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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/01941
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 4/14/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:01941

Full Text







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PRF

SWilliam Low
lic Affairs

Hundreds of maritime patrol
aviators and notable retirees
gathered at NAS Jacksonville
April 4-6 to honor the Centen-
nial of Naval Aviation (1911 -
2011) and catch a vision of what
the next 100 years might hold.
For many years, the Mari-
time Patrol and Reconnais-
sance Force (MPRF) held
its annual gathering in
Washington, D.C., but in
2009 the event moved to NAS
Jacksonville.
The history of naval mari-
time patrol and reconnais-
sance reaches back to the first
days of military flight. Two
years before anyone flew across
the Atlantic Ocean, Navy pilots
were chasing enemy subma-
rines during World War I. As
aerial weaponry advanced,
they began to attack and some-
times sink those submarines.
As America prepared to
enter World War II, the Navy
started training pilots at NAS
Jacksonville. For over seven
decades, the station would
serve as the center of Atlantic
maritime patrol and anti-sub-
marine warfare.
Retired master chief Rex
Roffler was in Jacksonville in
January 1942.


:ates 100 years of naval aviation
sa


Adm. John Harvey Jr., commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, disembarks
the flight deck and mission systems areas April 4 at NAS Jacksonville. Harvey
Reconnaissance Force Centennial of Naval Aviation event.
"It was right after the attack wingtip. We had to move some were no fenci
at Pearl Harbor and the planes planes to Cecil Field, which a watch. Abe
here were lined up wingtip to was a ranch at the time. There' watch came y


Photo by MC2 Gary Granger Jr.
from a P-8A Poseidon test aircraft after touring
addressed Sailors during the Maritime Patrol and


es so they posted
ut midnight the
yelling to me, 'the


cows are eating the planes!'
He didn't know what to do, so
See MPRF, Page 8


Photo by Clark Pierce
PBY Catalina dedication party at NAS Jacksonville Heritage Park: (from left) VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt.
Perry Yaw, Rick Sorrell, Marlin Crider, Carl Creamer, Richard Gammache, Bill Lahnen, Gilbert Wood and Rear
Adm. Michael Hewitt.


PBY Catalina honored by patrol community


By Clark Pierce
Editor

There was a festive atmosphere at NAS Jacksonville
Heritage Park April 6 as hundreds of Sailors, civilians
and retirees gathered to dedicate the refurbished PBY-
5A Catalina patrol plane (Bureau Number 6582).
VP-26 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Jeffrey Draeger
welcomed the guests, "As we celebrate 100 years of
naval aviation, including the significant contributions
of the maritime patrol and reconnaissance force, this
dedication ceremony is a fitting tribute to the men
and women who have gone before us. We honor their
steadfast service, remarkable courage and immeasur-
able sacrifice. We strive to live up to their example and
add to their legacy of mission accomplishment. Today,
we pause to honor them."
The Orange Park High School NJROTC color guard
paraded the colors. Patriotic music was performed by
Navy Band Southeast.
Commander, Patrol Wing 11 Capt. Trey Wheeler
said, "This has been a tremendous week so far -
beginning with our Centennial of Naval Aviation cel-
ebration and ending with our MPRF Symposium.
It's been an honor to discuss naval aviation heritage
with maritime patrol and reconnaissance veterans -
including a few who served in PBY squadrons during
World War II.'
For our junior Sailors and officers, this week not
only brings history alive, but also sets the stage for the


future."
VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Perry Yaw
introduced the keynote speaker. "Over the years,
Rear Adm. Michael Hewitt has been 0o stranger
to Jacksonville or the maritime patrol and recon-
naissance community. From his department head
tour at VP-10 to his command of VP-8, followed by
his command of Wing 5 in Brunswick, Maine and
to his current position as commander, Patrol and
Reconnaissance Group, he has served with distinc-
tion," said Yaw.
Hewitt told the audience, "It's my honor to join you
for the dedication of this World War II-era PBY-5A fly-
ing boat. That the two-year restoration effort culmi-
nated with the Centennial of Naval Aviation celebra-
tion makes this event even more special. We couldn't
have picked a better time or place to honor this air-
craft and its crews than today at NAS Jacksonville
Heritage Park."
He continued, "Our thanks go out to NAS lax skip-
per (Capt.) Jeff Maclay for supporting our naval avia-
tion legacy in the maritime patrol and reconnaissance
community. It seems that NAS lax has been involved
with almost every aircraft in the Navy inventory since
World War II. With the arrival two days ago of the P-8A
Poseidon, we know this air station will continue to be
on the leading edge of our MPRF future."
Hewitt praised the many volunteers who worked

See PBY CATALINA, Page 10


First EA-6B rudder


assembly keeps


Prowler fleet flying

By Marsha Child
FRCSE Public Affairs

Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) manu-
factured the first EA-6B rudder assembly made at
a military facility and fit-checked/it on an aircraft
March 1, marking the first step in easing supply
shortages threatening to ground the Prowler fleet.
When FRCSE could not requisition replacement


assemblies,
which were
failing at a
rate of one
in two, the
manufac-
turing team
approached
Naval Inven-
tory Control
Point (NAVICP)
with a pro-
posal to make
the assembly.
NAVICP,
the orga-
nization
responsible
for supplying
a wide vari-
ety of com-
ponents to
the Fleet and
the Marine
Corps, award-
ed FRCSE a


Photo by Vic Pitts
On March 1, Aircraft Mechanics
Carlos Mayang (left) and Harold
Stubbs perform a fit check for
an EA-6B Rudder Assembly on a
Prowler at Fleet Readiness Center
Southeast. After seeing an open
bid in the Navy's supply system
in 2009, FRCSE obtained approv-
al to manufacture the complex
assembly, the first made at a mili-
tary facility.


contract for nearly $1 million to manufacture seven
assemblies on a cost-reimbursement basis.
"We had never done anything like this before,"
said June Tillett, the FRCSE manufacturing pro-
gram manager. "It was out there for open bid and
no commercial business seemed interested. A lack
of interest (on a government contract) is usually for
a good reason."
The FRCSE Machine Shop purchased the honey-
comb material, and artisans tried to make the core
but with little success without specific machinery.
Fleet Readiness Center East artisans at Marine
Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., tried to fabri-
cate the skin, but the component's large size made

See FRCSE, Page 13


Military Pay
Expect Two Paychecks April 15
Page 2


SIN SIDE


Officer Honored
NECE Recognizes IA
Page 7


Proud Manta
VP Squadrons Participate In Exercise
Page 16


I


5~ij~~







2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 14, 2011


Celebrating a century of naval aviation 1911-2011


Learn about naval aviation history and heritage during the yearlong Centennial of Naval Aviation celebration. Discover the wide-
ranging scope of naval aviation activities, including people, aircraft, ships, innovations and other significant events. This nationally
sponsored series of events will take place throughout the year. Centennial events are already underway at NAS lacksonville and will
continue throughout the year, culminating with the NAS Jax "Birthplace of the Blue Angels' Air Show Nov. 5-6. Visit www.public.
navy.mil/airfor/centennial.
Mission

To honor 100 years of mission-ready men and women, and recognize unique aviation-related achievements through event-driven
celebrations.


Looking back to 1945




A Consolidated PBY
Catalina seaplane prepares
to touch down on the
S St. Johns River near NAS
Jacksonville. More than
4,000 of these versatile
patrol-bomber flying
boats were built between
1936 and 1945. There was
scarcely a maritime battle
in World War II in which
they were not involved.
S. Beginning in 1952, the
Catalina was replaced
File ohoto by the Martin P5M Marlin.


Civilian families gather around to learn about the Consolidated PBY-5 Catalina at an
early NAS Jacksonville Air Show. This "flying boat" patrol bomber was produced from
1936 to 1945, and was not retired from the U.S. Navy until 1957. As the iconic aircraft
of today's maritime patrol and reconnaissance community, the Catalina could be
equipped with depth charges, bombs, torpedos and .50 caliber machine guns.


U.S. Navy photo


One perfect snowflake

By Sarah Smiley
Special Contributor r.o Azo" TL.


On a recent trip to L.L. Bean's
version of Disneyland in Freeport,
Maine, I spotted two unusual
things: a 17-foot tall Bean Boot and
about a billion of nature's most per-
fect snowflakes.
If you haven't been to L.L Bean's
flagship store, here's a quick bit of
advice: take a map, don't lose your
party, the animals are stuffed, the
fish are not, and when you're fin-
ished with all three of the expan-
sive levels, it's time to head over to
Bean's adjacent stores (yes there are
more) for home furnishings, boats,
bikes and kayaks. Oh, and wear
sneakers; unlike Disney, there are
no trams (but there is a restaurant!).
Our family of five walked out of
L.L. Bean like every other tourist:
loaded down with brown shopping
bags digging valleys into our arms..
Unlike the other tourists, however,
before we could get to the parking
lot, we had to yell words most par-
ents think they'll never say: "Get
down from that 17-foot boot before
I come up there and bring you
down!"
The weather had grown drasti-
cally colder while we were lost (I
mean this literally) inside the store.
Crisp winter air pelted our faces.
The boys stomped in partially fro-
zen puddles (you can do this when
you are wearing Bean Boots), and
I could almost see the legs of their
now wet pants freezing over. Dustin
and I lugged packages.
When we got to the car, Dustin
loaded the trunk while I scolded the
boys for getting their pants wet.
Then I saw in Lindell's hair what
looked like a piece of glitter, or one
of those annoying pieces of confetti
that sometimes fall out of birthday
or wedding invitations (why do peo-
ple think these are a good idea?).
I thought back to the time Dustin


had gone out with a bunch of guys
in his squadron and came home
with glitter in his hair. That was an
awkward conversation.
Me: Um, do you have glitter in
your hair?
The other guys (looking at their
watches and walking toward the
door): Dude, we totally need to get
home. See you later, pal. Maybe.
Me: Why would you have glitter in
your hair, Dustin?
Dustin: Oh, the dancers at that
club must have been wearing glitter
or something.
Me: So how did it get in your hair?
And what "club"?
It took awhile for Dustin to live
down the name "Glitter." I plucked
the glitter-like object from Lindell's
hair while I glared at Dustin. No
doubt, he knew what memory had
crossed my mind. But this "glitter"
melted between my fingers.
I looked at Ford, and then at
Owen. All of my children had tiny
pieces of "glitter" in their hair. I ran
to the side of the car and peered
at the ledge beneath the passen-
ger-side window. Piles of perfectly-
formed snowflakes lay like a clump
of shiny confetti waiting inside an
invitation.
I ran back to Ford. He had the
largest, most perfect snowflake I
have ever seen in my life sitting
atop his head. Another one fell on
Lindell. Two more fell on Owen's
jacket. Dustin's hair was covered
with them. The flakes weie intri-
cate, symmetrical, and so flawless
that they almost didn't seem real.
The five of us stood in the middle
of the parking lot and screamed:
"Look at them!" "There's billions!"
"They are perfect!" "I've never seen
a flake like this."


Cars swerved around us. Drivers
stared out'their windows like we
were crazy. I wanted to yell at them,
"Don't you see these flakes? Can't
you see them? They are perfect!"
Life for us had momentarily
paused. We weren't thinking about
deadlines or homework or the drive
back home. We could not think of
anything except the magnificent
snowflakes.
Passersby with angry, disap-
proving scowls on their faces had
missed the point. Their eyes were
open, but somehow they couldn't
really see. It was as if something
was in the way, reminding me of
sidelines at children's soccer games,
where there is a row of parents with
video cameras watching life unfold
through a lens.
The snowflakes were so excep-
tional, yet also entirely fleeting.
They melted in our hair before we
could really get our mind around
each perfect specimen.
If we tried to pick one up, it
turned to water in our hands. It was
like the sky was raining absolute
perfection, and we knew it might
not happen again. (Just so you don't
think I'm exaggerating about these
flakes, I put a picture on Facebook,
and no one believed that it was
real.)
There in the parking lot, I pulled
out my iPhone, always at the ready
(regrettably) in my back pocket, to
snap a picture of one perfect flake
in Ford's hair.
I looked at the snowflake through
the lens. It was incredible. Without
a single flaw. So I took the picture,
forever freezing this miracle on a
computer chip.
And suddenly, all at once, that act
seemed rather profane.


Troops to receive full

mid-month pay April 15
By Jim Caramone
American Forces Press Service


All service members will receive their full mid-
month pay they have earned in their April 15th pay-
checks, Pentagon officials said April 11.
"Basically, all active duty and reserve service
members will receive full mid-month pay on the
April 15," Pentagon spokesman Marine Col. Dave
Lapan said. "It may be in two separate payments, but
on the 15th everyone will receive their full allotted
pay."
Confusion arose about the April 15 payday due to
the threatened closure of the U.S. government last
week. Administration and congressional leaders
came to an agreement that ended that action late on
April 8.
The Defense Finance and Accounting Service had
posted "net pay advice" to some service members,
telling them what to expect in their accounts.
"Those net pay advice statements were made ...
before we knew there was an agreement to fund the
government," Lapan said. "When those were posted
they only showed partial payments, but again, every-
one will receive their full pay on the 15th for the duty
served and it may be in more than one deposit."
Officials urge service members to check their end-
of-month leave and earnings statements carefully.
The normal end-of-month statements will be posted
to accounts on April 22.
The finance and accounting service has restored
access to all leave and earnings statements, net pay
advice or advice of pay for service members on the
Mypay Website.
"The most-current advice of pay will still only
show the partial payments for April 1-8," the finance
service posted on its website. "This will allow us to
make sure we can still process pay for April 9-15 and*
take steps to ensure it is in bank accounts on the
15th."


Technology Exposition coming to Officers Club April 19


From staff

The annual NAS Jacksonville Technology Exposi-
tion, hosted by Commander, Navy Region Southeast,
will be April 19 from 10 a.m. 2 p.m. at the Officers'
Club. All military, civilian and contractor personnel
are invited to attend and discover solutions for every
mission.
More than 25 exhibitors will demonstrate the lat-
est solutions in secure communication technologies,
ruggedized computing solutions, secure workstations,


biometrics, engineering, storage and transport solu-
tions, distance learning, infrastructure management,
hardware/software, audio and visual equipment, and
much more.
To pre-register, visit www.federalevents.com, click
on the "NAS Jacksonville" link, then click the "To
Attend" tab, and choose Pre-register.
When you pre-register on line, you:
Avoid lines at check-in;
Receive a reminder email the day before the expo;
Receive a United States flag pin at check-in.


-aA r ..,e'Ins

NAS Jacksonville Assistant Public Affairs
Commanding Officer Officer
Capt. Jeffrey Maclay Kaylee LaRocque


NAS Jacksonville
Executive Officer
Capt. Robert Sanders
Command Master Chief
CMDCM(SW/SS) jeff Hudson
Public Affairs Officer
Miriam S. Gallet


Staff Writer
AT3 Omari Janhrette
lax Air News Editorial Staff
Editor
Clark Pierce
Design/Layout
George Atchley


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necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by,
the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the
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this publication, including inserts -or supplements, does not
constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The
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Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available
for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color,
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the violation is corrected.
The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close
of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to
jaxairnews@comcast.net.
The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday.


Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The luAm
Inm can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, email
jaxAirNews@comcast.net or write the luL a Imur Box 2, NAS
Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000.
The Ja AK NlEW is published by The Florida Times-Union,
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1 Riverside Avenue Jacksonville, FL 32202
904-359-4168
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0fF m 7118 8Omeff0nt


-






JAX AIR NEWS. NAS JACKSONVILLE. Thursday. April 14. 2011 3


'War Eagles' bid farewell to Melson


By Lt j.g. Rob Maul
VP-16 PAO

VP-16 will hold a change of command ceremony
April 15 at Hangar 117 where Cmdr. Mark Melson
will turn over duties as commanding officer to Cmdr.
Bradley Rosen.
Rosen joined the "War Eagles" in April 2010 and
will continue to maintain the standard of excellence
for which VP-16 is well known. Rosen, a native of
Randolph, N.J. and a 1995 graduate of the United
States Naval Academy, takes the helm during a high
profile time for the War Eagles.
He will lead the squadron through significant chal-
lenges in the maritime patrol and reconnaissance
community as he completes a shortened 12-month
inter deployment readiness cycle followed by a six-
month deployment. Rosen will also lead VP-16 as it
begins its transition to the P-8A Poseidon, the aircraft
that will replace the P-3C Orion.


Cmdr. Mark Melson Cmdr. Brad Rosen
Melson, a native of Dubuque, Iowa, and a graduate
of the University of Utah, joined VP-16 in May 2009
as executive officer and assumed command on April
29, 2011. During his time as the commanding officer,
Melson led his squadron on a successful six-month
deployment to, Italy, Djibouti and El Salvador. During
this deployment, the War Eagles completed more than


98 combat missions and 125 counter narcotics missions.
Upon their return home from deployment, the War
Eagles immediately began preparations for their next
deployment in December 2011. Upon leavingVP-16,
Melson will serve as the deputy director of the U.S.
Navy Senate Liaison Office in Washington, D.C.
Cmdr. Molly Boron will join the War Eagles as the
new executive officer. Boron is a native of Navarre,
Ohio and a 1995 graduate of the United States Naval
Academy. She is scheduled to take over as command-
ing officer in Spring 2011.
As the War Eagles prepare for the upcoming change
of command, they will remember the accomplish-
ments that Melson has helped them attain. They also
know that the next few months will be challenging
and that much is expected of them. The War Eagles
are confident that under the command of Rosen and
Boron, VP-16 will lead the way in the next chapter of
the maritime patrol and reconnaissance community's
history.


VP-16 officer selected Navy League award winner


By AT3 Omari Janhrette
Staff Writer

VP-16 Safety Officer Lt. Jared
Wilhelm was presented the
Navy League of the United
States' 2010 Adm. Vern Clark
Safety Award during the Sea-
Air-Space Exposition at the
Gaylord National Resort and
Convention Center, National
Harbor, Md. April 11.
This annual award is intend-
ed to stimulate safety through
ideas and programs that will
reduce avoidable injuries and
fatalities by providing spe-
cial recognition to individu-
als, units or organizations that
best exemplify and advance a
world-class safety culture.
"Lt. Wilhelm revolutionized
the Navy's safety program at
VP-16 with his enthusiasm
and creativity. His ideas are
being recognized and adopted
throughout the Navy includ-
ing the Aviation Safety School
in Pensacola," said VP-16
Commanding Officer Cmdr.
Mark Melson.
Wilhelm attended the avia-
tion safety officer (ASO) course


Photos by AT3 Omari anhrette
Lt. Jared Wilhelm, right, and AD1 Jeffrey Davis of VP-16 discuss
potential safety aviation discrepancies and corrections at the


squadron.
for six weeks in Pensacola,
where he learned the necessary
skills of developing a safe envi-
ronment in naval commands.
"One of the first things these
courses teach you is to start
thinking about safety when
you get back to your command.
Think about how you plan on
making safety a priority and


how you will bring safety issues
to the forefront in everything
you do," said Wilhelm.
In naval aviation there is a
model commonly referred to
as "Swiss Cheese Mod6l." This
term refers to the model of
human error, which is illustrat-
ed by holes in cheese.
Whenever the holes in the


Swiss cheese line up, it causes a
mishap. The illustration exem-
plifies the many factors that
contributed to a mishap.
While performing his duties
as ASO, Wilhelm developed a
new approach to aviation safe-
ty using humor. He calls this
humor, "safety hoopla."
His idea was to create a new
way of looking at mishaps.
Wilhelm wanted everyone in
the command, from the most


junior airman to the com-
manding officer, to take on
the responsibility of prevent-
ing mishaps by closing up the
cheese holes.
This is being accomplished
at VP-16 by having everyone
in the squadron check safety
issues.
With the squadron away on
a tri-site deployment, it was a
challenge for the "War Eagles"
to address key safety issues at
every site.
Wilhelm gives credit to the
VP-16 Sailors who contributed
to the squadron's successful
safety program by reinforcing
the importance of filling in the
cheese holes.
"Managing the safety pro-
gram for three deployment
sites was very challenging. Our
safety efforts would not be suc-
cessful if everyone is not on
board,'" added Wilhelm.
"It's a team effort. Cmdr.
Melson continuously reinforc-
es our safety goals and makes it
our top priority. I believe every-
one understands that without
safety we can't get the mission
done."






