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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/01972
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 11-05-2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:01972

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2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 1 Published by

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YOUVE DEFENDED YOUR COUNTRYNOW HONOR YOUR PASSION DESIGN MEDIA ARTS FASHION CULINARYCREATIVE CLASSES START JANUARY 9, 2012If you want to put your creativity to work, an education at The Art Institute of Jacksonville can help you earn the skills you need to become a creative professional. And if eligible, your military benets can help make it possible.Visit our website or call us for details."SU*OTUJUVUFTFEV+BDLTPOWJMMFt CREATE TOMORROW #BZQJOFPBE +BDLTPOWJMMF'-The Art Institute of Jacksonville is a branch of Miami International University of Art & DesignSee AiPrograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info. 1156471 #1001156471 (9.75col, 9.75in x 10.25in) 10/03/2011 16:12 CST 2 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW

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2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 3 2011 NAS JACKSONVILLE CENTENNIAL OF NAVAL AVIATION AIR SHOW On behalf of all the men and women of NAS Jacksonville, it is my distinct pleasure to welcome you to our 2011 NAS Jacksonville Centennial of Naval Aviation Air Show. As we commemorate the past 100 years of progress and achievement in Naval Aviation, we are particularly grateful for our long and cherished friendships with local communities, regions, and global neighbors. This event allows us to express our appreciation and gratitude to the First Coast community for your tremendous support of our Navy men and women, and their families throughout the year. The NAS Jacksonville Air Show offers an excellent opportunity for you to get a close-up look at some of the people, hardware and capabilities of the most powerful and humanitarian military in the world. Much of what you see has been on the front lines defending freedom. As you watch these aircraft perform, I ask that you also remember that many of our military personnel are currently deployed around the world, protecting the freedoms we all enjoy. I encourage you to take the opportunity to tour the flight line static displays and see first-hand the wide variety of military aircraft and hardware represented this year. In addition, youll see internationally renowned civilian aviators perform breathtaking aerial acrobatics for your viewing pleasure in the skies over NAS Jacksonville. I sincerely hope you enjoy the 2011 NAS Jacksonville Air Show and take advantage of the opportunity to experience the sights and sounds of freedom. This is a tradition that dates back to August 1945 and celebrates the unity and close friendships between our community and the U.S. Navy. Thank you for your continued support and enjoy this event! J. D. MACLAY Captain, U.S. Navy Commanding Officer 25 September 2011

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4 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW R S G OFFICE OF THE MAYOR Lucy C. Talley (904) 359-4349 Publisher lucy.talley@jacksonville.com ALVIN BROWN r f ntr, b (f) November 4, 2011 Dear Friends: It is a pleasure to welcome you to the 2011 Naval Air Station Jacksonville Air Show in Jacksonville, Florida, birthplace of the Blue Angels. The 2011 Naval Air Station Jacksonville Air Show is an essential part of a yearlong celebration of 100 years of Naval Aviation honoring a century of mission-ready men and women. Honoring the 100th anniversary of Naval Aviation underscores the commitment to sustaining a Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard that wins wars, protects the home front and enables peace. Our air forces are strong because of the support of our service members, their families and the American public. By honoring Naval Aviation, we honor our country and assure America and our allies that their security is guaranteed by a strong Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard Team. Best wishes for a successful event as the Blue Angels soar the skies in Celebration of 100 Years of Naval Aviation Sincerely, Rick Scott Governor THE CAPITOL October 2011 Dear Friends and Neighbors, On behalf of the staff of The Florida Times-Union and jacksonville. com, I welcome you to the 2011 NAS Jax Air Show. The Blue Angels have been a role model since their formation in 1946 and a symbol of the spirit and readiness of the United States Navy. It is a great honor to support this spectacular aerobatic demonstration. We have been a long-standing partner with the U. S. Navy to bring our military community the latest news and information via The Florida Times-Union and jacksonville.com, Jax Air News, The Mirror (Mayport) and The Periscope (Kings Bay). We consider it a privilege to work with the U.S. Navy and take great pride in our relationship with them now and in the future. We hope you enjoy this thrilling event, which celebrates, in part, the relationship between the citizens of the First Coast and the United States Navy. Our sincere thanks to all military personnel, both at home and overseas, who are diligently protecting our precious freedom. Sincerely, Lucy C. Talley ONE RIVERSIDE AVENUE (32202) P.O. BOX 1949 JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 32231 (904) 359-4349 FAX (904) 359-4400 lucy.talley@jacksonville.com November 2011 Dear Friends: Welcome to the 2011 NAS Jax Air Show. Jacksonville is honored to host this traditional event highlighting the skill and contributions of Naval aviators, including our own world-renowned Blue Angels, the Navys premier precision flying squadron. This year, as we enjoy a Celebration of 100 Years of Naval Aviation, I encourage you to remember the well-trained, talented pilots and additional military personnel, who are stationed around the world protecting our great nation. The awe-inspiring maneuvers you will witness at this event are just a sample of the expert skills our military possesses. Jacksonville is proud to be a military town and to be home to hundreds of thousands of active and retired military and their families. These men and women in uniform sacrifice so much to ensure our freedom and safety, and we all owe them a debt of gratitude. Again, welcome to the air show. Enjoy the celebration! Sincerely, Alvin Brown Mayor

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Since opening our doors in 1952 at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, VyStar has been privileged to serve the men and women of the armed forces as they serve our country. Thats why today, on this very exciting day, we are especially proud to be an Ofcial Sponsor of the 2011 NAS Jax Air Show. And VyStar Membership is open to all residents of Northeast Florida, so you dont have to be a Top Gun to benet from the kind of nancial services that top the industry.Congratulations on 100 Years Of Excellence And Heroism.sWWWVYSTARCUORG SERVING ALL RESIDENTS OF NORTHEAST FLORIDA JOIN TODAY We never forget that its your money. #1001160304 (9.75col, 9.75in x 10.25in) 10/11/2011 12:01 CST 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 5

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6 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW CO Letter ............................................................ 3 Letters (Governor, Mayor, Publisher) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Table of Contents/About This Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Air Show Map ........................................................ 8 Air Show History .................................................. 9, 14 Air Force Heritage Flight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Rob Reider .......................................................... 11 Air Show Prep .................................................... 12-13 Blue Angels Veteran Pilot Al Taddeo ................................... 16 Event Schedule ...................................................... 18 Matt Chapman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 The Black Daggers ................................................... 20 Mike Goulian ........................................................ 22 The Horsemen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Skip Stewart ........................................................ 26 Aircraft at NAS Jacksonville Through The Years ..................... 28-29 Blue Angels (History, FAQ, Team Bios) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30-39 Fat Albert ........................................................ 40-41 Patty Wagstaff ...................................................... 42 Kent Shockley & Shockwave .......................................... 43 Status of the Navy ................................................... 44 Birth of the Navy ................................................. 46-47 Celebrating Marines 236th Birthday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50-51 P-8A Poseidon ....................................................... 52 About This Section The 2011 NAS Jacksonville Air Show Program is a special advertising section produced by the Specialty Publications and Military Publications departments of The Florida Times-Union. The section was coordinated and edited by Military Publications Publisher Ellen Rykert and Specialty Publications Director Joe DeSalvo. The section was designed by Military Publications designer George Atchley. Peter Mackey, Specialty Publications designer, created the cover. Advertising was coordinated by Military Publications Sales Manager Tom Castle. Material, information and photographs used in this section was provided by The Blue Angels, Naval Air Station Jacksonville, the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps and the aerobatic teams, unless otherwise credited. A special thank you to Ron WIlliamson, NAS Jacksonville historian, for his generosity of time and resources. Table of Contents A Naval Air Transport Service crew captain holds one hand in the air to engage the port motor for starting on the flight line at NAS Jacksonville in 1942. An N2S is in the background. Photos courtesy of Ron Williamson F6F Hellcat with World War II camouflage color scheme. When viewed from above it is supposed to appear the color of the sea, and when viewed from below, it is supposed to appear the color of the sky. The first jet a Phantom to be reworked at the stations Overhaul and Repair Shop (now Fleet Readiness Center South east), arrives in July 1949. A F-9 Cougar landing at NAS Jacksonville, 1953. This HUP-1 was the first rescue helicopter as signed to NAS Jacksonville. Picture circa 1952. A Skyraider from Attack Squadron Fifteen (VA-15) catches a wire during carrier operations. An SH-3H Sea King operates from NAS Jacksonville.

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8 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW

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#1001162741 (9.75col, 9.75in x 5in) 09/22/2011 16:38 CST 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 9 By Ron Williamson Base Safety Officer/Command Historian Air shows have been a large part of the aviation history of Jacksonville and for the Navy. Probably the first display and Curtiss Hydroaeroplanes based at the station with the Earl Dodge aviation training camp, flew over Jacksonville to celebrate the end of World War I. The very first air show held on the site was actually dur ing the early 1930s, while under the control of the Florida National Guard. The highlight of the show was an aircraft loop, one that shocked the crowd! The first Navy show was held on the occasion of the stations fifth anniversary on Oct. 15, 1945. World War II had just ended and the station threw open the gates so the citizens of Jacksonville could see the air craft that helped win the war. Vice Adm. Marc Mitscher was the principle speaker at the ceremonies for the fifth anniversary and special invited guest for the air show. This was the only show held at the station in which the Blue Angles would not perform, as they had not yet been formed. But NAS Jacksonville remains one of only three locations in which the Blue Angels have flown shows in every type of aircraft the team has used. Air shows were held at the station with regularity until Theres history behind the NAS Jax Air Show Photo by Clark Pierce The Blue Angels practice a five-plane formation over NAS Jacksonville a few days before the 2010 NAS Jax Air Show. See HISTORY, Page 14

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10 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW Photo by MC2 Ron Trevino During the Air Force Heritage Flight at the 2010 NAS Jax Air Show, an F-16 Fighting Falcon splits off to the left and an F-4 Phantom splits to the right, as an A-10 Thunderbolt II and a P-51 Mustang maintain formation. The Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation (AFHFF) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that was formed on December 6, 2010, with the primary charitable mission of providing Heritage Flights to the public. These performances feature modern fighter/ attack aircraft flying alongside World War II, Korea and Vietnam-era aircraft in a dramatic display of our nations air power history. Our formations serve as a living memorial to the men and women who have served or are current ly serving in the U.S. Air Force and we proudly fly in support of USAF recruiting and retention efforts. Our performances Mission Provide and safely orchestrate 4060 Heritage Flight performances annually. Offer a living museum of, and aerial monument to, U.S. Air Force history. Celebrate and honor the sacrifice of those cur rently serving, as well as the sacrifices of war heroes of the past. Educate current and future generations on the long-term importance of the USAF. Strengthen and enhance Air Force recruiting and retention efforts. Who We Are 2011 Civilian Heritage Flight Pilots Greg Anders Jim Beasley, Jr. Kevin Eldridge Dan Friedkin Tom Gregory, III Steve Hinton Lee Lauderback Vlado Lenoch Dale Snodgrass ACC Fighter/Attack Aircraft A-10 East and West F-16 East and West F-15E Team F-22 Team F-4 East and West What We Do The Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation cel ebrates U.S. air power history by providing 4060 annual Heritage Flight (HF) demonstrations around the world. Heritage Flights are flown at events, ranging from open houses and air shows to sporting events, parades and funerals. program has supported hundreds of events and touched millions of people. The HF team currently consists of nine civilian pilots qualified to fly vin tage warbirds in formation with modern USAF sin gle-ship demonstration teams and F-4 pilots. Heritage Flights seek to honor the contributions of every man and woman who has served in the USAF while educating the general public on the impor tance of the USAF and its mission. For more information on the Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation and the Heritage Flight program, e-mail info@airforceheritageflight.org. Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation

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MORE BOXES CHECKED OFF THE BUCKET LIST.)$$%" !"$("$#"#"&rf r"$r"n#"$"r"n# t$$%" !"$(rb tt$r !# $""n#"$!" !"$( t$""#!$& '"# bb MORE WAYS TO SEARCH. MORE WAYS TO FIND.Scuba Diving Certication. One of the many things you can nd with The Real Yellow Pages, YP.com and YP.com on your mobile. Only from AT&T. AT&T Advertising Solutions is proud to support the NAS Jacksonville Air Show! #1001160306 (4.75col, 4.75in x 10.25in) 09/14/2011 17:02 CST 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 11 Rob Reider air show announcer, recipient of the coveted ICAS Sword of Excellence, entertainer, pilot, Midwest television personality, singer, performer, writer, and winner of five Emmy awards has put all his expe rience into bringing the excitement of air shows up close and personal to audiences all over the country. 2011 marks Robs 33rd year as an announcer and his sixth as a full-time air show announcer. Hes done 113 in the last five years, hes excited about the upcoming season. At the International Council convention in Las Vegas, Rob became the 34th recipient of the ICAS Sword of Excellence, the highest award an air show profession al can receive. Hes recognized by pilots around the country as the on-camera host for Sportys Pilot Shops pilot training vid eos. All of his entertainment, show busi ness, video, and aviation experience have given him the ability to commu nicate the excitement of air shows to the audience. Ive never gotten over just how amazing air show performers are, Rob says. Narrating a show is a won derful opportunity to try to put an audience into the cockpit. Besides, when Im announcing, I have the best seat in the house! While still a college student in Cincinnati, Rob began work as a sing er and co-host of a live, daily talk-vari ety show that was broadcast in four cities in the Midwest. During his 13-year career there, he won five Emmy awards for his on-air performance and musical composi tions. Over the years, he appeared as a soloist with the famed Cincinnati Pops Orchestra and has sung both The Star Spangled Banner and O Canada for many air shows and major league baseball games. to the Dayton Air Show and he immediately became a volun teer. By 1990, Rob was the color announcer, working with award-winning announcers Bill Bordeleau and Danny Clisham. He learned from the best in the business. Rob began to work on the air show circuit and has been a member of ICAS for 15 years. ICAS has also rec ognized his talent by asking him to be the master of ceremonies for the final night convention Chairmans Banquet for 10 of the last 11 years. Robs 2011 schedule will take him to 23 shows, making him one of the busi est and most sought-after announcers in North America. Rob owns and operates the Brightsides Studio, a fully digital facil ity producing music and narration tracks, air show commercials, and air show performers. He can also do voice-overs and full production com mercials for your air show. Its been said of Rob Reider, Hes excited and supercharged! Hes a per former with the unique ability to meet an audience where they are, touch their hearts, make them laugh, make them cry, and leave them with a feel ing that they have been totally enter tained. Hell do it at NAS Jacksonville, too. Meet Rob Reider, the Voice of the Air Show www robreider com

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12 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW Solid lineup takes plenty of teamwork By Clark Pierce Jax Air News Editor Two spectacular days of high-flying entertainment for hundreds of thou sands of spectators involves more than a year of detailed planning. From those who schedule the performers to those who direct traffic and clean up after each days events there are hundreds of tasks that must be coor dinated and executed to ensure a suc cessful event. The 2011 NAS Jacksonville Air Show will be held Nov. 5-6. The performers rehearsal day is Nov. 4 and is not open to the public. This year, as in past years, we will honor NAS Jacksonvilles distinct heritage as The Birthplace of the Blue Angels. In addition, we are celebrating the Centennial of Naval Aviation and concentrating on bringing more naval aircraft to the show. Our guest of honor is retired Navy Cmdr. Al Taddeo, a pilot on the first Blue Angels team that performed its inaugural show at Craig Field, on June 15, 1946, flying the Grumman F6F Hellcat. To put on such an event, every min ute detail must be coordinated. The Air Show Planning Team is comprised of 15 different committees with the common goal of producing a safe and professional family event that will promote a positive relationship with the surrounding community. We will highlight the pride and profes sionalism of our Sailors, Marines and civilian teammates, as well as that of our sister services and allies, while simultaneously providing a recruit ing opportunity for al the services, explained NAS Jacksonville Assistant Operations Officer and Air Show Coordinator Lt. Cmdr. Bob Strange. We are fortunate to have assembled one of the strongest performer lineups that the NAS Jacksonville Air Show has ever had. Through the outstand ing efforts of our MWR Department, and the superb coordination of several of the Operations Department offi cers, chiefs and Sailors, the 2011 show will showcase some of the best civil ian performers in the industry today, added Strange. And the military line up features the best flight demonstra tion team in the world the U.S. Navy Blue Angels, as well as tactical dem onstrations by Navy and Air Force air crews and the U.S. Army Special Ops Command jump team. In the fall of 2010, decisions were being made by the air show commit tee on which aircraft and acts to book for the show. When confirmed, rooms are blocked off in the visiting quarters on base for the performers and the departmental responsibility list is set into motion. This past December, key mem bers from Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department (MWR) and Air Operations Department (Air Ops) represented NAS Jacksonville, at the International Council of Air Shows (ICAS). The four-day convention is where top-level performers, such as the Blue Angels, are booked. ICAS is also where MWR books the civilian performers and Air Ops schedules the military performers and static dis plays. ICAS is a way for NAS Jax air show planners to evaluate and solicit acts, and find creative ways to advertise for our sponsors. We want a variety of planes and performers from both the military and civilian arenas that appeals to the widest possible audi ence, said MWR Operations Director Mike McCool. MWR Marketing Manager Shannon Leonard designs sponsorship pack ages and coordinates the marketing of the air show. Signing up corporate sponsors is a big role for MWR. I contact broadcast media outlets, as well as corporations and other possible sponsors to pres ent the benefits of associating their organization with the air show, said Leonard. Our sponsors are the rea son we can stage such a great show thats free to the public. Their support is truly appreciated. At monthly air show planning meet ings, each department provides a progress report. From budget prep arations and how to feed volunteers to how traffic and parking will be The making of an air show Photo by Clark Pierce NAS Jax 2011 Air Show Coordinator Lt. Cmdr. Bob Strange discusses some of the preparations needed for the upcoming air show with members of the air show committee Sept. 22. Planning for the show begins about a year before the actual show date. See PREP, Page 13

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ALL MILITARY PERSONNEL ADMITTED FREE Military Day at the FairShow your valid Military ID to receive one free admission ticket at entry gate. #1001179116 (4.75col, 4.75in x 10.25in) 10/11/2011 13:39 CST 2JAXHOME.COM (904) 5370405Marissa ScottREALTOR/ Relocation Specialist #1001175747 (4.75col, 4.75in x 2.38in) 10/06/2011 12:28 CST 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 13 directed is discussed. Security, fire and emergency medical personnel must execute a special air show drill to ensure they can handle any urgent situation that may occur. The weeks leading up to the air show get extremely busy, culminat ing with the physical set-up of the air show beginning Monday of show week, said Strange. Static display aircraft will be placed in position. Crowd line fencing, porta ble sanitation units and vendor booths will be set up, and the artificial show line will be painted on the airfield, Strange said. The Blue Angels will arrive on Wednesday and Thursday of show week to conduct key influencer and media flights, circle and arrival maneuvers and a practice flight dem onstration. All other performers, both civilian and military, arrive in time for Fridays practice show. The NAS Jacksonville Police Department manages the safety of guests and performers. Our biggest role in accomplish ing our mission is coordinating joint law-enforcement operations with local agencies to provide force protection measures that have been established to meet numerous air show security requirements. More than nine out side agencies team up with our police department personnel to support the air show, explained Lt. Gary Loth, Base Police Department event coordi nator. He said the department started planning for the event 12 months ago. The main event security tasks are bro ken down into many different groups, including airfield and spectator area protective measures; parking for more than 100,000 VIPs and guests per day; outlying perimeter security group; and the mobile traffic and enforcement units that continuously monitor traffic flow throughout the event weekend. Other duties include police patrol boat operations on the St. Johns River, tor boats anchor near the end of the runway to observe the air show. This requires extensive coordination between the U.S. Coast Guard, local, state and federal marine units. There are also other teams of per sonnel from the base who offer to help. Numerous volunteers are needed each day to clean, check security fencing and make prepare for the next day. Their hard work and labor continues on into Monday morning to ensure that the airfield is completely checked for foreign debris and safe to resume normal military operations at NAS Jacksonville. It takes thousands of people pull ing together to present this event that showcases NAS Jacksonville and the people who work here. Its the Navys way of saying thank you to the local community by giving them an unfor gettable weekend of thrilling aviation excellence. PREP: Year of planning to produce air show From Page 12

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14 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW NAS Cecil Field, which remained the main Jacksonville location until NAS Jacksonvilles 50th Anniversary in 1990. air shows alter nated between NAS Jacksonville and NAS Cecil Field. With the closure of NAS Cecil Field, NAS Jacksonville held three consecutive 2000. In 2001, Jacksonville Beach held their first air show and now alter nates every other year with NAS Jacksonville to host the annual event. Below is a chronology of air shows held at NAS Jacksonville since the installation was com missioned in 1940. HISTORY: Air Shows produced since 1945 From Page 9 Photo courtesy of Ron WIlliamson A birds-eye view of the 1952 NAS Jax Air Show. Date Featured Act(s) Oct. 15, 1945 None June 7, 1946 .Blue Angels (Private show for Navy officials only) Sept. 29, 1946 Blue Angels Nov. 8, 1948 Blue Angels May 8, 1949 Blue Angels Aug. 29, 1950 Blue Angels (30th Anniversary of first trans-Atlantic flight) Dec. 7, 1952 Blue Angels (Pearl Harbor Tribute) Oct. 25, 1959 Blue Angels Oct. 14-16, 1960 Blue Angels (Stations 20th Anniversary) Oct. 15-16, 1961 Blue Angels (Golden Anniversary of Naval Aviation) Oct. 15, 1963 Blue Angels Nov. 1, 1964 Blue Angels Oct. 15, 1965 Blue Angels (Stations 25th Anniversary) July 11, 1971 Blue Angels Nov. 3-4, 1973 Blue Angels Oct. 13-14, 1990 Blue Angels (Stations 50th Anniversary) Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 1992 Blue Angels Sept. 24-25, 1994 Blue Angels Oct. 26-27, 1996 Blue Angels (Blue Angels 50th Anniversary) Oct. 24-25, 1998 Blue Angels Nov. 5-7, 1999 Blue Angels Oct. 15-16, 2000 Blue Angels (Stations 60th Anniversary) Nov. 1-2, 2002 Blue Angels Oct. 30-31, 2004 Blue Angels Oct. 28-29, 2006 Blue Angels (Blue Angels 60th Anniversary) Oct. 25-26, 2008 Blue Angels Oct. 23-24, 2010 Blue Angels (Stations 70th Anniversary) Nov. 5-6, 2011 Blue Angels (Centennial of Naval Aviation) Tentative future show years 2013 2015 (Stations 75th Anniversary) 2017 2019 2021 (Blue Angels 75th Anniversary) Seven Navy air shows since the first one in 1945, been dedicated to special VIPs. On Oct. 15, 1960, the second wife of Adm. John Towers was honored, as the airfield was dedicated after her late husband for his contributions to naval aviation. The stations 25th Silver Anniversary Air Show was dedicated to Vice Adm. Robert Goldthwaite, who was in charge of aviation training at NAS Jax from 1941-43 and later served as Commander, Fleet Air Jacksonville from 1962-65. On Oct. 15, 1990, the air show was dedicated to local Congressman Charles Bennett, and Oct. 16, 1990, to Alexander Breast, whose firm in 1943 built a large number of the buildings at the station. Retired Navy Capt. Roy Butch Voris was invited show. Voris was honored for his efforts in forming the Flight Exhibition Team as well as being the first team leader of the named Blue Angels while based at NAS Jacksonville in 1946. On Nov. 2, 2000, Voris was again the special invit ed VIP guest and during his visit, the installations air terminal was dedicated with his name. He con tinued to be the VIP guest for the 2002 and 2004 air shows. Voris passed away in 2005 and he will always be remembered as Boss One. In 2006, retired Navy Cmdr. Raleigh Dusty Rhodes was the featured VIP guest. Rhodes was the third team leader of the Blue Angels while the team was based at NAS Jacksonville. He also led the team move to NAS Corpus Christi, Texas, in October tioned the team into the jet age and he designed the Blue Angels patch which is still used today. was the special VIP guest. Taddeo, the last surviving pilot of the original Blue Angels team, flew the origi nal number three plane when the team flew F6F Hellcats. He had not returned to NAS Jacksonville since being stationed here as a squadron command er in VF-43 in 1954. The 2011 Air Show celebrates The Centennial of Naval Aviation. NAS Jacksonville has played major contributions to naval aviation history, and it is our pleasure once again to invite Al Taddeo and his wife, Joan, as the air show VIP guests for this special anniversary.

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16 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW An original Blue Angel returns to NAS Jacksonville By Clark Pierce Jax Air News Editor At 92 years and counting, the venerable Al Taddeo is one of the most fascinating naval aviators to ever fly from NAS Jacksonville. Today, the retired Navy commander is a treasure chest of knowledge when it comes to the earliest history of the renowned Blue Angels. In fact, Taddeo is the last living member of the original Blue Angels team that was established at NAS Jacksonville in 1946. Before he reported to the yet unnamed flight exhi bition team at NAS Jacksonville on June 14, 1946, Lt. Alfred Taddeo served as a gunnery, tactics and formation-flying instructor at NAS Miamis Opalocka Field. Mel Cassidy (Lt.j.g.) and I volunteered at the same time, but only Cassidy was called up, said Taddeo in Then, on June 13, I received urgent orders to report immediately to the team at NAS Jacksonville. The next day, I reported to Lt. Cmdr. Butch Voris. At the time, I had no idea that the exhibition team would grow into the organization it is today. Like his team leader and the two other pilots, the veteran and a bachelor. With three Japanese kills to his credit, Taddeo had been awarded several Distinguished Flying Crosses, as well as Air Medals and battle stars so he was a smooth fit with the fledgling flight exhibition team. He began as the spare pilot, training as left wing number three. The squadron flew four blue-and-gold F6F Hellcats, but the formations were designed to three aircraft, with one held in reserve. Our first civilian air show at Craig Field on June 15, 1946 was just 12 minutes long, but when our pilots exited their cock pits, they got a tremendous ovation from the audi ence, said Taddeo. The team repeated the show on Sunday and was surprised to receive a big trophy proclaiming them as the best performers at the air show. A few days later, they flew to NAS Corpus Christi to perform a special exhibition for Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz. It marked the beginning of an increasingly busy air show schedule. Then there was the issue of naming the team. A contest was announced in the Jax Air News that generated hundreds of entries to nickname the team none of which clicked with the team including Skyscrapers, Strat-O-Cats, Blue Bachelors and Cloud Busters. According to the biog raphy of Butch Voris, the Lancers, was submitted by the son of Capt. Bill Gentner, director of train ing at NAS Jax. Taddeo remembers that Voris and his team mates were not enthusias tic. We didnt like it but given Gentners position, about all Skipper Voris could say was, thats interesting. I think it was Lt. Cmdr. Wickendoll who was thumbing through a New Yorker magazine and showed us an ad for the Blue Angel, a dinner and dance club named after a Marlene Dietrich flick. We all really liked the Blue Angels but nothing would happen until the Omaha, Neb. air show, said Taddeo. The 1946 Omaha show, July 1921, attracted U.S. and foreign military notables, along with national press coverage. The entire team was sold on being called the Blue Angels, so Butch Voris talked on the sly with some of the reporters that weekend and we started getting press as the Blue Angels. When we landed at NAS Jax, Gentner expressed his displeasure to Butch but the name stuck, said Taddeo. A mission Taddeo will never forget was flying to the Grumman factory in Bethpage, N.Y. in August of 1946 to receive the The Bearcat was smaller, more maneuver able and pulled by a large, four-blade propeller. To save even more weight, Grumman engineers stripped out the armor plating and tailhooks. We asked how that affected the flight characteristics and they had calculated no significant difference. As the team was en route to NAS Jax, we received an emergency radio call instructing us to land at NAS Norfolk. They informed us the engineers recal culated their weight-saving activities after we took off and, indeed, the Bearcats center of gravity was changing as we burned fuel. Landing at Norfolk took full back tab and a big pull on the stick. Needless to say, the tailhooks were reinstalled along with some additional ballast, explained Taddeo. Taddeos rotation with the Blue Angels ended Corsair squadron aboard USS Coral Sea. He returned to NAS Jax in 1954, flying with VF-43. He also served at the Pentagon, and as command ing officer of VF-144 and VA-52. Cmdr. Taddeo retired Feb. 1, 1963 after 21 years of service. Welcome back, Alfred Al Taddeo Photo courtesy Blue Angels In August of 1946, Blue Angels Lt. Alfred "Al" Taddeo, Lt. Maurice "Wick" Wickendoll, Lt. Cmdr. R.M. "Butch" Voris, Lt. Mel Cassidy, and Lt. j.g. Ross Robinson flew to the Grumman factory at Bethpage, N.Y. to bring home their new F8F Bearcat fighters. Compared to the F6F Hellcat, the Bearcat was smaller, lighter, had a full plexiglass canopy and turned a 4-blade propeller. They would fly the Bearcat until 1949. U.S. Navy photo The first Blue Angel Flight Demonstration Squadron pilots, 1946 assembled in front of one of their F6F-5 Hellcats. (From left) Lt. Al Taddeo, Solo; Lt. j.g. Gale Stouse, Spare; Lt. Cdr. R.M. "Butch" Voris, Flight Leader; Lt. Maurice "Wick" Wickendoll, Right Wing; Lt. Mel Cassidy, Left Wing. Photo by Clark Pierce Retired Cmdr. Alfred Taddeo admires the meticulously restored Vought F4U Corsair on display at the 2008 NAS Jax Air Show. After his rotation with the original Blue Angels, he was assigned to a Corsair squadron on board USS Coral Sea.

