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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/01976
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 12-01-2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:01976

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2011 HSL-42 CoC Firing RangeOn The Job Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast, toured NAS Jacksonville Nov. 21 as part of his commitment to personal ly visit each of the regions 16 installations. I havent yet had the chance to get out and see every instal lation since taking command in August, but Im looking for ward to visiting each one and seeing first-hand the great efforts our personnel through out the region are making to support our fleet, our Sailors and their families, Scorby said. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Jeffrey Maclay escorted Scorby to numerous locations, including the P-8A Integrated Training Center (ITC), the Child Development Center (CDC), base housing facilities, Naval Hospital Jacksonville and vari ous construction sites. Most of the locations were facilities that have been recently con structed or renovated. There have been signifi cant changes at NAS Jax since Admiral Scorby had the helm. Naval Supply Sysems Command Fleet Logistics Center (NAVSUP FLC), Site NAS Jacksonville, and Aviation Support Detachment (ASD), Jacksonville, were award ed an outstanding with an unprecedented score of 99.54 percent on their latest Supply Management Inspection (SMI), the highest score ever achieved at NAS Jacksonville. Commander Naval Air Forces (CNAF) evaluated NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, NAS Jacksonville and ASD Jacksonville joint supply func tions. It was a rigorous process involving 11 supply experts verifying everything from cur rent status on all requisitions to physical security of spaces. The most critical functions scrutinized included inventory accuracy, material availability, and record accuracy. In all, the inspectors reviewed more than 400 checklist items for meet ing objectives, conformance to directives and overall effective ness of customer support. The teams leadership was elated with the results. It has truly been my great fortune to have led such an incredible team of military, DoD civilians, and contractors that are dedicated to excellence. This is, no doubt, the best supply team Ive ever been part of during my 22-year career, said NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, NAS Jacksonville site director Cmdr. Terry Surdyke, who is retiring from active duty. Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 Capt. Trey Wheeler said, The ASD team achieved amazing results and continues to be the bench mark for aviation logistic sup portcongratulations on a spectacular inspection. Things are looking great as the end of 2011 draws near. Achieving a score above 89 percent on the SMI also quali fies NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, NAS Jacksonville and ASD, Jacksonville to compete for the Supply Excellence Award Ashore, better known as the Blue E. The SMI numerical score and monthly metrics are used to measure achievement of sup ply/customer support goals for the Blue E. To date, NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville and ASD Jacksonville have accumulated 134 of 135 possible points on these monthly metrics. This is on track to win the Blue E award for calendar year 2011. Im honored to pass along hearty congratulations to the FLCJ, NAS Jax and ASD, Jax teams. You continue to reach new levels of supply manage ment excellence, said NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Head. Bravo Zulu to the NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville and ASD Jacksonville Team. They have raised the bar and set a new standard for aviation logistics support. Installation of the first of 2,534 solar photovoltaic (PV) panels began in midNovember on the west roof of NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1122 to help reduce the bases conventional energy usage and promote environmental sustain ability. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 stimulus funds amounting to $5.7 million are paying for the installation of the gridtied PV system that is expected to be completed by July 2012. NAS Jacksonville Public Works Department Energy Manager Lt. j.g. Luis Velazquez is in charge of the con struction project. When this PV system comes on line, it will generate about 605 kilowatt hours of continuous power during the day, explained Velazquez. That translates to about 720 megawatt hours per year, providing about 25 percent of the han gars annual electrical power needs. The hangar is home to three MH-60R Seahawk helicopter squadrons (HSM70 Spartans, HSM-74 Swamp Fox and HSL-42 Proud Warriors) and the rooftop PV project will not impact their operational readiness. Like all solar PV users, NAS Jacksonville looks forward to a reason able return on investment compared Region commander tours NAS Jax Supply teams score outstanding on SMI Helo hangar going solar as part of stations clean energy plan

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011 Learn about naval aviation history and heritage during the yearlong Centennial of Naval Aviation celebration. Discover the wide-ranging scope of naval aviation activities, including people, aircraft, ships, innovations and other significant events. This nationally sponsored series of events will take place throughout the year. Centennial events are already underway at NAS Jacksonville and will continue throughout the year, culminating with the NAS Jax Centennial of Naval Aviation Air Show Nov. 5-6. Mission To honor 100 years of mission-ready men and women, and recognize unique aviation-related achievements through event-driven celebrations. Learn more at www.public.navy.mil/airfor/centennial. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Until Thanksgiving Day, I had not paid much attention to the Occupy movement. I had followed the news stories and listened to debates for and against the protests. I had struggled to explain to my children the purpose of the campers outside the local library (Are they having an art show? No. Whats in those tents? People. People are living outside the library?) But on a daily basis, I had been too busy occupy ing my job (make that, jobs) to fully understand what the 99-percenters are trying to accomplish. Then I read an article about Thanksgiving, Occupy-style, and my feathers ruffled, perhaps overly so, given that my husband had just left for a deployment, apparently to everyones surprise: Everyone: But I thought the troops were coming home for the holidays. Thats what the president said. Me/Buzz Kill: Im sure some of them are coming home for the holidays. Many more are leaving. By Thanksgiving night, my Facebook feed was filled with status updates from military-spouse friends across the globe missing their deployed service members, and with updates from the ser vice members themselves, who wrote about tur key onboard the aircraft carrier or at a base in Afghanistan. These were interspersed with status updates from civilian friends recounting dinners spent with families intact and husbands at home to watch football and eat leftovers. As I scrolled down the screen, my emotions alter nated between commiseration and jealousy. Then I saw a link to the news article. It began with accounts of a confrontation between police and protestors at Occupy Wall Street in New York City. Nearly 200 occupiers surrounded 30 police, and, according to the article, one protester shouted, Why dont you stop being cops for Thanksgiving? Out of context, I might have thought this was a joke. Stop being a cop for Thanksgiving? Is that an option? Because if it is, Id like to volunteer my hus band to stop being a Navy pilot on Thanksgiving, too. And what about Christmas? No one needs pro tection or security on Christmas anyway, right? Of course, this cant happen. Terrorists and other threats to our country dont take a break for the holi days anymore than criminals do. Besides, Im pretty certain police officers are part of the 99 percent. Many of them dont have the luxury of taking a day off. I shook this off and continued reading, pausing only to visit the various Occupy websites, trying to find a FAQs, or at least a discernible mission state ment. The movement appears to be quite disor ganized, which increased my annoyance. Here in Bangor, the local occupiers have made extra work for the citys council members, police officers and other emergency personnel. Again, all of whom likely are not part of the 1 percent. As the wife of someone who has made a life dedi cated to the service of others, I know the desirethe frustrationof wanting to believe that it is not all in vain. This, by the way, is why Im not in the service myself. It takes a special person to protect and serve anyone and everyone, even those who are against you, and even when, after all your sacrifice, you are still in the 99%. However, fellow 99-percenters who are working hard to make ends meeton regular days and holi daysare not the only people annoying occupiers. Apparently the Occupy camps are also frustrated with homeless citizens taking up space and resourc es. Whoa! Wait a minute. Arent they, more than any one else, definitely not part of the 1 percent? Perhaps the break down of percentages should be different: there are the haves and have nots, the homeless, and the ones with the tough and thank less job of enforcing laws and protecting others. As I read these things on a lonely Thanksgiving night, while missing my deployed husband, I became more sad than angry. All this wasted time, resources and energy, and with no clear goals, is really quite a shame. People donated turkeys and food for the occupiers, who, I would guess, are less than 1 percent of the 99 percent. Indeed, the occupi ers are entirely supported through donations. Until the Occupy movement has a solid goal and mission statement, imagine the good that could be done if all their time and energy was distributed elsewhere. Like thanking the firemen who stood watch on Thanksgiving. The policemen who will be on patrol Christmas night. And the military men and women who protect the occupiers freedom to protest. Hey MoneyChic! I dont have a lot of money to spend this year on gifts what are some creative ways to gift family and friends? MoneyChic says: This is an issue for many people this holiday. Donna Freeman, a writer for MSN Money, only spends $100 every year on Christmas while the average American spends $515.94. You are probably thinking she only has to buy for a few people, but in fact, she is buying for her husband, daughter and a dozen other people. She says that most people dont think to look at thrift stores and yard sales where you can find great deals. Freeman found a great watch for her husband at just $3. She also uses store coupons to get free chocolate and other things. It may a little late to start finding gifts for everyone this year, but you can always early for next year. A good idea for children is to simply trade toys and clothes with a friend. Children grow so fast, why not get new things for the items they no longer can use? Some areas have swaps already arranged, but if there arent any in your area feel free to start one. There are also websites you can use to swap with people all over the country one is swapmomma.com and another is thredup.com. This idea also works great with friends. Everyone has clothes they no longer want or not longer fit so why not arrange for a swap with your friends? Also take advantage of websites such as groupon, daily deals and living social. All of these sites are great ways to get deals in your area. Im wrapping this up with a few other hints for giving on a budget. First, use price matching. It is a great way to save money and shop at a store you prefer. Second, do not buy wrap ping paper. Use old newspapers to wrap gifts. Third, re-gift any gift cards or gifts that you will not use. Last, redeem credit card rewards as well as other reward programs for gifts. Best of luck shopping on a budget this year. Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Catholic CCD 11 a.m. Protestant Worship Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study 6 p.m. in the Barracks Officer Christian Fellowship and Bible study Every Monday at 6 p.m. NAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051 Too occupied to occupy