4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 14, 2011


HSL-42 'Men



of Mayhem'



return home

By CWO3 Matt Chandler

The "Men of Mayhem" of Helicopter Anti-
submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 42 Detachment
Eight, returned to NAS Jacksonville April 3 after a
six-month deployment aboard the guided-missile
frigate USS Doyle (FFG 39).
The seven aircrew and 16 maintainers deployed
with one SH-60B Seahawk helicopter in support of
Counter Illicit Trafficking (CIT) operations. "We
brought along with us all of the tools, most of the
parts, and more than enough pride and profession-
alism to successfully complete the deployment,"
said Detachment Eight Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr.
Mike Ramsey.
Operating in the 4'h Fleet Area of Responsibility,
the Men of Mayhem flew more than 550 mishap-free
flight hours in the Eastern Pacific. The Detachment
participated in multiple operations and exercis-
es with U.S. Coast Guard vessels, Mexican Naval
Air Forces, the Colombian Navy, and Colombian
Naval Air Forces. The operational tempo through-
out deployment remained steady as Doyle and
Detachment Eight participated in Operations Aztec
Eagle and Caper Focus as well as theater secu-
rity cooperation exercises with Colombia and Costa
Rica. Their efforts in these operations and exercises
helped to improve interoperability for future opera-
tions with Central and South American military
forces and continue to strengthen critical diplomatic
relationships.
While operating in the Eastern Pacific, the Doyle,
Men of Mayhem and an embarked Coast Guard
LEDET seized 960 kilograms of cocaine worth an
estimated street value of $31.7 million. The team
also accounted for multiple disruptions of illicit
trafficking and aided in the maritime rescue of a
Panamanian fishing vessel.
The HSL-42 Men of Mayhem also represented
the U.S. Navy ashore as well, by acting as ambas-
sadors during port visits, including: Panama City,
Panama; Bahia Malaga, Colombia; Puerto Quetzal,
Guatemala; Golfito, Costa Rica; and Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba.
While in port, the detachment took part in various
community relations projects. One in particular was
at a Panamanian orphanage where a Sailor stated,
"I enjoy working as a volunteer abroad as well as


Photos courtesy of HSL-42
CWO3 Matt Chandler is welcomed home by his
loved ones April 3 after landing at NAS jax in Proud
Warrior 423.
at home. Giving back
to communities has
been a big part of my
life as a recipient
and now as a volun-
teer. I believe we have
left a lasting impres-
sion in Panama and
I know of a few spe-
cial children who
have touched my
Heart back at Divino
Nino de Hogar.
AM2 Jamie Sandau Today's bond with the
reunited with his wife, orphanage and acts
Jillian, and newborn son, of kindness will defi-
Brayden. nitely strengthen our
foreign relations with
Panama."
In addition to their hard work in the community,
eight sailors from the Detachment took advantage
of their off-duty time to earn their Enlisted Aviation
Warfare Specialist qualifications. Two others pro-
gressed even farther, earning their Enlisted Surface
Warfare Specialist qualifications, and five detach-
ment sailors took part in off-duty education through
the NCPACE Program.
On April 3, the detachment's return was filled
with emotion as the sailors reunited with their loved
ones. For two detachment members, it marked a new
chapter in their lives as they said hello to their new-
est family members. AM2 Jamie Sandau embraced
his wife, Jillian, and held his newborn son, Brayden,
for the first time. ADC Rome Pitts, the detachment's
leading chief petty officer, did the same with his
daughter, Janelle.
Later that afternoon, HSL-42 Commanding Officer
Cmdr. Brad Collins, Executive Officer Cmdr. Troy
Anderson, Detachment Eight OIC Lt.L Cmdr. Mike
Ramsey and Comm'and Master Chief Terrence
Mitchell greeted the rest of the Men of Mayhem after
their bus ride to NAS Jacksonville from NS Mayport.


CEC officer awarded


for work in Haiti
From Naval Facilities Engineering Command
Southeast Public Affairs


Photo courtesy of Naval
Facilities Engineering
Command Southeast
Naval Facilities Engin-
eering Command
(NAVFAC) Southeast
Commanding Officer
Capt. John Heinzel
(left) presents Lt.
Cmdr. Yves Reme with
the Navy and Marine
Corps Achievement
Medal April 5 for his
achievements in Haiti.


Naval Facilities Engin-
eering Command (NAVFAC)
Southeast Commanding Officer
Capt. John Heinzel presented
Lt. Cmdr. Yves Reme the Navy
and Marine Corps Achievement
Medal April 5 for his achieve-
ments as Resident Officer
in Charge of Construction
(ROICG), Port-Au-Prince, Haiti.
When given the opportunity
to work in his home country of
Haiti, Reme didn't have to think
twice.
"I was very fortunate to run
into Don Maconi last year who
asked me if I was willing and
available to go to Haiti," said
Reme, reserve Civil Engineer
Corps (CEC) Officer. "I never
would have believed that I
would be doing my last tour as a
CEC officer in Haiti."
Reme returned to Haiti to
see the schools he attended as
a child and the neighborhoods
where he grew up destroyed by
the earthquake.


During his time in Haiti, from October 2010 to April 2011,
Reme established the ROICC Haiti office to award and exe-
cute 55 construction projects with a total value of $35 mil-
lion in support of U.S. Southern Command's Humanitarian
Assistance Program in the wake of the 8.1 magnitude earth-
quake that struck Haiti in January 2010.
As a native of Haiti who is fluent in French, Creole and
Haitian, Reme's ability to communicate with the locals,
the U.S. Embassy, and the government of Haiti made
him an exceptional choice for the job. He quickly estab-
lished support functions and awarded contracts to con-
struct Emergency Operation Centers, Disaster Response
Warehouses, Schools, Medical Clinics, Community Centers
and water wells across the country to better prepare Haiti for
future natural disasters.
"I have so much respect for Yves," said Capt. Dwyn Taylor,
NAVFAC Southeast operations officer. "I had been to Haiti
before the earthquake and I was there with Yves when he
showed me the work they were doing in Haiti. Not only is he
compassionate and dedicated to helping the people of Haiti,
he is a devoted citizen of the United States."
"It is so easy to take many things for granted as Americans
... but it's clear Yves doesn't," stated Taylor.
"I am honored to know him as a man and to have worked
side-by-side with him as a Civil Engineer Corps officer."


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JAX \IR NE\\S. NAS JACKSONVILLE. Thursdayv.April 14. 2011 5


FACSFAC


Jacksonville


celebrates 34


years of excellence

By OS1 (SW) Debra Taylor
FACSFAC lax PA()


Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility
Jacksonville (FACSFAC Jax) celebrated its 34th anni-
versary on April 1 with a cake-cutting ceremony in
Building 118, located adjacent to the NAS Jacksonville
airfield control tower. The command originally stood
up in 1977 to fulfill the increasing need for coordina-
tion of the Jacksonville fleet operating areas. FACSFAC
Jax was also designated by COMNAVAIRLANT as
the single point of contact between the Navy and the
Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) on all airspace matters
in the Jacksonville area.
FACSFAC lax is responsible for the control, coordi-
nation and management of all airspace, sea space, and
sub-sea space within its area of responsibility. This
includes all military warning and restricted areas, tar-
get ranges and training routes from Charleston, S.C.
to Cape Canaveral, Fla. a coastline of approximately
280 miles.
Consisting of 88 military and 11 civilian personnel,
FACSFAC Jax is split into several divisions, each an
integral component of the overall mission.
Sealord Division, staffed with 37 air traffic control-
lers, has the formidable task of managing nearly 80,000
square miles of airspace. Sealord provides air traffic
control services to fleet and local squadrons from
area bases. It also supports carrier operations flying
in and out of restricted and warning airspace. With
an average of 36,300 aircraft per year, it is imperative
to maintain a vigilant watch. A close relationship is
maintained with the FAA in order to support the safe
and expeditious flow of traffic through the Operation
Area. During inclement weather, commercial airlin-
ers are sometimes re-routed through the restrict-
ed airspace. In addition to the over-water warning
area, Sealord controls all aircraft flying to and from
the Pinecastle Bombing Range, the Navy's only live-
impact range on the east coast.
The FACSFAC lax Airspace Office manages all Navy
Special Use Airspace (SUA) from Charleston, S.C. to
Key West, and the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba operat-
ing areas. It also manages SUA in the Gulf of Mexico
from Corpus Christi, Texas to Pensacola, as well as the
training airspace in Mississippi and the Naval Support
Activity in Crane, Ind. restricted areas.
According to Ron McNeal, the civilian FACSFAC
lax airspace assistant, "The airspace office is respon-
sible for developing new airspace requests, due to the
changing capabilities of naval aircraft, including the
F-35 Lightning and Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS)."
Along with new airspace, FACSFAC lax maintains let-
ters of agreement with many FAA en-route centers and
approach control facilities.
Bristol Division, comprised of 19 operations special-
ists, is responsible for the surface assets moving in and
out of restricted areas. "Bristol is the surface com-
ponent of FACSFAC lax, providing real-time training
opportunities to both Navy and joint units afloat. This
includes air control services to ship and shore assets,
exercise support for training, and Northern Right
Whale coordination with various coastal elements
along the eastern border," says OS1(SW/AW) Richard
English.
A unique aspect of the FACSFAC Jax mission is
tracking endangered North Atlantic Right Whales
that migrate through coastal waters during their
calving season, which runs from November through
April. Right whales are the most rare of all large whale
species. In U.S. waters, right whales are in danger
of extinction. According to the National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Agency, collisions with ships are
the number one cause of death to right whales. It is
estimated that only 300 to 400 North Atlantic Right
Whales survive in the western North Atlantic.
"Bristol Division provides naval units with the best
possible information upon which to make a sound
operational judgment to carry out mission require-
ments and minimize interaction with this endan-
gered species," explained OS2(SW) JaMichael Rogers,
FACSFAC lax Assistant North Atlantic right whale
coordinator.
This past calving season, Bristol tallied reports of
321 right whale sightings. The high number of sight-
ings is credited to the same whales being reported


Chapel Center

Calendar
Sunday Services
8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship
9:30 a.m. Catholic Mass
9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School
10:45 a.m. Catholic CCD
11 a.m. Protestant Worship
Daily Catholic Mass
11:35 a.m. (except Fridays)
Weekly Bible Study
6 p.m. in the Barracks
Officer Christian Fellowship and Bible study
Every Monday at 6 p.m. Contact Chaplain Williams
at 542-0024 for information.
Help wanted
Please call to volunteer as a lay communion assistant,
acolyte or prayer petitioner.

NAS Jacksonville Chapel Center
Corner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road
542-3051


Photos bi U IS SV, Debra Tadlor
(From left) Fleet Area Control and Surveillance
Facility Jax (FACSFACJAX) Commanding Officer
Cmdr. Todd Abrahamson, FACSFACJAX Senior
Enlisted Leader ACCS Scott Powell and FACSFACJAX
Executive Officer Lt. Cmdr. Michael Lebesch proudly
display the anniversary celebration cake.
A -r~


.I
---- b




.u:


S,
AC2 Richard Wilkinson of Sealord at Fleet Area
Control and Surveillance Facility Jax controls aircraft
in the local operating area.
numerous times throughout the season. Research at
the Center for Coastal Studies in Provincetown, Mass.
revealed that saving two mature female North Atlantic
right whales per year from untimely deaths could
reverse the decline of the population.
All users of FACSFAC Jax operating areas arrange
their proposed activities through schedules division.
Randall Wright, a civilian contractor for Wyle
Laboratories working in schedules division said, "We
control the scheduling and use of some 80,000 square
miles of Special Use Airspace and Surface areas in
the Jacksonville Area of Responsibility. The schedul-
ing process is complex and requires keen attention
to detail to ensure that areas are not double-booked
and to also ensure that requests for areas are not over-
looked." Granting permission for ship movements
and live exercises, the bristol and schedules divisions
work together to help battle groups avoid conflicts.
The FACSFAC Jax Maintenance Division provides
critical support by ensuring equipment is operating to
standards and all necessary supplies are available to
support the mission.
See FACSFAC, Page 13


Photo courtesy of VP-10
Lt. Greg Siegert (left) and Lt. Cmdr. David Neall of
the VP-10 Safety/NATOPS Department cut a cake,
celebrating the squadron's 38 years of mishap-free
flying.


'Red Lancers'

celebrate 38 years

of mishap-free flying

By Lt. j.g. Greg Ewing
VP- 10 PAO

The "Red Lancers" of VP-10 recently celebrated
surpassing 38 years and 227,000 hours of mishap-
free flying.
Over-the decades, the Red Lancers have maxi-
mized mission effectiveness and safety by continu-
ally focusing on time proven aviation fundamentals
and aggressively incorporating risk management
and strategies into all operations and striving to
uphold the highest standards in all endeavors.
This milestone would not have been possible
without the tireless efforts of all VP-10 personnel.
As Lt. Cmdr. David Neall, VP-10 Safety/NATOPs
officer, describes it, "The mishap-free flying anni-
versary is a significant achievement for our squad-
ron. It is a direct reflection of the hard work and
dedication of our aircrew and maintainers to keep
us safely flying every day. Our aircrew and mainte-
nance personnel will have to continue to be vigilant
so we can make the next mishap-free milestone."
On their upcoming deployment, VP-10 looks to
maintain the Red Lancer standard of excellence
during the tireless execution of airborne missions
over Southwest Asia.


I







6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 14. 2011


VP-30 wings Navy's new NFOs


By LL j.g Farin Wilson
VP-30 Public Affairs

On April 1, Commander,
Patrol and Reconnaissance
Group Rear Adm. Michael
Hewitt and VP-30 Comman-
ding Officer Capt. Perry Yaw
awarded naval flight officer
(NFO) wings to 14 officers.
The recipients completed the
undergraduate maritime flight
officer syllabus at the VP-30
"Pro's Nest" to earn their cov-
eted wings of gold.
The newly winged aviators
will now enroll in the CAT 1
Fleet Replacement Squadron
(FRS) syllabus at VP-30.
Upon completion of the CAT
1 syllabus, they will report
,to operational P-3C or EP-3
.squadrons to begin their ini-
tial sea tours in Kaneohe Bay,
Hawaii, Whidbey Island,
Wash., or remain at NAS
Jacksonville.


.. '
-4i





I e" c. I.L
aC


Photo by Lt. j.g. Farin Wilson
(Back row, from left) Ensigns Ty-Jebeck Ruun, John Bailey, Stephen Rhodes, Roger Kim, Lt. j.g.
Timothy Stecker and Ensign Denver White. (Front row, from left) CPRG Rear Adm. Michael
Hewitt, Ensigns Troy Tilson, Khoi Duong, Jason Coyne, Phillip Cook, Benjamin Nebeker, Raymond
Gomez, Christopher Wright, Bruce Rushing and VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Perry Yaw.


The NFO training pipeline
begins with Aviation Preflight
Introduction (API) instruction
in Pensacola, where all avia-
tion officers undergo a class-
room syllabus and are taught
the basics of naval aviation,
including courses such as aero-
dynamics, meteorology and
navigation principles.
After completing API, all stu-
dent NFOs report for primary
training at Training Squadron
Ten, also at NAS Pensacola.
Here they put their classroom
learning to the test with initial
airborne flight training in the
T-6A Texan II.
Upon completion of pri-
mary flight training at NAS
Pensacola, officers who are
selected for the P-3 training
pipeline report to VP-30 for P-3
Orion-specific training.


FRCSE executive named FMA vice president


By Marsha Childs
FRCSE Public Affairs
The Federal Managers Association
(FMA) announced George Smith, Fleet
Readiness Center Southeast depu-
ty director for the Industrial Support
Division, as its newly elected national
vice president at this year's convention
'held March 14-17 in Washington, D.C.
Smith, a federal employee for nearly
30 years, served most recently as Region
2 Director for FMA, a professional asso-
ciation representing the interests of the
nearly 200,000 managers, supervisors
and executives.
"I'm honored to have been elect-
ed," said Smith upon his return to
Jacksonville. "I feel like I have stepped
up to the next level. There will be more
demanded of me, but I am up to the
challenge. I hope to make a difference
on Capitol Hill and throughout FMA."
He began his federal service in 1982
as a temporary sandblaster at the Naval


Photo by Marsha Childs
The Federal Managers Association
(FMA) announced George Smith as
the groups's national vice president on
March 14 at this year's convention held
in Washington, D.C.
Air Rework Facility in Virginia. He rap-
idly rose to first-line supervisor working
in various shops.
Smith joined FMA in 1983 and
accepted a position as the FMA Chapter
85 parliamentarian in 1985. He served
on the executive board until he relocat-
ed to Jacksonville, Fla. in 1995 when a


Defense Base Realignment and Closure
(BRAC) order closed the Norfolk facility.
He joined FMA Chapter 11 at Naval
Air Depot Jacksonville and was elected
the chapter's president in 1998. In 2006,
members elected him as the FMA Zone
3 president and, following reorganiza-
tion, he transitioned to the Region 2
Director position.
"It is very exciting that we can make
a difference by passing legislation
that represents not only active feder-
al employees but also those who have
retired," he said.
He also advanced up the federal
employee ranks to second-level super-
visor in 1997 with his promotion to the
Engine Production general foreman,
followed by a promotion in 2001 to the
TF34 Engine Program manager, and
again in 2007 as section supervisor for
the Industrial Business Operations
Office. His extensive knowledge of
Naval aviation aircraft, weapons and


systems, including research, design,
development and systems engineering
makes him a valuable asset.
One of his numerous duties as vice
president will be to testify before
Congress about issues effecting federal
employees.
"When I'm on the Hill giving testi-
mony before members of Congress, it
can be a little unnerving," said Smith.
"I don't think the public realizes just
how much we do. I can tell you plenty of
anecdotes that prove otherwise."
Smith serves on the FMA commit-
tee providing input to the Office of
Personnel Management.
"Being an FMA member brings me
a true sense of accomplishment," said
Smith, "and it is a great networking
tool."
Smith said he is honored to serve with
FMA President Patricia Niehaus, the
first woman to hold the position in the
association's nearly 100-year history.