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$ 40. Period. Unlimited talk, text web. What you see is what you pay. That means $40 includes all taxes and regulatory fees. Plus unlimited talk, text, and web. All on a nationwide network. Choose from the latest phones, and never sign an annual contract. $40. Period. Another reason MetroPCS is wireless for all. 888.57metro www.metropcs.com MetroPCS Retail Stores Jacksonville 7200 Normandy Blvd. Ste. 5 Jacksonville, FL 32205 904-638-7957 Orange Park 8102 Blanding Blvd. Ste. 16 Jacksonville, FL 32244 904-638-7963 Regency 9770 Atlantic Blvd. (Across from Regency Square Mall, next to TJ Maxx Jacksonville, FL 32225 904-638-7965 Southside 8021 Philips Hwy. Ste. 2 (Across from BJs Wholesale) Jacksonville, FL 32256 904-638-7967 Certain restrictions apply. Visit metropcs.com or a MetroPCS store for information on specic terms and conditions of service, local coverage area, handset capabilities, and any restrictions. Nationwide long distance available only in continental United States and Puerto Rico. Rates, services, and features subject to change. While in your MetroPCS home coverage area, dial *228, option 2, to update your phones roaming capabilities. It is possible to enter TravelTalk while in a MetroPCS coverage area if there is a weak signal in that area. Additional charges may apply in TravelTalk areas. For details on TravelTalk rates, go to metropcs.com. Coverage not available everywhere. Some services not available in extended home and TravelTalk areas. Only taxes and regulatory fees. are included; convenience and payment fees. are not included. Handset price not included. 1176399 14746_ROP #1001176399 (9.75col, 9.75in x 5in) 10/07/2011 23:31 CST General, Surgical & Aesthetic Dermatology Specializing in the treatment of diseases of the Skin, Hair, and Nails Diagnosis & surgical removal of skin cancers and pre-cancerous lesions Monthly Evening of Beauty Seminars: 5:30 PM (904) 541-0315 Call today to make your reservation to attend this informative program.(904) 541-0315 Orange Park Office (904) 215-7546 Fleming Island Office www.parkavedermatology.com Accepting TRICARE and all Major Insurance PlansGeorge J. Schmieder D.O.F.A.A.D., F.A.O.C.D. r#PBSE$FSUJFE%FSNBUPMPHJTU r.PIT4VSHFPO r%JQMPNBUFPGUIF"NFSJDBO#PBSEPG%FSNBUPMPHZ r%JQMPNBUFPGUIF"NFSJDBO0TUFPQBUIJD $PMMFHFPG%FSNBUPMPHZ1179605 Aesthetic Services Include r#PUPYr+VWFEFSNrBEJFTTFrFSMBOFr5IFSNBHFr'SBYFMr'BDJBMTrFFMT rIPUPFKVWFOBUJPOr-BTFS)BJSFNPWBMr"DOF5SFBUNFOUTr.JDSPEFSNBCSBTJPO "TLBCPVUPVSOFX-VNFOJTMBTFSTJODMVEJOH$0:BH*1#1001179605 (4.75col, 4.75in x 2.38in) 10/12/2011 08:41 CST 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 17 Photo by Clark Pierce During his visit to NAS Jacksonville last year as Special Guest of the 2010 NAS Jax Air Show, Al Taddeo (left, seated) spent some tiime sharing some Blue Angels history with NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer, Capt. Robert Sanders (center) and NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer, Capt. Jeffrey Maclay. Photo courtesy of the Blue Angels A Blue Angel high-speed, low pass.

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18 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW Saturday, Nov. 5 Gates open at 9 a.m. Show beings at 10 a.m. In order of performance U.S. Army Special Operations Command Jump Team U.S. Coast Guard Helicopter Shockwave Jet Truck Skip Stewart P-3 Patty Wagstaff P-51 Air Force Heritage Flight F-4 Phantom II A-10 East Tac Demo Air Force Heritage Flight Mike Goulian SNJ-5 Matt Chapman Commemorative Air Force The Horsemen Flight Team F4U Corsair U.S. Navy Flight Legacy Tin Stix (Skip Stewart & Patty Wagstaff) with Shockwave Jet Truck John Mohr 3 p.m. U.S. Navy Blue Angels Sunday, Nov. 6 Gates open at 9 a.m. Show beings at 10 a.m. In order of performance U.S. Army Special Operations Command Jump Team Shockwave Jet Truck Skip Stewart P-3 Patty Wagstaff P-51 F-4 Phantom II A-10 East Tac Demo Air Force Heritage Flight Mike Goulian Matt Chapman Commemorative Air Force The Horsemen Flight Team F4U Corsair U.S. Navy Flight Legacy Tin Stix (Skip Stewart & Patty Wagstaff) with Shockwave Jet Truck John Mohr 2:30 p.m. U.S. Navy Blue Angels 2011 NAS Jax Air Show Schedule of Events (subject to change)

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#1001175789 (9.75col, 9.75in x 10.25in) 10/06/2011 13:28 CST 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 19

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20 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW Matt is recognized as an extraordi nary aerobatic pilot who thrills mil lions of air show fans each summer. and quickly worked his way up to the highest level of competition aer obatics the Unlimited category. Recognized for his skills, he won one of only five slots on the U.S. Unlimited Mens Aerobatic Team in 1996 and Championships, Matt was the high est-ranking American pilot, finish ing third in the world with a bronze medal. He led theMens Team to a silver medal. Along with this impres sive finish came the coveted Hilliard Trophy awarded to the highest-fin ishing U.S. pilot at the WAC. Matt also won the prestigious International Aerobatic Club Championships in 1994 and the Fond du Lac Cup in 1995. Matts exciting competition aero batics led him to air show perform ing.Matt is both a solo performer and flies formation in a thrilling show with fellow performer Mike Mancuso. Matt has flown in front of millions of fans at air shows all over.He has appeared on ESPN, ESPN2, Fox Sports Network, Real TV, The Learning Channels Amazing America and Speed Channel. Matt is also a respected airline cap tain with tens of thousands of flight hours. In addition to all that, Matt is a respected voice in the air show busi ness, with a reputation for safety and diligence. Matt enjoys building and flying radio-controlled aircraft of all types. Matt Chapman loves to fly www.mattchapman.com Since Sept. 11, 2001, few ele ments of the U.S. military have been more involved in the Global War on Terrorism than the Soldiers of the U.S. Army Special Operations Command, or USASOC. In Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom and numer ous other hotspots around the world, USASOC Soldiers have been amongst the first forces to deploy in support of U.S. and coalition force objectives. Many of these Soldiers, most of them having served in numerous combat rotations, remain deployed to those loca tions along with conventional forces and multinational part ners to help ensure the success of all GWOT operations, wheth er in a frontline combat role or a humanitarian assistance func tion. History & Responsibilities Department of the Army estab lished USASOC at Fort Bragg N.C., as a major Army com mand to enhance the readiness of Army spe cial operations forces. In addition to report ing to the Department of the Army, USASOC also functions as the Army component of the U.S. Special Operations Command, or USSOCOM, locat ed at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa. USSOCOM is the congressio nally mandated, unified com batant command responsible for all Department of Defense special operations forces within the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. The U.S. Army Special Operations Command . Black Daggers www.soc.mil

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22 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW Michael Goulian is one of only a few sport aviators who are popular on a global scale. An edgy, aggressive, and all out style of flying, have become Michaels signature, and it amazes fans across the globe. On most weekends from April through November, Michael can be seen flying a mesmerizing and intense, high performance solo aero batic display accompanied by a high tech choreographed music system that keeps spectators on the edge of their seats. Driven by a passion for speed and competition, Michael was hon ored to represent the USA for 5 years in the Red Bull Air Race World Championship. Michael flew his famous green & white No. 99 EDGE 540 in the Red Bull Air Race. Michael has been lucky to be rewarded with some of the indus tries highest honors. In 1990, he became one of the youngest US National Advanced Champions when he took that title at just 22 years old. He followed that up in 1995 by win ning the ultimate in US Aerobatics, the Unlimited National Aerobatic Championship. In the airshow world, Michael has been awarded both the Art Scholl (2006) and Bill Barber (2009) Awards for Airshow Showmanship. The recipi ent of these awards reads like a whos who in the airshow world over the last two decades so Michael feels very hon ored to be included with the greats. Michael and his entire team are very proud to have won the prestigious Red Bull Air Race Budapest in 2009. Michael has almost two decades of experience performing at worlds top airshows and races, having started in enjoys his reputation as a great aviator with a flawless safety record, he is also a dedicated professional with his fans. Michael also prides himself as being easy to work with and unassuming with event organizers and the media. Mike Goulian Milestones 2009 Budapest Red Bull Air Race Winner 2009 Bill Barber Showmanship Award Recipient 20062010 One of only three U.S. pilots invited to compete in the prestigious Red Bull Air Race International Competition. 2006 Art Scholl Showmanship Award Recipient. Three-time member of United States National Unlimited Aerobatic Team. Member of the 1998 United States Aerobatic Team that captured a sil ver medal at the World Aerobatic Championships in Trencin, Slovakia. 1995 United States National Aerobatic Champion, Unlimited Category. 1990 United States National Aerobatic Champion, Advanced Category. Co-author, Basic Aerobatics & Advanced Aerobatics, Industry textbooks. Collaborator and Trainer for the Stars of Tomorrow. Past member of the International Council of Airshows (ICAS) Board of Directors. Past Chairman of ICAS ACE Committee. Hosted the FAA safety video Avoiding Wake Turbulence. Hosted the FAA safety video Loss of Control Avoiding Spin. One of only six pilots invited to compete in the first annual Championship Airshow Pilots Association (CASPA) series. Principal aerobatic consultant and celebrity endorser, Flight Unlimited aerobatic flightsimulator software. Air Show & Race Pilot Michael Goulian www.mikegoulian.com

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1158216 #1001158216 (9.75col, 9.75in x 10.25in) 09/14/2011 18:05 CST 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 23

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24 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW The phrase The Horsemen, often evokes images of mystery and power. Today, the Horsemen ride again, this time as the worlds only P-51 Mustang formation aerobatic team. Steve Hinton is a fixture in the world of warbirds, performing at air shows around the world for more than 35 years, flying over 150 types of aircraft. His restoration company Fighter Rebuilders LLC, has restored more than 40 warbirds to pristine flying condition. President of Planes of Fame Air Museum since 1994; founding member of the Motion Picture Pilots Association; a civilian pilot with the USAF Heritage Flight; World Speed Record holder; Reno ing WWII fighters. Steve was inducted into the EAA Warbird Hall of Fame in 2005 and received the Art Sholl Showmanship Award from the International Council of Air Shows (ICAS) in 2010. Steve and his wife Karen live in Newport Beach, CA cherishing anytime they get to share with their twins Steven and Amanda. Dan Friedkin is a tour de force of flying. His pas sion for flight began as a kid who loved to build and fly radio controlled airplanes. At 14 he soloed a glider and soon thereafter began flying taildrag Lockheed Jetstar, and was 20 when he soloed the Mustang, which to this day remains his favorite air plane. Dan has a surface level formation aerobatic ing member of The Horsemen flight team, as well as Chairman of the United States Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation where he is one of only 9 civilian pilots qualified to fly formation with USAF single ship demo teams. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Georgetown University in Business Administration and a Masters degree from Rice University. Dan, his wife Debra, and their four chil dren live in Houston, Texas, where he runs a group of automotive businesses, serves on several boards, and is a Commissioner of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Ed Shipleys air show career began with the Six of Diamonds T-6 formation aerobatic team, where he flew right wing and lead. He is a former pilot in the USAF Heritage Flight and founding member of The Atlas Air and has flown air shows for over 20 years a Mustang across the Atlantic and flown a F4U Corsair off a nuclear aircraft carrier. Ed was a board member of the International Council of Air Shows and currently is a ICAS Ace evaluator for Warbirds and Jets. Ed and his wife Laurie live in Malvern, PA, where they enjoy their three children and four grandchildren. The Horsemen

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1155845 #1001155845 (9.75col, 9.75in x 10.25in) 09/14/2011 17:50 CST 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 25

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26 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW Skip Stewart is one of the most entertaining airshow pilots in the world today. He has over eight thousand hours of flying experience, is an airline transport pilot, certified flight instruc tor, has owned and operated an aerobatic flight school, earned gold medals in regional aerobatic competitions, served as a chief pilot for a Fortune 100 company and has spent more than ten years entertaining airshow fans around the world. Skip practices tirelessly in the airplane he cus tom built himself to insure the highest level of entertainment. His flying has been featured in magazines that include Smithsonian Air & Space, Aopa, Sports Illustrated, World Airshow News, Auto Pilot as well as in multiple international publications. He is the first pilot to fly an airplane under a jump ing motorcycle at an airshow and has also been known to fill in as the driver of the worlds fastest dodge ram jet truck! Hollywood stunt pilot Corkey Fornof said it best in an article written for autopilot magazine: I was curious about the name Prometheus, so i had to look it up in greek mythology. I discovered it means forethought. Prometheus was a rebel Titan who displeased Zeus by taking from him and giving to the people of earth the power of fire. The name matches the paint design with its hot rod style flame job, the show with its snarling, flashy maneuvers and skips forethought in his crowd pleasing routine. Prometheus the flying machine is part Pitts Special and the rest Skip and Christina Stewart. Starting life as a Pitts S-2s, Prometheus was modified to give Skip the airshow machine he wanted. This flying machine looks like a good old American hot rod. The horse power was increased to (400), the big three bladed prop reminds you of oversized racing slicks, the rear canted landing gear makes it look fast sitting on the ground and the paint job yells street rod. lbs. And range of 405 miles this is an all muscle bi-plane. Skip Stewart and Prometheus Photos courtesy of www skipstewartairshows com

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INDESCRIBABLY GOOD CHICKEN. Must present this coupon to receive offer. Offer expires 11/30/11. Each restaurant independently owned and operated. Offer not valid at any other locations. Not valid with any other offers. One offer per guest, per visit. No cash value. No substitutions. 2011 Zaxbys Franchising, Inc. Zaxbys is a registered trademark of Zaxbys Franchising, Inc.FLY INTO ZAXBYS FOR3FREECHICKEN FINGERZ Valid only at this location:6351 Roosevelt Blvd. Jacksonville 904.778.2007OFFERS VALID AT THIS LOCATION ONLY:6351 Roosevelt Blvd. Jacksonville t 904.778.2007 ZAXBYS DAYZ SUNDAYS10% millitary discount with valid ID TUESDAYS & THURSDAYS50 Chicken Wings Any Zalad and 22 oz. Beverage for $6.99 MONDAYSLimited-time offers. Each restaurant independently owned and operated. Offers not valid at any other locations. 2011 Zaxbys Franchising, Inc. Zaxbys, are trademarks of Zaxbys Franchising, Inc. #1001175090 (9.75col, 9.75in x 5in) 10/11/2011 15:26 CST 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 27 Skip Stewart and Prometheus zip down the runway at the 2010 NAS Jax Air Show. Photo by Clark Pierce

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28 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW Training Squadrons VN-11: January 1941-February 1942 VN-12: February 1941-February 1943 VN-13: October 1940-February 1943 VN-14: March 1941-February 1943 VN-15 March 1941-January 1943 VO-VCS #1: February 1943-July 1944 VO-ATU: January 1946-June 1946 VPB2-OTU #1: August 1942-January 1946 VPB2-OTU #2: April 1943-August 1944 VPB2-OTU #3: June 1943 VPB2-OTU #4: September 1944 VF-OTU #4: September 1943-September 1944 VTB #2: February 1943-November 1944 VTB #3: February 1943-November 1943 VF-OTU #5: November 1943-July 1945 MF-OUT: September 1944-December 1945 VO-VCS: June 1946-1948 AU-MS #10: July 1947-April 1948 VA-ATU #4: August 1947-November 1948 VA-ATU #5: August 1947-November 1948 VA-ATU #10: April 1948 VSB-ATU #1: December 1945-June 1946 IATU: July 1945-November 1948 VF-ATU #1: November 1947-November 1948 VF-ATU #2: July 1947-October 1947 Patrol/Bomber Squadrons (VPB) VPB-208 (Detachment): March 1945-September 1946 Carrier Air Groups (CAG/CVG) CAG 1: June 1950 (VF-11, VF-12, VF-13, VA-14, VA-15) CAG 4: February 1949-June 1950 (VF-41, VF-42, VF-43, VA-44, VA-45) CAG 8: November 1948-February 1950 (VF-81, VF-82, VF-83, VA-84, VA-85) CAG 8 (Reserve): April 1951-February 1953 ( VF-671, VF-742, VF-916, VF-921, VC-4 Det, VC-62 Det, VC-33 Det, VC-12 Det, HU-2 Det )* CAG 13: April 1949-February 1950 (VF-131, VF-132, VF-133, VA-134, VA-135) CAG 17: February 1950-September 1958 (VF-171, VF-172, VF-173, VA-174, VA-175) Fleet Air Wings Fleet Air Wing Eleven: January 1950-June 1973 (VP-3, VP-5, VP-7, VP-10, VP-16, VP18, VP-24, VP-45, VP-49, VP-56, VP-741)* Patrol Wing Eleven: June 1973April 1999 (VP-5, VP-16, VP-24, VP-45, VP-49, VP-56) Patrol Reconnaissance Wing Eleven: April 1999-Present (VP-5, VP-8, VP-10, VP-16, VP-24, VP-26, VP-30, VP-45, VPU-1, VQ-2 )* Helicopter Antisubmarine Wing One: December 1973June 1994 (HS-1, HS-3, HS-5, HS-7, HS-9, HS-11, HS-15, HS-17, HU-2) Helicopter Antisubmarine Wing Atlantic: June 1994-April 2005 (HS-1, HS-3, HS-5, HS-7, HS-11, HS-15) Sea Control Wing Atlantic: December 1997-January 2009 (VS-22, VS-24, VS-30, VS-31, VS-32, VQ-6) Fighter Squadrons (VF) VF-11: June 1950-February 1959 Red Rippers VF-12: June 1950-August 1955 Flying Ubangis VF-13: June 1950-April 1956 Night Cappers VF-22: June 1950 until June 1958 Cavaliers VF-41: January 1949-February 1951 VF-42: February 1949-June 1950 VF-43: February 1949-September 1950 VF-44: September 1950-October 1952 Hornets VF-81: November 1948-February 1950 VF-82: November 1948-November 1949 VF-83: November 1948-February 1950 VF-104: January 1954 VF-131: April 1949-February 1950 VF-132: April 1949-November 1949 VF-133: April 1949-November 1949 VMF-144: December 1948-February 1951 VF-171: February 1950-March 1958 Screamin Demons VF-172: March 1950-November 1955 Blue Bolts VF-173: March 1950-January 1959 Jesters VF-174: February 1950-February 1954 Hell Razors VF-742: February 1951-February 1953 VF-916: February 1951-September 1951 Roaring Bulls VF-921: March 1951-September 1951 Sidewinders Attack Squadrons (VA) VA-12: March 1950-March 1951; October 1951-February 1952; May 1952-October 1952 Flying Ubangis VA-15: February 1949-February 1952; July 1957-April 1965 Valions VA-34: October 1952-February 1953 Blue Blasters VA-35: October 1958-August 1965 Black Panthers VA-36: July 1955-April 1956 Roadrunners VA-42: September 1950-June 1951 Green Pawns VA-44: February 1949-September 1950; October 1952-February 1963 Hornets VA-45: February 1949-June 1950 Fishawks; September 1950; October 1952-March 1958 Blackbirds VA-66: April 1951-September 1951 Waldomen VA-84: November 1948-November 1949 VA-85: November 1948-November 1949; April 1951September 1951 Black Falcons VA-104: April 1953-December 1953; February NAS Jacksonville Aircraft Squadrons 19402011 (As of January 24, 2011) The first aircraft assigned to NAS Jacksonville, this Grumman J2F-3, arrives Jan. 16, 1940. This aircraft would remain as the commanding officer's plane. A consolidated P2Y-2 is parked at the sta tion's seaplane landing area. This aircraft was first used as a training aircraft from January through July 1941. The aircraft was no longer used after PBY aircraft began showing up at the station. NR-1 Ryans and N2S Stearmans are tilted on their noses to pack in as many aircraft as pos sible. A hurricane was approaching the station when this photo was taken on Sept. 13, 1941. This N2S-3 Stearman was used for primary stu dent training. The plan was all yellow to be easily seen by other pilots. Photo was taken Jan. 7, 1942 with the St. Johns River in the background. Flight of five P4Y-1Ps in formation. A F7U Cutlass on the ramp at the station, June 13, 1954. National Archives #80-G-484613 A P2V-2 in flight over NAS Jacksonville on July 3, 1953. A F2H2 Banshee in front of the station control tower on Aug. 28, 1951. A WC-121N Super Constellation assigned to the Hurricane Hunters, August 1967. Photo by PH2 Don K. Sieburg, Jr. Helicopter hovers over NAS Jacksonville, 1968. A4D Skyhawk in the skies over NAS Jack sonville. An air-to-air left side view of Patrol Squadron Fifty-Six (VP-56) P-2H, Bu. No. 148352, deploy ing to South America for exercise Unitas IV, Aug. 6, 1963.

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2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 29 1957-March 1959 Hells Archers VA-105: July 1955-April 1956; November 1958February 1959 VA-106: October 1952-December 1954 Gladiators VA-134: April 1949-February 1950 VA-135: April 1949-November 1949 Uninvited VA-165: September 1960-September 1961 Boomers VA-172: November 1955-February 1958 Blue Bolts VA-174: April 1949-February 1950 Hell Razors VA-175: January 1950-March 1958 Devils Diplomats VA-176: February 1955-May 1968 Thunderbolts VA-203: July 1970-December 1977 Blue Dolphins VA-859: April 1951 Fighter Attack Squadrons (VFA) VFA-82: July 1999-September 1999 Marauders VFA-86: July 1999-September 1999 Sidewinders Patrol Squadrons (VP) VP-3: January 1950-November 1955 Screaming Eagles VP-5: December 1949-Present Mad Foxes VP-7: September 1961-October 1969 Black Falcons VP-8: May 2009-Present Tigers VP-10: March 1951-February 1952, December 2009Present Red Lancers VP-16: February 1953-Present Eagles VP-18: January 1953-April 1965 Flying Phantoms VP-24: October 1972-April 1995 Batmen VP-26: June 2010-Present Tridents VP-30: June 1959-January 1966; May 1975-Present Pros Nest VP-45: January 1964-Present Pelicans VP-49: January 1972-January 1994 Woodpeckers VP-56: July 1961-June 1991 Dragons VP-62: November 1970-Present Broadarrows VP-83: (Detachment) April-May 1942 VP-94 (Detachment): May 1942-January 1943 VP-741: March 1951-February 1953 Fighting Gators VP-742: October 1952-August 1954; November 1956January 1968 VP-861: February 1950February 1953 Flying Phantoms VPU-1: May 2009-Present Old Buzzards Heavy Attack Squadrons (VAH) VAH-1: November 1955-January 1959 Smokin Tigers VAH-3: June 1956-June 1959 Sea Dragons Heavy Photographic Squadrons (VJ, VAP) VJ-62: April 1952-October 1952 Tigers VAP-62: August 1957-October 1969 Tigers Composite Squadrons (VC) VC-5: January 1952January 1953 Savage Sons VC-62: February 1954-September 1955 Fighting Photos Weather Reconnaissance Squadrons (VJ, VW) VJ-2: March 1953-December 1953 Hurricane Hunters VW-4: December 1953-August 1960; January 1965-April 1975 Hurricane Hunters Fleet Air Service Squadrons (FASRON) FASRON-6: November 1948-June 1959 FASRON-51: December 1951-January 1953 FASRON-109: December 1949-June 1959 Busy Beavers FASRON 795: February 1951-July 1951 Helicopter Combat Support Squadrons (HC) HC-2: October 1973-September 1977 Fleet Angels Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadrons (HS) HS-1: October 1973-June 1997 Seahorses HS-3: October 1973-June 2009 Tridents HS-5: February 1974-December 2009 Nightdippers HS-7: September 1973-Present Dusty Dogs HS-9: June 1976-April 1993 Sea Griffins HS-11: October 1973-Present Dragonslayers HS-15: November 1973-January 2010 Red Lions HS-17: April 1974-July 1991 Neptunes Raiders HS-75: October 1985-February 2007 Emerald Knights Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadrons (Light) (HSL) HSL-42: March 2010-Present Proud Warriors HSL-44: November 2009-Present Swamp Foxes Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadrons (HSM) HSM-70: February 2009-Present Spartans Sea Control Squadrons (VS) VS-22: December 1997-January 2009 Checkmates VS-24: October 1997-March 2007 Scouts VS-30: November 1997December 2005 Diamondcutters VS-31: November 1997-March 2008 Topcats VS-32: March 1998-September 2008 Maulers Electronic Countermeasures Squadron (VQ) VQ-6: March 1998-August 1999 Black Ravens Transport Squadrons (VR) VR-58: November 1977-Present Sunseekers VR-62: June 2009 Present Nomads Utility Squadron (VU) VU-4 (Detachment): 1954-February 1954-February 1957 VU-10 (Detachment): February 1957-July 1964 Squadrons assigned throughout base history 129 Carrier Air Groups/Wings assigned throughout base history 12 *Lists all squadrons that were assigned to that CAG/Wing. Squadrons in italics were not based at NAS Jacksonville. NAS Jacksonville Aircraft Squadrons 19402011 An H-46 Sea Knight helicopter flies over downtown Jacksonville in 1978. The station had four of these, assigned for search and rescue. The last of these helicopters left the station on July 25, 1980. A Douglas C-117D (previously R4D-8) sits out side Hangar 116 at NAS Jacksonville in 1971. A-7 Corsair in skies over NAS Jacksonville, 1970s. A P-3 Orion from Patrol Squadron THIRTY (VP-30) flies over Hangar 1000 at NAS Jack sonville in 1977. A P-3 Orion from Patrol Squadron FORTY-FIVE (VP-45) flies over downtown Jacksonville in 1982. The air station's C-12 Huron makes a pass over the runway in 1986. Fleet Logistic Support Squadron Fifty-Eights (VR-58) C-9 Skytrain makes a turn over down town Jacksonville in 1984. A SH-3H Sea King helicopter from HS-7 oper ates in the Atlantic Ocean in 1988. Photo by MC1 John Collins A P-3C Orion assigned to the Tridents of Patrol Squadron Two Six (VP-26) shown on the flight line on Feb 2, 2006, prior to night opera tions at Naval Air Station Sigonella. Photo by MC3 Milosz Reterski An S-3B Viking, assigned to the "Maulers" of Sea Control Squadron Three Two (VS-32), piloted by VS-32's Commanding Officer, Cmdr. William K Henderson, launches from the flight deck of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) on Nov. 16, 2005. Photo by Ensign Brandon Porthouse A lineman gives the signal to the pilots to start the engines of an MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Spartans of Helicopter Mari time Strike Squadron (HSM) 70 on the campus of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University on March 25, 2010. Photo by MC2 Lynn Friant Airman Jesse Baron assigned to Pro's Nest of Patrol Squadron Three Zero (VP-30) signals to the crew of a P-3C Orion during start-up checks on Feb. 13, 2007.

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30 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW Meet the Blue Angels pilots In 1946, the Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Chester Nimitz, had a vision to create a flight exhibition team in order to raise the publics interest in naval aviation and boost Navy morale. In the 1940s, we thrilled audiences with our precision combat maneuvers the F9 Panther. During the 1950s, we refined our demonstration with aerobatic maneu vers in the F9 Cougar and F-11 Tiger and introduced the first six-plane delta formation, still flown to this day. By the end of the 1960s, we were fly ing the F-4 Phantom, the only two-seat aircraft flown by the delta formation. Skyhawk, a smaller and lighter air craft with a tighter turning radius, allowing for a more dynamic flight demonstration. Anniversary by unveiling the Boeing day. As for support aircraft over the years, we have to go back to 1949 when it became necessary for the Blue Angels to operate a support aircraft to move personnel and equipment between show sites. These support aircraft included the Douglas R4D Sky Train, the Curtiss R5C Commando, the Douglas R5D Skymaster, and the Lockheed C-121 received the Lockheed Martin C-130, affectionately known as Fat Albert. A total of 16 officers voluntarily serve with the Blue Angels. Each year, the team typically selects three tacti cal (fighter or fighter/attack) jet pilots, two support officers and one Marine Corps C-130 pilot to relieve departing members. The Chief of Naval Air Training selects the Boss, the Blue Angels Commanding Officer. Boss must have at least 3,000 tactical jet flight-hours and have commanded a tactical jet squadron. The Commanding Officer flies the Number 1 jet. Career-oriented Navy and Marine Corps jet pilots with an aircraft carrier qualification and a minimum of 1,250 tactical jet flight-hours are eligible for positions flying jets Number 2 through Weapons Systems Officer (WSO) who meets the same criteria as Numbers 2 The Marine Corps pilots flying the C-130T Hercules Fat Albert support aircraft, must be aircraft command er qualified with at least 1,200 flight hours. Career-oriented officers specializing in maintenance, administration, avia tion medicine, public affairs and sup ply fill support positions. The Blue Angels base their selec tion of officers on professional ability, military bearing and communication skills. Blue Angels officers are wellrounded representatives of their fleet counterparts. Demonstration pilots, the Events Coordinator, Maintenance Officer and Flight Surgeon serve two years with the squadron.The other officers typi cally serve three years with the team. Blue Angels officers return to the fleet after their tours of duty. A large crowd watched the Blue Angels perform arial manuevers during the 2010 NAS Jax Air Show. Photo by MC3 Nicholas A. Garratt See PILOTS, Page 31

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So, we emphasize to our staff that this is the most important day in most brides lives.Plan Your Christmas Party Now at The Hilltop Formal Dining Room and Casual Patio Room Walnut paneled full bar with grand piano.Reservations Recommended 2030 Wells Road, Orange Park272-5959www.hilltop-club.com 1173826 #1001173826 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/04/2011 14:09 CST 1162747 #1001162747 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/20/2011 12:25 CST 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 31 CAPT Greg McWherter U .S Navy Flight Leader/ Commanding Officer Captain Greg McWherter is a native of Atlanta and gradu ated from Avondale High School in 1986 where he lettered in football and soccer. He attended The Citadel, where he played NCAA Division 1 soc cer for the Bulldogs and graduated Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering in 1990. Greg received his commission through the NROTC pro gram and entered aviation training at Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola in June 1990. Greg continued his train ing at nearby NAS Whiting Field, flying the T-34C Mentor, before moving to NAS Meridian, Miss., to fly the T-2C Buckeye and TA-4J Skyhawk. He earned his wings of gold in September 1992. In November 1992, Greg reported to Strike Fighter Squadron 106 (VFA-106), the Gladiators, at NAS Cecil Field, for initial training in the FA-18 Hornet. Upon comple tion of the Fleet Replacement Squadron, he was ordered to VFA-131, the Wildcats, where he served as the Landing Signals Officer (LSO), Weapons Training Officer and Quality Assurance Officer. From October 1993 to February 1997, he completed two workups and deployments to the Mediterranean Sea and Persian Gulf with the Wildcats aboard USS George Washington (CVN 73). He graduated from the United States Navy Fighter Weapons School (TOPGUN) in May 1995 and was selected as VFA-131s Pilot of the Year in 1996. In March 1997, Greg reported to NAS Fallon, Nev., as a TOPGUN Instructor. During his tour in Fallon, he served as a Training Officer and the Navys AIM-9M/X, Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System and FA-18 Air-to-Air Employment Subject Matter Expert. Greg returned to the fleet in March 2000 as Tactics Officer and Department Head for VFA-34 at NAS Oceana, Va. During his tour with the Blue Blasters, he completed two more Mediterranean Sea and Persian Gulf deploy ments aboard USS George Washington (CVN 73) and was selected by his peers to receive the 2003 Commander, Naval Air Forces Leadership Award. In August 2003, Greg received orders to the United States Joint Forces Command in Norfolk, Va. Within the Joint Requirements and Integration Directorate (J8), he served as the Joint Close Air Support (JCAS) Branch Chief and was responsible for identifying mission area shortfalls and developing joint solutions through the Department of Defense. During his Joint tour, Greg completed Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) Phase I through the College of Distance Education at the Naval War College. After completing refresher training in the FA-18 Hornet in March 2006, Greg reported as Executive Officer of VFA192 stationed at Naval Air Facility (NAF) Atsugi, Japan. He commanded the World Famous Golden Dragons through three major deployments aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) from June 2007 until July 2008. Greg commanded the Blue Angels from November 2008 to November 2010 and, after a brief tour as the Deputy Director for Officer Development at Naval Services Training Command (NSTC), returned to lead the team again in May 2011. He has more than 4,500 flight hours and 950 carrier-arrested landings. His decorations include the Legion of Merit, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal, two Air Medals (Strike Flight), two Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medals, a Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, as well as various campaign and unit awards. LCDR Jim Tomaszeski U .S Navy Right Wing Lieutenant Commander Jim Tomaszeski is a native of Orange Park and graduated from Coronado (Calif.) High School in 1997. He attended Florida State University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English in 2000. Jim then reported to Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola for Officer Candidate School and was commissioned an Ensign in December 2000. Jim reported for aviation indoctrination at NAS Pensacola in January 2001. He completed primary flight training at Vance Air Force Base, Enid, Okla., flying the T-37B Tweet. He then transferred to NAS Meridian, Miss., for intermediate and advanced flight training, flying the T-2C Buckeye and T-45C Goshawk. He earned his wings of gold in May 2003. Jim then reported to Strike Fighter Squadron 125 (VFA125), the Rough Raiders, in Lemoore, Calif., for training in the F/A-18 Hornet. In May 2004, he reported to VFA195, the Dambusters, stationed in Atsugi, Japan. While assigned to VFA-195, Jim completed multiple Western Pacific deployments aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63). He also participated in several multilateral international exer cises with South Korean, Republic of Singapore, Japanese and Australian Naval, Marine and Air Forces. While with the Dambusters, Jim served as Squadron Mess Officer, Public Affairs Officer, Schedules Officer, Avionics and Armament Division Officer, Laser Systems Safety Officer, Naval Air Training and Operation Procedures Standardization (NATOPS) Officer, Air-to-Air Weapons and Tactics Officer, Assistant Operations Officer and Landing Signals Officer (LSO). While there, Jim contributed to the PILOTS From Page 30 See PILOTS, Page 32

