Title: Jax air news
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/01868
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jax air news
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, Fla.
United States Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date: December 3, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028307
Volume ID: VID01868
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33313438
alephbibnum - 000579555
lccn - sn 95047201
lccn - sn 95047201

Full Text




Transition A-OK
Former HS-3 "Tridents" now HSC-9
Page 4


Afghanistan IA Report
Soldiers & Sailors Lend Assistance
Pages 6 & 7


rl-iITr FR


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2009


www.jaxairnews.com


~Dec. 7, 1941



emembering Pearl Harbor


From Naval History
& Heritage Command


The road to war between
Japan and the United
States began in the 1930s
when differences over China
drove the two nations apart.
In 1931 Japan conquered
Manchuria, which until then
had been part of China. In 1937
Japan began a long and ultimate-
ly unsuccessful campaign to con-
quer the rest of China.
In 1940, the Japanese gov-
ernment allied their country
with Nazi Germany in the Axis
Alliance, and soon occupied all of
Indochina.
The United States, which had
important political and eco-
nomic interests in East Asia,
was alarmed by these Japanese
moves. The U.S. increased mili-
tary and financial aid to China,
embarked on a program of
strengthening its military power
in the Pacific, and cut off the
shipment of oil and other raw
materials to Japan.
Because Japan was poor in
natural resources, its government
viewed these steps especially
the embargo on oil as a threat
to the nation's survival. Japanese
leaders responded by resolving to


Photo by MC2 Sarah Murphy
In this 2007 photo, the USS Arizona Memorial can be seen in the distance from the Healing Field Flag Memorial
at Pearl Harbor that featured 2,804 flags, each standing 8 feet tall, to commemorate every service member killed
in the Japanese attack of Dec. 7, 1941.


seize the resource-rich territories
of Southeast Asia, even though
that move would certainly result
in war with the United States.


To neutralize the danger posed
by the U.S. Pacific Fleet based at
Pearl Harbor, Admiral Isoroku
Yamamoto, commander of the


Japanese fleet, devised a plan
to destroy the U.S. fleet at the
outset of the war through a sur-
prise attack. The key elements


in Yamamoto's plan were metic-
ulous preparation, the achieve-
ment of surprise, and the use
of naval aviation on an unprec-
edented scale.
In the spring of 1941, Japanese
carrier pilots began training in
the special tactics called for by
the Pearl Harbor attack plan.
In October 1941 the naval gen-
eral staff gave final approval
to Yamamoto's plan, which
called for the formation of an
attack force commanded by Vice
Admiral Chuichi Nagumo. It
centered around six heavy air-
craft carriers accompanied by
24 supporting vessels. A sepa-
rate group of submarines was
to sink any American warships
that escaped the Japanese car-
rier force. Nagumo's fleet assem-
bled in the remote anchorage of
Tankan Bay in the Kurile Islands
and departed in strictest secrecy
for Hawaii on Nov. 26, 1941. The
ships' route crossed the North
Pacific and avoided normal ship-
ping lanes. At dawn on Dec. 7,
the Japanese task force had
approached undetected to a point
slightly more than 200 miles
north of Oahu.


See PEARL HARBOR, Page 10


Photos by Clark Pierce
At the CNRSE Regional Dispatch Center, 911 dispatchers Tammy Kane (foreground) and Judy
Godley process emergency calls for both NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport and dispatch
appropriate police, fire and medical resources.


Improved 911


response coming

to NAS Jax

By Andrew Rubio
NAVFAC Southeast Intern
Most 911 emergencies are time-
sensitive situations with
lives hanging in the balance.
In "mutual aid" responses where off-
base police and fire/rescue are back-up
responders for NAS Jax 911 emergencies
- they may not be familiar with the on-
base address system that assigns building
numbers rather than a physical street
address. In short, street addresses are
needed so 911 callers can be quickly locat-


of NAS Jax in this case that displays the 911
j--









emergency location, as well as the locations
of police, fire and rescue units.
ed using a common, systematic approach.
The NAS Jax Addressing Project was


See 911 RESPONSE, Page 10


TOUCHING Christmas Tree Lighting Gator Country Message for Troops
Dec. 4 at 4:30 p.m. Dec. 5 from 1:30 4:30 p.m.

BASE Patriots Grove on Yorktown Ave. Tape your video message at NEX Food Court


Angel artisans



Fleet Readiness Center
Southeast artisans paint a
variety of military aircraft
'to protect airframes
from corrosion. They also
place insignias and special
markings on each aircraft.
Here, aircraft painter James
"Dean" Taylor painstakingly
applies masking tap to
outline the yellow paint
striping on a Boeing F/A-18
Hornet Strike Fighter flown
by the Blue Angels, the
Navy flight demonstration
team. The Blue Angels
performed their first flight
demonstration in June 1946
at their original home base,
NAS Jacksonville.


Photos by Vic Pitts


Fresh from the FRCSE paint shop, including all the official striping and emblems, this
Blue Angels F/A-18 is ready to fly to its home base of NAS Pensacola.






2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 3, 2009


Looking back to 1959...


U.S. Navy photo
A Douglas AD-6 (later A-1) Skyraider assigned to the VA-35 "Black Panthers" rests on the ramp at NAS Jacksonville. The
Skyraider's twin-row, 18-cylinder, supercharged, air-cooled Wright R-3350 Cyclone engine was one of the most power-
ful radial aircraft engines ever produced. The Skyraider entered Navy service in 1946 at the beginning of the jet age.
Dubbed the "Able Dog" and "Spad," it delivered hefty combat payloads (up to 8,000 pounds) in Korea and Vietnam,
where it was valued by the Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force for its outstanding close air support capabilities. The Navy
flew Skyraiders until the end of 1968, transferring most of them to the United States Air Force and South Vietnamese
Air Force.



Waffle shortage not my imagination
By Sarah Smiley
Special Contributor ...


When I wrote last week's col-
umn, I sincerely had no idea
that Eggo, the frozen waffle
company, is in the midst of a nation-
wide shortage.
I had, of course, noticed that the
waffle section of our grocery store was
bare, save for a friendly note attached
to the shelf that read: "We are work-
ing to restock this item," but I didn't
realize conditions were the same else-
where across the country.
For about a month, I have been
unable to buy my boys the Eggo waf-
fles they love, and was left with no
option but to buy the store-brand ver-
sion, which went over like a frozen
stack of waffles.
The thought occurred to me, how-
ever briefly, that there might in fact
be an explanation for why the waffle
shelf for so long has looked like the
bread and water aisles before a hur-
ricane. One night, on my way home
from the grocery store, I had the idea
to Google it. Oh, but that's so silly, I
thought. How could there be a waf-
fle shortage? I experienced a gasoline
shortage in Florida after Hurricane
Ivan, and the refrigerated cookie
dough shelf was vacant after that sal-
monella scare a few months I ago, but
waffles? What catastrophe could pos-
sibly cause a waffle shortage?
I knew that I had more pressing
matters to Google, such as why my
children won't eat oatmeal, so by
the time I got inside the house and
unloaded the groceries, I had already
forgotten about the missing waffles.
Perhaps I also chose not to pur-
sue the mystery of the empty frozen
breakfast shelf because to do so would
expose me as the kind of mother who
doesn't fix her children eggs and toast


M ORF TH E H OMEFRONT


in the morning.
When Dustin asked me for waffle
status updates, he did so out of the
corner of his mouth: "Any word on
when the you-know-whats will be back
at the store?"
We never mentioned the dilemma
to our friends, although I suspect the
scarcity of waffles was a pink ele-
phant in the room at many a parental
gatherings over the last few weeks.
Then I outed our family in my
column as the waffle-lovers that we
are. And readers surprised me with
links to news about Eggo's nationwide
shortage.
Apparently, the company's plant in
Atlanta was shutdown in September
after record amounts of rain flooded
the area. And in Rossville, Tennessee,
home of the company's largest bak-
ery, many of the production lines are
closed for repairs. With output crip-
pled by the closures, Eggo estimates
that it will be summer 2010 before
supplies around the country reach
their normal levels.
Some readers also surprised me
with a scolding for feeding my chil-
dren such "poison." (Imagine if these
readers knew what my kids sometimes
eat for dinner! No, not real poison, but
close to it: chicken tenders and fries.)
One claimed that a persistent theme
is emerging in my column: my chil-
dren flop on the floor when they don't
get their way. So let me take this
opportunity to clarify. Only one of our
children is a floor flopper. The young-
est prefers to slap and scream, and
the oldest just says "WHAT?!?!" in a
high-pitched whine that is more offen-
sive to my ears than the sound of two
marbles rubbing together. Which is to


say, fear not worried reader; we have
the whole realm of disobedience here
at the Smiley house.
Incidentally, our floor flopper, who
shall from this point forward remain
nameless, was teased by one of his
peers about my column, and he has
requested to never again appear on
these pages. (There goes 1/5th of my
writing material.) I suggested he tell
the teaser that while he (the teaser)
was up reading the newspaper before
school, my son (the flopper) was play-
ing Wii. That's right, not only do I
feed my children waffles for break-
fast, I let them play Wii in the morn-
ing, too. So far, aside from the flop-
ping, slapping and whining, they seem
well-adjusted.
But back to the waffles. According
to NPR, Eggo company spokeswom-
an Kris Charles stated in an e-mail
that, "the existing stock of Eggos will
be distributed nationally based on
stores' sales histories of the waffles."
Meaning: stores that sell the most
will receive the most. You can thank
me later if you live near me and our
grocery store restocks some of the pre-
cious remaining waffles.
A waffle shortage. Who would have
thought? Certainly not the readers
who believe frozen breakfast is poison.
I take comfort in the fact that for a
nationwide shortage to make headline
news means that I'm not the only one
who has noticed. Maybe even I'm not
the only one with kids flopping on the
floor. (Perhaps I will attach a Swiffer
duster to him until the waffles return
full force in the summer.) Empty waf-
fle shelves across the country clearly
mean that I am not alone at the toast-
er oven.


Fiscal Year 2010 Seaman EY, MONEYCHIC!

if A A1m;r, o colr, iooc n morio


LUfULIIIIICI1 ") %.%' IlalIV1,U


From the Chief of Naval Personnel
Public Affairs
The Navy recently selected
226 enlisted Sailors to join
its officer ranks through
the Seaman to Admiral (STA-
21) program and are named in
NAVADMIN 329/09.
Seventy-three alternates were
also chosen for consideration for
the program in the event that a
primary candidate cannot partici-
pate in the program.
Primary and alternate candi-
dates are required to execute the
same eligibility actions in order to
remain eligible for the program.
The next step for candidates is to
complete a physical examination
and submit acceptance letters and
degree plans from up to three uni-
versities that host Naval Reserve
Officers Training Corps (NROTC)
units, to signify continued eligibil-
ity for the program.


Prior to attending NROTC, STA-
21 candidates attend the Naval
Science Institute (NSI) course
at Officer Training Command
in Newport, R.I. The eight-week
course provides an opportunity for
officer preparation and indoctrina-
tion.
As NROTC students, candidates
are allowed up to 36 months of
full-time, year-round education to
complete a baccalaureate degree.
During pursuit of their degree,
selectees remain on active duty
and continue to receive the ben-
efits associated with their cur-
rent pay grade to include pay and
allowances.
STA-21 Sailors will join the 740
ensigns commissioned through
NROTC annually and will enter
into a range of warfare areas
including submarine, surface war-
fare, aviation, supply, EOD and
medical corps.


Hey, MoneyChic!
It's time to start thinking about building
my credit. I think I've got a decent credit
score and I receive numerous credit card
applications in the mail each month. How
do I decide which credit card to carry?
MoneyChic says: If it's your first
credit card, you might consider getting a
secured credit card through your bank. If
you think you might branch out beyond
a secured card (which means you have
the money in the bank to cover that card
limit) then it's time to do some homework.
Choosing your card means more than
choosing the design on the card's cover.
Some items to consider in choosing your
card would be: What is your annual per-
centage rate? What are the fees charged
on the card, like over the limit fees, annu-
al fees or cash advances. What is the grace
period for the repay on the charges?
Some cards offer special perks, like fre-
quent flier miles or reward points, these
are worth figuring into the equation.
One word of caution be very cautious
with using your card and plan to pay bal-
ances off in full each month to avoid pit-
falls.


MA1 BENJAMIN COOK

Job title/command:
LPO, Security Dept.

Hometown:
New Orleans

Favorite duty station/
Why? Camp David, Md. Very
interesting.

Last book read: The Love Dare, by Alex
and Stephen Kendrick

Favorite pastime: Working out.

Most interesting experience:
Deployment to Afghanistan in 2003.

Who is your hero? My mom.





DAVID TOMALIS


Security Assistant

Hometown: Ansonia,
Conn.

Favorite duty station?
CINCUSNUEUR, London.

Last book read: Golf Digest magazine

Favorite pastime: Golf.

Most Interesting Experience: Naval
career.

Who is your hero? Military service men
and women.

New Parent workshop Dec. 8

From FFSC
The NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support
Center (FFSC) will host a New/Expectant Parent
Workshop Dec. 8 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the chapel
complex, Building 749.
The workshop topics include: never shake a baby, SIDS,
baby basics and the importance of tummy time.
Guest speakers will include state WIC representatives,
Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society personnel and
Naval Hospital Jacksonville specialists. Attending expect-
ant fathers will be able to experience a portion of their
partner's pregnancy and sense awareness and understand-
ing by wearing the empathy belly.
The event includes a light lunch. To sign up for the work-
shop, please call the FFSC at 542-2766, ext. 127.