,-- --------------------------------------^




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JAX AIR NEWS. NAS JACKSONVILLE. Thursday. April 14. 2011 7


Navy Entomology Center of Excellence officer recognized


By Lt. j.g. Ryan Larson
Navy Entomology Center
of Excellence PAO

Lt. James Dunford of the
Navy Entomology Center of
Excellence (NECE) was pre-
sented the Defense Meritorious
Service Medal in a ceremony
held at the center March 10, for
his outstanding service as an
Individual Augmentee while
deployed to Afghanistan.
Dunford deployed with the
U.S. Army 62"d Medical Brigade
Task Force from March to
November 2010 in support of
Operation Enduring Freedom.
He served as the entomolo-
gist for the Cooperative Medical
Assistance (CMA) Team; a small
unit tasked with planning, coor-
dinating and executing medical,
veterinary, and public health
humanitarian civil-military
operations.
Dunford facilitated and
exported sustainable Health
Sector Development initiatives
in order to assist Afghanistan in
the establishment and manage-
ment of self-sustaining medi-
cal, veterinary and agricultural
entomology programs.
As part of the CMA Team, he
also provided training to more


. -'." "" ", --

Photo courtesy of Lt. lames Dunford
Lt. James Dunford (center) walks with Afghan children while
performing tick surveillance during a veterinary outreach and
sustainment operation.


than 1,000 secondary, graduate
and professional medical and
non-medical Afghan nationals.
The CMA team executed a
"train the trainer" strategy to
disseminate medical and agri-
cultural knowledge throughout
Afghan villages by educating
village elders.
These tactics are part of a larg-
er counter insurgency operation
to win the hearts and minds of
the Afghan people by upholding
the country's infrastructure and
ability to sustain themselves in
the absence of coalition support.
"Lt. Dunford's recognition for


his deployment to Afghanistan
in support of the CMA is well
deserved," said Lt. Cmdr. Jeffrey
Stancil, NECE technical direc-
tor.
"He proactively designed and
implemented agricultural, vet-
erinary and medical capacity
building programs that were the
model for this type of counter
insurgency operation."
In the summer of 2010, the
team travelled to Bamyan
Province to teach entomology,
veterinary, and human health
and hygiene courses to schools
in the region. The team also


Photo by lose Medina
Navy Entomology Center
of Excellence Officer in
Charge Cmdr. Eric Hoffman
(right) presents Lt. James
Dunford with the Defense
Meritorious Service Medal for
his outstanding service while
deployed to Afghanistan as an
Individual Augmentee.

worked with students on-speak-
ing general entomology and
medical terms in English.
"It was a great honor to teach
in Bamyan," said Dunford.
"After sharing information on
medically and agriculturally
important insects with hun-
dreds of junior high and high
school students in several
remote valleys, I see that the
bright, yet isolated culture in
this part of the word is eager to
learn."
"Being able to teach at some
of the schools in the region was
especially memorable, and


learning that several students in
each class were already asking
questions in English was a testa-
ment to their dedication to edu-
cation," said Dunford. "I look
forward to hearing good things
about this part of Afghanistan in
the future."
Due to CMA mission require-
ments, the team frequently
travelled "outside the wire" and
relied heavily on external secu-
rity teams to mitigate hostile sit-
uations, which Dunford referred
to as "snippets."
According to Dunford, none
of the CMA missions outside the
wire would have been possible
without the support and exper-
tise of the security teams and
civil affairs personnel located
across the country.
"Many of my most memorable
experiences involved working
with the men and woman at the
small installations much closer
to the frontlines- I sincerely
appreciate and am humbled by
all that they do," said Dunford.
In April, Dunford will be
departing the Navy Entomology
Center of Excellence for a Duty
under Instruction fellowship at
the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention in Atlanta.


VP-45 takes another ASW Rodeo' win !


By Lt. j.g. Farin Wilson
VP-30 Public Affairs


Fierce competition was the hallmark of this year's
Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF)
Anti-submarine Warfare (ASW) Rodeo the event
where VP squadrons from across the globe sent their
best-and-brightest combat aircrew (CAC) to NAS
Jacksonville to compete for the coveted MPRF ASW
championship belt.
The VP-45 "Pelicans" CAC-1 took the win for the
second year in a row.
In his remarks at the award ceremony, Rear
Adm. Michael Hewitt, commander Patrol and
Reconnaissance Group, explained that competitors
simply "had to do what they were trained for and do it
well. Congratulations to the Pelicans."
Members of VP-45 CAC-1 consisted of Patrol Plane
Commander Lt. Kerry Bistline, Second Pilot Lt. Eric
Watt, Tactical Coordinator Lt. j.g. Will Thomas, Lt.
j.g. Pete Brown (Navigation/Communications), AWO2


Shawn Conliglio (Sensor 1), AWO1 Joshua Turnage
(Sensor 2), and AWO2 Robert Hall (Sensor 3).
The competitors were evaluated on standardization,
effectiveness and efficiency during a simulator.and a
tactical flight.
The simulator missions took place at NAS
Jacksonville and the tactical flights were 'hunting'' Los
Angeles-class submarine USS Pittsburgh (SSN-720)
out of Groton, Conn.
Judging took place during the two weeks prior to the
April 4 award presentation, with 11 squadrons partici-
pating. The winning CAC-1 from VP-45 claimed their
heavy focus on preparation and coordination were the
keys to success.
Lt. Cmdr. Rob Wilhelm, the evaluator for the flight
portion of the challenge said,."Their superior mission
planning, overall cohesion as a crew, and ability to
operate the aircraft effectively is what allowed them
to win."
Watt explained that they take a wide-view approach
of knowing the specific goal of each mission and


Photo by MC1 Michelle Lucht
VP-45 "Pelicans" CAC-1 was victorious again in the
MPRF Fleet Challenge. (From left) Lt. j.g. William
Thomas, Lt. j.g. Eric Nuckols, AWO2 Robert Hall,
AWO2 Shawn Coniglio and Lt. Eric Watt.
ensuring it is accomplished early, while still having
fun.
CAC-1 has been together since August 2010 and they
are looking forward to staying together through an
upcoming deployment.
CAC-1 will be heading to one of VP-45's tri-site
deployment sites El Salvador, Sigonella, Italy, or
Djibouti, Africa, in May/June 2011.


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."' '" "... ". "







8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE. T, .. -.. A.' A14. 0 i I


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Photo by MCI Michelle tucht
The Navy's next-generation, long-range, anti-submarine warfare and maritime patrol aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon, lands for the first time at NAS Jacksonville on April
4, during the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force Centennial of Naval Aviation events.


Photo by MCI Alfredo Rosado
World War II and Vietnam War veteran (retired) Rear Adm. Joe Coleman (ball
cap) swapped sea stories with VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Perry Yaw dur-
ing the "Heritage Fly In" of historic Navy aircraft on April 4 at NAS Jacksonville.


Photo by MCI Alfredo Rosado
AMEAN Justin Hussey explains the SV-2 airsafe vest and other aircrew survival
equipment to attendees of the Centennial of Naval Aviation celebration.


MPRF: Heritage Fly In begins week of celebration


From Page 1


I fired my rifle into the air and
the cows scattered," Roffler
continued.
"That night the cows took out
more planes than the enemy.
They chewed the canvas aile-
rons and rudders off of about 40
aircraft."
"Honoring the past, forg-
ing the future" is the theme of
the MPRF Centennial of Naval
Aviation (CoNA) celebration
and symposium and many
legends of naval aviation came
to town.
The week began with leg-
endary aircraft arriving at the
Heritage Fly In. In addition
to the three heritage-painted
P-3Cs that have been fly-
ing around Jacksonville for
the past few months, Col. Bob
Murphy flew his TBM Avenger,
"Pacific Princess" and Mike
Amble brought his Coast Guard
Stearman biplane for the event.
The fly in wrapped up with the
arrival of the P-8A Poseidon,
the Navy's next generation of
long-range, anti-submarine
warfare and maritime patrol
aircraft.
"I think the CoNA attendees
are going to walk away with a
feeling that their legacy lives on
today through our junior air-
crews. It's as much about what
our junior personnel are learn-
ing from the heroes of the past,
as it is what they are getting
from us," said Rear Adm. Mike
Hewitt, commander, Patrol and
Reconnaissance Group.
The next big event showcased
legendary Sailors of maritime
patrol. During the heritage din-
ner at NAS Jax Hangar 117, six
Navy aviators were inducted
into the Maritime Patrol and
Reconnaissance Hall of Honor:
Capt. Fernald Anderson;
lay Beasley; Chief Aviation
Ordnanceman Carl Creamer,
whose PBY was shot down dur-
ing the Battle of Dutch Harbor,
Alaska in 1942; Capt. Norman
"Bus" Miller, the most decorat-
ed naval aviator of WWII; Adm.
Thomas Moorer; and Vice Adm.
A


- -...C. .
TiT~i-ili -


7,






Photo by MCC William Lovelady
Retired AWC Paul White stands with VP-62 Commanding
Officer Cmdr. Brian Carpenter and CMDCM Phil Rogers with
the Liberty Bell trophy that White's crew won in 1978 for being
named the best Naval Air Reserve ASW crew. White is a plank


owner in both VP-62 and VP-16.
Edward Waller. Two of the six
inductees, Creamer and Waller,
remain living legends.
Capt. Perry Yaw, command-
ing officer of VP-30, asked all
naval aviators present to stand
and then sit in groups accord-
ing to the decade when they
received their wings as pilot or
crew. Most aviators still serv-
ing were seated in the 2000s
and 1990s, but even when the


1950s group were in their seats
- there were still a half-dozen
aviators standing all of whom
received their wings before the
end of WW II. Among those was
retired Rear Adm. Joe Coleman
a WW II aviator who also com-
manded USS Mispillion (AO-
105) and USS Ranger (CV-61)
during the Vietnam War.
"What I've been seeing over
the past year as we've been put-


4-


Photo by MC2 Gary Granger Jr.
A P-3C Orion, decked out in a heritage paint scheme, soars over
NAS Jacksonville on April 4 as part of the MPRF Centennial of
Naval Aviation celebration.


ting this event together, is that
our junior personnel have real-
ly taken ownership of our his-
tory and legacy," said Hewitt.
"We are fortunate they can
establish a close cooperation
with our senior folks, especially
those who served during World
War II and did so much to make
maritime patrol part of naval
aviation for the future," contin-
ued Hewitt.
"It's been a thrill for us to
meet these senior aviators from
our history and hear how proud
they are of what we are doing
today."
"This helps us to embrace
the more than 40 years of P-3
history and bring to life the
foundation of P-3 Sailors," said



^1- -


Photo b: ,.'C C !ianna -
To maintain physical fitness during their week at NAS lax, many Sailors and retirees entered the
MPRF Centennial of Naval Aviation 5K race.


AWVAN Raul Retana, "I'm
excited to learn more about the
PBYs and their action at the
Battle of Midway"
As the celebration of mari-
time patrol heritage wound
down, attendees looked to
the future. While the P-8A
Poseidon was on everyone's
mind, it won't be the only air-
craft flying maritime patrol.
This year marks 100 years of
naval aviation, and next year
marks 50 years that the P-3
Orion has been a part of naval
aviation. Since the end of the
Cold War, the P-3 has shifted
from primarily performing an
anti-submarine warfare mis-
sion to counter drug operation,
counter piracy and anything
else that requires a patrol and
surveillance capability.
"The P-3 is just as relevant
today as it was 50 years ago,"
said Vice Adm. Andy Winns,
naval inspector general and a
P-3 flight officer.
"We're approaching the oper-
ational phase with the P-8, yet
we have no idea how global
conflicts will change how we
use that aircraft in the future.
Right now the P-8 is expected to
fill the same role as the P-3, but
the P-3 is doing different mis-
sions than it did 50 years ago.
It's the adaptability of MPRF
men and women that will make
the difference," nns conclud-
ed.


4'. -:"


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e







JAX AIR NEW\VS. NAS .... *. VI! Thursday. April 14. : 11


Photo by MCC Wiilliam Lovelady
Three P-3C Orions with heritage paint schemes share the tarmac with the Navy's next-generation P-8A Poseidon and the unmanned Broad Area Maritime Surveillance
(BAMS) aircraft (center) April 5 at NAS Jacksonville.


Photo by AW03 Travis Robinson
Col. Bob Murphy taxis past a P-3C Orion in his restored Grumman TBM Avenger
torpedo bomber as part of the Heritage Fly In at NAS Jacksonville. The Avenger
saw its first action in the pivitol Battle of Midway in 1942.


Photo by AW03 Travis Robinson
Pilot Mike Amble invited VP-30 Executive Officer Cmdr. Matt Ahern aboard his
Stearman biplane for the MPRF Centennial of Naval Aviation Heritage Fly In
event. The Stearman (Boeing) Model 75 served as a primary flight trainer during
World War II.


Photo courtesy of VP-30


Photo by MCC William Lovelady


-;'.->? .^a a -H ;
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Photo by AW03 Travis Robinson
A quartet of VP-26 Sailors check out the Northrup Grumman Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) demonstrator model April 4 at the MPRF Tech Expo in the
VP-30 hangar.


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10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday. April 14L 2011


PBY markings honor local WWII POW survivor


By Lt. Cmdr. John Wickham
VP-26

On permanent display at
NAS Jacksonville Heritage
Park, the newly restored PBY-
5A Catalina, Bureau Number
6582, was dedicated April 6 to
all those who sacrificed their
lives aboard a PBY.
The PBY-5A, commonly
referred to as the Catalina,
was a "flying boat" capable of
being launched and recovered
both on sea and land. These
aircraft were designed and
built by Consolidated Aircraft
Manufacturing Company.
The designation PB stands
for Patrol Bomber and Y
for Consolidated Aircraft
Manufacturing Company.
More than 4,000 Catalinas
were built, serving in every
branch of the United States
Armed Forces, as well as with
allied countries, during the
Second World War. The air-
craft possessed several distinct
advantages over earlier flying
boats that extended its range
and effectiveness as a recon-
naissance and attack platform.
Some squadrons were dedi-
cated to nighttime attack
roles. These specially painted
Black PBYs were affection-
ately known as "Black Cats"


Photo by Clark Pierce
Hundreds of Sailors and retirees attended the April 6 dedication of the World War II PBY-5A Catalina at NAS Jax Heritage Park.


and flown by courageous
crews that played a vital role
suppressing the enemy's abil-
ity to resupply its forces under
the cover of night. Today, PBY
Catalina aircraft continue to
serve as aerial firefighting plat-
forms.
While PBY aircraft at NAS
lax is dedicated to all crew-
members lost aboard a PBY,
the airplane's markings were
specially selected in honor of
a local WWII POW survivor,


retired AOC Carl Creamer. A
veteran of the VP- 41 "Huskies,"
Creamer attended the dedica-
tion with his wife, Jeanette,
and sons, Roger and Richard
Creamer.
The Huskies flew the PBY
during WWII and partici-
pated in the Aleutian Islands
Campaign with Fleet Air Wing
4, based out of the naval facili-
ties at Dutch Harbor, Alaska.
On June 2, Creamer's PBY set
out on a patrol over the north-


ern Pacific, the first seven
hours of which was with-
out incident, until a flight of
Japanese Zeros pounced on the
VP-41 aircraft.
The aircraft was soon on its
way down for a crash landing
in the choppy sea. The crew
did not have enough time to
secure the bow and tunnel
hatches due to the sudden-
ness of the attack, and the
burning Catalina immediately
began sinking as water poured


through the openings. Three
of the nine crewmembers were
lost when one of the two life
rafts sank.
The pilot, Lt. j.g. Cusick, and
another crew member died
shortly of exposure, leaving
only three survivors: Wylie
Hunt, Joe Brown and Carl
Creamer. The three drifted in
the darkness and rough seas
until they were picked up by a
Japanese vessel and taken pris-
oners.


PBY CATALINA: 'Workhorse of maritime patrol for more than 20 years


From Page 1

nights and weekends (about 2,500
man-hours) to make the PBY refur-
bishment a success, including: retired
ADCS Gilbert Wood and retired ADC
Rick Sorrell, both Cubic Corporation
P-3 flight simulator instructors; retired
Cmdr. Ray Art; Lt. Cmdr. Dennis
Jensen; USAF Airmen 1"t Class Kenneth
Wood and Randall Treadway; retired
ADC Ron Adamec; AFCM Joe Tierney;
AFCM Mark Sulfridge; Capt. Perry Yaw
and his family; as well as the VP-26
Corrosion Branch and numerous VP-30


students and staff.
Hewitt reminded the audience,
"The PBY Catalina was the workhorse
of maritime patrol for more than 20
years. The P-3 has been that same kind
of workhorse for more than 40 years.
There are many similarities between
the people who flew PBYs and those
who operate in P-3s. Both can operate
from remote, expeditionary locales and
perform patrol, anti-submarine warfare
and over-land reconnaissance."
Hewitt added, "Our MPR force has
endured because, in its purest form,
naval aviation is about patrolling the


seas and building trust with our allies
around the globe. This week.affords
us the opportunity to look back, cel-
ebrate our heritage and renew our vow
to honor our next generation of heroes."
"The markings on this particular
PBY-5A honor a crew from VP-41 that
flew in the Battle of Dutch Harbor dur-
ing the Aleutian Islands Campaign
in Alaska June 3-4, 1942. During the
seventh hour of their patrol, the crew
of BUNO 6582 was overwhelmed by
Japanese fighters. With one engine
destroyed, the Catalina crash-landed
at sea with three of its nine-man crew


surviving in a life raft. They were picked
up by a Japanese vessel and spent the
remainder of World War II as prisoners
of war," concluded Hewitt.
Retired AOC Carl Creamer, a sur-
viving crew member of VP-41 BUNO
6582, was an honored guest at the cer-
emony. Hewitt also introduced other
former World War II PBY aircrew in
the audience: Marlin Crider, Richard
Gammache and Bill Lahnen.
Hewitt and Yaw unveiled the air-
craft's dedication plaque in honor of
all Sailors who were lost while serving
aboard PBY Catalina aircraft.


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12 JAX AIR i '.' NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday. Ar 14. 2011


Hanania Automotive Group selected as air show sponsor


By Tina Kassis
5' eal Contributor

Hanania Automotive Group, one of
Florida's leading auto dealer er',iup',.
today announced that it has been
selected as the title sponsor of the NAS
Jacksiri. ille Air Shrow- celebrating the
Centennial of Naval Aviation.
As the only company chosen for
this pri-.tigioui sponsorship position,
1ianania underwent a rigorous selec-
tion process to earn this role.
The dealer group will be represented
at virtually every part of the air show
to actively support the nation's military
and the greater Jacksonville commu-
nity.
'We are honored and excited to have
been selected to be in partnership
with the Centennial of Naval Aviation
Air Show at NAS lax," commented
Jack Hanania, president and CEO of
Hanania Automotive Group.
"This thrilling event is a vital part of
our community and region, and we are
proud to be able to play such an impor-
tant role.


Filephoto b. Kl 'ee -*' 7.
The Blue Angels will be back at NAS Jax this November.