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The Only Thing We Overlook Is The Ocean. 1515 1st Street North, Jacksonville Beach, FL 32250 Phone : 904-241-2311 We Support Our Troops! We Support Our Troops!1175365 ([WHQGHGVWD\UDWHVDYDLODEOH3OHDVHDVNIRU6DOHV Active Duty, Family or Friends Welcome Includes Hot Breakfast Buffet. Oceanfront Hotel, Tiki Bar and Grill on property Ask for Air Show Discount code rate LAIR *Blackout dates apply. Cannot be combined with any other offers. EXP 02/29/12 20% off rack rate #1001175365 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/12/2011 09:00 CST Monday, November 7, 2011ITT Technical Institute is a proud participant in the Yellow Ribbon program. Visit us to learn more about the educational opportunities available to active military, veterans and their dependents. Its our way of showing our appreciation to the men and women who have served in the armed forces. Tel. 904-573-9100 7011 A.C. Skinner Pkwy Jacksonville FL 32256s Instructors available to help answer your questions s Complimentary refreshments s For complete program information, go to www.itt-tech.edu s Classes now formingGo to programinfo.itt-tech.edu to access information on the programs of study offered at the ITT Technical Institutes (Programs), including, among other things: the occupations that each Program can help students prepare to enter; the on-time graduation rate for each Program; the costs associated with each Program; the placement rate for students who completed each Program; and the median loan debt incurred by students who completed each Program ITT is a registered mark of and is used under license granted by ITT Manufacturing Enterprises, Inc. Not all ITT Technical Institutes have all six schools of study, Please refer to the particular ITT Technical Institutes school catalog for details of the schools of study at that institute.SALUTE TO THE TROOPSWWW.ITT-TECH.EDUITT Technical Institute EDUCATION FOR THE FUTURE #1001167769 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/03/2011 10:13 CST 32 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW Dambusters receiving the 2005 Battle E for sustained superior performance in an operational environment. In June 2007, Jim reported to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 101 (VMFAT-101) as an instructor pilot. While with the Sharpshooters, Jim served as a LSO, Fighter Weapons Phase Instructor, Legal Officer, Assistant Air-toAir Phase Head and Assistant Carrier Qualification Phase Head. Jim joined the Blue Angels in September 2009. He has accumulated more than 2,000 flight hours and has 271 carrier arrested landings. His decorations include the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and various personal and unit awards. Maj Brent Stevens U .S Marine Corps Left Wing Major Brent Stevens is a native of Knoxville, Tenn., and graduated from Farragut High School in 1994. In 1996, Brent enlisted in the Marine Corps Reserves and reported for train ing at Marine Corps Recruit Depot (MCRD) Parris Island, S.C. Following recruit training, Brent reported to H Company, 4th Combat Engineer Battalion, 4th Marine Division in Knoxville. While serving as a combat engineer in the reserves, Brent attended the University of Tennessee, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics in 1999. Brent was commissioned a Marine Corps Second Lieutenant through the Platoon Leaders Class and report ed to Quantico, Va., for The Basic School in November 1999. He reported for aviation indoctrination at Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola in November 2000. He completed primary flight training in the T-37B Tweet at Vance Air Force Base, Enid, Okla. Brent was then assigned to NAS Meridian, Miss., for intermediate and advanced flight train ing where he flew the T-2C Buckeye and T-45C Goshawk. He received his wings of gold in September 2002. In October 2002, Brent reported to Strike Fighter Squadron 106 (VFA-106), the Gladiators, at NAS Oceana, Va., for training in the F/A-18 Hornet. In January 2004, he joined Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 (VMFA232), the Red Devils at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Miramar, Calif. While assigned to VMFA-232, Brent com pleted multiple Western Pacific deployments aboard USS NIMITZ (CVN 68). During a 2007 deployment to the Persian Gulf, Brent flew combat operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. While with the Red Devils, he served as the Powerline Division Officer, Ground Safety Officer, NATOPS Officer, Flight Officer, Assistant Operations Officer, Aviation Safety Officer, Quality Assurance Officer and Landing Signal Officer (LSO). While with the Red Devils, the squadron received the 2007 Robert M. Hanson Award as the Marine Corps Associations Fighter Attack Squadron of the Year. In April 2008, Brent reported to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 101 (VMFAT-101), the Sharpshooters, as an instructor pilot. During his tour, Brent served as a LSO, Airto-Ground Phase Instructor, Schedules officer, Airframes Division Officer and Out-of Control Flight (OCF) Program Manager. Brent joined the Blue Angels in September 2010. He has accumulated more than 1,700 flight hours and has 280 carrier arrested landings. His decorations include two Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals and various personal and unit awards. LT Rob Kurrle U .S Navy Slot Lieutenant Rob Kurrle, Jr. is a native of Statesville, N.C., and graduated from Statesville High School in 1997, where he lettered in tennis. He attended New Mexico Military Institute through the Naval Academy foundation program, which he completed in 1998. Rob then attended the United States Naval Academy where he played tennis and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering in 2002 and was commissioned as an Ensign in the U.S. Navy. Rob reported to Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola for aviation indoctrination in June 2002. He completed pri mary flight training in the T-34C Mentor at NAS Whiting Field and transferred to NAS Kingsville, Texas, for advanced flight training in the T-45A Goshawk. He received his wings of gold in January 2004. In February 2004, Rob reported to Strike Fighter Squadron 106 (VFA-106) Gladiators at NAS Oceana, Va., for initial training in the F/A-18C Hornet. In February 2005, Rob remained at NAS Oceana and reported to Strike Fighter Squadron 34 (VFA-34), the Blue Blasters. While assigned to the VFA-34, Rob completed the last at sea sustainment for USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) and a Western Pacific deployment aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). He also participated in several multilateral inter national exercises FOAL EAGLE, VALIANT SHIELD and RIM OF THE PACIFIC. Rob also served as Navigation Officer, Schedules Officer, Line Division Officer, Air to Air Weapons and Tactics Officer, and Landing Signals Officer (LSO). In February 2008, Rob reported back to VFA-106 for transition to the F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet. While serving as an Instructor Pilot with the Gladiators for the Hornet PILOTS From Page 31 See PILOTS, Page 33

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Rob joined the Blue Angels in September 2009, where he served as the Left Wing pilot in 2010. He has accumu lated more than 1,900 hours and 250 carrier arrested landings. His decorations include three Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals and various personal and unit awards. LCDR Ben Walborn U .S Navy Lead Solo Lieutenant Commander Ben Walborn is a native of Reading, Pa., and graduated from The Hill School in 1997, where he let tered in soccer and lacrosse. He attended the United States Naval Academy, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in Political Science in 2001, and was commissioned an Ensign in the U.S. Navy. Ben reported to Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola for aviation indoctrination in November 2001. He com pleted primary flight training in the T-34C Mentor in Corpus Christi, Texas, and transferred to NAS Meridian, Miss., for intermediate and advanced flight training in the T-2C Buckeye and T-45C Goshawk. He received his wings of gold in April 2004. In May 2004, Ben reported to Strike Fighter Squadron 122 (VFA-122), the Flying Eagles, in Lemoore, Calif., for initial training in the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet. In January 2005, he reported to the VFA-27 Royal Maces stationed in Atsugi, Japan. While assigned to VFA-27, Ben completed multiple Western Pacific deployments aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63). He also participated in several multilateral inter national exercises with South Korean, Thai, Republic of Singapore, Japanese and Australian Marine, Naval and Air Forces. While with the Royal Maces, Ben served as the Public Affairs Officer, Schedules Officer, Aircraft Division Officer, Air to Air Weapons and Tactics Officer, Assistant Operations Officer and Landing Signals Officer and contrib uted to the Royal Maces receiving the 2005 and 2006 Battle E for sustained superior performance in an opera tional environment. In January 2008, Ben received orders back to VFA-122. While serving as an Instructor Pilot with the Flying Eagles, he served as the Assistant Intelligence Officer and Landing Signals Officer. Ben joined the Blue Angels in September 2008. He served as the Narrator and VIP pilot in 2009 and as the Opposing Solo pilot in 2010. He has accumulated more than 2,200 hours and 346 carrier arrested land ings. His decorations include two Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals and various personal and unit awards. LT C J Simonsen U .S Navy Opposing Solo Lieutenant C.J. Simonsen is a native of Coon Rapids, Minn., and graduated from Coon Rapids High School in 1995, where he lettered in football, track and down hill skiing. In January 1996, he enlisted in the Navy and com pleted Basic Training at Recruit Training Command (RTC) in Great Lakes, Ill., in March 1996. C.J. then reported to Naval Nuclear Power Training Command in Orlando for Machinist Mate A school and Nuclear Power School. Upon comple tion, he reported to Naval Nuclear Power Training Unit in Charleston, S.C., to complete his training aboard USS Daniel Webster (SSN 626), where he served as a nuclear machinist mate, in June 1997. While in Charleston, C.J. was accepted to the Naval Academy Preparatory School (NAPS) in Newport, R.I., which he completed in May 1998. He then attended the United States Naval Academy, where he ran track, and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering in May 2002, and was commissioned an Ensign in the U.S. Navy. C.J. reported to Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola for aviation indoctrination in July 2002. He completed pri mary flight training in the T-34C Mentor in Milton, Fla., and transferred to NAS Meridian, Miss., for intermediate and advanced flight training in the T-2C Buckeye and T-45C Goshawk. He received his wings of gold in April 2005. C.J. then reported to Strike Fighter Squadron 122 (VFA122), the Flying Eagles, in Lemoore, Calif., for initial training in the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet. In January 2006, he report ed to VFA-102 Diamondbacks stationed in Atsugi, Japan. While assigned to VFA-102, C.J. completed multiple Western Pacific deployments aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) and USS George Washington (CVN 73). He also participated in several multilateral international exercises with Canadian, South Korean, Thai, Republic of Singapore, Japanese and Australian Marine, Naval and Air Forces. While with the Diamondbacks, C.J. served as Airframes Branch Officer, Schedules Officer, Aircraft Division Officer, and Operations Administration Officer and directly con tributed to the Diamondbacks receiving the 2007 Battle E for sustained superior performance in an operational environment. In February 2009, C.J. received orders to VFA-106, the Gladiators, in Oceana, Va. While serving as an Instructor Pilot with the Gladiators, he served as the Schedules Officer. C.J. joined the Blue Angels in September 2009. He has accumulated more than 1,400 hours and 379 carrier arrested landings. His decorations include two Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals and various personal and unit awards. PILOTS From Page 32

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34 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW What is the mission of the Blue Angels? The mission of the Blue Angels is to enhance Navy recruit ing, and credibly represent Navy and Marine Corps aviation to the United States and its Armed Forces to America and other countries as international ambassadors of good will. What are the policies/requirements governing back seat flights in the number 7 jet? Orientation flights are given to three members of the local media at each show site. Individuals must be accred ited members of the media and are recommended by Navy recruiters and air show sponsors, then reviewed and ap proved by the Blue Angels. A small number of VIP orientation flights are also offered each year to individuals from televi sion, sports, music and the movie industry. These individuals are selected by the Blue Angels to generate national media coverage and convey a positive image of the squadron and the Navy/Marine Corps. These flights are in direct support of Navy and Marine Corps recruiting objectives. Who authorized establishment of the Blue Angels? The Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, ordered the establishment of the team on April 24, 1946. Where did the name Blue Angels originate? The name was originated by the original team when plan ning a show in New York in 1946. One of them came across the name of the citys famous Blue Angel nightclub in the New Yorker Magazine. Where was the Blue Angels first air show? Craig Field, Jacksonville, Florida, on June 15, 1946. Why dont the Navy Blue Angels and the Air Force Thun derbirds fly together? Current Department of Defense policy states the use of military aviation demonstration teams is for recruiting pur poses, therefore the teams cannot fly within 150 miles of each other without special permission. Each demonstration team showcases U.S. military aviation capabilities to the public separately to maximize Navy or Air Force recruit ing efforts. However, the Blue Angels or Thunderbirds may perform with the U.S. Army Parachute Team, the Golden Knights, or the U.S. Navy Parachute Team, the Leapfrogs. On average, how many people view the Blue Angels each year? An estimated 15 million spectators view the squadron during air shows each year. Additionally, the Blue Angels visit more than 50,000 people a show season (March through November) at school and hospital visits. What are the basic requirements for becoming a Blue Angel demonstration pilot? Each applicant must be career-oriented, carrier-qualified, active-duty Navy or Marine Corps tactical jet pilot with a min imum of 1,250 flight hours. How many Blue Angels demonstration pilots have there been? Including the 2007 season, the Blue Angels have had 232 demonstration pilots, and 32 Flight Leaders/Com manding Officers. Do the Blue Angels pilots go through Strike Fighter Wing Pacifics TOPGUN? Some current and former Blue Angels pilots have gone through TOPGUN, however, it is not a prerequisite. How do you determine where to hold an air show? Each September, the Department of Defense receives hundreds of requests to hold air shows featuring the Navy Blue Angels. After the Department of Defense screens re quests for basic eligibility, requests are forwarded to the Blue Angels Commanding Officer. The squadron reviews each air show request, considering input from the Chief of Naval Information and Navy Recruiting Command. In Decem ber, the Blue Angels Events Coordinator, along with Navy and Department of Defense officials, meet at a scheduling conference in Washington, D. C. for final considerations and approval. How does someone become a Blue Angel de-monstration pilot? Navy and Marine Corps pilots meeting the basic require ments submit an application directly to the team via the Ap plications Officer. Applicants visit the squadron at scheduled show sites early in the show season to observe the team firsthand. Finalists are selected mid-season and interviewed at the Blue Angels squadron in Pensacola, Florida. The new demonstration pilots and support officers are selected by unanimous vote. The Chief of Naval Air Training selects the Flight Leader/Commanding Officer. What happens if a Blue Angel demonstration pilot is ill or hurt? Safety is paramount for every demonstration. Each pilot is responsible for good health and safety; however, the Blue Angels Flight Surgeon will medically disqualify a pilot if one The Blue Angels Frequently Asked Questions blueangels.navy.mil See FAQ, Page 35

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At Austal, our determination to help you grow your career is what drives us. So if youre looking for a job with competitive wages, a team atmosphere and most importantly, a future, this is the place for you. Apply today at austaljobs.com. NOW HIRING :: Chief Naval Architect // Mechanical Engineers & Designers // Naval Architects/Structural Designers // Mechanical Project Managers // Schedulers & Planners // Fabrication Manager/ Foremen/Supervisors // Fitout Manager & Tradesmen // Logistics Analyst // Accuracy Control Inspector // Contract Administrator // Welders/Fitters/Electricians MARVIN MORRIS Austal ElectricianAustal is an Equal Opportunity Employer #1001160430 (9.75col, 9.75in x 5in) 10/11/2011 13:28 CST 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 35 should become ill or injured. Should the Flight Lead er/Commanding Officer be grounded for medical purposes, the demonstration will be canceled. Why dont the Blue Angels maintain a spare pi lot? With the number of practice hours required to safely fly a demonstration a spare pilot could not be utilized effectively. Each pilot must complete 120 training flights during winter training in or der to perform a public demonstration safely. The teamwork required for the high speed, low-altitude flying in the tight Blue Angel formation takes hun dreds of hours to develop. A substitute pilot would not have enough time in the formation to do this safely. Why dont the pilots wear G-suits? G-suits are designed with air bladders (pockets) that inflate and deflate to keep a pilots blood from pooling in the pilots legs while executing sharp, unpredicted combat maneuvers. Unlike combat flying, the Blue Angels demonstration pilots know the maneuvers they will fly prior to execution, so each pilot knows when one will be pulling heavy gravitational forces. Anticipating the changes in gravitational forces allows the Blue Angels demon stration pilots to combat the G-forces with muscle contractions. In addition, the Boeing F/A-18s control stick is mounted between the pilots legs. The Blue Angels have a spring tensioned with 35 pounds of pressure installed on the control stick that gives the pilot a false feel. This allows the pilot minimal room for uncommanded movement. The pilots rest their right arms on their thighs for support and stability while flying. Therefore, inflat ing and deflating air bladders in a G-suit would in terrupt this support and stability, causing uncom manded aircraft movement. In this case, G-suits would detrimentally impact flight safety. How many Blue Angels have made flag rank? Twelve former Blue Angels have made flag rank. The flag officers include: RADM E. L. Feightner (ret.), No. 5, 1952; RADM W. A. Gureck (ret.), Nos. 2,4, 1955-56; RADM W. Lewis Chatham (ret.), No. 5, 1952; RADM Ernest Christensen (ret.), Nos. 3, 4, 1969-70; RADM Jim Maslowski (ret.), Nos. 3, 4, 1970-71; VADM Tony Less (ret.), No.1, 1974-75; RADM William E. Newman (ret.), No.1, 1978-79; RADM Dennis Wisely (ret.), No.1, 1980-81; RADM P. D. Moneymaker (ret.), No. 1, 1989-90; VADM Pat Walsh, Nos. 3/4, 198587; RADM David Anderson, Nos. 5,6,7, 1985-87; RADM Doug McClain, Nos. 3, 4, 1988-90, and BGEN Mark Bircher, No. 2, 1985-1987. blueangels.navy.mil FAQ From Page 34 See FAQ, Page 36

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36 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW Have any Blue Angels become astronauts? CDR Chuck Brady, Flight Surgeon, 198990. What is the average age of a Blue Angels pilot? The pilots average age is 33 years old. How is the enlisted, support and mainte nance team selected? Each applicant is carefully screened and selected by current team members. What is the average age of the enlisted, support and maintenance team? The average varies slightly, however, it is approximately 26 years old. Are the Blue Angels the best of the best? The Blue Angels are representatives of the excellence and professionalism found throughout the fleet. Each Blue Angels team member is an ambassador and representa tive of fleet counterpart. How long is a Blue Angel tour of duty? The demonstration pilots, Maintenance Officer, Events Coordinator, and Flight Sur geon each serve a two-year tour. All other members, including the Narrator, serve a three-year tour. Each member returns to the fleet after completing a tour with the Blue Angels. How many Marines serve in the squadron? There are 16 Marines on the 2007 team. Eight in Fat Albert, six in maintenance, No. 4 and No. 7. How many females are in the squadron? The number of females varies each year. The 2007 team has 15 females. How do team members deal with the time away from home? Individuals are made aware that they will be away from home a lot before they volun teer for duty with the team and are selected based on their ability to cope with, not only family separation, but with a strenuous prac tice and show schedule. Additionally, the Navy, Blue Angels, and civilian communities at Pensacola and El Centro provide a familytype support network. Do any of the Blue Angels get extra pay? No. Each member of the squadron volun teers for duty with the Blue Angels. Due to keen competition at all levels, each individual feels especially honored to be associated with the team. What is considered minimum visibility for a Blue Angel performance? To be able to perform, the Blue Angels must have at least three nautical miles of visibility horizontally from centerpoint, and a minimum cloud ceiling of 1,500 feet. At these minimums, the Blue Angels can per form a limited number of maneuvers in what is called a flat show. When the ceiling is at least 3,500 feet and visibility at least three nautical miles a low show can be per formed, which includes some rolling maneu vers. With a minimum ceiling of 8,000 feet and visibility of three nautical miles, the Blue Angels can perform their high show, which includes all maneuvers. What is the lowest and highest maneuver heights performed during an air show? This varies due to weather conditions. The highest is the vertical rolls performed by the Opposing Solo (up to 15,000 feet) and the lowest is the Sneak Pass (50 feet) performed by the Lead Solo. What is the most demanding maneuver performed? All maneuvers are demanding, both men tally and physically, and reflect the challeng es met daily by fleet Navy and Marine Corps aviators. What are the fastest and slowest speeds flown during an air show? The fastest speed is about 700 mph (just under Mach 1; Sneak Pass) and the slowest speed is about 120 mph (indicated speed; Section High Alpha), both flown by the solo pilots during the show. How many and what types of aircraft have the Blue Angels flown? Since 1946, there have been eight types of aircraft: (1) Grumman F6F Hellcat, June-August 1946; (2) Grumman F8F Bearcat, August 19461949; (3) Grumman F9F-2 Panther (first jet), 1949-June 1950 and Grumman F9F-5 Panther 1951-Winter 1954/55; (4) Grumman F9F-8 Cougar, winter 195455; mid-season 1957; (5) Grumman F11F-1 Tiger (first supersonic jet), mid-season 1957-1969; (6) McDonnell Douglas F-4J Phantom II, 1969-December 1974; (7) McDonnell Douglas A-4F Skyhawk II, De cember 1974-November 1986; (8) Boeing F/A-18 Hornet, November 1986-Present. How many jets are in the Squadron? The Blue Angels currently have 12 jets: 10 single-seat F/A-18 A models and two two-seat F/A-18 B models. What are the major differences between the fleet model and the Blue Angel F/A18? The Blue Angel F/A-18s have the nose cannon removed, a smoke-oil tank installed and a spring installed on the stick which ap plies pressure for better formation and in verted flying. Otherwise, the aircraft that the squadron flies are the same as those in the fleet. Each Blue Angel aircraft is fleet capa ble of being returned to combat duty aboard an aircraft carrier within 72 hours. Are Blue Angels aircraft carrier capable? All of the Blue Angels jets are carriercapable and can be made combat ready in about 72 hours. The squadrons C-130 (Fat Albert) is a Marine Corps fleet aircraft manned by an all-Marine Corps crew and was not designed for carrier operations. How do the jets get to each show site? The demonstration pilots fly the jets to each show site. How much does an F/A-18 cost? The basic acquisition price of a single F/A-18 A Hornet is approximately $21 mil lion. The cost of additional weapons-related equipment varies according to the configu ration and use of each aircraft can signifi cantly increase the total price. What is the top speed and rate of climb of an F/A-18? The F/A-18 can reach speeds just under Mach 2, almost twice the speed of sound or about 1,400 mph. The maximum rate of climb of the F/A-18 is 30,000 feet per minute. What is the weight of an F/A-18? An F/A-18 weighs about 24,500 pounds empty of all ordnance and aircrew. Why are the jets painted blue and gold? The jets bear the official colors for the U.S. Navy. How far can the F/A-18 fly on a full load of fuel or with external fuel tanks? The F/A-18 can travel approximately 1,000 miles on a full load of fuel without external tanks. Adding the external tanks extends the range to approximately 1,200 miles. How do you produce the smoke, and why do you use it? The smoke is produced by pumping biode gradable, paraffin-based oil directly into the exhaust nozzles of the aircraft where the oil is instantly vaporized into smoke. The smoke provides a traceable path for spectators to follow, so they can see the flight profile that has been flown. It also enhances safety of flight by providing a valuable means by which the solo pilots can see each other during opposing maneuvers and conditions of low ered visibility or haze. The smoke poses no hazard to the environment. Why cant the public listen to the pilots conversation during the show? Since all maneuvers are preceded by ra dio communication, broadcasting these ra dio calls or making the frequencies of their radios publicly available could interfere with pilot communication, thereby jeopardizing safety of flight. Why is the C-130 called Fat Albert? Fat Albert is a nickname given to the plane by Marine Corps Blue Angel pilots in the 1970s because of its size and shape and is a reference to the popular childrens cartoon of the same era. What does JATO stand for? JATO means Jet Assisted Take Off and is used by the Lockheed-Martin C-130 to clear short runways and gain high altitude in a short period of time such as might be necessary in combat situations. blueangels.navy.mil FAQ From Page 35 See FAQ, Page 37

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Sliders Seaside Grill 1175451 Newly Renovated 2nd Floor #1001175451 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/11/2011 15:05 CST May require up to a $36 activation fee/line, credit approval and deposit. Up to $350/line early termination fee (ETF) for advanced devices and up to $200 ETF/line for other devices (no ETF for Agreements cancelled during rst 30 days). Individual-Liable Discount: Available only to eligible employees of the company or organization participating in the discount program. May be subject to change according to the companys agreement with Sprint. Available upon request on select plans and only for eligible lines. Discount applies to monthly service charges only. No discounts apply to secondary lines or add-ons $29.99 or below. Other Terms: Coverage not available everywhere. Nationwide Sprint and Nextel National Networks reach over 278 and 279 million people, respectively. Offers not available in all markets/retail locations or for all phones/networks. Pricing, offer terms, fees and features may vary for existing customers not eligible for upgrade. Other restrictions apply. See store or sprint.com for details. Sprint. Sprint and the logo are trademarks of Sprint. Other marks are the property of their respective owners.All active duty, guard, reserve, retired and veteran members of the US Armed Forces as well as civilian contractors are eligible for the discount. (-&.41 -#,$-3(.//+(" !+$#(2".4-3".#$ ,78 578(1.1"$ 8 1(-$28N115A67 r 5$'$-.4!47.-+(-$"1$#(3! "*6'$-7.42'./ 37.41r/1(-3f1(5 3$ r3.1$423 //+7 SAVE 50 : 3"'$"*.43$!n.-+7.%%$1//+($#(3'(-t(-5.("$2$6n+(-$ "3(5 3(.-# -$6.n7$ 1&1$$,$-3$04(1$#$231("3(.-2 //+7 .-$+$"3$&4+ 1+7/1("$# r/1(-3$15("$/+ -2$04(1$2 -$6.n7$ 1 &1$$,$-3r 5$(3'#(2".4-32% $50 $2'$+$"3(.-b(2(3 '$"*.43'$+ 3$23#$5("$2 -#&$3$15("$/+ -#(2".4-32%1$$ 2'(//(-& -#/$"( +2%1., /1(5 3$.-+(-$.1$)423%.1 .% 2/1(-3".,#.#ntnt2/1(-3".,#.#,$,!$12 r,$#.1"$215 #1001176632 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/11/2011 13:00 CST 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 37 How much fuel does Fat Albert hold? Fat Albert holds 46,000 pounds of fuel. What is the normal cruising speed and shaft horsepower per motor of Fat Albert? Fat Alberts cruising speed is 360 mph and shaft horse power is about 4,500 per engine. What is the maximum takeoff weight of Fat Albert? The maximum takeoff weight of Fat Albert is 155,000 pounds. What is the distance under Fat Alberts propellers to the ground? The distance under Fat Alberts propellers to the ground is approximately six feet. How many crewmembers are assigned to fly Fat Albert, and what are their positions? Eight Marines are assigned to operate Fat Albert Airlines: three pilots, two flight engineers, a navigator, a flight me chanic and a loadmaster. How long has the team had the C-130? The team has been flying the C-130 since 1970. Have the Blue Angels ever performed overseas? Yes. Throughout the years, the Blue Angels have had a limited opportunity to perform overseas. Prior to the 2006 trip to the Netherlands, was in 1992 when the team com pleted a European tour performing in Sweden, Finland, Rus sia, Bulgaria, Italy, the United Kingdom, Romania, Spain and Germany. Is it possible to schedule a tour of the Blues home base? Unfortunately, no. Due to the hectic show and mainte nance schedules, it is extremely difficult to schedule tours or photographic opportunities. People who desire to see the Blue Angels between shows are encouraged to view a practice demonstration at the National Museum of Naval Aviation at NAS Pensacola usually held most Tuesday and Wednesday mornings during the show season when the team is home. The practices, weather permitting, and a ten tative practice schedule may be viewed on the Blue Angels Web site at www.blueangels.navy.mil. How can fans obtain a VIP pass for a show? Blue Angel reserved seating at an air show is extremely limited and reserved strictly for family and close, personal friends of current team members. Some air show sites re serve alternate seating areas for a nominal fee. Interested individuals should contact the local air show coordinator for additional information. What is the difference between a Blue Angel Hornet and the new F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet? The Super Hornet is 25 percent larger, can fly 40 per cent further, remain on station 80 percent longer and carry more weapons than its predecessors. The Super Hornet F/A-18 E/F models have deployed with battle groups since 2001. This aircraft is the Navys newest acquisition and its advanced technology will be used to carry the fleet into the 21st century. Will the Blue Angels fly the Super Hornet? The decision to transition to the Super Hornet has yet to be determined. FAQ From Page 36 Photo by MC2 Ron Trevino Fat Albert wows the crowd at the 2010 NAS Jax Air Show.