Uniform change is Monday
The shift to winter uniform of the day for NAS Jacksonville is
Monday. The uniform of the day will be:


Male/Female
Officer/CPO
El TO E6


Prescribed
Service Dress Blue
Service Dress Blue


Alternate
Winter Blue
Winter Blue


jNAirNews

NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer....................Capt. Jack Scorby Jr.
NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer..................... Capt. Jeffrey Maclay
Command Master Chief............................... CMDCM(SW/SS) Jeff Hudson
Public Affairs Officer .................................................... M iriam S. Gallet
Assistant Public Affairs Officer....................................... Kaylee LaRocque
Naval Air Station lacksonville Editorial Staff
Editor .................................................................... ....... Clark Pierce
Design/Layout........................... ............................ George Atchley
Staff W riter................................................... AM3(AW ) Nicole Bieneman
The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military
Services. Contents of the JAx AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official
views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of
Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising
in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute
endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-
Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in
the publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage
without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital
status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor
of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal
opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse
to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected.
The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the
Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@comcast.net.
The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or
comments can be directed to the editor. The JxAIR HEWS can be reached at (904)
542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, email JaxAirNews@comcast.net or write the
JaxAiRmEWs, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000.
The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in
no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement
with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every
Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave.,
Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by
The Florida Times-Union.
Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding
advertisements should be directed to:
J-Kx-Air News
Ellen S. Rykert, Military Publications Manager
1 Riverside Avenue Jacksonville, FL 32202
904-359-4168
Tom Castle, Advertising Sales Manager 904-359-4336




JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 3, 2009 3
























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INSURANCE






4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 3, 2009


'Tridents' transition to


new Seahawk, new base
By Lt. j.g. Scott Aulds
HSC-9 Public Affairs Officer


The HSC-9 "Tridents" recently cel-
ebrated their initial certification
to operate SH-60S aircraft mark-
ing the completion of the transition from
Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS)
3 to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron
(HSC) 9.
HSC-9 is the first East Coast anti-sub-
marine squadron to conduct the Sierra
transition and permanent duty station
change to Norfolk, Va.
Over the summer, more than 100 pilots,
aircrew, maintenance, and administra-
tive personnel completed their permanent
duty station change from NAS Jacksonville
to Norfolk. They simultaneously under-
took the transition from SH-60F/HH-60H
legacy aircraft to the new MH-60S "Sierra"
Seahawk.
Upon returning from deployment in
April, Trident maintenance person-
nel worked tirelessly to transfer seven
SH-60F/HH-60H aircraft to other squad-
rons or the Aerospace Maintenance and
Regeneration Group, Davis Monthan AFB,
Ariz. The Tridents then moved from NAS
Jacksonville to Norfolk and set up new
spaces, tools and publications required
for the Sierra. Many personnel extended
their tours while on sea duty to help make
the transition as smooth as possible. The
Tridents also celebrated the unveiling of a
new $19 million hangar designed to house
16 Seahawks eight each from HSC-9
and the future HSC-5. Designed with the
operators in mind, the hangar incorporates
the latest in security, safety, "green archi-
tecture" to provide the best administrative
and maintenance spaces on the seawall.
Operationally, HSC-9 remains part of
Carrier Air Wing 8 and will deploy with
USS George H. W. Bush (CVN 77).
The Sierra's new "open design" allows it
to truly live up to its name as a multi-mis-
sion platform. The all-glass, night-vision-
goggle compliant, digital cockpit allows
the pilots to safely conduct their missions
even in the most demanding environments.
From armed helicopter and special opera-
tions support missions to routine plane
guard (search and rescue) and passenger
transfers, the Seahawk Sierra will allow
the squadron to fulfill a myriad of respon-
sibilities in support of Commander, George


Photos courtesy of HSC-9
Commander, Carrier Air Wing 8 Capt. Patrick
Cleary flies with HSC-9 "Tridents" to land a
new SH-60 "Sierra" on the seawall at Naval
Operations Base (NOB) Norfolk.
H. W. Bush Strike Group.
HS-3 recalls a storied legacy of 57 years
of rotary wing operational excellence at
NAS Jacksonville. The Tridents' final
deployment as an HS squadron began
in September 2008, deployed with USS
Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) to the
Arabian Sea supporting combat opera-
tions in Afghanistan. Along the way, HS-3
took part in a historic visit to Cape Town,
South Africa. The squadron helped ensure
the success of the cooperative engagement
with the South African government by
transporting dignitaries to and from the
carrier. They also conducted an 80,000-
lbs., at-anchor vertical replenishment, as
well as moving supplies ashore for the offi-
cial reception.
Upon arriving on-station in the U.S.
Central Command area of responsibil-
ity, HS-3 flew plane guard, anti-terror-
ism force protection, anti-surface warfare,
logistics and anti-submarine warfare in
direct support of Operation Enduring
Freedom and maritime security operations
during the 2008-09 deployment.
The Tridents also detached three
HH-60H aircraft to USS San Antonio (LPD
17) and subsequently to USNS Lewis and
Clark for two months. This detachment
supported Combined Task Force 151 coun-
ter-piracy operations in the Gulf of Aden
where they assisted in apprehending 16
suspected pirates.
For 2008, HS-3 won the Commander
Naval Air Forces Aviation Battle
Efficiency, Commander, Naval Aviation
Safety Center Safety "S", and the Capt. A.


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Cmdr. William Cox and Lt. Aaron Berger depart the NOB seawall to support the Naval
Helicopter Association Gulf Coast Fleet Fly-in at NAS Whiting Field, Fla., Oct. 20-23.


An SH-60S 'Sierra' multimission Seahawk inside the new hangar HSC-9 will share with HS-5
when it moves to Norfolk in 2010 and is designated HSC-5
J. Isbell Trophy for antisubmarine warfare remain excited about their new location,
excellence. aircraft, and, most importantly, their new
Despite the many challenges present- role as the East Coast's first carrier-based
ed by the dual transition, the Tridents Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron.
MEMRM MN&wNM -MOMMEMMI


Move In Homes


Military receives







JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 3, 2009 5


USFF Commander Calls Sailors in Horn of Africa 'cutting edge'
By MC1 Larry Foos
Combined Joint Task Force
Horn of Africa Public Affairs


The commander of
U.S. Fleet Forces
(USFF) Command
addressed Sailors serving
as individual augmentees
(IA) and in global war on
terror support assignments
(GSA) at Combined Joint
Task Force-Horn of Africa
Nov. 24.
USFF Commander, Adm.
J.C. Harvey Jr., said those
Sailors are making an
"outsized" impact on the
African continent. As part
of his first tour visiting for-
ward deployed Sailors since
taking command last July,
Harvey was impressed by
the CJTF-HOA ability to
operate effectively in such a
large region with relatively
few personnel.
"CJTF-HOAs mission is
extremely important to us,"
Harvey said. "In terms of
presence on this continent,
your ability to engage with
other military here adds
to the overall stability and
security of this region,
which eventually translates
to greater security for the
United States."
With fewer than 3,000
military personnel, the pri-
mary mission of CJTF-HOA
is a non-kinetic approach
to counter violent extrem-
ism, and Harvey sees that
approach as the future for
other regions.
"You are on the cutting
edge," he said. "What hap-
pens here is going to hap-
pen elsewhere."
One of Harvey's objec-
tives was to hear from the
approximately 700 Sailors
currently deployed at
CJTF-HOA, and to learn
about their IA experienc-
es. Djibouti was also an
important stop for the Fleet


U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Carlotta Holley
Adm. J. C. Harvey Jr., commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, addresses Navy individual augmentees and oversees contin-
gency operations support Sailors Nov. 24 at Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti. This is
part of Harvey's first visit with deployed Sailors since taking command last July.


Forces commander because
of its strategic location and
seven-year history operat-
ing as a joint task force.
"A lot of Fleet Forces
Sailors and units have come
through here. So I think it's
an important part of my job
to understand the condi-
tions on the ground here,
the mission that we're ask-
ing these Sailors to do. And
to do what I can to make
sure they're properly pre-
pared for that mission,"
Harvey said.


The Navy is making an
even bigger contribution
to contingency operations,
which includes an average
of 20,000 IA and GSA Navy
Active and Reserves cur-
rently deployed, according
to Harvey.
He will be making stops
throughout the Middle East.
Before he left Djibouti,
Harvey made a point to tell
the deployed Sailors what it
meant to visit them and to
the region.
"I am humbled every day


by the capacity you have for
service, a profoundly good
service. It is profoundly


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for this region, that is so
desperately in need of help."


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USO Pal Day

celebrates

52 years

From staff

Saturday marks
the 52nd anniver-
sary of USO Pal
Day in St. Augustine,
where the city's attrac-
tions show their sup-
port and apprecia-
tion to members of the
U.S. armed forces and
their families by open-
ing their doors free of
charge.
In addition, mem-
bers of Elks Lodge 829
serve a free lunch spon-
sored by the Greater
Jacksonville Area USO.
Over the years, tens
of thousands of active
duty military and their
families have enjoyed
USO PAL Day.
The Greater Jackson-
ville Area USO has the
sole of mission of sup-
porting our brave men/
women and their fami-
lies who defend our
freedoms. We are great-
ly appreciative of our
partnership with the
City of St. Augustine,
Elks Lodge 829 and
the United Way of St.
Johns County.


I






6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 3, 2009


U.S. Navy Sailors and U.S. Army Soldiers from Provincial Reconstruction Team-Farah tour the Citadel in Farah City after completing a presence patrol through the city on Jan. 9. The Citadel
was frequently visited by Alexander the Great on his trips from Herat to Kandahar.




Afghan people struggle to





survive in their war-torn country


Individual Augmentee

recalls Afghanistan

experiences

By MC1 (AW) Monica Nelson
Navy Region Southeast Public Affairs

My first trip outside the
wire was to a refugee
camp near Bagram,
Afghanistan. Our party of vol-
unteers with the International
Security Assistance Force (ISAF)
was told that about 10 percent of
the children wouldn't survive the
harsh winter ahead. My job was
to photograph the distribution of
food, blankets, clothing and toys.
I watched two young boys come
to fists over a ball. Not 10 min-
utes later, two grown men did the
same over a blanket. The fight-
ing and the selfishness turned me
off yet I had to put it in context.
For years, Afghans had been beat-
en down, trampled on and taken
advantage of from the outside as
well as within. To survive, they
must scrounge and fight.
Was I surprised they hadn't
learned to share? Isn't sharing
based on the trust that good is
intended for us and will be ours
despite what we give up?
At what point along the way
will they learn to trust, to believe
that long-term good is intended
for them one that goes beyond a
ball or a blanket a real commit-
ment to their well being?
Two weeks later, still in the
scorching summer heat, I was
at Kabul's children's hospital. A
multi-storied building with many
wards, the hospital received only
$400 per month from the Afghan
government. Bandages were often
reused because funds weren't
available for new ones. Nowhere
was this more atrocious than in
the burn ward, where windows
were open for lack of air condi-
tioning. Flies buzzed in and
around open flesh wounds. These
burned children, their pain, the
condition of their care... it was all
terrible.
Whenever I'm asked about
Afghanistan, I see in my mind
the pain-filled eyes of a particular
baby in the burn ward. It remains
with me throughout the day.
People ask how I took pictures
without crying that day. I don't
know except that sometimes real-
ity demands you be wholly present
- not to dwell on your own feel-
ings, but to act and give meaning
to those situations. As a photogra-
pher, I do my job to the best of my
ability in hopes that the images
motivate relief for the situation.
Shortly after visiting the hospi-


Two elderly women wait with head-of-the-line privileges to see a nurse at
their village for the first time in their lives. American, Italian, Slovenian
and Afghan military medical personnel brought the free clinic to the area
to meet the needs of five area villages whose closest hospital was a two-
hour walk.


E.- -i


Children crowd around a Cougar vehicle talking and laughing as MC1
Monica Nelson is inside eating her MRE. After about three bites of chicken
pasta, she passed it off to a teenager in the back of the crowd. An elderly
woman passing by received her bottle of water.


tal, I boarded a plane with Army
Tech. Sgt. Laura Deckman for
the Italian and Spanish "Camp
Arena" in Herat, the capital of
ISAF's Regional Command West.
An Army captain met us at the
airfield and assigned the rooms
we would forward deploy from for
the next five months. Our orders
were to email to Kabul one story
and a minimum of five photos
per day. We had no vehicle, no
supervisor in the area, no point
of contact for what was happen-
ing, and only a Spanish Internet
caf6, known for its deadly viruses,
from where we would send in our
articles and photos.
There were five other
Americans in our building and an
additional 30 Special Operations
Forces Marines who would
become our immediate American
family. We lived on the Italian
side of the camp that was sepa-
rated by a running track from the
Spanish side.
Laura and I learned quickly


that Italians and Spanish start
work late and only after coffee.
Our success was found network-
ing at the coffee shop on the
Italian side, closest to the airfield.
We befriended the internation-
als on the camp and asked each
person passing through the area
where they were headed and what
their mission was.
Capt. Alex Wymore, the Army
public affairs officer down the
road at Camp Stone, wasted no
time recruiting us to do his work
for him. In return, we got story
leads and the use of his Humvee.
We nicknamed him "Papa
Wymore" because he was so fond
of being a father. His daily Skype
chats with his wife and three chil-
dren kept Laura and me enter-
tained on every mission. Laura
was the truck commander, while I
drove and Papa Wymore manned
the gun turret.
He introduced us to the Afghan
National Army (ANA) 207th Corps
public affairs element, where


Volunteers from International Security Assistance Force Headquarters in
Kabul, Afghanistan, brought winter clothing, school supplies, food and
blankets to Barek Aub Refugee Camp located near Bagram, Afghanistan
Oct 31. The refugee camp is the largest in the vicinity of the nation's
capital.


we met the man who would be
our fourth and sleep in the back-
seat on all our convoy missions -
despite our attempts to keep him
awake.
Fahte Noori, 22, showed up for
our first team mission without
body armor, a weapon, a video or
still camera. He said he didn't like
guns, and his Kalashnikov was
broken. We asked him what he
brought along to do communica-
tions work for the 207th and he
replied simply, "I brought a note-
book."
Noori became Peter Pan to
us, the leader of the lost boys in
the ANA public affairs, and we
brought him along on nearly every
ANA mission. He nicknamed
Laura, "Sam," which he said was
for love, and then said it was for
a flower, before returning to his
original meaning of love.
He called me "Mariam,"
explaining, "You have the eyes of
the mother of Christ." I found that
amusing coming from the man


who prayed to Allah every day
and ate bacon in American chow
halls.
Laura and I also earned the
nickname, "The Angels" in offi-
cial e-mails and traveled from
Bala Morghab in the north down
to Bala Baluk and Farah in the
south. Our Humvee took us on all
humanitarian missions, while the
Italians and Spanish would take
us to Bala Morghab or Farah by
Chinook, C-27J or C-130.
We reported the opening of a
women's center, a teacher's train-
ing center, and the security wall
being built around it. We were
guests at Farah's free medical
clinic, interviewed poppy farmers
watching their fields get eradicat-
ed, visited numerous new school
sites and saw the Navy's embed-
ded training team at work men-
toring the ANA medical staff.
We covered a number of local
Afghan kidnapping by Taliban,

See IA TOUR, Page 7


t
, -1*..


mom






JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 3, 2009 7


(From left) Air Force Tech. Sgt. Laura Deckman, Afghan National Army Sgt. Fahte Noori,
MC1 (AW) Monica Nelson and Army Capt. Alex Wymore became the mobile public affairs ele-
ment in Afghanistan's western region with the help of "Charlie" the Humvee.