Our nation's military is sec- all located on Blanding Boulevard in
ond to none; we all owe a great deal Jacksonville, and gladly serves the com-
of gratitude to the men and women munity in the North Florida area.
who defend us and support freedom The 2011 NAS Jacksonv Ile Air Show is
and democracy around the world." an essential part of a yearlong celebra-
Hanania Automotive Group tion of 100 years of Naval Aviation hon-
owns Acura of Orange Park, Audi oring a century of mission-ready men
Jacksonville, Hyundai of Orange andwomen.
Park and Volkswagen of Orange Park The event will take place Nov. 5-6 at


NAS Jacksonville.
H,,nnrink the 100th anniversary of
naval aviation underscores the com-
mitment to sustaining a Navy, Marine
Corps and Coast Guard that win wars,
protect the home front and enable
peace.
The nation's air forces are strong
because of the support of their ser-
vice members, their families and the
American public.
Bh hcin~ring naval aviation, we honor
the country and the city of Jacksonville,
and assure America and our allies that
their security is guaranteed by a strong
\a\ ), Marine Corps and Coast Guard
Team.
"We salute Hanania Automotive
Group on our selection as this year's
title sponsor," said NAS lax Morale,
Welfare and Recreation Operations
Manager Mike McCool.
"We would like to thank all area busi-
nesses that competed for this honor.
Hanania Automotive Group's commit-
ment to supporting the NAS Jax 2011 Air
Show is commendable."


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JAX AIR NEWS. NAS JACKSONVILLE. Thursday, April 14, 2011 13


FRCSE: Parts from SARDIP save money


From Page 1


the task impossible.
"The honeycomb core
is sandwiched between
a skin that resembles a
taco shell," said Tillett. "It
is a very complex assem-
bly with more than 100
parts."
Tillett, along with Plan-
ner/Estimator Rickey
Paradise, Materials
Engineer John Lee,
Composite Repair Shop
Supervisor Jerry Watson
and Sheet Metal Shop
Supervisor Jamie
Childers traveled to Texas
in April 2010 to establish
informal partnerships
with two commercial
vendors.
One fabricated the
honeycomb cbres and
the other the skins, both
using specialized tool-
ing and machinery with
materials provided by
FRCSE.
Paradise and Danny
Parker, an equipment
specialist, drew up the
contracts to identify
the materials and labor
needed for the difficult
project. In addition, they
designed the workflow
and incorporated the
specifications for bond-
ing the aluminum parts.
The FRCSE Machine
Shop located the original
rudder assembly tool-
ing stored since the early
1970s in a warehouse at
the U.S. Army-Charles
Melvin Price Support
Center in Granite City, Ill.
During shipment, a
large, outdated fixture
secured by only four lag
bolts to a wooden pallet
broke loose from the plat-
form and sustained dam-
age.
FRCSE artisans not
only repaired and cali-
brated the unit but also


Photos by Vic Pitts
A Fleet Readiness .Center Southeast EA-6B Prowler
aircrew prepares for takeoff from NAS Jacksonville
Dec. 7, 2010. Pilot Cmdr. Russell Larratt (upper left)
and Naval Flight Officers Cmdr. Paul Filardi (not
shown), Lt. Cmdr Dan Stark (lower center) and Lt.
Cmdr. Steven Kulikowski (upper right) are deliver-
ing the last scheduled Prowler to Electronic Attack
Squadron (VAQ) 140 at NAS Widbey Island, Wash.
The Navy is transitioning from the Prowler to the
EA-18 Growlerwith the last squadron transition
scheduled in 2014. The Marine Corps will continue
to use an ICAP-III variant of the EA-6B in its four
electronic attack squadrons until 2019.


made the metal pins that
secure the rudder in the
fixture. A bonding fix-
ture was also shipped.
Artisans faced a bigger
challenge when decid-
ing how to position the
assembly in the fixtures
without the benefit of
instructions.
In the Composite
Repair Shop, fabricators
bonded the outer skin
and the honeycomb core
in a "clean" room. The
bonding fixture helped.
artisans line up the upper
and lower ribs and the
forward spar.
Once in position, the
assembly was baked in
an autoclave. Supervisor
Jerry Watson said if the
assembly is "not aligned
correctly, it affects the
next shop down the line"
and ultimately the per-
formance of the rudder.
Once bonded, the unit
was sent to the sheet
metal shop where arti-
sans drilled holes in
the seams and attached


numerous fittings and
shrouds. They sent the
assembly back to the
composite shop for seam
sealing and final finishes.
Painters applied a prim-
er coat before aircraft
mechanics fit-checked
the unit on the aircraft.
Aerospace Engineers
John Salemi and Shawn
Pillsworth provided First
Article Testing on the
first rudder assembly to
ensure conformance with
design specifications
throughout production.
FRCSE machinists
manufactured more than
75 components for each
contracted rudder assem-
bly.
As the fallout rate for
the EA-6B rudder assem-
blies increased, NAVICP
awarded FRCSE a second
contract for $1.7 million
to manufacture 12 addi-
tional rudders, totaling 19
in all.
FRCSE and NAVICP are
discussing a third con-
tract to ensure the legacy


Sheet Metal Mechanic
Bill Cowart installs hinge
covers on the leading
edge of an EA-6B Rudder
Assembly in the Sheet
Metal Shop Feb. 10.
Fleet Readiness Center
Southeast is the first mil-
itary installation to make
the scarce assemblies.
aircraft have a ready sup-
ply of "Condition A" rud-
der assemblies.
FRCSE EA-6B Product
Manager Mike Butler
said the maintenance
facility uses rudders
taken from aircraft
slated for the Stricken
Aircraft Reclamation
and Disposal Program
(SARDIP), a cost-saving
measure to reclaim parts
and to demilitarize the
remainder of the aircraft.
S"We have been rely-
ing on SARDIP aircraft
to meet production and
Fleet requirements," said
Butler.
"One out of every three
Prowlers that comes in
for SARDIP has a good
rudder."
The Navy is transi-
tioning from the EA-6B
Prowler to the EA-18G
Growler, a modified ver-
sion of the two-seat F/A-
18F Super Hornet, with
the last squadron transi-
tion scheduled in 2014.
The Marine Corps plans
to continue employing
the newest ICAP-III vari-
ant of the EA-6B in their
four electronic attack
squadrons until 2019,
according to a Naval Air
Systems Command news
release.


052 JaMichael
Rogers of Bristol
Division at Fleet
Area Control
and Surveillance
Facility Jax plots
the position of a
Northern Right
Whale reported in

area. Rogers serves
as the Northern
Right Whale
coordinator.

Photo by OS1(SW) Debra Taylor


FACSFAC: Celebrates


34 years of service

From Page 5

"Maintenance personnel run diagnostics on all
frequency lines entering and exiting the facility,
run the command Preventive Maintenance System
(PMS) program, manage the handling of secret
and classified material throughout the command,
and are on call 24/7 to handle any equipment
issues that arise," said ET2 Rhine of Maintenance
Division.
A recent addition to FACSFAC Jax is the First
Lieutenant Division, which is responsible for main-
taining the overall material condition of the facility.
This includes the rehabbing, painting, and general:
upkeep of the facility's spaces. When asked what
it's like working in First Lieutenant Division, OSSA
Sinara Hinton said, "I'm proud to be a part of the
improvements taking place around the command.
I believe the beautification of our work environ-
ment contributes to command morale."
The mission of the administration department
is customer service. Admin personnel distrib-
ute the plan of the week, handle incoming cor-
respondence, help Sailors resolve pay issues, pro-
cess incoming and separating personnel, manage
government travel via the Defense Travel System,
process awards, and carry out a number of other
administrative duties.
"Admin is a great place to work. I love making
sure all our Sailors are secure about their pay or
other administrative issues so they can focus on the
mission", says YN2(AW/SW) Ericka Cook, FACSFAC
Jax admin petty officer.
SThe current commanding officer of FACSFAC
Jax, Cmdr. Todd Abrahamson, is the facility's 17th
CO since its establishment in 1977, and had this
to say: "It's an honor to celebrate the command's
34th anniversary and to lead the professional men
and women of FACSFAC Jax. I am continually
impressed with the outstanding 24/7 operational
support everyone here continues to perform."


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14 JA -. .A IP "I.A ', '. . -
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JAX AR NEW\S. -NAS\ JA CKSO\\ILLE. Thursday. April 14. 2011 15


NAS Jax welcomes Shepherd as new CMC


By Kaylee LaRocque
l*A S .' - '

CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad
Shepherd has reported to NAS
Jacksonville as the command
master chief (CMC) and says
he's looking forward to the
c h.ll lIn w, of his new role here.
"I am thrilled to be here and
ready for the chall,-ng-, of this
tour. I've been stationed here
before and am familiar with
the base and have worked with
many of the personnel here in
the past so think I can make
some positive contributions
to the NAS lax team," said
Shepherd.
Shepherd, a native of
Akron, Ohio graduated from
Springfield Senior High School
in 1984 and enlisted in the
Navy in March 1984 through
the Delayed Entry Program.
"I wanted to serve my country
and see the world so I joined
the Navy and that's what I've
done for the past 27 years," said
Shepherd.
After completing Basic
Training in San Diego in
September 1984, his first tour
was on board USS Enterprise
(CVN-65) in Alameda
California as an aviation store-
keeper strlker. During his four-
year tour, Shepherd completed
three Western Pacific/Indian
Ocean deployments and was
promoted to second class petty
officer.
His next tour was as a recruit
company commander push-
ing recruits at Recruit Training
Command, Great Lakes, Ill.
"That was a very rewarding
assignment. It was a great place
to learn what your maximum
capabilities are. If you can do a
job like that there's not much
else you can't tackle," explained
Shepherd.
"I pushed six companies,
three with a partner and three
by myself. It was very demand-
ing but an awesome tour
because you really have a lot of


Photo by Kaylee LaRocque
NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd confers with YNCS Tracey
Broussard on some base issues during a meeting in his office on April 7.


impact on the fleet and shaping
the future of the Navy by train-
ing new recruits."
Shepherd then transferred
to the HS-7 "Dusty Dogs" at
NAS Jacksonville, complet-
ing two deployments on
board USS John F. Kennedy
(CV-67) and USS Dwight D.
Eisenhower (CVN-69). During
this tour, he was also selected
HS-7's Sailor of the Year and
Maintenanceman of the Year
and was promoted to chief
petty officer (CPO).
"It was a very rewarding tour
and I had great mentors there, I
was able to release aircraft safe
for flight and had the opportu-
nity to be a flight deck coordi-
nator on deployment." he said
proudly.
In 1995, Shepherd reported
to the NAS Cecil Field Aircraft
Intermediate Maintenance
Department, as a production
chief and the material control
leading chief in support of F/A-
18 aircraft. His next tour was on
board USS Eisenhower (CVN
69) in Norfolk, Va., where he
completed two deployments to


the Mediterranean/ Arabian
Gulf/Adriatic Sea areas of
responsibility.
Three years later, he reported
to NAS Jacksonville, Aviation
Supply Detachment Jax as the
supply leading CPO and assis-
tant officer in charge/senior
enlisted advisor.
His next tour took him back
to sea on board USS John F.
Kennedy (CV 67) as supply
leading chief and acting com-
mand master chief where he
completed a Mediterranean
Sea/Arabian Gulf deployment
before decommissioning the
carrier.
He then transferred to USS
Stephen W. Groves (FFG-29) as
command master chief. During
his tour, the ship completed
one counter narco-terrorism
operations deployment in the
Eastern Pacific and South and
Central America seizing over 10
metric tons of narcotics.
He most recently served as
CMC at Helicopter Maritime
Strike Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet
at NS Mayport in support of
11 operation helicopter based


commands before reporting
aboard NAS lax.
"I've had a great career
and have done a lot. Not only
have I met many great people
and traveled the world, but
the Navy allowed me to pur-
sue my educational aspira-
tions. Getting a college degree
is essential in today's Navy as
well as it is in the civilian sec-
tor," stated Shepherd, who has
a Bachelor of Science degree
in Management and Technical
Operations from Embry Riddle
Aeronautical University and
recently earned his Master's in
Business Administration (MBA)
from Webster University.
He is also a graduate of the
U.S. Navy Senior Enlisted
Academy, Class 110 (Gold) and
the Command Master Chief
Course class 43.
"Our military members
today are extremely intelligent;
many, either already have col-
lege degrees or are currently
working on them. Our Navy
has changed dramatically since
I've been in. Today, it's all about
performance and going above


and beyond. Sailors have to
strive to be the best of the best
and it's up to our leadership to
help them get there," he con-
tinued.
As the new CMC, Shepherd
wants the NAS lax team to
know he has an open door pol-
icy and is open to iuggestiuns
on how to improve the qual-
ity of life for the Sailors and
their families here. "I am very
approachable and have an open
door policy but Sailors need to
follow their chain of command.
I am fully dedicated to ensur-
ing our chief community lead
from the front and mentor our
junior Sailors because they are
the future of our Navy. We need
to provide them with the sup-
port and guidelines to do their
job," Shepherd emphasized.
"The Navy is responsible for
taking care of our people this
means making sure they have
the right tools, are trained to
do the job and they are pre-
pared to go to war and fight for
our country. We also have an
obligation to ensure their fami-
lies are taken care of and most
importantly our military mem-
bers return home safely."
In his free time, Shepherd
enjoys spending time with his
family, running and reading.
He also scuba dives and says
he's up for just about any type
of adventure.
"I am a strong proponent
of physical fitness. I just hap-
pened to love running and the
Navy says physical fitness is a
top priority for our Sailors, so I
am all about getting out there
and encouraging people to
exercise," he said.
Although he knows his
next three years here will be
demanding, Shepherd is pre-
pared.
"I'm ready for the challenge
and look forward to a success-
ful tour in assisting with keep-
ing NAS Jax moving towards
the future," he said.


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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 14, 2011


VP-5, VP-26

participate in

'Proud Manta' exercise

From VP-5 Public Affairs

The "Mad Foxes" of VP-5 recently dem-
onstrated their anti-submarine warfare
(ASW) prowess in the largest NATO ASW
exercise in the world, Proud Manta 11.
The exercise was a splendid exhibition of
seamless cooperation between the par-
ticipating NATO countries focusing on
maintaining proficiency in a coordinat-
ed anti-submarine environment using a
multi-national force of ships, submarines
and aircraft.
The exercise involved 10 nations
including the United States, Italy,
Canada, United Kingdom, Turkey,
France, Greece, Belgium, Spain and
Germany; each contributing many dif-
ferent assets. Nineteen aircraft par-
ticipated in the exercise including P-3's
from the United States, Germany and
Canada. Other aircraft included French
and Italian Atlantiques as well as British
Merlin helicopters.
Six submarines from Greece, Italy,
Spain, Turkey and the United States
also participated in the exercise as well
as eight surface ships from Belgium,
Italy, Germany, Turkey and the United
States. Proud Manta 11 highlighted
each nation's ability to defend against
a submarine attack and consisted of
two weeks of around the clock opera-
tions in the Ionian Sea, southeast of Sicily.
The exercise was a huge success for the
Mad Foxes due to a complete team effort
as they flew around the clock amassing
more than 38 on station hours. As with
everything, squadrons are only success-
ful if they are able to get aircraft off deck.
The VP-5 Maintenance team answered
the call. Their tireless efforts were the
driving force to mission success and
resulted in over a 90 percent sortie mis-
sion completion rate.
AO1 Dennis Yearty described the effort
from his shop, stating, "It was as close to
a real world scenario as we could get. My
shop worked around-the-clock preparing
ordnance loads for all of the P-3 events."
The VP-5 intelligence team dili-
gently analyzed on station data
and quickly provided a quick turn-
around. The aircrew would then take
this product and use it to shape and
sharpen their tactics as the exer-
cise environment was extremely fluid.
T'he Mad Foxes were not albne in
their endeavors. They were joined by
a- crew and maintenance personnel
S.


~i7i


Photos by MC2 lason ilson
ADAN Heather Falan of VP-5 works
on an engine of a P-3C Orion at NAS
Sigonella, Italy.


Photo by Matt Simons
Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Commanding Officer
Capt. John Heinzel presents Kim Burbank with the Global War on Terrorism
Medal on April 7 in front of her co-workers for distinguished service performed
while forward deployed to Overseas Contingency Operations in Iraq from August
2009 to November 2010.
AE3 Andrew Pobliego and the rest of
the maintenance team from VP-5 pre-
pare a P-3C Orion for flightat NASpresented
Sigonella, Italy.AC employee presented


from the "Tridents of VP-26. "We are
excited to help and relish the opportu-
nity to conduct real world ASW opera-
tions," VP-26 Detachment Officer in
Charge Lt. Cmdr. Dustin Hendrix said
of their opportunity to participate.
While VP-5 constantly trains for any and
all scenarios, it is impossible to dupli-
cate the sense of accomplishment and
camaraderie earned from working side
by side with so many allied nations. For
most of the VP-5 aircrews, it was the first
time they had operated in a NATO envi-
ronment affording them the opportunity
of learning the intricacies of operating
in such an intense environment. Proud
Manta 11 proved to be a challenge that
provided valuable experience to all the
crews involved.
The exercise was culminated by a top
notch Italian Navy hosted end of exercise
social. The Proud Manta social is widely
recognized for its smorgasbord of home-
made authentic food from all participat-
ing countries. Spread throughout the
reception hall were participants encour-
aging you to sample some of the global
fare offered at the social's eight food sta-
tions. Italian pastas, French pastries and
German kielbasas were just some of culi-
nary delights enjoyed by all hands as they
had the opportunity to converse with
their counterparts in a fun, relaxed envi-
ronment. In a period of just two weeks,
it was apparent the Mad Foxes created
bonds that will no doubt strengthen the
squadron and NATO as a whole.


Global War on Terrorism Medal


From Naval Facilities Engineering
Command Southeast Public Affairs

Naval Facilities Engineering Command
(NAVFAC) Southeast employee Kim
Burbank was presented the Global War
on Terrorism Medal April 7 in front of
her co-workers for distinguished service
performed while forward deployed to
Overseas Conitingency Operations in Iraq
from August 2009 to November 2010.
"This trip was very rewarding and the
best thing I ever did," claimed Burbank. "I
loved getting to know the people and the
different cultures. Everyone over there was
from different places and came from all
over the world."
Capt. John Heinzel, NAVFAC Southeast
commanding officer, pinned the medal
on Burbank and congratulated her for
work performed while working at a Joint
Contracting Command, Iraq/Afghanistan
at the Armed Services Board of Contract
Appeals, the Government Accountability
Office and the Court of Federal Claims.
"I am honored to recognize you for the
work you did for our nation," said Heinzel.
"We are glad to have you here working for
us."
Burbank was recognized for her work


as the litigation paralegal providing liti-
gation support for the attorneys. She
assisted in case preparation for litigation
and analyzed facts and legal questions to
assist in case preparation under the Army
Procurement Fraud program.
"I did lots of legal review and protests,"
said Burbank. "If they asked me to go
again, I would maybe Djibouti next!"
The medal symbolizes the honor
and achievement of civilians with the
Department of Defense to defend freedom
against danger that may develop on for-
eign soil. The ribbon's blue stripe is associ-
ated with the Department of Defense; gold
represents excellence; black and red sym-
bolize threat of terrorism; red, white, and
blue are for patriotism and love of freedom.
At first sight, one would think Burbank
is very quiet and timid. But when you talk
to her about this, she can't say enough
about how much she enjoyed the work,
the people and the culture. She loves to
do things out of the ordinary. She hit the
gym every day while she was overseas and
enjoys flying in an ultra light (plane) for
fun.
"I really miss the work and the people
there, but I am delighted to be here at
NAVFAC Southeast," said Burbank.