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VETERANS MAKE OUR COUNTRY BETTER. WERE MAKING THEIR HOMES BETTER. 2011, HOMER TLC, Inc. All rights reserved.The Home Depot is committed to improving the housing needs of military veterans. And when you buy a veterans-themed gift card, The Home Depot will donate 5% of the value you place on it to organizations helping those whove served our country.To purchase the gift card and learn more, go to homedepot.com 1156346 #1001156346 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/14/2011 18:05 CST 1162744 #1001162744 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/20/2011 11:21 CST 40 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW An all-Marine Corps crew of three officers and five enlisted personnel operate the LockheedMartin C-130T Hercules, affectionately known as Fat Albert Airlines. Fat Albert joined the team in It carries more than 40 maintenance and support personnel, their gear and enough spare parts and communication equipment to complete a success ful air show. Fat Albert cruises at a speed of more than 320 feet. Four Allison turboprop engines, which produce more than 16,000 shaft-horsepower, provide Fat Albert Airlines with the power to land and depart on runways as short as 2,500 feet. At select show sites, Fat Albert demonstrates its jet-assisted takeoff (JATO) capability. Eight solidfuel rocket bottles, four on each side, attached near the rear paratrooper doors thrust the Hercules sky ward. Fired simultaneously, the JATO bottles allow the mammoth transport aircraft to takeoff within 1,500 feet, climb at a 45-degree angle, and propel it to an altitude of 1,000 feet in approximately 15 sec onds. Getting Fat Albert airborne in minimal time and distance simulates conditions in hostile envi ronments or on short, unprepared runways. Blue Angels Trusty Companion Fat Albert flies over show center at the 2010 NAS Jax Air Show. Photo by Clark Pierce Fat Albert C-130T Hercules

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42 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW To Patty Wagstaff, the sky represents adventure, freedom and challenge. A six-time member of the U.S. Aerobatic Team, Patty has won the gold, silver and bronze medals in Olympic-level international aerobatic competi tion and is the first woman to win the title of U.S. National Aerobatic champion and one of the few people to win it three times. Patty, whose company is based in St. Augustine, flies one of the most thrilling, low-level aerobatic demonstrations in the world. Flying before millions of people each year, her breathtaking performances give air show spectators a front-row seat view of the precision and complexity of modern, unlimited hard-core aerobatics. Her smooth, aggressive style sets the standard for performers the world over. Born in the USA, Patty grew up in and around airplanes. At age 9, she moved to Japan where her father was a captain for Japan Air Lines. Her earliest memories include sitting with her father at the con trols of his airplanes. At 10 years old, when her father let her take the controls of his DC-6, her lifelong love affair with airplanes began. From Japan, her travels took her across Southeast Asia, Europe and to Australia, where she lived and traveled up the west coast in a small boat. small town in the southwest part of the state Dillingham where she worked for the Bristol Bay Native Association. Her job involved traveling to each of the remote villages in the region, areas only accessible by air. Pattys first experience with bush flying was not a positive one. The first airplane she chartered for her job crashed on their first flight. So Patty decided to learn to fly herself, hiring friend and later husband, Since then, she earned her Commercial, Instrument, Seaplane and Commercial Helicopter Ratings. She is a flight and instrument instructor and is rated and qualified to fly many airplanes, from World War II fighters to jets. Pattys sister, Toni, is also a pilot and a captain for Continental Airlines. Though she had never seen aerobatics, a lifelong curiosity led her to attend her first air show in British perform and promised herself I can do that! By earned a spot on the U.S. Aerobatic Team. Pattys skill is based on years of training and expe rience. She is a six-time recipient of the First Lady of Aerobatics Betty Skelton Award. In July 2004, Patty was inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame and was the recipient of the National Air and Space Museums Award for Current Achievement in 1994. Having received many awards for her flying, Patty is particularly proud of receiving the air show industrys most prestigious award the Sword of Excellence, and the Bill Barber Award for Showmanship. Recently, Patty was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Air Force Association, was inducted into the EAA/IAC Hall of Fame, and in 2005 received the NAA/99s Katherine Wright Award. In March of .1994, her airplane, the Goodrich Extra 260, went on display in the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum in Washington, D.C. You can see Pattys airplane and exhibit in the Pioneers of Flight Gallery. Patty has trained with the Russian Aerobatic Team and has flown air shows and competitions in such exotic places as South America, Russia, Europe, Mexico and Iceland. She is a member of the Screen Actors Guild, Motion Picture Pilots Association, United Stuntwomens Association, working as a stunt pilot and aerial coordinator for the film and television industry. She was the Demo pilot for Raytheons (now Hawker Beechcrafts) military trainer, the T6A/B Texan II in international air shows such as Paris, Singapore and Farnborough, and continues to coach their Demo Team. For the past 10 years, Patty has traveled to East Africa to give bush, recurrency and aerobatic train ing to the pilots of the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS), who protect Kenyas elephants, rhino and other nat ural resources from poachers. In 2010, Patty started flying for Cal Fire as an Air Attack pilot in the OV-10 Bronco. Cal Fire pilots fly both the OV-10 and the S2T Tanker out of 13 differ ent bases helping keep California safe from fires and supporting firefighters on the ground. Continuing a life of experience and adventure, when shes not flying, you can find her at the barn, riding her Selle Francais show jumper, Ivgeni de Hogue. Pattys other interests include her Jack Russell Terriers and her parrot Buddha; riding her motorcy cle and bicycle; reading; writing articles for aviation magazines; and practicing yoga. Patty is proud to be sponsored by Champion Aerospace Inc., manufacturer of high-performance aviation quality spark plugs, harnesses and oil fil ters, and Cannon Aviation Insurance, where the cus tomer is always the first priority. Patty is also sponsored by Sarasota Avionics International, which meets her avionics needs; Textron Lycoming, which makes her engine; MT Propeller, which provides the propeller for it. She also has had long time support from Shell Oil, Bose Headsets, Goodyear Tire Corporation, National Parachutes, Concorde Battery and Lord Corporation. Additionally, she is supported by Microsoft,and you can fly her Extra 300S, which is featured on the famed Microsoft Flight Simulator. Patty Wagstaffs Achievements 2007: Inductee, International Aerospace Hall of Fame 2006: Inductee, Air Show Hall of Fame 2006: Aviation Week & Space Technology Laureate, Philip J. Klass Award for Lifetime Achievement 2005: Recipient, Air Force Association Lifetime Achievement Award 2005: Inductee, International Aerobatic Club Hall of Fame 2005: Katherine Wright Award 2002: Katherine and Marjorie Stinson Award 1998: Bill Barber Award for Showmanship 1997: Recipient, NAA Paul Tissiander Diploma 1997: Inductee, Women in Aviation International Hall of Fame 1997: Inductee, Arizona Aviation Hall of Fame 1996: Recipient, Charlie Hillard Trophy 1996: GAN & Flyers Readers Choice Award, Favorite Female Performer 1996: Top Scoring US Pilot at World Aerobatic Championships 1985-1996: Member, U.S. Aerobatic Team 1995: Recipient, ICAS Sword of Excellence Award 1988-1994: Winner Betty Skelton First Lady of Aerobatics Trophy 1994: National Air and Space Museum Award for Current Achievement 1994: NAA Certificate of Honor 1993: International Aerobatic Club Champion Us National Aerobatic Champion 1991, 1992, 1993 US National Aerobatic Championships 1990/1992/1994: Top US Medal Winner, World Aerobatic Championships 1991: Voted Western Flyer Readers Choice Favorite Airshow Performer 1987: Rolly Cole Memorial Award for Contributions to Sport Aerobatics Flying a way of life for Patty Wagstaff www.pattywagstaff.com

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The Eastport Apartment Community is Jacksonvilles Premier Luxury Apartment Community on the Northside conveniently located just minutes from the Naval Bases, Rivercity Shopping Center and Downtown. We offer Luxury living at an affordable price. Call today and ask about our Military Discount Program and come home to the Eastport.FREE Washer & Dryer FREE 24 HR Fitness Center FREE WIFI* FREE Billiard room Lagoon Style Pool and Spa Laminate hardwood ooring Business Center Two Bedroom 11701 Palm Lake Dr., Jacksonville, FL 32218 Eastport@michaelsongroupllc.com (904) 696-0016 2 BEDROOM /2 BATH(2nd and 3rd Floor Only)*with 12 mo lease. See property mgmt. for details. 1 Month FREE* RPP (RENTAL PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM) FOR OUR MILITARY! ** selected models only #1001178497 (9.75col, 9.75in x 5in) 10/11/2011 15:51 CST #1001175788 (4.75col, 4.75in x 2.38in) 10/06/2011 17:18 CST 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 43 Kent Shockley was born in Pasadena, Calif., grew up in Orange County, Calif., and moved to Galena, Kan., in sons, Chris, and Michael, who are both athletes, and honor students in the Baxter Springs schools. Kent has worked around jet-powered vehicles since he was 15 years old with his father, Les Shockley. Kent worked as crew chief on the road with Les during the summer months, and as his school schedule would permit. Kent then worked after school in his fathers shop doing jet mainte nance, fabrication of vehicles, and helped in building, tuning, and repair ing of custom jet-powered race cars. During these years, he helped his dad become a three-time National Jet Car Champion. At the age of 21, Kent learned to drive the Shock Wave Jet the first person to be licensed to drive a multitude-powered vehicle. Shockley turned over the week-to-week driving of the ShockWave to his son Kent. Kent is not only a competent and very safety conscientious driver, he is also great with the fans, always taking time to sign an autograph or explain something about the awesome truck to one of the fans. I am really proud to be the driver of the most awesome act in the motor sports industry, Kent said. My dad has given me an opportu nity that very few get and I am enjoying every minute of it. My dad has set some pretty tough standards to live up to, but I feel that I have the devotion it takes to meet them. I love my job and look for ward to the exciting years ahead. Kent Shockley & ShockWave Photo by Kaylee LaRocque ShockWave performs at the 2010 NAS Jax Air Show, with Kent Shockley at the wheel.

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rf nttntb rrr r "#!$%&!%'(%%!'()#*+#*) '!$# #$(,+(,& "#-$&#.#,&#, +r!/#)0#$bbb1 r !(%%(2 -/#-%($3)#)0#$+(,& "#-$ &#.#,&#, +r!/#)0#$bbn ,4!3((/#,5#$"*, "-5"%-5" -,5# #$(,+(,& )#)!$(0-%-(&*$-,53!*$/-+f(,&$#2#-/#(.-,6" 3!*$2!).%# #&+2(/#,5#$"*, 7 8 8 9 b r : r ; "#-%&#+ $#();!,<*#+ !'/#$#+ #5#,&+!'%-5" #+2*# #1001175454 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/11/2011 16:08 CST t E^D E^: t D s ^ ^ t W ^ / D t ^ D t D ^ ^ t K ^ t tDZE, t Z t > t & & Dd s/d> hd/KE E dZ/E/E' &KZ ^hZ &hdhZ & ^ : r rf & ^ rn& ^ : t bf b & t n DW^^ & ^ : n& ^ : f rr ^ ^ ^^ t f n rr ^ > f & ^ : n b r DW^^ rbr b rns tttn n rbr rbr b rb r r rb r r^K r b rn & tttn n rb or call #1001158581 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/14/2011 15:06 CST 44 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW Navy Personnel Active Duty: 326,524 Officers: 53,263 Enlisted: 268,717 Midshipmen: 4,544 Ready Reserve: 102,849 [As of 11 Aug 2011 ] Selected Reserves: 65,117 Individual Ready Reserve: 37,732 Reserves currently mobilized: 4,719 [As of 27 Sep 2011] Personnel on deployment: 43,661 Navy Department Civilian Employees: 204,103 Ships and Submarines Deployable Battle Force Ships: 284 Ships Underway (away from homeport): 151 ships (53% of total) On deployment: 112 ships (39% of total) Attack submarines underway (away from homeport): 25 subs (46%) On deployment: 17 subs (31%) Ships Underway Aircraft Carriers: USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) Pacific Ocean USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Pacific Ocean USS George Washington (CVN 73) 7th Fleet USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) 5th Fleet USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) 5th Fleet Amphibious Assault Ships: USS Wasp (LHD 1) Atlantic Ocean USS Essex (LHD 2) Pacific Ocean USS Bataan (LHD 5) 5th Fleet USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) port visit San Francisco USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) Atlantic Ocean USS Makin Island (LHD 8) Pacific Ocean Amphibious Command Ships: USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20) port visit Rijeka, Croatia Aircraft (operational): 3700+ www.navy.mil Status of the Navy as of October 7, 2011

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Homes start at low $100s 7 COMMUNITIES IN NORTHEAST FLORIDA www.pulte.com/jacksonville (904) 406-7255 1175748 #1001175748 (4.75col, 4.75in x 2.38in) 10/11/2011 11:56 CST NORTHSIDE 560 SKYMARKS DR. MV-68963 (River City Mktplace) ........................757-6760WESTSIDE 5175 LENOX AVE. MV-58679 (Next to Lowes) ......................................378-9282151 BLANDING BLVD. MV-08262 (1/2 mile S. of Orange Park Mall) .................................276-20139440 ATLANTIC BLVD. MV-26275 (Across from Regency Square Mall) .........................724-09451509 COUNTY RD. 220 MV-52467 (Eagle Harbor, next to Wal-Mart) .............................682-0017 13840 BEACH BLVD. MV-63147 (1/2 mile East of Hodges) ............................................821-0982SOUTHSIDE 8080 PHILIPS HWY MV-63057 (At Baymeadows, next to Lowes) ........636-7576MIDDLEBURG 1567 BRANAN FIELD RD. MV-80820 ...........................................589-9874MUST PRESENT COUPON. ONLINE OR MAIL-IN REBATE. CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. VALID 10/27 THRU 11/15/11. PROMO CODE: 87999The Discount Tire Company Prepaid Card is issued by MetaBank, Sioux Falls, SD pursuant to a license from Visa U.S.A. Inc. STATE OR LOCAL TAXES AND, WHERE REQUIRED OR CHARGED, STATE ENVIRONMENTAL OR DISPOSAL FEES ARE EXTRA.MONDAYFRIDAY: 8:006, SATURDAY: 8:005 VISA PREPAID CARD WHEN YOU PURCHASE ANY SET OF 4 BFGoodrich TIRES INSTALLED! ONLINE OR MAIL-IN REBATE. VALID 10/23 THROUGH 11/5/11. THE DISCOUNT TIRE COMPANY PREPAID CARD IS ISSUED BY METABANK, SIOUX FALLS, SD PURSUANT TO A LICENSE FROM VISA U.S.A. INC. VISA PREPAID CARD $25 OFF A PURCHASE OF $250 OR MORE $50 OFF A PURCHASE OF $500 OR MORE $100 OFF A PURCHASE OF $1000 OR MORE UP TOGREAT SAVINGS COUPON 1164829 #1001164829 (4.75col, 4.75in x 10.25in) 10/11/2011 09:36 CST 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 45 U.S. Navy photos (Above) USS Birmingham (Scout Cruiser No 2) steams downriver from the Norfolk Navy Yard, Va with the Curtiss Pusher airplane of Eugene Ely on board Ely made his historic first-flight later that afternoon Ely also became the first person to land on a U S Navy ship when he landed on USS Pennsylvania Jan 18, 1911, in San Francisco Bay (Below) First airplane flight from a warship

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Event Dates: Oct 21st 30th In Orange Park/Jacksonville WWW.GENERALRV.COM HOURS: MON-FRI 9-6 SAT 9-5, SUN.12-5 RV AUCTION SALE! $50 MILLION DOLLARS WORTH OF RVs WILL BE AUCTIONED OFF! PAY WHAT YOU WANT TO PAY ON THE RV OF YOUR DREAMS! You can SAVE THOUSANDS when you make a bid on the RV of your choice! Or you can purchase at the BUY IT NOW price. Many RVs will be sacriced regardless of cost. Sorry, no wholesalers allowed. Shop Early! Units Change Out Daily! EVENT DATES: OCT 21st 30th 1577 Wells Rd., Orange Park, FL 32073 | ootPMM'SFFoo1175499 Going Once... Going Twice. Gone!NEW AUTUMN RIDGE 278BH NEW 2012 COACHMEN FREELANDER 21QBCOR SUBMIT YOUR BID!OR SUBMIT YOUR BID!#84741, OVERSIZE BUNK BEDS, SLEEPS 8, WALKAROUND QUEEN BED, ONLY 4,750 LBS. LIST PRICE $18,771 QUEEN BED, POWER AWNING, GENERATOR, LCD TV & MORE! STK #87836 LIST PRICE $67,843 BUY IT NOW FOR: $12,997 $119/MO PAYMENTBUY IT NOW FOR: $49,989 $337/MO PAYMENT AFTER REBATE AFTER REBATE #1001175499 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/11/2011 11:06 CST AAA Has You Covered!While youre protecting our country, were protecting your family.Insurance Auto, Health, Home and Life. Emergency Road Service Enjoy 24-hour protection as a driver or passenger in any car throughout the U.S. and Canada. Travel Exclusive discounts, amenities and great rates to anywhere in the world. Exclusive AAA Discounts Dining, Shopping, Hotels, Entertainment and more at over 160,000 locations. International Driving Permits, Free Of ce Services and much more! Proudly serving members of the U.S. Military. Call or visit your local AAA of ce today:Jacksonville904-565-7722or visit online at AAA.com/JacksonvilleOrange Park904-272-2010or visit online at AAA.com/OrangePark #1001153204 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/30/2011 09:12 CST 46 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW Philadelphia, the Continental Congress voted to fit out two sailing vessels, armed with ten carriage guns, as well as swiv el guns, and manned by crews of eighty, and to send them out on a cruise of three months to intercept transports carrying munitions and stores to the British army in America. This was the original legisla tion out of which the Continental Navy grew and as such constitutes the birth cer tificate of the navy. To understand the momentous signifi cance of the decision to send two armed vessels to sea under the authority of the Continental Congress, we need to review the strategic situation in which it was made and to consider the political strug gle that lay behind it. Americans first took up arms in the tionship with the king, but to defend their rights within the British Empire. Georgia were in open rebellion. Royal governments had been thrust out of many colonial capitals and revolutionary governments put in their places. The Continental Congress had assumed some of the responsibilities of a central government for the colonies, created a Continental Army, issued paper money for the support of the troops, and formed a committee to negotiate with foreign countries. Continental forces captured Fort Ticonderoga on Lake Champlain and launched an invasion of Canada. riority at sea, from which they threat ened to stop up the colonies trade and to wreak destruction on seaside settle ments. In response a few of the states had commissioned small fleets of their own for defense of local waters. Congress had not yet authorized privateering. Some in Congress worried about pushing the armed struggle too far, hoping that recon ciliation with the mother country was still possible. Yet, a small coterie of men in Congress had been advocating a Continental Navy from the outset of armed hostili ties. Foremost among these men was John Adams, of Massachusetts. For months, he and a few others had been agitating in Congress for the establishment of an American fleet. They argued that a fleet would defend the seacoast towns, protect vital trade, retaliate against British raiders, and make it possible to seek out among neutral nations of the world the arms and stores that would make resistance possible. The Birth of the United States Navy USS Constitution, the world's oldest commissioned warship afloat, displays all her flags and pennants in recognition of the Navy's 235th birthday on Oct. 13, 2010, in Charlestown, Mass. Photo by Seaman Shannon S. Heavin See NAVY, Page 47

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#1001175456 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/11/2011 11:49 CST Master of Business Administration (MBA) Master of Health Administration (MHA) Master of Arts (MA): Counseling Human Resources Development Human Resources Management Information Technology Management Management and Leadership Master of Science (MS): Finance GRADUATE PROGRAMS FOR ADULTSUse your G.I. BillNo GRE/GMAT Exam (in most cases) &WFOJOHBOEXFFLFOEDMBTTFTr$MBTTFTUBVHIU by faculty that are professionals JOUIFJSFMEr&BSOZPVSEFHSFFJOBT MJUUMFBTNPOUITr Call today Online programs: webster.edu/online webster.edu/jacksonville Navy College Ofce-Building 110 Jacksonville, FL 32212 Linda Schindler, Academic Advisor lschind@webster.edu (904) 779-71241165651 We Support Our Troops 10407 Centurion Parkway N. Suite 210, Jacksonville, FL 32256 Rita Braunegg, Academic Advisor braunegg@webster.edu (904) 268-3037 #1001165651 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/12/2011 09:13 CST 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 47 Still, the establishment of a navy seemed too bold a move for some of the timid men in Congress. Some southerners agreed that a fleet would protect and secure the trade of New England but denied that it would that of the southern colonies. Most of the delegates did not consider the break with England as final and feared that a navy implied sovereignty and independence. Others thought a navy a hasty and foolish challenge to the mightiest fleet the world had seen. The most the pro-navy men could do was to get Congress to urge each colony to fit out armed vessels for the protection of their coasts and harbors. Then, on Oct. 3, Rhode Islands delegates laid before Congress a bold resolution for the build ing and equipping of an American fleet, as soon as possible. When the motion came to the floor for debate, Samuel Chase, of Maryland, attacked it, say ing it was the maddest Idea in the World to think of building an American Fleet. Even pro-navy mem bers found the proposal too vague. It lacked specifics and no one could tell how much it would cost. If Congress was yet unwilling to embrace the idea of establishing a navy as a permanent measure, it could be tempted by short-term opportunities. Fortuitously, on Oct. 5, Congress received intel ligence of two English brigs, unarmed and with out convoy, laden with munitions, leaving England bound for Quebec. Congress immediately appointed a committee to consider how to take advantage of this opportunity. Its members were all New Englanders and all ardent supporters of a navy. They recommended first that the governments of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut be asked to dispatch armed vessels to lay in wait to intercept the munitions ships; next they outlined a plan for the equipping by Congress of two armed vessels to cruise to the eastward to intercept any ships bearing supplies to the British army. Congress let this plan lie on the table until Oct. 13, when another fortuitous event occurred in favor of the naval movement. A letter from General Washington was read in Congress in which he reported that he had taken under his command, at Continental expense, three schooners to cruise off Massachusetts to inter cept enemy supply ships. The commander in chief had preempted members of Congress reluctant to take the first step of fitting out warships under Continental authority. Since they already had armed vessels cruising in their name, it was not such a big step to approve two more. The committees pro posal, now appearing eminently reasonable to the reluctant members, was adopted. The Continental Navy grew into an important force. Within a few days, Congress established a Naval Committee charged with equipping a fleet. This committee directed the purchasing, outfit ting, manning, and operations of the first ships of the new navy, drafted subsequent naval legislation, and prepared rules and regulations to govern the Continental Navys conduct and internal adminis tration. Over the course of the War of Independence, the Continental Navy sent to sea more than 50 armed vessels of various types. The navys squadrons and cruisers seized enemy supplies and carried corre spondence and diplomats to Europe, returning with needed munitions. They took nearly 200 British ves sels as prizes, some off the British Isles themselves, contributing to the demoralization of the enemy and forcing the British to divert warships to protect convoys and trade routes. In addition, the navy pro voked diplomatic crises that helped bring France into the war against Great Britain. The Continental Navy began the proud tradition carried on today by our United States Navy, and whose birthday we cel ebrate each year in October. This article and more can be found on the Naval Historical Center Web site (www.history.navy.mil). NAVY: 236 years of service to her country From Page 46

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See Our Military Specials Atwww.nimnichtchevy.com(904) 638-7986CHEVROLET Supporting our Troops for over years...70 GM Military Discount Retirees Included!! #1001168524 (3col, 5in x 5in) 10/11/2011 11:00 CST A Special Salute To Our Advertisers! ank you for your support of this tribute to the Centennial of Naval Aviation and to Military and aerobatic excellence! 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 49 Front view of a PBY-2 on the seaplane ramp at NAS Jacksonville. These PBYs were replaced with the PBY-5 in 1943 This picture was taken on Jan 8, 1942 Photo courtesy of Ron Williamson

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&$" %#' rfrnftbn!"rf rf ntb%!$"% %#'" &!%' rffnttb #1001160668 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/15/2011 14:44 CST LIGHTNING FAST. LIGHTNING STRONG. LTE is a trademark of ETSI. 1162743 #1001162743 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/20/2011 18:42 CST 50 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW Photo by MC3 Andrew Ryan Smith Col. Andrew MacMannis, commanding officer of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (31st MEU), cuts a cake during a ceremony commemorating the 235th Marine Corps birthday on Nov. 10, 2010, aboard the forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2). All U.S. Marines are gung-ho. But, few can match the vision and total commitment of the famous 13th Commandant, Gen. John A. Lejeune. In 1921, he Gen. Lejeunes order sum-marized the history, mis sion, and tradition of the Corps. It further directed that the order be read to all Marines on Nov. 10 of each year to honor the founding of the Marine Corps. Thereafter, Nov. 10 became a unique day for U.S. Marines throughout the world. Soon, some Marine commands began to not only honor the birthday, but celebrate it. In 1923, the Marine Barracks at Fort Mifflin, Pa., staged a formal dance. The Marines at the Washington Navy Yard arranged a mock battle on the parade ground. At Quantanamo Bay, Cuba, the Marine baseball team The first formal Birthday Ball took place on Philadelphia in 1925. First class Marine Corps style, all the way! Guests included the Commandant, the Secretary of War (in 1925 the term politically correct Celebrating Marine Corps 236th Birthday See MARINE CORPS, Page 51

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1162745 #1001162745 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/20/2011 12:21 CST 52 Minutes of CLASSIC HITS Every Hour! PLUS 80 Minutes of Commercial Free Music at 8 a.m. Every Weekday! Jacksonvilles Classic Hits 1162746 #1001162746 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/20/2011 12:24 CST 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 51 didnt exist; it was Secretary of War, not Secretary of Defense), and a host of statesmen and elected officials. Prior to the ball, Gen. Lejeune unveiled a memo rial plaque at Tun Tavern. Then the entourage headed for the Benjamin Franklin Hotel and an evening of festivities and frolick ing. Over the years, the annual Birthday Ball grew and grew, tak ing on a life of its own. In 1952, the Commandant, Gen. Lemuel C. Shepherd Jr. formalized the cake-cutting ceremony and other traditional observances. For example, Marine Corps policy now mandates that the first piece of cake must be pre sented to the oldest U.S. Marine present. The second piece goes to the youngest Marine. Among the many such mandates is a solemn reading of the Commandants birthday message to the Corps. Like the U.S. Marine Corps itself, the annual Birthday Ball has evolved from simple origins to the polished and professional functions of today. Nonetheless, one thing remains constant, the 10th day of November! This unique holiday for warriors is a day of camara derie, a day to honor Corps and Country. Throughout the world on Nov. 10, U.S. Marines celebrate the birth of their Corps the most loyal, most feared, most revered, and most professional fighting force the world has ever known. This is a excerpt from Warrior Culture of the U.S. Marines, copy right 2001 Marion F. Sturkey. It was found on usmcpress.com. MARINE CORPS: Celebrating 236 years of service From Page 50

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52 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW Photo by MC1 Michelle Lucht The Navys next generation long-range anti-submarine warfare and maritime patrol aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon, lands at NAS Jacksonville on April 4, during the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Centennial of Naval Aviation events. Description frame and high-bypass turbo-fan jet engine with a fully connected, state-of-the-art open architecture mission system. This combination, coupled with next-generation sensors, will dramatically improve anti-submarine warfare (ASW), and anti-surface warfare (ASuW) capabilities. Features rable and expandable system facilitating easier, more affordable upgrades. sensor system, inverse synthetic aperture/synthetic aperture radar, new electronic support measures system, new electro-optical/infrared sensor, digital magnetic anomaly detector. sion crew (plus relief pilot and in-flight technician). Workstations with universal multi-function dis plays, ready accommodation for additional worksta tion, workload sharing. wing pylons, two centerline pylons, all supported by digital stores management allowing for carriage of joint missiles, torpedoes and mines. Search stores: rotary reloadable, pneumatically controlled sono buoy launcher. Common Data Link (CDL), FORCEnet compliant. ability a key performance parameter. Background The Navys replacement platform for the P-3C Navys future in long-range maritime patrol capa bility, while transforming how the Navys maritime patrol and reconnaissance force will man, train, operate and deploy. from a smaller force and less infrastructure while focusing on worldwide responsiveness and interop erability with traditional manned forces and evolv ing unmanned sensors. Boeing was awarded the contract to develop the together a reliable airframe and high-bypass turbo fan jet engine with a fully connected, state-of-theart open architecture mission system. will dramatically improve antisubmarine and gram went through a preliminary design review in be delivered for flight test in 2009, with IOC planned for 2013. General Characteristics Primary Function: Anti-Submarine and Antisurface Warfare. Contractor: Boeing IDS Date Deployed: First squadron is planned for 2013. Propulsion: Two high-bypass CFM56 turbofan engines Length: Height: Wingspan: Weight: Airspeed: 490 knots. Ceiling: 41,000 feet Range: 1,200 nautical miles radius with four hours on station. Crew: Nine. Armament: Torpedoes, cruise missiles, bombs, mines P-8A Multi-mission Maritime Aircraft (MMA)

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For employment opportunities visit www.AdvanceAutoParts.jobs Proud to offer a 10% discount to all active duty and retired military personnel. Please show military ID or be in uniform. Discount available on regular priced items only.1174101 #1001174101 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/10/2011 17:37 CST Theres never been a better time to buy a Lennar home. For more information, call 904.380.0774 or visit LennarJXF.com.Buy before November 30 and get the LOWEST MONTHLY PAYMENTS EVER when you purchase a Lennar home in the Jacksonville area at an Everythings Included price.FIND A GREAT PLACE TO BE STATIONED thats real close to where youre stationed.1175508 #1001175508 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/05/2011 18:11 CST #1001161768 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/19/2011 08:59 CST 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 53 Photo courtesy of Ron Williamson An F2H-2P Banshee of Photo Squadron VC-62 climbs into the skies The aircraft left NAS Jacksonville on Jan 21, 1953

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www.nova.edu/jax 904-245-8910 Come discover Nova Southeastern University at one of our Jacksonville Information Meetings to learn more about graduate and undergraduate degree programs in elds like Business, Education, Counseling, Health Science, Physician Assistant and more.Tuesday, November 8, 2011, 6:00pm Saturday, November 12, 2011, 9:30am Tuesday, January 17, 2012, 6:00pm Saturday, January 21, 2012, 9:30am Tuesday, March 6, 2012, 6:00pm Saturday, March 10, 2012, 9:30am Tuesday, May 1, 2012, 6:00pm Saturday, May 5, 2012, 9:30am 1158214 #1001158214 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/14/2011 18:03 CST Jacksonvilles New #1 For Country Steve & Eden Weekday Mornings 5:30 10:00 a.m. 1160660 #1001160660 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/16/2011 05:53 CST 54 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW PBY returns to NAS Jacksonville after a train ing flight with aviation cadets in 1944. The first jets arrived at NAS Jacksonville, June 9, 1948. These F2H1 Phantoms brought out many of the station personnel. Photos courtesy of Ron Williamson PBY Catalinas on the sea plane ramp in October 1945 There were 100 Catalinas assigned to NAS Jacksonville. A-4 Skyhawks returning to NAS Jacksonville, 1970s.

