine Corps fighter planes to Wake Island. On Dec. 4, Enterprise delivered the aircraft and by Dec. 7, the task force was on its way back to Pearl Harbor. On Dec. 5, Kimmel sent the USS Lexington with a task force under Rear Adm. Newton to deliver 25 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011 New VP-62 CO Seahawk & SubExcellence NAS Jacksonville was named winner of the 2011 Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) Commander in Chiefs Installation Excellence Award (large category). CNIC is com prised of 11 regions and 72 bases worldwide. It is my privilege to inform the military and civilian men and women of NAS Jax that our installation has been selected as this years Commander, Navy Installations Command winner for best Navy installation large cat egory, said NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Jeffrey Maclay. This award reflects the hard work by all who help NAS Jax deliv er the most effective and efficient readiness from the shore. Our syn ergistic One Team, One Fight rela tionship targeted the best use of available resources to ensure all accomplished their assigned mis sions while at the same time focusing on innovative manage ment actions that increase produc tivity. Bravo Zulu to all and thank you for what you and your teams do every day, he continued. In its mission to support the fleet, fighter, family throughout 2011, NAS Jax was the premier installation for delivering effec tive, sustained and improved shore readiness to its 15 home-based squadrons, Sailors and civilian personnel, as well as supporting numerous joint commands, gov ernment agencies and carrier read iness sustainment exercises. Its personnel approached every chal lenge with a leading-edge mental ity and continued their unprec edented, accident-free growth by exceeding the Chief of Naval Personnel mandated 75 percent mishap reduction goal in addition to being almost 70 percent below the industry standards, among many other accomplishments. CNIC Vice Adm. Michael Vitale extended congratulations to the NAS Jax team. I congratulate and send my heartfelt Bravo Zulu to NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Jeffrey Maclay and his team for their outstanding leadership in winning the FY 2011 Commander Navy Installations Command Commander in Chiefs Annual Award for Installation Excellence, said Vitale. Competition this year was very tight and all nomination packages were impressive and spoke to all of the great accomplishments that CNIC installations made world wide. However, NAS Jacksonville distinguished itself and made the best use of its available resources to accomplish its assigned mis sions, while at the same time focusing on innovative manage ment actions to increase the pro ductivity of its work force. Through your hard work and dedication, the CNIC selects NAS Jax as Best in the Navy

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 Learn about naval aviation history and heritage during the yearlong Centennial of Naval Aviation celebration. Discover the wide-ranging scope of naval aviation activities, including people, aircraft, ships, innovations and other significant events. This nationally sponsored series of events will take place throughout the year. Centennial events are already underway at NAS Jacksonville and will continue throughout the year, culminating with the NAS Jax Centennial of Naval Aviation Air Show Nov. 5-6. Mission To honor 100 years of mission-ready men and women, and recognize unique aviation-related achievements through event-driven celebrations. Learn more at www.public.navy.mil/airfor/centennial. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS I am committed to mak ing sure this column does not become a yearlong rant about the ups and downs of having my husband deployed, but reactions to my Occupy col umn bring up common mili tary-spouse conundrums: Do military families think they are owed something because of their sacrifices? And can you even call it a sacrifice when my husband is paid for his job? A similar and equally per plexing problem for military spouses is: Didnt we know what we were getting into when we married someone in the military? There are no easy answers to these questions. My husbands job involves sacrifice, yes, but we are compensated for his work. And no, we shouldnt feel entitled to anything from civil ians just because we are a mili tary family and make sacrifices on other peoples behalf. Its an all-volunteer military, after all. Thats what people say, at least. My husband doesnt vol unteer in the truest sense of the word. He doesnt have the luxury of choosing when and where he serves. No one asks, Is now a good time to leave your family for a year? (Remember, the military is pro tecting democracy, not practicing it.) And, of course, service members receive a paycheck for their volunteerism. So what an all-volunteer military actually means is that everyone else wont be forced to serve (a la the draft) if they choose not to. I liken it to that moment in a classroom when a teacher asks a question and the crick ets start chirping. Chirp, chirp. Everyone looks at their lap or busies themselves with their notes. No one wants to be called on. Then some brave soul someone who cant stand the crickets any longer and who knows that sooner or later the teacher will start pick ing random people anyway raises his hand and volunteers an answer. Everyone else sighs with relief. Military men and women are those people, the ones who raise their hand and save the shy kid in the back of the class from his worst nightmare. Unlike high school, however, military volunteers receive free (in quotes because noth ing is ever really free, least of all military benefits) health care and tax-free groceries. And then the military volun teers get married and things become really complicated: I didnt raise my hand. Dustins paycheck does not include my first name. Im still practicing democracy despite living under the shadow of an organization that involves forced volunteerism. Its as if Dustin raised his hand in class and then told the teacher, I bet Sarah knows the answer to that. But didnt I know this when I married him? Especially because I grew up in the mili tary? Yes, of course, I knew all these things in the same way that someone trying to get pregnant knows that having a baby will ultimately mean many sleepless nights, pre mature gray hair and stretch marks. I knew it in the same way that someone apply ing to college knows eventu ally they will be stressed about term papers, school loans and exams. I knew it in the same way that someone who brings a puppy into their home knows the pet will one day grow old and die. Sometimes we want some thing so badly, all the related struggles are entirely worth it, or at least, tolerable. But that doesnt make them any easier. Try asking a new mother, Well, didnt you know that you wouldnt get a full nights sleep for the next 18 years? On second thought, dont try that. The point is, sometimes we know what we are getting into, but we do it anyway, usually because we believe the benefits or importance outweighs the risks. I think this is true of any profession. However, some pro fessions require more sacrifice. So when I write that we should thank a policeman, fireman or other individual in a position of service, its not because I think they are enti tled or that they should be pit ied, as if theyve been forced into something against their will. Rather, I think we should thank these people because they volunteered to do work many others would not. For instance, Im thankful that someone else hauls off my trash, that someone else plows the highways, that someone else mans the pediatricians phone in the middle of the night. Im also thankful that it is my husband, not me, who deploys, and that someone else gets the power lines back up after a storm. I dont know if all of the above means others should be grateful, too. I dont know if it means these people are enti tled to something. I dont know if theirs is still a sacrifice given that they are paid and knew what to expect. I just know that these people raised their hand when the crickets were chirp ing. And I am grateful. Hey, MoneyChic! Im ready to make a budget that helps secure my financial future. What advice can you give me? MoneyChic says: Creating your first budget is often the biggest challenge but once this is done, you can begin successfully saving. First, start by figuring out your total income after taxes. Next, write down every bill you have each month. After you do this, try to estimate other expenses such as groceries, eating out, any fees, entertainment, per sonal care, etc. After this is done, you can see what money is left for savings each month. If this doesnt seem realistic and your budget says you have $500 for savings each month but in reality you usually only have $20 then try record ing all the money you spend for three months. Once you have an accurate idea of what you spend each month, you have the basis for your savings plan. Also keep in mind that the caseworkers at Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society can help you develop a budget and sav ings plan. Just call your local office at 542-3515 and sched ule an appointment. Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Catholic CCD 11 a.m. Protestant Worship Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study 6 p.m. in the Barracks Officer Christian Fellowship and Bible study Every Monday at 6 p.m. NAS Jacksonville Chapel Center Corner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road 542-3051 NEX/Commissary holiday closuresThe NAS Jax Commissary will close at 4 p.m. Christmas Eve, Dec. 24 and will remain closed through Christmas Day. The store will reopen Dec. 26. The Commissary will be open normal hours on New Years Eve, Dec. 31 and will be closed New Years Day. The NAS Jax Navy Exchange (NEX) will be open Christmas Eve, Dec. 24 from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. The store will be closed Christmas Day. The NEX will be open New Years Eve, Dec. 31 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and New Years Day, Jan. 1 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.All volunteer is not what it seems

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Cmdr. Gerald Dearie relieved Cmdr. Brian Carpenter as command ing officer of VP-62 during a ceremony in Hangar 117 Dec. 3. Capt. Trey Wheeler, com mander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing-11 (CPRW) presided over the ceremony. With the charge I relieve you, sir, Dearie became the 30th com manding officer of the VP-62 Broadarrows, one of two Reserve VP Squadrons under the operational control of CPRW-11. The squadron consists of 130 drilling Reservists and 119 active component and fulltime support personnel. VP-62 Reservists travel from seven states to train for operational missions in support of national defense and the Global War on Terror. Dearie, a second gen eration P-3 Orion pilot, is from Stone Mountain, Ga. He received his com mission from the United States Naval Academy in 1992, graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science. Following gradua tion, Dearie reported to VA-205 at NAS Atlanta. He then completed primary and intermediary flight training with VT-27 and advanced flight training with VT-31 at NAS Corpus Christi, Texas. He was awarded his pilot wings in July 1995. After gradu ation from fleet replace ment training at VP-30, Dearie reported to VP-45. In August 1999, Dearie was selected for the Pilot Exchange Program and reported to Royal Australian Air Force 292 Squadron in South Australia. Dearie left active duty in July 2002 and joined VP-62 as a drilling Reservist. He held sever al billets including train ing officer and operations officer. In 2010, while taking part in Rim of the Pacific Exercise, Dearie led Crew 8 through the successful launch of a Harpoon (AGM-84) anti-ship missile the first time a Reserve crew launched a harpoon in more than 10 years. Dearie was hired by FedEx Express in 2003 as a professional instruc tor in the McDonnell Douglas MD-11. He is currently a proficien cy check airman in the Boeing 727, qualified to fly as both a first officer and flight engineer. Under the leadership of Carpenter, the squadron received the Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve Battle Efficiency Award for 2011 and the Retention Golden Anchor Award for 2010. Carpenter also led the Broadarrows through the re-establishment of their maintenance department. He guided the efforts which were comprised of 60 newly assigned full-time per sonnel, most without P-3 experience. During his term, the squadron passed three standup milestones: the CPRW-11 Maintenance Process Assessment, the Commander, Naval Air Force Aviation Maintenance Inspection and the Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection. The maintenance department facili tated 375 sorties and 1,400 mishap-free flight hours, completing more than 4,000 maintenance actions and 19,055 acci dent-free maintenance man hours, resulting in a 93 percent fully mission capable rate and 97 per cent mission completion rate. And, during Carpenters tenure the squad ron detached to partici pate in a Joint Task Force Exercise off the coast of southern California flying over 70 hours in support of the exer cise. The Broadarrows were also awarded the CPRW-11 Quarterly Anti-submarine Warfare Symposium Challenge trophy. Carpenter has received orders to the office of the Chief of Naval Aviation. Cmdr. Jon Townsend assumed duty as the VP-62 executive officer. Dearie takes the helm of VP-62 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles mission, since its founding in 1941, is to heal our nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the hospital located on board NAS Jacksonville, and five branch health clinics in Florida (Jacksonville, Key West and Mayport) and Georgia (Albany and Kings Bay). Achievements by the staff of 2,500 military and civilian personnel have led to an award-winning year. Its been an incred ible year for our hospital and branch health clinics, said Naval Hospital Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Lynn Welling. Our achievements under score our constant commit ment to providing the best care possible to each and every one of our patients. The team passed 25 com mand readiness inspections including receipt of the Joint Commission Gold Seal of Accreditation, the nations premier accrediting sys tem for hospitals NH Jax and its reserve units (Naval Operational Health Support Units) received Navy Surgeon Generals Blue H Awards for promoting healthy life styles and medical readiness. First Coast Worksite Wellness Council also recognized the hospital as one of Jacksonvilles healthiest companies. 2011:Naval Hospital Jacksonville celebrates achievements

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 5 Illustrating the hospitals clinical excellence, the family medicine residen cy program was named the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Clinical Site of the Year 2011. The Navy Inspector General recognized the commands Deployment Health Center, Third-Party Collections, Case Management and Civilian Personnel departments as best practices. Whats more, the Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery recognized NH Jax as home of the Case Manager of the Year. On the international front, the hos pital also became the first hospital on Floridas First Coast to be designated as Baby Friendly by the World Health Organization and United Nations Childrens Fund. And the list goes on for the com mand that serves a patient popula tion of approximately 215,000 active and retired Sailors, Soldiers, Marines, Airmen, Reservists, Coast Guardsmen and their families 57,000 of whom are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of the NH Jax facilities. We have an outstanding staff. Each and every day, our dedicated team of military and civilian personnel sees 1,800 outpatients, admits 15 inpatients, cares for 80 people in the ER, performs 14 same-day surgeries, fills 4,700 pre scriptions, conducts 4,600 lab tests and delivers two or three 2 to 3 babies, explains Welling. Additionally, as one of the Navys most deployed medical commands, at any given time up to 15 percent of our military staff is deployed around the world meeting combat, humanitarian and disaster needs. NH Jacksonville also offers numerous patient-centered programs and initiatives. Medical Homeport the Navywide approach to primary care that places patients in the center of a team of caregivers is offered at the hospital and branch health clinics in Mayport and Kings Bay. Our adoption of Medical Homeport means our patients regularly see the same family of caregivers who help plan their care, now and in the future, said Welling. Our move to a whole person approach is designed to enhance our patients access to care, strengthen communications and build stronger relationships between them and their team. Along with its direct care of our nations heroes and their families, NH Jaxs leadership understands the pos itive results of community collabora tion. On behalf of 14 health care orga nizations involved in the Quality Collaborative of Northeast Florida, NH Jax announced in September the development of emergency department pain medication guidelines to ensure patients get the most appropriate med ication, while minimizing controlled substance abuse. The command also participated in University of North Floridas (UNF) annual Caring Community and Quality Collaborative conferences, and Duval County Medical Society events. NH Jax hosts its annual Deployment Mental Health Symposium in partnership with UNF on Dec. 8 and 9, as well as its annu al Patient Safety Symposium early next year. Medicine by its very nature is com plicated, explains Welling. So it is very important for private and public sector healthcare leaders to come together as a community to learn from each other and to advance patient safety and quality care across the region in the hopes of making medicine safer for patient everywhere. Along with NH Jaxs award-winning programs, innovations, approach to quality care and community collabora tion, the command continues to receive high patient satisfaction ratings, which currently are at 92 percent. Were here to heal our nations heroes its that simple, Welling concluded. Photos by HM1(SW) Scott Morgan, MC2 Gary Granger Jr., Pamela Jackson and MC2(SW) Jacob Sippel HOSPITAL: an incredible year