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JA-X AIR NEWS. NAS JACKSONVILLE. Thursday. April 14. 2011 17


NAVFAC Southeast recognizes leadership graduates


From Naval Facilities
Engineering Command
Southeast Public Affairs

Naval Facilities Engineering
Command (NAVFAC)
Southeast recently recog-
nized three employees who
graduated from its Leadership
Development Program (LDP)
- Helen Lockard, Myrna
Martinez and Chris Morgan.
"LDP is aimed at improv-
ing core leadership skills and
broadening a member's hori-
zon, to include a better under-
standing of the entire NAVFAC
enterprise," said Steven Iselin,
NAVFAC's executive director. "I
expect to see great things in the
future from these leadership
graduates."
For two years, NAVFAC's
future leaders were challenged
to complete a variety of devel-
opmental activities while
maintaining their regular
workload and job responsibili-
ties. The program is rooted in
DoN's Leadership Competency
Model and is an essential tool
to ensure that NAVFAC has
highly skilled and capable
employees to lead the Navy's
facilities engineering com-
mand into the future.


Photo courtesy of Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast
Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast recently hon-
ored three graduates from its Leadership Development Program.
(From left) Myrna Martinez, Chris Morgan and Helen Lockard
all completed a two-year development program that is designed
to provide deliberate development through progressive learn-
ing opportunities and allow candidates to perform outside their
sphere of influence and comfort zone.


"The program allowed me to
expand my understanding of
NAVFAC and the services we
provide to our clients," said
Myrna Martinez, an environ-
mental engineer. "I thoroughly
enjoyed the two years of pro-
fessional growth that the LDP
provided me. I was able to
learn about, and interact with,
some business lines that I oth-


erwise would not have."
The developmental pro-
gram for NAVFAC's mid-level
employees included a variety
of leadership training cours-
es, Lean Six Sigma projects,
rotational assignments, atten-
dance at command leader-
ship meetings, and interviews
with members of NAVFAC's top
leadership.


Participants began their
program by participating in
an assessment that provided
feedback from supervisors,
peers and subordinates. The
feedback was used to devel-
op an Individual Leadership
Development Plan, which was
focused on strengthening the
member's leadership compe-
tencies. Each member received
guidance from a senior mentor
and opportunities to develop
a network of peers across the
organization.
"The program kicked off in
the first months with expo-
sure to enterprise level deci-
sion makers and gatekeepers of
national decision makers at the
Capitol Hill Workshop," said
Chris Morgan, reserve facili-
ties and enhanced use lease
program manager. "I was able
to speak with Congressional
staffer on facilities issues, and
meet political figures includ-
ing former White House staff-
ers, lobbyists, and nationally
acclaimed educators who deal
in international relations in
some of the toughest areas of
the world. This contributed to
an increased level of mission
focus and sense of personal
urgency."


NAVFAC revamped its legacy
leadership development pro-
gram in 2009 to provide more
robust developmental oppor-
tunities for its future civilian
leaders.
The highly competitive
program is designed to pro-
vide deliberate development
through progressive learning
opportunities and allow candi-
dates to perform outside their
sphere of influence and "com-
fort zone."
This, coupled with the other
program elements, allow par-
ticipants to gain an in-depth
knowledge of NAVFAC's opera-
tions at various organizational
levels.
"My advice to future cadre
members is that I think you get
out what you put in to the pro-
gram so be prepared to dedi-
cate a lot of time to LDP," said
Helen Locakard, an environ-
mental restoration section lead.
"Overall, I consider it a privi-
lege to have been a part of the
first cadre in the revamped
Leadership Development
Program. I learned far more
than I ever expected entering
the program and would highly
recommend it to other's within
NAVFAC."


Month of the Military Child Carnival -
April 16, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Allegheny
Softball Field.
Egg Hunt April 21, 7 p.m. at McCaffrey
Softball Complex.
FFSC Families With Purpose April 23,
noon to 3 p.m. at Fleet & Family Support
Center on Child St. Nationally renown
speaker Kevin McMahon. RSVP to 542-
5405.
Navy Jax Yacht Club Pot Luck Dinner &
Egg Hunt April 24. Dinner at 2 p.m., Easter
Bunny hops in at 3:30 p.m. Call Bob at 703-
7411 or Dave at 208-8982
Blessing of the Fleet April 30 at 2 p.m.
at NAS Jax Mulberry Cove Marina. Contact
rcsail@navyjaxyachtclub.com to register
your boat.
Military Officers Association of America
N.E. Florida Chapter meets the third
Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the
NAS Jax Officers' Club. Open to active duty
and retired officers of all services. RSVP
to Rear Adm. Dan Lestage at 264-6542 or
daniel.lestage@comcast.net


National Naval Officers Association
meets the fourth Thursday of each month at
5 p.m. at the Urban League, 903 W. Union
Street. Contact Lt. Cmdr. Paul Nix at 422-
8480 or email Paul24navy@aol.com.
Disabled American Veterans Chapter 38
meets the second Tuesday of each month
at 7 p.m. at 470 Madeira Dr., Orange Park.
Service officers available Monday thru
Friday 9 a.m 2 p.m. to help with VA claims,
call 269-2945 for an appointment. Bingo
every Thursday from 6:30-9:30 p.m. and
Saturday from 10 a.m. 3 p.m. The public
is welcome.
Navy Wives Clubs of America Jax No. 86
meets the first Wednesday of each month
at 7 p.m. in Building 857 (at NAS Jax main
gate behind Navy Marine Corps Relief
Society). Not So New Shop open Tuesday
and Thursday (9 a.m. to 1 p.m.). Call 542-


1582 for info.
Navy Wives Clubs of America DID No. 300
meets the second Thursday of each month
at 7 p.m. at the Oak Crest United Methodist
Church Education Building at 5900 Ricker
Road. Call 387-4332 or 272-9489.
Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290
monthly meeting is the first Thursday at 8
p.m., 390 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach. Call
246-6855.
COMPASS Spouse-to-Spouse Military
Mentoring Program by Naval Services
Family Line. Help others help themselves.
Call Melanie at 904-200-7751 or email:
COMPASSMayport@NSFamilyLine.org
Association of Aviation Ordnancemen
meets the third Thursday of each month
at 7 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Center on
Collins Road. For information, call AOC
John Newman at 683-5407 or visit www.


aao9.com.
Retired Activities Office (RAO) at NAS
Jax Fleet and Family Support Center
(FFSC) needs volunteers to assist military
retirees and dependents. Work three hours
a day, one day per week. Call 542-2766
ext. 126 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays
to volunteer.
Navy Jacksonville Yacht Club meets the
first Wednesday of every month at 7:30 p.m.
at the clubhouse (Building 1956) adjacent to
Mulberry Cove Marina. Open to active duty,
reserve and retired military, plus, active or
retired DoD civilians. Call 778-0805 or email
commodore@njyc.org.
Orange Park Lions Club meets the
second and fourth Monday at 7 p.m. at 423
Mclntosh Avenue, Orange Park, Fla. For
more information, call 298-1967.
National Active and Retired Federal
Employees Westside Jacksonville Chapter
1984 meets at 1 p.m. on the fourth Thursday'.
of each month at the Murray Hill United
Methodist Church, (Fellowship Hall Building)
at 4101 College Street. Call 786-7083.


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Community Calendar






18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 14, 2011


FREEDOM LANES

BOWLING CENTER
Call 542-3493.

Wednesday
Free bowling for active duty
11 a.m.- 1 p.m.

Extreme Bowling
Every Saturday Night
7-9 p.m. & 9:30 p.m. midnight

FITNESS & AQUATICS
Call 542-2930

Command Circuit Training
Tuesday & Thursday
7 8 a.m. in the Base Gym
45 Minute high intensity group training

Spring Sports Challenge
May 12 & 14
Events include a 1,500 relay, auto race, dodge ball,
3-on-3 basketball, kickball, swim relay, 3-on-3 volley-
ball, badminton, washers, tug-a-war and a canoe race.

I.T.T. EVENTS
Call 542-3318.

Adventure Landing Wet Pass $20
Dry Pass $21
Combo Pass $32

Jungle Quest
Located across from NAS Jax
$13
Indoor zip-line, rope bridge, and rock wall

Jacksonville Knights Minor League Football $6.50

Jacksonville Sharks Indoor Football $22

FCCJ Broadway Series
Shrek the Musical
May 14 at 2 p.m., $65 and 8 p.m., $62.50

Scenic St. Augustine Cruise,
May 14, $15

NBA Orlando Magic
$26.50 and up

Six Flags over Georgia $32
White Water $27


Summer Waves Water Park in Georgia S14.50

Jacksonville Suns Baseball Club S4.74 S11.50

LIBERTY COVE RECREATION
Trips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6
single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call
542-3491 for information.

Mall & Movie Trip
Orange Park Mall and AMC Theater
April 15

Free Jacksonville Sharks vs. Cleveland Gladiators
April 23, 7 p.m.
Departs Liberty Vault at 5:30 p.m.

Free Jacksonville Suns Baseball Game
April 26,7 p.m.
Departs Liberty Vault at 6 p.m.

Spring Barracks Bash
May 19 at 4 p.m.
Across the street from The Zone
Free, food, entertainment and prizes!

NAS JAX GOLF CLUB
Golf course info: 542-3249
Mulligan's info: 542-2936

Military Appreciation Days
$18 per person, includes cart & green fees
April 26 for active duty
Today and April 28 for retirees & DoD personnel
NEX Spring Fling Golf Tournament
April 28, 10 a.m.
$50 per person


Sign-up at the golf shop

MULBERRY COVE MARINA
Call 542-3260.

Free Kayak & Canoe Rental
Every Thursday for active duty

Marina Riverfest
May 14,12-7 p.m.
Free music, games, food and prizes!

YOUTH ACTIVITIES CENTER
Call 778-9772

2011 Adventure Summer
Registration Dates
Current school-age care participants Going on now
Single & Dual Active Duty Going on now
Other Active Duty April 18 22
DoD Civilians April 25 29
Registration packets are currently available for pick-
up.
For more information call the Youth Center at (904)
778-9772

Month of the Military Child Carnival
April 16, 11 a.m. 2 p.m.
Free admission, games and prizes!
Alleghany Softball Field

Easter Egg Hunt
April 21, 7 p.m.
McCaffrey Softball Complex
Children 12 and under eat FREE at The Zone and
Mulligan's Restaurant April 21, 5 9 p.m.
*Call 778-9772 for more details


Photo by Kaylee LaRocque


Bull riding at the NAS Jax Commissary

Connor Stubbs, 17, demonstrates his skills at bull riding during a promotional event at the NAS Jax
Commissary April 8. The bull was set up out front for patrons to ride to promote Matador beef jerky.


Wild Adventures Georgia
1-day- $28.25
2-day- $40
Annual Passport $64.75
Annual Gold $87


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NAS Jax Sports


Men and Women Open Singles
Tennis Tourney April 25 at 5 p.m.
Open to all NAS Jax authorized men and
women ages 18 and up. Separate men's
and women's divisions. Matches play at
the Guy Ballou Tennis Complex. Awards
for each division. Call NAS Jax Athletics to
sign up by April 22.
All Navy Wrestling Mini Camp -
June 24 25
All Navy Wrestling Coach Ray Borja will
conduct a mini camp at NAS Jax Gym June
24 at 6 p.m. and June 25 at 10 a.m. Open
to all active duty Navy personnel. Wrestling
equipment and attire are not necessary and
weigh-ins will not be conducted for the mini
camp. Navy personnel must sign up at base
gym.
Women's Softball League
Open to active duty, selective reservists,
military dependents over 18, DoD and
DoD contractors. The games play in the
evenings. Contact the base gym for rules
and required paperwork.
Captain's Cup Soccer League
Open to active duty, command DoD, DoD
contractors and selective reservists. Play
begins in April with games played in the
evening. Contact the base gymnasium for
rules and required paperwork.
Captain's Cup Kickball
League forming
Open to active duty, command DoD, DoD
contractors and selective reservists.
Games play on Monday and Wednesday at
lunch time. Contact the base gym for rules
and the required paperwork.
Captain's Cup Indoor Volleyball
League starting soon
Open to all NAS Jax active duty, command
DoD, DoD contractors and selective
reservists. Contact base gym for rules and
the required paperwork.
For more information, call Bill Bonser
at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail blll.bonser@
navy.mil.


I COIZQ9rlA

SDance Off


JAX AIR NEWS. NAS JAiCKSONVILLE. Thursday. April 14. 2011 19


Command fitness leader seminar slated


Standings

Intramural Winter Golf


Team
NCTS
Air Ops
SERCC Gold
VP-30
FRCSE
CNATTU
RCC SE
VP-16
ASD
VR-62
Rotor Heads
VP-62
SERCC Blue
BHC Flex
CBMU202


As of April 8
Wins Losses
10 0
7 2
7 3
7 3
7 3
6 3
6 4
5 4
4 4
4 5
3 6
3 7
3 7
2 7
0 9


Ties
1


1

1



1


From MWR


A command fitness leader (CFL) sem-
inar will be held April 27-28 at the NAS
Jax Officers' Club and base gym. The
seminar is open to all CFLs, assistant


CFLs, Morale, Welfare and Recreation
fitness specialists, prospective CFLs
and senior enlisted personnel.
For more information and to sign up,
email lia. domengeaux@navy.mil.


Intramural Spring Softball
As of April 8
Team Wins Losses
Mech's 3 0
Air Ops 2 0
FACSFAC 2 0
VR-58 2 0
HSL-42 1 0
Masterbatters 1 0
NRSE RCC 3 1
CNRSE 1 1
Dirty 30 1 1
Rabid Possums 1 1
VP-16 1 1
VP-45 1 1
VPU-1 1 1
FRSCE 900 1 2
Stingers 1 2
HSL-44 0 0
CBMU-202 0 1
Dirty Birdz 0 1
Justic 0 1
Air Frames 0 2
NCTS 0 2
NMC 0 2
P-3 59ers 0 2


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Ron Rasmussen, Red
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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 14. 2011


SERMC completes USS Hue City Integrated Logistics Overhaul

By Daphne Cassani 1
Corporate Communications Dir#fctor r


Fleet and Industrial Supply Center
Jacksonville (FISCJ) Detachment
Southeast Regional Maintenance
Center (SERMC) located in Mayport,
just completed a six-month Integrated
Logistics Overhaul (ILO) onboard USS
Hu6 City (CG 66). On March 9, FISCI
Det. SERMC Site Director LCDR Joaquin
Molina turned over all ILO deliver-
ables to Hu6 City's supply officer. The
ILO was part of the ship's Selected
Restricted Availability (SRA).
An ILO, a self-help program request-
ed by the ship, is comprised of five
functions: analyses of configuration,
support equipment, technical manual
(TM), and planned maintenance system
(PMS), and ship's force training.
"The ILO improved Hu6 City's readi-
ness by providing logistics support
that accurately reflected the ship's true
equipment and operating needs. The
final product was a reset of her invento-
ry, verification of weapons systems, and
validation of all equipment on board,"
said Molina.
Accomplishing this gargantuan task
involved removing nearly 20 thousand
line items with an estimated value of
$17 million from Hu6 City. Line items,
products with National Stock Numbers
(NSN), each possess range and depth.
Range has been defined as the variety
of products stocked to support repair/
maintenance of a particular system/
component. Depth has been defined
as the actual number of a specific line
item onboard a ship. The depth is over
691 thousand line items. Most of these
were hand-carried from the Hu6 City's
five store rooms, off the ship filling 250
triwalls.
"The Inter-Service Supply Support
Operations Program (ISSOP) staff com-
pleted the off-load over a five-day peri-
od beginning mid-September 2010,"
said Molina.
Although this process involved a lot of
good old fashioned manual labor, Glen
Van Vorst, FISCJ Det. SERMC deputy
site director explained, "The off-load,
:on-load evolution is the most visible
;portion [of an ILO]. It's the in-depth
:analysis portion that requires the most
:effort."
Once off the ship, ISSOP team mem-
bers transported the thousands of
line items to a warehouse where the
Maintenance Support Analysis Team
I(MSAT), comprised of 20 military per-
sonnel, received them. MSAT invento-
ried each and every piece/part in the
triwalls, which included one thousand
XIIDMAR drawers.
. MSAT employed configuration anal-
ysis, removed excess line items, and
replaced still needed items back into
'IDMAR drawers and triwalls. At the
;end of this process, MSAT reduced
2he number of triwalls by 118 and had
'purged more than 1,800 line items.
Simultaneously, MSAT updated
the ship's Consolidated Shipboard
Allowance Listing (COSAL), which was
designed to ensure logistics support is
available onboard for most unsched-
uled corrective maintenance and PMS
requirements.
FISCJ Det. SERMC Senior Logistician
Buddy Abad said, "Updating the ship's
records [COSAL] was our main con-
cern."
The updated COSAL was used
to revise ship's Weapons System File
(WSF), which is maintained at the Naval
Inventory Control Point (NAVICP) in
Mechanicsburg, Penn.
The synchronization of the COSAL
and the WSF has been vital to mission
success; and failure to do so could result
reduced logistics support for needed
repair parts. Refilled triwalls were
labeled according to the final shipboard
destination of its contents and subse-
quently shelved them in mock store-
rooms awaiting return to the ship.


COLUMBIA
CO L L E GE


Photo courtesy of the Department of Defense
Following the Fleet and Industrial Supply Center Jacksonville (FISCJ) Detachment Southeast Regional Maintenance Center's
March 9 completion of the Integrated Logistics Overhaul and Selected Restricted Availability at Mayport, VIDMAR drawers
sit on the deck of USS Hue City (CG 66) waiting to be returned to the proper store rooms inside the ship.


Photos by Daphne Cassani
Fleet and Industrial Supply Center Jacksonville (FISCJ) Detachment Southeast
Regional Maintenance Center's Inter-Service Supply Support Operations Program
employee Osvaldo Martinez removes a tri-wall filled with line items for on-load
to USS Hue City (CG 66) from a truck.


Donell Wright, a contract employee
working for the Fleet and Industrial
Supply Center Jacksonville (FISCJ)
Detachment Southeast Regional
Maintenance Center's Inter-Service
Supply Support Operations Program,
removes packaged line items from the
conveyor belt and stages them for pick
up and hand-carry to USS Hue City's
(CG 66) store rooms during the on-
load phase of the Integrated Logistics
Overhaul.
ISSOP conducted the on-load over a
five-day period, Feb. 28 March 4. "The
goal was to turn the ship's repair parts
over with an inventory accuracy of
98.5 percent or greater," said Van Vorst.
According to Molina, the SERMC team
exceeded that goal.
"When the ship's repair parts were
turned over, the inventory accuracy was
99.8 percent. This team was just out-
standing! They went above and beyond,
taking the extra step every time to get it


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Susan Loesche and Thomas Benton,
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Jacksonville' (FISCJ) Detachment
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Center's Inter-Service Supply Support
Operations Program, hand off boxed
up line items during the on-load phase
of the Integrated Logistics Overhaul
on board USS Hue City (CG 66) at
Mayport.
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"As we prepare to support future
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JAX AIR NEWS. NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday. April 14, 2011 21


Ask Dr. Joe



Welcome 3O |



to tick



season

By Capt. Joseph McQuade
Naval Hospital lacksonville
Director of Public Health Capt. Joseph McQuade


Junior volunteers needed at


" Naval Hospital Jacksonville


By NH lax Public Affairs


The American Red Cross at Naval
Hospital Jacksonville (NH lax) is
recruiting for this summer's Junior Red
Cross volunteers. This offers an excel-
lent opportunity for students interest-
ed in health care careers to train with
highly skilled Navy Medicine profes-
sionals physicians, nurses, pharma-
cists, therapists and technicians as
well as contribute to creating a positive
experience for NH Jax patients.
The program is open to a limited
number of high school students age 16


to 18 who have base access. Volunteers
work four to 20 hours per week.
Applications can be picked up at the
NH lax American Red Cross office (next
to Physical & Occupational Therapy)
and must be completed by May 20.
Potential volunteers will be interviewed
June 11 from 10 a.m. to noon. The pro-
gram kicks off with an orientation June
13 from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and CPR
training June 15 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
in the hospital's second deck confer-
ence room. Selected volunteers will be
required to get a TB test at the hospital.
For more information, call 542-7525.