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Get a quote for a brighter future.Together, we can make a difference.Elna Crittenden Coble (904) 771-14046011-8 103rd Street Jacksonville elnacoble@allstate.comGET A QUOTE & ILL DONATE $5Saluting 100 Years of Naval Aviation! As a local Allstate Agent, Im proud to support The Wounded Warrior Project. And now, its easy for you to help too. Call or stop by for a free insurance quote and Ill donate $5* to The Wounded Warrior Project. *No purchase or use of goods or services necessary for donation fulfillment. Maximum donation of $1,000. Limited to one (1) donation per household. Ends 12/31/2011. Insurance subject to terms, qualifications and availability. Allstate Fire And Casualty Insurance Company: Northbrook, IL. 2011 Allstate Insurance Company 1177117 #1001177117 (9.75col, 9.75in x 10.25in) 10/11/2011 11:35 CST 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW | 55

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rfntbb rffnt brfntbb rff rff !"#"$%& rfntbb %&trfntbb rfntnfr'("rfntbb rff rfrnrtbrf rrfrrrf #1001162707 (9.75col, 9.75in x 10.25in) 09/20/2011 12:25 CST 56 | 2011 NAS JAX AIR SHOW



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2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 1 Published by

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YOUVE DEFENDED YOUR COUNTRYNOW HONOR YOUR PASSION DESIGN MEDIA ARTS FASHION CULINARYCREATIVE CLASSES START JANUARY 9, 2012If you want to put your creativity to work, an education at The Art Institute of Jacksonville can help you earn the skills you need to become a creative professional. And if eligible, your military benets can help make it possible.Visit our website or call us for details."SU*OTUJUVUFTFEV+BDLTPOWJMMFt CREATE TOMORROW #BZQJOFPBE +BDLTPOWJMMF'-The Art Institute of Jacksonville is a branch of Miami International University of Art & DesignSee AiPrograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info. 1156471 #1001156471 (9.75col, 9.75in x 10.25in) 10/03/2011 16:12 CST 2 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW

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2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 3 2011 NAS JACKSONVILLE CENTENNIAL OF NAVAL AVIATION AIR SHOW On behalf of all the men and women of NAS Jacksonville, it is my distinct pleasure to welcome you to our 2011 NAS Jacksonville Centennial of Naval Aviation Air Show. As we commemorate the past 100 years of progress and achievement in Naval Aviation, we are particularly grateful for our long and cherished friendships with local communities, regions, and global neighbors. This event allows us to express our appreciation and gratitude to the First Coast community for your tremendous support of our Navy men and women, and their families throughout the year. The NAS Jacksonville Air Show offers an excellent opportunity for you to get a close-up look at some of the people, hardware and capabilities of the most powerful and humanitarian military in the world. Much of what you see has been on the front lines defending freedom. As you watch these aircraft perform, I ask that you also remember that many of our military personnel are currently deployed around the world, protecting the freedoms we all enjoy. I encourage you to take the opportunity to tour the flight line static displays and see first-hand the wide variety of military aircraft and hardware represented this year. In addition, youll see internationally renowned civilian aviators perform breathtaking aerial acrobatics for your viewing pleasure in the skies over NAS Jacksonville. I sincerely hope you enjoy the 2011 NAS Jacksonville Air Show and take advantage of the opportunity to experience the sights and sounds of freedom. This is a tradition that dates back to August 1945 and celebrates the unity and close friendships between our community and the U.S. Navy. Thank you for your continued support and enjoy this event! J D. MACLAY Ca ptain, U.S. Navy C ommanding Officer 25 September 2011

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4 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW R S G OFFICE OF THE MAYOR Lucy C. Talley (904) 359-4349 Publisher lucy.talley@jacksonville.com ALVIN BROWN r f ntr, b (f) November 4, 2011 Dear Friends: It is a pleasure to welcome you to the 2011 Naval Air Station Jacksonville Air Show in Jacksonville, Florida, birthplace of the Blue Angels. The 2011 Naval Air Station Jacksonville Air Show is an essential part of a yearlong celebration of 100 years of Naval Aviation honoring a century of mission-ready men and women. Honoring the 100th anniversary of Naval Aviation underscores the commitment to sustaining a Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard that wins wars, protects the home front and enables peace. Our air forces are strong because of the support of our service members, their families and the American public. By honoring Naval Aviation, we honor our country and assure America and our allies that their security is guaranteed by a strong Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard Team. Best wishes for a successful event as the Blue Angels soar the skies in Celebration of 100 Years of Naval Aviation S incerely, R ick Scott G overnor THE CAPITOL October 2011 Dear Friends and Neighbors, On behalf of the staff of The Florida Times-Union and jacksonville. com, I welcome you to the 2011 NAS Jax Air Show. The Blue Angels have been a role model since their formation in 1946 and a symbol of the spirit and readiness of the United States Navy. It is a great honor to support this spectacular aerobatic demonstration. We have been a long-standing partner with the U. S. Navy to bring our military community the latest news and information via The Florida Times-Union and jacksonville.com, Jax Air News, The Mirror (Mayport) and The Periscope (Kings Bay). We consider it a privilege to work with the U.S. Navy and take great pride in our relationship with them now and in the future. We hope you enjoy this thrilling event, which celebrates, in part, the relationship between the citizens of the First Coast and the United States Navy. Our sincere thanks to all military personnel, both at home and overseas, who are diligently protecting our precious freedom. S incerely, L ucy C. Talley ONE RIVERSIDE AVENUE (32202) P.O. BOX 1949 JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 32231 (904) 359-4349 FAX (904) 359-4400lucy.talley@jacksonville.com November 2011 Dear Friends: Welcome to the 2011 NAS Jax Air Show. Jacksonville is honored to host this traditional event highlighting the skill and contributions of Naval aviators, including our own world-renowned Blue Angels, the Navys premier precision flying squadron. This year, as we enjoy a Celebration of 100 Years of Naval Aviation, I encourage you to remember the well-trained, talented pilots and additional military personnel, who are stationed around the world protecting our great nation. The awe-inspiring maneuvers you will witness at this event are just a sample of the expert skills our military possesses. Jacksonville is proud to be a military town and to be home to hundreds of thousands of active and retired military and their families. These men and women in uniform sacrifice so much to ensure our freedom and safety, and we all owe them a debt of gratitude. Again, welcome to the air show. Enjoy the celebration! S incerely, A lvin Brown M ayor

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Since opening our doors in 1952 at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, VyStar has been privileged to serve the men and women of the armed forces as they serve our country. Thats why today, on this very exciting day, we are especially proud to be an Ofcial Sponsor of the 2011 NAS Jax Air Show. And VyStar Membership is open to all residents of Northeast Florida, so you dont have to be a Top Gun to benet from the kind of nancial services that top the industry.Congratulations on 100 Years Of Excellence And Heroism.sWWWVYSTARCUORG SERVING ALL RESIDENTS OF NORTHEAST FLORIDA JOIN TODAY We never forget that its your money. #1001160304 (9.75col, 9.75in x 10.25in) 10/11/2011 12:01 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 5

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6 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW CO Letter ............................................................ 3 Letters (Governor, Mayor, Publisher) .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 4 Table of Contents/About This Section .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 6 Air Show Map ........................................................ 8 Air Show History .................................................. 9, 14 Air Force Heritage Flight .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . 10 Rob Reider .......................................................... 11 Air Show Prep .................................................... 12-13 Blue Angels Veteran Pilot Al Taddeo ................................... 16 Event Schedule ...................................................... 18 Matt Chapman .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 The Black Daggers ................................................... 20 Mike Goulian ........................................................ 22 The Horsemen .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Skip Stewart ........................................................ 26 Aircraft at NAS Jacksonville Through The Years ..................... 28-29 Blue Angels (History, FAQ, Team Bios) .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 30-39 Fat Albert ........................................................ 40-41 Patty Wagstaff ...................................................... 42 Kent Shockley & Shockwave .......................................... 43 Status of the Navy ................................................... 44 Birth of the Navy ................................................. 46-47 Celebrating Marines 236th Birthday .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 50-51 P-8A Poseidon ....................................................... 52About This SectionThe 2011 NAS Jacksonville Air Show Program is a special advertising section produced by the Specialty Publications and Military Publications departments of The Florida Times-Union. The section was coordinated and edited by Military Publications Publisher Ellen Rykert and Specialty Publications Director Joe DeSalvo. The section was designed by Military Publications designer George Atchley. Peter Mackey, Specialty Publications designer, created the cover. Advertising was coordinated by Military Publications Sales Manager Tom Castle. Material, information and photographs used in this section was provided by The Blue Angels, Naval Air Station Jacksonville, the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps and the aerobatic teams, unless otherwise credited. A special thank you to Ron WIlliamson, NAS Jacksonville historian, for his generosity of time and resources. Table of Contents A Naval Air Transport Service crew captain holds one hand in the air to engage the port motor for starting on the flight line at NAS Jacksonville in 1942 .. An N2S is in the background .. Photos courtesy of Ron Williamson F6F Hellcat with World War II camouflage color scheme .. When viewed from above it is supposed to appear the color of the sea, and when viewed from below, it is supposed to appear the color of the sky .. The first jet a Phantom to be reworked at the stations Overhaul and Repair Shop (now Fleet Readiness Center South east), arrives in July 1949 .. A F-9 Cougar landing at NAS Jacksonville, 1953 .. This HUP-1 was the first rescue helicopter as signed to NAS Jacksonville .. Picture circa 1952 .. A Skyraider from Attack Squadron Fifteen (VA-15) catches a wire during carrier operations .. An SH-3H Sea King operates from NAS Jacksonville ..

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8 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW

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#1001162741 (9.75col, 9.75in x 5in) 09/22/2011 16:38 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 9 By Ron WilliamsonBase Safety Officer/Command HistorianAir shows have been a large part of the aviation history of Jacksonville and for the Navy. Probably the first display and Curtiss Hydroaeroplanes based at the station with the Earl Dodge aviation training camp, flew over Jacksonville to celebrate the end of World War I. The very first air show held on the site was actually dur ing the early 1930s, while under the control of the Florida National Guard. The highlight of the show was an aircraft loop, one that shocked the crowd! The first Navy show was held on the occasion of the stations fifth anniversary on Oct. 15, 1945. World War II had just ended and the station threw open the gates so the citizens of Jacksonville could see the air craft that helped win the war. Vice Adm. Marc Mitscher was the principle speaker at the ceremonies for the fifth anniversary and special invited guest for the air show. This was the only show held at the station in which the Blue Angles would not perform, as they had not yet been formed. But NAS Jacksonville remains one of only three locations in which the Blue Angels have flown shows in every type of aircraft the team has used. Air shows were held at the station with regularity until Theres history behind the NAS Jax Air Show Photo by Clark Pierce The Blue Angels practice a five-plane formation over NAS Jacksonville a few days before the 2010 NAS Jax Air Show .. See HISTORY, Page 14

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10 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW Photo by MC2 Ron Trevino During the Air Force Heritage Flight at the 2010 NAS Jax Air Show, an F-16 Fighting Falcon splits off to the left and an F-4 Phantom splits to the right, as an A-10 Thunderbolt II and a P-51 Mustang maintain formation .. The Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation (AFHFF) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that was formed on December 6, 2010, with the primary charitable mission of providing Heritage Flights to the public. These performances feature modern fighter/ attack aircraft flying alongside World War II, Korea and Vietnam-era aircraft in a dramatic display of our nations air power history. Our formations serve as a living memorial to the men and women who have served or are current ly serving in the U.S. Air Force and we proudly fly in support of USAF recruiting and retention efforts.Our performancesMission Provide and safely orchestrate 4060 Heritage Flight performances annually. Offer a living museum of, and aerial monument to, U.S. Air Force history. Celebrate and honor the sacrifice of those cur rently serving, as well as the sacrifices of war heroes of the past. Educate current and future generations on the long-term importance of the USAF. Strengthen and enhance Air Force recruiting and retention efforts.Who We Are2011 Civilian Heritage Flight Pilots Greg Anders Jim Beasley, Jr. Kevin Eldridge Dan Friedkin Tom Gregory, III Steve Hinton Lee Lauderback Vlado Lenoch Dale Snodgrass ACC Fighter/Attack Aircraft A-10 East and West F-16 East and West F-15E Team F-22 Team F-4 East and WestWhat We DoThe Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation cel ebrates U.S. air power history by providing 4060 annual Heritage Flight (HF) demonstrations around the world. Heritage Flights are flown at events, ranging from open houses and air shows to sporting events, parades and funerals. program has supported hundreds of events and touched millions of people. The HF team currently consists of nine civilian pilots qualified to fly vin tage warbirds in formation with modern USAF sin gle-ship demonstration teams and F-4 pilots. Heritage Flights seek to honor the contributions of every man and woman who has served in the USAF while educating the general public on the impor tance of the USAF and its mission.For more information on the Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation and the Heritage Flight program, e-mail info@airforceheritageflight.org.Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation

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MORE BOXES CHECKED OFF THE BUCKET LIST.)$$%"o !"$("$#"#"&rfo o r"$r"n#"$"r"n#o t$$%"o !"$(rbo tt$ro !#o $""n#"$!"o !"$(o t$""#!$&o '"# bb MORE WAYS TO SEARCH. MORE WAYS TO FIND.Scuba Diving Certication. One of the many things you can nd with The Real Yellow Pages, YP.com and YP.com on your mobile. Only from AT&T. AT&T Advertising Solutions is proud to support the NAS Jacksonville Air Show! #1001160306 (4.75col, 4.75in x 10.25in) 09/14/2011 17:02 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 11Rob Reider air show announcer, recipient of the coveted ICAS Sword of Excellence, entertainer, pilot, Midwest television personality, singer, performer, writer, and winner of five Emmy awards has put all his expe rience into bringing the excitement of air shows up close and personal to audiences all over the country. 2011 marks Robs 33rd year as an announcer and his sixth as a full-time air show announcer. Hes done 113 in the last five years, hes excited about the upcoming season. At the International Council convention in Las Vegas, Rob became the 34th recipient of the ICAS Sword of Excellence, the highest award an air show profession al can receive. Hes recognized by pilots around the country as the on-camera host for Sportys Pilot Shops pilot training vid eos. All of his entertainment, show busi ness, video, and aviation experience have given him the ability to commu nicate the excitement of air shows to the audience. Ive never gotten over just how amazing air show performers are, Rob says. Narrating a show is a won derful opportunity to try to put an audience into the cockpit. Besides, when Im announcing, I have the best seat in the house! While still a college student in Cincinnati, Rob began work as a sing er and co-host of a live, daily talk-vari ety show that was broadcast in four cities in the Midwest. During his 13-year career there, he won five Emmy awards for his on-air performance and musical composi tions. Over the years, he appeared as a soloist with the famed Cincinnati Pops Orchestra and has sung both The Star Spangled Banner and O Canada for many air shows and major league baseball games. to the Dayton Air Show and he immediately became a volun teer. By 1990, Rob was the color announcer, working with award-winning announcers Bill Bordeleau and Danny Clisham. He learned from the best in the business. Rob began to work on the air show circuit and has been a member of ICAS for 15 years. ICAS has also rec ognized his talent by asking him to be the master of ceremonies for the final night convention Chairmans Banquet for 10 of the last 11 years. Robs 2011 schedule will take him to 23 shows, making him one of the busi est and most sought-after announcers in North America. Rob owns and operates the Brightsides Studio, a fully digital facil ity producing music and narration tracks, air show commercials, and air show performers. He can also do voice-overs and full production com mercials for your air show. Its been said of Rob Reider, Hes excited and supercharged! Hes a per former with the unique ability to meet an audience where they are, touch their hearts, make them laugh, make them cry, and leave them with a feel ing that they have been totally enter tained. Hell do it at NAS Jacksonville, too. Meet Rob Reider, the Voice of the Air Show www .. robreider .. c om

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12 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW Solid lineup takes plenty of teamworkBy Clark PierceJax Air News EditorTwo spectacular days of high-flying entertainment for hundreds of thou sands of spectators involves more than a year of detailed planning. From those who schedule the performers to those who direct traffic and clean up after each days events there are hundreds of tasks that must be coor dinated and executed to ensure a suc cessful event. The 2011 NAS Jacksonville Air Show will be held Nov. 5-6. The performers rehearsal day is Nov. 4 and is not open to the public. This year, as in past years, we will honor NAS Jacksonvilles distinct heritage as The Birthplace of the Blue Angels. In addition, we are celebrating the Centennial of Naval Aviation and concentrating on bringing more naval aircraft to the show. Our guest of honor is retired Navy Cmdr. Al Taddeo, a pilot on the first Blue Angels team that performed its inaugural show at Craig Field, on June 15, 1946, flying the Grumman F6F Hellcat. To put on such an event, every min ute detail must be coordinated. The Air Show Planning Team is comprised of 15 different committees with the common goal of producing a safe and professional family event that will promote a positive relationship with the surrounding community. We will highlight the pride and profes sionalism of our Sailors, Marines and civilian teammates, as well as that of our sister services and allies, while simultaneously providing a recruiting opportunity for al the services, explained NAS Jacksonville Assistant Operations Officer and Air Show Coordinator Lt. Cmdr. Bob Strange. We are fortunate to have assembled one of the strongest performer lineups that the NAS Jacksonville Air Show has ever had. Through the outstanding efforts of our MWR Department, and the superb coordination of several of the Operations Department offi cers, chiefs and Sailors, the 2011 show will showcase some of the best civil ian performers in the industry today, added Strange. And the military line up features the best flight demonstra tion team in the world the U.S. Navy Blue Angels, as well as tactical dem onstrations by Navy and Air Force air crews and the U.S. Army Special Ops Command jump team. In the fall of 2010, decisions were being made by the air show commit tee on which aircraft and acts to book for the show. When confirmed, rooms are blocked off in the visiting quarters on base for the performers and the departmental responsibility list is set into motion. This past December, key mem bers from Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department (MWR) and Air Operations Department (Air Ops) represented NAS Jacksonville, at the International Council of Air Shows (ICAS). The four-day convention is where top-level performers, such as the Blue Angels, are booked. ICAS is also where MWR books the civilian performers and Air Ops schedules the military performers and static dis plays. ICAS is a way for NAS Jax air show planners to evaluate and solicit acts, and find creative ways to advertise for our sponsors. We want a variety of planes and performers from both the military and civilian arenas that appeals to the widest possible audi ence, said MWR Operations Director Mike McCool. MWR Marketing Manager Shannon Leonard designs sponsorship pack ages and coordinates the marketing of the air show. Signing up corporate sponsors is a big role for MWR. I contact broadcast media outlets, as well as corporations and other possible sponsors to pres ent the benefits of associating their organization with the air show, said Leonard. Our sponsors are the rea son we can stage such a great show thats free to the public. Their support is truly appreciated. At monthly air show planning meet ings, each department provides a progress report. From budget prep arations and how to feed volunteers to how traffic and parking will be The making of an air show Photo by Clark Pierce NAS Jax 2011 Air Show Coordinator Lt .. Cmdr .. Bob Strange discusses some of the preparations needed for the upcoming air show with members of the air show committee Sept .. 22 .. Planning for the show begins about a year before the actual show date .. See PREP, Page 13

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ALL MILITARY PERSONNEL ADMITTED FREE Military Day at the FairShow your valid Military ID to receive one free admission ticket at entry gate. #1001179116 (4.75col, 4.75in x 10.25in) 10/11/2011 13:39 CST 2JAXHOME.COM (904) 5370405Marissa ScottREALTOR/ Relocation Specialist #1001175747 (4.75col, 4.75in x 2.38in) 10/06/2011 12:28 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 13directed is discussed. Security, fire and emergency medical personnel must execute a special air show drill to ensure they can handle any urgent situation that may occur. The weeks leading up to the air show get extremely busy, culminat ing with the physical set-up of the air show beginning Monday of show week, said Strange. Static display aircraft will be placed in position. Crowd line fencing, porta ble sanitation units and vendor booths will be set up, and the artificial show line will be painted on the airfield, Strange said. The Blue Angels will arrive on Wednesday and Thursday of show week to conduct key influencer and media flights, circle and arrival maneuvers and a practice flight dem onstration. All other performers, both civilian and military, arrive in time for Fridays practice show. The NAS Jacksonville Police Department manages the safety of guests and performers. Our biggest role in accomplish ing our mission is coordinating joint law-enforcement operations with local agencies to provide force protection measures that have been established to meet numerous air show security requirements. More than nine out side agencies team up with our police department personnel to support the air show, explained Lt. Gary Loth, Base Police Department event coordi nator. He said the department started planning for the event 12 months ago. The main event security tasks are bro ken down into many different groups, including airfield and spectator area protective measures; parking for more than 100,000 VIPs and guests per day; outlying perimeter security group; and the mobile traffic and enforcement units that continuously monitor traffic flow throughout the event weekend. Other duties include police patrol boat operations on the St. Johns River, tor boats anchor near the end of the runway to observe the air show. This requires extensive coordination between the U.S. Coast Guard, local, state and federal marine units. There are also other teams of per sonnel from the base who offer to help. Numerous volunteers are needed each day to clean, check security fencing and make prepare for the next day. Their hard work and labor continues on into Monday morning to ensure that the airfield is completely checked for foreign debris and safe to resume normal military operations at NAS Jacksonville. It takes thousands of people pull ing together to present this event that showcases NAS Jacksonville and the people who work here. Its the Navys way of saying thank you to the local community by giving them an unfor gettable weekend of thrilling aviation excellence.PREP: Year of planning to produce air show From Page 12

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14 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW NAS Cecil Field, which remained the main Jacksonville location until NAS Jacksonvilles 50th Anniversary in 1990. air shows alter nated between NAS Jacksonville and NAS Cecil Field. With the closure of NAS Cecil Field, NAS Jacksonville held three consecutive 2000. In 2001, Jacksonville Beach held their first air show and now alter nates every other year with NAS Jacksonville to host the annual event. Below is a chronology of air shows held at NAS Jacksonville since the installation was com missioned in 1940. HISTORY: Air Shows produced since 1945From Page 9 Photo courtesy of Ron WIlliamson A birds-eye view of the 1952 NAS Jax Air Show .. Date Featured Act(s) Oct. 15, 1945 N one June 7, 1946 Blue Angels ( Private show for Navy officials only) Sept. 29, 1946 B lue Angels Nov. 8, 1948 B lue Angels May 8, 1949 B lue Angels Aug. 29, 1950 B lue Angels ( 30th Anniversary of first trans-Atlantic flight) Dec. 7, 1952 B lue Angels (Pearl Harbor Tribute) Oct. 25, 1959 B lue Angels Oct. 14-16, 1960 B lue Angels (Stations 20th Anniversary) Oct. 15-16, 1961 B lue Angels ( Golden Anniversary of Naval Aviation) Oct. 15, 1963 B lue Angels Nov. 1, 1964 B lue Angels Oct. 15, 1965 B lue Angels (Stations 25th Anniversary) July 11, 1971 B lue Angels Nov. 3-4, 1973 B lue Angels Oct. 13-14, 1990 B lue Angels (Stations 50th Anniversary) Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 1992 B lue Angels Sept. 24-25, 1994 B lue Angels Oct. 26-27, 1996 B lue Angels ( Blue Angels 50th Anniversary) Oct. 24-25, 1998 B lue Angels Nov. 5-7, 1999 B lue Angels Oct. 15-16, 2000 B lue Angels (Stations 60th Anniversary) Nov. 1-2, 2002 B lue Angels Oct. 30-31, 2004 B lue Angels Oct. 28-29, 2006 B lue Angels ( Blue Angels 60th Anniversary) Oct. 25-26, 2008 B lue Angels Oct. 23-24, 2010 B lue Angels (Stations 70th Anniversary) Nov. 5-6, 2011 B lue Angels (Centennial of Naval Aviation) Tentative future show years 2013 2015 ( Stations 75th Anniversary) 2017 2019 2021 ( Blue Angels 75th Anniversary) Seven Navy air shows since the first one in 1945, been dedicated to special VIPs. On Oct. 15, 1960, the second wife of Adm. John Towers was honored, as the airfield was dedicated after her late husband for his contributions to naval aviation. The stations 25th Silver Anniversary Air Show was dedicated to Vice Adm. Robert Goldthwaite, who was in charge of aviation training at NAS Jax from 1941-43 and later served as Commander, Fleet Air Jacksonville from 1962-65. On Oct. 15, 1990, the air show was dedicated to local Congressman Charles Bennett, and Oct. 16, 1990, to Alexander Breast, whose firm in 1943 built a large number of the buildings at the station. Retired Navy Capt. Roy Butch Voris was invited show. Voris was honored for his efforts in forming the Flight Exhibition Team as well as being the first team leader of the named Blue Angels while based at NAS Jacksonville in 1946. On Nov. 2, 2000, Voris was again the special invit ed VIP guest and during his visit, the installations air terminal was dedicated with his name. He con tinued to be the VIP guest for the 2002 and 2004 air shows. Voris passed away in 2005 and he will always be remembered as Boss One. In 2006, retired Navy Cmdr. Raleigh Dusty Rhodes was the featured VIP guest. Rhodes was the third team leader of the Blue Angels while the team was based at NAS Jacksonville. He also led the team move to NAS Corpus Christi, Texas, in October tioned the team into the jet age and he designed the Blue Angels patch which is still used today. was the special VIP guest. Taddeo, the last surviving pilot of the original Blue Angels team, flew the origi nal number three plane when the team flew F6F Hellcats. He had not returned to NAS Jacksonville since being stationed here as a squadron command er in VF-43 in 1954. The 2011 Air Show celebrates The Centennial of Naval Aviation. NAS Jacksonville has played major contributions to naval aviation history, and it is our pleasure once again to invite Al Taddeo and his wife, Joan, as the air show VIP guests for this special anniversary.

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16 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW An original Blue Angel returns to NAS JacksonvilleBy Clark PierceJax Air News EditorAt 92 years and counting, the venerable Al Taddeo is one of the most fascinating naval aviators to ever fly from NAS Jacksonville. Today, the retired Navy commander is a treasure chest of knowledge when it comes to the earliest history of the renowned Blue Angels. In fact, Taddeo is the last living member of the original Blue Angels team that was established at NAS Jacksonville in 1946. Before he reported to the yet unnamed flight exhi bition team at NAS Jacksonville on June 14, 1946, Lt. Alfred Taddeo served as a gunnery, tactics and formation-flying instructor at NAS Miamis Opalocka Field. Mel Cassidy (Lt.j.g.) and I volunteered at the same time, but only Cassidy was called up, said Taddeo in Then, on June 13, I received urgent orders to report immediately to the team at NAS Jacksonville. The next day, I reported to Lt. Cmdr. Butch Voris. At the time, I had no idea that the exhibition team would grow into the organization it is today. Like his team leader and the two other pilots, the veteran and a bachelor. With three Japanese kills to his credit, Taddeo had been awarded several Distinguished Flying Crosses, as well as Air Medals and battle stars so he was a smooth fit with the fledgling flight exhibition team. He began as the spare pilot, training as left wing number three. The squadron flew four blue-and-gold F6F Hellcats, but the formations were designed to three aircraft, with one held in reserve. Our first civilian air show at Craig Field on June 15, 1946 was just 12 minutes long, but when our pilots exited their cock pits, they got a tremendous ovation from the audi ence, said Taddeo. The team repeated the show on Sunday and was surprised to receive a big trophy proclaiming them as the best performers at the air show. A few days later, they flew to NAS Corpus Christi to perform a special exhibition for Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz. It marked the beginning of an increasingly busy air show schedule. Then there was the issue of naming the team. A contest was announced in the Jax Air News that generated hundreds of entries to nickname the team none of which clicked with the team including Skyscrapers, Strat-O-Cats, Blue Bachelors and Cloud Busters. According to the biog raphy of Butch Voris, the Lancers, was submitted by the son of Capt. Bill Gentner, director of train ing at NAS Jax. Taddeo remembers that Voris and his team mates were not enthusias tic. We didnt like it but given Gentners position, about all Skipper Voris could say was, thats interesting. I think it was Lt. Cmdr. Wickendoll who was thumbing through a New Yorker magazine and showed us an ad for the Blue Angel, a dinner and dance club named after a Marlene Dietrich flick. We all really liked the Blue Angels but nothing would happen until the Omaha, Neb. air show, said Taddeo. The 1946 Omaha show, July 1921, attracted U.S. and foreign military notables, along with national press coverage. The entire team was sold on being called the Blue Angels, so Butch Voris talked on the sly with some of the reporters that weekend and we started getting press as the Blue Angels. When we landed at NAS Jax, Gentner expressed his displeasure to Butch but the name stuck, said Taddeo. A mission Taddeo will never forget was flying to the Grumman factory in Bethpage, N.Y. in August of 1946 to receive the The Bearcat was smaller, more maneuver able and pulled by a large, four-blade propeller. To save even more weight, Grumman engineers stripped out the armor plating and tailhooks. We asked how that affected the flight characteristics and they had calculated no significant difference. As the team was en route to NAS Jax, we received an emergency radio call instructing us to land at NAS Norfolk. They informed us the engineers recal culated their weight-saving activities after we took off and, indeed, the Bearcats center of gravity was changing as we burned fuel. Landing at Norfolk took full back tab and a big pull on the stick. Needless to say, the tailhooks were reinstalled along with some additional ballast, explained Taddeo. Taddeos rotation with the Blue Angels ended Corsair squadron aboard USS Coral Sea. He returned to NAS Jax in 1954, flying with VF-43. He also served at the Pentagon, and as command ing officer of VF-144 and VA-52. Cmdr. Taddeo retired Feb. 1, 1963 after 21 years of service.Welcome back, Alfred Al Taddeo Photo courtesy Blue Angels In August of 1946, Blue Angels Lt .. Alfred "Al" Taddeo, Lt .. Maurice "Wick" Wickendoll, Lt .. Cmdr .. R .. M .. "Butch" Voris, Lt .. Mel Cassidy, and Lt .. j .. g .. Ross Robinson flew to the Grumman factory at Bethpage, N .. Y .. to bring home their new F8F Bearcat fighters .. Compared to the F6F Hellcat, the Bearcat was smaller, lighter, had a full plexiglass canopy and turned a 4-blade propeller .. They would fly the Bearcat until 1949 .. U .. S .. Navy photo The first Blue Angel Flight Demonstration Squadron pilots, 1946 assembled in front of one of their F6F-5 Hellcats .. (From left) Lt .. Al Taddeo, Solo; Lt .. j .. g .. Gale Stouse, Spare; Lt .. Cdr .. R .. M .. "Butch" Voris, Flight Leader; Lt .. Maurice "Wick" Wickendoll, Right Wing; Lt .. Mel Cassidy, Left Wing .. Photo by Clark Pierce Retired Cmdr .. Alfred Taddeo admires the meticulously restored Vought F4U Corsair on display at the 2008 NAS Jax Air Show .. After his rotation with the original Blue Angels, he was assigned to a Corsair squadron on board USS Coral Sea ..