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Anderson takes command of the Proud WarriorsCmdr. Troy Anderson relieved Cmdr. Brad Collins as commanding officer of the HSL-42 Proud Warriors Nov. 22 bringing an end to one outstanding chapter in the commands history and marking the start of another. Retired Capt. Glenn Doyle, former command ing officer of HSL-42 and commodore of Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet was the guest speaker for the ceremony. Doyle provided the attendees with highlights of the HSL/HSM community and words of wisdom to both the departing and incoming commanding officers. Anderson, who served as executive officer of the Proud Warriors for the previous 15 months, assumed command of the squadron and spoke of the knowl edge and experience gained throughout his career. Anderson thanked the many people who have led, guided and supported him throughout his 18 years of naval service enabling him to reach the pinnacle of his career, leading the squadron. A native of LaGrange, Ga., Anderson graduated from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1993 with a degree in civil engineering and was commissioned through the Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps pro gram. Anderson completed primary, intermediate and advanced flight training in Milton, Fla., and earned his Wings of Gold in May 1996. Andersons operational experience include tours with the Swamp Foxes of HSL-44 and the Vipers of HSL48, where he completed three deployments in support of Operations Noble Anvil and Allied Force, combat operations in support of the liberation of Kosovo and Operation Desert Fox, combat operations in support of United Nations sanctions enforcement against the nation of Iraq. Additionally, he was assigned to USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) where he deployed with the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group, along with the embarked 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, and conducted combat operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Andersons shore duty assignments include PERS404, Enlisted Aviation Assignments Division, as a rat ing assignment officer and the Naval War College in Newport, R.I., where he earned a Masters degree in national security and strategic studies. Upon comple tion of his tour in Rhode Island, he reported to the Headquarters, North American Aerospace Defense Command and United States Northern Command in Colorado Springs, Colo. fulfilling roles as the secretary to the joint staff and aide to the deputy commander. In August 2010, Anderson reported to HSL-42 as the executive officer. At the end of the ceremony, Anderson handed over the responsibilities as the squadrons executive officer to Cmdr. Derek Fleck. A native of Battle Creek, Mich., Fleck graduated from Northwestern University in 1995 with a bachelor of science degree in journalism. His last assignment prior to reporting to HSL-42 was the deputy executive assistant to the Supreme Allied Commander Europe/Commander, U.S. European Command. The ceremony marked the conclusion of a successful tour for Collins, under whose leadership the squad ron continued its award-winning tradition by earning its fourth Battle E in five years, its 10th consecutive Golden Anchor Award for Retention Excellence, the CNO Safety S Award, Arleigh Burke Fleet Trophy for superior performance in improvements in Battle Efficiency and Capt. Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy for antisubmarine and anti-surface warfare excellence among other awards. Additionally, Collins mark on the naval aviation community was capped by the squadron achieving 25 years class A mishap-free and through the exception al efforts of Detachment Two and USS Halyburton (FFG 40) in successfully completing the opera tional testing for the MQ-8B Fire Scout, Vertical Takeoff and Landing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. The ceremony culminated in the presentation of gifts from the Chief Petty Officers Mess and First Class Petty Officers Association recognizing him for his outstand ing leadership and guidance over the past 30 months. Collins leaves a legacy of exceptional leadership and contributions to the command as he departs for his next assignment with the Missile Defense Agency in Colorado Springs, Colo. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011 3

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Phase II ERB results now available for commanders Phase II Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) results were posted for command access on Nov. 29, at which time notifications will begin, officials said. In accordance with NAVADMIN 129/11, Sailors selected for separation will be personally contacted by their commanding officer or officer-in-charge within seven calendar days of commander notification. A NAVADMIN will be released once results are available for individual Sailor access in BUPERS Online (BOL). Sailors considered by the board will be classified in one of three categories in BOL. SSelected for reten tion NNot selected for retention CSelected for rat ing conversion. The Phase II ERB reviewed the records of ERBeligible E-6 through E-8 Sailors from 31 overmanned ratings. The board was charged with reviewing each candidates official military personnel file and any correspondence submitted by the member to identify the best-qualified Sailors to receive the finite number of retention quotas available in a fair and transparent manner. The Navy values every Sailor, and the decisions that went into this board were made with careful con sideration, said Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, chief of Naval Personnel. We are striving to ensure that maximum opportu nities exist for these Sailors to continue serving if they choose to apply for conversion to an undermanned rate or affiliate with the Selected Reserve, or if they transition into the civilian sector. Sailors not selected for retention will have access to the Navys transition assistance management pro gram and other benefits for members who are invol untary separated. This assistance will be proactive, comprehensive, tailored and supported by every level of the chain of command. As outlined in NAVADMIN 332/11, Sailors separat ing due to the ERB will be eligible for the following enhanced transition benefits: tion service providers. less than one year remaining on active duty to allow Sailors time to obtain civilian licenses and certifica tions aligned with their job or rating prior to their transition; mum of 60 days in the continental United States prior to separation to ease their transition into the civilian sector; in January of 2012 will provide outplacement services, including pre-separation transition coaching, resume writing, job interview preparation and job search assistance for ERB separating Sailors. 60-Day transition period for ERB-affected SailorsCommanders overseas are required to give Sailors separating due to the Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) the opportunity to be in the continental United States for at least 60 days prior to separation, according to NAVADMIN 332/11. For Sailors to have an effective plan and smooth transition, they need to learn about transition services and develop their personal way ahead, said Capt. Kate Janac, ERB coordinator, chief of naval operations. Sailors serving overseas do not have access to cer tain opportunities available to Sailors in the states. This early return from overseas affords Sailors the time they need to better utilize separation benefits and services. Janac says commanders stateside may authorize up to 60-days for transition for Sailors facing separation prior to their end of active-duty obligated service date. The 60-day transition period may include Permissive Temporary Duty for job hunting or run concurrently with separation leave. Under existing Navy policies and command approval, the transition period may also include any combination of normal working hours, liberty, Temporary Duty and regular leave. In general, Sailors will not take the 60 days afford ed to them all at once, except for those stationed over seas who need to come back to the United States to a separation activity on separation orders, said Janac. The mission must still be done, so both the chainof-command and Sailor will have to plan ahead to optimize the time authorized for transition between now and Sept. 1, 2012. In accordance with MILPERSMAN 1910-812, mem bers eligible for separation while serving in the 48 contiguous United States will normally be separated on board their current command. If justification is presented and there is no additional cost to the gov ernment, Sailors may be authorized to transfer to a separation activity other than their current command, provided the gaining activity has separation capabil ity and no objections to receiving personnel for transi tion separation, said Janac. The real goal is not to focus on reaching 60 days, but rather to construct a plan to engage the wealth of transition resources available for all Sailors, not just ERB-separating Sailors, said Janac. Preparing for a new career requires a great deal of commitment and effort from Sailors in the same way they have already committed to the Navy. A barbecue at Homestead-Miami Speedway in Florida before the Nov. 20 Ford 400 NASCAR race is the latest example of the pride Americans have in their military families, first lady Michelle Obama said. At the event held in conjunction with the White Houses Joining Forces initiative, which fosters public and private-sector support for service mem bers, veterans and their families Obama and Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, thanked military families for their service and highlighted their resilience. Tony Stewart won the race and the 2011 NASCAR Sprint Cup championship, but military families received a share of the applause at the speedway. The fact that NASCAR is taking the time . dur ing what is probably the most tense time of their whole race season that theyre putting the focus on all of you is just what we want you to know, the first lady told the military families at the event. This is how much your country is willing to step up. NASCAR is one of thousands of businesses, organi zations, educational institutions and plain folk who step forward for service members and their families because they know what they owe military person nel, Obama noted. We know you guys are moms . and dads jug gling it all alone while someone is deployed, she said. For all the military kids out there, we want the whole country to know we know that youre sacrific ing as well. That its not easy to have your mom and dad away from home for long periods of time, but you guys are strong. You guys are leaders in your own right. Obama and Biden said they want Americans to think of service members and their families all times of the year, not just during special occasions. We want to make this a part of the dialogue in this country forever, the first lady said. This is about the way we want this country to talk about our troops, veterans and military fami lies forever. We want you to feel that appreciation and that gratitude so that you know your sacrifice is not in vain. People care about you. They care about what youve done, and this is just our way of shining whatever spotlight we have on the sacrifices that you make.Michelle Obama: NASCAR event shows pride in military families 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011

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YN1(SW/AW) Aliscia Crocker has been selected as Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior Sailor of the Year for 2011 while QM2(SW) William Sunda has been named the 2011 CNRSE Junior Sailor of the Year. As CNRSE Administration Department leading petty offi cer and executive assistant to the command master chief, Crocker oversees daily admin istrative operations and pro vides support to more than 400 region officers, enlisted Sailors and civilian personnel. As the regional awards yeoman, she processed more than 400 per sonal awards for personnel throughout the region. Crocker is a very metic ulous, hardworking and extremely dedicated Sailor who is always focused on what is in the best interests of the command, said Charles Washington, program ana lyst and Crockers immediate supervisor. She is committed to being the best at what she does and is constantly going above and beyond the call of duty. Though Crocker already has a bachelors degree in mass communications from Kansas University, she completed 12 credits toward her masters degree in business admin istration through Webster University during the past year. Its important to constantly challenge yourself and con stantly learn. It also makes you more marketable for a career after the Navy, Crocker said. Crocker said the Navy pro vides great opportunities to every Sailor, but its up to the individual to put forth the effort to succeed. To be successful, it takes hard work, and you need to keep in line with the Navys core values, she said. The Navy gives you a great oppor tunity to better yourself, but to get there, you need to set goals. As regional watch officer and regional battle watch special ist, Sunda received, reviewed and processed more than 10,000 messages from installa tions and ships throughout the region. Sunda is the kind of Sailor that really makes a difference in our Navy, said QMCS(SW/ AW) Ali Wilkerson, Sundas immediate supervisor. He constantly strives to be the best Sailor he can be and sets a great example with his positive attitude, motivation and will to succeed. In addition to his roles in the Regional Operations Center, Sunda is an active volunteer. He led three fundraisers as a member of the CNRSE Holiday Committee, guided the efforts to adopt a highway as a mem ber of the CNRSE Petty Officers Association, coordinated volunteer efforts at Venetia Elementary School and is an active representative for the Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society. I think its important to take on tasks that you are truly pas sionate about, Sunda said. You always have to put forth your best effort and work hard, but it makes it easier when you are truly passionate about what youre doing. Sunda is also dedicated to education. In the past year, he has completed 10 courses toward a bachelors degree in chemical engineer ing at Florida State College at Jacksonville. As a result, he was one of 74 selected out of 600 applicants for the Navys Seaman to Admiral program for fiscal year 2012. In February, Sunda will detach from CNRSE and report to the Naval Science Institute in Rhode Island. It really is an honor to be named CNRSE Junior Sailor of the Year when I competed against so many great Sailors, he said. I feel a lot of pride in my fel low Sailors, my command and the Navy. Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles satel lite pharmacy (located near the Navy Exchange) operates on holiday hours from Dec. 12 to Jan. 7. During this time, the satellite phar macy lobby is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and the drive-up window from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. On Dec. 24 and Dec. 31, the lobby is closed and the drive-up window is open from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. The satellite pharmacy is closed for federal holidays on Dec. 26 and Jan. 2. NH Jaxs main outpatient pharmacy (at the hospital) will be closed Dec. 24 26 and 31, as well as Jan. 1 and 2. As always, patients obtain refills by calling 800-NAV-PHAR (800628-7427) or going online at www. TRICAREonline.com. CNRSE announces 2011 Sailors of the Year Satellite pharmacy holiday hours released JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011 Work life balance is always a challenge in the military, but the holiday sea son presents its own unique stress points for Sailors working up to and through Thanksgiving. Few of us like standing watch or working during this time of the year but thats the reality of running the worlds finest Navy.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011 7