Q. Are tick bites really a problem In
Northeast Florida?
A: A woman came to our Family
Medicine clinic for care a few weeks
ago, complaining of feeling fatigued
with sore muscles and fever. The doc-
tor who saw her had a long list of things
that may have caused these problems,
but after looking at a blood test the doc-
tor decided she might have been bit-
ten by a tick. After a short time on an
antibiotic, the patient's symptoms went
away and she was truly surprised to
know that tick bites-- especially at this
time of year-- can cause these kinds of
problems.
As the weather becomes nicer with
the beginning of spring, many people
think about enjoying outdoor activities
such as walking in wooded areas, hik-
ing, and camping. But as people begin
to get out and about, so do animals,
insects, and spiders. One animal to be
aware of this time of year is the deer
tick. Ticks live in wooded areas, brushy
fields, and around your home. They
crawl onto grass or leaves and wait for
animals or people to brush up against
them. After hitching a ride, ticks sur-
vive by crawling onto host animals' and
humans' skin and drawing blood to eat.
In contrast to biting insects like mos-
quitoes and flies, ticks take their time
to bite--they crawl around looking for
a good hiding place to begin feeding.
Anywhere you find deer, you can find
ticks.
Even more unpleasantly, ticks pass
infections from one host to the next,
including humans. In Florida and the
Southeastern United States, ticks can
transmit about a half-dozen types of ill-
nesses as in the case described above.
Most tick-borne diseases are mild and
the patient may recover on their own
without medications, but others can be
more serious and even require hospital-
ization.


see their provider.
The staff at Naval Hospital
Jacksonville are working together with
the Naval Medical Research Center and
the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention (CDC) to monitor for these
cases and offer lab testing for patients
with possible rickettsial illness. This
monitoring study will help describe the
level of tick illness in our area and guide
prevention and treatment efforts in the
future.
As with most matters, prevention is
the best approach to tick-related dis-
eases. When you hike, camp or enjoy
the outdoors where ticks are found, a
few precautions will help keep you safe:
1. Don't be afraid to use bug spray
with the chemical DEET in it.
2. Wear light-colored clothing
because this makes it easier to see ticks.
3. Wear long pants and a long-
sleeved shirt.
4. Tuck your pants into your socks or
boots and tuck in your shirt.
5. Stay on cleared trails.
After outdoor activities, check every-
one in your family-including outdoor
pets-- for ticks. Look hard to find them
because ticks can be very tiny, and ask
another person to help you check your-
self. If you find a tick which has latched
onto the skin:
1. Grab the tick close to your skin
with a tweezers or tissue and pull it
straight out (don't crush
the tick in your fingernails).
2. Wash where the tick bit you.
3. Wash your hands.
4. Remember that if you get sick after
a tick bite, you should go see your pro-
vider. The antibiotics for tick bites are
easy to take and are curative!
Most experts will tell you that if you
can remove the tick from your skin
within 24 hours, the risk of infection is
very low. Keep these simple measures
in mind and enjoy being outdoors.


.MD, ,

,
X

^ItTLnort^


Challenge


4 Life
Monthly Challenge. Weekly Goals. Total Wellness.


Naval Hospital
Jacksonville's holistic
approach to wellness
for your total
readiness. This
program makes use of
the latest research-
based techniques to
improve your
physical, emotional,
spiritual and
relationship health.


'.... . ... . . .. ',
R CHA, ENE: a 'LE L
GeMoving, Stay Motivated ,
Beght arManaus see amezhi egesew A
the goa a maandchievable In rderqpromtea

Wee2 Goal: Trysomethngnew ,
Find.cs t wek t the Fitness Source ao your r,
ftme ientf choice. Ifthis Is not your cup of te., I f
then lust keep moving and continue with your week
dnegoal of nIreased tme or intensity.


Tuesd5 se1630 o
at NAS JAX tack


APRILCHALLgNGE:


, e *


Express Appreciation and
SFondness
One of the most Important ways we show
love Is to say if But expressing love goes
beyond saying 'I love you.' Explore ways to expand
your love vocabulary.
Week 2 Goal: Express aporeclalon daily


I


It is easy to takeyouppartner for granted and focus
more on what he or she is not doing. Train yourself to
recognize all the little things your partner does for you,
and to showgratltUde for them.
Events:
Heallhv Romanic Relatlonships Class.
Wednesday, 1200 at Hospital Chapel
r :


APRIL CHALLENGE:
Find Your "Higher Power"
SWhetheryou believe in God as defined
by a religion or not, it is Important to
recognize a.power greater than yourself and
to develop the ability to receive guidance and
empowerment through that relationship.
Week 2 Goal: Seek your higher power
All it really takes to find your higher power is desire
and effort. Each day, spend time contemplating your
beefs and seeking knowledge in whateverway you
feel comfortable (prayer, scripture, pondering, etc.).
Events:
Guided Relaxation and Meditation Class:
Thursday; 1200 at Hospital Chapel
Rellolos Services and Classes:
Contact local Chaplain


To get Involved, e-mail: challenge411fe@med.navy.mil


LIBERTY


Improve your life skills with FFSC classes


From FFSC


The NAS Jacksonville Fleet and
Family Support Center (FFSC) Life
Skills Education and Support Program
is the foremost preventive measure for
avoidance of personal and family prob-
lems. All FFSC workshops and classes
are free to service members and their
families. Pre-registration is required.
If special accommodations or handi-
capped access is required, please notify
FFSC upon registration.
Million Dollar Sailor Workshop (7:30
a.m.-4 p.m.) April 18-19, July 18-19,
Oct. 5-6.
Military Spouse 101 Workshop May


14 (10 a.m.-noon), July 7 (1-3 p.m.), Sept.
6 (6-8 p.m.), Nov. 19 (10 a.m.-noon).
Active Parenting of Teens, ages 11-18
(1-4 p.m.) May 4, 11, 18, 25; July 6, 13,
20, 27; Sept. 7, 14, 21, 28; Nov. 2, 9, 16, 23.
Love and Logic Parenting Group,
ages infant to 5 (1-3 p.m.) April 20, 27;
June 1, 8, 15, 22; Aug. 3, 10, 17, 24; Oct. 5,
12, 19, 26.
Basic Ombudsman Training May
16-19 (5:30-10 p.m.), Aug. 22-24 (8 a.m.-4
p.m.), Nov. 7-10 (5:30-10 p.m.)
Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.-
4 p.m.) April 25-28, May 23-26, July
27-30.
For more information or to register,
call 542-5745.


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I






22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE. Thursday, -.i 14. 2011


NMSC PA training rank


By Larry Coffey
N..SC PAO

The physician assistant (PA) rraiing
program managed by Navy Medicine
Support Command N M C1 was listed
April 5 by U.S. News & World Report as
the 13th best PA program among more
than 140 PA graduate schools in the
nation.
A story in the 2012 special edi-
tion of U.S. News & World Report Best
Graduate Schools will appear on news-
stands, announcing that the Fort Sam
Houston-based Inter-service Physician
Assistant Program (IPAP) :raining pro-
gram in San Antonio where Navy PAs
train was chosen in a three-way tie with
Northeastern University in Boston and
Stony Brook University SUNY in Stony
Brorok
The selection was based on peer
assessment surveys within the PA dis-
cipline and can be viewed now at http://
grad-schools.usnews. rank ingsa nd re-
views.com/best-graduate-schools/top-
health-schools/physician-assistant-
rankings.
"I am very proud of our PA train-
ing program," said Rear Adm. Eleanor
Valentin, Navy Medicine Support
Command commander and the Navy's
Medical Service Corps director, which
includes PAs.
"Our physician assistants are charged
with the care of our most important
resources in the Navy and Marine
Corps our people. So it is essential
that we provide the best training pos-
sible. Our joint training program at Fort
Sam Houston accomplishes this in part
by combining the best of the military
services."
The quad-service IPAP is taught
by Navy, Army, Air Force and Coast
Guard instructors, and is comprised
of students from those services and
the Marine Corps. NAS Jacksonville-
based NMSC and its subordinate
Navy Medicine Manpower, Personnel,
Training and Education Command
(NMMPTE) in Bethesda, Md., manage
Navy Medicine's officer and enlisted
education and training programs.
Phase I of IPAP is a grueling 67-week
course of academic training at Fort Sam


Photo by Larr; '
Samuel Perdue places lieutenant junior
grade shoulder bars on his aunt. Lt.
j.g. Tonva Lozier, during a Physician
Assistant (PA) commencement cere-
mony held Oct. 10 at the Marine Corps
Recruil Depot in San Diego.

Houston. Officer candidates are pro-
vided 2,640 contact hours of medical
education and must successfully com-
plete 95 written examinations and six
lab practical exams.
Navy and Marine Corps students
complete Phase II together, which con-
sists of 13 clinical rotations at Naval
Medical Center, San Diego, and at pri-
vate facilities in the San Diego area.
During 55 weeks of training, students
have 2,810 hours of clinical rotations,
direct patient care, research work and
classroom study, said Lt. Cmdr. Ron
Perry of the Health Care Inter-service
Training Office and an IPAP instruc-
tor from 2006 to early 2011. Students
also submit a master's thesis to the
University of Nebraska. The students
graduate with master's degrees in PA
studies from the University of Nebraska,
which was ranked number 16 by U.S.
News & World Report. The students are
commissioned as a lieutenant junior
grade in the Navy Medical Service
Corps, Perry said.
"Our mission is to provide the uni-
formed services highly competent,
compassionate PAs," Perry said. "We
are committed to training PAs who
model integrity, strive for leadership
excellence, and are committed to life-
long learning."
The IPAP is the world's largest PA pro-
gram, graduating approximately 225
PAs annually, while maintaining the
high-quality reputation for which it has


become known. Pr.-r'. said.
"Ail : a-T'. :rjdJLu .es are \ '.l pre-
p Lred to provide h1i .,g-q. l;:. p-'ie':
care in a variety .,' settings, such as
inpatient, ou:pa;ir-n primary and
surgical care," Perry said. Thc. pro-
vide this care both in the U.S. and
abroad."
Lt. H Tonya Lozier is a 20101 IPA'
graduate and former student 0;
Perr.'s who is now ringg at the
Marine Special Operai.on;s Command
iM ~ RSOCI at Camp Lejeune, NC.
"It is wonderful to hear that the Inter-
service Phvsit an Assistant Program
has been ranked among the lead-
in- PA programs," said Lozier, a PA at


,ed high

M \RS,)C's HM2 Charles Luke Nilam
Medical Clinic. \hat an extraordi-
nary testament to the quality of leader-
ship and instruction provided to pre-
pare hundreds of IPAP students service
wide."
Lozier, a former senior chief hospital
corpsman and independent duty corps-
man (IDC), said, "I've had the plea-
sure of \,,,rking with man\ outstand-
ingr IPAP-gr.,duat.ied PAs throughout
my Navy career. As a new graduate of
the Inter-service Physician Assistant
Program. I am honored to be a part of
the team of health care professionals
providing care for our service members
and their families worldwide."


VP ";4*9


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UF engineering students tour FRCSE


Learn challenges

to repair

older aircraft

By Marsha Childs


University of Florida (UF)J n ig i ril.,
students toured I lI,. -i.. arl ..- Center
Southeast (IIf( s-) April 1 to learn firr
hand how artisans maintain military
aircraft including propulsion s imrns a
subject the students are ,LI 11 inIg
Associate Professor Bill Lear who
teaches Aerospace Propulsion in the
UF Aerospace rigineering Department
escorted 30 mostly young men and a
few young women from Gaine-'. ille for
a rare glimpse of the secured industrial
facility.
Lear said the visit was his fifth to the
facility, but the students' first.
"There are two primary reasons why I
bring the students to I IC SE." said Lear.
"First, there is no substitute for seeing
the hardware to convey the idea of how
power gas turbines operate. And sec-
ond, they get a sense for how design
approaches taught in the classroom
interact with maintenance challenges."
Dave Knox, who .heads FRCSE
Propulsion and Power Engineering,
hosted the visitors.
While touring the Crinkley Engine
Facility, Knox described a recent inci-
dent involving an F/A-18 Hornet aircraft
that experienced major engine failure
during takeoff from the USS John C.
Stennis (CVN 74). He said aircraft oper-
ating from carrier decks sustain struc-
tural and fatigue damage due to harsh
environmental conditions.
"Part of our job is to take a failure like
that and figure out what went wrong,"
he said. "Our goal is to make sure that
doesn't happen on another aircraft."
The engineering challenges FRCSE


' \ ---. -
-'-7-';


Photos h Mard4ha Childh
University of Florida Associate Professor Bill Lear (far left) and 30 students enrolled in his Aerospace Propulsion class visit
the computer-controlled engine test cell at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast April 1. Artisans use a automated monorail
system to perform testing on engines, such as the J52 engine installed on the EA-6B Prowler aircraft. The system improves
workflow and ensures optimum ergonomics for workers.


Engine Mechanic Juan Rosa (center) operates the controller as F414 Fleet Support
Team Engineer Taylor Blackenship (right) points out damage on a low-pressure
turbine module to University of Florida engineering students during a tour of the
Crinkley Engine Facility at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast on April 1.


personnel face when maintaining and
repairing older model aircraft fas-
cinated Robert Barraza, a UF senior
majoring in aerospace engineering. He


almost missed the tour due to a security
requirement for non-U.S. citizens.
"I am so happy I got my citizenship,"
said Barraza whose origin of birth is
Mexico. "I only became a U.S. citizen
two weeks ago. You must be a U.S. citi-
zen to work in the defense industry with
a high-level security clearance."
FRCSE employs about 350 engineers,


F404 Engineering Lead Michael
Schoenfeld (center right) explains
to University of Florida engineering
students how Fleet Readiness Center
Southeast (FRCSE) artisans perform
out-of-airframe testing on a variety of
repaired engines to verify performance
specification in the engine test cell.
FRCSE Propulsion and Power engi-
neers hosted the students visiting from
Gainesville on April 1.
including aerospace, mechanical, elec-
trical chemical, material and industrial
engineers.


NAS ackson



2011 Shorelne CleanUp

Thursday 26 May 2011

Meet at the Marina at 0830
Lunch at 1130
RSVP by 16 May to 542-2798 or angela.glass@navy.mil


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snacks, cold beverages, rental boats, camping supplies and much more.
Contact the Marina at 542-3260, end of Ranger Rd, Bldg. 1072


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Ss y q -- s -- ;--:r a v, -;. -r S,-^-c'


Sp H O M S R

S In the Jacksonville division, Rylands'Buy Smart'sales event promotion a .-e '-:r ';-. ,-: r:,'. ,r : r*'.-a
purchase agreements signed between Aprn 7, 2011 and Aprl 17. 2011. E J,- eri r *- **: ':- .. -.
.S.Ll ? ;r, Se; cr,' e- C: :,- valuee w-l Yvay by plan and by community. Closing cost assistance on base price
PJ1126 rsn : er ~ c i~3ldr e :, : a Homes to those financing through Ryand Mortgage Company and closing with
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JAX AIR : ..SNAS JACKSO \ E hyr-Jiy- Apr-l 14, 2011 23






JAX AIR NEWS, NASj .KaoN.ii,-ii Thursda; April 14, 2"1 i








Newslassified


PLACE YOUR MILITARY CLASSIFIED AD


BY PHONE 366-6300
Mon. Thurs. 7:30 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
Fn. 7:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
TOLL FREE 800-258-4637
BY FAX 904-359-4180
IN PERSON
Many people prefer to place dass.f:es ir :efs
and some dassifed categories require pfeparr.e-
For your convyenece, we welccrre you to lace p.r
dassified ad at The Florida Times-'n.nr O. 7 30
a.m.-5.00 p.m. Morday-Friday at Ore Pr,e'sde
Avenue (at the foot of te Acosta Brdge-
Deadlines

Thursday Tue, Noon Tue, 11 a.m.
Please note: Fax deadlines are one hour earlier.
Holiday and Legal deadlines vary and wil be sup-
plied upon request. Cancellation and correction
deadlines are the same as placement deadlines.


CANCELLATIONS, CHANGES & BILLING
Ad Errors P'ease re-d ac co "e "'s$ m : :_ :r .'i i=: "---: :- .- -c.-: "-::---;-
sertion ar ory re G-a-e 'or me a' scace : ---:- - 3-:- -- ,: :e ~ "-:-u: : --:-
and billing adjusmEters
Ad Cancellation iorma a-,er-sirg ceal; :-e aC Cr *'c- r c- IC' -e- :3-ce *; : a: a-:e
rjrnber /ill be ;ss.ed R e'as ts number for ,.Ercar- ,C 366-3:c
Billing Inquiries Ca tre Bi irg Custore- Se-.ce C-,a--e-: a: S' -1 2: ~: a-s,.- :es:c-s a-S :
payments or cried I r'-s, ca!i *Ce Cre.: Depau"e a: 353-42'4

GENERAL INFORMATION
Advertising copy ;s scIect to approval: cc :*.e P.c: se- ,'O *eese. re "; :c eit re.c c' class:; a
advertisements under approprate headrngs Ccop srojc cce publication. Credit for Publisher errors will be a we cr tr'e 'rse: ser'-on' 'c "ra: pc' "r o' one adert.ise'mer
rhich was incorrect Futher, the Publisher shal rot be ;:ab e for any omss5c of adverusements ordered to be
published, nor for any general, special or consequential car-ages. Aoert.sirg language must comply .vth Fede'a:.
State or local laws regarding the prohibition of dsc-' aton in emrplo-,"er:. housrg and public accommodations.
Standard abbreviations are acceptable: however, the i:rs: wd of each ad may not be abbrevated


, The anchor indicates the ad is a FREE Fleet Market Ad placed by military personnel.


CLASSIFIED INDEX


Auctions


I Employment


I a E t fo Sal srvce


Real Estate for Rent


I Merchandise


I Co m rilRelEtt et/nml.


Financial


I Transportation


* it- SAs. 904-366-6300

ONLINE
Classified line ads are online at jaxairnews.com
FREE online advertising!
Your Classified in-column ad automatically appears
online at no additional charge.