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$ 40. Period. Unlimited talk, text web. What you see is what you pay. That means $40 includes all taxes and regulatory fees. Plus unlimited talk, text, and web. All on a nationwide network. Choose from the latest phones, and never sign an annual contract. $40. Period. Another reason MetroPCS is wireless for all. 888.57metro www.metropcs.com MetroPCS Retail Stores Jacksonville 7200 Normandy Blvd. Ste. 5 Jacksonville, FL 32205 904-638-7957 Orange Park 8102 Blanding Blvd. Ste. 16 Jacksonville, FL 32244 904-638-7963 Regency 9770 Atlantic Blvd. (Across from Regency Square Mall, next to TJ Maxx Jacksonville, FL 32225 904-638-7965 Southside 8021 Philips Hwy. Ste. 2 (Across from BJs Wholesale) Jacksonville, FL 32256 904-638-7967 Certain restrictions apply. Visit metropcs.com or a MetroPCS store for information on specic terms and conditions of service, local coverage area, handset capabilities, and any restrictions. Nationwide long distance available only in continental United States and Puerto Rico. Rates, services, and features subject to change. While in your MetroPCS home coverage area, dial *228, option 2, to update your phones roaming capabilities. It is possible to enter TravelTalk while in a MetroPCS coverage area if there is a weak signal in that area. Additional charges may apply in TravelTalk areas. For details on TravelTalk rates, go to metropcs.com. Coverage not available everywhere. Some services not available in extended home and TravelTalk areas. Only taxes and regulatory fees. are included; convenience and payment fees. are not included. Handset price not included. 1176399 14746_ROP #1001176399 (9.75col, 9.75in x 5in) 10/07/2011 23:31 CST General, Surgical & Aesthetic Dermatology Specializing in the treatment of diseases of the Skin, Hair, and Nails Diagnosis & surgical removal of skin cancers and pre-cancerous lesions Monthly Evening of Beauty Seminars: 5:30 PM (904) 541-0315 Call today to make your reservation to attend this informative program.(904) 541-0315 Orange Park Office (904) 215-7546 Fleming Island Office www.parkavedermatology.com Accepting TRICARE and all Major Insurance PlansGeorge J. Schmieder D.O.F.A.A.D., F.A.O.C.D. r#PBSE$FSUJFE%FSNBUPMPHJTU r.PIT4VSHFPO r%JQMPNBUFPGUIF"NFSJDBO#PBSEPG%FSNBUPMPHZ r%JQMPNBUFPGUIF"NFSJDBO0TUFPQBUIJD $PMMFHFPG%FSNBUPMPHZ1179605 Aesthetic Services Include r#PUPYr+VWFEFSNrBEJFTTFrFSMBOFr5IFSNBHFr'SBYFMr'BDJBMTrFFMT rIPUPFKVWFOBUJPOr-BTFS)BJSFNPWBMr"DOF5SFBUNFOUTr.JDSPEFSNBCSBTJPO "TLBCPVUPVSOFX-VNFOJTMBTFSTJODMVEJOH$0:BH*1#1001179605 (4.75col, 4.75in x 2.38in) 10/12/2011 08:41 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 17 Photo by Clark PierceDuring his visit to NAS Jacksonville last year as Special Guest of the 2010 NAS Jax Air Show, Al Taddeo (left, seated) spent some tiime sharing some Blue Angels history with NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer, Capt .. Robert Sanders (center) and NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer, Capt .. Jeffrey Maclay .. Photo courtesy of the Blue Angels A Blue Angel high-speed, low pass ..

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18 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW Saturday, Nov .. 5 Gates open at 9 a.m. Show beings at 10 a.m. In order of performance U .. S .. Army Special Operations Command Jump Team U .. S .. Coast Guard Helicopter Shockwave Jet Truck Skip Stewart P-3 Patty Wagstaff P-51 Air Force Heritage Flight F-4 Phantom II A-10 East Tac Demo Air Force Heritage Flight Mike Goulian SNJ-5 Matt Chapman Commemorative Air Force The Horsemen Flight Team F4U Corsair U .. S .. Navy Flight Legacy Tin Stix (Skip Stewart & Patty Wagstaff) with Shockwave Jet Truck John Mohr3 p.m. U .. S .. Navy Blue Angels Sunday, Nov .. 6 Gates open at 9 a.m. Show beings at 10 a.m. In order of performance U .. S .. Army Special Operations Command Jump Team Shockwave Jet Truck Skip Stewart P-3 Patty Wagstaff P-51 F-4 Phantom II A-10 East Tac Demo Air Force Heritage Flight Mike Goulian Matt Chapman Commemorative Air Force The Horsemen Flight Team F4U Corsair U .. S .. Navy Flight Legacy Tin Stix (Skip Stewart & Patty Wagstaff) with Shockwave Jet Truck John Mohr2:30 p.m. U .. S .. Navy Blue Angels 2011 NAS Jax Air Show Schedule of Events (subject to change)

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#1001175789 (9.75col, 9.75in x 10.25in) 10/06/2011 13:28 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 19

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20 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW Matt is recognized as an extraordi nary aerobatic pilot who thrills mil lions of air show fans each summer. and quickly worked his way up to the highest level of competition aer obatics the Unlimited category. Recognized for his skills, he won one of only five slots on the U.S. Unlimited Mens Aerobatic Team in 1996 and Championships, Matt was the high est-ranking American pilot, finish ing third in the world with a bronze medal. He led theMens Team to a silver medal. Along with this impres sive finish came the coveted Hilliard Trophy awarded to the highest-fin ishing U.S. pilot at the WAC. Matt also won the prestigious International Aerobatic Club Championships in 1994 and the Fond du Lac Cup in 1995. Matts exciting competition aero batics led him to air show perform ing.Matt is both a solo performer and flies formation in a thrilling show with fellow performer Mike Mancuso. Matt has flown in front of millions of fans at air shows all over.He has appeared on ESPN, ESPN2, Fox Sports Network, Real TV, The Learning Channels Amazing America and Speed Channel. Matt is also a respected airline cap tain with tens of thousands of flight hours. In addition to all that, Matt is a respected voice in the air show busi ness, with a reputation for safety and diligence. Matt enjoys building and flying radio-controlled aircraft of all types.Matt Chapman loves to fly www .. mattchapman .. com Since Sept. 11, 2001, few ele ments of the U.S. military have been more involved in the Global War on Terrorism than the Soldiers of the U.S. Army Special Operations Command, or USASOC. In Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom and numer ous other hotspots around the world, USASOC Soldiers have been amongst the first forces to deploy in support of U.S. and coalition force objectives. Many of these Soldiers, most of them having served in numerous combat rotations, remain deployed to those locations along with conventional forces and multinational part ners to help ensure the success of all GWOT operations, wheth er in a frontline combat role or a humanitarian assistance func tion. History & Responsibilities Department of the Army estab lished USASOC at Fort Bragg N.C., as a major Army com mand to enhance the readiness of Army spe cial operations forces. In addition to report ing to the Department of the Army, USASOC also functions as the Army component of the U.S. Special Operations Command, or USSOCOM, locat ed at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa. USSOCOM is the congressio nally mandated, unified com batant command responsible for all Department of Defense special operations forces within the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. The U .. S .. Army Special Operations Command .. .. .. Black Daggers www .. soc .. mil

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22 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW Michael Goulian is one of only a few sport aviators who are popular on a global scale. An edgy, aggressive, and all out style of flying, have become Michaels signature, and it amazes fans across the globe. On most weekends from April through November, Michael can be seen flying a mesmerizing and intense, high performance solo aero batic display accompanied by a high tech choreographed music system that keeps spectators on the edge of their seats. Driven by a passion for speed and competition, Michael was hon ored to represent the USA for 5 years in the Red Bull Air Race World Championship. Michael flew his famous green & white No. 99 EDGE 540 in the Red Bull Air Race. Michael has been lucky to be rewarded with some of the indus tries highest honors. In 1990, he became one of the youngest US National Advanced Champions when he took that title at just 22 years old. He followed that up in 1995 by win ning the ultimate in US Aerobatics, the Unlimited National Aerobatic Championship. In the airshow world, Michael has been awarded both the Art Scholl (2006) and Bill Barber (2009) Awards for Airshow Showmanship. The recipi ent of these awards reads like a whos who in the airshow world over the last two decades so Michael feels very hon ored to be included with the greats. Michael and his entire team are very proud to have won the prestigious Red Bull Air Race Budapest in 2009. Michael has almost two decades of experience performing at worlds top airshows and races, having started in enjoys his reputation as a great aviator with a flawless safety record, he is also a dedicated professional with his fans. Michael also prides himself as being easy to work with and unassuming with event organizers and the media.Mike Goulian Milestones2009 Budapest Red Bull Air Race Winner 2009 Bill Barber Showmanship Award Recipient 20062010 One of only three U.S. pilots invited to compete in the prestigious Red Bull Air Race International Competition. 2006 Art Scholl Showmanship Award Recipient. Three-time member of United States National Unlimited Aerobatic Team. Member of the 1998 United States Aerobatic Team that captured a sil ver medal at the World Aerobatic Championships in Trencin, Slovakia. 1995 United States National Aerobatic Champion, Unlimited Category. 1990 United States National Aerobatic Champion, Advanced Category. Co-author, Basic Aerobatics & Advanced Aerobatics, Industry textbooks. Collaborator and Trainer for the Stars of Tomorrow. Past member of the International Council of Airshows (ICAS) Board of Directors. Past Chairman of ICAS ACE Committee. Hosted the FAA safety video Avoiding Wake Turbulence. Hosted the FAA safety video Loss of Control Avoiding Spin. One of only six pilots invited to compete in the first annual Championship Airshow Pilots Association (CASPA) series. Principal aerobatic consultant and celebrity endorser, Flight Unlimited aerobatic flightsimulator software.Air Show & Race Pilot Michael Goulian www .. mikegoulian .. com

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1158216 #1001158216 (9.75col, 9.75in x 10.25in) 09/14/2011 18:05 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 23

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24 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW The phrase The Horsemen, often evokes images of mystery and power. Today, the Horsemen ride again, this time as the worlds only P-51 Mustang formation aerobatic team. Steve Hinton is a fixture in the world of warbirds, performing at air shows around the world for more than 35 years, flying over 150 types of aircraft. His restoration company Fighter Rebuilders LLC, has restored more than 40 warbirds to pristine flying condition. ( ( President of Planes of Fame Air Museum since 1994; founding member of the Motion Picture Pilots Association; a civilian pilot with the USAF Heritage Flight; World Speed Record holder; Reno ing WWII fighters. Steve was inducted into the EAA Warbird Hall of Fame in 2005 and received the Art Sholl Showmanship Award from the International Council of Air Shows (ICAS) in 2010. Steve and his wife Karen live in Newport Beach, CA cherishing anytime they get to share with their twins Steven and Amanda. Dan Friedkin is a tour de force of flying. His pas sion for flight began as a kid who loved to build and fly radio controlled airplanes. At 14 he soloed a glider and soon thereafter began flying taildrag Lockheed Jetstar, and was 20 when he soloed the Mustang, which to this day remains his favorite air plane. ( ( Dan has a surface level formation aerobatic ing member of The Horsemen flight team, as well as Chairman of the United States Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation where he is one of only 9 civilian pilots qualified to fly formation with USAF single ship demo teams. ( ( He holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Georgetown University in Business Administration and a Masters degree from Rice University. Dan, his wife Debra, and their four chil dren live in Houston, Texas, where he runs a group of automotive businesses, serves on several boards, and is a Commissioner of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Ed Shipleys air show career began with the Six of Diamonds T-6 formation aerobatic team, where he flew right wing and lead. He is a former pilot in the USAF Heritage Flight and founding member of The ( ( Atlas Air and has flown air shows for over 20 years a Mustang across the Atlantic and flown a F4U Corsair off a nuclear aircraft carrier. Ed was a board member of the International Council of Air Shows and currently is a ICAS Ace evaluator for Warbirds and Jets. Ed and his wife Laurie live in Malvern, PA, where they enjoy their three children and four grandchildren. The Horsemen

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1155845 #1001155845 (9.75col, 9.75in x 10.25in) 09/14/2011 17:50 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 25

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26 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW Skip Stewart is one of the most entertaining airshow pilots in the world today. He has over eight thousand hours of flying experience, is an airline transport pilot, certified flight instruc tor, has owned and operated an aerobatic flight school, earned gold medals in regional aerobatic competitions, served as a chief pilot for a Fortune 100 company and has spent more than ten years entertaining airshow fans around the world. Skip practices tirelessly in the airplane he cus tom built himself to insure the highest level of entertainment. His flying has been featured in magazines that include Smithsonian Air & Space, Aopa, Sports Illustrated, World Airshow News, Auto Pilot as well as in multiple international publications. He is the first pilot to fly an airplane ( u nder a jump ing motorcycle at an airshow and has also been known to fill in as the driver of the worlds fastest dodge ram jet truck! Hollywood stunt pilot Corkey Fornof said it best in an article ( written for autopilot magazine: I was curious about the name Prometheus, so i had to look it up in greek mythology. ( I discovered it means forethought. Prometheus was a rebel Titan who displeased Zeus by taking from him and giving to the people of earth the power of fire. The name matches the paint design with its hot rod style flame job, the show with its snarling, flashy maneuvers and skips forethought in his crowd pleasing routine. Prometheus the flying machine is part Pitts Special and the rest Skip and Christina Stewart. Starting life as a Pitts S-2s, Prometheus was modified to give Skip the airshow machine he wanted. This flying machine looks like a good old American hot rod. The horse power was increased to (400), the big three bladed prop reminds you of oversized racing slicks, the rear canted landing gear makes it look fast sitting on the ground and the paint job yells street rod. lbs. And range of 405 miles this is an all muscle bi-plane.Skip Stewart and Prometheus Photos courtesy of www .. s kipstewartairshows .. c om

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INDESCRIBABLY GOOD CHICKEN. Must present this coupon to receive offer. Offer expires 11/30/11. Each restaurant independently owned and operated. Offer not valid at any other locations. Not valid with any other offers. One offer per guest, per visit. No cash value. No substitutions. 2011 Zaxbys Franchising, Inc. Zaxbys is a registered trademark of Zaxbys Franchising, Inc.FLY INTO ZAXBYS FOR3FREECHICKEN FINGERZ Valid only at this location:6351 Roosevelt Blvd. Jacksonville 904.778.2007OFFERS VALID AT THIS LOCATION ONLY:6351 Roosevelt Blvd. Jacksonville t 904.778.2007 ZAXBYS DAYZ SUNDAYS10% millitary discount with valid ID TUESDAYS & THURSDAYS50 Chicken Wings Any Zalad and 22 oz. Beverage for $6.99 MONDAYSLimited-time offers. Each restaurant independently owned and operated. Offers not valid at any other locations. 2011 Zaxbys Franchising, Inc. Zaxbys, are trademarks of Zaxbys Franchising, Inc. #1001175090 (9.75col, 9.75in x 5in) 10/11/2011 15:26 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 27 Skip Stewart and Prometheus zip down the runway at the 2010 NAS Jax Air Show .. Photo by Clark Pierce

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28 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW Training Squadrons VN-11: January 1941-February 1942 VN-12: February 1941-February 1943 VN-13: October 1940-February 1943 VN-14: March 1941-February 1943 VN-15 March 1941-January 1943 VO-VCS #1: February 1943-July 1944 VO-ATU: January 1946-June 1946 VPB2-OTU #1: August 1942-January 1946 VPB2-OTU #2: April 1943-August 1944 VPB2-OTU #3: June 1943 VPB2-OTU #4: September 1944 VF-OTU #4: September 1943-September 1944 VTB #2: February 1943-November 1944 VTB #3: February 1943-November 1943 VF-OTU #5: November 1943-July 1945 MF-OUT: September 1944-December 1945 VO-VCS: June 1946-1948 AU-MS #10: July 1947-April 1948 VA-ATU #4: August 1947-November 1948 VA-ATU #5: August 1947-November 1948 VA-ATU #10: April 1948 VSB-ATU #1: December 1945-June 1946 IATU: July 1945-November 1948 VF-ATU #1: November 1947-November 1948 VF-ATU #2: July 1947-October 1947 Patrol/Bomber Squadrons (VPB) VPB-208 (Detachment): March 1945-September 1946 Carrier Air Groups (CAG/CVG) CAG 1: June 1950 (VF-11, VF-12, VF-13, VA-14, VA-15) CAG 4: February 1949-June 1950 (VF-41, VF-42, VF-43, VA-44, VA-45) CAG 8: November 1948-February 1950 (VF-81, VF-82, VF-83, VA-84, VA-85) CAG 8 (Reserve): April 1951-February 1953 (VF-671,VF-742, VF-916, VF-921, VC-4 Det, VC-62 Det, VC-33 Det, VC-12 Det, HU-2 Det)* CAG 13: April 1949-February 1950 (VF-131, VF-132, VF-133, VA-134, VA-135) CAG 17: February 1950-September 1958 (VF-171, VF-172, VF-173, VA-174, VA-175) Fleet Air Wings Fleet Air Wing Eleven: January 1950-June 1973 (VP-3, VP-5, VP-7, VP-10, VP-16, VP18, VP-24, VP-45, VP-49, VP-56, VP-741)* Patrol Wing Eleven: June 1973April 1999 (VP-5, VP-16, VP-24, VP-45, VP-49, VP-56) Patrol Reconnaissance Wing Eleven: April 1999-Present (VP-5, VP-8, VP-10, VP-16, VP-24, VP-26, VP-30, VP-45, VPU-1, VQ-2)* Helicopter Antisubmarine Wing One: December 1973June 1994 (HS-1, HS-3, HS-5, HS-7, HS-9, HS-11, HS-15, HS-17, HU-2) Helicopter Antisubmarine Wing Atlantic: June 1994-April 2005 (HS-1, HS-3, HS-5, HS-7, HS-11, HS-15) Sea Control Wing Atlantic: December 1997-January 2009 (VS-22, VS-24, VS-30, VS-31, VS-32, VQ-6) Fighter Squadrons (VF) VF-11: June 1950-February 1959 Red Rippers VF-12: June 1950-August 1955 Flying Ubangis VF-13: June 1950-April 1956 Night Cappers VF-22: June 1950 until June 1958 Cavaliers VF-41: January 1949-February 1951 VF-42: February 1949-June 1950 VF-43: February 1949-September 1950 VF-44: September 1950-October 1952 Hornets VF-81: November 1948-February 1950 VF-82: November 1948-November 1949 VF-83: November 1948-February 1950 VF-104: January 1954 VF-131: April 1949-February 1950 VF-132: April 1949-November 1949 VF-133: April 1949-November 1949 VMF-144: December 1948-February 1951 VF-171: February 1950-March 1958 Screamin Demons VF-172: March 1950-November 1955 Blue Bolts VF-173: March 1950-January 1959 Jesters VF-174: February 1950-February 1954 Hell Razors VF-742: February 1951-February 1953 VF-916: February 1951-September 1951 Roaring Bulls VF-921: March 1951-September 1951 Sidewinders Attack Squadrons (VA) VA-12: March 1950-March 1951; October 1951-February 1952; May 1952-October 1952 Flying Ubangis VA-15: February 1949-February 1952; July 1957-April 1965 Valions VA-34: October 1952-February 1953 Blue Blasters VA-35: October 1958-August 1965 Black Panthers VA-36: July 1955-April 1956 Roadrunners VA-42: September 1950-June 1951 Green Pawns VA-44: February 1949-September 1950; October 1952-February 1963 Hornets VA-45: February 1949-June 1950 Fishawks; September 1950; October 1952-March 1958 Blackbirds VA-66: April 1951-September 1951 Waldomen VA-84: November 1948-November 1949 VA-85: November 1948-November 1949; April 1951September 1951 Black Falcons VA-104: April 1953-December 1953; February NAS Jacksonville Aircraft Squadrons 19402011(As of January 24, 2011) The first aircraft assigned to NAS Jacksonville, this Grumman J2F-3, arrives Jan .. 16, 1940 .. This aircraft would remain as the commanding officer's plane .. A consolidated P2Y-2 is parked at the sta tion's seaplane landing area .. This aircraft was first used as a training aircraft from January through July 1941 .. The aircraft was no longer used after PBY aircraft began showing up at the station .. NR-1 Ryans and N2S Stearmans are tilted on their noses to pack in as many aircraft as pos sible .. A hurricane was approaching the station when this photo was taken on Sept .. 13, 1941 .. This N2S-3 Stearman was used for primary student training .. The plan was all yellow to be easily seen by other pilots .. Photo was taken Jan .. 7, 1942 with the St .. Johns River in the background .. Flight of five P4Y-1Ps in formation .. A F7U Cutlass on the ramp at the station, June 13, 1954 .. National Archives #80-G-484613 A P2V-2 in flight over NAS Jacksonville on July 3, 1953 .. A F2H2 Banshee in front of the station control tower on Aug .. 28, 1951 .. A WC-121N Super Constellation assigned to the Hurricane Hunters, August 1967 .. Photo by PH2 Don K .. Sieburg, Jr .. Helicopter hovers over NAS Jacksonville, 1968 .. A4D Skyhawk in the skies over NAS Jack sonville .. An air-to-air left side view of Patrol Squadron Fifty-Six (VP-56) P-2H, Bu .. No .. 148352, deploy ing to South America for exercise Unitas IV, Aug .. 6, 1963 ..

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2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 29 1957-March 1959 Hells Archers VA-105: July 1955-April 1956; November 1958February 1959 VA-106: October 1952-December 1954 Gladiators VA-134: April 1949-February 1950 VA-135: April 1949-November 1949 Uninvited VA-165: September 1960-September 1961 Boomers VA-172: November 1955-February 1958 Blue Bolts VA-174: April 1949-February 1950 Hell Razors VA-175: January 1950-March 1958 Devils Diplomats VA-176: February 1955-May 1968 Thunderbolts VA-203: July 1970-December 1977 Blue Dolphins VA-859: April 1951 Fighter Attack Squadrons (VFA) VFA-82: July 1999-September 1999 Marauders VFA-86: July 1999-September 1999 Sidewinders Patrol Squadrons (VP) VP-3: January 1950-November 1955 Screaming Eagles VP-5: December 1949-Present Mad Foxes VP-7: September 1961-October 1969 Black Falcons VP-8: May 2009-Present Tigers VP-10: March 1951-February 1952, December 2009Present Red Lancers VP-16: February 1953-Present Eagles VP-18: January 1953-April 1965 Flying Phantoms VP-24: October 1972-April 1995 Batmen VP-26: June 2010-Present Tridents VP-30: June 1959-January 1966; May 1975-Present Pros Nest VP-45: January 1964-Present Pelicans VP-49: January 1972-January 1994 Woodpeckers VP-56: July 1961-June 1991 Dragons VP-62: November 1970-Present Broadarrows VP-83: (Detachment) April-May 1942 VP-94 (Detachment): May 1942-January 1943 VP-741: March 1951-February 1953 Fighting Gators VP-742: October 1952-August 1954; November 1956January 1968 VP-861: February 1950February 1953 Flying Phantoms VPU-1: May 2009-Present Old Buzzards Heavy Attack Squadrons (VAH) VAH-1: November 1955-January 1959 Smokin Tigers VAH-3: June 1956-June 1959 Sea Dragons Heavy Photographic Squadrons (VJ, VAP) VJ-62: April 1952-October 1952 Tigers VAP-62: August 1957-October 1969 Tigers Composite Squadrons (VC) VC-5: January 1952January 1953 Savage Sons VC-62: February 1954-September 1955 Fighting Photos Weather Reconnaissance Squadrons (VJ, VW) VJ-2: March 1953-December 1953 Hurricane Hunters VW-4: December 1953-August 1960; January 1965-April 1975 Hurricane Hunters Fleet Air Service Squadrons (FASRON) FASRON-6: November 1948-June 1959 FASRON-51: December 1951-January 1953 FASRON-109: December 1949-June 1959 Busy Beavers FASRON 795: February 1951-July 1951 Helicopter Combat Support Squadrons (HC) HC-2: October 1973-September 1977 Fleet Angels Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadrons (HS) HS-1: October 1973-June 1997 Seahorses HS-3: October 1973-June 2009 Tridents HS-5: February 1974-December 2009 Nightdippers HS-7: September 1973-Present Dusty Dogs HS-9: June 1976-April 1993 Sea Griffins HS-11: October 1973-Present Dragonslayers HS-15: November 1973-January 2010 Red Lions HS-17: April 1974-July 1991 Neptunes Raiders HS-75: October 1985-February 2007 Emerald Knights Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadrons (Light) (HSL) HSL-42: March 2010-Present Proud Warriors HSL-44: November 2009-Present Swamp Foxes Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadrons (HSM) HSM-70: February 2009-Present Spartans Sea Control Squadrons (VS) VS-22: December 1997-January 2009 Checkmates VS-24: October 1997-March 2007 Scouts VS-30: November 1997December 2005 Diamondcutters VS-31: November 1997-March 2008 Topcats VS-32: March 1998-September 2008 Maulers Electronic Countermeasures Squadron (VQ) VQ-6: March 1998-August 1999 Black Ravens Transport Squadrons (VR) VR-58: November 1977-Present Sunseekers VR-62: June 2009 Present Nomads Utility Squadron (VU) VU-4 (Detachment): 1954-February 1954-February 1957 VU-10 (Detachment): February 1957-July 1964 Squadrons assigned throughout base history 129 Carrier Air Groups/Wings assigned throughout base history 12 *Lists all squadrons that were assigned to that CAG/Wing. Squadrons in italics were not based at NAS Jacksonville.NAS Jacksonville Aircraft Squadrons 19402011 An H-46 Sea Knight helicopter flies over downtown Jacksonville in 1978 .. The station had four of these, assigned for search and rescue .. The last of these helicopters left the station on July 25, 1980 .. A Douglas C-117D (previously R4D-8) sits outside Hangar 116 at NAS Jacksonville in 1971 .. A-7 Corsair in skies over NAS Jacksonville, 1970s .. A P-3 Orion from Patrol Squadron THIRTY (VP-30) flies over Hangar 1000 at NAS Jack sonville in 1977 .. A P-3 Orion from Patrol Squadron FORTY-FIVE (VP-45) flies over downtown Jacksonville in 1982 .. The air station's C-12 Huron makes a pass over the runway in 1986 .. Fleet Logistic Support Squadron Fifty-Eights (VR-58) C-9 Skytrain makes a turn over down town Jacksonville in 1984 .. A SH-3H Sea King helicopter from HS-7 oper ates in the Atlantic Ocean in 1988 .. Photo by MC1 John CollinsA P-3C Orion assigned to the Tridents of Patrol Squadron Two Six (VP-26) shown on the flight line on Feb 2, 2006, prior to night opera tions at Naval Air Station Sigonella .. Photo by MC3 Milosz ReterskiAn S-3B Viking, assigned to the "Maulers" of Sea Control Squadron Three Two (VS-32), piloted by VS-32's Commanding Officer, Cmdr .. William K .. Henderson, launches from the flight deck of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) on Nov .. 16, 2005 .. Photo by Ensign Brandon Porthouse A lineman gives the signal to the pilots to start the engines of an MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Spartans of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 70 on the campus of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University on March 25, 2010 .. Photo by MC2 Lynn FriantAirman Jesse Baron assigned to Pro's Nest of Patrol Squadron Three Zero (VP-30) signals to the crew of a P-3C Orion during start-up checks on Feb .. 13, 2007 ..