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This tour gave us, and our major tenant commanders, the opportunity to highlight some of the improvements and brief the admiral on our most recent challenges and successes, said Maclay The purpose of our tour today is to pro vide our new regional commander with an overview of construction and commu nity support operations that have changed since he was the installations command ing officer, said Cmdr. Gil Manalo, NAS Jacksonville public works officer. The base has spent more than $350 mil lion on public works projects throughout the past three years, according to Manalo. Those projects include the construction of the P-8A ITC, a new CDC, a hospital addi tion featuring a new breast care center and pharmacy, and a new all hands recreation al club to replace the existing club, The Zone. The installations mission is to sup port the fleet, the fighter and the family, Manalo said. Deteriorating base infrastructure nega tively impacts our ability to support the mission and meet new missions that may come to NAS Jacksonville. We may never have the amount of funding to improve 100 percent of our facilities and infrastructure, but each year we work with installation and region leadership to prioritize the impor tant and critical requirements that can be executed with the available resources. According to Scorby, the careful plan ning and dedicated effort of the personnel within the NAS Jacksonville Public Works Department have had a tremendous impact on the quality of life for those who live and work on base. Over the past few years they have com pleted some really impressive projects and they continue to strive for improvement with current and future projects, Scorby said. Their continued effort to improve NAS Jacksonville is key to making it one of the premier installations in the region. SOLAR: SecNav energy goal gets boost from 2,530 PV panelsto purchasing the equivalent amount of power from an electric utility company, said William Allen, construction field engi neering manager for Atlantic Contingency Constructors of Norfolk, Va., the contractor for the project. This is one of more than a half-dozen rooftop integrated PV systems were con structing for Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast. It rep resents tangible results from the Navys renewable energy and conservation plans, said Allen. ARRA projects are intended to modern ize Navy and Marine Corps shore infra structure, enhance Americas energy inde pendence and sustain a steady and robust maritime force for decades. Velazquez added, This project con tributes to achieving the Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus energy goal of increasing alternative energy afloat and ashore and by 2020 producing at least 50 percent of shore-based energy requirements from alternative sources. Christmas tree and decoration inspections To reduce the risk of fire during the holi day season, the follow ing requirements are in effect and in accordance with standards set forth in the NAS Jacksonville Instruction 11320.1S, Fire Prevention and Fire Protection Measures. and trees for all occu pancies (except hous ing) shall be inspected and approved by the fire department. Christmas trees are not permitted in assembly (clubs), correctional, BEQ/BOQ, Navy Lodge, dormitories or education al facilities. assembly occupancies shall be labeled or other wise identified or certi fied by the manufacturer as being fire retardant. Laboratories Inc. (UL) listed electric lights and wiring decorations shall be permitted or used on Christmas trees and other similar decorations. or other similar devices is strictly prohibited. Exception to this rule is during religious cere monies held at places of worship such as the base chapel. To schedule an inspec tion, please call 5422783/0379 or 509-6124. ADMIRAL: Tours former command, visits new project sites 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011

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With the VP-26 Tridents pack-out nearing completion Nov. 22 in NAS Jax Hangar 1000, naval flight officer Lt. Cmdr. Nicholas Primozic was busy attending to last-minute details within his collateral duties as command services and professional development department head. With about 325 officers and Sailors slated to depoy, theres always one more thing to be accomplished, one more detail to be tweeked, said Primozic. For this mornings quarters, we invited subject matter experts from NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center to dis cuss the importance of motor vehicle safety and suicide pre vention. Tomorrow is our feed the troops Thanksgiving feast in the hangar for families and friends, said Primozic. He added, Our air lift to Bahrain and Qatar is scheduled for the day after Thanksgiving, with our P-3C Orions departing the following week. The successful comple tion of our Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle went accord ing to plan, said VP-26 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Noel Dahlke. Like every deploying maritime patrol and reconnaissance squadron, the Tridents are now at the peak of readiness and eager to execute their mission. Were deploying with 12 highly qualified com bat aircrew (CAC), along with dozens of experienced trouble shooters, maintainers and sup port personnel so were pre pared to execute every mission assigned to us. In addition to anti-subma rine warfare and combat air support over land, the VP-26 Tridents may also employ their P-3C Orions in maritime sur veillance mis sions and the international effort against piracy. VP-26 to begin 5th Fleet deployment JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011 9

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CNIC N913 hosts first webinar for familiesCommander, Navy Installation Commands Fleet and Family Readiness Program announces their first webinar (Dec. 7) focused directly on families. The webinar improves understand ing of all Navy family readiness pro grams and increases family prepared ness. This webinar will highlight the new Family Readiness Groups (FRG) Standardized Curriculum, and will include topics such as: Establishing an FRG, FRG Membership Building, Fundraising, Event Planning and Emergency Response and more! Not to replace the eight-hour Family Readiness Groups Leadership Training provided by Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC), its purpose is to invite attendees to preview the training and encourage attendance. The FRG webi nar will be held Dec. 7 at 7 p.m. (EST). FRG members and families will need to create a webinar account by logging on to the LMS http://learning.zeiders. com and complete the form for first time users to register. Seating is limited. Note: The LMS is not compatible with AOL accounts. USO Pal Day celebrates 52 yearsDec. 3 marks the 54th anniversary of USO Pal Day in St. Augustine, where the oldest citys attractions show their support and appreciation to members of the U.S. armed forces and their families by opening their doors free of charge. In addition, members of Elks Lodge 829 will serve a free lunch sponsored by the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. Over the years, tens of thousands of active duty military and their families have enjoyed USO Pal Day. The Greater Jacksonville Area USO has the sole of mission of supporting our brave men/women and their fami lies who defend our freedoms. We are greatly appreciative of our partnership with the City of St. Augustine, Elks Lodge 829 and the United Way of St. Johns County. Navy assistance programs for separating Sailors, as well as some enhanced transition benefits unique for Sailors not selected for retention by the Enlisted Retention Board (ERB), are outlined in NAVADMIN 332/11. If youve served in the Navy, youve been a good military team member, and we want to give you and your family the best possible transition benefits, said Rear Adm. Martha Herb, director of Personal Readiness and Community Support. If you are not selected to stay in the Navy, you can succeed on the outside with your proven military val ues, education, training and experience. The transi tion tools were providing for separating Sailors will help you hit the ground running and get off to a good start. The NAVADMIN outlines the full spectrum of sepa ration benefits available to Sailors leaving the Navy voluntarily or involuntarily that are designed to help them succeed in civilian life. Sailors separating via the ERB will receive targeted outreach assistance to ensure an individual transition plan is developed. Historically high retention and low attrition led to the need for the Enlisted Retention Board. Held in two phases, the board considered the records of approxi mately 16,000 Sailors from 31 overmanned ratings to determine who will be recommended for reten tion. Those Sailors not selected for retention will have access to the full spectrum of Navy support services, as well as several enhanced transition benefits. Benefits for all Sailors who are separated invol untarily in accordance with Department of Defense Instruction 1332.29, including those affected by the ERB, consist of: for Sailors and their families, as well as the option to purchase health care coverage through the Continued Health Care Benefit Program for up 18 additional months. access medical and other benefits; after separation. In addition to resources provided to all separating members, Sailors separating by the ERB will be eli gible for the following enhanced transition benefits: tion service providers. less than one year remaining on active duty to allow Sailors time to obtain civilian licenses and certifica tions aligned with their job or rating prior to their transition; mum of 60 days in the continental United States prior to separation to ease their transition into the civilian sector. in January of 2012 will provide outplacement services, including pre-separation transition coaching, resume writing, job interview preparation and job search assistance for ERB separating Sailors. will be mandatory for all ERB separating Sailors. For more information on transition assistance ben efits and resources, Sailors can check out a refer ence handbook posted at http://www.public.navy.mil/ bupers-npc/boards/ERB/Pages/default2.aspx. Sailors and their family members are also encour aged to access the full range of stress management resources available to them during this transition, including their command leadership, ombudsmen, medical and mental health specialists, and counselors at Fleet and Family Support Centers.Navy benefits for separating Sailors outlined in NAVADMIN release 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011

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As part of their pre-deploy ment certifications, seven petty officers from the VP-26 Tridents took part in small arms training and qualifica tion Nov. 21 at the indoor fir ing range on board NAS Jacksonville. Range safety officer AO1 Naomi Stout and firing line coach AO2 Dennis Mansion, both of VP-8, ensured that stu dents were familiar with the range regulations particu larly the safety requirements associated with the weapon, in this case, the M9 Beretta semiautomatic pistol, the U.S. mili tarys primary handgun. Stout said, When VP squad rons deploy to the U.S. Navy 5th Fleet area of responsibil ity, its a requirement that 100 percent of personnel be to be qualified to handle and shoot the M9 Beretta from standing and kneeling positions. She added, Each Sailor must successfully complete the Navy Handgun Qualification Course, that requires shooting a minimum of 48 rounds with a score at least 180 points. As firing line coach, Mansion watches the shooters and offers advice or calls a safety time out when needed. If you have a question while shooting raise your non-fir ing hand. Weapons must be pointed down range and level at the deck at all times, said Mansion. Hearing protection and shatterproof eye protection is required whenever firearms are being discharged during qualification fire at the range. Approved hearing protection such as sound attenuators that reduce noise levels to 84 deci bels or below is required. Stout always stresses the four general safety rules for responsible weapons handling, whether in training or combat. Rule 1: Treat every weapon as if it were loaded. Rule 2: Never point a weapon at anything you do not intend to shoot. Rule 3: Keep your finger straight and off the trigger until ready to fire. Rule 4: Keep weapon on SAFE until you intend to fire. VP Sailors sharpen shooting skills at firing range JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011 13