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 As the War Eagles of VP-16 prepare to deploy, their team of aviation ordnancemen (AOs) have kept them armed and mission-ready. In order to train and complete an InterDeployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC), a P-3C Orion squad ron must carry, train with, and deploy a variety of sensors and weapons. Despite typical IDRC challenges, the AO shop has answered the call, supported their shipmates, and excelled during their inspections during the last year. AOs or Ordies are respon sible for maintaining, loading, inspecting, and recovering weapons and external sensors. The most common job is load ing expendable search sensors or sonobuoys, to detect sub marines. The sonobouys are loaded in internal racks and external chutes in the belly of the P-3C. The AO shop loads practice torpedoes and missiles for local training flights and can equip the P-3C with defensive flares to protect against surface to air missiles in threat envi ronments. The daily flow of work revolves around supporting the squadrons flight schedule. AOs arrive at the aircraft a few hours before the flight crew to upload mission ordnance and to conduct a preflight inspec tion. Once the flight crew arrives, AOs stand by to troubleshoot equipment. If the plane is car rying missiles, the AOs pull pins out of the weapons just before takeoff to remove the safeties and arm the weapon. The AOs of VP-16 recent ly completed a success ful Conventional Weapons Training Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI). This inspection lasted several days and involved outside observ ers testing safety and proficien cy standards. The AOs scored very well on this most recent CWTPI. They also assisted the Broadarrows of VP-62 in preparing for their successful CWTPI. AO2 Jose Rosario explained that there are some advantages to working with a small team, Having such a small shop has really helped all of us improve our skills and work on our flex ibility as we have to quickly yet efficiently get all of the parts needed. We must have every thing up and running with buoys loaded before aircrew show up while still being ready to switch planes if something goes wrong. The hard work of the AOs is not lost on the aircrew they support: Our Ordies do an awesome job, said Lt. j.g. Ryan Cunz. Not only do they work quickly, efficiently and get things done correctly; they are team players, always willing to work with you. They are a great contribution to our mission accomplishment. Mission accomplishment is the name of the game, and its not lost on the AOs. AO3 Benjamin Marks shared his thoughts on job satisfac tion, When a crew comes back from their mission and everything works correctly, it is a great feeling knowing all of our training and hard work has paid off and the mission was successfully completed because of it. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) welcomes the second Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) TRACK Program graduate hired at the aviation maintenance facil ity. Adam Sardinas, 26, a decorat ed Marine and Iraq War veteran wounded during his second tour to the Middle East, works as an engine mechanic helper in the J52 Blade Shop at the Crinkley Engine Facility. The job is great, said Sardinas. There is always room to learn here. That is the best part about it. All these guys are very smart. They are incredible. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps as an infantry machine gun ner, but he developed a passion for machinery early on while working on cars with his stepfather. I was always building hotrods and motors, he said. It came nat ural to me. I loved the mechanics of it. Sardinas enlisted in June 2003 two weeks after graduating from Tampa Bay Technical High School, Tampa, Fla. He said he looked for the branch of service that best rep resented G.I. Joe, the action figure toy. For him that was the Marine Corps. The 20-year-old saw plenty of action while deployed for seven months with the 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment to Fallujah, Iraq in 2005. It was during his second tour a year later when then Lance Cpl. Sardinas and two Marines sustained injuries while their unit, Kilo Company, engaged Sunni insurgents in Ramadi, Iraq, the capital of Anbar province. We were on a roof doing over watch on a perimeter, when an RPG (rocket-propelled grenade) exploded, he said. I was knocked unconscious for 30 seconds to a minute. When I finally woke up, they (Marines) were picking me up. They had wrapped up my face and hands. Shrapnel nearly tore off my right thumb, and I had two pieces in my face. After a series of surgeries, the first in Ballad and two more at Naval Hospital Camp Lejeune, N.C., doctors were able to fuse his fractured thumb and insert a metal pin. He still carries the shrapnel in his face as a reminder of that fateful day, April 24, 2006. In addition, Sardinas suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI). His TBI counselor told him about the Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) TRACK Program headquartered in Jacksonville. He applied and inter viewed at the education center specifically designed for wounded warriors. While assigned to the Wounded Warrior Barracks at Camp Lejeune, he received a Purple Heart Medal in October 2006. He was honorably discharged from the Marine Corps in 2007. Sardinas relocated to Jacksonville in August 2010 to start the yearlong WWP TRACK Program. He completed a three-month external internship at FRCSE repairing F/A-18 Hornet aircraft, welding components in Plant Services, and measuring J52 engine compressor blades in the engines facility. Upon graduation, he applied for his current position working with engines. He still deals with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and lim ited range of motion in his right thumb. Yet, he feels fortunate to have the opportunity to pursue a civilian career. One year later, my life has defi nitely changed for the better, he said. Sardinas is the second WWP TRACK graduate employed at FRCSE. The first is Purple Heart recipi ent Christopher Lynch, a U.S. Army veteran with service-connect ed disabilities, hired in January 2011. He also works at the FRCSE Crinkley Engine Facility. VP-8 Fighting Tigers mentor recruitsSeveral members of the VP-8 Fighting Tigers watched proudly as the new Sailors of Recruit Division 372 conducted a pass in review Nov. 10 in front of friends, family and VIPs at Recruit Training Command (RTC), Great Lakes, Ill. Over the past eight weeks, personnel from the squadron have made several trips to RTC during their sponsorship of Division 372. The VP-8 Sailors provided encouragement, mentorship and guid ance for the recruits as they completed require ments ranging from their initial physical fitness assessment to battle stations. The Fighting Tigers, led by Commanding Officer Cmdr. Chris Flaherty, CMDCM Frank King and AMC Dillon Lacoste, attended the recruits battle station exercise, cap ping ceremony and pass in review. It was great to see Division 372 make the transi tion from citizens to Sailors during their time at Recruit Training Command. The recruit division commanders did an outstanding job teaching these Sailors, and setting them up for a successful Navy career, stated Flaherty. All of the VP-8 Sailors who had the opportunity to travel to RTC agreed that it was very rewarding to observe and mentor the recruits. The drastic change that the division made over the course of the eight weeks was evident to all. Division 372 was recognized as the number one division in their graduating group, earned the coveted Chief of Naval Operations Gold Division Award, and the recruits had a 100 percent passing rate on their final physical fitness test. Lacoste remarked, It was a great experience for our Sailors as well as the recruits. I believe the divi sion sponsorship program is a catalyst for success. The recruits gain a better knowledge of their future ratings and general Navy living by spending time with fleet Sailors. Sailors participating in the program gain a sense of remembrance and pride as they relive some of the moments they experienced when they were recruits. I am grateful to have had to opportunity to be a part of this experience, continued Lacoste. Both the recruits and their mentors agreed that the sponsorship program provides an outstanding opportunity for a mutually beneficial partnership, and some of the recruits already expressed their desire to return as mentors in the future, maybe even one day as part of VP-8. A Navy message released Nov. 22 announced revi sions in special duty assignment pay (SDAP). NAVADMIN 356/11 lists updated SDAP levels for active-duty and Reserve component full-time sup port and qualified selected Reserve Sailors on active duty. Increases to existing SDAP levels are effective immediately and reductions are effective 60 days from release of NAVADMIN 356/11. Sailors whose SDAP will be eliminated will receive half of their previous SDAP entitlement for 12 months, or until the Sailor completes the tour, whichever comes first. The SDAP program is an incentive pay ranging from $75 to $450 a month used to entice qualified Sailors to serve in designated billets that are considered extremely difficult or entail arduous duty. Program levels change to reflect the current environment asso ciated with each billet and to sustain adequate manning levels. In order to qualify for SDAP, Sailors must be assigned to and working in a valid billet on the Command Manpower Authorization Listing. This billet must be authorized by the Bureau of Naval Personnel as a special duty assignment billet. Commands holding SDAP billets are required to com plete an annual recertification. NAVADMIN 356/11 supersedes previously released SDAP rates. More than 25,000 Sailors currently receive SDAP. Sailors can read OPNAVINST 1160.6 and talk with their command career counselor to learn more about SDAP. VP-16 aviation ordnancemen in spotlight Navy announces updated special duty assignment pay ratesFRCSE welcomes decorated wounded warrior to federal service

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HSL-42 Detachment One, the Yellow Bellied Sliders, cur rently deployed on board the guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58), was recently called on to conduct a personnel transfer (for humani tarian reasons) from the Ohio class cruise-missile submarine USS Georgia (SSGN 729). The crew of Proud Warrior 431 having previously con ducted several passenger trans fers and medical evacuations during the deployment was tasked with the mission. When informed that the transfer would be from a submarine, the crew knew it would not be a routine event. USS Georgia was unable to leave its station, so the Roberts immediately began to close on the submarines position at best speed. After calculating time and distance to the submarine, it was decided that the transfer would take place the following morning in lieu of a night trans fer. The SH-60B Seahawk crew reviewed submarine transfer procedures and prepared them selves to execute this unique mission. After conducting a thorough preflight brief, Proud Warrior 431 launched just after sunrise and flew toward USS Georgia. The combination of gusty winds and rough sea state were not ideal for the transfer. The course that gave the submarine the most stable deck required a downwind recovery from the starboard sailplane. The preferred recovery from the missile deck would have required a compromise between a headwind com ponent for the helicopter and bow seas for the submarine. Unfortunately, waves crashing over the bow and the missile deck were cause for concern for the Sailors who were required to be on deck. After close coordination, the submarine maneuvered to place the wind directly off the bow, providing a more stable deck, while also providing a headwind component for the helicopter. The pilots, Lt. Seth DiNola and Lt. Jennifer Holsclaw, set up for the approach at approxi mately one-half mile and 200 feet. The helicopter then estab lished a 30-foot steady hover, conned into position by the senior aircrewman, AWRC Scott Wade. On deck below the heli copter were the transfer petty officer and passenger. Three safety observers were on deck, next to the submarines dry dock shelter just aft of the sail. Once in position, junior air crewman AWRAN Robert Dukes was lowered to the deck of USS Georgia where he attached a seabag to the rescue hoist and stayed on deck to give the passenger a quick safe ty brief for the upcoming return to USS Roberts. After Dukes connected him self to the helicopter hoist and then the passenger to himself both were successfully lifted off deck. When safely inside the aircraft cabin, Proud Warrior 431 was cleared for forward flight and departed for USS Roberts. In the end, it was the close coordination between aircrew and submarine that ensured success of the mission. ATCS(AW/NAC) Eric Elkin assumed the duties as first command senior chief at Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville (FACSFACJAX) Nov. 21. The 9578 NEC requirement to have a full-time command senior chief became a reality on Nov. 1. This billet enhances the commands readiness by alleviating the need for a collateral duty senior enlisted leader and allowing a dedicated leader to properly execute the Navys key foundational pro grams. FACSFACJAX is the first FACSFAC command to convert an E-8 billet to a dedicated command senior chief billet. Elkin previously served with the Shadows of VQ-4, Naval Air Maintenance Training Group Detachment 1080, the Pelicans of VP-45, and in September 2009, he reported to Helicopter Sea Combat Wing Atlantic Detachment Jax (CHSCWL) via the United States Navy Senior Enlisted Academy, Newport, R.I. During his assignment at CHSCWL, Elkin was board-selected as a command senior chief and recently attended the Command Leadership School Command Master Chief/Chief of the Boat course. I look forward to working with each and every Sailor attached to FACSFACJAX and will strive to uphold and enforce the highest standards of pro fessionalism and integrity. This goal of achieving excellence will only be attained through active com munication at all levels of our command, while adhering to our command prin ciples: Do Focus On The Basics; Do The Right Thing; Do Respect Yourself and Your Peers; and Do Enjoy What You Do, said Elkin. Proud Warriors Det. One helps submarine Sailor New command senior chief at FACSFACJAX JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 7

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Mandatory retirement date announced for officers selected by SERThe statutory retirement date for officers selected for retirement by the FY-12 Selective Early Retirement (SER) board was announced in NAVADMIN 365/11, released Dec. 2. In accordance with Title 10, United States Code, Section 638, officers selected for early retirement must retire no later than the first day of the seventh month following the Secretary of the Navys approval of the boards results. Based on these criteria, the mandatory retirement date is Apr. 1, 2012. NAVADMIN 365/11 also outlines guidance and procedures for offi cers to apply for a 90-day deferral of retirement. A deferral of retirement may be made on a case-by-case basis in order to prevent a personal hardship to the officer or for humanitarian reasons. Authority and dis cretion to grant deferral lies solely with the Secretary of the Navy. The SER board, originally announced in NAVADMIN 006/11, was convened after high retention, reduction in officer billets and low attri tion among senior active duty unrestricted line officers resulted in an excess. The board was used as a force management measure to balance the force and ensure sufficient senior officers are available at the right times in their careers to serve in critical fleet billets. Naval Supply Systems Command Fleet Logistics Center (NAVSUP FLC) Jacksonville hosted the Joint Personal Property Shipping Office (JPPSO) Southeast kick off meeting Nov. 15-16 at NAS Jacksonville. Attendees included represen tatives from NAVSUP Global Logistics Support, NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville and person nel from JPPSO South Central (Texas). Personnel from the Personal Property Shipping Offices (PPSO) at Beaufort, S.C., and Albany, Ga., and Marine Corps, Army, and Air Force Personal Property Headquarters com mand representatives also attended the two-day event. In an effort to reduce redun dancies, the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) encouraged regionalization of PPSOs with the goal of gain ing logistics efficiencies and improving customer support. The conclusion of this region alization process will result in all back office functions, con tracting of carriers and move ment household goods being performed by JPPSOs. The customer interface, or front office functions, e.g., fielding questions about the online completion of forms and the entire move.mil system, will be performed by local Personal Property Offices (PPPO). NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville will manage JPPSO Southeast, which will provide back office support to all services PPPOs in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and the Caribbean. The first sites will transfer into the regional plan in Fiscal Year (FY) 13, and the final sites in FY16. Once regionalization is complete, there will be seven JPPSOs strategically located across the nation. Key areas of discussion dur ing the event were IT require ments and costs, staffing and human capital requirements, communication strategies and overview of the detailed Plan of Action and Milestones for the transition of each site. Attendees developed a great er understanding of the future JPPSO operations, as well as networking with personnel from other services. The individual networking of JPPSO and PPSO representa tives opened communications channels that will play a critical role in the successful establish ment of JPPSO Southeast. This meeting was extremely beneficial in helping my team understand the unique ser vice requirements at each of the sites we will be support ing under JPPSO Southeast. Insight from the Air Force on their regionalization efforts [JPPSO South Central] pro vided valuable information that we can use to ensure we make a seamless transition here in Jacksonville, said Carlos Vargas, NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville household goods regional manager. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, one of seven fleet logistics cen ters under NAVSUP Global Logistics Support, provides operational logistics, busi ness and support services to fleet, shore and indus trial commands of the Navy, Coast Guard, Military Sealift Command, and other joint and allied forces. NAVSUP FLC Jax to manage new JPPSO Southeast JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 9