Salh Mohammad of Farah City registers to vote at the Voters' Registration Center for men on
Jan. 8. Between the male and female registration sites, 300 to 400 Afghans register to vote in
Farah City a day. The election for the next Afghan president happened in August.

Photos by MC1 (AW) Monica Nelson


A Muslim prayer opens up a shura between Americans and Afghans. Following the shura, tree
saplings and wheat seed were given to local Herat, Afghanistan families by Afghan Regional
Security Integration Command West to encourage profitable agriculture in the area and dis-
courage illegal poppy production.

I A vounn Af han


IA TOUR: Adjusting

to routines of life

stateside draining

From Page 6

followed combined joint missions provid-
ing medical care to villages which had
never seen a doctor, recorded progress on
voter registration, as well as ANA and
Afghan National Police barracks. We went
on humanitarian aid missions outside of
Adraskan, Bala Baluk, Herat and Farah.
Before I knew it, my IA deployment was
up and I returned stateside, where adjust-
ing was mentally draining. I went back
to work six days after my arrival because
time off only proved frustrating I needed
a purpose to help me adjust.
I knew how to adjust in the outward
sense. I knew how to do my job, pay my
bills, return phone calls but how would I
reconcile the differences between the coun-
tries? As an American, raised on Biblical
and Constitutional truths that stress lib-
erty and justice for all, it was difficult to
accept the current lack of both for the non-
Taliban Afghans.


g 7 g .*r "g'1D1.
girl waits with
her mother in
line at the free
medical clinic in
Ahmadi Village
west of Herat,
Afghanistan March
30. American,
Italian, Slovenian
and Afghan
medical personnel
spent the day
providing care and
prescriptions to the
five surrounding
villages. The closest
hospital was a two-
hour walk.
IIii


Children burned from kerosene lamps that
burst in their homes receive care at the Indira
Ghandi Institute of Child's Health, the only
pediatric hospital in the country, located in
Kabul, Afghanistan. The recovery for these
children is dependent on international aid
donations. The hospital receives $400 a
month to run the entire place, not merely
the burn ward. The children's burn ward is a
regular recipient of medical supplies brought
in by International Security Assistance Force
volunteers.
Going back to work was my way of liv-
ing in the present, rather than bemoan-
ing unanswered questions. I found it was
trust that enabled my adjustment. I know
my fellow Americans and the mission they
perform in Afghanistan takes into consid-
eration the long-term good and well-being
of her innocent people. That continues to
make me exceedingly proud and thankful.


The free joint-American medical clinic in Farah incorporates two Afghan locals recommended
by their government. One, a pharmacist, and the other, a nutritionist, volunteer to assist their
fellow citizens twice a week.


An Afghan National Army recruit practices his writing while waiting for the next drill. Due to
high levels of illiteracy in the country, army training has to incorporate reading and writing of
Afghan languages.


Young girls outside Gorg Village in Farah Province, Afghanistan, pose for a photo after
receiving pens from American troops. Originally the girls stayed away from the troops and
crouched down, hiding under their scarves when the female troops approached them. It took
the okay from an Afghan man for them to show their face and receive their pens.






8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 3, 2009



World champion Frisbee freestyler




named NAVAIR associate fellow


By Marsha Childs
FRCSE Public Affairs


Paul Kenny was
inducted as a
Naval Air Systems
Command (NAVAIR)
Associate Fellow at a Nov.
18 ceremony in Patuxent
River, Md., for his visionary
leadership as a materials
engineer at Fleet Readiness
Center Southeast (FRCSE).
Yet, his friends say Kenny
is really a part-time engi-
neer and a full-time "jam-
mer" also known as a
Frisbee freestyler. That
may not be so far from the
truth considering he is
ranked sixth in the world.
His fascination with the
flight mechanics of a spin-
ning disc is identical to
the flight dynamics of a jet
fighter, as both are rooted
in physics. With 20 years of
success in engineering and
management, Kenny excels
at solving complex prob-
lems.
He applies his engineer-
ing expertise and creativ-
ity to the technical appli-
cation of his Frisbee free-
style moves. From a perfect
whip-over to a machine-gun
move, he pushes the enve-
lope of his sport. At the
same time, he says he will
keep his day job.
Kenny serves as the
FRCSE Non-destructive
Inspection (NDI) Team
Lead and Program
Manager. NDI is a method-
ology used to inspect air-
craft components for stress
fractures without causing
damage to the part being
inspected.
"In terms of finding
cracks in aircraft compo-
nents, there are multiple
ways to do it," said Kenny.
One NDI innovation
Kenny developed is the Low
Frequency Eddy Current
(LFEC) method for detect-
ing cracks in F/A-18 Hornet
wing spars. He authored
the directives governing the
inspection process.
"LFEC is a new technol-
ogy. It creates electromag-
netic flow that induces cur-
rent into the spar. A crack
will block the current's
flow," said Kenny.
This method makes it
possible for maintainers to
inspect wings in the field.
Undetected damage directly
effects aircrew safety and
can have a negative impact
on mission readiness.
Kenny also developed an
equally unique eddy cur-
rent inspection technique
used to detect a catastroph-
ic crack in a weep hole,
located in a riser in the cen-
ter wing fuel cell on a P-3
Orion aircraft.
Weep holes are close
together and difficult to
inspect. The eddy current
flex probe has the capabil-
ity to turn corners and fully
inspect the inner bores with
considerable reliability.
Kenny implemented


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Photo courtesy Paul Kenny
Freestyler champion Paul Kenny demonstrates a tricky maneu-
ver at the 2004 FPA World Frisbee Freestyler Championships
in Rimini, Italy.


Photo by Liz Goettee
Navy Air Systems Assistant Commander for Research and Engineering Rear Adm. Donald
Gaddis (left) and deputy assistant Jessie McCurdy (right) announce Materials Engineer Paul
Kenny's induction as an Associate Fellow Nov. 18 at Patuxent River, Md.


Photo by Marsha Childs
Metals Inspector Jim Kestner (left) measures the distance
between an X-ray tube head and a F/A-18 Hornet wing
to determine the correct density for the radiography as
Materials Engineer Paul Kenny (right) looks on.


X-ray technique for detect-
ing wing spar cracks. This
method provides a live view
of the component. When
a defect is detected, a joy
stick positions an X-ray
tube to record a high reso-
lution image.
Kenny credits the NDI
artisans who are applying
the new technology. "I'm
the hand-waving visionary
and these guys make it hap-
pen," he said.
Nationally and interna-
tionally recognized as the
Navy's foremost expert in
the field of NDI testing of
aviation materials and
their components, Kenny


has enabled Warfighters
to successfully and safely
complete their missions for
more than two decades.
He holds American
Society for Nondestructive
Testing Level III certifica-
tions in all five major meth-
ods: radiographic testing,
ultrasonic testing, eddy cur-
rent testing, magnetic par-
ticle testing and fluorescent
penetrant testing.
Kenny joins an elite
group of NAVAIR Fellows
selected from FRCSE,
including John Yadon,
Daryl Hoffman, Rick
Rogers, Jack Benfer and
Dave Stricklin.


Photo by Marsha Childs
FRCSE NDI Team Lead Paul Kenny (left) and Metals Inspector David Tribble examine a small
crack detected using a low eddy current inspection technique developed by Kenny.


a National Ultrasonic
C-scan Program, utiliz-
ing the Mobile Automated
Ultrasound Scanner Five
(I\IL\US V) for detecting
defects in composite wing
skins. Headquartered
at FRCSE, the MAUS V
Program is being utilized to
establish composite rework
and repair capability for all
of NAVAIR.


The composite coverings
on Hornet wings age dif-
ferently than metal. Over
time, composite material
separates into layers and
peels off or delaminates,
whereas metals crack.
"If you have a very large
delamination, the skin is no
good. It can't be repaired,"
Kenny said. The critical
aircraft is lost to the Fleet.


"It takes a very knowl-
edgeable MAUS V operator
to assess conditions from an
NDI standpoint," he said.
When detected, artisans
can repair a delaminated
wing without removing the
skin by drilling the affected
area, and sealing the gap so
energy can transfer properly.
FRCSE artisans are also
using a filmless, real time


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10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 3, 2009


PEARL HARBOR: Remembering attack from 68 years ago


From Page 1


Fortunately, the U.S. carriers were not at Pearl
Harbor at this time. On Nov. 28, Adm. Kimmel sent USS
Enterprise under Rear Adm. William Halsey to deliver
Marine Corps fighter planes to Wake Island. On Dec. 4,
Enterprise delivered the aircraft and by Dec. 7, the task
force was on its way back to Pearl Harbor. On Dec. 5,
Admiral Kimmel sent the USS Lexington with a task force
under Rear Admiral Newton to deliver 25 scout bombers
to Midway Island. The last Pacific carrier, USS Saratoga,
had departed Pearl Harbor for repairs on the West Coast.
At 0600 on Dec. 7, six Japanese carriers launched the
first wave of 181 planes composed of torpedo bombers,
dive bombers, horizontal bombers and fighters. Even as
they winged south, some elements of U.S. forces on Oahu
realized there was something different about this Sunday
morning.
In the hours before dawn, U.S. Navy vessels spotted
an unidentified submarine periscope near the entrance
to Pearl Harbor. It was attacked and reported sunk by
the destroyer USS Ward (DD-139) and a patrol plane. At
0700, an alert operator of an Army radar station at Opana
spotted the approaching first wave of the attack force. The
officers to whom those reports were relayed did not con-
sider them significant enough to take action. The report
of the submarine sinking was handled routinely, and the
radar sighting was passed off as an approaching group of
American planes due to arrive that morning.
The Japanese aircrews achieved complete surprise when
they hit American ships and military installations on
Oahu shortly before 8 a.m. They attacked military air-
fields at the same time they hit the fleet anchored in Pearl
Harbor. The Navy air bases at Ford Island and Kaneohe
Bay, the Marine Corps airfield at Ewa and the Army Air


Corps fields at Bellows, Wheeler and Hickam were all
bombed and strafed as other elements of the attacking
force began their assaults on the ships moored in Pearl
Harbor. The purpose of the simultaneous attacks was
to destroy the American planes before they could rise to
intercept the Japanese.
Of the more than 90 ships at anchor in Pearl Harbor,
the primary targets were the eight battleships. Seven
were moored on Battleship Row along the southeast shore
of Ford Island, while the USS Pennsylvania (BB-38) lay
in drydock across the channel. Within the first minutes of
the attack all the battleships adjacent to Ford Island had
taken bomb and or torpedo hits. The USS West Virginia
(BB-48) sank quickly. The USS Oklahoma (BB-37) turned
turtle and sank. At about 8:10 a.m., the USS Arizona (BB-
39) was mortally wounded by an armor-piercing bomb
that ignited the ship's forward ammunition magazine.
The resulting explosion and fire killed 1,177 crewmen, the
greatest loss of life on any ship that day and about half
the total number of Americans killed.
The USS California (BB-44), USS Maryland (BB-46),
USS Tennessee (BB-43) and USS Nevada (BB-36) also
suffered varying degrees of damage in the first half hour
of the raid. There was a short lull in the fury of the attack
at about 8:30 a.m. when USS Nevada, despite her wounds,
managed to get underway and move down the channel
toward the open sea. Before she could clear the harbor, a
second wave of 170 Japanese planes, launched 30 minutes
after the first, appeared over the harbor. They concentrat-
ed their attacks on the moving battleship, hoping to sink
her in the channel and block the narrow entrance to Pearl
Harbor. On orders from the harbor control tower, the USS
Nevada was beached at Hospital Point and the channel
remained clear. When the attack ended shortly before 10
a.m., less than two hours after it began, the American


forces had paid a fearful price.
Twenty-one ships of the U.S. Pacific Fleet were sunk or
damaged: the battleships Arizona, California, Maryland,
Nevada, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West
Virginia; cruisers USS Helena (CL-50), USS Honolulu
(CL-48) and USS Raleigh (CL-7); the destroyers USS
Cassin (DD-372), USS Downes (DD-375), USS Helm
(DD-388) and USS Shaw (DD-373); seaplane tender USS
Curtiss (AV-4); target ship (ex-battleship) USS Utah (AG-
16); repair ship USS Vestal (AR-4); minelayer USS Oglala
(CM-4); tug USS Sotoyomo (YT-9); and Floating Drydock
Number 2.
Aircraft losses were 188 destroyed and 159 damaged,
the majority hit before they had a chance to take off.
American dead numbered 2,403. That figure included 68
civilians, most of them killed by improperly fused anti-
aircraft shells landing in Honolulu. There were 1,178
military and civilian wounded. Japanese losses were com-
paratively light. Twenty-nine planes, less than 10 percent
of the attacking force, failed to return to their carriers.
The Japanese success was overwhelming but it was
not complete. They failed to damage any American air-
craft carriers which by a stroke of luck were absent
from the harbor. They neglected to damage the shore
facilities at the Pearl Harbor Naval Base, which played
an important role in the Allied victory in World War
II. American technological skill raised and repaired all
but three of the ships sunk or damaged at Pearl Harbor
(Arizona, considered too badly damaged to be salvaged;
Oklahoma, considered too old to be worth repairing, and
the obsolete and USS Utah (AG-16) considered not worth
the effort). Most importantly, the shock and anger caused
by the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor united a divided
nation and was translated into a wholehearted commit-
ment to victory in World War II.


911 RESPONSE: Changes will improve emergency response aboard NAS Jacksonville


From Page 1


initiated in August through
an open dialogue between
NAS Jacksonville, the
City of Jacksonville, the
Jacksonville Sheriffs Office
(JSO) and various on-site
contractors.
The goal was to modify
the on-base 911 response
system to meet current
standards recognized by
local, state and federal
agencies.
The NAS Jax Public
Works Department,
Commander Navy Region
Southeast Regional
Dispatch Center (CNRSE-
RDC) and the JSO 911
Coordinator's Office worked


together to: (1) assign
address ranges to all street
segments on the station; (2)
assign names to un-named
streets; and (3) assign
a street address to each
building and residence on
base.
Beginning in January,
the RDC database will cor-
relate building numbers,
street addresses and phone
numbers to more accurately
dispatch first responders to
on-base emergencies. In the
event of a mutual aid situa-
tion, JSO and Jacksonville
Fire Rescue Department
will also be able to respond
to the emergency more effi-
ciently.
What should on-base


911 callers say when
they call for help?
State your emergency
and your address. If you
are calling from a landline
and only know your build-
ing number, it will be okay
for now. However, your
building address is now the
standard and you should
learn it without delay.
When calling from
a cell phone, it is vital
to know your street
address.
There will be no new
names on existing streets,
only streets that previ-
ously had no name. Due to
construction of new fam-
ily housing, there will be
some re-named streets in


that area but this will not
affect anyone because the
streets to be renamed are
un-occupied.
How will people be
notified of their new
addresses?
Addresses will be
released through the chain
of command for office set-
tings. Base housing con-
tractor Balfour Beatty will
notify you of on-base hous-
ing addresses.
How will mailing/ship-

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7273 103rd St. Jax 772-9022
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ping addresses change?
If you receive your office
mail from the USPS via a


PO Box at the base post

See 911, Page 14


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NOSC Jax celebrates Native Americans
By Lt. Cmdr Alphonso Doss I
NOSC Jax Administrative/Supply Officer I i L


HM2 Shellaree Bradford present-
ed the biography of Army Lt. Col.
Ernest Childers Nov. 18 during
the NOSC Jax Multi-Cultural Awareness
Committee Native American Heritage
Month Observation celebration.