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The HS-11 Dragonslayers recently completed three weeks of training as part of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 at NAS Fallon, Nevada home of the Naval Strike Air Warfare Center. The center, known through out the Navy as the only facil ity where an entire carrier air wing can conduct comprehen sive training, presented Slayer aircrews with a variety of exer cises aimed at honing their skills at terrain and mountain flying, aerial gunnery, close air support and combat search and rescue. These exercises, integrating aircraft from CVW-1, tested the air wings ability to analyze, prioritize and prosecute targets on the ground as well as res cuing downed aviators in hos tile environments. Five Hellfire missiles, launched from Slayer HH-60H aircraft, successfully hit and destroyed their intended tar gets. The squadron also com pleted several unit-level train ing events practicing surfaceto-air countermeasure tactics against various radar and weapon systems. Slayer maintenance person nel worked long days keeping aircraft fully mission capable to support flight operations. Most days, the flight schedule started before sunrise and last ed until well after sunset. They also had to battle the dynamic weather changes each day dur ing autumn in the mountain ous environment. The highly successful com pletion of air wing maneuvers is another step in preparing HS-11 for its upcoming deploy ment aboard the aircraft car rier USS Enterprise (CVN 65), as it departs this spring for its final cruise before retirement in late 2012. Next on the squadrons schedule is a detachment to the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) in the Bahamas for anti-subma rine warfare training in early December. When HS-11 returns from Enterprises 2012 deployment, they will fly to their new home port of NAS Norfolk where they will transition to the MH-60S (Sierra) in 2014. The Dragonslayers have been homeported at NAS Jacksonville since 1973. When Enterprise is decom missioned in 2012, the squad ron will join CVW-17, currently embarked on the aircraft car rier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71). YN2 (SW/AW) Derek Matthews of Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville (FACSFACJAX) retired Nov. 29 after serving 20 years of active duty naval service at the NAS Jax Officers club. The guest speaker was FACSFACJAX Commanding Officer Cmdr. Todd Abrahamson. Matthews enlisted in the Navy in January 1992, com pleting recruit training in Great Lakes, Ill. He then received orders to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 87 in Jacksonville, where he qualified as a plane captain, was quickly designated as senior plane captain, and received his Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist designation. Following his tour at VFA87, he attended Yeoman A School in Meridian, Miss. His initial yeoman duty station was Military Sealift Command in Cape Canaveral, Fla. After advancing to petty officer third class, he was sent on temporary assigned duty to Port Au Prince, Haiti, in support of Operation Uphold Democracy. While at Military Sealift Command, Matthews was selected as Blue Jacket of the Quarter in 1995 and again in 1997, when he was also selected as Blue Jacket of the Year. Additionally, he was awarded a Navy and Marine Corps Achievement medal for his role in decommission ing the USNS Vanguard. In 1999, Matthews trans ferred to USS John F. Kennedy at NS Mayport, where he completed two deployments, earned his Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist designation, advanced to second class petty officer and was select ed as Junior Sailor of the Year for 2001. Matthews then trans ferred to Naval Hospital Jacksonville before deploy ing to Iraq in June 2003 for one year as an Individual Augmentee (IA). In 2005, he was selected for another IA to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where he supported detainee operations. MWR seeking sponsorsThe Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department of NAS Jacksonville is soliciting commercial/corpo rate sponsors for a wide range of 2012 special events and advertising oppor tunities. Revenues generated through spon sorship and advertising are used spe cifically to enhance quality of life pro grams for our service members and their families. Through sponsorship and adver tising you can develop brand loyalty, consumer affiliation and promote your products and services to more than 25,000 base personnel. For more information contact the MWR Marketing Department at (904) 542-8205 or e-mail jaxs_nas_mwrm ktg@navy.mil. Slayers hone skills at NAS Fallon Matthews retires after 20 years of service 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011

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Following his IAs, he transferred to USS Taylor (FFG 50), where he completed two deployments before reporting to FACSFACJAX in December 2010. He served as the FACSFACJAX administration leading petty officer and legal assistant. He will continue to reside in Jacksonville with his wife, Rhonda, and daughter, Taylor. MATTHEWS: Retires after 20 years service Expeditionary commands around the fleet began the scheduled 7-month transition to the Navy Working Uniform Type II and III (NWU Type II/ III) this month. The NWU family of uniforms is intended to replace multiple, less capable legacy uniforms, reduce the Navys total own ership costs, modernize the warfighter, and complete the vision of Task Force Uniform. The two new uniforms in the NWU series were developed for use in the tactical expedition ary mission of todays Navy, tailored for desert and wood land environments. Commands that have been approved to wear the NWU Type II/III uniform will tran sition to the new uniform in alphabetical order by the name of the respective command. The NWU Type II (des ert) uniform will be worn by Navy Special Warfare (NSW) operators and Sailors assigned to NSW units or units which directly support NSW opera tions. The NWU Type III (wood land) uniform will be the stan dard camouflage uniform for all personnel, to be worn in non-desert environments, including most stateside areas. The only difference between the two uniforms is the camou flage pattern. The NWU Type III will replace the existing tri-col ored woodland camouflage utility uniform. It will be the standard camouflage uni form worn in the continental United States, and can be worn while deployed as prescribed by combatant commanders. Occasion for wear of the NWU Type III will be the same as the current woodland camouflage utility uniform per NAVADMIN 188/09. The NWU Type II/III approval is a culmination of a four-year effort comprising all of the expeditionary stake holders, ensuring we capture the true operational require ments our Sailors need to succeed on the battlefield, said Master Chief Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician Robert McCue, NWU Type II/ III Conformance Test Monitor during an interview in August. They provide unmatched capabilities to the warfighter enabling tactical advantage and enhancing mission suc cess by saving lives. Each Expeditionary Sailor will receive three blouses, three trousers, two cover insig nia, one parka, one fleece liner, one helmet cover, and one sun hat (boonie cap). Fleece watch caps will be provided at a later time when available. Items from the NWU Type II/ III will be issued only by the approved commands and will not be available from the Navy Exchange. The Chief of Naval Operations approved the final design for the NWU II/III Aug. 30. Transition to NWU Type II/III now underway JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011 15

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Bean Bag Toss Wednesday at 7 p.m. Play Bingo at lunch Monday Friday at 11:15 a.m. Evening sessions are Sunday, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday at 6:30 p.m. Cash prizes! NFL Sunday Ticket At the Bud Brew House 12:30 p.m. close $.50 wings! Beverage specials!Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Bowling Special $5.95 all you can bowl 4 10 p.m., shoe rental not included Rising Stars Youth League Begins Dec. 10 League plays on Saturday mornings at 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor pool is now open regular hours Monday-Friday 5: 308 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 8 p.m. Weekend hours 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 78 a.m. in the Base Gym 45 Minute high intensity group training Jingle Bell Jog Dec.15 at 11:30 a.m. Pre-register ends Dec. 9 Day of race registration 10:30 11:15 a.m. 40,000 Calories of Christmas Now through Jan. 22 Two person teams! Prizes awarded!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. St. Augustine Nights of the Lights Adult $7 Child $4 Amelia Island Attractions Holiday Home Tour $20; Ghost Tour Adult $8 Child $4; Pub Crawl $23; Museum Family Pass $10 College Bowl Games Gator Bowl $35 and Capital Bowl $74 Jax Zoo Train, Carousel tickets and Jax Zoo Spooktacular now available at ITT! Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day pass $28.25 Stone Mountain Georgia $20.75 Georgia Aquarium $16.50-$22 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Blue Man Group in Orlando $48, includes free admission to select CityWalk venues. Disney World Due to the success of the Disney Salute, the expiration dates of the tickets have been extended until Sept. 27, 2012. If you have already purchased and used the six allotted 2011 salute tickets, you may purchase an additional six tickets. Disney ITT prices for military families: $135.50 for a 4 Day ticket with Park Hopper Option $135.50 for a 4 Day ticket with Water Park Fun & More $162 for a 4 Day ticket with both Park Hopper AND Water Park Fun & More The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2011-2012 Season (First Orchestra seat ing) Wicked, Beauty and The Beast, Jersey Boys, and Les Miserables. Jacksonville Jaguar tickets Section 146 and 147 $58.50 Jag Game Day Shuttle $12 per person Legoland 1 day $39.50; 2 day $48.50 Daytona 500 February 18 26, 2012 $27 to $199 Daytona Bike Week March 10 & 17 2012 $25 Monster Jam March 3, 2012 $25 $41 MOSH $7 $12Liberty Cove RecreationTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5423491 for information. St. Augustine Pal Day Dec. 3 All attractions free for military Sign-up at Liberty for free transporta tion Departs at 9 a.m. Free Jacksonville Jaguars Games Dec. 5 Space is limited! Sign-up early! Save Santa Scavenger Hunt Dec. 112 Find Santa and win $500! Free Airport Shuttle Dec. 14 Jan. 12 Sign-up at Liberty Vault NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Dec. 13 & 27 for active duty Dec. 15 & 29 for retirees & DoD person nelMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Holiday Camp Dates Week 1 Dec. 1923 Week 2 Dec. 2530 Movie under the Stars featuring The Polar Express Dec. 9 at dusk Patriots Grove Free admission & popcorn! $.50 drinks Tropical Freeze Dec. 17 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Noon 4 p.m. Free snow sledding, musical entertain ment, snacks and beverages Childrens Holiday Bingo The Zone Dec. 17 Doors open at 4 p.m., games begin at 5 p.m. $10 per person Children must be able to daub on their own Gift cards awarded as prizesFlying Club Call 777-8549 /6035 Flying Club Ground School Jan. 9 Feb. 15 $500 per person 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011

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Press secretary cites concerns of sexual assault in the ranksDefense Secretary Leon Panetta will issue very direct guidance in the com ing months about how the department should respond to sexual assaults with in the ranks, the Pentagon press secre tary told reporters Nov.18. George Little cited public commen tary from Capitol Hill and elsewhere on the militarys sexual assault prob lem, and he said Panetta finds it totally unacceptable. Panetta had zero tolerance for this at the CIA when I worked with him there, Little said, And he believes that its no longer acceptable that we say we can just do better on this. We need to take action. Potential actions are being discussed, but no final decisions have been made, he said. The defense secretary is troubled by what he understands are sexual assault problems inside the military, Little said. In the coming months, he contin ued, you will see him issue very direct guidance to the department on this very important issue and problem. The following Florida/Georgia Blood Alliance blood drives are scheduled at NAS Jacksonville in December: Dec. 5, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax (Building 848) Dec. 6, 1-4 p.m. Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast Dec. 10, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Navy Operational Support Center Jax Chuck Tamblyn is one of our many wonderful volunteers at the Jacksonville Navy -Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS). For the past seven months, Tamblyn has served as a caseworker and has dedicated more than 304 hours. He has given out over $94,976 in assistance and helps provide active duty ser vice members and their families with financial assistance. Born in Michigan, Tamblyn joined the Navy and attended the U.S. Naval Academy where he majored in economics. He received his masters degree from the Naval War College in National Security and Strategic Studies. He went on to serve 26 years in the Navy, retiring in 2007. Tamblyn and his wife have a daughter, cur rently a junior at the University of Florida, and a son who is a math teacher at Sandalwood High School. Tamblyn participates in many fun activ ities including golf, reading and riding motor cycles. He is also active in the community as a church youth leader, member of Navy League and Rotary Club. He is best known in the office for his amazing vocabulary skills. Want to learn more about volunteer opportunities? Please contact Chairman of Volunteers Amanda OConnell at 542-3515 or mandivoc@gmail.com. Blood drives set for next week JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011 17