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NAS Jax team has also enhanced the quality of life for all personnel and the tenant commands. Great job, he con cluded. I was delighted by the news that Navy Region Southeasts (NRSE) nomi nee to CNIC for the 2011 Installation Excellence Award was selected as this years Navy wide winner, remarked Commander, NRSE Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. All 16 installations in the region did a remarkable job in 2011 and Im proud of them all. However, the demonstrated joint commitment of NAS Jax and its tenant commands to the fleet, fighter and family enabled them to be selected for this prestigious award, he added. Placing second was Naval Base Coronado, Calif., followed by Naval Base Kitsap, Wash. The Commander in Chiefs Annual Award for Installation Excellence was established in 1985 by President Ronald Reagan. The DoD then initiated a ser vice-wide competition on behalf of the president. The president challenged members of the DoD to search for installations where personnel do the best job with their resources to support the mission, and to seek out solutions to the many complex problems they face. To quote the president, I am confi dent that this search for excellence and innovations will yield many new and better ways of accomplishing our mis sion and, at the same time, honor those whose dedication has produced the best defense organization in the world. In meeting the presidents challenge, the Navy, Marine Corps, Army, Air Force and DLA conduct their own intraservice competitions. Valuable benefits from this program include recognition for excellence, creative management, problem-solving ideas and innovation leadership. them along and provide support is critical, he con tinued. Also attending the kickoff event was NS Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Doug Cochrane who gave the students a short history lesson about the Wright brothers and how they fulfilled their dreams doing something they loved. On a cold, windswept day on the North Carolina dunes, they changed the world forever. They were dreamers. Their previ ous business ventures failed because with great achievement there fre quently comes failure, he said. Cochrane also talk ed about Capt. Scott Speicher, a Forrest High School graduate who was killed during Operation Desert Storm in Iraq and whose remains were recently returned home to Jacksonville. Like the Wright brothers, he dared to dream too, he dared to be brave and he dared to change the world, said Cochrane. And, lets talk about the man who want ed a better world for his children a world where they would be viewed by the content of their char acter and not the color of their skin Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. He also was a world changer Cochrane then acknowl edged the teachers and staff members. These people have given you nothing more than 100 percent since you stepped into this school. They dream of a better world and that will come from you and their efforts on your behalf, said Cochrane as the students gave them a hearty round of applause. They will not let you fail. The commu nity, our Navy personnel, your parents and your own personal initiative will not let you fail. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Jeffrey Maclay stat ed, We in the Navy do what we do around the world to make sure that our children and all of you inherit a safer and more peaceful world. What you do with that world depends in large part on your teachers and their commitment to making your education the most meaningful they can. We in the Navy, hope to help with that commitment and to promote excellence in yourselves by acting as tutors and mentors. The last line of the Sailors Creed states, com mitted to the excellence and fair treatment of all. And thats what you can expect from the Sailors who will be mentoring you. They want to see you excel, reach your goals and perhaps raise your goals and be the best you can, continued Maclay. Forrest High School Principal Dr. Alvin Brennan closed the cer emony by saying, I, and Im sure my colleagues will agree, understand the significance of partnering with the Navy and what it will do for our schools. I know that at Forrest High School, it will bring a wealth of opportunity for our students as they tran sition out into adulthood. Im really excited about this collaboration and the benefits it will provide. The program was ini tiated by Forrest High School Psychologist Freedom Reid who approached the Navy school liaison officers about having Sailors come into the schools to mentor the students. We have a real need for this program. The students will meet positive role models and learn about career oppor tunities. And the Sailors will benefit because they will be invited to the school events and be part of our community, said Reid. Its a win-win partner ship and really a great idea to get our Sailors involved out in the schools and help these students, added NAS Jax School Liaison Officer Dawn Mills. CNIC AWARD: Best base Navy widePROJECT NAVY: Partnering with schools 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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scout bombers to Midway Island. The last Pacific carrier, USS Saratoga, had departed Pearl Harbor for repairs on the west coast. At 0600 on Dec. 7, six Japanese carriers launched the first wave of 181 planes composed of torpedo bombers, dive bombers, horizontal bombers and fighters. Just before dawn, U.S. Navy vessels spotted an unidentified subma rine periscope near the entrance to Pearl Harbor. It was attacked and reported sunk by the destroyer USS Ward (DD-139) and a patrol plane. At 0700, an alert operator at an Army radar station at Opana spotted the approaching first wave of the attack force. The officers to whom those reports were relayed did not consider them signifi cant enough to take action. The report of the subma rine sinking was handled routinely, and the radar sighting was passed off as an approaching group of American planes due to arrive that morning. The Japanese air crews achieved complete surprise when they hit American ships and mili tary installations on Oahu shortly before 0800. They attacked military airfields at the same time they hit the fleet anchored in Pearl Harbor. The Navy air bases at Ford Island and Kaneohe Bay, the Marine Corps airfield at Ewa and the Army Air Corps fields at Bellows, Wheeler and Hickam were all bombed and strafed as other ele ments of the attacking force began their assaults on the ships moored in Pearl Harbor. The pur pose of the simultaneous attacks was to destroy the American planes before they could rise to intercept the Japanese. Of the more than 90 ships at anchor in Pearl Harbor, the primary tar gets were the eight battle ships. Seven were moored on Battleship Row along the southeast shore of Ford Island, while the USS Pennsylvania (BB-38) lay in drydock across the channel. Within the first minutes of the attack all the battleships adjacent to Ford Island had taken bomb and or torpedo hits. The USS West Virginia (BB-48) sank quickly. The USS Oklahoma (BB37) turned turtle and sank. At about 0810, the USS Arizona (BB-39) was mortally wounded by an armor-piercing bomb that ignited the ships forward ammunition magazine. The resulting explosion and fire killed 1,177 crew men, the greatest loss of life on any ship that day and about half the total number of Americans killed. The USS California (BB44), USS Maryland (BB-46), USS Tennessee (BB-43) and USS Nevada (BB-36) also suffered varying degrees of damage in the first half hour of the raid. There was a short lull in the fury of the attack at about 0830 when USS Nevada, despite her wounds, managed to get underway and move down the channel toward the open sea. Before she could clear the har bor, a second wave of 170 Japanese planes, launched 30 minutes after the first, appeared over the harbor. They concentrated their attacks on the moving bat tleship, hoping to sink her in the channel and block the narrow entrance to Pearl Harbor. On orders from the harbor control tower, the USS Nevada was beached at Hospital Point and the channel remained clear. When the attack ended shortly before 1000, less than two hours after it began, the American forc es had paid a fearful price. Twenty-one ships of the U.S. Pacific Fleet were sunk or damaged: the battleships Arizona, California, Maryland, Nevada, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West Virginia; cruis ers USS Helena (CL-50), USS Honolulu (CL-48) and USS Raleigh (CL-7); the destroyers USS Cassin (DD-372), USS Downes (DD-375), USS Helm (DD388) and USS Shaw (DD373); seaplane tender USS Curtiss (AV-4); target ship (ex-battleship) USS Utah (AG-16); repair ship USS Vestal (AR-4); minelayer USS Oglala (CM-4); tug USS Sotoyomo (YT-9); and Floating Drydock Number 2. Aircraft losses were 188 destroyed and 159 dam aged, the majority hit before they had a chance to take off. American dead numbered 2,403. That figure included 68 civil ians, most of them killed by improperly fused antiaircraft shells landing in Honolulu. There were 1,178 military and civil ian wounded. Japanese losses were comparatively light. Twenty-nine planes, less than 10 percent of the attacking force, failed to return to their carriers. The Japanese success was overwhelming but it was not complete. They failed to damage any American aircraft carri ers which by a stroke of luck were absent from the harbor. They neglected to damage the shore facili ties at the Pearl Harbor Naval Base, which played an important role in the Allied victory in World War II. American technological skill raised and repaired all but three of the ships sunk or damaged at Pearl Harbor (Arizona, consid ered too badly damaged to be salvaged; Oklahoma, considered too old to be worth repairing, and the obsolete USS Utah (AG16) considered not worth the effort). Most impor tantly, the shock and anger caused by the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor united a divided nation and was translated into a wholehearted commit ment to victory in World War II. Beware of USAA phishing scamIn early November, USAA members began receiv ing email claiming to be from USAA with the sub ject line: USAA Protection Alert. In an elaborate scheme, the email informs members about a failed usaa.com login attempt and to click on a link to update their identity. Clicking on the link directs the member first to a counterfeit website to log on. Logging on pro duces the second website, asking for a PIN. Clicking Next produces another website asking for the member to set up security questions and after click ing Next again, a final website opens, asking for the members sensitive information including: card holders name, card number expiration date, card verification code, billing address, billing zip code, billing phone number, email address and email password. Although the e-mail includes a USAA logo and appears to be from USAA, it is not. This is a phishing scam targeting USAA mem bers and military personnel. If you get an email or pop-up message that asks for personal or financial information, do not reply. And dont click on the link in the message, either. Legitimate companies dont ask for this information via email. If you are concerned about your account, contact the orga nization mentioned in the email using a telephone number you know to be genuine, or open a new Internet browser session and type in the companys correct Web address yourself. In any case, dont cut and paste the link from the message into your Internet browser phishers can make links look like they go to one place, but that actually send you to a different site. PEARL HARBOR: date which will live in infamy JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 11

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Cmdr. Larry Shaffield of Information Dominance Corps Region Southeast retired Nov. 19 after 25 years of honorable naval service at a ceremony at the NAS Jax Pavilion. Capt. Kathryn Yates was the guest speaker. Shaffield enlisted in the Navy in 1986 as an electronics technician and completed the Navys nuclear power training as a reactor opera tor. His first operational assignment was USS Buffalo (SSN 715) where he completed two Western Pacific deployments. He was assigned to Trident Refit Facility Kings Bay in 1992 and during this assign ment he was accepted to Officer Candidate School. After completion of intelli gence officer training, Shaffield was assigned to U.S. Atlantic Command as a Caribbean geo political analyst. With the trans fer of geographic responsibility for the Caribbean to U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), he was reassigned to the SOUTHCOM Headquarters in Miami, complet ing the tour as branch chief for Caribbean and Central American Analysis. His next assignment was VP-45 at NAS Jacksonville. While assigned as the squadrons aviation intelligence officer he made two deployments in support of counter drug operations in the Caribbean and in support of allied operations in the Balkans. Following VP-45, he was assigned to the Weapons Tactics Unit of VP-30 as a strike mission planning instructor, providing mission planning and intelligence training to P-3 Orion Squadron strike crews and intelligence sup port personnel throughout the maritime patrol and reconnais sance force. In 2004, Shaffield reported to USS Tarawa (LHA-1) as the ships intelligence officer responsible for the intelligence, cryptologic and electronic warfare divisions. He completed a wartime deployment as part of Expeditionary Strike Group One. In 2006, he was assigned to U.S. Strategic Command where he played in integral role in the J2s intelligence support to information operations and current intelligence reporting. His final assignment was as officer in charge (OIC) for Information Dominance Corps Region Southeast. During his tenure, Shaffield has overseen the integration of both addition al geographic regions and addi tional professional career fields into the national architecture for Reserve Component management of Information Dominance Corps personnel. Shaffield and his wife, Carol, have two children, Mairead, a sophomore at Troy University and Jack, a plebe at the United States Merchant Marine Academy. Shaffield will return to his home town of Dothan, Ala. where he will begin a new career in the nuclear power industry. Veterans honored at West Jacksonville Health and RehabLt. Cmdr. Charles Mayfield of Information Dominance Corps Region Southeast (IDCRSE) Jacksonville joined a regional chapter of The American Foreign Legion at the West Jacksonville Health and Rehabilitation Center/Retirement Home to serve as the guest speaker at a ceremony honoring the resident military veterans Nov. 9. The ceremony included a rousing rendition of the Pledge of Allegiance, patriotic music, reading of poems, and an awards ceremony. Against the backdrop of vibrant decorations and smiling faces, Mayfield spoke with infectious ener gy and presented each veteran in attendance with a certificate, folded American flag, and a proud and heartfelt thank-you. Mayfield credited the Vietnam-era veterans with being the generation that instilled a sense of patri otism and duty to God and country in him. He also noted how the American Legion was responsible for sending him to Boys State, a sum mer program for high-school students sponsored by the American Legion that focuses on state and local government. Mayfield concluded the ceremony by acknowl edging that following generations have big shoes to fill but said that we should all do our best to con tinue to carry on honorable traditions. For those interested in volunteering at the West Jacksonville Health and Rehabilitation Center or to find out more information, contact Althea Kensey at Activities@WestJacksonville.com. Shaffield retires after 25 years a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert announced expanded occasion for wear and updated policies for the Navy Working Uniform (NWU) Types I, II and III in NAVADMIN 366/11, released Dec. 2. There has been a lot of inter est throughout the fleet regard ing expanding the locations that Sailors can wear the Navys working uniform. Several weeks ago the CNO asked Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Rick West to take a look at the Navy Working Uniform policy. Following their review, I am proud to report that we are extending the wear poli cy of the working uniform to improve the practicality while ensuring professionalism and maintaining its value, said Greenert. I want my shipmates to look sharp, be uniform and have the quality they deserve. The NAVADMIN expands the authorized stops for which NWUs may be worn when com muting to and from home and work, and to allow wear of the NWU during selected events when authorized by regional commanders or commanding officers. These policies will take effect Jan. 1 for all continental United States, Hawaii and Guam com mands. NWU wear is authorized for commuting and all normal tasks, such as stops at child care centers, gas stations, offbase shopping, banking, at the DMV, and dining before, during and after the work day. Since NWUs are not a lib erty uniform, consumption of alcohol while off base in the NWUs is not permitted. Area or regional commanders may fur ther restrict this policy within their geographic limits. Additionally, the NWU Type I is authorized for wear by all Commander, Navy Recruiting Command (CNRC) recruiters in the continental United States, Hawaii and Guam. NWUs are not authorized for wear on commercial trav el such as airlines, railways, or buses in the continental United States. However, they may be worn on military and government-contracted flights between military airfield installations, as well as com muter transportation such as city and commuter buses, subways and ferries. The uni forms may also be worn at the Pentagon Metro and Pentagon commuter slug lines. The NAVADMIN also out lines the manner of wear for the NWU off base. The shirt/blouse is required to be worn at all times. Commanders also must ensure grooming standards are enforced. Trousers must be bloused and the only head gear autho rized is the eight point cover and the parka hood must be stowed unless being used. The fleece with chest rank tab is also authorized as a standalone outer garment. Regional commanders will stipulate the wear of the NWU for official ceremonies and functions, such as Fleet Week, celebrations and parades, and sporting events with media interest. NAVADMIN 259/11 wear rules for these uniforms out side of the continual United States remain in effect. A total of 12,261 Sailors reviewed by the Navy Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) were selected for retention, the Navy announced Dec 2. Additionally, a total of 125 Sailors not selected for retention by the ERB were able to stay Navy after qualifying for a rating conversion. Conversion waivers were introduced in NAVADMIN 160/11 to increase options for ERB-eligible Sailors. Conversion applications were held until the ERB had completed delib erations. Only Sailors not selected for retention in-rate by the ERB were con sidered for conversion and all applicants had to satisfy eligibility requirements to be considered for the limited number of vacancies in undermanned career fields. The decision to establish the ERB was made after careful consideration, said Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, chief of naval personnel. Our Sailors have served honorably and we are committed to doing all we can to help them transi tion. The ERB was announced earlier this year after record high retention and low attrition among active duty Sailors left the Navy overmanned. The purpose was to help the Navy rebalance the force in terms of seniority, experience and skills. The ERB reviewed the records of nearly 16,000 selected third class petty officers through senior chief petty offi cers from 31 overmanned ratings, who had greater than seven, but less than fifteen years of cumulative service as of October 2011. The quota-based board was held in two phases. Phase I convened in late August and reviewed the records of 7,625 Sailors in pay grades E4 and E5. Of the Phase I Sailors reviewed, 5,588 were selected for retention. Of the Sailors reviewed in Phase I, 1,922 Sailors were not selected for retention. The second phase convened in September and reviewed the records of 7,761 Sailors in pay grades E6, E7 and E8. Of the Sailors reviewed in Phase II, 6,673 were selected for retention. Of the Sailors reviewed in Phase II, 1,025 were not selected for retention. An additional 53 Sailors who were not selected for retention had their ERB results vacated in accordance with NAVADMIN 129/11, after they were advanced in rate from the September 2011 Navy advancement examination cycle. These Sailors will remain in their current rate. Navy is taking an active role in help ing the Sailors not selected for retention through this transition. Specifically, Navy is offering employment outplace ment services and enhanced transition benefits for ERB-affected Sailors who will not be able to serve out the duration of their contract. Sailors transitioning from the Navy through ERB will also have access to the Navy transition assistance programs, are eligible for involuntary separation pay, and will retain commissary and Navy Exchange privileges for an addi tional two years after separation. Navy Personnel Command (NPC) established a transition assistance information webpage providing Sailors and leader ship a central location to find transition assistance information and resources. The NPC customer service center is also available to assist Sailors in locating transition assistance resources.Wear rules for navy working uniforms expanded Navy announces results of enlisted retention board selection process JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 13

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Thanksgiving is bare ly over, but the holiday shopping season is in full gear. Consumers previ ously had a restriction on over spending and imposed a tight grip on their dollars. Every year you find yourself say ing, I will not spend as much money as I did last year. The holidays are a time of year when we all tend to spend too much money. We then find our selves strapped for cash at the beginning of the year when we should be starting the new year off on the right foot. The fol lowing are some tips to save money this holiday season. Make a budget and stick to it! Start early The early bird catches the worm. In this case the early bird catches the good sales and you are less stressed towards Christmas time! Have children make a list of five things they would like to have and choose one to buy. Instead of buying gifts for the whole fam ily, draw names from a hat and designate estab lished dollar amounts. Cut costs when plan ning holiday travel arrangements early. Be flexible on dates and times you are willing to travel. Find websites with free shipping for you online shoppers. Do research online to find out where the prod uct you are looking for is cheapest. Think outside of the box for gift ideas like a free yard cleaning or one free car wash. Remember, the goal is to avoid using credit at all costs. This includes applying for new lines of credit, small loans, or credit cards. Definitely avoid pay day loans to help you make holiday purchases, as it is the downfall which brings future financial burdens. Finally, by going cash only you can stop the overspending trend and begin your New Year on a positive note. Donate blood, save livesA Florida/Georgia Blood Alliance holiday blood drive on board NAS Jacksonville is sched uled for Dec. 10, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Navy Operational Support Center Jax on Yorktown Avenue. Watch what you spend during the holidays MWR seeking sponsorsThe Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department of NAS Jacksonville is soliciting commercial/corporate sponsors for a wide range of 2012 special events and advertising opportuni ties. Revenues generated through sponsorship and advertising are used spe cifically to enhance qual ity of life programs for our service members and their families. Through sponsorship and advertising you can develop brand loyalty, consumer affiliation and promote your products and services to more than 25,000 base personnel. For more informa tion contact the MWR Marketing Department at (904) 542-8205 or e-mail jaxs_nas_mwrmktg@ navy.mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 15