Photos courtesy NOSCJ
Gen. Jacob Devers con-
gratulates 2nd Lt. Ernest
Childers after Childers was
awarded the Congressional
Medal of Honor during the
Italian campaign in World
War II.


While sever-
al other prom-
inent Native
Americans
were recog-
nized for their
contributions,
Childers was
recognized for
receiving the
Congressional
Medal of
Honor for his
actions during
World War II.
W h i 1 e
assig ned
to the 45th
In fantr y
Division in
Italy, then-


2nd Lt. Childers single-handedly killed
two enemy snipers, destroyed two machine


HM2 Shellaree Bradford read Medal of
Honor recipient Lt. Col. Childers' biogra-
phy to NOSC Jax staff on Native American
Recognition Day.
gun nests and captured an artillery observ-
er.
Childers died at the age of 87 and was
buried at Floral Haven Memorial Gardens
in his birthplace of Broken Arrow, Okla.


Grannie King
Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southeast
Personnel Resources and Program Manager Elaine
- ----Gill was the guest speaker at NAS Jacksonville's
American Indian Heritage Observance luncheon Nov.
16. Gill shared stories about her grandmother, Matilda
S* Newbern King, who was one-half Cherokee. Gill is
holding framed mementos of "Grannie King," including
her trademark tobacco pipe, a canister of Prince Albert
Photo byAnnalisa Cachin tobacco and a portrait of Grannie King herself.


cooo
JAX AIR NEWS, NASJACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 3, 2009 11


Thanksgiving feast

I CS1 (SW) Ronnie
Robinson, left, and
CS1 (SW) Adrian
TDorsey glaze
sweet potatoes in
preparation of the
2009 Flight Line
Cafe Thanksgiving
Feast. The galley
prepared a huge
feast of the
usual traditional
Thanksgiving items
suh as roasted
turkey, ham and all
-46 the fixins.


CS3(SW) Kawardis Lambert bastes the turkeys
during the cooking process for Thanksgiving
dinner. The Flight Line Cafe prepared 18 turkeys
and expected nearly 600 Sailors and family
members to attend the feast.

Photos by AM3(AW)
Nicole Bieneman




CS1 (SW) Adrian Dorsey created
cornucopias out of French
bread that he later filled full of
fruit, mixed nuts and assorted
candies for the 2009 Flight Line
-Cafe Thanksgiving Feast.


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12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 3, 2009

F-35B flies to Maryland test site, prepares for vertical landings


From Staff


The first Lockheed Martin F-35B
Lightning II (formerly known as the
Joint Strike Fighter) short take-off/
vertical landing (STOVL) variant stealth
fighter arrived Nov. 16 at NAS Patuxent
River, Md., where it will conduct its first
hovers and vertical landings.
The ferry flight initiates a sequence of
F-35 arrivals at Patuxent River this year
and next.
Piloted by Lockheed Martin F-35 Chief
Test Pilot Jon Beesley, the aircraft flew
from Fort Worth, Texas, to Patuxent
River by way of Dobbins Air Force Base in
Georgia.
"We have high confidence in the capabili-
ties of this aircraft, and we fully expect that
it will meet or exceed the expectations of our
customers," said Dan Crowley, Lockheed
Martin executive vice president and F-35
program general manager. "At Patuxent
River, this aircraft will continue the pro-
cess of validating our revolutionary STOVL
propulsion system through a series of short
takeoffs, hovers and vertical landings."
The aircraft will be supported at
Patuxent River by the F-35 Autonomic
Logistics Information System (ALIS) and
will be monitored by the Lockheed Martin


I ,-- -
- . :* .: . --*
Lockheed Martin photo by Peter Torres
Maj. Art Tomassetti, USMC, test flies the
F-35B at Edwards AFB, Calif.
F-35 Sustainment Operations Center in
Fort Worth. Known as BF-1, the aircraft is
the first F-35 to be sustained by ALIS the
worldwide support system that will monitor
the prognostics and health of F-35s around
the globe to ensure mission readiness.
A key enabler to the move to Patuxent


River was the completion of aerial refu-
eling tests that cleared the F-35B for
extended-range flights. These flights,
conducted by the second STOVL vari-
ant aircraft, BF-2, demonstrated the
aircraft's ability to refuel in flight
using the probe-and-drogue approach
favored by the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine
Corps, Royal Navy and Royal Air Force.
The F-35B will replace U.S. Marine Corps
AV-8B STOVL fighters, U.S. Navy F/A-18
strike fighters and EA-6B electronic attack
aircraft.
F-35 Program Update
Second F-35B STOVL variant, BF-2,
completed program's first aerial refueling
test using the Navy- and Marine Corps-
style probe-and-drogue refueling system on
Aug. 13.
First F-35C carrier variant unveiled
July 28.
F-35 flight test program accomplished
its 100th flight on June 23.
Software development is on schedule,
more than 70 percent complete.
First Flight Readiness Review shows
F-35B is ready to proceed with STOVL
flight testing.
Second F-35B STOVL variant, BF-2,
completed first flight on Feb. 25.
First F-35 variant equipped with mis-


sion systems, BF-4, rolled out of the fac-
tory Jan. 21; will lead to the first avionics
testing on board an F-35 aircraft.
First weight-optimized F-35A CTOL
variant, AF-1, rolled out of the factory on
Dec. 19, 2008.
Second F-35 ground-test article, AG-1,
rolled out of the factory on Dec. 17, 2008.
F-35 completed first supersonic flight
on Nov. 13, 2008.
First F-35A completed testing at
Edwards AFB ahead of schedule on Oct.
23, 2008.
F-35B first flight successfully complet-
ed on June 11, 2008.
USAF Lt. Col. James Kromberg
became the first military pilot to fly F-35
(F-35A) on Jan. 30, 2008.
The F-35 Lightning II is a fifth genera-
tion fighter, combining advanced stealth
with fighter speed and agility, fully fused
sensor information, network-enabled oper-
ations, advanced sustainment, and lower
operational and support costs. Lockheed
Martin is developing the F-35 with its
principal industrial partners, Northrop
Grumman and BAE Systems. Two sep-
arate, interchangeable F-35 engines are
under development: the Pratt & Whitney
F135 and the GE Rolls-Royce Fighter
Engine Team F136.


Navy changes name of SAVI program to SAPR, services remain unchanged


By Wanda Archer
Fleet and Family Support Center

A s of September, the
4 name of the Sexual
. assault Victim
Intervention (SAVI) pro-
gram was changed to sex-
ual assault prevention and
response (SAPR) in order
to correspond with other
military branches. Services
to sexual assault victims
remain the same.
A victim of sexual assault
may wish to report the
crime to law enforcement
and may do so through base
security, local law enforce-
ment or 911.


A victim of sexual assault
may wish to receive some
services to include an
optional forensic exam with-
out law enforcement or com-
mand involvement. The fol-
lowing explains the options
to sexual assault victims:
Restricted reporting of
sexual assault is intended
to give a victim additional
time and increased control
over the release and man-
agement of his/her personal
information, and to empow-
er him/her to seek relevant
information and support to
make more informed deci-
sions about participating in
the criminal investigation.


Service Members wish-
ing to receive limited assis-
tance for sexual assault
without police reporting or
investigation may contact:
Installation sexual
assault resource center
(SARC)
Command SAPR
Advocate
Health Care Personnel
Chaplain
Upon contacting one of
the above providers, the
service member will be
asked to meet, read, ini-
tial, and sign a "prefer-
ence sheet" that explains
the limitations of limited
reporting, e.g., no military


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protection orders may be
offered.
The Command will be
contacted within 24 hours
of the service member sign-
ing the preference sheet,
but only limited informa-
tion will be forwarded (no
name, gender, social secu-
rity numbers, etc.).
Unrestricted Reporting
of sexual assault is for ser-


vice members desiring a
forensic examination and
official investigation of his/
her allegations using cur-
rent reporting channels,
e.g., chain of command,
law enforcement, command
advocate and SARC.
Details regarding the
incident will be limited to
only those personnel who
have a legitimate need to


know.
Improper disclosure of
covered communications,
improper release of medi-
cal information, and other
violations of this policy are
prohibited and may result
in discipline under the
Uniform Code of Military
Justice, loss of credentials,
or other adverse personnel
or administrative actions.


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14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 3, 2009

Making a difference


Naval Hospital Jax women in the workplace


NH Jax Facilities Management


Naval Hospital
Jacksonville (NH
Jax) is a medi-
cal, surgical and teaching
hospital providing inpa-
tient and outpatient care
to active duty and retired
military personnel and
their families.
Women perform many
jobs throughout the hospi-
tal, at all levels of manage-
ment and staff. They are
physicians, pharmacists,
front desk clerks, custodi-
ans, general maintenance
workers, supervisors,
nurses, social workers and
military service members.
Six of these outstanding
women shared their experi-
ences.
Angela Hill is the sole
discharge planner for NH
Jax. She coordinates the
needs of patients being
discharged from the hos-
pital (e.g., home health
care, medical equipment).
She also deals daily with
patients from infants to
senior citizens on issues
such as child abuse, sub-
stance intervention and
domestic violence. Hill
attributes her success, in
part, to her passion for
helping people in need
and the excellent educa-
tion she obtained-earn-
ing a Masters in Social
Work from the University
of Georgia. She credits
her mother with her drive
to help others, having
watched her care for men-
tally challenged children.
Hill feels she is fortunate
and blessed to be in this
position.
SKC Carolyn Campbell
is the leading chief petty
officer for the NH Jax
Materials Management
Department. Originally
joining the military for edu-
cational benefits, Campbell
earned a Bachelor of Arts
degree in fine arts. She
credits a great deal of her
success to the mentorship
of YN1 Mency, who taught
her the value of learning
and applying the informa-
tion from directives, manu-
als and standard operating
procedures. Confidence,
determination and knowl-
edge are qualities that have
helped her persevere and
overcome obstacles during
her career. She feels that
NH Jax is an excellent
environment for continued
growth in her professional
career.


HM1 Sheila Velez, assigned to Naval Hospital jax Command
Education and Training, says, "the structure and camarade-
rie within the military has made her strong, determined and
resourceful."


Photos by Loren Barnes
SKC Carolyn Campbell, leading chief petty officer in the Naval Hospital Jax Materials
Management Department, believes that higher education not only adds to a person's knowl-
edge, but also builds their self-confidence and determination.


Margaret Brown, Naval Hospital jax safety manager, works
with staff, patients and visitors to assure that the facility
delivers the highest quality of care without harmful incidents.


Krissy Sierski is a gen-
eral maintenance worker
who has worked at NH
Jax since October 2005. As
part of the IAP-Hill team,
a contracted business that
provides facility support
services to the hospital, her
duties include preventa-
tive maintenance, hazard-
ous waste management and
minor construction. While
trained as a nursing assis-
tant, she finds her work
with IAP-Hill to be more
rewarding. Sierski takes
great pride in her work and
is known as a go-getter who
always does excellent work.
Margaret Brown is the
safety manager at NH Jax.
She's been working here
since May 2001. What led
her to this career choice?
Simply put, it wasn't even
planned, Brown said. She
was working in a labora-
tory, and her department
needed someone to address


a few safety issues. One
thing led to another and
the one time lab assign-
ment turned into a position
she loves today. Brown's
goal is to keep the hospital
safe for patients, staff and
visitors. Does her work ever
get boring? Brown said,
"This field is getting more
involved and interesting.
Changes happen some-
times every 15 minutes."
Her legacy is her work
being done thoroughly. She
is very thankful that she
is here at Naval Hospital
doing just that her work.
HM1 Sheila Velez is a
hospital corpsman assigned
to Command Education
and Training at NH Jax.
She has worked here since
October 2001. She began
her Navy career as a den-
tal assistant and is pres-
ently working toward a
degree in human resources.
Asked what is the secret


Krissy Sierski is a jack of all
trades maintenance worker
who is part of the lAP-Hill
contractor team.

to her success, Velez said,
"It's attention to detail and
follow-through ethics." She
believes these two things
guarantee success in any
position or field. Velez, who
joined the military after the
death of her sister, found a
home in the military. The
structure and camarade-
rie within the military has
made her strong, deter-
mined and resourceful. She
believes these qualities are
apparent in her daily work.
When asked if she felt she
had been treated equally
throughout her career, she
said "no." However, she
said that once she works
with an individual and they
experience her work ethics
and fairness, she has never
had a problem. Her future
goals are to earn a degree
and get promoted to chief
petty officer.
Women who have made
a difference at NH Jax con-
tinue to do so when they
move on to other assign-


Angela Hill, Naval Hospital Jax discharge planner, credits her
mother with her drive to help others, having watched her
care for mentally-challenged children.
ments. able to gain the confidence
Cmdr. Linda Lake recent- and knowledge of the labor
ly served as the head of process to better serve her
patient administration at patients.
NH Jax and is now on her Lake feels the ratio of
long-awaited tour in Rota, women to men in the nurs-
Spain. ing field has changed for
Lake said she wanted to the better.
be a nurse since age 12 and She believes good men
started doing summer vol- have recognized their value
unteer work at a hospital in the nursing profession.
at age 15. After high school, She said that nursing is a
she received her Associate sustainable professional
Degree in Nursing and career for men and women
spent nine years practic- rather than a stepping-
ing civilian healthcare. She stone to a medical practice.
found that environment Working at NH Jax
enjoyable, but lacked a per- brought Lake two firsts in
sonal and professional chal- her career administrative
lenge. and ambulatory care expe-
Lake said, "I found that rience. Her goals include
challenge in the mili- obtaining her Nursing
tary and now I now feel Practice Doctorate to work
my full potential can be in diabetes management.
realized." She joined the Each and every one of
Naval Reserves as a hos- these women brings profes-
pital corpsman and earned sionalism and dedication to
a Bachelor's Degree in the workplace every day.
Nursing through a Navy Through education and per-
scholarship program. severance women continue
Lake's first mentor in the to shine in the workplace
Navy was Jim Finch, her where race, creed, color or
department head in labor sex is no longer an obstacle.
and delivery in Guam. Their presence makes us all
"He was the most compe- stronger and aids greatly
tent and caring nurse I in our continuing efforts
ever worked with," she to improve the delivery of
said. Through his efforts patient care throughout
and leadership, Lake was Navy Medicine.