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2011 HSL-42 CoC Firing RangeOn The Job Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast, toured NAS Jacksonville Nov. 21 as part of his commitment to personal ly visit each of the regions 16 installations. I havent yet had the chance to get out and see every installation since taking command in August, but Im looking for ward to visiting each one and seeing first-hand the great efforts our personnel throughout the region are making to support our fleet, our Sailors and their families, Scorby said. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Jeffrey Maclay escorted Scorby to numerous locations, including the P-8A Integrated Training Center (ITC), the Child Development Center (CDC), base housing facilities, Naval Hospital Jacksonville and various construction sites. Most of the locations were facilities that have been recently con structed or renovated. There have been signifi cant changes at NAS Jax since Admiral Scorby had the helm. Naval Supply Sysems Command Fleet Logistics Center (NAVSUP FLC), Site NAS Jacksonville, and Aviation Support Detachment (ASD), Jacksonville, were award ed an outstanding with an unprecedented score of 99.54 percent on their latest Supply Management Inspection (SMI), the highest score ever achieved at NAS Jacksonville. Commander Naval Air Forces (CNAF) evaluated NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, NAS Jacksonville and ASD Jacksonville joint supply func tions. It was a rigorous process involving 11 supply experts verifying everything from cur rent status on all requisitions to physical security of spaces. The most critical functions scrutinized included inventory accuracy, material availability, and record accuracy. In all, the inspectors reviewed more than 400 checklist items for meet ing objectives, conformance to directives and overall effectiveness of customer support. The teams leadership was elated with the results. It has truly been my great fortune to have led such an incredible team of military, DoD civilians, and contractors that are dedicated to excellence. This is, no doubt, the best supply team Ive ever been part of during my 22-year career, said NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, NAS Jacksonville site director Cmdr. Terry Surdyke, who is retiring from active duty. Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 Capt. Trey Wheeler said, The ASD team achieved amazing results and continues to be the benchmark for aviation logistic sup portcongratulations on a spectacular inspection. Things are looking great as the end of 2011 draws near. Achieving a score above 89 percent on the SMI also qualifies NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, NAS Jacksonville and ASD, Jacksonville to compete for the Supply Excellence Award Ashore, better known as the Blue E. The SMI numerical score and monthly metrics are used to measure achievement of sup ply/customer support goals for the Blue E. To date, NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville and ASD Jacksonville have accumulated 134 of 135 possible points on these monthly metrics. This is on track to win the Blue E award for calendar year 2011. Im honored to pass along hearty congratulations to the FLCJ, NAS Jax and ASD, Jax teams. You continue to reach new levels of supply manage ment excellence, said NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Head. Bravo Zulu to the NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville and ASD Jacksonville Team. They have raised the bar and set a new standard for aviation logistics support. Installation of the first of 2,534 solar photovoltaic (PV) panels began in midNovember on the west roof of NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1122 to help reduce the bases conventional energy usage and promote environmental sustain ability. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 stimulus funds amounting to $5.7 million are paying for the installation of the gridtied PV system that is expected to be completed by July 2012. NAS Jacksonville Public Works Department Energy Manager Lt. j.g. Luis Velazquez is in charge of the construction project. When this PV system comes on line, it will generate about 605 kilowatt hours of continuous power during the day, explained Velazquez. That translates to about 720 megawatt hours per year, providing about 25 percent of the hangars annual electrical power needs. The hangar is home to three MH-60R Seahawk helicopter squadrons (HSM70 Spartans, HSM-74 Swamp Fox and HSL-42 Proud Warriors) and the rooftop PV project will not impact their operational readiness. Like all solar PV users, NAS Jacksonville looks forward to a reasonable return on investment compared Region commander tours NAS Jax Supply teams score outstanding on SMI Helo hangar going solar as part of stations clean energy plan

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011 Learn about naval aviation history and heritage during the yearlong Centennial of Naval Aviation celebration. Discover the wide-ranging scope of naval aviation activities, including people, aircraft, ships, innovations and other significant events. This nationally sponsored series of events will take place throughout the year. Centennial events are already underway at NAS Jacksonville and will continue throughout the year, culminating with the NAS Jax Centennial of Naval Aviation Air Show Nov. 5-6. Mission To honor 100 years of mission-ready men and women, and recognize unique aviation-related achievements through event-driven celebrations. Learn more at www.public.navy.mil/airfor/centennial. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Until Thanksgiving Day, I had not paid much attention to the Occupy movement. I had followed the news stories and listened to debates for and against the protests. I had struggled to explain to my children the purpose of the campers outside the local library (Are they having an art show? No. Whats in those tents? People. People are living outside the library?) But on a daily basis, I had been too busy occupying my job (make that, jobs) to fully understand what the 99-percenters are trying to accomplish. Then I read an article about Thanksgiving, Occupy-style, and my feathers ruffled, perhaps overly so, given that my husband had just left for a deployment, apparently to everyones surprise: Everyone: But I thought the troops were coming home for the holidays. Thats what the president said. Me/Buzz Kill: Im sure some of them are coming home for the holidays. Many more are leaving. By Thanksgiving night, my Facebook feed was filled with status updates from military-spouse friends across the globe missing their deployed service members, and with updates from the ser vice members themselves, who wrote about tur key onboard the aircraft carrier or at a base in Afghanistan. These were interspersed with status updates from civilian friends recounting dinners spent with families intact and husbands at home to watch football and eat leftovers. As I scrolled down the screen, my emotions alternated between commiseration and jealousy. Then I saw a link to the news article. It began with accounts of a confrontation between police and protestors at Occupy Wall Street in New York City. Nearly 200 occupiers surrounded 30 police, and, according to the article, one protester shouted, Why dont you stop being cops for Thanksgiving? Out of context, I might have thought this was a joke. Stop being a cop for Thanksgiving? Is that an option? Because if it is, Id like to volunteer my husband to stop being a Navy pilot on Thanksgiving, too. And what about Christmas? No one needs protection or security on Christmas anyway, right? Of course, this cant happen. Terrorists and other threats to our country dont take a break for the holidays anymore than criminals do. Besides, Im pretty certain police officers are part of the 99 percent. Many of them dont have the luxury of taking a day off. I shook this off and continued reading, pausing only to visit the various Occupy websites, trying to find a FAQs, or at least a discernible mission statement. The movement appears to be quite disor ganized, which increased my annoyance. Here in Bangor, the local occupiers have made extra work for the citys council members, police officers and other emergency personnel. Again, all of whom likely are not part of the 1 percent. As the wife of someone who has made a life dedicated to the service of others, I know the desirethe frustrationof wanting to believe that it is not all in vain. This, by the way, is why Im not in the service myself. It takes a special person to protect and serve anyone and everyone, even those who are against you, and even when, after all your sacrifice, you are still in the 99%. However, fellow 99-percenters who are working hard to make ends meeton regular days and holidaysare not the only people annoying occupiers. Apparently the Occupy camps are also frustrated with homeless citizens taking up space and resources. Whoa! Wait a minute. Arent they, more than anyone else, definitely not part of the 1 percent? Perhaps the break down of percentages should be different: there are the haves and have nots, the homeless, and the ones with the tough and thank less job of enforcing laws and protecting others. As I read these things on a lonely Thanksgiving night, while missing my deployed husband, I became more sad than angry. All this wasted time, resources and energy, and with no clear goals, is really quite a shame. People donated turkeys and food for the occupiers, who, I would guess, are less than 1 percent of the 99 percent. Indeed, the occupiers are entirely supported through donations. Until the Occupy movement has a solid goal and mission statement, imagine the good that could be done if all their time and energy was distributed elsewhere. Like thanking the firemen who stood watch on Thanksgiving. The policemen who will be on patrol Christmas night. And the military men and women who protect the occupiers freedom to protest. Hey MoneyChic! I dont have a lot of money to spend this year on gifts what are some creative ways to gift family and friends? MoneyChic says: This is an issue for many people this holiday. Donna Freeman, a writer for MSN Money, only spends $100 every year on Christmas while the average American spends $515.94. You are probably thinking she only has to buy for a few people, but in fact, she is buying for her husband, daughter and a dozen other people. She says that most people dont think to look at thrift stores and yard sales where you can find great deals. Freeman found a great watch for her husband at just $3. She also uses store coupons to get free chocolate and other things. It may a little late to start finding gifts for everyone this year, but you can always early for next year. A good idea for children is to simply trade toys and clothes with a friend. Children grow so fast, why not get new things for the items they no longer can use? Some areas have swaps already arranged, but if there arent any in your area feel free to start one. There are also websites you can use to swap with people all over the country one is swapmomma.com and another is thredup.com. This idea also works great with friends. Everyone has clothes they no longer want or not longer fit so why not arrange for a swap with your friends? Also take advantage of websites such as groupon, daily deals and living social. All of these sites are great ways to get deals in your area. Im wrapping this up with a few other hints for giving on a budget. First, use price matching. It is a great way to save money and shop at a store you prefer. Second, do not buy wrap ping paper. Use old newspapers to wrap gifts. Third, re-gift any gift cards or gifts that you will not use. Last, redeem credit card rewards as well as other reward programs for gifts. Best of luck shopping on a budget this year. Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Catholic CCD 11 a.m. Protestant Worship Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study 6 p.m. in the Barracks Officer Christian Fellowship and Bible study Every Monday at 6 p.m. NAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051 Too occupied to occupy