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ERB opportunity: Shipmates to Workmates programNow that the Navy is notifying the more than 3,000 Sailors impacted by the Enlisted Retention Board (ERB), six major Navy commands introduced the Shipmates to Workmates program to aid transition ing Sailors in competing for job opportunities as fed eral civilians. The program managed jointly by the Naval Sea Systems Command, Naval Air Systems Command, Naval Facilities Command, Naval Supply Systems Command, Commander, Naval Installations, Space and Naval Warfare Command, and the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations provides information about career opportunities available at partnering commands and actively assists sailors prepare job applications and resumes. The participating commands will steer separating sailors, command career counselors and transition assistance coordinators to a dedicated Shipmates to Workmates website to facilitate participation. This website will serve as a one-stop shop for sailors seeking Navy-related employment. Finding out that you are being separated from the Navy, will be a significant blow, said Rear Adm. Clarke Orzalli, vice commander NAVSEA. The Shipmates to Workmates program is an opportunity to do what we can to soften the blow, as well as continue to utilize their significant skills for the benefit of the Navy. Through the website and other outreach programs, the effort will attempt to demystify the government service hiring process, match job supply to demand, link existing Navy and Defense Department transition support, and assist qualified sailors with local hiring processes. The Shipmates to Workmates program is simply good leadership this program demonstrates our leadership commitment to our sailors by assisting those being involuntarily separated, said Cmdr. Pat Sanders, NAVSEAs lead for the program. Each of the participating commands will participate in job fairs and other hiring events for transitioning sailors. Forums are scheduled at fleet concentration areas throughout the country. For more information on the Shipmates to Workmates program as well as a full schedule of upcoming career forums, visit the Shipmates to Workmates website at http://jobs.navair. navy.mil/sm2wm/. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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Military members from the Resident Officer in Charge of Construction (ROICC) Haiti office spent Veterans Day along side former president and Mrs. Jimmy Carter to work on a Habitat for Humanity project in Leogane, Haiti. Cmdr. Jeanine Avant, ROICC Haiti and Cmdr. Dewayne Roby along with other volun teers from the U.S. Embassy joined the former President and his wife to complete the construction of 150 core homes Veterans Day weekend. A core home consists of 215 sq. ft. of living space for an average Haitian family of five. The homes have a traditional front porch, combination ply wood/concrete masonry block walls with a concrete floor and a corrugated metal roof. It breaks ones heart to see the living conditions of Haitian families, especially since the earthquake has forced many of the survivors to live in Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) camps, said Avant. I am happy that we could pro vide some assistance, although so much more is needed. Leogane, Haiti is about 20 miles west of Port au Prince where Habitat for Humanity has been involved in con structing a permanent housing community near the epicenter of the Jan. 12, 2010 earthquake. The devastating earthquake killed approximately 300,000 people and destroyed 90 per cent of the infrastructure in Leogane and left thousands of families homeless. Cmdr. Dewayne Roby, who deployed with the Joint Task Force Haiti immediately after the earthquake in 2010, has seen improvements since that time, but agrees that there is much more work to be done and is proud to contribute to this effort. ROICC Haiti was established by Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC SE) in November 2010, as a forward-deployed field office to administer the Haiti Humanitarian Assistance Program (HAP) construction. Besides ROICC Haiti, a team of project managers, archi tects/engineers, contract specialists and others sup port the Haiti HAP projects back at NAVFACs Facilities Engineering Command in Jacksonville. The projects are located throughout Haiti to assist the country in preparing for any future natural disasters. Projects administered by the ROIC include emergency oper ations centers, disaster relief warehouses, fire stations, and community clusters which will provide the local leaders the ability to coordinate and effec tively respond to emergencies and provide necessary relief to the Haitian people. Military volunteers building homes in Haiti 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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Twelve NAS Jacksonville commands and departments participated in a Festival of Trees contest sponsored by the Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department and Navy Exchange. A short ceremony was held Dec. 1 to announce the three top winners of the competition. Placing first was the Navy Operational Support Center which received a check for $500 towards their MWR fund. The NAS Jax Security Department/Honor Support Teams tree was selected for second place earning them $300 and the Navy Jax Yacht Club placed third earning them $200. The theme for the tree decorating was patriotism. The trees were judged on overall presentation, creativity, implementa tion of the theme and command representation. This event has provided a great opportunity to not only participate in a fun holiday event, but also give you and your commands the chance to show your holiday spirit, camaraderie and be represented in a high traf fic area, said NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Jeffrey Maclay during the event. NAS Jax holds Festival of Trees JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 21

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22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. Hot shot at NAS Jax Golf ClubHole in one Keith Hall: No. 9 Blue,136 Yards,9 iron

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We want to hear from you! Do you have a comment or suggestion on a recent MWR experience? Go to surveymon key.com/nasjaxmwrThe Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Monday Madness Pizza Special 14 one topping pizza only $5! 2 9 p.m., Dine-in or carry-out only! Call 542-3900 The Zone is featuring hand made burgers on Wednesdays! Texas Holdem Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Bean Bag Toss Wednesday at 7 p.m. Play Bingo at lunch Monday Friday at 11:15 a.m. Evening sessions are Sunday, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday at 6:30 p.m. Cash prizes! New Years Day Bingo $150 per person Doors open at 11 a.m., games begin at 1 p.m. NFL Sunday Ticket At the Bud Brew House 12:30 p.m. close $.50 wings! Beverage specials!Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Bowling Special $5.95 all you can bowl 4 10 p.m., shoe rental not included Rising Stars Youth League Begins December 10 League plays on Saturday mornings at 10:30 a.m. New Years Eve Extreme Bowling Party December 31, 7 p.m. 1 a.m. $15 per person, $20 after Dec. 29 Includes bowling, shoe rental, music, party favors, pizza, midnight toast and breakfast buffet! Full lanes may be reserved by purchas ing 6 tickets. New Year Bowling Specials January 1, 16 p.m. $1.50 games all day Shoe rental not included January 2, 4 10 p.m. $5.95 all you can bowl, shoe rental includedFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor pool is now open regular hours Monday-Friday 5: 308 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 8 p.m. Weekend hours 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 7 8 a.m. in the Base Gym 45 Minute high intensity group training Jingle Bell Jog December 15 at 11:30 a.m. Pre-register ends December 9 Day of race registration 10:30 11:15 a.m. 40,000 Calories of Christmas Now through January 22 Two person teams! Prizes awarded!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Ringling Bros. Barnum & Bailey Circus January 20 22 $13 per person ITT is now booking Sandals Resorts, all inclusive vacations! The Gaylord Palms Resort is now offer ing a preferred rate for ITT customers. The resort is located just 1 mile from Walt Disney World theme park! Rates include Ice and Snow tickets. St. Augustine Nights of the Lights Adult $7 Child $4 Amelia Island Attractions Holiday Home Tour $20; Ghost Tour Adult $8 Child $4; Pub Crawl $23; Museum Family Pass $10 College Bowl Games Gator Bowl $35 and Capital Bowl $74 Jax Zoo Train, Carousel tickets and Jax Zoo Spooktacular now available at ITT! Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day pass $28.25 Stone Mountain Georgia $20.75 Georgia Aquarium $16.50-$22 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Vacation Condominium Rentals For as little as $329 per week / per unit Choose from over 3,500 locations in over 80 countries Call 1-800-724-9988 or visit www.afv club.com Installation #62 Blue Man Group in Orlando $48, includes free admission to select CityWalk venues. Disney World Orlando, Florida Due to the success of the Disney Salute, the expiration dates of the tickets have been extended until September 27, 2012. If you have already purchased and used the six allotted 2011 salute tickets, you may purchase an additional six tickets. Disney ITT prices for military families: $135.50 for a 4 Day ticket with Park Hopper Option $135.50 for a 4 Day ticket with Water Park Fun & More $162 for a 4 Day ticket with both Park Hopper AND Water Park Fun & More The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2011-2012 Season (First Orchestra seat ing) Wicked, Beauty and The Beast, Jersey Boys, and Les Miserables. Jacksonville Jaguar tickets Section 146 and 147 $58.50 Jag Game Day Shuttle $12 per person Legoland 1 day $39.50; 2 day $48.50 Daytona 500 February 18 26, 2012 $27 to $199 Daytona Bike Week March 10 & 17 2012 $25 Monster Jam March 3, 2012 $25 $41 Gator Bowl Patches $5 Includes saving at local restaurants, amusement parks, golf course and more! MOSH $7 $12Liberty Cove RecreationTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5423491 for information. FREE Airport Shuttle December 14 January 12 Sign-up at Liberty Vault Indoor Rock Climbing December 10 Departs Liberty Vault at 1:30 p.m. Free Jaguars Game December 11 Departs Liberty Vault at 11 a.m. Dave & Busters Trip December 15 Departs Liberty Vault at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees December 13 & 27 for active duty December 15 & 29 for retirees & DoD personnel Mulligans Kids Night Thursday Purchase a regular priced meal and kids (12 and under) receive a regular item at price or a free kids menu item. December Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $17 Monday Friday after 12 p.m. Not valid on holidays Monday & Tuesday December Special Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fees included Not valid on holidays Winter Solstice Special December 22 Play 18-holes for $17 Cart and green fees included Santa Sez Golf Tournament December 22, 10 a.m. shotgun start $45 military, $55 civilian guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Holiday Camp Dates Week 1 Dec 19 23 Week 2 Dec 25 30 Movie under the Stars featuring The Polar Express December 9 at dusk Patriots Grove Free admission & popcorn! $.50 drinks Tropical Freeze December 17 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Noon 4 p.m. Free snow sledding, musical entertain ment, snacks and beverages Childrens Holiday Bingo The Zone December 17 Doors open at 4 p.m., games begin at 5 p.m. $10 per person Children must be able to daub on their own Gift cards awarded as prizesFlying Club Call 777-8549 /6035 Flying Club Ground School January 9 February 15 $500 per person December Special 20% discount on aircraft rentals Monday Thursday Cannot be combined with other dis counts New members initiation fees waived! A saving of $75 $125! JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 23

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Defense Secretary Leon Panetta com memorated the 100th anniversary of naval aviation Dec. 2, praising mil itary aviators boldness and courage and expressing hope that Congress will draw inspiration from it in tackling the nations financial challenges. Speaking at the Naval Aviation Centennial Gala here, the secretary expressed concern about additional, automatic across-the-board cuts the Defense Department could face if Congress doesnt take action in the next year. Those cuts, if implemented, would undercut all of the departments strate gy-driven efforts, he said, and he called on Congress to draw inspiration from the aviation community and put par tisanship aside to find a solution to the countrys fiscal problems. If our aviators, if our men and women in uniform, are willing to put their lives on the line, are willing to fight and to die for this country, then surely our elected leaders should be able to take a small risk in order to do whats right for this country, he said. Panetta joined a long list of aviation luminaries and military and defense leaders in paying tribute to the achieve ments naval aviators have made since aviation pioneer Eugene Ely first launched from the bow of the Navy test ship Pennsylvania in 1911. Boldness has been at the heart of our aviators ever since, he said, and remains critical as aviation assets pro vide a capability absolutely essential to projecting power overseas. While providing an unrivaled force on the seas, the secretary noted, their contribution also extends inland. In Afghanistan, hundreds of miles from the nearest sea, carrier aviation assets account for fully half of all air combat missions and one-third of close air sup port for our troops in contact with the enemy, he said. Meanwhile, aviation assets pro vide critical relief in times of crisis, he added, recalling his visit last month to USS Blue Ridge, which dispatched helicopters loaded with food, water and supplies via helicopter after Japans dev astating earthquake and tsunami. All this takes a talented team of more than just pilots, Panetta said. He recog nized the forward air controllers, logis tics specialists, maintainers, rescue swimmers, crew chiefs and weapons system specialist who are integral parts of the naval aviation community. They, too, are the heroes we cele brate tonight, he said. That boldness will remain critical to maintaining air superiority into the future, he told the group. We need the entire military to be bold to take the offensive, to innovate, to embrace risk, he said. That, Panetta said, includes adapt ing not only to a changing strategic environment, but also to a new period of fiscal constraint. As the department focuses on build ing a strong military for the future while meeting its fiscal responsibilities, Panetta offered assurance that it will remain the worlds best military while keeping faith with troops and their fam ilies. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert, Assistant Marine Corps Commandant Gen. Joseph Dunford Jr., Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Robert J. Papp Jr. and Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. James A. Winnefeld Jr. all joined Panetta last night in paying tribute to a century of naval aviation. Mabus noted the vision that has guid ed naval aviation for the past century. [It] has adapted, grown and evolved over the past 100 years, he said. It is continuing to do so, and due to the courage, skill and professionalism of every sailor and marine, naval aviation will remain an integral part of the most formidable expeditionary fighting force the world has ever known. Greenert recognized that people not equipment or technology are the heart of naval aviation. As we turn our focus to the future, it is important that we remain focused on winning today and in the future, always work together to provide offshore options for our nation, and utilize our diverse and talented force responsibly when employing our resources, he said. Dunford, who said he has witnessed aviators flying into harms way to sup port troops under attack or provide lifesaving medical evacuation support, thanked the community for its strict code of honor to its comrades. Papp recognized the commitment aviators repeatedly demonstrate as they put themselves into harms way to pro tect or save others. Winnefeld, a career aviator, congrat ulated the aviation community for its first century of successes and looked to the future with a live video feed from USS George H.W. Bush as it transits home after its first deployment. You are the best, Panetta summa rized in his address to the aviation com munity. You are great citizens. You are great warriors. You are great patriots. In a gesture of gratitude for their ser vice and sacrifice, First Lady Michelle Obama invited military families, including families of the military fallen -to be among the first to see the White House decked out for this years holiday season. This holiday season, she said, the White House is offering a special tribute to those who serve. Among the White Houses 37 Christmas trees scattered along the visitor tour route are two special Christmas trees intended to honor ser vice members and their families. The official White House Christmas tree is a towering 18-foot balsam fir in the Blue Room and is a salute to service members of all branches. The tree is decorated with holiday cards created by military children around the world; service medals, badg es and patches; and military images adorned with pinecone frames and rib bons. Some of those cards are inspiring, Obama said, sharing one of the writ ten messages. Five children in Medical Lake, Wash., wrote, No matter how many Christmases our dad misses, he makes every Christmas special and we love him. In another card is a more matter-offact message, the first lady noted. Hey Dad, its cool youre in Italy. So when are you coming back, because I already know what I want for Christmas. A Gold Star Christmas tree, bright with gold star ornaments and framed Purple Heart medals, graces the visi tors entrance on the East Wing landing. The tree was decorated by families of military fallen and features photos of fallen heroes and messages from their loved ones. A mom from Anchorage, Alaska, wrote this note to her son, Obama said: I love and miss you, son. Thank you for all of the great memories we shared. The tree is surrounded with photos and stories from more than 800 Gold Star families, the first lady noted. Each one showcases the strength and resilience that characterizes our Gold Star families, she said. In the coming weeks, visitors to the White House will be able to write notes to service members to express their gratitude, and Gold Star families will be invited to inscribe a ceramic gold star ornament with a personalized note. These families deserve the gratitude of a thankful nation, the first lady said, particularly in light of the sacrifices they make each day. Spouses are rais ing kids alone while their loved ones are deployed and their children are taking on extra responsibilities to help. And shes been inspired, she said, by the sur vivors of the fallen who continue to give back to their communities. Americans need to hear these stories, she said, and to understand what its like to be a military family. The Joining Forces campaign is intended to do just that, she said. The first lady and Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, started the initia tive earlier this year to raise awareness of military families sacrifices and to rally Americans around them. We wanted to make sure that never again would someone have to ask the question: What is a Gold Star family and what does that sacrifice mean, she said. We all should know. Obama said thats one of the reasons the troops and their families are high lighted at the White House this holiday season. The first lady wrapped up with her own message of gratitude. I want to thank all of the Gold Star families for your enduring strength and commitment to this country, she said. And I want to thank all of the troops, all of our veterans, all of our military families, whose service and sacrifice inspires us all. The first lady then invited the mili tary children lining the front rows to decorate holiday cookies and orna ments with her in the State Dining Room. She iced cookies alongside them as she praised their festive creations. The military families also toured holi day decorations in several of the White Houses ornate rooms. A big attrac tion was the White House gingerbread house, which is made up of 400 pounds of gingerbread, white chocolate and marzipan. But Obamas dog, Bo, upstaged even the gingerbread house. Scattered throughout the tour route are five Bo topiaries made of various materials such as felt, buttons, pom-poms, candy, and even trash bags. As the children did their crafts, they had the opportunity to compare the fake first dogs with the real deal when the first lady brought Bo to the State Dining Room for a visit. Panetta, defense leaders celebrate naval aviation First lady kicks off holiday season with military families 24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011