911: Online and


GPS services will


eventually show


new addresses

From Page 10

office, there is no need to change your address.
However, if you receive USPS mail or packages via UPS/
FedEx at your on-base office or home then you must use
your new address, such as the following example:
John Doe
Bldg. ###
#### Yorktown Ave.
Jacksonville, FL 32212
Will my vehicle GPS navigation system or online
maps show these new addresses?
Yes . eventually. The City of Jacksonville online GIS
(Geographic Information System) Map will show them
immediately upon project completion but each map-
making company will take time to update their proprie-
tary systems. The JSO is working with Yahoo, Google and
MapQuest to inform them of the changes and facilitate
updates.
How many people were involved with this proj-
ect?
Frank Lazzara and Don Towery, NAS Jax Public Works
Department Planning; Jimmy Roark, Sarah Schneider
and Andrew Rubio, all NAVFAC interns; Virginia
Frederick and Tim O'Toole, JSO; Marvin Garland, Chris
James and Roy Jennings, CNRSE.
NAS Jax is leading the way in street addressing for the
Navy. Other stations in CNRSE area of responsibility will
follow our example.


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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 3, 2009 15



Finding true love (part 1)


By Chaplain (Lt.) Justin Top

There is certainly a lot
of advice out there for
strengthening marriages. I
have also noticed that there is not
much guidance for people who are
not yet married but are looking
for meaningful relationships.
However, there is a lot of bad
information from Hollywood
that leads many people to begin
a relationship on shaky ground.
Whether you are in a relation-
ship now and want to strengthen
it, or you are seeking to develop
a meaningful relationship in the
future, what you do now will build
the foundation for your relation-
ship. Here are a few things you
can do for yourself now to improve
your future relationship, even if
you don't know who it will be with
yet.
Be Happy With Yourself.
Many people think that self-
esteem comes from having some-
body to love them. That isn't
really self-esteem. By nature,
self-esteem cannot be attached to
somebody else. Many people get
involved in relationships because


CHAPLAINS CORNER


they believe they "need" it to be
happy. People who are desperate
to find somebody to be with often
make poor decisions about who
they pursue, and may pretend
to be something they are not to
impress that person. If they can't
love you for who you really are,
then it isn't really love.
Understand What Love
Really Is. Movies portray love as
some incomprehensible and irre-
sistible force of fate that impos-
es itself on our will. We are led
to believe that love controls us.
Once we have "fallen" in love we
are often completely consumed by
it to our joy if the love is recip-
rocated, or to our misery if it is
not. This is not love but infatu-
ation. This implies that you are
powerless in the love relationship.
The truth is that love is a choice
that must be made every day. The
responsibility for love lies square-
ly on your shoulders. True love
comes from hard work and sacri-


Chaplain (Lt.) Justin Top


fice. Even if there is such thing as
love at first sight (which I doubt),
it is nothing in comparison to love
after years of sacrifice and service
to each other.
Choose To Whom You Are
Attracted. If love is a choice, you
can begin now to train yourself


to be attracted to the kind of peo-
ple that you can really love and
respect. Sometimes people get
in relationships with a person
they would never consider mar-
rying because it is exciting or
they are attracted to them. But
it doesn't work out the way they
expect. Infatuation will overcome
reason. In they end they have
trained themselves to be attract-
ed to the type of people who they
knew wouldn't be good to marry.
Program yourself to be attracted to
goodness, integrity and the types
of attributes that are most likely to
lead to a happy family life.
Become The Type Of
Person You Would Want To
Love. Many people say that oppo-
sites attract. That may be true
sometimes on a superficial level,
but people are attracted on a
deeper level to those who hold the
same values. For example, women
who focus on their appearance
and being sexually attractive will


attract and be attracted to the
kind of men who seek above all
else for a "sexy" woman. Thus,
their relationship will be based on
that type of physical attraction.
Those who place high value on
spirituality will be more attracted
to those with the same values. If
you are going to bars and clubs to
find a relationship, you are more
likely to build a relationship on
that lifestyle because you and the
person you find place more value
in it. So, if you have a history of
attraction for the wrong kind of
people, take a look at yourself and
ask why. If you want to attract
somebody who is affectionate,
thoughtful, spiritual, intelligent,
hardworking, etc. you should
seek to develop those character-
istics within yourself and go
to the places where people share
those values.
Part 1 focused on what you can
do to prepare yourself to develop
love in your relationship. In Part
2, the focus will be on what you
can do once you are in a relation-
ship to help create a healthy foun-
dation for love.


From Spiritual Fitness
Division Southeast


Are you looking for a weekend
away from hectic work cen-
ters and/or household respon-
sibilities? Do you need some time to
reflect on improving personal rela-
tionships to create a better lifestyle?
The solution is as close as the
Spiritual Fitness Division Southeast
at NAS Jacksonville Chapel Center.
Contact the Chaplains Religious
Enrichment Development Operation
(CREDO) at 542-3923 to learn more
about the following retreats:
Personal Growth Retreat (PGR)
Jan. 15-17 and March 26-28
Begins Friday at 3 p.m. and ends Sunday
at 3 p.m.
Participants have the opportunity to
understand themselves better, look at their


goals and reshape them, discover new
perspective in relationships, take personal
responsibility in decisions, explore the basis
of their spirituality, and identify resources
that can assist them.
Marriage Enrichment Retreat (MER)
Dec. 11-13
Begins Friday at 7 p.m. and concludes
Sunday after lunch. The MER is designed
to encourage healthy marriages and is
designed to help couples grow. It is not
designed for couples who need significant
counseling. Couples discover ways to
nurture their marriage, handle the inevitable
conflicts, establish roles and boundaries,
discover their spouses love language, build
intimacy and communication, and strengthen
the emotional, physical, and spiritual aspects
of their marriage.
Team Building Workshop/Retreat
Designed to enhance readiness and team
cohesiveness by transforming attitudes,
feelings, and relationships. Participants learn
the four qualities of effective group dynamics:
communication, cooperation, trust, and


fun. Three hours to full day workshops are
available. Contact Spiritual Fitness Division
Southeast for more information and to
schedule one of these programs for your
command.
Family Enrichment Retreat (FER)
May 21-23
A weekend retreat for families to promote
healthy relationships. Practical skills base
on proven principles that strengthen and
empower every member of the family. FERs
are open to the first 10 families and held at
St. Simons Island, Ga.
All retreats are free to participants
and commands, including transporta-
tion (except to MER), food and lodging.
Registration required and active duty
personnel must present no-cost TAD
orders, a special request chit or leave
papers covering the retreat period.
Active duty, reserves, retirees, DoD/
DoN civilians and their family mem-
bers can attend CREDO retreats.


Chapel Center Calendar
Regular y u Services
8:15 a.m. Holy Eucharist Episcopal
9:30 a.m. Catholic Mass
9:45 Protestant Sunday School
10:45 a.m. Catholic CCD
11 a.m. Protestant Worship
* Set your course in Navy life at COMPASS NAS Jax -a "spouses
mentoring spouses" program by Naval Services Family Line.
Contact compassjacksonville@nsfamilyline.org
Barracks Bible Study Join Chaplain Calhoun every
Wednesday at 6 p.m. in the main conference room.
Adopt-A-Sailor Local organizations wishing to express their
gratitude for the service of single Sailors during the Thanksgiving
and Christmas holidays may call 542-3440.
* Weekly Bible Study in Building 749, every Tuesday at 9:30 a.m.
* Bring non-perishable donations to the Chapel Food Locker at
Building 749 in the Chapel Center.
Women of Faith First Saturday of the month at 10:30 a.m. for
fellowship, study and support. Bring a potluck dish to share.
Officer Christian Fellowship and Bible study Every Tuesday at
6 p.m. Contact Chaplain Williams at 542-0024.
Tae Kwon Do with Chaplain Felder Every Monday and
Wednesday at 4:30 p.m.
Monthly men's prayer breakfast every second Saturday at 9
a.m. at the chapel.
NAS Jacksonville Chapel Center
542-3051
Corner of Birmingham Avenue and Mustin Road


CREDO GROWTH AND ENRICHMENT RETREATS





16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 3, 2009


Trusts:


What are they good for?


By Jeffrey Gott, Esq.
Special Contributor


Previously you heard that
living trusts are complex
instruments that require
a lot of work to create and main-
tain if one wishes to achieve
their goal which most often is
avoiding probate.
Now, let's identify some
instances where trusts make a
bit more sense. These consist
of placing a child's inheritance
under the control of a responsible
adult until the child reaches an
age older than 18; benefiting a
disabled child without jeopardiz-
ing their entitlement to public
benefits; transferring real estate
located in different states; and
achieving privacy with regard
to the final disposition of one's
assets.


When a minor child receives
property in their own name, such
as money from a life insurance
policy, that money does not go
directly to the minor child to do
with as they please but instead
is placed with their guardian.
Subsequently, a guardian's
control will end when the minor
child reaches an age between 18
and 21, depending on state law.
A trust can take the place of this
arrangement such that a child
must wait until an age of your
choosing before they receive their
money.
Many times this is age 25 or
some other arrangement whereby
the child will receive one-third
at age 25, one-third at age 30,
and the remaining balance at age
35. Also, if the likely guardian of
your minor child is an individual


you are not comfortable control-
ling your child's inheritance, e.g.
an ex-spouse, placing the assets
in trust allows you to name a
trustee of your choosing.
Another instance when a trust
is recommended is to provide
for disabled adult children who
receive public benefits. Generally,
public benefits such as Medicaid
and Social Security Disability are
subject to a means test, i.e. an
applicant only receives the bene-
fit if they receive minimal income
and own little or no assets.
In such a case, if a disabled
child on Medicaid gets an inheri-
tance they are then disqualified
from receiving the public benefit.
The disabled child would have
to use the inheritance to pay for
expenses previously covered by
the public benefit until they then


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re-qualified, presumably when
the inheritance was exhausted.
This can be avoided with a
Special Needs Trust which puts
the inheritance with a trustee
who is only to spend the money
to supplement the public benefits
and not take their place.
A trust is also advisable where
one owns real property in differ-
ent states. In most states the
law maintains that real estate
whose owner is deceased must go
through probate.
Thus, someone living in Florida
who also owns property in
Alabama could be faced with two
probates, one in each state. If,
however, the Alabama real estate
was placed in a trust then a sec-
ond probate could be avoided.
Lastly, administering a trust
tends to be a more private oper-


ation than opening a probate
at the local courthouse. After
all, most court cases are public
records. Therefore, if privacy is a
paramount concern, a trust can
be useful.
Creating a stand-alone trust is
generally beyond the scope of a
military legal assistance office.
Our attorneys are normally lim-
ited to putting simple trusts in a
last will and testament.
Nonetheless, discussing these
issues with a legal assistance
attorney is always a good place to
start.
This article is not intended to
substitute for the personal advice
of a licensed attorney.


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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 3, 2009 17


Home preventive care: Peace of mind


Regular home

maintenance

saves money,

even lives

By Manuel Rios
USAA Senior Vice President
You change your
car's oil every few
months. You visit
the dentist twice a year.
You back up your hard
drive religiously. You do
these things because you
know that ignoring them is
asking for trouble.
But when was the last
time you tested your smoke
detectors? Or changed your
dishwasher hose? If you're
like most people, you over-
look warning signs around
the house that could lead to
something far more disas-
trous than a few cavities.
Fires, flooded floors, severe
weather damage fias-
cos like these can not only
drain your bank account,
but put your family's safe-
ty at risk and, at the very
least, be a major pain in the
neck.
Like routine check-ups
for your self and your car,
checking your policy to
make sure it's up to date
and contains any addition-
al coverage you may need
such as those listed above.
Additional riders may be
needed above ad beyond the
typical homeowner's poli-
cy. Additional coverage can
add additional costs.
The good news is you
can make a difference with-
out much effort. To a large
degree, most home damag-
es can be reduced or avoid-
ed altogether with some
routine preventive mainte-
nance. Start with this list
of potential trouble spots.