Slllllllllll lll ll

Happy Ads
Lost and Found
Clubs and Organizations
Rides/Travel
Notices
Personals
Dating and
Entertainment


Notices

Aoptln Where Yeou elec The Parents.
elect & meet adoptve parents includ-
Ing updated Info. after ie birth. Lvin
expenses, medcal care, xou ng n
transportation provided. For more Info.
contact Jacke O y at 904-443-7770 or
904-710-4276. An Inqulrles are kept
stricty omnfldenia Florida Ber 438211





Open Houses
Argyle
Arlington
Avondale/Ortega
Beaches
Downtown
Fernandina/Amella Island
Intracoastal West
Keystone Heights/Melrose
Mandarin
Middleburg
North Jacksonville
Orange Park/Clay County
Riverside
San Marco
Southside
Springfield
Westside
Waterfront
Condominiums
Manufactured Homes
Lots
Farm Acreage
Investment Property
.Retirement Community
Baker County
Georgia Real Estate
Nassua County
Putnam County
St. Johns Open Houses
St. Johns Homes
St. Johns Waterfront
St. Johns Oceanfront
St Johns Intracoastal
St. Johns Marshfront
St Johns Condos
St. Johns Duplex/
Townhouses
St Johns Manufactured
Homes
St Johns Lots/Acreage
St Johns Active Adult
Com.
St. Johns Investment
Income Property
Miscellaneous
Out of Area/Town/State
Real Estate Wanted

^o Georgia
Real Estate
LAND FOR SALE 82.3 ACRES
Bristol Go. Pierce County. Large
pond with high drivable dame.
Approximately 50 acres of Long
Leaf Pines. Electric power on site,
LOTS OF DEER AND TURKEY.
Owner will finance. Call cell
904-753-1846 or home 904-261-0339


SN rth
Jacksonville
10881 GARDEN ST:
Across from Cory State Forest's East
entrance where horseback riding,
bicycling & walking the trails are
welcome. All brick home on 1 acre.
4/3 split firpln w/upstairs Bonus
room. Debbie Willlams 0 Charnelle


S North
Jacksonville
1182 JONES RD:
JUST REDUCED Immaculate DW
on 1 acre. Backs up to a 4 acre
pond that's perfect for fishing or
lust relaxing. Plenty of room for
toys, pets & horses. Please contact
Debble Williams 0 Charnelle
Whittemore Realty (904)838-0370.



Middleburg


L- A-

M00 Tax Credit Exp. 4/31/2011, some VA
buyers elglble, 3 bdrm/ 2ba Only $973
me. pil. Clol 904-955-4769 for more Info.
Generation Homes


8000 Tax Cred Exp. 4/31/2011, some VA
buyre *Illbl4 bdnnI3b Only $1161 mo.
pie CliC904-955-4769 for more Info.
Oenortion Home


^ Orange Park
/ Clay County



TWO CREEKS
In Clay County


F!,, - .- r
Approved Short Sale Price
$126,000 close in June!
3954 Trail Ridge, Middleburg
3BR 2BA, 1739 sf
Preserve Lot, Like New!
VA FINANCING
K.ren Wentz
MiItIry Relocaton
4SpeciSllst
Prudential

(904) 477-0463
www.KarenWentz.com


1BR/1BA Apartment
Freshly Cleaned Carpets,
New Paint And
Large Bedroom with an
Amazing Walk-in closet.
Even has a
Backyard BBQ Area!
Only 6 Miles to NAS JAX!
$475/MONTH
2 1BR/1BA Units Available


Island Realty, Inc.
S904-215-2910
www.island-realty.info


xeL .tY


Law Offices of

Heather B. Quick, PA.
Experienced Criminal Defense Litigator


Admitted to

the Florida Bar

for 10 years

Former

prosecutor




428-A Osceola Avenue
Jacksonville Beach, FL 32250
Phone 904425-9647 Toll Free: 866-801-2193
SPax 904685-2193

Free criminal consultation Credit cards accepted.

www.ifixDUIproblems.com


v Orange Park
/ Clay County
PACE ISLAND
GATED COMMUNITY
For Sole by owner, price reduced
$210,000. Built in 1988. Brick front ond
stucco, 1888sqft. 3br/2ba, 2 cor garage,
updated screen in patio & new roof.
1569 Royal Fern Ln., Orange Park
32003 Coll 904-824-2663 or 904-422-1119



Nassau County

BRYCEVILLE
BRING HORSES AND COWS
3307 Hamp Hick Rd. off of CR 121.
Have to move due to Illness In fam-
Ily. 5 1/2 acres all fenced and cross
fenced. Large born w/ electric,
water, feed room, 5 horse stall, 1994
nlce3br/2ba doublewlde MH, util-
ity room, approx 1620sf, wheel-
chair accessible, front & back
porches, zoned agriculture. Pres-
ently packing to move hurry lets
make a good deal. Call BOBO or
MARY at 904-879-7463, 904-201-0174


W Out Of Area/
Town/State



SSALE
NORTH CAROLINA MTNS -
Sky Valley, golf course condo, beau-
tlful view, 2 bedroom, 2 both, din-
Ing room, fireplace, front porch
golf course view, nicely furnished.
Joint ownership (not timeshare).
$20,000. Call 904-739-0711 for more
Information.


NWManufactured
Homes
1 Acre, Mob. Hm. 2Bdrl.SBA, 2 car
ar, 2 wells, sept 2 sheds, $10,000
Cash. $300mt. 904-529-1474. 4:30-7pm.

DOLLAR AND DEED
Can get ya d
3 bdrm, 2 bath,
2011 Model for Only $360 month
904-783-4619

NEVER BEFORE TITLED
Factory Warranties Apply
3bdrm, 2bath Will Move for free
Only $36,900
904-783-4619

Orange Park 2011 Jacobsen modular.
Landscaped Fenced lot. Owner
financing $695mo. 904-589-9585

PALM HARBOR
32x80, 4bdrm, 2bath
Only $475 month
904-783-4619

USED DOUBLE
Will Move 4 Free
Only $14,900
904-783-4619


We FINANCE, LOW DOWN
Call Becca 904-781-0441


Ready for move in EZ Qualify. No
payments for 45 days. 2, 3 & 4 bdrms
to choose from call 904-695-0080



Lots For Sale

WESTSIDE- Lot with city water &
elec poles. Good for mobile/
modular home. Asking $39,900
Please Call 249-0346


Apartments Furnished
Apartments Unfurnished
Condominiums
Retirement Communities
Homes Furnished
Homes Unfurnished
Manufactured Homes
Mobile Home Lots
Roommates
Rooms to Rent
Beach Home Rentals
Beach/Vacation/Resorts
Storage/Mini-Lockers
Management/Rental Services
Wanted to Rent
St Johns Apartments Furnished
St Johns Apartments Unfur-
nished
St Johns Condominiums
St Johns Duplex
Townhomes
St Johns Retirement Com-
munities
St Johns Houses Furnished
St Johns Houses
Unfurnished
St Johns Mobile Home/Lot
Rental
St Johns Lots
St Johns Roommates
St Johns Rooms to Rent
St Johns Oceanfront/Waterfront
St Johns Vacation Rental
St Johns Storage/
Mini-Lockers
St Johns Wanted to Rent

r Apartments
Furnished

Westside
Small 1 Bedroom Apartment
Mostly furnished, includes utili-
ties, cable, $175 week, $500deposit
Call 904-695-1412


'1 Apartments
Unfurnished
Arlington ADOBE APTS. FRBE Er &
SPECIALS1 Studio & Ibr's $400- $450
Near Town & Co Shp Ctr 904-745-0450
Avondale Duplex 2/1 hardwood
floors, porches, fireplace. 2nd
floor includes washer/dryer
$900mo. 1st floor washer/dryer
hookup $800mo. Garage addi-
tional $100. Call 904-486-0023

Riverside & Westslde 1 Br
Starling at $450 2 Br Starting
at $550 3 App. Feel 771-1243
200 OFF 1t Month Rent
WESTSIDE- OFF 103rd
2BR DUPLEX, FENCED YARD,
REERENCES REQ. $595 7782897

WESTSIDE/MURRAY HILL
1BR $395.00 & 2BR $525.00
$99.00 Security Deposit
904-329-1985
NOT 11 NOT 21
BUT 3 MONTHS FREE ON 2BRI11I
CALL NOWI I 904.781.6616


Condominiums

Baymeadows / 9A
immaculate town home 2/2.5,
W/D, Lrg closets, gated, pool
& gym. $925mo., good credit
required. Call 904-716-8855
email: kittyiniax@comcast.net
Mandarin The Preserves
3/2 Condo, 1550sf, BY OWNER
NO FEE ground fl, like new, DW,
W/D, Olympic pool/picnic area/
exercise facility, park like land-
scaped grounds, $925. 904-732-6648

^^ Houses
Unfurnished
ARGYLE -3/2, Living Room, Dining
Room, Split BR, ceiling fans, fenced yard.
$1095 Refs. required 778-2897


SUPPORTING OUR HEROES AT

Orta ?hear APARTMENTS


BRAND FEE


(I(I-MW!MW DISCOUNT


v HoMuses
Unfurnished
ARLINGTON 2 bed, I both Duplex,
CH&A, wld hookup 5625 mo. + dep
1231 Bretto St. 904-305-3177

MANDARIN 5015 Tan St.
3/2, 2 car garage, ceramic tile,
large fenced back yard,
new appliances. Pets ok.
$1,195. month + deposit.
Call 386-447-1832 or 386-569-1505

NAS Jax. Close to 17 & 295. Lg
townhome approx 1720 SF. 32.5,
one car gar. + extra parking.
$95O/mo. Call 904.757.3876


Northside Home for rent
*** First month's rent free ***
with $655 security deposit "
904-316-8492

ON DR'S LAKE 4/3 home
pool, sauna, dock with
working boat lift. $2000m+dep.
Avail 7/1. 904-237-0451/904-352-9961


WESTSIDE- 5549 Ortega Park Blvd,
32244. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car
garage, 2000 sq. feet, $1200/month,
new carpet, no smoking.
904-710-3050 www.Jandsllc.com

WESTSIDE 3/2
Fenced yard, carport, EXTRA
clean, pets ok, $940 month +
lst+ last + security deposit.
Call 904-246-9001

Westside 3BR/2bath house, $975.00
large Bedrooms and kitchen.
fenced yard, 2car garage. patio,
fireplace. CH/A. Call 708-3024


S Manufactured
Homes
MARIETTA AREA,
2005, 28x80 Fleetwood, 1st & last
down $495mo. Call 904-589-9585

Middleburg 2008 Jacobsen modular 2
ac lot, paved road, owner has
financing $695mo. 904-589-9585

WESTSIDE lbr, 2br & 3br MH
Clean & Quietest Place this side of
Heaven. Check us out Friday nights
to witness a quality & disciplined
community, report to us your option
and qualify for no deposit.
Background. Income, credit checked.
Napoli Community. 904-781-5645


Large 3bd/2ba, 1280sqft
call RebeccaO 904-695-2255


2 and 3 bedrooms avail. Rents
as low as $575. call Becca 904-781-0441



Roommates

ROOMMATE WANTED 3br Apt.,
master bdrm w/bath avail. Min's to
NAS Jax. Price negotiable $425mo
all Inclusive. For details. 904-229-4387

A WESTSIDE Close to NAS JAX
SSeeking responsible 8 reliable
1jperson to share home,
separate both, clean, no pets,
no drugs, utilities & cable included
Preferably female. 904-307-2890

Westside turn TV w/d $350/mo plus
1/3 utils SSI ok 904-314-6279, 301-523-9293


7 Rooms
To Rent
ARLINGTON / W'side / N'side-
Furnished, phone, TV, w/d, ch&a.
$100-$130wk 838-4587


Job Fairs
Resume Services
Accounting/Bookkeeping
Advertising/Media
Architecture/Interior
Design/Graphics Design
Automotive Sales/Service
Aviation
Civil Service/Government/
Public Administration
Computer Hardware/
Software/Programming
Construction
Customer Service
Dental
Domestic Services/
Caregiving
Delivery Driver
Education/Teaching/
Training
Engineering
Entertainment
Executive/Management
Finance/Investment
General Employment
Hotel/Hospitality/Tourism
Industrial Trades
Insurance
Landscaping/Grounds
Maintenance
Law Enforcement/
Security/Safety
Legal
Maintenance/Janitorial
Services
Management/Professional
Marketing
Mechanics
Medical/Health Care
Marine/Trade
Nurses/Nurses Aides
Office/Clerical/
Administration
Part-Time
Personal Services/Beauty
Real Estate/Property
Management
Recreation/Sports/Fitness
Restaurant/Bar/Club/
Food/Beverages
Retail
Sales
Science/Research
Social Services/Counseling
Technical Support
Telemarketing
Transportation
Warehouse/Inventory
Work at Home
Positions Wanted



W Medical/
Health Care





Life
Care
Center
of Orange Park
Now Hiring:
* RN Staff Development
Coordinator w/ exp.
Apply at:
2145 Kingsley Ave.
Orange Park, Fl 32073
Ph # 904-272-2424
Fax# 904-272-0013


^ General
Employment






CAN YOU MAKE PEOPLE SMILE?
High energy, friendly, money
motivated person required. Must
have reliable transportation, have
a clean criminal record & be able
to start immediately. Call 224-1085
or send a resume by fax 268-9663 or
e-mail your resume to
hrdept@abmrktg.com


Advance Your Career at
Harts Harbor Health Care Center!

Become a part of our professional Team Today
Now is an exciting time to be a part of Harts Harbor
Health Care Center!
We're expanding our team of healthcare professionals
and we currently have career opportunities
available for the following positions:

Environmental Director
Licensed Nurses

We are seeking Individuals with:
Exceptional Clinical & Professional Capabilities
Strong Team and Leadership Skills
Long-term Care Experience preferred, EEOC

Please apply at Harts Harbor Health Care
11565 Harts Road
Jacksonville, Fl 32218
(904)751-1834


Support
your military
newspaper.

The best again
in townm.
For Classified Advertising,
call 904-366-6300,
or 1-800-258-4637.

r Hews


Besides protecting our country,
military personnel stationed in our
communities donated 650,620 hours
of volunteer service in Northeast .
Florida and Southeast Georgia last
year. Their time was given to community
organizations, church groups, youth
activities, scouting and more.


I:Control Your Own Income

AI I


IEpomt


SI .I










IndusLaw ealEstate
IndustrialTrades Enforcement/ Property Managment


"A" Class Layout Fitter Welder
'/ust be able to /Olaut and fabricate
sheet metal, set up and operate
Broke Presses, read blue prints,
/ IG and TIG endingg on alumi-
rum, steel, and stainless steel. Per-
form tack, vertical, o',erhead and
flat ,/elds mlth prec;ison and qual-
ity Adiust and set up welding
machines for oil thickness.es and
types of metia "A" CIcss elders
Oni, Fa/ resume to 904-353-2833,
or stop by 122 '/ State St., Jack-
soniille to fill out on Opplication.


"A" Class Sheet
Metal Mechanic Foreman
/,ust be able to layout and fabricate
sheet metal, oversee and set up all
operations performed in the sheet
metal department, set up and oper-
ate Brake Presses, read blue prints,
U/IG and TIG welding would be a
plus Foa resume to 904-353-2833, or
Stup by 1220 State St., Jackson-
Aille, to fill out an application


Security/Safety

SECURITY OFFICERS
FT. PT "D/G" Lic req'd, oil snifts.
G'et pay. 24/16 hrs. D Class
Offered too Holiday cork ovail-
onle Call NOW" 1-866-458-9523
EOE


Mechanics


If you have ever considered
a career in Real Estate!
Real estate classes starting
soon at $199! Attend a dis-
covery session to see how
you con get stored.
Call Audrey Lockie today,
Career Counselor
(904)596-5959


www.realestatecareersfionda.-com




Sales


I Trades


RADIO TECHNICIAN NEEDED
Diagnose, locate & repoar molfunc-
tions in mobile and portable radio
units, install new equipment for ini-
tial use. Transfer equipment to
other vehicles or fixed locations.
Calibrate radio equipment. 1-2
years of radio tech exp. Exp. With
public safety vehicle electronic
equipment, portables, mobiles and
backbone equipment, a plus. Must
pass extensive bkground inc. drug
test and physical. Must have HS
diploma / GED. EEO Drug-Free
Workplace For application &
Information: Clay County Sheriffs
Office, P 0 Box 548, GCS FL 32043,
(904) 213-6040, www.claysheriff.
com. Deadline to apply 4/22/11


'eaCrirectcory









ALIT A O R E.H


0
m i'n:K _


4660 Sws Bvd. 642-6060

N1IYMC BU8CK3MC
11503PhitpsHwn 854-4826


CADILLACSAAB OF
ORANGE PARK
7999 Blanding Blvd. 778-7700
www.cadaoforangepak.com

CLAUDE NOLAN CADILLAC
4700Soahsde Bld. 642-5111
www.claudenolan.com


NIMNICHT CHEVY
1550 Cassat Ave
904-647-4220
www nimnichlchevy.com
JERRY HIAM CHEVY
3494 Philips Hwy 398-3036
www.jenyhaim.com







ATLANTI CHRYSLER
www.atanliqeep.com
2330 US1 South 3544421
JACKSONVILE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A&BAYMEADOWS. 4930M0
RICK KIEFER -
1-95 Ext 373, FernBch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com
ORANGE PARK
CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE
7233 Bndg Blvd. 777-5500
www oangeparkdoge comn


ATLANTIC DODGE
www.aanticeep.com
2330 US1 South 354-4421

JACKSONIALWE CHRLE
EPDODCGE
9A & Baymeadows 493000

ORANGE PARK CHRYSLER
JEEPDODGE
7233 Blanda g Bd. 777-5500
www.ongeparkdodge.con

RICKKEFFER
1-95 Exit373, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com


PAILJCLa K FOR litXy
I-95 N.Ext 129 (Yufee)
225-3673
MIKE SHAD FORD
At The Avenues
10720 Philps Hwy.
904-292-3325
MIKE DAVIDSON FORD
AT MGIENCY
9650AtLanticBvd. 725-3060
MIKE SHAD FORD
OF ORANGE PARK
7700 Blanding Bvd. 7773673


iMC.