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Anderson takes command of the Proud WarriorsCmdr. Troy Anderson relieved Cmdr. Brad Collins as commanding officer of the HSL-42 Proud Warriors Nov. 22 bringing an end to one outstanding chapter in the commands history and marking the start of another. Retired Capt. Glenn Doyle, former commanding officer of HSL-42 and commodore of Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet was the guest speaker for the ceremony. Doyle provided the attendees with highlights of the HSL/HSM community and words of wisdom to both the departing and incoming commanding officers. Anderson, who served as executive officer of the Proud Warriors for the previous 15 months, assumed command of the squadron and spoke of the knowl edge and experience gained throughout his career. Anderson thanked the many people who have led, guided and supported him throughout his 18 years of naval service enabling him to reach the pinnacle of his career, leading the squadron. A native of LaGrange, Ga., Anderson graduated from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1993 with a degree in civil engineering and was commissioned through the Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps pro gram. Anderson completed primary, intermediate and advanced flight training in Milton, Fla., and earned his Wings of Gold in May 1996. Andersons operational experience include tours with the Swamp Foxes of HSL-44 and the Vipers of HSL48, where he completed three deployments in support of Operations Noble Anvil and Allied Force, combat operations in support of the liberation of Kosovo and Operation Desert Fox, combat operations in support of United Nations sanctions enforcement against the nation of Iraq. Additionally, he was assigned to USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) where he deployed with the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group, along with the embarked 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, and conducted combat operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Andersons shore duty assignments include PERS404, Enlisted Aviation Assignments Division, as a rat ing assignment officer and the Naval War College in Newport, R.I., where he earned a Masters degree in national security and strategic studies. Upon comple tion of his tour in Rhode Island, he reported to the Headquarters, North American Aerospace Defense Command and United States Northern Command in Colorado Springs, Colo. fulfilling roles as the secretary to the joint staff and aide to the deputy commander. In August 2010, Anderson reported to HSL-42 as the executive officer. At the end of the ceremony, Anderson handed over the responsibilities as the squadrons executive officer to Cmdr. Derek Fleck. A native of Battle Creek, Mich., Fleck graduated from Northwestern University in 1995 with a bachelor of science degree in journalism. His last assignment prior to reporting to HSL-42 was the deputy executive assistant to the Supreme Allied Commander Europe/Commander, U.S. European Command. The ceremony marked the conclusion of a successful tour for Collins, under whose leadership the squad ron continued its award-winning tradition by earning its fourth Battle E in five years, its 10th consecutive Golden Anchor Award for Retention Excellence, the CNO Safety S Award, Arleigh Burke Fleet Trophy for superior performance in improvements in Battle Efficiency and Capt. Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy for antisubmarine and anti-surface warfare excellence among other awards. Additionally, Collins mark on the naval aviation community was capped by the squadron achieving 25 years class A mishap-free and through the exception al efforts of Detachment Two and USS Halyburton (FFG 40) in successfully completing the opera tional testing for the MQ-8B Fire Scout, Vertical Takeoff and Landing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. The ceremony culminated in the presentation of gifts from the Chief Petty Officers Mess and First Class Petty Officers Association recognizing him for his outstanding leadership and guidance over the past 30 months. Collins leaves a legacy of exceptional leadership and contributions to the command as he departs for his next assignment with the Missile Defense Agency in Colorado Springs, Colo. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011 3

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Phase II ERB results now available for commanders Phase II Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) results were posted for command access on Nov. 29, at which time notifications will begin, officials said. In accordance with NAVADMIN 129/11, Sailors selected for separation will be personally contacted by their commanding officer or officer-in-charge within seven calendar days of commander notification. A NAVADMIN will be released once results are available for individual Sailor access in BUPERS Online (BOL). Sailors considered by the board will be classified in one of three categories in BOL. SSelected for reten tion NNot selected for retention CSelected for rat ing conversion. The Phase II ERB reviewed the records of ERBeligible E-6 through E-8 Sailors from 31 overmanned ratings. The board was charged with reviewing each candidates official military personnel file and any correspondence submitted by the member to identify the best-qualified Sailors to receive the finite number of retention quotas available in a fair and transparent manner. The Navy values every Sailor, and the decisions that went into this board were made with careful consideration, said Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, chief of Naval Personnel. We are striving to ensure that maximum opportunities exist for these Sailors to continue serving if they choose to apply for conversion to an undermanned rate or affiliate with the Selected Reserve, or if they transition into the civilian sector. Sailors not selected for retention will have access to the Navys transition assistance management program and other benefits for members who are involuntary separated. This assistance will be proactive, comprehensive, tailored and supported by every level of the chain of command. As outlined in NAVADMIN 332/11, Sailors separating due to the ERB will be eligible for the following enhanced transition benefits: tion service providers. less than one year remaining on active duty to allow Sailors time to obtain civilian licenses and certifications aligned with their job or rating prior to their transition; mum of 60 days in the continental United States prior to separation to ease their transition into the civilian sector; in January of 2012 will provide outplacement services, including pre-separation transition coaching, resume writing, job interview preparation and job search assistance for ERB separating Sailors. 60-Day transition period for ERB-affected SailorsCommanders overseas are required to give Sailors separating due to the Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) the opportunity to be in the continental United States for at least 60 days prior to separation, according to NAVADMIN 332/11. For Sailors to have an effective plan and smooth transition, they need to learn about transition services and develop their personal way ahead, said Capt. Kate Janac, ERB coordinator, chief of naval operations. Sailors serving overseas do not have access to certain opportunities available to Sailors in the states. This early return from overseas affords Sailors the time they need to better utilize separation benefits and services. Janac says commanders stateside may authorize up to 60-days for transition for Sailors facing separation prior to their end of active-duty obligated service date. The 60-day transition period may include Permissive Temporary Duty for job hunting or run concurrently with separation leave. Under existing Navy policies and command approval, the transition period may also include any combination of normal working hours, liberty, Temporary Duty and regular leave. In general, Sailors will not take the 60 days afforded to them all at once, except for those stationed overseas who need to come back to the United States to a separation activity on separation orders, said Janac. The mission must still be done, so both the chainof-command and Sailor will have to plan ahead to optimize the time authorized for transition between now and Sept. 1, 2012. In accordance with MILPERSMAN 1910-812, members eligible for separation while serving in the 48 contiguous United States will normally be separated on board their current command. If justification is presented and there is no additional cost to the government, Sailors may be authorized to transfer to a separation activity other than their current command, provided the gaining activity has separation capability and no objections to receiving personnel for transition separation, said Janac. The real goal is not to focus on reaching 60 days, but rather to construct a plan to engage the wealth of transition resources available for all Sailors, not just ERB-separating Sailors, said Janac. Preparing for a new career requires a great deal of commitment and effort from Sailors in the same way they have already committed to the Navy. A barbecue at Homestead-Miami Speedway in Florida before the Nov. 20 Ford 400 NASCAR race is the latest example of the pride Americans have in their military families, first lady Michelle Obama said. At the event held in conjunction with the White Houses Joining Forces initiative, which fosters public and private-sector support for service mem bers, veterans and their families Obama and Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, thanked military families for their service and highlighted their resilience. Tony Stewart won the race and the 2011 NASCAR Sprint Cup championship, but military families received a share of the applause at the speedway. The fact that NASCAR is taking the time . during what is probably the most tense time of their whole race season that theyre putting the focus on all of you is just what we want you to know, the first lady told the military families at the event. This is how much your country is willing to step up. NASCAR is one of thousands of businesses, organizations, educational institutions and plain folk who step forward for service members and their families because they know what they owe military person nel, Obama noted. We know you guys are moms . and dads jug gling it all alone while someone is deployed, she said. For all the military kids out there, we want the whole country to know we know that youre sacrificing as well. That its not easy to have your mom and dad away from home for long periods of time, but you guys are strong. You guys are leaders in your own right. Obama and Biden said they want Americans to think of service members and their families all times of the year, not just during special occasions. We want to make this a part of the dialogue in this country forever, the first lady said. This is about the way we want this country to talk about our troops, veterans and military fami lies forever. We want you to feel that appreciation and that gratitude so that you know your sacrifice is not in vain. People care about you. They care about what youve done, and this is just our way of shining whatever spotlight we have on the sacrifices that you make.Michelle Obama: NASCAR event shows pride in military families 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011

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YN1(SW/AW) Aliscia Crocker has been selected as Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior Sailor of the Year for 2011 while QM2(SW) William Sunda has been named the 2011 CNRSE Junior Sailor of the Year. As CNRSE Administration Department leading petty officer and executive assistant to the command master chief, Crocker oversees daily admin istrative operations and pro vides support to more than 400 region officers, enlisted Sailors and civilian personnel. As the regional awards yeoman, she processed more than 400 per sonal awards for personnel throughout the region. Crocker is a very metic ulous, hardworking and extremely dedicated Sailor who is always focused on what is in the best interests of the command, said Charles Washington, program ana lyst and Crockers immediate supervisor. She is committed to being the best at what she does and is constantly going above and beyond the call of duty. Though Crocker already has a bachelors degree in mass communications from Kansas University, she completed 12 credits toward her masters degree in business admin istration through Webster University during the past year. Its important to constantly challenge yourself and con stantly learn. It also makes you more marketable for a career after the Navy, Crocker said. Crocker said the Navy pro vides great opportunities to every Sailor, but its up to the individual to put forth the effort to succeed. To be successful, it takes hard work, and you need to keep in line with the Navys core values, she said. The Navy gives you a great oppor tunity to better yourself, but to get there, you need to set goals. As regional watch officer and regional battle watch special ist, Sunda received, reviewed and processed more than 10,000 messages from installa tions and ships throughout the region. Sunda is the kind of Sailor that really makes a difference in our Navy, said QMCS(SW/ AW) Ali Wilkerson, Sundas immediate supervisor. He constantly strives to be the best Sailor he can be and sets a great example with his positive attitude, motivation and will to succeed. In addition to his roles in the Regional Operations Center, Sunda is an active volunteer. He led three fundraisers as a member of the CNRSE Holiday Committee, guided the efforts to adopt a highway as a mem ber of the CNRSE Petty Officers Association, coordinated volunteer efforts at Venetia Elementary School and is an active representative for the Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society. I think its important to take on tasks that you are truly passionate about, Sunda said. You always have to put forth your best effort and work hard, but it makes it easier when you are truly passionate about what youre doing. Sunda is also dedicated to education. In the past year, he has completed 10 courses toward a bachelors degree in chemical engineer ing at Florida State College at Jacksonville. As a result, he was one of 74 selected out of 600 applicants for the Navys Seaman to Admiral program for fiscal year 2012. In February, Sunda will detach from CNRSE and report to the Naval Science Institute in Rhode Island. It really is an honor to be named CNRSE Junior Sailor of the Year when I competed against so many great Sailors, he said. I feel a lot of pride in my fellow Sailors, my command and the Navy. Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles satel lite pharmacy (located near the Navy Exchange) operates on holiday hours from Dec. 12 to Jan. 7. During this time, the satellite phar macy lobby is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and the drive-up window from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. On Dec. 24 and Dec. 31, the lobby is closed and the drive-up window is open from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. The satellite pharmacy is closed for federal holidays on Dec. 26 and Jan. 2. NH Jaxs main outpatient pharmacy (at the hospital) will be closed Dec. 24 26 and 31, as well as Jan. 1 and 2. As always, patients obtain refills by calling 800-NAV-PHAR (800628-7427) or going online at www. TRICAREonline.com. CNRSE announces 2011 Sailors of the Year Satellite pharmacy holiday hours released JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011 Work life balance is always a challenge in the military, but the holiday sea son presents its own unique stress points for Sailors working up to and through Thanksgiving. Few of us like standing watch or working during this time of the year but thats the reality of running the worlds finest Navy.