These simple check-ups
may cost you a few hours
per year, but could save you
thousands of dollars and
months of headaches. They
might even save your life.
Plumbing
Neglecting your pipes
and hoses can get you into
hot water literally. The
equipment that breaks is
one problem, but worse
are the soaked carpets
and waterlogged walls
that result. That's why
it's essential to do a walk-
through of your home at
least once a year to look for
signs of trouble.
Pull out your washing
machine, refrigerator, ice
maker, dishwasher and
other appliances to inspect
hoses for bulges, cracks and
leaks. Replacing the rub-
ber or plastic hoses with
more durable steel hoses is
a worthwhile investment of
$10-$20.
Check your hot water
heater for rust or leaks,
and have it repaired or
replaced if necessary. If
you suspect that the unit
may be damaged, contact a
licensed professional. Don't
try and fix a water heater
yourself.
Also look for discoloration
on the walls and ceilings
that could indicate a leaky
pipe. Call a plumber for
help before the pipe bursts
completely or mold starts
to grow.
Heating and Air
Conditioning
A good heater may keep
you toasty through the win-
ter, but starting a fire in
the attic is going too far.
Preventive maintenance
can keep your HVAC unit
from breaking down, or
worse, becoming a hazard.
You'll get lower utility bills
to boot.
Every three months,
change your AC or furnace


filter to prevent excess dust
and air pollutants from cir-
culating through the house.
Fresh air filters may keep
the system from getting
clogged and overheating.
It's also a good idea to
have a professional check
your system once a year.
For a service fee, a techni-
cian will clean the furnace,
check for fluid leaks and
other more complicated
tasks, any of which could
prevent fires or major dam-
age to your unit.
Electrical
You'd be shocked at how
many fires and injuries
result from utter disregard
for the basic rules of home
electricity. Just keeping an
eye on these areas and cor-
recting problems quickly
can greatly reduce your
risks.
Check electrical cords
and replace any that are
frayed. And make sure
you're not overloading an
outlet or power strip that
is connected to too many
appliances. House fires are
especially common dur-
ing the winter holidays,
when circuits become over-
whelmed with lights and
other electric d6cor.
Also check that all
ground fault circuit inter-
rupters, or GFCIs, are
working. GFCIs protect
people from injuries by cut-
ting off power to a circuit
when there's a change in
current. The devices are


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usually attached to elec-
trical outlets that are out-
doors, in bathrooms and
kitchens and other areas
where appliances come
in contact with water.
Tripping breakers are
a sign that professional
attention may be required.
Flickering lights, out-
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touch any of these symp-
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a licensed electrician to
investigate.
Security
Sometimes preventing
disasters is about having
the right tools in place and
keeping them maintained.
Keep a fire extinguisher
within easy reach of the
kitchen, where most house
fires start. Check for any
damage to the fire extin-
guisher that may impair
its use, including a cracked
nozzle or dented canister.
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Change the batteries in

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your smoke detectors every
six months or so. And test
to make sure they're work-
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Consider getting a moni-
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alerts authorities to pos-
sible intrusions or fires.
Typically, a security system
will earn you a discount on
homeowners insurance.
Outside
When the weather turns
nasty, your home is put to
the test from the outside
in. As with indoor hazards,
poor exterior maintenance
can create dangerous situ-
ations and lead to major
property damage. It may
be time to get your hands
dirty with these outdoor
chores.
Cut tree limbs so they're
not touching the house or
hanging over the roof. This
prevents damage from fall-
ing limbs and also keeps
fires from spreading.
Check once a year to see
that roof vents, shingles,
metal flashing, and other
roof materials are in good
condition. Even small leaks
or loose materials could
become big problems in a
heavy storm.
Clean your gutters of dirt
and debris at least once
per year. Proper drainage


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damage to exterior wood
and walls.
While it takes a little
time and elbow grease,
the benefits of home main-
tenance far outweigh the
work and costs involved.
Not only can you prevent
major repair costs down the
road, you make your home
a more enjoyable place to
live, and protect its resale
value should you decide
to move. Most important-
ly, you can sleep better at
night knowing you've taken
precautions to help keep
your family safe.
For more information
about how to keep your
home and family safe,
visit the Federal Alliance
for Safe Homes at flash.
org and the Institute for
Business & Home Safety at
disasters afety. org.
This information is pro-
vided for general informa-
tional purposes only and
should not be considered
a substitute for insurance
coverage or professional
insurance coverage advice.
Please contact your insurer
regarding any specific poli-
cy converge and any restric-
tions regarding your cur-
rent policy.


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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 3, 2009


Congratulations!


'Click it

or

ticket'

They're called crash test
dummies for a reason.
"Larry" and "Vince" fight
off the effects of caffeine
and concussions to pro-
mote safety belt usage.
In Florida, the law is,
"Click It or Ticket."


IFf ....











Photo by Clark Pierce


VA disability assistance available
From AM VETS


f you are retiring or separating from
activity duty and desire assistance
with submitting your claim for dis-
ability and compensation to the Veterans
Administration (VA), you can start up to
one year prior to retiring or separating.
The first step is getting your medical
information in order and AMVETS can
assist you. AMVETS is an advocate for
separating or retiring service members
and their families providing assistance
with the submission of claims to the VA
for benefits, disabilities and compensation.


AMVETS is a national Veterans Service
Organizations authorized to submit claims
to the VA and advocate for the veterans
and their families with the VA nationwide.
The assistance is free of charge and you
are not required to become an AMVETS
member to receive it. AMVETS provides
assistance with medical record review,
claim submissions, housing, employment,
education, document certification, VA iden-
tification cards and much more.
For more information, contact AMVETS
representative David Sanders at 542-2834
or email:amvetsjax@yahoo.com.


HOLIDAY DRIVING TIPS


From Navy Safety Center


es, it's a no-brainer don't drink and
drive. Every year, 23,000 people die
because someone else didn't follow this
rule. If you plan to drink, plan your transpor-
tation in advance.
Do not drive if you are tired.
Keep your car in good condition. Make
sure your tires, brakes, Ii. .11i1il and tail-
lights, and turn signals are all working.
Obey the speed limit. In rain, snow, fog
and darkness slow down.
Stay aware of the drivers around you. If
you see an erratic driver, don't get angry get
away from them.


Be careful at intersections. The c'. i ,--
American driver is mediocre. Don't assume
others are going to do the right thing espe-
cially red light runners.
Keep your children in car safety seats and
make sure they are properly installed.
Drive defensively. Obey the rules and be
predictable.
Use caution, as well as your -i, i1- when
turning or changing lanes.
Use cell phones with caution. Pull over if
you can, or limit your calls to emergencies.
If your car has an anti-lock braking system
(ABS) and you must brake hard because of an
obstacle, be sure to press the brake pedal and
hold, as you gently steer around the obstacle.


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issued flag, a government headstone
or marker and a Presidential Memorial
Certificate. Even though these benefits
are "guaranteed," certain procedures
must be followed to receive them.
Some veterans may be eligible
for monetary burial allowances, as
well, but this is yet another issue that
complicates matters; in order to be
considered, the veteran must meet a
list of additional requirements.
With so many issues related to
receiving VA burial benefits, it is no
wonder that there is a gap in under-
standing the guidelines are difficult
to comprehend. Thankfully, though, at
least one funeral services company has
stepped in to assist veterans and their
families during their time of need.
The Dignity Memorial network,
the nation's leading network of locally-
operated funeral homes and cemeteries,
*Lindberg Group June 2008


offers a free Veterans Planning Guide
to eligible veterans. The 56-page guide
clearly outlines VA burial benefits,
spells out the required procedures and
offers helpful information to veterans
and their families. The guide also con-
tains worksheets that allow you to plan
your own arrangements, making clear
your final wishes.
Chris Marsh, a representative of
the Dignity Memorial network, says
the company is doing what it can to
help veterans. "Knowing that the
federal guidelines for veterans can be
difficult to understand, we developed
the Veterans Planning Guide to make
the process of both planning one's
own arrangements and receiving
well-deserved benefits much easier,"
says Marsh. "We made the guide free
so more veterans can receive those
benefits that they have earned."
In addition to providing important
information and special offers for
veterans (including a free flag box
and information on how to receive a
10% discount on services not covered
by VA benefits), the guide outlines
possible payment plans, so that
funeral expenses are much easier to
manage. Marsh notes, however, that
even if you choose not to pay up front,
planning early is vital for you and
your loved ones.
For more information about the
Dignity Memorial network's veterans
services, or to request a free planner,
call toll free 877-827-1011 or go to
www.VeteransJacksonville.com.
The Dignity Memorial brand name is used to identify a network
of licensed funeral, cremation and cemetery providers that
comprise the Dignity Memorial network. The Dignity Memorial
network includes affiliates of Service Corporation International,
1929 Allen Parkway, Houston, Texas, as well as many other
fine independently owned and operated establishments.


Sprint


/ /
I,
/ 7


The Now Network"


It's our small way of


saying thank you.

Sprint supports the men and women of the
Armed Forces and thanks you for your service
to our nation. To show our appreciation, U.S.
military personnel save on Sprint plans.
Get it on the Now Network.'




Save 15%

Select regularly priced
monthly service plans




Thank You Troops Promotion
Waived Activation Fees!
$25.00 Credit!
Applied to your account within 3 months!

Hurry, offers end January 09, 2010!

Visit your local Sprint Store ocday! '
1939 Wells Rd
Orange Park, Florida 32073

578 Marsh Landing Parkway
Jacksonville, Florida 32250 f.

Or contact Bill Lancaster:
904-591-6796
William.Lancaster@sprint.comn

www.sprint.com/save
Reference Corporate ID: GADON_ZZZ

Offer only for individual-liable lines with approved credit and a 2-year service agreement. May require up to a $36 activation fee/line, credit approval & deposit. S200 early termination fee/line
applies. Nationwide Sprint and Nextel National Networks reach over 275 and 274 million people, respectively. Coverage not available everywhere. Offer only available to Active members of the US
Military, Reservists, Retired Military and their dependents. Current US Military ID or dependent ID0 required at time of purchase. Also available for US Coast Guard and National Guard individual-liable
accounts. Government Employee Discount: Advertised discount only available to employees of Government agencies subject to employee discount pricing with Sprint. Family members must be
invoiced on the same account Discount subject to change according to company's agreement with Sprint Discount applies only to monthly service charges Taxes and surcharges still apply May
not be combinable with other offers. 2009 Sprint. Sprint and the logo are trademarks of Sprint. Other marks are the property of their respective owners.


Photo by AM3(AW) Nicole Bieneman
OS3 Robert Hubert III of NAS Jax and his wife, Sara, hold their 3-month-old twins, Lila
Jane and Robert Thomas. Hubert recently transferred from NS Mayport to NAS Jax.











TAX AIR NEWS, NAS TACKSONVIT LF Thursdalr December 3 2009 19







20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 3, 2009


AUTO dren enjoy the play area.


SKILLS CENTER
Call 542-3227 for informa-
tion.
Complete auto shop with 22
work bays
ASE-certified master
mechanic available for
assistance
Open Monday, T1mn'-1I.i, &
Friday 12 8 p.m.
Saturday & Sunday 9 a.m.
5 p.m.

FREEDOM LANES

BOWLING CENTER
Call 542-3493 for informa-
tion.

New Year's Eve Extreme
Bowling Party
Dec. 31, 8 p.m.- 1 a.m.
$15 per person includes
glow-in-the-dark bowling,
shoe rental, music, party
favors, pizza, soft drinks,
door prizes, champagne
toast (non-alcoholic avail-
able) and breakfast. Tickets
now on sale.

Wednesday
Free bowling for active duty
11 a.m. 1 p.m.
Color Pin Bowling
5 10 p.m. $2 games

Saturday Night Extreme
Bowling
7-9 p.m. & 9:30 p.m. mid-
night
$11 per person, includes
shoe rental

Sunday
Family Day Special
11 a.m. 5 p.m. $1.25
games

THE ZONE

COMPLEX
Call 542-3521 for informa-
tion.

Children's Holiday Bingo
Dec. 19
Ages 3 19, child must be
able to daub on their own
Doors open at 4 p.m.
Games start at 5 p.m.
$15 per person

Lunch Bingo
Monday Friday
11:15 a.m. 1 p.m., 10
games, $1 per card
per game
Enjoy lunch while you play.

Direct TV Sunday Ticket
Watch you favorite NFL
game at the Bud
Brew House.
Enjoy a pizza special or just
order off the menu.
Open to all MWR patrons
and their guests.
Families welcome!
Doors open at 12:30 p.m.

Texas Hold'em
Tournaments
Budweiser Brew House
Monday & T1mLI-1.iy
at 7 p.m.
Zone gift certificates
awarded

Trivia Night
Budweiser Brew House
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.

Karaoke
Budweiser Brew House
Wednesday & F,-il.iy
7:30 p.m. until closing

FITNESS &

AQUATICS
Call 542-2930 for
information.

Jingle Bell Jog
Dec. 11 at 11:30 a.m.
Pre-register at the
base gym

Family Fitness Center
Located above the Youth


Center
Mon. Fri., 9 a.m. 1 p.m.
Tues. & Thurs., 4 -7 p.m.
Work out while your chil-


TRX Suspension Training
Class is now at the Gym
Class is offered Monday
through Tmhu,-d.iy at 11:15
a.m. and on Friday at 4:15
p.m.

Tennis Lessons by Corey
Bowlin
Junior Clinic December 5
& 19, 10- 11 a.m. (ages 6
10), 11 a.m. noon (ages
11 -17)
Adult Clinic December 7, 14
& 21, 5 6 p.m. (beginner),
6 7 p.m. (intermediate)
Private and group lessons
also available, for more
information call Corey at
(404) 519-0520

I.T.T. EVENTS
Call 542-3318 for information.

The Florida Ballet in the
Nutcracker
Florida Theatre
Dec. 18, 7:30 p.m.
Dec. 19, 2:30 & 7:30 p.m.
Dec. 20, 3 p.m.
$17.75 per ticket

FCCJ Artist Series
Broadway
Stomp
Dec.12, 8 p.m. ($51.75)
Firstt Orchestra seating)
A Chorus Line
Jan. 23, 2 p.m. ($60), 8 p.m.
($61)
The Wizard of Oz
Feb. 27, 2 p.m. ($57.75), 8
p.m. ($59.50)
Feb. 28, 1:30 p.m. ($57.75)
Mamma Mia
March 27, 2 p.m. & 8 p.m.
($62.50)
Grease
May 1, 2 p.m. ($61), 8 p.m.
($74.50)
Chicago
May 22, 8 p.m. ($62.50)

Jacksonville Jaguars tickets
Section 147 $58.25
200 Level $54
400 Level $42
Jag Shuttle $12

Champs Bowl in Orlando
Florida Citrus Bowl
Stadium
Dec. 29 at 8 p.m. $47.50

Gator Bowl
Jan.l1
Section 124, $30 per person

Gator Bowl Patch
$5 for great savings at the
following locations,
Advenuture Landing,
Bono's Pit Bar-B-Q, Dave &
Busters, Domino's Pizza,
The Golf Club at Fleming
Island, McAlister's Deli,
McDonalds,
Sneaker's Sports Grille,
Windsor Parke Golf Club
and
Champions Club at
Julington Creek.

Capital One Bowl in
Orlando
Florida Citrus Bowl
Stadium
Jan.1 at 1 p.m. $68.50

World Famous Lipizzaner
Stallions
Jan. 3 at 2 p.m. at Veterans
Memorial Arena
$32 per person, buy one get
one free

Ringling Brothers and
Barnum & Bailey Circus
Jan. 23, 3:30 p.m. and 7:30
p.m., $13 per person

Military Rolex 24 Hours
Jan. 30 & 31
$12 military members
$40 for all others

NASCAR Bud Shootout
Feb. 2
$33 for unreserved

Dane Cook
Veterans Memorial Arena


Feb. 5 at 7:30 p.m.
$81.50 for club seating


Camping World 300
Feb. 13 $59

NASCAR Daytona 500
Feb. 14
Keech Box & DePalma -
$152
Sprint Fan Zone $75
Superstretch $59
Turns tower $165
Petty Tower $350

Monster Truck Jam
Feb. 27, 7:30 p.m.
$32 per person, club seat-
ing, includes pit pass

NBA Orlando Magic tickets
Level H (Blue,Black or
Silver) Adult/Child
$104-$94-$78
Level I (Blue, Black or
Silver) Adult/Child $91-
$80-$70
Level J (Blue, Black or
Silver) Adult/Child $73-
$62-$52
Level M (Blue, Black or
Silver) Adult/Child $60-
$50-$39
Level N (Blue, Black or
Silver) Adult/Child $46-
$36-$25

Club Resort Vacation
Condo Rentals
Low as $329 per week / per
unit over 3,500 locations
in 80 countries www.afv-
club.com or call 1-800-724-
9988 reference #62
for NAS Jax

LIBERTY COVE

RECREATION
Trips, activities and costs
may be restricted to E1-E6
single or unaccompanied
active duty members. Call
542-3491 for information.