NIMNICHT-GMC
11503Phiips Hwy 854-482


DUVAL HONDA
1325 CassatAve. 899-1900
LOU SOBH HONDA
OF THE AVENUES
11333PhipsHwy. 370-1300


KEY HYUNDAI
4660 Southside Blvd. 64206






ATLANTIC INFINI
10980 Atlantic B 6420200






1111111


ATLANTIC JEP
www.atai0ieep.com
2330US1South 354-4421
JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A&BAYMEADOWS. 493M00
RICK KEFFER
1-95 Ext 373, Fern Bch
1-80-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com

ORANGE PARK
CH LER JEEP DODGE
7233 Bandng B. 777-5500
www.oangeparkdodgecomm






KU OF ORANGE PARK
6373 Blnding Blvd.
771-6078





NORTH FLORIDA
LICOLNI
4620 Southside Bld.
6424100

MIKE SHAD FORD
UNCOLN
77 Blng Blvd. 777-3673


SAAB OF ORANGE PARK
7999 BlandingBlvd. 302-5373
www.saabolorngeparkcom


KETH PERSON TOYOTA
6501 Youngerman Circe.
771-9100

ERNIE PALMER TOYOTA
1310 CassatAve. 3894561


OrTEEN VOLKSWAGEN
VISIT OSTEENVW.COM
TODAYl
904-322-5100

TOM BUSH VOLKSWAGEN
9850 Atlat Bolevard
725-0911


OTEEVOLVO
www.osteenvolvo.com
396-5486


OT LEASING
C R LaousS" u 1955
2810 St Agustne Rd.
398-5000
www.gtleasing.com


JAX AIR NE,


AC & Heating

We will eal ny o ri trln estimte on
'e* s,1'er-s & -c0 -s -,r 1:" 924-
5~a-Z= aoee ,c c--CAC'it'14


Child Care

SIn Home Dorcore has 2 open-
| igs Crai aie for .naonT oa
3a er fV-= 300-60. CPR &
F rst A: C cr'- 777-S46
Home Daycore Provider CDA
ce.se tFCADU'261
PR -s? A, e. OOen.rgs
S yrs Sear *.aooroc
Schools & Naooa Station

In-Home Daycore O.P.H.S.
Sarea. 5am-5 30m, M-F. FL
SCL FO0CL0014 Coil
90-955s 1965



AC, Heating, Fuel
Antiques
Appliances
Arts & Crafts
Auctions
Building Supplies
Business/Office Equipment
Clothes
Collectibles
Computer
Craft/Thrift Stores
Electronics
Estate Sales
Farm/Planting
Fruits/Vegetables
Furniture/Household
Garage Sales
Garden/Lawn
Hot Tubs/Spas
Jewelry/Watches
Kid's Stuff
Machinery & Tools
Medical
Miscellaneous Merchandise
Musical Merchandise
Photography
Portable Buildings
Public Sales
Sporting Goods
Tickets
Trailers
Wanted to Buy or Trade



Antiques


AMERICAN INDIAN ITEMS
WANTED- Old rugs, Pottery,
Jewelry, Bead work, Paintings, etc.
Pre- 1960. Please call FL 352-466-3013
or N.M. 505-228-5974


Appliances

Appliances, buy, sell, trade & repair
W/Ds, Refries., stove, $65-up wrnty.
Mon- Sun 9-7. Delivery 904-695-1412
S G.E. Commercial upright
freezer 14cu. ft., 4 shelves, 1
v drawer, $150. 904-241-7287
SFood Freezer GA 13.1 cu
Deluxe, exc. cond. $100.
t 771-0819
SGE Hot Point top
freezer/refrigerator Exc. cond.
_ l $100. 771-0819
Broan 30" Stainless Steel
Range hood $45.
904-269-1478



Electronics

60" Big screen TV w/great pic-
ture but no sound. '$75.
904-264-6785
TV/Monitor HD 15" Magnavox
w/remote $40. Digital TV con-
verter $6. Both exc. cond.
t1 268-2482


Estate Sales

B LANGSTON TOWNCENTER AREA
Contemp furn, decorator & antique
access., fine glassware, jewelry.
3820 Purcellville Ct. Thur/Fri 9-5 Sat 9-2
WWW.BLANGSTONS.COM 642-1003

F Furniture /
Household
All New Quality Furniture Sofa sets
$399 Queen Mat & Box $150 5pc Bed
Set $399 (904)245-9397
BED. Iron frame, tubular
posts w/lrg brass tops. Very
old, but In great cond. $425.
268-2482


High School education or
e0011mlonw. 1
*2-4 yrs xperence In HD
truck troler repair experience.
uMl GEm. lclr el f Aimrlc Ire. AT&T Hired Us, Now We Want You!
Registration Agents Needed
800-2514301 10 Openings s500-S90 wk
Paid Weekly Will Train
Appey ell oe Call 904.413.15S3
WWW.MCALOISTICS.COM _
EOE / AA

STechnical


650,620 HOURS

Besides protecting our country,
military personnel stationed in our
communities donated 650,620 hours
of volunteer service in Northeast
Florida and Southeast Georgia last
year.'Their time was given to community
organizations, church groups, youth
activities, scouting and more.

hank You!








PMirrore


Periscope.


Navy

Classified

Ads



THE FLEET

M ARKET Rank/Grade: Work Phone# Organization: Date Submitted:
Name(please print): Signature:
ADVERTISING
1. Free advertising in the Fleet Market is restricted to active duty and retired military 7. Additional readership in other publications can be arranged for a nominal fee by
R U L ES personnel (or their dependents) and civilian employees assigned to the Mayport calling 1-800-258-4637 (toll free), or enclosing your phone number.
P a fill ut thi Naval Station. 8. Faxed ads will be accepted at 904-366-6230, however. they mus' be completed
ease fill o t 2. Advertising in the Feet Market is a free service provided by the publisher to on an onginal form.
form In black or help qualified personnel dispose of unwanted personal articles. Service ads Select the number of weeks ad is to run: j 1 w' 3 2 Mks 3 3 wks 3 4 wks
blue ink. such as sharing rddes to work or on leave, announcing lost and found items, and garage
sales will be accepted. ADS PERTAINING TO GUN SALES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. ANIMAL To renew your ad after the allotted time you must re-submt your ad to The Mrror.
OR PET ADS W1LL ONLY BE ACCEPTED IFTHE ANIMALS ARE OFFERED FREE. CHILD CARE NOTE: (1) This form must be clipped (not torn alorg the outside border. (2) No
DEADLINES PROIDERSCANNOTDISCRIMINATE.REALESTATEADSWILLBE LIMEDTOANNOUNCEMENT more than one word (or abbreviation for one 'oro Der nock. (3) Only two free
OF HOMES FOR SALE OR RENT BY QUALIFIED INDDUALS WITH PERMANENT CHANGE O ads per family. Der week. (4) Select the category for t"e ad cy refemrg to te
STATION (PCS) OR "OFFICIALLY REASSIGNED" ORDERS. REAL ESTATE ADS MUST CONTAIN Classified Index.
STHE ONE OF THOSE STATEMENTS IN THE BODY OF THE AD- OTHERWISE THEY WILL BE BILLED.
S1 3. All information requested must be included and readable All ads should be

M IR RO R nriten indeDendent of other information contained on this form.
4. Ads received after the above time will run in the following week's issue. Category:
5. Completed forms should be delivered or mailed to the Fleet Market. Jax A,'
News. Bldg. 1. Naval Air Station Jacksonville. Jacksonville. FL 32212. or to Jax -
Noon Air News, One Riverside Avenue. Jacksonville, FL 32202 w
rldyr 6 Ads appearing to be in the promotion of a business or which do not meet the -a W w
Friday above requirements will be billed. The publisher reserves the night to orrm a,
or all ads. One Riverside Avenue. Jacksonville FL 32202


-9 FREE-0 FRE FREE 1 FREE FREE FREE :FREE *:FREE FREE;0 F REE


m -


X5,NA> I\. ::--; .Thuri.

V Furniture /
Household
Beoutiful Foirfield Traditional Love
5eao witS decorative throw pillows.
Needle point floral deslnn on front
in coral and beige. Excellent con-
dition. Ideal for professional office
or hone. 5I90 573-144 or 762-5998.
Great Distinction brown all leather
large chair with ottoman. Sold new
for $2000. Will sell for $1000.
Excellent condition. 573-9344 or
762-5991-
SRecliner Swivels Rocks suede
515 Cc-cS 5s95. Roitoo desk
29'-o- 2"95 AI like nev. To-
bes S 9-S-74-6814
5Solid wood Adirondack
Rocker like new $50 obo.

Ivy League medium oak bed-
Sroom sT full sz dresser. mir-
ror. ngntstono, sleigh bed,
i lex c c o n a $ B00
904491- 799 58- 2307
t Green Couch $250; love seat
$200 leather couch, end
Srecl;ne's $40 All very good
cona 904 215-7792
Ad. beds (2) twin extra long,
doubles as king size beds.
Head, foot elevated, massage
therapy, exc cond. $500 both or
sJooea. 904-542-2732
SWood bdrm set, 9 drwr
dresser, 2 night thIbis, bed
Some, heodbrd $350obo.
904x8-1484


Garage Sale

East Arlington Community Yard
Sale Indian Springs Subdiv
(Corner of Girvin Rd & Atlantic
Blvd) Sot 16, April 8a-2p
Northside Furniture, canoe, & more.
1630 Cedar Bay Rd. Fri & Solt 9-2p
Northside Morshwinds Community
Garage Sale Sat. April 16th, 8:00am
-1:00pm Off Alto Dr. North of 9A
PONTE VEDRA/SAWMILL LAKES
4/16 8-1 Community garage salelel
Approximately 50-70 homes. County
Rd 210 near Palm Voalley Bridge
Souhilde Belle Rive Comm tor Sale 20
+Homes, Sat 4/1. 8am-3pm (R) of Souh-
ide Blvd. 2nd light S of Baymeadows Rd.
Southslde Sloop PI. Cul-de-sac Sale
in Secret Cove off Belfort FriSat 8-2


Garden / Lawn

FILL DIRT CHEAP!!!
Call David at: 416-6459
4 Yard Machine Riding Mower
38", 13HP. Great shape $350.
904-616-6008



Watches










High quality ladies engage-
| meantt ring clt Marquise center
,stone +.21cts. Additional dia-
monds. Appr. $7200. Sell $2600.
904-220-9276

Misc.
Merchandise
(4) 17" Tires w/chrome rims.
Good cond. Looks great on
tjt Nissan Honda or Toyota
$300obo. 904-718-7241
DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
NEEDED
I BUY sealed, unexpired boxes.
Call Mike (904)712-9015
FILL DIRT CHEAP!!!
Call : 416-6459
Large Stainless Steel Round Bird
Cage In good condition. $250.00.
573-9344 or 762-5998.
& FORD Sport-Trac hard ton-
Ineau cover, folding, likenew
J$1000obo. 904-312-0712
Cemetery Plots (2) at Jack-
sonville Memory Gardens in
|Orange Pk, Masonic Garden
Plot 164 &165. $3300.
904-386-8154
4 SHARP 32" TV $260..Golf bags
beige w/cover $35. Black $25
Clubs $10-$15. Motorcycle hel-
met $15. 904-384-7809
SNascar Collection Diecast
Misc. items. Price varies. Pub
V style tbl w/4paded chrs, cafe
style sm tbt 2 pad chrs,
904-529-8263
Tile Saw. Table, 7", 3/4 H.P. In
ori. box, never used. Pd $90.
Sacrifice $40. 268-2482


Adopt a Pet
Pets & Supplies
Livestock & Supplies
Animals Wanted

Pets &
Supplies
BORDER COLLIE PUPS all Colors
chomp bloodlines call 912-422-3982
Go to www.wolkerkennet.com
CHIHUAHUA Pups Short & long hair
W/F, blue color 300. 904-737-4293
English Bulldog Pups AKC
Champion lines, oil colors avi now.
$1350. 904-35-1386
SFree Ball Python, Irg, handled
since birth. Lrg enclosure,
stand, lamps, access., heater.
Exc. pet reptile. Don
912-409-8634
German Shorthaired Pointer, AKC
Pups, champ bloodlines 912-422-3982
Go to www.walkerkennel.com

OLDE ENGLISH BULLDOG *
PUPS 3/M 3/F.
Ready April 28th $800 and up.
Rexbullies@yahoo.com
Poodle Standard AKC Puppies. $700.
229-217-0540 or 229-891-6847.
ROTTWEILER Puppies- CKC Rea
Bwks, HC, shots, POP, girls $350.00
904-998-2180
Vilsla Pups AKC dewclaws removed,
tails docked superior bidline $850.
Taking deposits now 229-388-6356
WolfHybridPups. Beautiful. 1M/ IF,
H/C. DOB 1/7. $250. 904.266.3452
YORKIE, MORKIE, Moltlpoo, Chow Chow
PUPS. CASH ONLY 904-721-5253, 923-735




Aviation
Boats
Sailboats
Boat Dockage & Rentals
Marine Equipment
& Supplies
RV Rentals
RV's & Suppliers
Motorcycles & Mini Bikes
Auto Brokers
Auto Parts
Antiques/Classics
Automobiles
Trucks/Trailers/SUVs
Vans/Buses
$2000 or Less
Commercial Vehicles
Misc. Auto
Autos/Trucks Wanted
Auto Rent/Lease


Boats


f
SPower Boat Jackstands (4)
26-46". Adi. Poppett stands up
Vt o 35ft boat. Steel. Don
912-409-8634. $260.


^^ Motorcycles
/ Mini Bikes
Honda VTX1300S 2005.
Black, wndshld, Irg hard Ithr bogs,
backrest. 6400+ mis. Just serviced.
Runs great! Asking $6000. One
flow: quarter sized scuff on front
fender... must see the pics.
8 4 3 6 9 7 5 4 3 4
timothy.smith.iiCgmail.com
* H-iarley Davidson 1987 fxrs
1340cc 33Kmlles, new tires,
battery. Lots of extras. Gar.
kept. $5800obo. 904-821-1550
2003 Suzuki SVl000s Sportbike,
low mi's, lots of extras,
$3500oo. Call 904-882-1202



Automobiles

BMW 5301 2001 Jet Black w/tan
leather 73,000 miles, alloy wheels,
automatic steptronic trans, CD,
Xenon lights, Good condition,
no problems asking $10,250"
Call Bob 904-233-7986
Honda Accord 1998- Great on gas!
$2,650. -35 MPG!!! 4- Cyl, 2.3 Liter,
5 speed A/C CD 192k. 419-515-6191
Kla Sephia 2001
Automatic transmission. Four door
sedan. 106,000 miles. $2,000.00 or
best offer. Call 904-849-7073.
Porsche Boxster S. 2002 66,500 miles
very clean and garaged. Asking
$17,500 call 904-881-7972
4 '06 S-Type Jaguar, exc cond.,
30,0O60m's, dual transm., Ithr,
wood inter. $17K.
S912-617-5883/912-673-979
4, Mercury Grand Marquis LS
S'96, 38km's, driven only In
town miles by Senior Citizen
S$5900. Unbelievable.
904-874-6814
--ei
lERNIE PALMER TOYOTA I
WOULD UKE TO CONOGATULATE
STYXX JENKINS for Joining I
bur award winning sales team


I I


I
Stop by or give him a call
1310 CASSAT AVE
Cell:470-9224 Bus: 904-389-4561
Bring In This Ad
S For Extra Savings


I Trucks/
Trailiers SUVs





CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 LS- 2002
VERY CLEAN-Non-Smoker- ONLY
$5,995. irh24 30yahooo.com
904-256-9243 PERFECT-2 WD, V8,
bed cover/liner, automatic, cruise,
elect, windows, must see!
SLEXUS RX300 2002
$11.900 Exc. cond.
4kmi's. 264-6364
S2001 Isuzu Rodeo Sport 130kmi,
exc cond., PW. PDL. A/C,
AAuto, new tires $49950bo.
912-656-2249
4 '97 Jeep Cherokee 6cyl, 4x4,
lift kit, runs good, needs int.
,,ork, body decent. $1400obo.
912-552-5857/912-882-4724
FORD RANGER XLT Ext.
cab. '94, AT. ST/PB Trans.
196kmi, exc. working truck.
904-505-7455
TRUCK VAN CAR WANTED
WILL TAKE OVER PAYMENTS
Coll 904-388-3432


"W Autos / Trucks
Wanted
SCoshS for iunk cars 200+. Free
toting, must have title 781-3813
me:


iv. Apn! 14. 201 1 25


Sporting Goods

FRANCHI 20 gouge automatic shot-
gun. CAMO finish. NEW IN BOX.
Pood $S40. make offer 904-502-3744
Lifestyle Fitness Trainer
1 Treadmill 200.
i 215-7792


Wanted to
Buy or Trade
SCashs for lunk cars 200-. Free
towing, must have tite. 781-3813


A great career In health care begins at Southern Career College
You can get skills in phlebotomy in only 8 weeks!
Call to reserve your seat in this
limited program today!
1-877-290-4082.
Train to be a Medical Assistant Technician in only 11 months!

The next term will start soon!
Call 1-877-290-4082

Find us at our new campus, at 9550 Regency Square Blvd, Suite
1000. Conveniently located near Regency Square Mall.
It All Begins Here! Serving the Jacksonville
community for over 25 years! Let us show you how we can
help you reach your career dreams!
A new you! Call today. 1-877-290-4082


AUTO UNE
A Family owned
Business
autoinepreowned.com
2126 MayrtRd, Atn Beadc
904-242-8000
AUTOS
BEACH BLVD.
AUTOMOTIVE
Family Owned Since1967
beachdvdautomtive.com
6833 Beach Blvd.
724-3511
DARCARS
-4-
WESTSIDE
PRE-OWNED
SUPERSTOE
1672 Cassat Ave.
904-384-6561
www.westsidedodge.net
O'STEENVW
CERTIRED
PRE-OWNED

VISITOSTEENVW.CO
TODArY
904322-5100
TOM BUSH
VW-MAZDA


www.tombush.com
9850 Atant Blvd
904-7250911
WORLD IMPORTS
CERTIRED
PRE-OWNED
AUTO CENTER
www.wordmportsusacom
11650 BEACH BLVD.
998-9992

READ DRIVE
EVERY
SATURDAY IN
THE
TIMES-UNION
OR
GO TO
DRIVE.
JACKSONVILLE.
COM FOR
GREAT
VEHICLE
VALUES!


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Umrf SAVE

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ornONAL
SSW BONUS
CASH WrrH
TIOS AIY]


Drive one.


800-849-3462
R 904-264-2442


Drive one.


SE HABLA
ESPANOL


US HWY 17 SOUTH
GREEN COVE SPRINGS


Saes Hours:
Monday- Friday 8:30am- 7pm
Saturday 8:30am 6pm


VIS ITuS AT
.:' ,


Cross the Bridge to
Green Cove
Springs and SAVE!


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o3RING YOUR MILITARY 13 FOR ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTSa


o DON'T FORGET A3OUT OUR 30DY SHI-OP AND SERVICE DEPARTMENT I
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IAX Aia NEWas, N-AS


NEW 2011 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN

CONSUMER REPORTS
BEST BUY!


MOPAR
ACCESSORIES
WITHANY WRANGLER
PURCHASED!
S. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.



a*'10 *6 6 3-,.t


NEW 2010 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT
#AW 117851 MSRP $25,765 ................. .............. ........................... .....NOW $19,996
NEW 2010 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT
4a,, 154862 :.'-c. .$ NOW: $20,486
NEW 2010 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT
.: 1 MSRP: $26,855................ NOW: $20,986
20HSLE


NEW 2010 CHRYSLER 300 TOURING
#AH I-1 : ."' -., $32,635


NOW: $24,582


I--I-III)--
NEW 2010 DODGE JOURNEY SXT
#AT137432 MSRP: $29,840 ..........................NOW: $22,495
NEW 2010 DODGE CHALLENGER R/T
,-H :,,. MSRP: $35,235 ........................................ ...................... ....................N OW :$28 ,986
NEW 2010 DODGE CHALLENGER R/T
#- i- 14003 MSRP: $35,260 ............................................ ....................... .......... ...... N O W : 2 8 ,9 8 6

NEW 2010 RAM 2500 CREW CAB SLT
#AG159527 MSRP: $47,640 ................................... NOW $36,986


Jeep
no DC3E3f f1 RA&M
Sales Hours:
Monday Friday 9am 7pm
Saturday 9am 6pm


GARBER
AUTOMAIL
800-849-3462 OR 904-264-2442
On US HWY 17 between Orange Park and Green
Cove Springs. Convenient from the North or South.


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21 GIARBER* a^
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