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This tour gave us, and our major tenant commanders, the opportunity to highlight some of the improvements and brief the admiral on our most recent challenges and successes, said Maclay The purpose of our tour today is to provide our new regional commander with an overview of construction and commu nity support operations that have changed since he was the installations command ing officer, said Cmdr. Gil Manalo, NAS Jacksonville public works officer. The base has spent more than $350 mil lion on public works projects throughout the past three years, according to Manalo. Those projects include the construction of the P-8A ITC, a new CDC, a hospital addi tion featuring a new breast care center and pharmacy, and a new all hands recreational club to replace the existing club, The Zone. The installations mission is to sup port the fleet, the fighter and the family, Manalo said. Deteriorating base infrastructure nega tively impacts our ability to support the mission and meet new missions that may come to NAS Jacksonville. We may never have the amount of funding to improve 100 percent of our facilities and infrastructure, but each year we work with installation and region leadership to prioritize the impor tant and critical requirements that can be executed with the available resources. According to Scorby, the careful plan ning and dedicated effort of the personnel within the NAS Jacksonville Public Works Department have had a tremendous impact on the quality of life for those who live and work on base. Over the past few years they have com pleted some really impressive projects and they continue to strive for improvement with current and future projects, Scorby said. Their continued effort to improve NAS Jacksonville is key to making it one of the premier installations in the region. SOLAR: SecNav energy goal gets boost from 2,530 PV panelsto purchasing the equivalent amount of power from an electric utility company, said William Allen, construction field engineering manager for Atlantic Contingency Constructors of Norfolk, Va., the contractor for the project. This is one of more than a half-dozen rooftop integrated PV systems were con structing for Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast. It rep resents tangible results from the Navys renewable energy and conservation plans, said Allen. ARRA projects are intended to modern ize Navy and Marine Corps shore infra structure, enhance Americas energy independence and sustain a steady and robust maritime force for decades. Velazquez added, This project con tributes to achieving the Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus energy goal of increasing alternative energy afloat and ashore and by 2020 producing at least 50 percent of shore-based energy requirements from alternative sources. Christmas tree and decoration inspections To reduce the risk of fire during the holi day season, the follow ing requirements are in effect and in accordance with standards set forth in the NAS Jacksonville Instruction 11320.1S, Fire Prevention and Fire Protection Measures. and trees for all occu pancies (except hous ing) shall be inspected and approved by the fire department. Christmas trees are not permitted in assembly (clubs), correctional, BEQ/BOQ, Navy Lodge, dormitories or education al facilities. assembly occupancies shall be labeled or other wise identified or certi fied by the manufacturer as being fire retardant. Laboratories Inc. (UL) listed electric lights and wiring decorations shall be permitted or used on Christmas trees and other similar decorations. or other similar devices is strictly prohibited. Exception to this rule is during religious cere monies held at places of worship such as the base chapel. To schedule an inspec tion, please call 5422783/0379 or 509-6124. ADMIRAL: Tours former command, visits new project sites 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011

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With the VP-26 Tridents pack-out nearing completion Nov. 22 in NAS Jax Hangar 1000, naval flight officer Lt. Cmdr. Nicholas Primozic was busy attending to last-minute details within his collateral duties as command services and professional development department head. With about 325 officers and Sailors slated to depoy, theres always one more thing to be accomplished, one more detail to be tweeked, said Primozic. For this mornings quarters, we invited subject matter experts from NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center to dis cuss the importance of motor vehicle safety and suicide prevention. Tomorrow is our feed the troops Thanksgiving feast in the hangar for families and friends, said Primozic. He added, Our air lift to Bahrain and Qatar is scheduled for the day after Thanksgiving, with our P-3C Orions departing the following week. The successful comple tion of our Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle went accord ing to plan, said VP-26 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Noel Dahlke. Like every deploying maritime patrol and reconnaissance squadron, the Tridents are now at the peak of readiness and eager to execute their mission. Were deploying with 12 highly qualified com bat aircrew (CAC), along with dozens of experienced troubleshooters, maintainers and support personnel so were pre pared to execute every mission assigned to us. In addition to anti-subma rine warfare and combat air support over land, the VP-26 Tridents may also employ their P-3C Orions in maritime sur veillance mis sions and the international effort against piracy. VP-26 to begin 5th Fleet deployment JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011 9

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CNIC N913 hosts first webinar for familiesCommander, Navy Installation Commands Fleet and Family Readiness Program announces their first webinar (Dec. 7) focused directly on families. The webinar improves understand ing of all Navy family readiness pro grams and increases family prepared ness. This webinar will highlight the new Family Readiness Groups (FRG) Standardized Curriculum, and will include topics such as: Establishing an FRG, FRG Membership Building, Fundraising, Event Planning and Emergency Response and more! Not to replace the eight-hour Family Readiness Groups Leadership Training provided by Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC), its purpose is to invite attendees to preview the training and encourage attendance. The FRG webi nar will be held Dec. 7 at 7 p.m. (EST). FRG members and families will need to create a webinar account by logging on to the LMS http://learning.zeiders. com and complete the form for first time users to register. Seating is limited. Note: The LMS is not compatible with AOL accounts. USO Pal Day celebrates 52 yearsDec. 3 marks the 54th anniversary of USO Pal Day in St. Augustine, where the oldest citys attractions show their support and appreciation to members of the U.S. armed forces and their families by opening their doors free of charge. In addition, members of Elks Lodge 829 will serve a free lunch sponsored by the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. Over the years, tens of thousands of active duty military and their families have enjoyed USO Pal Day. The Greater Jacksonville Area USO has the sole of mission of supporting our brave men/women and their families who defend our freedoms. We are greatly appreciative of our partnership with the City of St. Augustine, Elks Lodge 829 and the United Way of St. Johns County. Navy assistance programs for separating Sailors, as well as some enhanced transition benefits unique for Sailors not selected for retention by the Enlisted Retention Board (ERB), are outlined in NAVADMIN 332/11. If youve served in the Navy, youve been a good military team member, and we want to give you and your family the best possible transition benefits, said Rear Adm. Martha Herb, director of Personal Readiness and Community Support. If you are not selected to stay in the Navy, you can succeed on the outside with your proven military values, education, training and experience. The transi tion tools were providing for separating Sailors will help you hit the ground running and get off to a good start. The NAVADMIN outlines the full spectrum of separation benefits available to Sailors leaving the Navy voluntarily or involuntarily that are designed to help them succeed in civilian life. Sailors separating via the ERB will receive targeted outreach assistance to ensure an individual transition plan is developed. Historically high retention and low attrition led to the need for the Enlisted Retention Board. Held in two phases, the board considered the records of approximately 16,000 Sailors from 31 overmanned ratings to determine who will be recommended for reten tion. Those Sailors not selected for retention will have access to the full spectrum of Navy support services, as well as several enhanced transition benefits. Benefits for all Sailors who are separated invol untarily in accordance with Department of Defense Instruction 1332.29, including those affected by the ERB, consist of: for Sailors and their families, as well as the option to purchase health care coverage through the Continued Health Care Benefit Program for up 18 additional months. access medical and other benefits; after separation. In addition to resources provided to all separating members, Sailors separating by the ERB will be eli gible for the following enhanced transition benefits: tion service providers. less than one year remaining on active duty to allow Sailors time to obtain civilian licenses and certifications aligned with their job or rating prior to their transition; mum of 60 days in the continental United States prior to separation to ease their transition into the civilian sector. in January of 2012 will provide outplacement services, including pre-separation transition coaching, resume writing, job interview preparation and job search assistance for ERB separating Sailors. will be mandatory for all ERB separating Sailors. For more information on transition assistance ben efits and resources, Sailors can check out a refer ence handbook posted at http://www.public.navy.mil/ bupers-npc/boards/ERB/Pages/default2.aspx. Sailors and their family members are also encour aged to access the full range of stress management resources available to them during this transition, including their command leadership, ombudsmen, medical and mental health specialists, and counselors at Fleet and Family Support Centers.Navy benefits for separating Sailors outlined in NAVADMIN release 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011

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As part of their pre-deploy ment certifications, seven petty officers from the VP-26 Tridents took part in small arms training and qualifica tion Nov. 21 at the indoor fir ing range on board NAS Jacksonville. Range safety officer AO1 Naomi Stout and firing line coach AO2 Dennis Mansion, both of VP-8, ensured that students were familiar with the range regulations particu larly the safety requirements associated with the weapon, in this case, the M9 Beretta semiautomatic pistol, the U.S. militarys primary handgun. Stout said, When VP squadrons deploy to the U.S. Navy 5th Fleet area of responsibil ity, its a requirement that 100 percent of personnel be to be qualified to handle and shoot the M9 Beretta from standing and kneeling positions. She added, Each Sailor must successfully complete the Navy Handgun Qualification Course, that requires shooting a minimum of 48 rounds with a score at least 180 points. As firing line coach, Mansion watches the shooters and offers advice or calls a safety time out when needed. If you have a question while shooting raise your non-fir ing hand. Weapons must be pointed down range and level at the deck at all times, said Mansion. Hearing protection and shatterproof eye protection is required whenever firearms are being discharged during qualification fire at the range. Approved hearing protection such as sound attenuators that reduce noise levels to 84 deci bels or below is required. Stout always stresses the four general safety rules for responsible weapons handling, whether in training or combat. Rule 1: Treat every weapon as if it were loaded. Rule 2: Never point a weapon at anything you do not intend to shoot. Rule 3: Keep your finger straight and off the trigger until ready to fire. Rule 4: Keep weapon on SAFE until you intend to fire. VP Sailors sharpen shooting skills at firing range JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011 13