St. Augustine/USO Pal Day
Dec. 5
Free lunch and tour

Jaguars Football Game
Dec. 6
Free admission & transpor-
tation

Free Holiday Airport
Shuttle
Dec.14 Jan.12
Sign-up at Liberty within
24 hours of departure.

NAS JAX

GOLF CLUB
Golf course info: 542-3249
Mulligan's info: 542-2936

Military Appreciation Days
at NAS Jax Golf Club
$17 per person, includes
cart & green fees
Dec. 15 for active duty.
Dec. 17 for retirees & DoD
personnel.

Christmas Eve Golf
Scramble
Dec. 24, 10 a.m. shotgun
start
$40 military/DoD, $50 civil-
ian guest

Senior Military Invitational
Golf Tournament
Dec. 9 10, 9 a.m. shotgun
start
$75 per person

Sunday Brunch now at
Mulligan's, 10 a.m. 2 p.m.

0-CLUB & T-BAR
For information on book-
ing command or private
functions at the O'Club or
T-Bar, call the Officers'
Club main office, 542-3041.

T-Bar Social Hours
Monday Friday, 3:30-7:30
p.m.
Reserve Drill Weekends,
3:30-7:30 p.m.

MULBERRY COVE


MARINA
Call 542-3260.

Free Kayak & Canoe
Rental
Every T1hmI'--1. for active
duty

YOUTH CENTER
Call 778-9772.

Free open recreation for
children in kindergarten
through age 17
Tuesday Friday, 6:15-8
p.m.


Saturday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.
Register at the Youth
Center.

Christmas Tree Lighting
Party
Patriots Grove
Dec. 4 at 4:30 p.m.
Free photos with Santa, face
painting, refreshments & more


Tropical Freeze
Mulberry Cove Marina
Dec. 19, noon 4 p.m.
Free snow sledding, food
and beverages


NAS JAX

FLYING CLUB
Call 777-8549/6035.


Private Pilot Ground School
$450 includes instruction
and books
Jan. 4 Feb. 10

CHILD

DEVELOPMENT

HOMES
For more information, call
542-5381.


Photo by Melanie Cullum
(From left) Navy spouses Toni Piunno and Dani Miller are congratulated by COMPASS
Jacksonville Team Leader Molly Sautter Nov. 19 for graduating from mentor training.
COMPASS is an evolving program designed to help new Navy spouses gain a better
understanding of how the Navy system is set up and how the Navy performs its mis-
sion. The program program is based on a spouse-to-spouse support and mentoring
network. For more information, call Sautter at 240-1160.







Come Discover Our "Homes Ready Now"
and Help Us Spread Joy by Donating a
New Toy to a Deserving Tot.
Great prices and low interest rates have combined to
make this the best season ever to buy a new Drees
home. In addition, if you're looking to move quickly,
Drees has a great selection of "Homes Ready Now."
Finally, while shopping for your new home, Drees
invites you to bring a new, unwrapped toy for "Toys for
Tots." Hurry! All toys must be collected by December
12. For a complete list of Drees' communities and our
designated toy drop-off centers, visit dreeshomes.com
Homes now from the $120's-$300's


Drees
HOMES


ong. . .


us sotMI


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JAX AIR NEWS, NASJACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 3, 2009 21


It's a three-peat for CNATTU Jax at

Greybeard Softball Championship
By ATC Carl Vick
CNATTU Jax
Public AffairsOfficer


The Center for Naval
Aviation Technical
Training Unit
(CNATTU) Jacksonville's
Blue Team, took top hon-
ors at the 2009 Fall
Greybeard Softball
Championship. It was
the Blue Team's first
Championship and
the third in a row for
CNATTU.
CNATTU Blue Team
ended the regular season
with a 5-3 record, earning
them the No. 2 spot in the
playoffs. They went 4-0
in the playoffs, which set
them up to face off against
Air Operations.
The tournament was a
double-elimination for-
mat, meaning that Air
Operations would have
to beat CNATTU twice in
order to take home the tro-
phy.


Photo by ATC Mark Petersen
(Front row, from left) AO1 Luis Aponteramos, AT1 Rafael
Rodriguez, AD2 Wilfredo Briones, AT1 Chad Wellborn and
AO1 Philip Metz. (Back row from left) ATC Carl Vick, Capt.
Jack Scorby Jr., ADCS Bryan Crofoot, Lt. James Cook, ATC
John Adams and AMC Jeff Wright. (Not pictured) AOC Ahmad
Walker and AE1 Richard Carrillo.


It would not come to that.
At the top of the seventh
inning, CNATTU was lead-
ing 5-4. Air Operations had
the opportunity to take it to
the bottom of the seventh.
The talented third base-


man, AO1 Philip Metz, the
game's most valuable play-
er, ensured a hitless half-
inning to secure the trophy
that was presented by NAS
Jax Commanding Officer
Capt. Jack Scorby Jr.


Create video holiday greetings


Saturday at NEX Food Court


From Staff
WGNE Gator Country 99.9 is
bringing some holiday spirit
to local military members who
will not be home for the holidays by post-
ing family videos on the WGNE Web site
www.999gatorcountry.com .
A special taping session will be held at
the NAS Jax NEX Food Court Saturday
from 1:30-4:30 p.m. No reservations are
needed, videos will be taped on a first


come, first serve basis. Military family
members can also download their own vid-
eos by following the instructions on the
Web site. For more information, call 542-
5588.






N% 40 A


Captain's Cup 4-on-4 Flag Football Meeting
Dec. 9 at 11:30 a.m. at Gym
Open to active duty, command DoD personnel and
selective reservists. Have your command athletic
officer or designated representative attend the
meeting and receive five captain's cup points.
Jingle Bell Jog 5K Dec. 11 at 11:30 a.m.
Perimeter Road/Antenna Farm, open to all
personnel
Sign up at NAS Gym or Fitness Source prior to
race day and receive T-shirt.
Race day registration 10-11 a.m.
Awards given to the top-three male and female
runners for age groups: 29 & under; 30-37; 38-44;
45-49; and 50 over.
Captain's Cup 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament
Jan. 25
Open to active duty, selective reservists, command
DoD and DoD contractors from NAS Jax. Teams
are comprised of a maximum four players from
their respective commands and can enter multiple
teams. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Gym.
Sign up by Jan. 20.
Sports officials and scorekeepers needed
North Florida Military Officials Association needs
individuals to officiate basketball, soccer, softball,
football, volleyball and wrestling at NAS Jax.
Experience not required.
For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-
2930/3239.


STANDINGS


Team
Fighting'
Hot Fire
HSM-70
VP-16
FACS F,
HS-11
NAVFA(
Naval H-


Intramural Fall Basketball
As of Nov. 27
Wins Lc
Tigers 2
2
0 1
0
AC 1
C 1
hospital 1


losses
0
0
0
0
1

1


Team
VPU-1
VP-30
Supply
Air Operations
NCTS
VP-5


Team
VP-16
VR-58
CNRSE/
HSM-70
Air Oper
NRSE R
VPU-1
FRCSEE
FRC-SE
VP-30 E
HS-5
Dirty 30
FANG
HS-11
Dirty Bir
FRCSE
Rabid Po
HITRON
VP-8
VP-5 Wh
NAVFAC
PSD


Team
Air Ops C
Great W
NAVHOS
VR-58
Wolf Pac
CNATTL
VPU-1
NOSC
CNATTU
SERCC


/N
a
C
40
R
'S



dz
B


hit


Wins
1
1
0
0
0
0


Intramural Fall Softball
As of Nov. 20
Wins I
16
15
4RD 13
13
tions 11
;C 11
10
00 9
COC 9
S9
8
6
6
6
z 5
lack 5
ssums 4
4
3
te 3
3
3


Intramural Fall Volleyball
Final Standings
Wins L
Gold 10
hites 7
SP 6
5
ck 4
J Gold 3
3
3
J Blue 2
2


December 1 12


ATTENTION

E1-E6 Single Sailors


The Grinch is hiding

somewhere on base

and has plans to ruin

Christmas if not

captured by


December 12!

Santa Claus is

offering a


$500 reward

if you can find

The Grinch!

Find the daily clue

at Liberty Cove or

receive the clue by

texting JAXLIBERTY

to 30364


Questions?

Call 542-1335


Visit the ITT Office to get YOUR ticket!


NAS JAX SPORTS


I


www.ucanquit2.org


10






T



L



TICKETS


osses
1
1
1
2
2
2


osses
2
5
6
5
5
5
6
8
8
4
3
10
10
5
6
8
13
6
12
12
16


losses
0
3
5
5
5
4
4
6
4
4


I







JAx AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, 1 I 1.11.. .,, December 3, 2009


* Jax Air News


SSIfie


PLACE YOUR MILITARY CLASSIFIED AD


BY PHONE 366-6300
Mon.-Thurs. 7:30a.m.-6:00p.m.
Fri. 7:30a.m.-5:30p.m.
Toll Free 800-258-4637
BY FAX 904-359-4180
IN PERSON
Many people prefer to place classified in person
and some classified categories require prepayment.
For your convenience, wewe come you to place your
classified ad at The Florida Times-Union from 7:30
a.m. 5:00 p.m., Monday-Friday at One Riverside
Avenue (at the foot of the Acosta Bridge).
Deadlines
R dae C ll by IFa Lb


Thursday Tue, Noon


Tue, 11 a.m.


Please note: Fax deadlines are one hour earlier.
Holiday and Legal deadlines vary and will be sup-
plied upon request. Cancellation and correction
deadlines are the same as placement deadlines.


CANCELLATIONS, CHANGES & BILLING
Ad Errors Please read your ad on the first day of publication. We accept responsibility for only the first incorrect
insertion and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 366-6300 immediately for prompt correction and
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number will be issued. Retain this number for verification. Call 366-6300.
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GENERAL INFORMATION
Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject or classify all advertise-
ments under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of publication.
Credit for Publisher errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was
incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for
any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbrevia-
tions are acceptable; however, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated.


4 The anchor indicates the ad is a FREE Fleet Market Ad placed by military personnel.


CLASSIFIED INDEX


Auctions


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Employment



Merchandise


Financial Transportation


1 E2- 904-366-6300

ONLINE
Classified line ads are online at jaxairnews.com

FREE online advertising!
Your Classified in-column ad automatically appears online at
no additional charge.


__________________________ I __________________________________________________________ I __________________________________________


Happy Ads
Lost and Found
Clubs and Organizations
Rides/Travel
Notices
Personals
Dating and
Entertainment







424-6066 Eric
18 years EXPERIENCE.


Notice of
Termination of
practice of
Alexander
Milanick, DDS.
Copies of records may
be obtained in this
county(Duval) by
written request to his
father, Mr. Milanick,
P. 0. Box 1724,
Flagler Beach, FL
32136- 1724 (904)
347-3473. You may be
billed for the actual
cost of copying,
mailing, or delivering
records that shall be
available at and
within reasonable
times.









I i
Open Houses
Argyle
Arlington
Avondale/Ortega
Beaches
Downtown
Fernandina/Amelia Island
Intracoastal West
Keystone Heights/Melrose
Mandarin
Middleburg
North Jacksonville
Orange Park/Clay County
Riverside
San Marco
Southside
Springfield
Westside
Waterfront
Condominiums
Manufactured Homes
Lots
Farm Acreage
Investment Property
Retirement Community
Baker County
Georgia Real Estate
Nassua County
Putnam County
St. Johns Open Houses
St. Johns Homes
St. Johns Waterfront
St. Johns Oceanfront
St. Johns Intracoastal
St. Johns Marshfront
St. Johns Condos
St. Johns Duplex/
Townhouses
St. Johns Manufactured
Homes
St. Johns Lots/Acreage
St. Johns Active Adult
Com.
St. Johns Investment
Income Property
Miscellaneous
Out of Area/Town/State
Real Estate Wanted


. KINGSLAND, GA,
208 Grassmere St.
in the Meadows.
Attractive 1633sf 3/2
home for sale or rent.
Open fir plan, oversized
rooms, cobblestone fpl,
2cgar, fncd bkyd, 400sf
scrn prch & much more.
Reduced tos ell $149,900
or rent for $1000m. Visit
http://www.infotube.net/
190940 to view pictures &
get all the info on this
amazing home. Call
Stacy 912-882-3507
w/questions or to sched-
ule a viewing.


SAN JOSE AREA
Brick home, Move in
condition! Convenient
to everything! Min-
utes from downtown.
3 Br / 1 Ba, 1100 SqFt,
New Windows, New
Roof, Remodeled
kitchen with custom
cabinets, Remodeled
bathroom, Beautiful
Hardwood floors, New
driveway, Brick exte-
rior with maintenance
-free vinyl overhang,
Huge fenced back
yard, Tiled Sunroom
overlooking backyard
and patio, Attached
one-car garage, Fire-
place, plus more...
$ 1 5 9 9 0 0 C a ll
904-254-8797



Ortega Farms
$349,000
River Access
5051 Havenwood Oaks Terrace
- 3 Bedrooms & 3.5 Full baths
-Custom Built in 2007
3506 square feet
Call Russell Grooms
Office 421-3535

House for Sale by
owner. 3BR/1 bath in
West Jax area (zip
32210). showers,
backyard workshop.
Concrete block
construction with
attached garage. Out
of state owner.
Presently used as a
rental property, renter
in. SPECIAL PRICE
to Navy Personnel.
Call (916)791-1237 or
cpriglick@yahoo.com
for details.



3/2, newly remodeled,
new roof, 1250sq. ft., 2
car gar, fresh paint, new
carpet, close to schools,
$156K Call 904-707-8149

If you're buying,
selling, or relocating,
give me a call!