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Navy partners with Duval schools to mentor studentsA ceremony was held Nov. 29 at Nathan B. Forrest High School to kick off Project Navy Appreciating and Valuing Youth (N.A.V.Y.), a pilot program which pro motes mentorship to students by Navy personnel. Sailors from NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport commands are partnering with four Duval County schools Forrest High School, Ribault Middle School, Stillwell Middle School and George Washington Carver Elementary School to connect with students and provide positive role models. The event began with the playing of the nation al anthem by Navy Band Southeast and presenta tion of colors by members of the Forrest High School AFROTC Unit. Forrest High School student and AFROTC member James Stevens then led the audi ence in the Pledge of Allegiance. Duval County Public Schools Superintendent Ed Pratt-Dannals thanked those in attendance and offered his remarks. We are very fortunate that the Navy has chosen these schools to partner with. Navy personnel are exemplary citizens and outstanding role models in providing service to our community and to our country and will be great mentors to our students, said Dannals. A mentor can have a significant positive impact on someones life, students typically have better grades and attendance, are more focused and have great goals. And to have a person next to them to help move Remembering Pearl Harbor ~ Dec. 7, 1941 ~ The road to war between Japan and the United States began in the 1930s when differences over China drove the two nations apart. In 1931 Japan conquered Manchuria, which until then had been part of China. In 1937 Japan began a long and ulti mately unsuccessful campaign to conquer the rest of China. In 1940, the Japanese govern ment allied their country with Nazi Germany in the Axis Alliance, and soon occupied all of Indochina. The United States was alarmed by Japans moves so it increased military and financial aid to China, embarked on a program of strengthening its own military power in the Pacific, and cut off the shipment of oil and other raw materials to Japan. Because Japan was poor in natu ral resources, its government viewed these steps especially the embargo on oil as a threat to the nations survival. To neutralize the danger posed by the U.S. Pacific Fleet based at Pearl Harbor, Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, commander of the Japanese fleet, devised a plan to destroy the U.S. fleet at the outset of the war through a surprise attack. In October 1941 the naval gen eral staff gave final approval to Yamamotos plan, which called for the formation of an attack force commanded by Vice Admiral Chuichi Nagumo. It centered around six heavy aircraft carriers accompanied by 24 supporting vessels. A separate group of submarines was to sink any American warships that escaped the Japanese carrier Force. Nagumos fleet departed in strict est secrecy for Hawaii on Nov. 26, 1941. The ships route crossed the North Pacific and avoided nor mal shipping lanes. At dawn on Dec. 7, the Japanese task force had approached undetected to a point slightly more than 200 miles north of Oahu. Fortunately, the U.S. aircraft car riers were not at Pearl Harbor at this time. On Nov. 28, Adm. Kimmel sent USS Enterprise under Rear Admiral William Halsey to deliver Marine Corps fighter planes to Wake Island. On Dec. 4, Enterprise delivered the aircraft and by Dec. 7, the task force was on its way back to Pearl Harbor. On Dec. 5, Kimmel sent the USS Lexington with a task force under Rear Adm. Newton to deliver 25 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011 New VP-62 CO Seahawk & SubExcellence NAS Jacksonville was named winner of the 2011 Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) Commander in Chiefs Installation Excellence Award (large category). CNIC is com prised of 11 regions and 72 bases worldwide. It is my privilege to inform the military and civilian men and women of NAS Jax that our installation has been selected as this years Commander, Navy Installations Command winner for best Navy installation large cat egory, said NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Jeffrey Maclay. This award reflects the hard work by all who help NAS Jax deliver the most effective and efficient readiness from the shore. Our synergistic One Team, One Fight relationship targeted the best use of available resources to ensure all accomplished their assigned mis sions while at the same time focusing on innovative manage ment actions that increase productivity. Bravo Zulu to all and thank you for what you and your teams do every day, he continued. In its mission to support the fleet, fighter, family throughout 2011, NAS Jax was the premier installation for delivering effec tive, sustained and improved shore readiness to its 15 home-based squadrons, Sailors and civilian personnel, as well as supporting numerous joint commands, gov ernment agencies and carrier readiness sustainment exercises. Its personnel approached every chal lenge with a leading-edge mental ity and continued their unprec edented, accident-free growth by exceeding the Chief of Naval Personnel mandated 75 percent mishap reduction goal in addition to being almost 70 percent below the industry standards, among many other accomplishments. CNIC Vice Adm. Michael Vitale extended congratulations to the NAS Jax team. I congratulate and send my heartfelt Bravo Zulu to NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Jeffrey Maclay and his team for their outstanding leadership in winning the FY 2011 Commander Navy Installations Command Commander in Chiefs Annual Award for Installation Excellence, said Vitale. Competition this year was very tight and all nomination packages were impressive and spoke to all of the great accomplishments that CNIC installations made world wide. However, NAS Jacksonville distinguished itself and made the best use of its available resources to accomplish its assigned mis sions, while at the same time focusing on innovative manage ment actions to increase the pro ductivity of its work force. Through your hard work and dedication, the CNIC selects NAS Jax as Best in the Navy

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 Learn about naval aviation history and heritage during the yearlong Centennial of Naval Aviation celebration. Discover the wide-ranging scope of naval aviation activities, including people, aircraft, ships, innovations and other significant events. This nationally sponsored series of events will take place throughout the year. Centennial events are already underway at NAS Jacksonville and will continue throughout the year, culminating with the NAS Jax Centennial of Naval Aviation Air Show Nov. 5-6. Mission To honor 100 years of mission-ready men and women, and recognize unique aviation-related achievements through event-driven celebrations. Learn more at www.public.navy.mil/airfor/centennial. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS I am committed to mak ing sure this column does not become a yearlong rant about the ups and downs of having my husband deployed, but reactions to my Occupy col umn bring up common mili tary-spouse conundrums: Do military families think they are owed something because of their sacrifices? And can you even call it a sacrifice when my husband is paid for his job? A similar and equally per plexing problem for military spouses is: Didnt we know what we were getting into when we married someone in the military? There are no easy answers to these questions. My husbands job involves sacrifice, yes, but we are compensated for his work. And no, we shouldnt feel entitled to anything from civilians just because we are a military family and make sacrifices on other peoples behalf. Its an all-volunteer military, after all. Thats what people say, at least. My husband doesnt vol unteer in the truest sense of the word. He doesnt have the luxury of choosing when and where he serves. No one asks, Is now a good time to leave your family for a year? (Remember, the military is protecting democracy, not practicing it.) And, of course, service members receive a paycheck for their volunteerism. So what an all-volunteer military actually means is that everyone else wont be forced to serve (a la the draft) if they choose not to. I liken it to that moment in a classroom when a teacher asks a question and the crick ets start chirping. Chirp, chirp. Everyone looks at their lap or busies themselves with their notes. No one wants to be called on. Then some brave soul someone who cant stand the crickets any longer and who knows that sooner or later the teacher will start picking random people anyway raises his hand and volunteers an answer. Everyone else sighs with relief. Military men and women are those people, the ones who raise their hand and save the shy kid in the back of the class from his worst nightmare. Unlike high school, however, military volunteers receive free (in quotes because nothing is ever really free, least of all military benefits) health care and tax-free groceries. And then the military volunteers get married and things become really complicated: I didnt raise my hand. Dustins paycheck does not include my first name. Im still practicing democracy despite living under the shadow of an organization that involves forced volunteerism. Its as if Dustin raised his hand in class and then told the teacher, I bet Sarah knows the answer to that. But didnt I know this when I married him? Especially because I grew up in the mili tary? Yes, of course, I knew all these things in the same way that someone trying to get pregnant knows that having a baby will ultimately mean many sleepless nights, pre mature gray hair and stretch marks. I knew it in the same way that someone apply ing to college knows eventu ally they will be stressed about term papers, school loans and exams. I knew it in the same way that someone who brings a puppy into their home knows the pet will one day grow old and die. Sometimes we want some thing so badly, all the related struggles are entirely worth it, or at least, tolerable. But that doesnt make them any easier. Try asking a new mother, Well, didnt you know that you wouldnt get a full nights sleep for the next 18 years? On second thought, dont try that. The point is, sometimes we know what we are getting into, but we do it anyway, usually because we believe the benefits or importance outweighs the risks. I think this is true of any profession. However, some professions require more sacrifice. So when I write that we should thank a policeman, fireman or other individual in a position of service, its not because I think they are enti tled or that they should be pit ied, as if theyve been forced into something against their will. Rather, I think we should thank these people because they volunteered to do work many others would not. For instance, Im thankful that someone else hauls off my trash, that someone else plows the highways, that someone else mans the pediatricians phone in the middle of the night. Im also thankful that it is my husband, not me, who deploys, and that someone else gets the power lines back up after a storm. I dont know if all of the above means others should be grateful, too. I dont know if it means these people are enti tled to something. I dont know if theirs is still a sacrifice given that they are paid and knew what to expect. I just know that these people raised their hand when the crickets were chirp ing. And I am grateful. Hey, MoneyChic! Im ready to make a budget that helps secure my financial future. What advice can you give me? MoneyChic says: Creating your first budget is often the biggest challenge but once this is done, you can begin successfully saving. First, start by figuring out your total income after taxes. Next, write down every bill you have each month. After you do this, try to estimate other expenses such as groceries, eating out, any fees, entertainment, per sonal care, etc. After this is done, you can see what money is left for savings each month. If this doesnt seem realistic and your budget says you have $500 for savings each month but in reality you usually only have $20 then try record ing all the money you spend for three months. Once you have an accurate idea of what you spend each month, you have the basis for your savings plan. Also keep in mind that the caseworkers at Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society can help you develop a budget and savings plan. Just call your local office at 542-3515 and sched ule an appointment. Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Catholic CCD 11 a.m. Protestant Worship Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study 6 p.m. in the Barracks Officer Christian Fellowship and Bible study Every Monday at 6 p.m. NAS Jacksonville Chapel Center Corner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road 542-3051 NEX/Commissary holiday closuresThe NAS Jax Commissary will close at 4 p.m. Christmas Eve, Dec. 24 and will remain closed through Christmas Day. The store will reopen Dec. 26. The Commissary will be open normal hours on New Years Eve, Dec. 31 and will be closed New Years Day. The NAS Jax Navy Exchange (NEX) will be open Christmas Eve, Dec. 24 from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. The store will be closed Christmas Day. The NEX will be open New Years Eve, Dec. 31 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and New Years Day, Jan. 1 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.All volunteer is not what it seems

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Cmdr. Gerald Dearie relieved Cmdr. Brian Carpenter as command ing officer of VP-62 during a ceremony in Hangar 117 Dec. 3. Capt. Trey Wheeler, com mander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing-11 (CPRW) presided over the ceremony. With the charge I relieve you, sir, Dearie became the 30th com manding officer of the VP-62 Broadarrows, one of two Reserve VP Squadrons under the operational control of CPRW-11. The squadron consists of 130 drilling Reservists and 119 active component and fulltime support personnel. VP-62 Reservists travel from seven states to train for operational missions in support of national defense and the Global War on Terror. Dearie, a second gen eration P-3 Orion pilot, is from Stone Mountain, Ga. He received his commission from the United States Naval Academy in 1992, graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science. Following gradua tion, Dearie reported to VA-205 at NAS Atlanta. He then completed primary and intermediary flight training with VT-27 and advanced flight training with VT-31 at NAS Corpus Christi, Texas. He was awarded his pilot wings in July 1995. After gradu ation from fleet replace ment training at VP-30, Dearie reported to VP-45. In August 1999, Dearie was selected for the Pilot Exchange Program and reported to Royal Australian Air Force 292 Squadron in South Australia. Dearie left active duty in July 2002 and joined VP-62 as a drilling Reservist. He held sever al billets including train ing officer and operations officer. In 2010, while taking part in Rim of the Pacific Exercise, Dearie led Crew 8 through the successful launch of a Harpoon (AGM-84) anti-ship missile the first time a Reserve crew launched a harpoon in more than 10 years. Dearie was hired by FedEx Express in 2003 as a professional instruc tor in the McDonnell Douglas MD-11. He is currently a proficien cy check airman in the Boeing 727, qualified to fly as both a first officer and flight engineer. Under the leadership of Carpenter, the squadron received the Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve Battle Efficiency Award for 2011 and the Retention Golden Anchor Award for 2010. Carpenter also led the Broadarrows through the re-establishment of their maintenance department. He guided the efforts which were comprised of 60 newly assigned full-time per sonnel, most without P-3 experience. During his term, the squadron passed three standup milestones: the CPRW-11 Maintenance Process Assessment, the Commander, Naval Air Force Aviation Maintenance Inspection and the Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection. The maintenance department facili tated 375 sorties and 1,400 mishap-free flight hours, completing more than 4,000 maintenance actions and 19,055 acci dent-free maintenance man hours, resulting in a 93 percent fully mission capable rate and 97 per cent mission completion rate. And, during Carpenters tenure the squad ron detached to partici pate in a Joint Task Force Exercise off the coast of southern California flying over 70 hours in support of the exer cise. The Broadarrows were also awarded the CPRW-11 Quarterly Anti-submarine Warfare Symposium Challenge trophy. Carpenter has received orders to the office of the Chief of Naval Aviation. Cmdr. Jon Townsend assumed duty as the VP-62 executive officer. Dearie takes the helm of VP-62 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles mission, since its founding in 1941, is to heal our nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the hospital located on board NAS Jacksonville, and five branch health clinics in Florida (Jacksonville, Key West and Mayport) and Georgia (Albany and Kings Bay). Achievements by the staff of 2,500 military and civilian personnel have led to an award-winning year. Its been an incred ible year for our hospital and branch health clinics, said Naval Hospital Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Lynn Welling. Our achievements under score our constant commit ment to providing the best care possible to each and every one of our patients. The team passed 25 com mand readiness inspections including receipt of the Joint Commission Gold Seal of Accreditation, the nations premier accrediting sys tem for hospitals NH Jax and its reserve units (Naval Operational Health Support Units) received Navy Surgeon Generals Blue H Awards for promoting healthy life styles and medical readiness. First Coast Worksite Wellness Council also recognized the hospital as one of Jacksonvilles healthiest companies. 2011:Naval Hospital Jacksonville celebrates achievements

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 5 Illustrating the hospitals clinical excellence, the family medicine residency program was named the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Clinical Site of the Year 2011. The Navy Inspector General recognized the commands Deployment Health Center, Third-Party Collections, Case Management and Civilian Personnel departments as best practices. Whats more, the Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery recognized NH Jax as home of the Case Manager of the Year. On the international front, the hos pital also became the first hospital on Floridas First Coast to be designated as Baby Friendly by the World Health Organization and United Nations Childrens Fund. And the list goes on for the com mand that serves a patient popula tion of approximately 215,000 active and retired Sailors, Soldiers, Marines, Airmen, Reservists, Coast Guardsmen and their families 57,000 of whom are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of the NH Jax facilities. We have an outstanding staff. Each and every day, our dedicated team of military and civilian personnel sees 1,800 outpatients, admits 15 inpatients, cares for 80 people in the ER, performs 14 same-day surgeries, fills 4,700 pre scriptions, conducts 4,600 lab tests and delivers two or three 2 to 3 babies, explains Welling. Additionally, as one of the Navys most deployed medical commands, at any given time up to 15 percent of our military staff is deployed around the world meeting combat, humanitarian and disaster needs. NH Jacksonville also offers numerous patient-centered programs and initiatives. Medical Homeport the Navywide approach to primary care that places patients in the center of a team of caregivers is offered at the hospital and branch health clinics in Mayport and Kings Bay. Our adoption of Medical Homeport means our patients regularly see the same family of caregivers who help plan their care, now and in the future, said Welling. Our move to a whole person approach is designed to enhance our patients access to care, strengthen communications and build stronger relationships between them and their team. Along with its direct care of our nations heroes and their families, NH Jaxs leadership understands the pos itive results of community collabora tion. On behalf of 14 health care orga nizations involved in the Quality Collaborative of Northeast Florida, NH Jax announced in September the development of emergency department pain medication guidelines to ensure patients get the most appropriate med ication, while minimizing controlled substance abuse. The command also participated in University of North Floridas (UNF) annual Caring Community and Quality Collaborative conferences, and Duval County Medical Society events. NH Jax hosts its annual Deployment Mental Health Symposium in partnership with UNF on Dec. 8 and 9, as well as its annual Patient Safety Symposium early next year. Medicine by its very nature is com plicated, explains Welling. So it is very important for private and public sector healthcare leaders to come together as a community to learn from each other and to advance patient safety and quality care across the region in the hopes of making medicine safer for patient everywhere. Along with NH Jaxs award-winning programs, innovations, approach to quality care and community collabora tion, the command continues to receive high patient satisfaction ratings, which currently are at 92 percent. Were here to heal our nations heroes its that simple, Welling concluded. Photos by HM1(SW) Scott Morgan, MC2 Gary Granger Jr., Pamela Jackson and MC2(SW) Jacob Sippel HOSPITAL: an incredible year