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The HS-11 Dragonslayers recently completed three weeks of training as part of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 at NAS Fallon, Nevada home of the Naval Strike Air Warfare Center. The center, known through out the Navy as the only facil ity where an entire carrier air wing can conduct comprehensive training, presented Slayer aircrews with a variety of exercises aimed at honing their skills at terrain and mountain flying, aerial gunnery, close air support and combat search and rescue. These exercises, integrating aircraft from CVW-1, tested the air wings ability to analyze, prioritize and prosecute targets on the ground as well as rescuing downed aviators in hos tile environments. Five Hellfire missiles, launched from Slayer HH-60H aircraft, successfully hit and destroyed their intended tar gets. The squadron also com pleted several unit-level train ing events practicing surfaceto-air countermeasure tactics against various radar and weapon systems. Slayer maintenance person nel worked long days keeping aircraft fully mission capable to support flight operations. Most days, the flight schedule started before sunrise and lasted until well after sunset. They also had to battle the dynamic weather changes each day during autumn in the mountain ous environment. The highly successful com pletion of air wing maneuvers is another step in preparing HS-11 for its upcoming deployment aboard the aircraft car rier USS Enterprise (CVN 65), as it departs this spring for its final cruise before retirement in late 2012. Next on the squadrons schedule is a detachment to the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) in the Bahamas for anti-subma rine warfare training in early December. When HS-11 returns from Enterprises 2012 deployment, they will fly to their new homeport of NAS Norfolk where they will transition to the MH-60S (Sierra) in 2014. The Dragonslayers have been homeported at NAS Jacksonville since 1973. When Enterprise is decom missioned in 2012, the squad ron will join CVW-17, currently embarked on the aircraft car rier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71). YN2 (SW/AW) Derek Matthews of Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville (FACSFACJAX) retired Nov. 29 after serving 20 years of active duty naval service at the NAS Jax Officers club. The guest speaker was FACSFACJAX Commanding Officer Cmdr. Todd Abrahamson. Matthews enlisted in the Navy in January 1992, completing recruit training in Great Lakes, Ill. He then received orders to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 87 in Jacksonville, where he qualified as a plane captain, was quickly designated as senior plane captain, and received his Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist designation. Following his tour at VFA87, he attended Yeoman A School in Meridian, Miss. His initial yeoman duty station was Military Sealift Command in Cape Canaveral, Fla. After advancing to petty officer third class, he was sent on temporary assigned duty to Port Au Prince, Haiti, in support of Operation Uphold Democracy. While at Military Sealift Command, Matthews was selected as Blue Jacket of the Quarter in 1995 and again in 1997, when he was also selected as Blue Jacket of the Year. Additionally, he was awarded a Navy and Marine Corps Achievement medal for his role in decommissioning the USNS Vanguard. In 1999, Matthews trans ferred to USS John F. Kennedy at NS Mayport, where he completed two deployments, earned his Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist designation, advanced to second class petty officer and was select ed as Junior Sailor of the Year for 2001. Matthews then trans ferred to Naval Hospital Jacksonville before deploy ing to Iraq in June 2003 for one year as an Individual Augmentee (IA). In 2005, he was selected for another IA to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where he supported detainee operations. MWR seeking sponsorsThe Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department of NAS Jacksonville is soliciting commercial/corpo rate sponsors for a wide range of 2012 special events and advertising oppor tunities. Revenues generated through spon sorship and advertising are used spe cifically to enhance quality of life programs for our service members and their families. Through sponsorship and adver tising you can develop brand loyalty, consumer affiliation and promote your products and services to more than 25,000 base personnel. For more information contact the MWR Marketing Department at (904) 542-8205 or e-mail jaxs_nas_mwrm ktg@navy.mil. Slayers hone skills at NAS Fallon Matthews retires after 20 years of service 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011

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Following his IAs, he transferred to USS Taylor (FFG 50), where he completed two deployments before reporting to FACSFACJAX in December 2010. He served as the FACSFACJAX administration leading petty officer and legal assistant. He will continue to reside in Jacksonville with his wife, Rhonda, and daughter, Taylor. MATTHEWS: Retires after 20 years service Expeditionary commands around the fleet began the scheduled 7-month transition to the Navy Working Uniform Type II and III (NWU Type II/ III) this month. The NWU family of uniforms is intended to replace multiple, less capable legacy uniforms, reduce the Navys total own ership costs, modernize the warfighter, and complete the vision of Task Force Uniform. The two new uniforms in the NWU series were developed for use in the tactical expedition ary mission of todays Navy, tailored for desert and wood land environments. Commands that have been approved to wear the NWU Type II/III uniform will tran sition to the new uniform in alphabetical order by the name of the respective command. The NWU Type II (des ert) uniform will be worn by Navy Special Warfare (NSW) operators and Sailors assigned to NSW units or units which directly support NSW opera tions. The NWU Type III (wood land) uniform will be the standard camouflage uniform for all personnel, to be worn in non-desert environments, including most stateside areas. The only difference between the two uniforms is the camouflage pattern. The NWU Type III will replace the existing tri-col ored woodland camouflage utility uniform. It will be the standard camouflage uni form worn in the continental United States, and can be worn while deployed as prescribed by combatant commanders. Occasion for wear of the NWU Type III will be the same as the current woodland camouflage utility uniform per NAVADMIN 188/09. The NWU Type II/III approval is a culmination of a four-year effort comprising all of the expeditionary stake holders, ensuring we capture the true operational require ments our Sailors need to succeed on the battlefield, said Master Chief Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician Robert McCue, NWU Type II/ III Conformance Test Monitor during an interview in August. They provide unmatched capabilities to the warfighter enabling tactical advantage and enhancing mission suc cess by saving lives. Each Expeditionary Sailor will receive three blouses, three trousers, two cover insignia, one parka, one fleece liner, one helmet cover, and one sun hat (boonie cap). Fleece watch caps will be provided at a later time when available. Items from the NWU Type II/ III will be issued only by the approved commands and will not be available from the Navy Exchange. The Chief of Naval Operations approved the final design for the NWU II/III Aug. 30. Transition to NWU Type II/III now underway JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011 15

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The Zone Entertainment ComplexCall 542-3521 Texas Holdem Tournament Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Bean Bag Toss Wednesday at 7 p.m. Play Bingo at lunch Monday Friday at 11:15 a.m. Evening sessions are Sunday, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday at 6:30 p.m. Cash prizes! NFL Sunday Ticket At the Bud Brew House 12:30 p.m. close $.50 wings! Beverage specials!Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Wednesday Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Bowling Special $5.95 all you can bowl 4 10 p.m., shoe rental not included Rising Stars Youth League Begins Dec. 10 League plays on Saturday mornings at 10:30 a.m.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor pool is now open regular hours Monday-Friday 5: 308 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 8 p.m. Weekend hours 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Command Circuit Training Tuesday & Thursday 78 a.m. in the Base Gym 45 Minute high intensity group training Jingle Bell Jog Dec.15 at 11:30 a.m. Pre-register ends Dec. 9 Day of race registration 10:30 11:15 a.m. 40,000 Calories of Christmas Now through Jan. 22 Two person teams! Prizes awarded!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. St. Augustine Nights of the Lights Adult $7 Child $4 Amelia Island Attractions Holiday Home Tour $20; Ghost Tour Adult $8 Child $4; Pub Crawl $23; Museum Family Pass $10 College Bowl Games Gator Bowl $35 and Capital Bowl $74 Jax Zoo Train, Carousel tickets and Jax Zoo Spooktacular now available at ITT! Jacksonville Zoo Adult $12, Child $7 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Wild Adventures Theme Park 1 day pass $28.25 Stone Mountain Georgia $20.75 Georgia Aquarium $16.50-$22 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Blue Man Group in Orlando $48, includes free admission to select CityWalk venues. Disney World Due to the success of the Disney Salute, the expiration dates of the tickets have been extended until Sept. 27, 2012. If you have already purchased and used the six allotted 2011 salute tickets, you may purchase an additional six tickets. Disney ITT prices for military families: $135.50 for a 4 Day ticket with Park Hopper Option $135.50 for a 4 Day ticket with Water Park Fun & More $162 for a 4 Day ticket with both Park Hopper AND Water Park Fun & More The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2011-2012 Season (First Orchestra seating) Wicked, Beauty and The Beast, Jersey Boys, and Les Miserables. Jacksonville Jaguar tickets Section 146 and 147 $58.50 Jag Game Day Shuttle $12 per person Legoland 1 day $39.50; 2 day $48.50 Daytona 500 February 18 26, 2012 $27 to $199 Daytona Bike Week March 10 & 17 2012 $25 Monster Jam March 3, 2012 $25 $41 MOSH $7 $12Liberty Cove RecreationTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5423491 for information. St. Augustine Pal Day Dec. 3 All attractions free for military Sign-up at Liberty for free transportation Departs at 9 a.m. Free Jacksonville Jaguars Games Dec. 5 Space is limited! Sign-up early! Save Santa Scavenger Hunt Dec. 112 Find Santa and win $500! Free Airport Shuttle Dec. 14 Jan. 12 Sign-up at Liberty Vault NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Dec. 13 & 27 for active duty Dec. 15 & 29 for retirees & DoD personnelMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Holiday Camp Dates Week 1 Dec. 1923 Week 2 Dec. 2530 Movie under the Stars featuring The Polar Express Dec. 9 at dusk Patriots Grove Free admission & popcorn! $.50 drinks Tropical Freeze Dec. 17 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Noon 4 p.m. Free snow sledding, musical entertainment, snacks and beverages Childrens Holiday Bingo The Zone Dec. 17 Doors open at 4 p.m., games begin at 5 p.m. $10 per person Children must be able to daub on their own Gift cards awarded as prizesFlying Club Call 777-8549 /6035 Flying Club Ground School Jan. 9 Feb. 15 $500 per person 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011

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Press secretary cites concerns of sexual assault in the ranksDefense Secretary Leon Panetta will issue very direct guidance in the coming months about how the department should respond to sexual assaults within the ranks, the Pentagon press secre tary told reporters Nov.18. George Little cited public commen tary from Capitol Hill and elsewhere on the militarys sexual assault prob lem, and he said Panetta finds it totally unacceptable. Panetta had zero tolerance for this at the CIA when I worked with him there, Little said, And he believes that its no longer acceptable that we say we can just do better on this. We need to take action. Potential actions are being discussed, but no final decisions have been made, he said. The defense secretary is troubled by what he understands are sexual assault problems inside the military, Little said. In the coming months, he contin ued, you will see him issue very direct guidance to the department on this very important issue and problem. The following Florida/Georgia Blood Alliance blood drives are scheduled at NAS Jacksonville in December: Dec. 5, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax (Building 848) Dec. 6, 1-4 p.m. Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast Dec. 10, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Navy Operational Support Center Jax Chuck Tamblyn is one of our many wonderful volunteers at the Jacksonville Navy -Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS). For the past seven months, Tamblyn has served as a caseworker and has dedicated more than 304 hours. He has given out over $94,976 in assistance and helps provide active duty service members and their families with financial assistance. Born in Michigan, Tamblyn joined the Navy and attended the U.S. Naval Academy where he majored in economics. He received his masters degree from the Naval War College in National Security and Strategic Studies. He went on to serve 26 years in the Navy, retiring in 2007. Tamblyn and his wife have a daughter, cur rently a junior at the University of Florida, and a son who is a math teacher at Sandalwood High School. Tamblyn participates in many fun activities including golf, reading and riding motor cycles. He is also active in the community as a church youth leader, member of Navy League and Rotary Club. He is best known in the office for his amazing vocabulary skills. Want to learn more about volunteer opportunities? Please contact Chairman of Volunteers Amanda OConnell at 542-3515 or mandivoc@gmail.com. Blood drives set for next week JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 1, 2011 17

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