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30 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW Meet the Blue Angels pilots In 1946, the Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Chester Nimitz, had a vision to create a flight exhibition team in order to raise the publics interest in naval aviation and boost Navy morale. In the 1940s, we thrilled audiences with our precision combat maneuvers the F9 Panther.During the 1950s, we refined our demonstration with aerobatic maneu vers in the F9 Cougar and F-11 Tiger and introduced the first six-plane delta formation, still flown to this day.By the end of the 1960s, we were fly ing the F-4 Phantom, the only two-seat aircraft flown by the delta formation. Skyhawk, a smaller and lighter air craft with a tighter turning radius, allowing for a more dynamic flight demonstration. Anniversary by unveiling the Boeing day.As for support aircraft over the years, we have to go back to 1949 when it became necessary for the Blue Angels to operate a support aircraft to move personnel and equipment between show sites.These support aircraft included the Douglas R4D Sky Train, the Curtiss R5C Commando, the Douglas R5D Skymaster, and the Lockheed C-121 received the Lockheed Martin C-130, affectionately known as Fat Albert.A total of 16 officers voluntarily serve with the Blue Angels. Each year, the team typically selects three tacti cal (fighter or fighter/attack) jet pilots, two support officers and one Marine Corps C-130 pilot to relieve departing members.The Chief of Naval Air Training selects the Boss, the Blue Angels Commanding Officer. Boss must have at least 3,000 tactical jet flight-hours and have commanded a tactical jet squadron. The Commanding Officer flies the Number 1 jet. Career-oriented Navy and Marine Corps jet pilots with an aircraft carrier qualification and a minimum of 1,250 tactical jet flight-hours are eligible for positions flying jets Number 2 through Weapons Systems Officer (WSO) who meets the same criteria as Numbers 2 The Marine Corps pilots flying the C-130T Hercules Fat Albert support aircraft, must be aircraft command er qualified with at least 1,200 flight hours.Career-oriented officers specializing in maintenance, administration, avia tion medicine, public affairs and sup ply fill support positions.The Blue Angels base their selec tion of officers on professional ability, military bearing and communication skills. Blue Angels officers are wellrounded representatives of their fleet counterparts. Demonstration pilots, the Events Coordinator, Maintenance Officer and Flight Surgeon serve two years with the squadron.The other officers typi cally serve three years with the team. Blue Angels officers return to the fleet after their tours of duty. A large crowd watched the Blue Angels perform arial manuevers during the 2010 NAS Jax Air Show .. Photo by MC3 Nicholas A .. Garratt See PILOTS, Page 31

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So, we emphasize to our staff that this is the most important day in most brides lives.Plan Your Christmas Party Now at The Hilltop Formal Dining Room and Casual Patio Room Walnut paneled full bar with grand piano.Reservations Recommended 2030 Wells Road, Orange Park272-5959www.hilltop-club.com 1173826 #1001173826 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/04/2011 14:09 CST 1162747 #1001162747 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/20/2011 12:25 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 31 CAPT Greg McWherter U .. S .. Navy Flight Leader/ Commanding Officer Captain Greg McWherter is a native of Atlanta and gradu ated from Avondale High School in 1986 where he lettered in football and soccer. He attended The Citadel, where he played NCAA Division 1 soc cer for the Bulldogs and graduated Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering in 1990. Greg received his commission through the NROTC pro gram and entered aviation training at Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola in June 1990. Greg continued his train ing at nearby NAS Whiting Field, flying the T-34C Mentor, before moving to NAS Meridian, Miss., to fly the T-2C Buckeye and TA-4J Skyhawk. He earned his wings of gold in September 1992. In November 1992, Greg reported to Strike Fighter Squadron 106 (VFA-106), the Gladiators, at NAS Cecil Field, for initial training in the FA-18 Hornet. Upon comple tion of the Fleet Replacement Squadron, he was ordered to VFA-131, the Wildcats, where he served as the Landing Signals Officer (LSO), Weapons Training Officer and Quality Assurance Officer. From October 1993 to February 1997, he completed two workups and deployments to the Mediterranean Sea and Persian Gulf with the Wildcats aboard USS George Washington (CVN 73). He graduated from the United States Navy Fighter Weapons School (TOPGUN) in May 1995 and was selected as VFA-131s Pilot of the Year in 1996. In March 1997, Greg reported to NAS Fallon, Nev., as a TOPGUN Instructor. During his tour in Fallon, he served as a Training Officer and the Navys AIM-9M/X, Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System and FA-18 Air-to-Air Employment Subject Matter Expert. Greg returned to the fleet in March 2000 as Tactics Officer and Department Head for VFA-34 at NAS Oceana, Va. During his tour with the Blue Blasters, he completed two more Mediterranean Sea and Persian Gulf deploy ments aboard USS George Washington (CVN 73) and was selected by his peers to receive the 2003 Commander, Naval Air Forces Leadership Award. In August 2003, Greg received orders to the United States Joint Forces Command in Norfolk, Va. Within the Joint Requirements and Integration Directorate (J8), he served as the Joint Close Air Support (JCAS) Branch Chief and was responsible for identifying mission area shortfalls and developing joint solutions through the Department of Defense. During his Joint tour, Greg completed Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) Phase I through the College of Distance Education at the Naval War College. After completing refresher training in the FA-18 Hornet in March 2006, Greg reported as Executive Officer of VFA192 stationed at Naval Air Facility (NAF) Atsugi, Japan. He commanded the World Famous Golden Dragons through three major deployments aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) from June 2007 until July 2008. Greg commanded the Blue Angels from November 2008 to November 2010 and, after a brief tour as the Deputy Director for Officer Development at Naval Services Training Command (NSTC), returned to lead the team again in May 2011. He has more than 4,500 flight hours and 950 carrier-arrested landings. His decorations include the Legion of Merit, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal, two Air Medals (Strike Flight), two Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medals, a Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, as well as various campaign and unit awards. LCDR Jim Tomaszeski U .. S .. Navy Right Wing Lieutenant Commander Jim Tomaszeski is a native of Orange Park and graduated from Coronado (Calif.) High School in 1997. He attended Florida State University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English in 2000. Jim then reported to Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola for Officer Candidate School and was commissioned an Ensign in December 2000. Jim reported for aviation indoctrination at NAS Pensacola in January 2001. He completed primary flight training at Vance Air Force Base, Enid, Okla., flying the T-37B Tweet. He then transferred to NAS Meridian, Miss., for intermediate and advanced flight training, flying the T-2C Buckeye and T-45C Goshawk. He earned his wings of gold in May 2003. Jim then reported to Strike Fighter Squadron 125 (VFA125), the Rough Raiders, in Lemoore, Calif., for training in the F/A-18 Hornet. In May 2004, he reported to VFA195, the Dambusters, stationed in Atsugi, Japan. While assigned to VFA-195, Jim completed multiple Western Pacific deployments aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63). He also participated in several multilateral international exer cises with South Korean, Republic of Singapore, Japanese and Australian Naval, Marine and Air Forces. While with the Dambusters, Jim served as Squadron Mess Officer, Public Affairs Officer, Schedules Officer, Avionics and Armament Division Officer, Laser Systems Safety Officer, Naval Air Training and Operation Procedures Standardization (NATOPS) Officer, Air-to-Air Weapons and Tactics Officer, Assistant Operations Officer and Landing Signals Officer (LSO). While there, Jim contributed to the PILOTSFrom Page 30 See PILOTS, Page 32

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Skinner Pkwy Jacksonville FL 32256s Instructors available to help answer your questions s Complimentary refreshments s For complete program information, go to www.itt-tech.edu s Classes now formingGo to programinfo.itt-tech.edu to access information on the programs of study offered at the ITT Technical Institutes (Programs), including, among other things: the occupations that each Program can help students prepare to enter; the on-time graduation rate for each Program; the costs associated with each Program; the placement rate for students who completed each Program; and the median loan debt incurred by students who completed each Program ITT is a registered mark of and is used under license granted by ITT Manufacturing Enterprises, Inc. Not all ITT Technical Institutes have all six schools of study, Please refer to the particular ITT Technical Institutes school catalog for details of the schools of study at that institute.SALUTE TO THE TROOPSWWW.ITT-TECH.EDUITT Technical Institute EDUCATION FOR THE FUTURE #1001167769 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/03/2011 10:13 CST 32 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW Dambusters receiving the 2005 Battle E for sustained superior performance in an operational environment. In June 2007, Jim reported to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 101 (VMFAT-101) as an instructor pilot. While with the Sharpshooters, Jim served as a LSO, Fighter Weapons Phase Instructor, Legal Officer, Assistant Air-toAir Phase Head and Assistant Carrier Qualification Phase Head. Jim joined the Blue Angels in September 2009. He has accumulated more than 2,000 flight hours and has 271 carrier arrested landings. His decorations include the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and various personal and unit awards. Maj Brent Stevens U .. S .. Marine Corps Left Wing Major Brent Stevens is a native of Knoxville, Tenn., and graduated from Farragut High School in 1994. In 1996, Brent enlisted in the Marine Corps Reserves and reported for train ing at Marine Corps Recruit Depot (MCRD) Parris Island, S.C. Following recruit training, Brent reported to H Company, 4th Combat Engineer Battalion, 4th Marine Division in Knoxville. While serving as a combat engineer in the reserves, Brent attended the University of Tennessee, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics in 1999. Brent was commissioned a Marine Corps Second Lieutenant through the Platoon Leaders Class and report ed to Quantico, Va., for The Basic School in November 1999. He reported for aviation indoctrination at Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola in November 2000. He completed primary flight training in the T-37B Tweet at Vance Air Force Base, Enid, Okla. Brent was then assigned to NAS Meridian, Miss., for intermediate and advanced flight train ing where he flew the T-2C Buckeye and T-45C Goshawk. He received his wings of gold in September 2002. In October 2002, Brent reported to Strike Fighter Squadron 106 (VFA-106), the Gladiators, at NAS Oceana, Va., for training in the F/A-18 Hornet. In January 2004, he joined Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 (VMFA232), the Red Devils at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Miramar, Calif. While assigned to VMFA-232, Brent com pleted multiple Western Pacific deployments aboard USS NIMITZ (CVN 68). During a 2007 deployment to the Persian Gulf, Brent flew combat operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. While with the Red Devils, he served as the Powerline Division Officer, Ground Safety Officer, NATOPS Officer, Flight Officer, Assistant Operations Officer, Aviation Safety Officer, Quality Assurance Officer and Landing Signal Officer (LSO). While with the Red Devils, the squadron received the 2007 Robert M. Hanson Award as the Marine Corps Associations Fighter Attack Squadron of the Year. In April 2008, Brent reported to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 101 (VMFAT-101), the Sharpshooters, as an instructor pilot. During his tour, Brent served as a LSO, Airto-Ground Phase Instructor, Schedules officer, Airframes Division Officer and Out-of Control Flight (OCF) Program Manager. Brent joined the Blue Angels in September 2010. He has accumulated more than 1,700 flight hours and has 280 carrier arrested landings. His decorations include two Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals and various personal and unit awards. LT Rob Kurrle U .. S .. Navy Slot Lieutenant Rob Kurrle, Jr. is a native of Statesville, N.C., and graduated from Statesville High School in 1997, where he lettered in tennis. He attended New Mexico Military Institute through the Naval Academy foundation program, which he completed in 1998. Rob then attended the United States Naval Academy where he played tennis and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering in 2002 and was commissioned as an Ensign in the U.S. Navy. Rob reported to Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola for aviation indoctrination in June 2002. He completed pri mary flight training in the T-34C Mentor at NAS Whiting Field and transferred to NAS Kingsville, Texas, for advanced flight training in the T-45A Goshawk. He received his wings of gold in January 2004. In February 2004, Rob reported to Strike Fighter Squadron 106 (VFA-106) Gladiators at NAS Oceana, Va., for initial training in the F/A-18C Hornet. In February 2005, Rob remained at NAS Oceana and reported to Strike Fighter Squadron 34 (VFA-34), the Blue Blasters. While assigned to the VFA-34, Rob completed the last at sea sustainment for USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) and a Western Pacific deployment aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). He also participated in several multilateral inter national exercises FOAL EAGLE, VALIANT SHIELD and RIM OF THE PACIFIC. Rob also served as Navigation Officer, Schedules Officer, Line Division Officer, Air to Air Weapons and Tactics Officer, and Landing Signals Officer (LSO). In February 2008, Rob reported back to VFA-106 for transition to the F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet. While serving as an Instructor Pilot with the Gladiators for the Hornet PILOTSFrom Page 31 See PILOTS, Page 33

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Rob joined the Blue Angels in September 2009, where he served as the Left Wing pilot in 2010. He has accumu lated more than 1,900 hours and 250 carrier arrested landings. His decorations include three Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals and various personal and unit awards. LCDR Ben Walborn U .. S .. Navy Lead Solo Lieutenant Commander Ben Walborn is a native of Reading, Pa., and graduated from The Hill School in 1997, where he let tered in soccer and lacrosse. He attended the United States Naval Academy, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in Political Science in 2001, and was commissioned an Ensign in the U.S. Navy. Ben reported to Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola for aviation indoctrination in November 2001. He com pleted primary flight training in the T-34C Mentor in Corpus Christi, Texas, and transferred to NAS Meridian, Miss., for intermediate and advanced flight training in the T-2C Buckeye and T-45C Goshawk. He received his wings of gold in April 2004. In May 2004, Ben reported to Strike Fighter Squadron 122 (VFA-122), the Flying Eagles, in Lemoore, Calif., for initial training in the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet. In January 2005, he reported to the VFA-27 Royal Maces stationed in Atsugi, Japan. While assigned to VFA-27, Ben completed multiple Western Pacific deployments aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63). He also participated in several multilateral inter national exercises with South Korean, Thai, Republic of Singapore, Japanese and Australian Marine, Naval and Air Forces. While with the Royal Maces, Ben served as the Public Affairs Officer, Schedules Officer, Aircraft Division Officer, Air to Air Weapons and Tactics Officer, Assistant Operations Officer and Landing Signals Officer and contrib uted to the Royal Maces receiving the 2005 and 2006 Battle E for sustained superior performance in an opera tional environment. In January 2008, Ben received orders back to VFA-122. While serving as an Instructor Pilot with the Flying Eagles, he served as the Assistant Intelligence Officer and Landing Signals Officer. Ben joined the Blue Angels in September 2008. He served as the Narrator and VIP pilot in 2009 and as the Opposing Solo pilot in 2010. He has accumulated more than 2,200 hours and 346 carrier arrested land ings. His decorations include two Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals and various personal and unit awards. LT C .. J .. Simonsen U .. S .. Navy Opposing Solo Lieutenant C.J. Simonsen is a native of Coon Rapids, Minn., and graduated from Coon Rapids High School in 1995, where he lettered in football, track and down hill skiing. In January 1996, he enlisted in the Navy and com pleted Basic Training at Recruit Training Command (RTC) in Great Lakes, Ill., in March 1996. C.J. then reported to Naval Nuclear Power Training Command in Orlando for Machinist Mate A school and Nuclear Power School. Upon comple tion, he reported to Naval Nuclear Power Training Unit in Charleston, S.C., to complete his training aboard USS Daniel Webster (SSN 626), where he served as a nuclear machinist mate, in June 1997. While in Charleston, C.J. was accepted to the Naval Academy Preparatory School (NAPS) in Newport, R.I., which he completed in May 1998. He then attended the United States Naval Academy, where he ran track, and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering in May 2002, and was commissioned an Ensign in the U.S. Navy. C.J. reported to Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola for aviation indoctrination in July 2002. He completed pri mary flight training in the T-34C Mentor in Milton, Fla., and transferred to NAS Meridian, Miss., for intermediate and advanced flight training in the T-2C Buckeye and T-45C Goshawk. He received his wings of gold in April 2005. C.J. then reported to Strike Fighter Squadron 122 (VFA122), the Flying Eagles, in Lemoore, Calif., for initial training in the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet. In January 2006, he report ed to VFA-102 Diamondbacks stationed in Atsugi, Japan. While assigned to VFA-102, C.J. completed multiple Western Pacific deployments aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) and USS George Washington (CVN 73). He also participated in several multilateral international exercises with Canadian, South Korean, Thai, Republic of Singapore, Japanese and Australian Marine, Naval and Air Forces. While with the Diamondbacks, C.J. served as Airframes Branch Officer, Schedules Officer, Aircraft Division Officer, and Operations Administration Officer and directly con tributed to the Diamondbacks receiving the 2007 Battle E for sustained superior performance in an operational environment. In February 2009, C.J. received orders to VFA-106, the Gladiators, in Oceana, Va. While serving as an Instructor Pilot with the Gladiators, he served as the Schedules Officer. C.J. joined the Blue Angels in September 2009. He has accumulated more than 1,400 hours and 379 carrier arrested landings. His decorations include two Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals and various personal and unit awards. PILOTSFrom Page 32

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34 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW What is the mission of the Blue Angels? The mission of the Blue Angels is to enhance Navy recruit ing, and credibly represent Navy and Marine Corps aviation to the United States and its Armed Forces to America and other countries as international ambassadors of good will.What are the policies/requirements governing back seat flights in the number 7 jet? Orientation flights are given to three members of the local media at each show site. Individuals must be accred ited members of the media and are recommended by Navy recruiters and air show sponsors, then reviewed and ap proved by the Blue Angels. A small number of VIP orientation flights are also offered each year to individuals from televi sion, sports, music and the movie industry. These individuals are selected by the Blue Angels to generate national media coverage and convey a positive image of the squadron and the Navy/Marine Corps. These flights are in direct support of Navy and Marine Corps recruiting objectives. Who authorized establishment of the Blue Angels? The Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, ordered the establishment of the team on April 24, 1946.Where did the name Blue Angels originate?The name was originated by the original team when plan ning a show in New York in 1946. One of them came across the name of the citys famous Blue Angel nightclub in the New Yorker Magazine. Where was the Blue Angels first air show?Craig Field, Jacksonville, Florida, on June 15, 1946.Why dont the Navy Blue Angels and the Air Force Thun derbirds fly together? Current Department of Defense policy states the use of military aviation demonstration teams is for recruiting pur poses, therefore the teams cannot fly within 150 miles of each other without special permission. Each demonstration team showcases U.S. military aviation capabilities to the public separately to maximize Navy or Air Force recruit ing efforts. However, the Blue Angels or Thunderbirds may perform with the U.S. Army Parachute Team, the Golden Knights, or the U.S. Navy Parachute Team, the Leapfrogs. On average, how many people view the Blue Angels each year? An estimated 15 million spectators view the squadron during air shows each year. Additionally, the Blue Angels visit more than 50,000 people a show season (March through November) at school and hospital visits. What are the basic requirements for becoming a Blue Angel demonstration pilot? Each applicant must be career-oriented, carrier-qualified, active-duty Navy or Marine Corps tactical jet pilot with a minimum of 1,250 flight hours. How many Blue Angels demonstration pilots have there been? Including the 2007 season, the Blue Angels have had 232 demonstration pilots, and 32 Flight Leaders/Com manding Officers. Do the Blue Angels pilots go through Strike Fighter Wing Pacifics TOPGUN? Some current and former Blue Angels pilots have gone through TOPGUN, however, it is not a prerequisite.How do you determine where to hold an air show?Each September, the Department of Defense receives hundreds of requests to hold air shows featuring the Navy Blue Angels. After the Department of Defense screens re quests for basic eligibility, requests are forwarded to the Blue Angels Commanding Officer. The squadron reviews each air show request, considering input from the Chief of Naval Information and Navy Recruiting Command. In Decem ber, the Blue Angels Events Coordinator, along with Navy and Department of Defense officials, meet at a scheduling conference in Washington, D. C. for final considerations and approval. How does someone become a Blue Angel de-monstration pilot? Navy and Marine Corps pilots meeting the basic requirements submit an application directly to the team via the Ap plications Officer. Applicants visit the squadron at scheduled show sites early in the show season to observe the team firsthand. Finalists are selected mid-season and interviewed at the Blue Angels squadron in Pensacola, Florida. The new demonstration pilots and support officers are selected by unanimous vote. The Chief of Naval Air Training selects the Flight Leader/Commanding Officer. What happens if a Blue Angel demonstration pilot is ill or hurt? Safety is paramount for every demonstration. Each pilot is responsible for good health and safety; however, the Blue Angels Flight Surgeon will medically disqualify a pilot if one The Blue Angels Frequently Asked Questions blueangels .. navy .. mil See FAQ, Page 35

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36 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW Have any Blue Angels become astronauts? CDR Chuck Brady, Flight Surgeon, 198990. What is the average age of a Blue Angels pilot? The pilots average age is 33 years old. How is the enlisted, support and mainte nance team selected? Each applicant is carefully screened and selected by current team members. What is the average age of the enlisted, support and maintenance team? The average varies slightly, however, it is approximately 26 years old. Are the Blue Angels the best of the best? The Blue Angels are representatives of the excellence and professionalism found throughout the fleet. Each Blue Angels team member is an ambassador and representa tive of fleet counterpart. How long is a Blue Angel tour of duty? The demonstration pilots, Maintenance Officer, Events Coordinator, and Flight Sur geon each serve a two-year tour. All other members, including the Narrator, serve a three-year tour. Each member returns to the fleet after completing a tour with the Blue Angels. How many Marines serve in the squadron?There are 16 Marines on the 2007 team. Eight in Fat Albert, six in maintenance, No. 4 and No. 7.How many females are in the squadron? The number of females varies each year. The 2007 team has 15 females. How do team members deal with the time away from home? Individuals are made aware that they will be away from home a lot before they volun teer for duty with the team and are selected based on their ability to cope with, not only family separation, but with a strenuous prac tice and show schedule. Additionally, the Navy, Blue Angels, and civilian communities at Pensacola and El Centro provide a familytype support network. Do any of the Blue Angels get extra pay? No. Each member of the squadron volun teers for duty with the Blue Angels. Due to keen competition at all levels, each individual feels especially honored to be associated with the team. What is considered minimum visibility for a Blue Angel performance? To be able to perform, the Blue Angels must have at least three nautical miles of visibility horizontally from centerpoint, and a minimum cloud ceiling of 1,500 feet. At these minimums, the Blue Angels can perform a limited number of maneuvers in what is called a flat show. When the ceiling is at least 3,500 feet and visibility at least three nautical miles a low show can be per formed, which includes some rolling maneu vers. With a minimum ceiling of 8,000 feet and visibility of three nautical miles, the Blue Angels can perform their high show, which includes all maneuvers. What is the lowest and highest maneuver heights performed during an air show? This varies due to weather conditions. The highest is the vertical rolls performed by the Opposing Solo (up to 15,000 feet) and the lowest is the Sneak Pass (50 feet) performed by the Lead Solo. What is the most demanding maneuver performed? All maneuvers are demanding, both men tally and physically, and reflect the challeng es met daily by fleet Navy and Marine Corps aviators. What are the fastest and slowest speeds flown during an air show? The fastest speed is about 700 mph (just under Mach 1; Sneak Pass) and the slowest speed is about 120 mph (indicated speed; Section High Alpha), both flown by the solo pilots during the show. How many and what types of aircraft have the Blue Angels flown? Since 1946, there have been eight types of aircraft: (1) Grumman F6F Hellcat, June-August 1946; (2) Grumman F8F Bearcat, August 19461949; (3) Grumman F9F-2 Panther (first jet), 1949-June 1950 and Grumman F9F-5 Panther 1951-Winter 1954/55; (4) Grumman F9F-8 Cougar, winter 195455; mid-season 1957; (5) Grumman F11F-1 Tiger (first supersonic jet), mid-season 1957-1969; (6) McDonnell Douglas F-4J Phantom II, 1969-December 1974; (7) McDonnell Douglas A-4F Skyhawk II, De cember 1974-November 1986; (8) Boeing F/A-18 Hornet, November 1986-Present. How many jets are in the Squadron? The Blue Angels currently have 12 jets: 10 single-seat F/A-18 A models and two two-seat F/A-18 B models. What are the major differences between the fleet model and the Blue Angel F/A18? The Blue Angel F/A-18s have the nose cannon removed, a smoke-oil tank installed and a spring installed on the stick which ap plies pressure for better formation and in verted flying. Otherwise, the aircraft that the squadron flies are the same as those in the fleet. Each Blue Angel aircraft is fleet capa ble of being returned to combat duty aboard an aircraft carrier within 72 hours. Are Blue Angels aircraft carrier capable? All of the Blue Angels jets are carriercapable and can be made combat ready in about 72 hours. The squadrons C-130 (Fat Albert) is a Marine Corps fleet aircraft manned by an all-Marine Corps crew and was not designed for carrier operations. How do the jets get to each show site? The demonstration pilots fly the jets to each show site. How much does an F/A-18 cost? The basic acquisition price of a single F/A-18 A Hornet is approximately $21 mil lion. The cost of additional weapons-related equipment varies according to the configuration and use of each aircraft can signifi cantly increase the total price. What is the top speed and rate of climb of an F/A-18? The F/A-18 can reach speeds just under Mach 2, almost twice the speed of sound or about 1,400 mph. The maximum rate of climb of the F/A-18 is 30,000 feet per minute. What is the weight of an F/A-18? An F/A-18 weighs about 24,500 pounds empty of all ordnance and aircrew. Why are the jets painted blue and gold? The jets bear the official colors for the U.S. Navy. How far can the F/A-18 fly on a full load of fuel or with external fuel tanks? The F/A-18 can travel approximately 1,000 miles on a full load of fuel without external tanks. Adding the external tanks extends the range to approximately 1,200 miles. How do you produce the smoke, and why do you use it? The smoke is produced by pumping biode gradable, paraffin-based oil directly into the exhaust nozzles of the aircraft where the oil is instantly vaporized into smoke. The smoke provides a traceable path for spectators to follow, so they can see the flight profile that has been flown. It also enhances safety of flight by providing a valuable means by which the solo pilots can see each other during opposing maneuvers and conditions of low ered visibility or haze. The smoke poses no hazard to the environment. Why cant the public listen to the pilots conversation during the show? Since all maneuvers are preceded by ra dio communication, broadcasting these ra dio calls or making the frequencies of their radios publicly available could interfere with pilot communication, thereby jeopardizing safety of flight. Why is the C-130 called Fat Albert? Fat Albert is a nickname given to the plane by Marine Corps Blue Angel pilots in the 1970s because of its size and shape and is a reference to the popular childrens cartoon of the same era. What does JATO stand for? JATO means Jet Assisted Take Off and is used by the Lockheed-Martin C-130 to clear short runways and gain high altitude in a short period of time such as might be necessary in combat situations. blueangels .. navy .. mil FAQFrom Page 35 See FAQ, Page 37

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Sliders Seaside Grill 1175451 Newly Renovated 2nd Floor #1001175451 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/11/2011 15:05 CST May require up to a $36 activation fee/line, credit approval and deposit. Up to $350/line early termination fee (ETF) for advanced devices and up to $200 ETF/line for other devices (no ETF for Agreements cancelled during rst 30 days). Individual-Liable Discount: Available only to eligible employees of the company or organization participating in the discount program. May be subject to change according to the companys agreement with Sprint. Available upon request on select plans and only for eligible lines. Discount applies to monthly service charges only. No discounts apply to secondary lines or add-ons $29.99 or below. Other Terms: Coverage not available everywhere. Nationwide Sprint and Nextel National Networks reach over 278 and 279 million people, respectively. Offers not available in all markets/retail locations or for all phones/networks. Pricing, offer terms, fees and features may vary for existing customers not eligible for upgrade. Other restrictions apply. See store or sprint.com for details. Sprint. Sprint and the logo are trademarks of Sprint. Other marks are the property of their respective owners.All active duty, guard, reserve, retired and veteran members of the US Armed Forces as well as civilian contractors are eligible for the discount. (-&.41 a -#,$-3(.a //+(" a !+$#(2".4-3".#$ ,78 a 578(1.1"$ 8 a 1(-$28N115A67 r a 5$'$-.4!47.-+(-$"1$#(3! a "*6'$-7.42'./ a 3 7.41r/1(-3f1(5 a 3 $ r3.1$423 a / /+7 SAVE 50 : a 3" '$"*.43$!n.-+7.%%$1//+($#(3'(-t(-5.("$2$6n+(-$ a "3(5 a 3(.a -# -$6. n7$ a 1&1$$,$-3$04(1$#$231("3(.-2 a //+7 .-$+$"3$&4+ a 1+7/1("$# r/1(-3$1 5("$/+ a -2$04(1$2 a -$6.n7$ a 1 &1 $$,$-3r a 5$(3'#(2".4-32% $50 $2'$+$"3(.-b(2(3 '$"*.43'$+ a 3$23#$5("$2 a -#&$3$15("$/+ a -#(2".4-32%1$$ 2'(//(-& a -#/$"( a +2%1., a /1(5 a 3$.-+(-$.1$)423%.1 .% 2/1(-3".,#.#ntnt2/1(-3".,#.#,$,!$12 r,$#.1"$215 #1001176632 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/11/2011 13:00 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 37How much fuel does Fat Albert hold? Fat Albert holds 46,000 pounds of fuel. What is the normal cruising speed and shaft horsepower per motor of Fat Albert? Fat Alberts cruising speed is 360 mph and shaft horse power is about 4,500 per engine. What is the maximum takeoff weight of Fat Albert? The maximum takeoff weight of Fat Albert is 155,000 pounds. What is the distance under Fat Alberts propellers to the ground? The distance under Fat Alberts propellers to the ground is approximately six feet. How many crewmembers are assigned to fly Fat Albert, and what are their positions? Eight Marines are assigned to operate Fat Albert Airlines: three pilots, two flight engineers, a navigator, a flight me chanic and a loadmaster. How long has the team had the C-130? The team has been flying the C-130 since 1970. Have the Blue Angels ever performed overseas? Yes. Throughout the years, the Blue Angels have had a limited opportunity to perform overseas. Prior to the 2006 trip to the Netherlands, was in 1992 when the team completed a European tour performing in Sweden, Finland, Rus sia, Bulgaria, Italy, the United Kingdom, Romania, Spain and Germany. Is it possible to schedule a tour of the Blues home base? Unfortunately, no. Due to the hectic show and maintenance schedules, it is extremely difficult to schedule tours or photographic opportunities. People who desire to see the Blue Angels between shows are encouraged to view a practice demonstration at the National Museum of Naval Aviation at NAS Pensacola usually held most Tuesday and Wednesday mornings during the show season when the team is home. The practices, weather permitting, and a ten tative practice schedule may be viewed on the Blue Angels Web site at www.blueangels.navy.mil. How can fans obtain a VIP pass for a show? Blue Angel reserved seating at an air show is extremely limited and reserved strictly for family and close, personal friends of current team members. Some air show sites re serve alternate seating areas for a nominal fee. Interested individuals should contact the local air show coordinator for additional information. What is the difference between a Blue Angel Hornet and the new F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet? The Super Hornet is 25 percent larger, can fly 40 per cent further, remain on station 80 percent longer and carry more weapons than its predecessors. The Super Hornet F/A-18 E/F models have deployed with battle groups since 2001. This aircraft is the Navys newest acquisition and its advanced technology will be used to carry the fleet into the 21st century. Will the Blue Angels fly the Super Hornet? The decision to transition to the Super Hornet has yet to be determined. FAQFrom Page 36Photo by MC2 Ron TrevinoFat Albert wows the crowd at the 2010 NAS Jax Air Show ..

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No war clauses No aviation clauses No hazardous duty clauses Visit us at www.navymutual.org INSURING THOSE WHO SERVE Henderson Hall | 29 Carpenter Road | Arlington, VA 22212 800-628-6011 | www.navymutual.org Photo courtesy Dept. of Defense 1156345 #1001156345 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/14/2011 17:54 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 39 Photo by Kaylee LaRocque Pilot Dave Marco prepares to take former Blue Angel pilot Al Taddeo up in his P-51 Mustang during a practice ses sion, leading up to the 2010 NAS Jax Air Show ..