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 As the War Eagles of VP-16 prepare to deploy, their team of aviation ordnancemen (AOs) have kept them armed and mission-ready. In order to train and complete an InterDeployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC), a P-3C Orion squad ron must carry, train with, and deploy a variety of sensors and weapons. Despite typical IDRC challenges, the AO shop has answered the call, supported their shipmates, and excelled during their inspections during the last year. AOs or Ordies are respon sible for maintaining, loading, inspecting, and recovering weapons and external sensors. The most common job is load ing expendable search sensors or sonobuoys, to detect sub marines. The sonobouys are loaded in internal racks and external chutes in the belly of the P-3C. The AO shop loads practice torpedoes and missiles for local training flights and can equip the P-3C with defensive flares to protect against surface to air missiles in threat envi ronments. The daily flow of work revolves around supporting the squadrons flight schedule. AOs arrive at the aircraft a few hours before the flight crew to upload mission ordnance and to conduct a preflight inspec tion. Once the flight crew arrives, AOs stand by to troubleshoot equipment. If the plane is car rying missiles, the AOs pull pins out of the weapons just before takeoff to remove the safeties and arm the weapon. The AOs of VP-16 recent ly completed a success ful Conventional Weapons Training Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI). This inspection lasted several days and involved outside observ ers testing safety and proficiency standards. The AOs scored very well on this most recent CWTPI. They also assisted the Broadarrows of VP-62 in preparing for their successful CWTPI. AO2 Jose Rosario explained that there are some advantages to working with a small team, Having such a small shop has really helped all of us improve our skills and work on our flexibility as we have to quickly yet efficiently get all of the parts needed. We must have every thing up and running with buoys loaded before aircrew show up while still being ready to switch planes if something goes wrong. The hard work of the AOs is not lost on the aircrew they support: Our Ordies do an awesome job, said Lt. j.g. Ryan Cunz. Not only do they work quickly, efficiently and get things done correctly; they are team players, always willing to work with you. They are a great contribution to our mission accomplishment. Mission accomplishment is the name of the game, and its not lost on the AOs. AO3 Benjamin Marks shared his thoughts on job satisfac tion, When a crew comes back from their mission and everything works correctly, it is a great feeling knowing all of our training and hard work has paid off and the mission was successfully completed because of it. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) welcomes the second Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) TRACK Program graduate hired at the aviation maintenance facil ity. Adam Sardinas, 26, a decorat ed Marine and Iraq War veteran wounded during his second tour to the Middle East, works as an engine mechanic helper in the J52 Blade Shop at the Crinkley Engine Facility. The job is great, said Sardinas. There is always room to learn here. That is the best part about it. All these guys are very smart. They are incredible. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps as an infantry machine gunner, but he developed a passion for machinery early on while working on cars with his stepfather. I was always building hotrods and motors, he said. It came natural to me. I loved the mechanics of it. Sardinas enlisted in June 2003 two weeks after graduating from Tampa Bay Technical High School, Tampa, Fla. He said he looked for the branch of service that best represented G.I. Joe, the action figure toy. For him that was the Marine Corps. The 20-year-old saw plenty of action while deployed for seven months with the 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment to Fallujah, Iraq in 2005. It was during his second tour a year later when then Lance Cpl. Sardinas and two Marines sustained injuries while their unit, Kilo Company, engaged Sunni insurgents in Ramadi, Iraq, the capital of Anbar province. We were on a roof doing over watch on a perimeter, when an RPG (rocket-propelled grenade) exploded, he said. I was knocked unconscious for 30 seconds to a minute. When I finally woke up, they (Marines) were picking me up. They had wrapped up my face and hands. Shrapnel nearly tore off my right thumb, and I had two pieces in my face. After a series of surgeries, the first in Ballad and two more at Naval Hospital Camp Lejeune, N.C., doctors were able to fuse his fractured thumb and insert a metal pin. He still carries the shrapnel in his face as a reminder of that fateful day, April 24, 2006. In addition, Sardinas suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI). His TBI counselor told him about the Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) TRACK Program headquartered in Jacksonville. He applied and inter viewed at the education center specifically designed for wounded warriors. While assigned to the Wounded Warrior Barracks at Camp Lejeune, he received a Purple Heart Medal in October 2006. He was honorably discharged from the Marine Corps in 2007. Sardinas relocated to Jacksonville in August 2010 to start the yearlong WWP TRACK Program. He completed a three-month external internship at FRCSE repairing F/A-18 Hornet aircraft, welding components in Plant Services, and measuring J52 engine compressor blades in the engines facility. Upon graduation, he applied for his current position working with engines. He still deals with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and limited range of motion in his right thumb. Yet, he feels fortunate to have the opportunity to pursue a civilian career. One year later, my life has defi nitely changed for the better, he said. Sardinas is the second WWP TRACK graduate employed at FRCSE. The first is Purple Heart recipi ent Christopher Lynch, a U.S. Army veteran with service-connect ed disabilities, hired in January 2011. He also works at the FRCSE Crinkley Engine Facility. VP-8 Fighting Tigers mentor recruitsSeveral members of the VP-8 Fighting Tigers watched proudly as the new Sailors of Recruit Division 372 conducted a pass in review Nov. 10 in front of friends, family and VIPs at Recruit Training Command (RTC), Great Lakes, Ill. Over the past eight weeks, personnel from the squadron have made several trips to RTC during their sponsorship of Division 372. The VP-8 Sailors provided encouragement, mentorship and guid ance for the recruits as they completed require ments ranging from their initial physical fitness assessment to battle stations. The Fighting Tigers, led by Commanding Officer Cmdr. Chris Flaherty, CMDCM Frank King and AMC Dillon Lacoste, attended the recruits battle station exercise, cap ping ceremony and pass in review. It was great to see Division 372 make the transition from citizens to Sailors during their time at Recruit Training Command. The recruit division commanders did an outstanding job teaching these Sailors, and setting them up for a successful Navy career, stated Flaherty. All of the VP-8 Sailors who had the opportunity to travel to RTC agreed that it was very rewarding to observe and mentor the recruits. The drastic change that the division made over the course of the eight weeks was evident to all. Division 372 was recognized as the number one division in their graduating group, earned the coveted Chief of Naval Operations Gold Division Award, and the recruits had a 100 percent passing rate on their final physical fitness test. Lacoste remarked, It was a great experience for our Sailors as well as the recruits. I believe the division sponsorship program is a catalyst for success. The recruits gain a better knowledge of their future ratings and general Navy living by spending time with fleet Sailors. Sailors participating in the program gain a sense of remembrance and pride as they relive some of the moments they experienced when they were recruits. I am grateful to have had to opportunity to be a part of this experience, continued Lacoste. Both the recruits and their mentors agreed that the sponsorship program provides an outstanding opportunity for a mutually beneficial partnership, and some of the recruits already expressed their desire to return as mentors in the future, maybe even one day as part of VP-8. A Navy message released Nov. 22 announced revi sions in special duty assignment pay (SDAP). NAVADMIN 356/11 lists updated SDAP levels for active-duty and Reserve component full-time sup port and qualified selected Reserve Sailors on active duty. Increases to existing SDAP levels are effective immediately and reductions are effective 60 days from release of NAVADMIN 356/11. Sailors whose SDAP will be eliminated will receive half of their previous SDAP entitlement for 12 months, or until the Sailor completes the tour, whichever comes first. The SDAP program is an incentive pay ranging from $75 to $450 a month used to entice qualified Sailors to serve in designated billets that are considered extremely difficult or entail arduous duty. Program levels change to reflect the current environment associated with each billet and to sustain adequate manning levels. In order to qualify for SDAP, Sailors must be assigned to and working in a valid billet on the Command Manpower Authorization Listing. This billet must be authorized by the Bureau of Naval Personnel as a special duty assignment billet. Commands holding SDAP billets are required to complete an annual recertification. NAVADMIN 356/11 supersedes previously released SDAP rates. More than 25,000 Sailors currently receive SDAP. Sailors can read OPNAVINST 1160.6 and talk with their command career counselor to learn more about SDAP. VP-16 aviation ordnancemen in spotlight Navy announces updated special duty assignment pay ratesFRCSE welcomes decorated wounded warrior to federal service

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HSL-42 Detachment One, the Yellow Bellied Sliders, cur rently deployed on board the guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58), was recently called on to conduct a personnel transfer (for humanitarian reasons) from the Ohio class cruise-missile submarine USS Georgia (SSGN 729). The crew of Proud Warrior 431 having previously con ducted several passenger transfers and medical evacuations during the deployment was tasked with the mission. When informed that the transfer would be from a submarine, the crew knew it would not be a routine event. USS Georgia was unable to leave its station, so the Roberts immediately began to close on the submarines position at best speed. After calculating time and distance to the submarine, it was decided that the transfer would take place the following morning in lieu of a night transfer. The SH-60B Seahawk crew reviewed submarine transfer procedures and prepared themselves to execute this unique mission. After conducting a thorough preflight brief, Proud Warrior 431 launched just after sunrise and flew toward USS Georgia. The combination of gusty winds and rough sea state were not ideal for the transfer. The course that gave the submarine the most stable deck required a downwind recovery from the starboard sailplane. The preferred recovery from the missile deck would have required a compromise between a headwind com ponent for the helicopter and bow seas for the submarine. Unfortunately, waves crashing over the bow and the missile deck were cause for concern for the Sailors who were required to be on deck. After close coordination, the submarine maneuvered to place the wind directly off the bow, providing a more stable deck, while also providing a headwind component for the helicopter. The pilots, Lt. Seth DiNola and Lt. Jennifer Holsclaw, set up for the approach at approxi mately one-half mile and 200 feet. The helicopter then estab lished a 30-foot steady hover, conned into position by the senior aircrewman, AWRC Scott Wade. On deck below the heli copter were the transfer petty officer and passenger. Three safety observers were on deck, next to the submarines dry dock shelter just aft of the sail. Once in position, junior air crewman AWRAN Robert Dukes was lowered to the deck of USS Georgia where he attached a seabag to the rescue hoist and stayed on deck to give the passenger a quick safety brief for the upcoming return to USS Roberts. After Dukes connected him self to the helicopter hoist and then the passenger to himself both were successfully lifted off deck. When safely inside the aircraft cabin, Proud Warrior 431 was cleared for forward flight and departed for USS Roberts. In the end, it was the close coordination between aircrew and submarine that ensured success of the mission. ATCS(AW/NAC) Eric Elkin assumed the duties as first command senior chief at Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville (FACSFACJAX) Nov. 21. The 9578 NEC requirement to have a full-time command senior chief became a reality on Nov. 1. This billet enhances the commands readiness by alleviating the need for a collateral duty senior enlisted leader and allowing a dedicated leader to properly execute the Navys key foundational programs. FACSFACJAX is the first FACSFAC command to convert an E-8 billet to a dedicated command senior chief billet. Elkin previously served with the Shadows of VQ-4, Naval Air Maintenance Training Group Detachment 1080, the Pelicans of VP-45, and in September 2009, he reported to Helicopter Sea Combat Wing Atlantic Detachment Jax (CHSCWL) via the United States Navy Senior Enlisted Academy, Newport, R.I. During his assignment at CHSCWL, Elkin was board-selected as a command senior chief and recently attended the Command Leadership School Command Master Chief/Chief of the Boat course. I look forward to working with each and every Sailor attached to FACSFACJAX and will strive to uphold and enforce the highest standards of professionalism and integrity. This goal of achieving excellence will only be attained through active com munication at all levels of our command, while adhering to our command prin ciples: Do Focus On The Basics; Do The Right Thing; Do Respect Yourself and Your Peers; and Do Enjoy What You Do, said Elkin. Proud Warriors Det. One helps submarine Sailor New command senior chief at FACSFACJAX JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 7

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8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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Mandatory retirement date announced for officers selected by SERThe statutory retirement date for officers selected for retirement by the FY-12 Selective Early Retirement (SER) board was announced in NAVADMIN 365/11, released Dec. 2. In accordance with Title 10, United States Code, Section 638, officers selected for early retirement must retire no later than the first day of the seventh month following the Secretary of the Navys approval of the boards results. Based on these criteria, the mandatory retirement date is Apr. 1, 2012. NAVADMIN 365/11 also outlines guidance and procedures for offi cers to apply for a 90-day deferral of retirement. A deferral of retirement may be made on a case-by-case basis in order to prevent a personal hardship to the officer or for humanitarian reasons. Authority and discretion to grant deferral lies solely with the Secretary of the Navy. The SER board, originally announced in NAVADMIN 006/11, was convened after high retention, reduction in officer billets and low attrition among senior active duty unrestricted line officers resulted in an excess. The board was used as a force management measure to balance the force and ensure sufficient senior officers are available at the right times in their careers to serve in critical fleet billets. Naval Supply Systems Command Fleet Logistics Center (NAVSUP FLC) Jacksonville hosted the Joint Personal Property Shipping Office (JPPSO) Southeast kick off meeting Nov. 15-16 at NAS Jacksonville. Attendees included representatives from NAVSUP Global Logistics Support, NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville and person nel from JPPSO South Central (Texas). Personnel from the Personal Property Shipping Offices (PPSO) at Beaufort, S.C., and Albany, Ga., and Marine Corps, Army, and Air Force Personal Property Headquarters com mand representatives also attended the two-day event. In an effort to reduce redun dancies, the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) encouraged regionalization of PPSOs with the goal of gain ing logistics efficiencies and improving customer support. The conclusion of this region alization process will result in all back office functions, con tracting of carriers and move ment household goods being performed by JPPSOs. The customer interface, or front office functions, e.g., fielding questions about the online completion of forms and the entire move.mil system, will be performed by local Personal Property Offices (PPPO). NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville will manage JPPSO Southeast, which will provide back office support to all services PPPOs in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and the Caribbean. The first sites will transfer into the regional plan in Fiscal Year (FY) 13, and the final sites in FY16. Once regionalization is complete, there will be seven JPPSOs strategically located across the nation. Key areas of discussion dur ing the event were IT require ments and costs, staffing and human capital requirements, communication strategies and overview of the detailed Plan of Action and Milestones for the transition of each site. Attendees developed a great er understanding of the future JPPSO operations, as well as networking with personnel from other services. The individual networking of JPPSO and PPSO representa tives opened communications channels that will play a critical role in the successful establishment of JPPSO Southeast. This meeting was extremely beneficial in helping my team understand the unique ser vice requirements at each of the sites we will be support ing under JPPSO Southeast. Insight from the Air Force on their regionalization efforts [JPPSO South Central] pro vided valuable information that we can use to ensure we make a seamless transition here in Jacksonville, said Carlos Vargas, NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville household goods regional manager. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, one of seven fleet logistics centers under NAVSUP Global Logistics Support, provides operational logistics, busi ness and support services to fleet, shore and indus trial commands of the Navy, Coast Guard, Military Sealift Command, and other joint and allied forces. NAVSUP FLC Jax to manage new JPPSO Southeast JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 9

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NAS Jax team has also enhanced the quality of life for all personnel and the tenant commands. Great job, he con cluded. I was delighted by the news that Navy Region Southeasts (NRSE) nomi nee to CNIC for the 2011 Installation Excellence Award was selected as this years Navy wide winner, remarked Commander, NRSE Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. All 16 installations in the region did a remarkable job in 2011 and Im proud of them all. However, the demonstrated joint commitment of NAS Jax and its tenant commands to the fleet, fighter and family enabled them to be selected for this prestigious award, he added. Placing second was Naval Base Coronado, Calif., followed by Naval Base Kitsap, Wash. The Commander in Chiefs Annual Award for Installation Excellence was established in 1985 by President Ronald Reagan. The DoD then initiated a ser vice-wide competition on behalf of the president. The president challenged members of the DoD to search for installations where personnel do the best job with their resources to support the mission, and to seek out solutions to the many complex problems they face. To quote the president, I am confi dent that this search for excellence and innovations will yield many new and better ways of accomplishing our mis sion and, at the same time, honor those whose dedication has produced the best defense organization in the world. In meeting the presidents challenge, the Navy, Marine Corps, Army, Air Force and DLA conduct their own intraservice competitions. Valuable benefits from this program include recognition for excellence, creative management, problem-solving ideas and innovation leadership. them along and provide support is critical, he continued. Also attending the kickoff event was NS Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Doug Cochrane who gave the students a short history lesson about the Wright brothers and how they fulfilled their dreams doing something they loved. On a cold, windswept day on the North Carolina dunes, they changed the world forever. They were dreamers. Their previ ous business ventures failed because with great achievement there fre quently comes failure, he said. Cochrane also talk ed about Capt. Scott Speicher, a Forrest High School graduate who was killed during Operation Desert Storm in Iraq and whose remains were recently returned home to Jacksonville. Like the Wright brothers, he dared to dream too, he dared to be brave and he dared to change the world, said Cochrane. And, lets talk about the man who want ed a better world for his children a world where they would be viewed by the content of their char acter and not the color of their skin Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. He also was a world changer Cochrane then acknowl edged the teachers and staff members. These people have given you nothing more than 100 percent since you stepped into this school. They dream of a better world and that will come from you and their efforts on your behalf, said Cochrane as the students gave them a hearty round of applause. They will not let you fail. The commu nity, our Navy personnel, your parents and your own personal initiative will not let you fail. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Jeffrey Maclay stat ed, We in the Navy do what we do around the world to make sure that our children and all of you inherit a safer and more peaceful world. What you do with that world depends in large part on your teachers and their commitment to making your education the most meaningful they can. We in the Navy, hope to help with that commitment and to promote excellence in yourselves by acting as tutors and mentors. The last line of the Sailors Creed states, com mitted to the excellence and fair treatment of all. And thats what you can expect from the Sailors who will be mentoring you. They want to see you excel, reach your goals and perhaps raise your goals and be the best you can, continued Maclay. Forrest High School Principal Dr. Alvin Brennan closed the cer emony by saying, I, and Im sure my colleagues will agree, understand the significance of partnering with the Navy and what it will do for our schools. I know that at Forrest High School, it will bring a wealth of opportunity for our students as they tran sition out into adulthood. Im really excited about this collaboration and the benefits it will provide. The program was ini tiated by Forrest High School Psychologist Freedom Reid who approached the Navy school liaison officers about having Sailors come into the schools to mentor the students. We have a real need for this program. The students will meet positive role models and learn about career oppor tunities. And the Sailors will benefit because they will be invited to the school events and be part of our community, said Reid. Its a win-win partner ship and really a great idea to get our Sailors involved out in the schools and help these students, added NAS Jax School Liaison Officer Dawn Mills. CNIC AWARD: Best base Navy widePROJECT NAVY: Partnering with schools 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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scout bombers to Midway Island. The last Pacific carrier, USS Saratoga, had departed Pearl Harbor for repairs on the west coast. At 0600 on Dec. 7, six Japanese carriers launched the first wave of 181 planes composed of torpedo bombers, dive bombers, horizontal bombers and fighters. Just before dawn, U.S. Navy vessels spotted an unidentified subma rine periscope near the entrance to Pearl Harbor. It was attacked and reported sunk by the destroyer USS Ward (DD-139) and a patrol plane. At 0700, an alert operator at an Army radar station at Opana spotted the approaching first wave of the attack force. The officers to whom those reports were relayed did not consider them signifi cant enough to take action. The report of the subma rine sinking was handled routinely, and the radar sighting was passed off as an approaching group of American planes due to arrive that morning. The Japanese air crews achieved complete surprise when they hit American ships and mili tary installations on Oahu shortly before 0800. They attacked military airfields at the same time they hit the fleet anchored in Pearl Harbor. The Navy air bases at Ford Island and Kaneohe Bay, the Marine Corps airfield at Ewa and the Army Air Corps fields at Bellows, Wheeler and Hickam were all bombed and strafed as other ele ments of the attacking force began their assaults on the ships moored in Pearl Harbor. The pur pose of the simultaneous attacks was to destroy the American planes before they could rise to intercept the Japanese. Of the more than 90 ships at anchor in Pearl Harbor, the primary tar gets were the eight battle ships. Seven were moored on Battleship Row along the southeast shore of Ford Island, while the USS Pennsylvania (BB-38) lay in drydock across the channel. Within the first minutes of the attack all the battleships adjacent to Ford Island had taken bomb and or torpedo hits. The USS West Virginia (BB-48) sank quickly. The USS Oklahoma (BB37) turned turtle and sank. At about 0810, the USS Arizona (BB-39) was mortally wounded by an armor-piercing bomb that ignited the ships forward ammunition magazine. The resulting explosion and fire killed 1,177 crew men, the greatest loss of life on any ship that day and about half the total number of Americans killed. The USS California (BB44), USS Maryland (BB-46), USS Tennessee (BB-43) and USS Nevada (BB-36) also suffered varying degrees of damage in the first half hour of the raid. There was a short lull in the fury of the attack at about 0830 when USS Nevada, despite her wounds, managed to get underway and move down the channel toward the open sea. Before she could clear the har bor, a second wave of 170 Japanese planes, launched 30 minutes after the first, appeared over the harbor. They concentrated their attacks on the moving battleship, hoping to sink her in the channel and block the narrow entrance to Pearl Harbor. On orders from the harbor control tower, the USS Nevada was beached at Hospital Point and the channel remained clear. When the attack ended shortly before 1000, less than two hours after it began, the American forc es had paid a fearful price. Twenty-one ships of the U.S. Pacific Fleet were sunk or damaged: the battleships Arizona, California, Maryland, Nevada, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West Virginia; cruis ers USS Helena (CL-50), USS Honolulu (CL-48) and USS Raleigh (CL-7); the destroyers USS Cassin (DD-372), USS Downes (DD-375), USS Helm (DD388) and USS Shaw (DD373); seaplane tender USS Curtiss (AV-4); target ship (ex-battleship) USS Utah (AG-16); repair ship USS Vestal (AR-4); minelayer USS Oglala (CM-4); tug USS Sotoyomo (YT-9); and Floating Drydock Number 2. Aircraft losses were 188 destroyed and 159 dam aged, the majority hit before they had a chance to take off. American dead numbered 2,403. That figure included 68 civil ians, most of them killed by improperly fused antiaircraft shells landing in Honolulu. There were 1,178 military and civil ian wounded. Japanese losses were comparatively light. Twenty-nine planes, less than 10 percent of the attacking force, failed to return to their carriers. The Japanese success was overwhelming but it was not complete. They failed to damage any American aircraft carri ers which by a stroke of luck were absent from the harbor. They neglected to damage the shore facili ties at the Pearl Harbor Naval Base, which played an important role in the Allied victory in World War II. American technological skill raised and repaired all but three of the ships sunk or damaged at Pearl Harbor (Arizona, consid ered too badly damaged to be salvaged; Oklahoma, considered too old to be worth repairing, and the obsolete USS Utah (AG16) considered not worth the effort). Most impor tantly, the shock and anger caused by the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor united a divided nation and was translated into a wholehearted commit ment to victory in World War II. Beware of USAA phishing scamIn early November, USAA members began receiving email claiming to be from USAA with the subject line: USAA Protection Alert. In an elaborate scheme, the email informs members about a failed usaa.com login attempt and to click on a link to update their identity. Clicking on the link directs the member first to a counterfeit website to log on. Logging on pro duces the second website, asking for a PIN. Clicking Next produces another website asking for the member to set up security questions and after clicking Next again, a final website opens, asking for the members sensitive information including: card holders name, card number expiration date, card verification code, billing address, billing zip code, billing phone number, email address and email password. Although the e-mail includes a USAA logo and appears to be from USAA, it is not. This is a phishing scam targeting USAA mem bers and military personnel. If you get an email or pop-up message that asks for personal or financial information, do not reply. And dont click on the link in the message, either. Legitimate companies dont ask for this information via email. If you are concerned about your account, contact the orga nization mentioned in the email using a telephone number you know to be genuine, or open a new Internet browser session and type in the companys correct Web address yourself. In any case, dont cut and paste the link from the message into your Internet browser phishers can make links look like they go to one place, but that actually send you to a different site. PEARL HARBOR: date which will live in infamy JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 11

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Cmdr. Larry Shaffield of Information Dominance Corps Region Southeast retired Nov. 19 after 25 years of honorable naval service at a ceremony at the NAS Jax Pavilion. Capt. Kathryn Yates was the guest speaker. Shaffield enlisted in the Navy in 1986 as an electronics technician and completed the Navys nuclear power training as a reactor opera tor. His first operational assignment was USS Buffalo (SSN 715) where he completed two Western Pacific deployments. He was assigned to Trident Refit Facility Kings Bay in 1992 and during this assign ment he was accepted to Officer Candidate School. After completion of intelli gence officer training, Shaffield was assigned to U.S. Atlantic Command as a Caribbean geo political analyst. With the trans fer of geographic responsibility for the Caribbean to U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), he was reassigned to the SOUTHCOM Headquarters in Miami, complet ing the tour as branch chief for Caribbean and Central American Analysis. His next assignment was VP-45 at NAS Jacksonville. While assigned as the squadrons aviation intelligence officer he made two deployments in support of counter drug operations in the Caribbean and in support of allied operations in the Balkans. Following VP-45, he was assigned to the Weapons Tactics Unit of VP-30 as a strike mission planning instructor, providing mission planning and intelligence training to P-3 Orion Squadron strike crews and intelligence sup port personnel throughout the maritime patrol and reconnais sance force. In 2004, Shaffield reported to USS Tarawa (LHA-1) as the ships intelligence officer responsible for the intelligence, cryptologic and electronic warfare divisions. He completed a wartime deployment as part of Expeditionary Strike Group One. In 2006, he was assigned to U.S. Strategic Command where he played in integral role in the J2s intelligence support to information operations and current intelligence reporting. His final assignment was as officer in charge (OIC) for Information Dominance Corps Region Southeast. During his tenure, Shaffield has overseen the integration of both addition al geographic regions and addi tional professional career fields into the national architecture for Reserve Component management of Information Dominance Corps personnel. Shaffield and his wife, Carol, have two children, Mairead, a sophomore at Troy University and Jack, a plebe at the United States Merchant Marine Academy. Shaffield will return to his home town of Dothan, Ala. where he will begin a new career in the nuclear power industry. Veterans honored at West Jacksonville Health and RehabLt. Cmdr. Charles Mayfield of Information Dominance Corps Region Southeast (IDCRSE) Jacksonville joined a regional chapter of The American Foreign Legion at the West Jacksonville Health and Rehabilitation Center/Retirement Home to serve as the guest speaker at a ceremony honoring the resident military veterans Nov. 9. The ceremony included a rousing rendition of the Pledge of Allegiance, patriotic music, reading of poems, and an awards ceremony. Against the backdrop of vibrant decorations and smiling faces, Mayfield spoke with infectious energy and presented each veteran in attendance with a certificate, folded American flag, and a proud and heartfelt thank-you. Mayfield credited the Vietnam-era veterans with being the generation that instilled a sense of patriotism and duty to God and country in him. He also noted how the American Legion was responsible for sending him to Boys State, a summer program for high-school students sponsored by the American Legion that focuses on state and local government. Mayfield concluded the ceremony by acknowl edging that following generations have big shoes to fill but said that we should all do our best to continue to carry on honorable traditions. For those interested in volunteering at the West Jacksonville Health and Rehabilitation Center or to find out more information, contact Althea Kensey at Activities@WestJacksonville.com. Shaffield retires after 25 years a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchforbabies.org 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert announced expanded occasion for wear and updated policies for the Navy Working Uniform (NWU) Types I, II and III in NAVADMIN 366/11, released Dec. 2. There has been a lot of interest throughout the fleet regarding expanding the locations that Sailors can wear the Navys working uniform. Several weeks ago the CNO asked Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Rick West to take a look at the Navy Working Uniform policy. Following their review, I am proud to report that we are extending the wear poli cy of the working uniform to improve the practicality while ensuring professionalism and maintaining its value, said Greenert. I want my shipmates to look sharp, be uniform and have the quality they deserve. The NAVADMIN expands the authorized stops for which NWUs may be worn when commuting to and from home and work, and to allow wear of the NWU during selected events when authorized by regional commanders or commanding officers. These policies will take effect Jan. 1 for all continental United States, Hawaii and Guam commands. NWU wear is authorized for commuting and all normal tasks, such as stops at child care centers, gas stations, offbase shopping, banking, at the DMV, and dining before, during and after the work day. Since NWUs are not a lib erty uniform, consumption of alcohol while off base in the NWUs is not permitted. Area or regional commanders may further restrict this policy within their geographic limits. Additionally, the NWU Type I is authorized for wear by all Commander, Navy Recruiting Command (CNRC) recruiters in the continental United States, Hawaii and Guam. NWUs are not authorized for wear on commercial trav el such as airlines, railways, or buses in the continental United States. However, they may be worn on military and government-contracted flights between military airfield installations, as well as com muter transportation such as city and commuter buses, subways and ferries. The uni forms may also be worn at the Pentagon Metro and Pentagon commuter slug lines. The NAVADMIN also out lines the manner of wear for the NWU off base. The shirt/blouse is required to be worn at all times. Commanders also must ensure grooming standards are enforced. Trousers must be bloused and the only head gear autho rized is the eight point cover and the parka hood must be stowed unless being used. The fleece with chest rank tab is also authorized as a standalone outer garment. Regional commanders will stipulate the wear of the NWU for official ceremonies and functions, such as Fleet Week, celebrations and parades, and sporting events with media interest. NAVADMIN 259/11 wear rules for these uniforms out side of the continual United States remain in effect. A total of 12,261 Sailors reviewed by the Navy Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) were selected for retention, the Navy announced Dec 2. Additionally, a total of 125 Sailors not selected for retention by the ERB were able to stay Navy after qualifying for a rating conversion. Conversion waivers were introduced in NAVADMIN 160/11 to increase options for ERB-eligible Sailors. Conversion applications were held until the ERB had completed deliberations. Only Sailors not selected for retention in-rate by the ERB were con sidered for conversion and all applicants had to satisfy eligibility requirements to be considered for the limited number of vacancies in undermanned career fields. The decision to establish the ERB was made after careful consideration, said Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, chief of naval personnel. Our Sailors have served honorably and we are committed to doing all we can to help them transition. The ERB was announced earlier this year after record high retention and low attrition among active duty Sailors left the Navy overmanned. The purpose was to help the Navy rebalance the force in terms of seniority, experience and skills. The ERB reviewed the records of nearly 16,000 selected third class petty officers through senior chief petty offi cers from 31 overmanned ratings, who had greater than seven, but less than fifteen years of cumulative service as of October 2011. The quota-based board was held in two phases. Phase I convened in late August and reviewed the records of 7,625 Sailors in pay grades E4 and E5. Of the Phase I Sailors reviewed, 5,588 were selected for retention. Of the Sailors reviewed in Phase I, 1,922 Sailors were not selected for retention. The second phase convened in September and reviewed the records of 7,761 Sailors in pay grades E6, E7 and E8. Of the Sailors reviewed in Phase II, 6,673 were selected for retention. Of the Sailors reviewed in Phase II, 1,025 were not selected for retention. An additional 53 Sailors who were not selected for retention had their ERB results vacated in accordance with NAVADMIN 129/11, after they were advanced in rate from the September 2011 Navy advancement examination cycle. These Sailors will remain in their current rate. Navy is taking an active role in help ing the Sailors not selected for retention through this transition. Specifically, Navy is offering employment outplace ment services and enhanced transition benefits for ERB-affected Sailors who will not be able to serve out the duration of their contract. Sailors transitioning from the Navy through ERB will also have access to the Navy transition assistance programs, are eligible for involuntary separation pay, and will retain commissary and Navy Exchange privileges for an addi tional two years after separation. Navy Personnel Command (NPC) established a transition assistance information webpage providing Sailors and leader ship a central location to find transition assistance information and resources. The NPC customer service center is also available to assist Sailors in locating transition assistance resources.Wear rules for navy working uniforms expanded Navy announces results of enlisted retention board selection process JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 13

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Thanksgiving is bare ly over, but the holiday shopping season is in full gear. Consumers previ ously had a restriction on over spending and imposed a tight grip on their dollars. Every year you find yourself say ing, I will not spend as much money as I did last year. The holidays are a time of year when we all tend to spend too much money. We then find ourselves strapped for cash at the beginning of the year when we should be starting the new year off on the right foot. The following are some tips to save money this holiday season. Make a budget and stick to it! Start early The early bird catches the worm. In this case the early bird catches the good sales and you are less stressed towards Christmas time! Have children make a list of five things they would like to have and choose one to buy. Instead of buying gifts for the whole fam ily, draw names from a hat and designate estab lished dollar amounts. Cut costs when plan ning holiday travel arrangements early. Be flexible on dates and times you are willing to travel. Find websites with free shipping for you online shoppers. Do research online to find out where the prod uct you are looking for is cheapest. Think outside of the box for gift ideas like a free yard cleaning or one free car wash. Remember, the goal is to avoid using credit at all costs. This includes applying for new lines of credit, small loans, or credit cards. Definitely avoid pay day loans to help you make holiday purchases, as it is the downfall which brings future financial burdens. Finally, by going cash only you can stop the overspending trend and begin your New Year on a positive note. Donate blood, save livesA Florida/Georgia Blood Alliance holiday blood drive on board NAS Jacksonville is sched uled for Dec. 10, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Navy Operational Support Center Jax on Yorktown Avenue. Watch what you spend during the holidays MWR seeking sponsorsThe Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department of NAS Jacksonville is soliciting commercial/corporate sponsors for a wide range of 2012 special events and advertising opportuni ties. Revenues generated through sponsorship and advertising are used spe cifically to enhance quality of life programs for our service members and their families. Through sponsorship and advertising you can develop brand loyalty, consumer affiliation and promote your products and services to more than 25,000 base personnel. For more informa tion contact the MWR Marketing Department at (904) 542-8205 or e-mail jaxs_nas_mwrmktg@ navy.mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 15