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VETERANS MAKE OUR COUNTRY BETTER. WERE MAKING THEIR HOMES BETTER. 2011, HOMER TLC, Inc. All rights reserved.The Home Depot is committed to improving the housing needs of military veterans. And when you buy a veterans-themed gift card, The Home Depot will donate 5% of the value you place on it to organizations helping those whove served our country.To purchase the gift card and learn more, go to homedepot.com 1156346 #1001156346 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/14/2011 18:05 CST 1162744 #1001162744 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/20/2011 11:21 CST 40 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW An all-Marine Corps crew of three officers and five enlisted personnel operate the LockheedMartin C-130T Hercules, affectionately known as Fat Albert Airlines. Fat Albert joined the team in It carries more than 40 maintenance and support personnel, their gear and enough spare parts and communication equipment to complete a success ful air show.Fat Albert cruises at a speed of more than 320 feet. Four Allison turboprop engines, which produce more than 16,000 shaft-horsepower, provide Fat Albert Airlines with the power to land and depart on runways as short as 2,500 feet.At select show sites, Fat Albert demonstrates its jet-assisted takeoff (JATO) capability. Eight solidfuel rocket bottles, four on each side, attached near the rear paratrooper doors thrust the Hercules sky ward. Fired simultaneously, the JATO bottles allow the mammoth transport aircraft to takeoff within 1,500 feet, climb at a 45-degree angle, and propel it to an altitude of 1,000 feet in approximately 15 sec onds. Getting Fat Albert airborne in minimal time and distance simulates conditions in hostile envi ronments or on short, unprepared runways.Blue Angels Trusty Companion Fat Albert flies over show center at the 2010 NAS Jax Air Show .. Photo by Clark Pierce Fat Albert C-130T Hercules

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) A dynamometer or dyno for short, is a device for measuring force, moment of force (torque), or power. ) A formal document showing how much better you are than your friends. Dy-no Sponsored in part by Dynoday Dynoday DYNO DAY PARTY & CAR SHOW Sunday Nov. 13th $50 DYNO RUNS ALL DAY!! free food & drink Fill the bottom out and bring with you to the event for a chance to win 3 FREE DYNO PULLS w/wideband sensor.THE PARTY STARTS @ 10am come early to get your Advance Auto Parts SWAG BAGS!! #1001177112 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/12/2011 11:49 CST Welcome to Jacksonvilles premier community. Just 10 minutes from the airport and 2 minutes to the pool! Featuring an amazing Amenity Center with:Broker Participation Welcome. Prices, availability subject to change without notice.Directions: Take I-95 to Pecan Park Road East to US 17 N to Yellow Bluff. Tuesday Saturday: 10 am to 6 pm Sunday Monday: 12 pm to 6 pm ~ 15629 Tisons Bluff Road Jacksonville, FL 32218www.yellowblufflanding.comFURNISHED MODELS OPEN DAILY.Homes by: Lennar & D.R. Horton YELLOW BLUFF landing New Single-Family Homes from the $130s to the $220s.MORE FUN.LESS MONEY. Resort-Style Pool Fitness Center Childrens Pool with Fountains & Slides Tennis Courts Sand Volleyball Court Playground Soccer Field Basketball Courts #1001175745 (9.75col, 9.75in x 5in) 10/11/2011 09:11 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 41 A low ceiling didnt defeat Fat Albert at the 2010 NAS Jax Air Show .. Photo by Kaylee LaRocque blueangels .. navy .. mil

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42 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW To Patty Wagstaff, the sky represents adventure, freedom and challenge. A six-time member of the U.S. Aerobatic Team, Patty has won the gold, silver and bronze medals in Olympic-level international aerobatic competi tion and is the first woman to win the title of U.S. National Aerobatic champion and one of the few people to win it three times. Patty, whose company is based in St. Augustine, flies one of the most thrilling, low-level aerobatic demonstrations in the world. Flying before millions of people each year, her breathtaking performances give air show spectators a front-row seat view of the precision and complexity of modern, unlimited hard-core aerobatics. Her smooth, aggressive style sets the standard for performers the world over. Born in the USA, Patty grew up in and around airplanes. At age 9, she moved to Japan where her father was a captain for Japan Air Lines. Her earliest memories include sitting with her father at the con trols of his airplanes. At 10 years old, when her father let her take the controls of his DC-6, her lifelong love affair with airplanes began. From Japan, her travels took her across Southeast Asia, Europe and to Australia, where she lived and traveled up the west coast in a small boat. small town in the southwest part of the state Dillingham where she worked for the Bristol Bay Native Association. Her job involved traveling to each of the remote villages in the region, areas only accessible by air. Pattys first experience with bush flying was not a positive one. The first airplane she chartered for her job crashed on their first flight. So Patty decided to learn to fly herself, hiring friend and later husband, Since then, she earned her Commercial, Instrument, Seaplane and Commercial Helicopter Ratings. She is a flight and instrument instructor and is rated and qualified to fly many airplanes, from World War II fighters to jets. Pattys sister, Toni, is also a pilot and a captain for Continental Airlines. Though she had never seen aerobatics, a lifelong curiosity led her to attend her first air show in British perform and promised herself I can do that! By earned a spot on the U.S. Aerobatic Team. Pattys skill is based on years of training and expe rience. She is a six-time recipient of the First Lady of Aerobatics Betty Skelton Award. In July 2004, Patty was inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame and was the recipient of the National Air and Space Museums Award for Current Achievement in 1994. Having received many awards for her flying, Patty is particularly proud of receiving the air show industrys most prestigious award the Sword of Excellence, and the Bill Barber Award for Showmanship. Recently, Patty was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Air Force Association, was inducted into the EAA/IAC Hall of Fame, and in 2005 received the NAA/99s Katherine Wright Award. In March of .1994, her airplane, the Goodrich Extra 260, went on display in the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum in Washington, D.C. You can see Pattys airplane and exhibit in the Pioneers of Flight Gallery. Patty has trained with the Russian Aerobatic Team and has flown air shows and competitions in such exotic places as South America, Russia, Europe, Mexico and Iceland. She is a member of the Screen Actors Guild, Motion Picture Pilots Association, United Stuntwomens Association, working as a stunt pilot and aerial coordinator for the film and television industry. She was the Demo pilot for Raytheons (now Hawker Beechcrafts) military trainer, the T6A/B Texan II in international air shows such as Paris, Singapore and Farnborough, and continues to coach their Demo Team. For the past 10 years, Patty has traveled to East Africa to give bush, recurrency and aerobatic train ing to the pilots of the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS), who protect Kenyas elephants, rhino and other nat ural resources from poachers. In 2010, Patty started flying for Cal Fire as an Air Attack pilot in the OV-10 Bronco. Cal Fire pilots fly both the OV-10 and the S2T Tanker out of 13 differ ent bases helping keep California safe from fires and supporting firefighters on the ground. Continuing a life of experience and adventure, when shes not flying, you can find her at the barn, riding her Selle Francais show jumper, Ivgeni de Hogue. Pattys other interests include her Jack Russell Terriers and her parrot Buddha; riding her motorcy cle and bicycle; reading; writing articles for aviation magazines; and practicing yoga. Patty is proud to be sponsored by Champion Aerospace Inc., manufacturer of high-performance aviation quality spark plugs, harnesses and oil filters, and Cannon Aviation Insurance, where the cus tomer is always the first priority. Patty is also sponsored by Sarasota Avionics International, which meets her avionics needs; Textron Lycoming, which makes her engine; MT Propeller, which provides the propeller for it. She also has had long time support from Shell Oil, Bose Headsets, Goodyear Tire Corporation, National Parachutes, Concorde Battery and Lord Corporation. Additionally, she is supported by Microsoft,and you can fly her Extra 300S, which is featured on the famed Microsoft Flight Simulator.Patty Wagstaffs Achievements2007: Inductee, International Aerospace Hall of Fame 2006: Inductee, Air Show Hall of Fame 2006: Aviation Week & Space Technology Laureate, ( Philip J. Klass Award for Lifetime Achievement 2005: Recipient, Air Force Association Lifetime Achievement Award 2005: Inductee, International Aerobatic Club Hall of Fame 2005: Katherine Wright Award 2002: Katherine and Marjorie Stinson Award 1998: Bill Barber Award for Showmanship 1997: Recipient, NAA Paul Tissiander Diploma 1997: Inductee, Women in Aviation International Hall of Fame 1997: Inductee, Arizona Aviation Hall of Fame 1996: Recipient, Charlie Hillard Trophy 1996: GAN & Flyers Readers Choice Award, Favorite Female Performer 1996: Top Scoring US Pilot at World Aerobatic Championships 1985-1996: Member, U.S. Aerobatic Team 1995: Recipient, ICAS Sword of Excellence Award 1988-1994: Winner Betty Skelton First Lady of Aerobatics Trophy 1994: National Air and Space Museum Award for Current Achievement 1994: NAA Certificate of Honor 1993: International Aerobatic Club Champion Us National Aerobatic Champion (  1991, 1992, 1993 US National Aerobatic Championships 1990/1992/1994: Top US Medal Winner, World Aerobatic Championships 1991: Voted Western Flyer Readers Choice Favorite Airshow Performer 1987: Rolly Cole Memorial Award for Contributions to Sport AerobaticsFlying a way of life for Patty Wagstaff www .. pattywagstaff .. com

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The Eastport Apartment Community is Jacksonvilles Premier Luxury Apartment Community on the Northside conveniently located just minutes from the Naval Bases, Rivercity Shopping Center and Downtown. We offer Luxury living at an affordable price. Call today and ask about our Military Discount Program and come home to the Eastport.FREE Washer & Dryer FREE 24 HR Fitness Center FREE WIFI* FREE Billiard room Lagoon Style Pool and Spa Laminate hardwood ooring Business Center Two Bedroom 11701 Palm Lake Dr., Jacksonville, FL 32218 Eastport@michaelsongroupllc.com (904) 696-0016 2 BEDROOM /2 BATH(2nd and 3rd Floor Only)*with 12 mo lease. See property mgmt. for details. 1 Month FREE* RPP (RENTAL PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM) FOR OUR MILITARY! ** selected models only #1001178497 (9.75col, 9.75in x 5in) 10/11/2011 15:51 CST #1001175788 (4.75col, 4.75in x 2.38in) 10/06/2011 17:18 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 43Kent Shockley was born in Pasadena, Calif., grew up in Orange County, Calif., and moved to Galena, Kan., in sons, Chris, and Michael, who are both athletes, and honor students in the Baxter Springs schools. Kent has worked around jet-powered vehicles since he was 15 years old with his father, Les Shockley. Kent worked as crew chief on the road with Les during the summer months, and as his school schedule would permit. Kent then worked after school in his fathers shop doing jet mainte nance, fabrication of vehicles, and helped in building, tuning, and repair ing of custom jet-powered race cars. During these years, he helped his dad become a three-time National Jet Car Champion. At the age of 21, Kent learned to drive the Shock Wave Jet the first person to be licensed to drive a multitude-powered vehicle. Shockley turned over the week-to-week driving of the ShockWave to his son Kent. Kent is not only a competent and very safety conscientious driver, he is also great with the fans, always taking time to sign an autograph or explain something about the awesome truck to one of the fans. I am really proud to be the driver of the most awesome act in the motor sports industry, Kent said. My dad has given me an opportu nity that very few get and I am enjoying every minute of it. My dad has set some pretty tough standards to live up to, but I feel that I have the devotion it takes to meet them. I love my job and look for ward to the exciting years ahead.Kent Shockley & ShockWave Photo by Kaylee LaRocqueShockWave performs at the 2010 NAS Jax Air Show, with Kent Shockley at the wheel ..

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rf nttntb rrr r t t #!$%&!%'(%%!'()#*+#*) '!$# t # $(,+(,& t #-$&#.#,&#, t + r!/#)0#$bbb1 r t (%%(2 t /#-%t ( $3)#)0#$+(,& t #-$ &#.#,&#, t + r!/#)0#$bbn ,4!3((/#,5#$"*, t -5"%-5" t ,5# t # $(,+(,& )#)!$(0-%-(&*$-,53!*$/-+t f (,&$#2#-/#(.-,6t 3 !*$2!).%# t # &+2(/#,5#$"*, t 7 8 8 9 b r : r ; "#-%&#+ t $#();!,<*#+ t !'/#$#+ t #5#,&+!'%-5" t #+2*# #1001175454 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/11/2011 16:08 CST t E^D E^: t D s ^ ^ t W ^ / D t ^ D t D ^ ^ t K ^ t tDZE, t Z t > t & & Dd s/d> hd/KE E dZ/E/E' &KZ ^hZ &hdhZ & ^ : r rf & ^ rn& ^ : t bf b & t n DW^^ & ^ : n& ^ : f rr ^ ^ ^^ t f n rr ^ > f & ^ : n b r DW^^ rbr b rns tttn n rbr rbr b rb r r rb r r^K r b rn & tttn n rb or call #1001158581 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/14/2011 15:06 CST 44 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW Navy Personnel Active Duty: 326,524 Officers: 53,263 Enlisted: 268,717 Midshipmen: 4,544 Ready Reserve: 102,849 [As of 11 Aug 2011 ] Selected Reserves: 65,117 Individual Ready Reserve: 37,732 Reserves currently mobilized: 4,719 [As of 27 Sep 2011] Personnel on deployment: 43,661 Navy Department Civilian Employees: 204,103 Ships and Submarines Deployable Battle Force Ships: 284 Ships Underway (away from homeport): 151 ships (53% of total) On deployment: 112 ships (39% of total) Attack submarines underway (away from homeport): 25 subs (46%) On deployment: 17 subs (31%) Ships Underway Aircraft Carriers: USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) Pacific Ocean USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Pacific Ocean USS George Washington (CVN 73) 7th Fleet USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) 5th Fleet USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) 5th Fleet Amphibious Assault Ships: USS Wasp (LHD 1) Atlantic Ocean USS Essex (LHD 2) Pacific Ocean USS Bataan (LHD 5) 5th Fleet USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) port visit San Francisco USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) Atlantic Ocean USS Makin Island (LHD 8) Pacific Ocean Amphibious Command Ships: USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20) port visit Rijeka, Croatia Aircraft (operational): 3700+ www.navy.milStatus of the Navyas of October 7, 2011

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Homes start at low $100s 7 COMMUNITIES IN NORTHEAST FLORIDA www.pulte.com/jacksonville (904) 406-7255 1175748 #1001175748 (4.75col, 4.75in x 2.38in) 10/11/2011 11:56 CST NORTHSIDE 560 SKYMARKS DR. MV-68963 (River City Mktplace) ........................757-6760WESTSIDE 5175 LENOX AVE. MV-58679 (Next to Lowes) ......................................378-9282151 BLANDING BLVD. MV-08262 (1/2 mile S. of Orange Park Mall) .................................276-20139440 ATLANTIC BLVD. MV-26275 (Across from Regency Square Mall) .........................724-09451509 COUNTY RD. 220 MV-52467 (Eagle Harbor, next to Wal-Mart) .............................682-0017 13840 BEACH BLVD. MV-63147 (1/2 mile East of Hodges) ............................................821-0982SOUTHSIDE 8080 PHILIPS HWY MV-63057 (At Baymeadows, next to Lowes) ........636-7576MIDDLEBURG 1567 BRANAN FIELD RD. MV-80820 ...........................................589-9874MUST PRESENT COUPON. ONLINE OR MAIL-IN REBATE. CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. VALID 10/27 THRU 11/15/11. PROMO CODE: 87999The Discount Tire Company Prepaid Card is issued by MetaBank, Sioux Falls, SD pursuant to a license from Visa U.S.A. Inc. STATE OR LOCAL TAXES AND, WHERE REQUIRED OR CHARGED, STATE ENVIRONMENTAL OR DISPOSAL FEES ARE EXTRA.MONDAYFRIDAY: 8:006, SATURDAY: 8:005 VISA PREPAID CARD WHEN YOU PURCHASE ANY SET OF 4 BFGoodrich TIRES INSTALLED! ONLINE OR MAIL-IN REBATE. VALID 10/23 THROUGH 11/5/11. THE DISCOUNT TIRE COMPANY PREPAID CARD IS ISSUED BY METABANK, SIOUX FALLS, SD PURSUANT TO A LICENSE FROM VISA U.S.A. INC. VISA PREPAID CARD $25 OFF A PURCHASE OF $250 OR MORE $50 OFF A PURCHASE OF $500 OR MORE $100 OFF A PURCHASE OF $1000 OR MORE UP TOGREAT SAVINGS COUPON 1164829 #1001164829 (4.75col, 4.75in x 10.25in) 10/11/2011 09:36 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 45 U .. S .. Navy photos (Above) USS Birmingham (Scout Cruiser No .. 2) steams downriver from the Norfolk Navy Yard, Va .. w ith the Curtiss Pusher airplane of Eugene Ely on board .. Ely made his historic first-flight later that afternoon .. Ely also became the first person to land on a U .. S .. Navy ship when he landed on USS Pennsylvania Jan .. 18, 1911, in San Francisco Bay .. (Below) First airplane flight from a warship ..

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Event Dates: Oct 21st 30th In Orange Park/Jacksonville WWW.GENERALRV.COM HOURS: MON-FRI 9-6 SAT 9-5, SUN.12-5 RV AUCTION SALE! $50 MILLION DOLLARS WORTH OF RVs WILL BE AUCTIONED OFF! PAY WHAT YOU WANT TO PAY ON THE RV OF YOUR DREAMS! You can SAVE THOUSANDS when you make a bid on the RV of your choice! Or you can purchase at the BUY IT NOW price. Many RVs will be sacriced regardless of cost. Sorry, no wholesalers allowed. Shop Early! Units Change Out Daily! EVENT DATES: OCT 21st 30th 1577 Wells Rd., Orange Park, FL 32073 | ootPMM'SFFoo1175499 Going Once... Going Twice. Gone!NEW AUTUMN RIDGE 278BH NEW 2012 COACHMEN FREELANDER 21QBCOR SUBMIT YOUR BID!OR SUBMIT YOUR BID!#84741, OVERSIZE BUNK BEDS, SLEEPS 8, WALKAROUND QUEEN BED, ONLY 4,750 LBS. LIST PRICE $18,771 QUEEN BED, POWER AWNING, GENERATOR, LCD TV & MORE! STK #87836 LIST PRICE $67,843 BUY IT NOW FOR: $12,997 $119/MO PAYMENTBUY IT NOW FOR: $49,989 $337/MO PAYMENT AFTER REBATE AFTER REBATE #1001175499 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/11/2011 11:06 CST AAA Has You Covered!While youre protecting our country, were protecting your family.Insurance Auto, Health, Home and Life. Emergency Road Service Enjoy 24-hour protection as a driver or passenger in any car throughout the U.S. and Canada. Travel Exclusive discounts, amenities and great rates to anywhere in the world. Exclusive AAA Discounts Dining, Shopping, Hotels, Entertainment and more at over 160,000 locations. International Driving Permits, Free Of ce Services and much more! Proudly serving members of the U.S. Military. Call or visit your local AAA of ce today:Jacksonville904-565-7722or visit online at AAA.com/JacksonvilleOrange Park904-272-2010or visit online at AAA.com/OrangePark #1001153204 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/30/2011 09:12 CST 46 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW Philadelphia, the Continental Congress voted to fit out two sailing vessels, armed with ten carriage guns, as well as swiv el guns, and manned by crews of eighty, and to send them out on a cruise of three months to intercept transports carrying munitions and stores to the British army in America. This was the original legisla tion out of which the Continental Navy grew and as such constitutes the birth cer tificate of the navy. To understand the momentous signifi cance of the decision to send two armed vessels to sea under the authority of the Continental Congress, we need to review the strategic situation in which it was made and to consider the political strug gle that lay behind it. Americans first took up arms in the tionship with the king, but to defend their rights within the British Empire. Georgia were in open rebellion. Royal governments had been thrust out of many colonial capitals and revolutionary governments put in their places. The Continental Congress had assumed some of the responsibilities of a central government for the colonies, created a Continental Army, issued paper money for the support of the troops, and formed a committee to negotiate with foreign countries. Continental forces captured Fort Ticonderoga on Lake Champlain and launched an invasion of Canada. riority at sea, from which they threat ened to stop up the colonies trade and to wreak destruction on seaside settle ments. In response a few of the states had commissioned small fleets of their own for defense of local waters. Congress had not yet authorized privateering. Some in Congress worried about pushing the armed struggle too far, hoping that recon ciliation with the mother country was still possible. Yet, a small coterie of men in Congress had been advocating a Continental Navy from the outset of armed hostili ties. Foremost among these men was John Adams, of Massachusetts. For months, he and a few others had been agitating in Congress for the establishment of an American fleet. They argued that a fleet would defend the seacoast towns, protect vital trade, retaliate against British raiders, and make it possible to seek out among neutral nations of the world the arms and stores that would make resistance possible.The Birth of the United States Navy USS Constitution, the world's oldest commissioned warship afloat, displays all her flags and pennants in recognition of the Navy's 235th birthday on Oct .. 13, 2010, in Charlestown, Mass .. Photo by Seaman Shannon S .. Heavin See NAVY, Page 47

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#1001175456 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/11/2011 11:49 CST Master of Business Administration (MBA) Master of Health Administration (MHA) Master of Arts (MA): Counseling Human Resources Development Human Resources Management Information Technology Management Management and Leadership Master of Science (MS): Finance GRADUATE PROGRAMS FOR ADULTSUse your G.I. BillNo GRE/GMAT Exam (in most cases) &WFOJOHBOEXFFLFOEDMBTTFTr$MBTTFTUBVHIU by faculty that are professionals JOUIFJSFMEr&BSOZPVSEFHSFFJOBT MJUUMFBTNPOUITr Call today Online programs: webster.edu/online webster.edu/jacksonville Navy College Ofce-Building 110 Jacksonville, FL 32212 Linda Schindler, Academic Advisor lschind@webster.edu (904) 779-71241165651 We Support Our Troops 10407 Centurion Parkway N. Suite 210, Jacksonville, FL 32256 Rita Braunegg, Academic Advisor braunegg@webster.edu (904) 268-3037 #1001165651 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/12/2011 09:13 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 47Still, the establishment of a navy seemed too bold a move for some of the timid men in Congress. Some southerners agreed that a fleet would protect and secure the trade of New England but denied that it would that of the southern colonies. Most of the delegates did not consider the break with England as final and feared that a navy implied sovereignty and independence. Others thought a navy a hasty and foolish challenge to the mightiest fleet the world had seen. The most the pro-navy men could do was to get Congress to urge each colony to fit out armed vessels for the protection of their coasts and harbors. Then, on Oct. 3, Rhode Islands delegates laid before Congress a bold resolution for the build ing and equipping of an American fleet, as soon as possible. When the motion came to the floor for debate, Samuel Chase, of Maryland, attacked it, say ing it was the maddest Idea in the World to think of building an American Fleet. Even pro-navy mem bers found the proposal too vague. It lacked specifics and no one could tell how much it would cost. If Congress was yet unwilling to embrace the idea of establishing a navy as a permanent measure, it could be tempted by short-term opportunities. Fortuitously, on Oct. 5, Congress received intel ligence of two English brigs, unarmed and with out convoy, laden with munitions, leaving England bound for Quebec. Congress immediately appointed a committee to consider how to take advantage of this opportunity. Its members were all New Englanders and all ardent supporters of a navy. They recommended first that the governments of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut be asked to dispatch armed vessels to lay in wait to intercept the munitions ships; next they outlined a plan for the equipping by Congress of two armed vessels to cruise to the eastward to intercept any ships bearing supplies to the British army. Congress let this plan lie on the table until Oct. 13, when another fortuitous event occurred in favor of the naval movement. A letter from General Washington was read in Congress in which he reported that he had taken under his command, at Continental expense, three schooners to cruise off Massachusetts to inter cept enemy supply ships. The commander in chief had preempted members of Congress reluctant to take the first step of fitting out warships under Continental authority. Since they already had armed vessels cruising in their name, it was not such a big step to approve two more. The committees pro posal, now appearing eminently reasonable to the reluctant members, was adopted. The Continental Navy grew into an important force. Within a few days, Congress established a Naval Committee charged with equipping a fleet. This committee directed the purchasing, outfit ting, manning, and operations of the first ships of the new navy, drafted subsequent naval legislation, and prepared rules and regulations to govern the Continental Navys conduct and internal adminis tration. Over the course of the War of Independence, the Continental Navy sent to sea more than 50 armed vessels of various types. The navys squadrons and cruisers seized enemy supplies and carried corre spondence and diplomats to Europe, returning with needed munitions. They took nearly 200 British ves sels as prizes, some off the British Isles themselves, contributing to the demoralization of the enemy and forcing the British to divert warships to protect convoys and trade routes. In addition, the navy pro voked diplomatic crises that helped bring France into the war against Great Britain. The Continental Navy began the proud tradition carried on today by our United States Navy, and whose birthday we cel ebrate each year in October.This article and more can be found on the Naval Historical Center Web site (www.history.navy.mil).NAVY: 236 years of service to her country From Page 46

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See Our Military Specials Atwww.nimnichtchevy.com(904) 638-7986CHEVROLET Supporting our Troops for over years...70 GM Military Discount Retirees Included!! #1001168524 (3col, 5in x 5in) 10/11/2011 11:00 CST A Special Salute To Our Advertisers! ank you for your support of this tribute to the Centennial of Naval Aviation and to Military and aerobatic excellence! 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 49 Front view of a PBY-2 on the seaplane ramp at NAS Jacksonville .. These PBYs were replaced with the PBY-5 in 1943 .. This picture was taken on Jan .. 8, 1942 .. Photo courtesy of Ron Williamson

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&$" m m %#' y y rf rnftbn!"rf rf ntb%!$"% m %#'" mm &!%' rffnttb #1001160668 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/15/2011 14:44 CST LIGHTNING FAST. LIGHTNING STRONG. LTE is a trademark of ETSI. 1162743 #1001162743 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/20/2011 18:42 CST 50 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW Photo by MC3 Andrew Ryan Smith Col .. Andrew MacMannis, commanding officer of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (31st MEU), cuts a cake during a ceremony commemorating the 235th Marine Corps birthday on Nov .. 10, 2010, aboard the forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2) .. All U.S. Marines are gung-ho. But, few can match the vision and total commitment of the famous 13th Commandant, Gen. John A. Lejeune. In 1921, he Gen. Lejeunes order sum-marized the history, mission, and tradition of the Corps. It further directed that the order be read to all Marines on Nov. 10 of each year to honor the founding of the Marine Corps. Thereafter, Nov. 10 became a unique day for U.S. Marines throughout the world. Soon, some Marine commands began to not only honor the birthday, but celebrate it. In 1923, the Marine Barracks at Fort Mifflin, Pa., staged a formal dance. The Marines at the Washington Navy Yard arranged a mock battle on the parade ground. At Quantanamo Bay, Cuba, the Marine baseball team The first formal Birthday Ball took place on Philadelphia in 1925. First class Marine Corps style, all the way! / Guests included the Commandant, the Secretary of War (in 1925 the term politically correct Celebrating Marine Corps 236th BirthdaySee MARINE CORPS, Page 51

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1162745 #1001162745 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/20/2011 12:21 CST 52 Minutes of CLASSIC HITS Every Hour! PLUS 80 Minutes of Commercial Free Music at 8 a.m. Every Weekday! Jacksonvilles Classic Hits 1162746 #1001162746 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/20/2011 12:24 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 51didnt exist; it was Secretary of War, not Secretary of Defense), and a host of statesmen and elected officials. Prior to the ball, Gen. Lejeune unveiled a memo rial plaque at Tun Tavern. Then the entourage headed for the Benjamin Franklin Hotel and an evening of festivities and frolick ing. Over the years, the annual Birthday Ball grew and grew, tak ing on a life of its own. In 1952, the Commandant, Gen. Lemuel C. Shepherd Jr. formalized the cake-cutting ceremony and other traditional observances. For example, Marine Corps policy now mandates that the first piece of cake must be pre sented to the oldest U.S. Marine present. The second piece goes to the youngest Marine. Among the many such mandates is a solemn reading of the Commandants birthday message to the Corps. Like the U.S. Marine Corps itself, the annual Birthday Ball has evolved from simple origins to the polished and professional / functions of today. Nonetheless, one thing remains constant, the 10th day of November! / This unique holiday for warriors is a day of camara derie, a day to honor Corps and Country. Throughout the world on Nov. 10, U.S. Marines celebrate the birth of their Corps the most loyal, most feared, most revered, and most professional fighting force the world has ever known.This is a excerpt from Warrior Culture of the U.S. Marines, copy right 2001 Marion F. Sturkey. It was found on usmcpress.com. MARINE CORPS: Celebrating 236 years of service From Page 50

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52 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW Photo by MC1 Michelle Lucht The Navys next generation long-range anti-submarine warfare and maritime patrol aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon, lands at NAS Jacksonville on April 4, during the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Centennial of Naval Aviation events .. Description frame and high-bypass turbo-fan jet engine with a fully connected, state-of-the-art open architecture mission system. This combination, coupled with next-generation sensors, will dramatically improve anti-submarine warfare (ASW), and anti-surface warfare (ASuW) capabilities. Features rable and expandable system facilitating easier, more affordable upgrades. sensor system, inverse synthetic aperture/synthetic aperture radar, new electronic support measures system, new electro-optical/infrared sensor, digital magnetic anomaly detector. sion crew (plus relief pilot and in-flight technician). Workstations with universal multi-function dis plays, ready accommodation for additional worksta tion, workload sharing. wing pylons, two centerline pylons, all supported by digital stores management allowing for carriage of joint missiles, torpedoes and mines. Search stores: rotary reloadable, pneumatically controlled sono buoy launcher. Common Data Link (CDL), FORCEnet compliant. ability a key performance parameter. Background The Navys replacement platform for the P-3C Navys future in long-range maritime patrol capa bility, while transforming how the Navys maritime patrol and reconnaissance force will man, train, operate and deploy. from a smaller force and less infrastructure while focusing on worldwide responsiveness and interop erability with traditional manned forces and evolv ing unmanned sensors. Boeing was awarded the contract to develop the together a reliable airframe and high-bypass turbo fan jet engine with a fully connected, state-of-theart open architecture mission system. will dramatically improve antisubmarine and gram went through a preliminary design review in be delivered for flight test in 2009, with IOC planned for 2013. General Characteristics Primary Function: Anti-Submarine and Antisurface Warfare. Contractor: Boeing IDS Date Deployed: First squadron is planned for 2013. Propulsion: Two high-bypass CFM56 turbofan engines Length: Height: Wingspan: Weight: Airspeed: 490 knots. Ceiling: 41,000 feet Range: 1,200 nautical miles radius with four hours on station. Crew: Nine. Armament: Torpedoes, cruise missiles, bombs, minesP-8A Multi-mission Maritime Aircraft (MMA)

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For employment opportunities visit www.AdvanceAutoParts.jobs Proud to offer a 10% discount to all active duty and retired military personnel. Please show military ID or be in uniform. Discount available on regular priced items only.1174101 #1001174101 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/10/2011 17:37 CST Theres never been a better time to buy a Lennar home. For more information, call 904.380.0774 or visit LennarJXF.com.Buy before November 30 and get the LOWEST MONTHLY PAYMENTS EVER when you purchase a Lennar home in the Jacksonville area at an Everythings Included price.FIND A GREAT PLACE TO BE STATIONED thats real close to where youre stationed.1175508 #1001175508 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 10/05/2011 18:11 CST #1001161768 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/19/2011 08:59 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 53 Photo courtesy of Ron WilliamsonAn F2H-2P Banshee of Photo Squadron VC-62 climbs into the skies .. The aircraft left NAS Jacksonville on Jan .. 21, 1953 ..

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www.nova.edu/jax 904-245-8910 Come discover Nova Southeastern University at one of our Jacksonville Information Meetings to learn more about graduate and undergraduate degree programs in elds like Business, Education, Counseling, Health Science, Physician Assistant and more.Tuesday, November 8, 2011, 6:00pm Saturday, November 12, 2011, 9:30am Tuesday, January 17, 2012, 6:00pm Saturday, January 21, 2012, 9:30am Tuesday, March 6, 2012, 6:00pm Saturday, March 10, 2012, 9:30am Tuesday, May 1, 2012, 6:00pm Saturday, May 5, 2012, 9:30am 1158214 #1001158214 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/14/2011 18:03 CST Jacksonvilles New #1 For Country Steve & Eden Weekday Mornings 5:30 10:00 a.m. 1160660 #1001160660 (4.75col, 4.75in x 5in) 09/16/2011 05:53 CST 54 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW PBY returns to NAS Jacksonville after a train ing flight with aviation cadets in 1944 .. The first jets arrived at NAS Jacksonville, June 9, 1948 .. These F2H1 Phantoms brought out many of the station personnel .. Photos courtesy of Ron Williamson PBY Catalinas on the sea plane ramp in October 1945 .. There were 100 Catalinas assigned to NAS Jacksonville .. A-4 Skyhawks returning to NAS Jacksonville, 1970s ..

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Get a quote for a brighter future.Together, we can make a difference.Elna Crittenden Coble (904) 771-14046011-8 103rd Street Jacksonville elnacoble@allstate.comGET A QUOTE & ILL DONATE $5Saluting 100 Years of Naval Aviation! As a local Allstate Agent, Im proud to support The Wounded Warrior Project. And now, its easy for you to help too. Call or stop by for a free insurance quote and Ill donate $5* to The Wounded Warrior Project. *No purchase or use of goods or services necessary for donation fulfillment. Maximum donation of $1,000. Limited to one (1) donation per household. Ends 12/31/2011. Insurance subject to terms, qualifications and availability. Allstate Fire And Casualty Insurance Company: Northbrook, IL. 2011 Allstate Insurance Company 1177117 #1001177117 (9.75col, 9.75in x 10.25in) 10/11/2011 11:35 CST 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW | 55

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rfntbb rffnt brfntbb rff rff M !"#"$%& rfntbb %&trfntbb rfntnfr'("rfntbb rff rfrnrtbrf rrfrrrf #1001162707 (9.75col, 9.75in x 10.25in) 09/20/2011 12:25 CST 56 | 2011 NAS JAX A AIR SHOW