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ERB opportunity: Shipmates to Workmates programNow that the Navy is notifying the more than 3,000 Sailors impacted by the Enlisted Retention Board (ERB), six major Navy commands introduced the Shipmates to Workmates program to aid transitioning Sailors in competing for job opportunities as federal civilians. The program managed jointly by the Naval Sea Systems Command, Naval Air Systems Command, Naval Facilities Command, Naval Supply Systems Command, Commander, Naval Installations, Space and Naval Warfare Command, and the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations provides information about career opportunities available at partnering commands and actively assists sailors prepare job applications and resumes. The participating commands will steer separating sailors, command career counselors and transition assistance coordinators to a dedicated Shipmates to Workmates website to facilitate participation. This website will serve as a one-stop shop for sailors seeking Navy-related employment. Finding out that you are being separated from the Navy, will be a significant blow, said Rear Adm. Clarke Orzalli, vice commander NAVSEA. The Shipmates to Workmates program is an opportunity to do what we can to soften the blow, as well as continue to utilize their significant skills for the benefit of the Navy. Through the website and other outreach programs, the effort will attempt to demystify the government service hiring process, match job supply to demand, link existing Navy and Defense Department transition support, and assist qualified sailors with local hiring processes. The Shipmates to Workmates program is simply good leadership this program demonstrates our leadership commitment to our sailors by assisting those being involuntarily separated, said Cmdr. Pat Sanders, NAVSEAs lead for the program. Each of the participating commands will participate in job fairs and other hiring events for transitioning sailors. Forums are scheduled at fleet concentration areas throughout the country. For more information on the Shipmates to Workmates program as well as a full schedule of upcoming career forums, visit the Shipmates to Workmates website at http://jobs.navair. navy.mil/sm2wm/. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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Military members from the Resident Officer in Charge of Construction (ROICC) Haiti office spent Veterans Day along side former president and Mrs. Jimmy Carter to work on a Habitat for Humanity project in Leogane, Haiti. Cmdr. Jeanine Avant, ROICC Haiti and Cmdr. Dewayne Roby along with other volun teers from the U.S. Embassy joined the former President and his wife to complete the construction of 150 core homes Veterans Day weekend. A core home consists of 215 sq. ft. of living space for an average Haitian family of five. The homes have a traditional front porch, combination ply wood/concrete masonry block walls with a concrete floor and a corrugated metal roof. It breaks ones heart to see the living conditions of Haitian families, especially since the earthquake has forced many of the survivors to live in Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) camps, said Avant. I am happy that we could pro vide some assistance, although so much more is needed. Leogane, Haiti is about 20 miles west of Port au Prince where Habitat for Humanity has been involved in con structing a permanent housing community near the epicenter of the Jan. 12, 2010 earthquake. The devastating earthquake killed approximately 300,000 people and destroyed 90 per cent of the infrastructure in Leogane and left thousands of families homeless. Cmdr. Dewayne Roby, who deployed with the Joint Task Force Haiti immediately after the earthquake in 2010, has seen improvements since that time, but agrees that there is much more work to be done and is proud to contribute to this effort. ROICC Haiti was established by Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC SE) in November 2010, as a forward-deployed field office to administer the Haiti Humanitarian Assistance Program (HAP) construction. Besides ROICC Haiti, a team of project managers, archi tects/engineers, contract specialists and others sup port the Haiti HAP projects back at NAVFACs Facilities Engineering Command in Jacksonville. The projects are located throughout Haiti to assist the country in preparing for any future natural disasters. Projects administered by the ROIC include emergency operations centers, disaster relief warehouses, fire stations, and community clusters which will provide the local leaders the ability to coordinate and effectively respond to emergencies and provide necessary relief to the Haitian people. Military volunteers building homes in Haiti 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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Twelve NAS Jacksonville commands and departments participated in a Festival of Trees contest sponsored by the Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department and Navy Exchange. A short ceremony was held Dec. 1 to announce the three top winners of the competition. Placing first was the Navy Operational Support Center which received a check for $500 towards their MWR fund. The NAS Jax Security Department/Honor Support Teams tree was selected for second place earning them $300 and the Navy Jax Yacht Club placed third earning them $200. The theme for the tree decorating was patriotism. The trees were judged on overall presentation, creativity, implementation of the theme and command representation. This event has provided a great opportunity to not only participate in a fun holiday event, but also give you and your commands the chance to show your holiday spirit, camaraderie and be represented in a high traffic area, said NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Jeffrey Maclay during the event. NAS Jax holds Festival of Trees JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 21

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22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. Hot shot at NAS Jax Golf ClubHole in one Keith Hall: No. 9 Blue,136 Yards,9 iron

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We want to hear from you! Do you have a comment or suggestion on a recent MWR experience? Go to surveymonkey.com/nasjaxmwrThe Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Monday Madness Pizza Special 14 one topping pizza only $5! 2 9 p.m., Dine-in or carry-out only! Call 542-3900 The Zone is featuring hand made burgers on Wednesdays! Texas Holdem Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Bean Bag Toss Wednesday at 7 p.m. Play Bingo at lunch Monday Friday at 11:15 a.m. Evening sessions are Sunday, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday at 6:30 p.m. Cash prizes! New Years Day Bingo $150 per person Doors open at 11 a.m., games begin at 1 p.m. NFL Sunday Ticket At the Bud Brew House 12:30 p.m. close $.50 wings! Beverage specials!Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Bowling Special $5.95 all you can bowl 4 10 p.m., shoe rental not included Rising Stars Youth League Begins December 10 League plays on Saturday mornings at 10:30 a.m. New Years Eve Extreme Bowling Party December 31, 7 p.m. 1 a.m. $15 per person, $20 after Dec. 29 Includes bowling, shoe rental, music, party favors, pizza, midnight toast and breakfast buffet! Full lanes may be reserved by purchasing 6 tickets. New Year Bowling Specials January 1, 16 p.m. $1.50 games all day Shoe rental not included January 2, 4 10 p.m. $5.95 all you can bowl, shoe rental includedFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor pool is now open regular hours Monday-Friday 5: 308 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 8 p.m. Weekend hours 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 7 8 a.m. in the Base Gym 45 Minute high intensity group training Jingle Bell Jog December 15 at 11:30 a.m. Pre-register ends December 9 Day of race registration 10:30 11:15 a.m. 40,000 Calories of Christmas Now through January 22 Two person teams! Prizes awarded!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Ringling Bros. Barnum & Bailey Circus January 20 22 $13 per person ITT is now booking Sandals Resorts, all inclusive vacations! The Gaylord Palms Resort is now offering a preferred rate for ITT customers. The resort is located just 1 mile from Walt Disney World theme park! Rates include Ice and Snow tickets. St. Augustine Nights of the Lights Adult $7 Child $4 Amelia Island Attractions Holiday Home Tour $20; Ghost Tour Adult $8 Child $4; Pub Crawl $23; Museum Family Pass $10 College Bowl Games Gator Bowl $35 and Capital Bowl $74 Jax Zoo Train, Carousel tickets and Jax Zoo Spooktacular now available at ITT! Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day pass $28.25 Stone Mountain Georgia $20.75 Georgia Aquarium $16.50-$22 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Vacation Condominium Rentals For as little as $329 per week / per unit Choose from over 3,500 locations in over 80 countries Call 1-800-724-9988 or visit www.afvclub.com Installation #62 Blue Man Group in Orlando $48, includes free admission to select CityWalk venues. Disney World Orlando, Florida Due to the success of the Disney Salute, the expiration dates of the tickets have been extended until September 27, 2012. If you have already purchased and used the six allotted 2011 salute tickets, you may purchase an additional six tickets. Disney ITT prices for military families: $135.50 for a 4 Day ticket with Park Hopper Option $135.50 for a 4 Day ticket with Water Park Fun & More $162 for a 4 Day ticket with both Park Hopper AND Water Park Fun & More The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2011-2012 Season (First Orchestra seating) Wicked, Beauty and The Beast, Jersey Boys, and Les Miserables. Jacksonville Jaguar tickets Section 146 and 147 $58.50 Jag Game Day Shuttle $12 per person Legoland 1 day $39.50; 2 day $48.50 Daytona 500 February 18 26, 2012 $27 to $199 Daytona Bike Week March 10 & 17 2012 $25 Monster Jam March 3, 2012 $25 $41 Gator Bowl Patches $5 Includes saving at local restaurants, amusement parks, golf course and more! MOSH $7 $12Liberty Cove RecreationTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5423491 for information. FREE Airport Shuttle December 14 January 12 Sign-up at Liberty Vault Indoor Rock Climbing December 10 Departs Liberty Vault at 1:30 p.m. Free Jaguars Game December 11 Departs Liberty Vault at 11 a.m. Dave & Busters Trip December 15 Departs Liberty Vault at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees December 13 & 27 for active duty December 15 & 29 for retirees & DoD personnel Mulligans Kids Night Thursday Purchase a regular priced meal and kids (12 and under) receive a regular item at price or a free kids menu item. December Special Play 18-holes with cart for only $17 Monday Friday after 12 p.m. Not valid on holidays Monday & Tuesday December Special Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fees included Not valid on holidays Winter Solstice Special December 22 Play 18-holes for $17 Cart and green fees included Santa Sez Golf Tournament December 22, 10 a.m. shotgun start $45 military, $55 civilian guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Holiday Camp Dates Week 1 Dec 19 23 Week 2 Dec 25 30 Movie under the Stars featuring The Polar Express December 9 at dusk Patriots Grove Free admission & popcorn! $.50 drinks Tropical Freeze December 17 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Noon 4 p.m. Free snow sledding, musical entertainment, snacks and beverages Childrens Holiday Bingo The Zone December 17 Doors open at 4 p.m., games begin at 5 p.m. $10 per person Children must be able to daub on their own Gift cards awarded as prizesFlying Club Call 777-8549 /6035 Flying Club Ground School January 9 February 15 $500 per person December Special 20% discount on aircraft rentals Monday Thursday Cannot be combined with other discounts New members initiation fees waived! A saving of $75 $125! JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011 23

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Defense Secretary Leon Panetta commemorated the 100th anniversary of naval aviation Dec. 2, praising mil itary aviators boldness and courage and expressing hope that Congress will draw inspiration from it in tackling the nations financial challenges. Speaking at the Naval Aviation Centennial Gala here, the secretary expressed concern about additional, automatic across-the-board cuts the Defense Department could face if Congress doesnt take action in the next year. Those cuts, if implemented, would undercut all of the departments strategy-driven efforts, he said, and he called on Congress to draw inspiration from the aviation community and put par tisanship aside to find a solution to the countrys fiscal problems. If our aviators, if our men and women in uniform, are willing to put their lives on the line, are willing to fight and to die for this country, then surely our elected leaders should be able to take a small risk in order to do whats right for this country, he said. Panetta joined a long list of aviation luminaries and military and defense leaders in paying tribute to the achievements naval aviators have made since aviation pioneer Eugene Ely first launched from the bow of the Navy test ship Pennsylvania in 1911. Boldness has been at the heart of our aviators ever since, he said, and remains critical as aviation assets provide a capability absolutely essential to projecting power overseas. While providing an unrivaled force on the seas, the secretary noted, their contribution also extends inland. In Afghanistan, hundreds of miles from the nearest sea, carrier aviation assets account for fully half of all air combat missions and one-third of close air support for our troops in contact with the enemy, he said. Meanwhile, aviation assets pro vide critical relief in times of crisis, he added, recalling his visit last month to USS Blue Ridge, which dispatched helicopters loaded with food, water and supplies via helicopter after Japans devastating earthquake and tsunami. All this takes a talented team of more than just pilots, Panetta said. He recognized the forward air controllers, logistics specialists, maintainers, rescue swimmers, crew chiefs and weapons system specialist who are integral parts of the naval aviation community. They, too, are the heroes we cele brate tonight, he said. That boldness will remain critical to maintaining air superiority into the future, he told the group. We need the entire military to be bold to take the offensive, to innovate, to embrace risk, he said. That, Panetta said, includes adapt ing not only to a changing strategic environment, but also to a new period of fiscal constraint. As the department focuses on build ing a strong military for the future while meeting its fiscal responsibilities, Panetta offered assurance that it will remain the worlds best military while keeping faith with troops and their families. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert, Assistant Marine Corps Commandant Gen. Joseph Dunford Jr., Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Robert J. Papp Jr. and Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. James A. Winnefeld Jr. all joined Panetta last night in paying tribute to a century of naval aviation. Mabus noted the vision that has guided naval aviation for the past century. [It] has adapted, grown and evolved over the past 100 years, he said. It is continuing to do so, and due to the courage, skill and professionalism of every sailor and marine, naval aviation will remain an integral part of the most formidable expeditionary fighting force the world has ever known. Greenert recognized that people not equipment or technology are the heart of naval aviation. As we turn our focus to the future, it is important that we remain focused on winning today and in the future, always work together to provide offshore options for our nation, and utilize our diverse and talented force responsibly when employing our resources, he said. Dunford, who said he has witnessed aviators flying into harms way to sup port troops under attack or provide lifesaving medical evacuation support, thanked the community for its strict code of honor to its comrades. Papp recognized the commitment aviators repeatedly demonstrate as they put themselves into harms way to protect or save others. Winnefeld, a career aviator, congrat ulated the aviation community for its first century of successes and looked to the future with a live video feed from USS George H.W. Bush as it transits home after its first deployment. You are the best, Panetta summa rized in his address to the aviation community. You are great citizens. You are great warriors. You are great patriots. In a gesture of gratitude for their service and sacrifice, First Lady Michelle Obama invited military families, including families of the military fallen -to be among the first to see the White House decked out for this years holiday season. This holiday season, she said, the White House is offering a special tribute to those who serve. Among the White Houses 37 Christmas trees scattered along the visitor tour route are two special Christmas trees intended to honor service members and their families. The official White House Christmas tree is a towering 18-foot balsam fir in the Blue Room and is a salute to service members of all branches. The tree is decorated with holiday cards created by military children around the world; service medals, badges and patches; and military images adorned with pinecone frames and ribbons. Some of those cards are inspiring, Obama said, sharing one of the writ ten messages. Five children in Medical Lake, Wash., wrote, No matter how many Christmases our dad misses, he makes every Christmas special and we love him. In another card is a more matter-offact message, the first lady noted. Hey Dad, its cool youre in Italy. So when are you coming back, because I already know what I want for Christmas. A Gold Star Christmas tree, bright with gold star ornaments and framed Purple Heart medals, graces the visi tors entrance on the East Wing landing. The tree was decorated by families of military fallen and features photos of fallen heroes and messages from their loved ones. A mom from Anchorage, Alaska, wrote this note to her son, Obama said: I love and miss you, son. Thank you for all of the great memories we shared. The tree is surrounded with photos and stories from more than 800 Gold Star families, the first lady noted. Each one showcases the strength and resilience that characterizes our Gold Star families, she said. In the coming weeks, visitors to the White House will be able to write notes to service members to express their gratitude, and Gold Star families will be invited to inscribe a ceramic gold star ornament with a personalized note. These families deserve the gratitude of a thankful nation, the first lady said, particularly in light of the sacrifices they make each day. Spouses are rais ing kids alone while their loved ones are deployed and their children are taking on extra responsibilities to help. And shes been inspired, she said, by the survivors of the fallen who continue to give back to their communities. Americans need to hear these stories, she said, and to understand what its like to be a military family. The Joining Forces campaign is intended to do just that, she said. The first lady and Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, started the initiative earlier this year to raise awareness of military families sacrifices and to rally Americans around them. We wanted to make sure that never again would someone have to ask the question: What is a Gold Star family and what does that sacrifice mean, she said. We all should know. Obama said thats one of the reasons the troops and their families are high lighted at the White House this holiday season. The first lady wrapped up with her own message of gratitude. I want to thank all of the Gold Star families for your enduring strength and commitment to this country, she said. And I want to thank all of the troops, all of our veterans, all of our military families, whose service and sacrifice inspires us all. The first lady then invited the mili tary children lining the front rows to decorate holiday cookies and orna ments with her in the State Dining Room. She iced cookies alongside them as she praised their festive creations. The military families also toured holiday decorations in several of the White Houses ornate rooms. A big attrac tion was the White House gingerbread house, which is made up of 400 pounds of gingerbread, white chocolate and marzipan. But Obamas dog, Bo, upstaged even the gingerbread house. Scattered throughout the tour route are five Bo topiaries made of various materials such as felt, buttons, pom-poms, candy, and even trash bags. As the children did their crafts, they had the opportunity to compare the fake first dogs with the real deal when the first lady brought Bo to the State Dining Room for a visit. Panetta, defense leaders celebrate naval aviation First lady kicks off holiday season with military families 24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 8, 2011