I
I
I
I
I


Ro Andrade





Military Relocation
Specialist USN (ret)
Direct Line
(904) 662-5030
randrade@ I
watsonrealtycorp.com
Watson Realty Corp.
4729 US Hwy 17S
Orange Park, FL 32003 I


SHADOW BOXES,
DOG HOUSES
Made to Order by
Manuel Bello Woodworking
www.goatlocker.org/bellovincent
Tel: 904-645-7767


We Appreciate You!
S S00 tax credit no down payment -VA approved
S Foreclosure and
Short Sale Specialty
SVanguard Realty, Inc
Call Dennis Kinkopf 904-868-3252

Serving buyers and sellers in the greater
Jacksonville area.
Military Relocation, First Time Homebuyer,
Move-Up Buyer and Foreclosure Specialist.
***Free Homeowner's Warranty
for buyers and sellers***
***Free List of Distressed
and Foreclosed Homes***
***Free Info on Homeowner's Tax Credit***
***Free Listingbook Account***
***Free Market Snapshot Account***
Call or email me today for info. I am here to serve
your real estate needs.
Linda Tanner
U.S. Navy (Retired)
MBA, GRI, ABR, SRES, CDPE
Keller Williams First Coast Realty
2233 Park Avenue, Suite 500
Orange Park, FL 32073
904-449-4374
lindadawntanner@aol.com
www.lindadawntanner.com



Carlos Berries
SRealtor, USN RET
Cell: (904) 563-1824
Office: (904) 733-3003
berriosc@bellsouth.net
www.gotocarlosberrios.com
Hablo EspaFiol

SRELOCATING?
SEXIT 1 STOP REALTY Oall Tdiay!
9220 Cypress Geen REDrI
BUYER REPRESENTATION
FREE CMA, MARKETING PLAN

11o a n I I I LtLt


$0 DOWN!
If you have land or
own family land, your
landis your CREDIT!!!
LUV HOMES s
904-772-8031 o



You Can Rent To Own a
beautiful like new 3/2
mobile Home and no
credit needed only
$625.00 a month call
904-781-0441


109 Prince Albert Ave
Aberdeen Model Open
Dec 5-6, 4/3 3034sf, 3Car,
GameRm, Granite, 10Yr
Warr, $299,900, Wood-
side Homes 904-794-7922
CGC031802 MLS120428

Get results!
Run your ad
more than one day.
There are different people
in the market for goods,
services,
andjobs every day
Don't miss a hot prospect!
Place your ad today


3 BR / 2.5 BA Townhome.
This 1,664 S.F Unit has a Large
Family Room, Living Room and
Spacious Dining Room.
Enjoy the Two Near By Swim.
Parks and Other Amenities
Fleming Island Has to Offer.
$1,050 / Month


Cal Pona Wch
Island Realty, Inc.
904-215-2910
www.island-realty.info


L~fU

046*4



904-436-1432


-partment


Apartments Unfurnished
Condominiums
Retirement Communities
Homes Furnished
Homes Unfurnished
Manufactured Homes
Mobile Home Lots
Roommates
Rooms to Rent
Beach Home Rentals
Beach/Vacation/Resorts
Storage/Mini-Lockers
Management/Rental Services
Wanted to Rent
St. Johns Apartments Furnished
St. Johns Apartments Unfur-
nished
St. Johns Condominiums
St. Johns Duplex
Townhomes
St. Johns Retirement Com-
munities
St. Johns Houses Furnished
St. Johns Houses
Unfurnished
St. Johns Mobile Home/Lot
Rental
St. Johns Lots
St. Johns Roommates
St. Johns Rooms to Rent
St. Johns Oceanfront/Waterfront
St. Johns Vacation Rental
St. Johns Storage/
Mini-Lockers
St. Johns Wanted to Rent



SAN MARCO Spacious
studio walk 2 river shops
$695 UTILS INCLUDED
Pd prkng 737-8194 616-3367

Apartmentsf
Unfurisheda^


ARLINGTON Adobe Apts
1Month FREE Rent Studio
$400. 1/1 $450. 2/1 $625.
745-0450 1110 Caliente Dr

Foa advelising ifoinmalion,
please call 904-359-4336,
Fax 904-366-6230.


Bri''gig Quality Homes and
Qualified Buyers TogetherM

Christina and Mystic Starner<
GoMobile, Text: SeeStarner To: 87778
E-mrail: SeeStarner@SeeStarner.com

Cell: 904-214-6296
CERTIFIED DISTRESSED so n"WeforetSurecrisis
PROPERTY EXPERT o homeonero ta rime.

Serving Northeast Florida .o


Community Amenities
* Relaxing pool with cabana
* Resident Business Center
* 24-hour Fitness Center
* Garages available
* Brand New Playground
* Volleyball Court


Interior Amenities
* Fully equipped kitchen with
built-in microwave
* Walk-in closets
* Full size washer & dryer
in each apartment
* Ceiling fans
* Private terrace or balcony
* Fireplaces
*in select apartments


90.37.07




.


APARTMENTS


(904)-272-437 1

Military Discount Program
Clay County Schools
Pool and Recreational Areas

Large Units with Spacious Floor Plans
2 & 3 Bedroom Townhomes
Washer-Dryer Connections
On-Site Maintenance
I I I I


COME ON BY!

OPEN WEEKENDS iiA.

622 Filmore Street ,

Orange Park, FL =
Filmore St.


Arlington
Huntington at
Hidden Hills Apts.
Free Rent.!!
-Low Price!!
Call Today 904-641-6409

BEACHES, WALK TO OCEAN!
1, 2&3BR Apts. & Home
rentals, $550 & Up. 249-5611.
FREE RENT FOR DECEMBER!
1-95 & UNIV BLVD
2br/lba, residential area
across from schools.
$575mo. 904-349-8706
Mandarin/9047 San Jose Blvd
EXTRA LARGE Apts
Reduced Rates May & June
1BR 900sf Call special rates
Beauclerc Bay Apt., 733-3730
Next to Goodby's Boat Ramp
MURRAY HILL Gar. Apt
1/1, refrig, stove, no
pets, $425m+$400dp.
904-388-9002 or 540-3888
MURRAY HILL LARGE
1 & 2 BR Apts. Cable Ready,
Carpet, Kit Equip. 384-1472
Northside 1.5BR/I1 BA
CH&A, alarm $545mo.
No dep. 548 W. 27th St
Hud ok 766-0268, 945-6941
ORANGE PARK 2/1
$665mo+$150dp wtr incid
pool & laundry. No pets
Admiral Apts 954-817-5193
Riverside & Westside
1Br Starting at $450
2 & 3 BR's also avail
$25 App. Fee! Call 771-1243
$200 OFF 1st Month Rent
, Riverfront 1BR Apt.
600sf, priv., secure,
fresh & clean with
wtr incl. $550m.
904-388-6686


Riverfront upstairs
apt, 1200sf, hdwd
firs, 2/1, fully furn'd
corp. apt. w/elec.,
wtr, cbl, wi-fi & w/d on
premise. 1car cov. prkg,
priv & secure. No pets.
$1300m. Same unit
unfurn. w/elec, cbl, wtr,
wi-fi, $1oo00m. 904-388-6686
WESTSIDE Off 103rd
2BR DUPLEX, FENCED
YARD, NO W/D CONN.
REF. REQ. $595778-2897
WESTSIDE- Off 103rd
2/1 freshly painted, ch&a
$550m wtr incid 403-7293
WESTSIDE 2/1, CH&A
Clean, quiet in country
setting, water included.
$545MO. 904-783 0288



Baymeadows, 2-story
condo, 2/2, fireplace,
washer/dryer, located
near pool and in quiet
community. Call
(904)714-9310
ORANGE PARK Twnhse
end unit w/ gar, new
2br/2.Sba w/ bonus rm,
1200sf $900m 904-465-7970
PONTE VEDRA BEACH
2br/2.5ba TH. New firs!
FP, scrn porch, sec sys,
pool, tennis court. $895m
water incid. 904-874-4499
E EAGLE HARBOR
Condo for rent 3/2,
garage, pool, "A"
Schools, w/d conn,
sec. dep., play grnd,
904-264-3618 Scott
WESTSIDE Riverfront
2/2, boat slip, ramp,
priv pkng, 1st fir, sec,
no crdt V $850mo 251-4778


Southside-Furn. Very nice
& clean 2/1 & 2/2,
shaded, w/d, no pets/
smoking $695mo. 737-0537





ARGYLE, 3/2, LR, DR,
firpic, ceiling fans, scrned
covered patio, fenced yard.
$995. Refs req. 778-2897


FLEMING ISLAND
area 4/2 plus bonus
room, 2000sf, Pool
home on lake, 3car
gar, fenced backyard,
$1800 per month.
904-272-4408/982-4837
MIDDLEBURG 3br/2ba,
on 2.5 acres w/wreck
room. 1st, last & sec.
dep. Call 904-461-3474
Orange Pk/ Middleburg
2624 Pinewood Blvd. S.
$895/mo. Pets OK
904-731-1599, 327-7823


A




MADISON
APARTMENT GROUP









Madison @ Bay Pointe
4500 Baymeadows Rd.
Jacksonville, FL 32217
866-721-8505
Located in Baymeadows Area Off295


Orange Park
All Homes Neat & Clean
Ready to Move In
Belair Blvd 3/2, $900/m
Grove Park
Debbie Lane 3/2 $1000/m
MeadowBrook
Hercules E. 3/1.5 $800/m
Lake Side, pool
Sheldon 4/2 $1200/m
Middleburg,
Old Jennings 3/2, $800/m
Cedar Bend, Apt.
Lombard 2/1.5 $500/m
Bentwood 2/1.5 $500/m
Lombard 2/1.5 $500/m
Duplex, Apt.
AAeadowbrook 2/1 $500/m
LATHAM REAL ESTATE
Inc. Realtor MLS 264-4567
ORANGE PARK
Real nice 3/2 ready
for the Holidays
drive by 404 Federal Hill
Rd. call 904-282-0502 PCS
Osprey Pointe/S PABLO
4BR/2.5BA, 2450sf, 2 car
garage, iacuzzi, play-
ground, garden tub,
hrdwd, carpet, tile,
sileston, culdesac,
2 story, fenced yrd,
$1850-$1950/mo & SD
Avail 1/1/10. 904-349-1631
SOUTHSIDE- 3/2, 3639
Coronado Rd. $975. 3/1.5
2836 Sam Rd $895mo pets
OK 904-731-1599, 327-7823
, KINGSLAND, GA,
208 Grassmere St.
in the Meadows.
Attractive 1633sf 3/2
home for sale or rent.
Open fir plan, oversized
rooms, cobblestone fpl,
2cgar, fncd bkyd, 400sf
scrn prch & much more.
Reduced tos ell $149,900
or rent for $1000m. Visit
http://www.infotube.net/
190940 to view pictures &
get all the info on this
amazing home. Call
Stacy 912-882-3507
w/questions or to sched-
ule a viewing.
, ORANGE PARK
Fleming Island 3/2,
2200sf, 2cg, 8mi
NAS, spacious mas-
ter/floor plan, scrnd
porch, ZBestl $1175/m
PCS 760-208-3119
SBeautiful 3/2 near
Oakleaf, new car-
pet, paint, tile, 50%
off first month
$1 1 50m. nego. PCS.
90n4-914A-A4777


See The Starners for Real Estate


Georgia
lAnflouncemit-sl Real


[ KNOWS LANDING APTS I


WSTRIDGE
URY APARTMENT HOMES

FLOOR PLANS STARTING AT $726NONTH
PLUS ADDITIONAL MILITARY DISCOUNTS 'I








JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, 'I 1.I. i ,, December 3, 2009 23


, Beautiful House for
sale in Mandarin 4/2
2265sf, hardwd firs,
centralized vacuum
cleaner, owner will help
finance $215,000.
904-616-1705
SARGYLE 3br/2ba
Liv/Dining, Fam
room, 2cgar, fully
fncd, garden tub
w/sep. shower, Irg yd,
laundry rm, 6852 Old
Middleburg Rd., 32222.
PCS. 904-505-7078.
$1050m.

4 ARGYLE/Oakleaf
area-3br/2ba, encld.
gar, 2300sf, $1150.
904-707-8557
W NORTHSIDE 4/2.5,
2800sf, built '07,
w/lrg patio, 2cgar,
den, living/dining,
family, kitchen w/break-
fast nook. PCS. $249,900.
904-881-2767
TIRED OF PAYING
RENT? Would you like
to own a home? Have
poor or bad credit?
www.wehelp247.com
We're a local company
that can help you
restore your credit and
receive up to $10K in
FREE money towards
the purchase of your
dream home. 781-8000
Call now
Very Nice 2/2 Townhome
close to NAS Jax & Mall.
$700m. Call 305-510-3728
Military Priority
WESTSIDE Off 103rd
1BR & 2BR, $595 & $695,
Fenced yard, No W/D hook

Westside 3/2 House with
appliances, Ig master,
pool/ playground access
& a great view, lake
front $1100 plus deposit
Call Jill (904)226-3575
SArlington/Ft. Caro-
line 3/2, 2cgar, Irg
detached workshop,
freshly painted,
nice & clean, 20min.
fro Nam M ayport
$975m+$975sec. dp.
904-641 -1851



A $1.00 A DAY GIVES
YOU A PLACE TO STAY!
Woodland Estates
904-771-9055

Need a place to live but
short on money call us
and pay only $31.00 for
December rent call
904-781-0441

For: Beautiful Large 3/2
MH for rent only $650.00
Call now and you will pay
only $31.00 for your 1st
month rent 904-695-2255
MIDDLEBURG- 3/2 DW
$700mo + $650dep.
Call 904-806-2237
NORTHSIDE
0 DEPOSIT FROM $395
1 & 2 BR weekly/monthly
904-766-6986



FLEMING ISLAND- Fur-
nished room for rent
wkly or monthly, female
preferred, single family
home on the water
$125wk. or $400mo inclds
utilIs 904-237-5860







Commercial/Industrial
For Sale
Commercial /Industrial
For Rent
Businesses For Sale
Office Space For Sale
Office Space For Rent
Retail For Sale
Retail For Rent
St. Johns Commercial/
Industrial For Sale
St. Johns Commercial/
Industrial For Rent
St. Johns Businesses
For Sale
St. Johns Office Space
For Sale
St. Johns Office Space
For Rent
St. Johns Retail For Sale
St. Johns Retail For Rent



San Marco-6room bungalow
1200sf, home/office
Zoned CRO exc. loc.
$1550mo. 904-962-1381


MEDICAL CODING
& BILLING Seeking
Active Duty Military
Spouses to train &
certify.
No Experience
Necessary
Call Jennifer Pearce
904-564-9500 X107
904-537-5358


RN's
Baptist Health is cur-
rently seeking the follow-
ing:

Nurse
Epidemiologist/
Infection Con-
trol Specialist
BAPTIST MEDICAL
CENTER DOWNTOWN
has a full-time position
available. Qualified can-
didate will have a BSN,
FL RN license or eligibil-
ity, Professional Certifi-
cation in Infection Con-
trol, and a minimum of 5
years acute care experi-
ence. MSN preferred.
Job #7165.

Nurse
Epidemiologist
WOLFSON CHILDREN'S
HOSPITAL has a
part-time position avail-
able with varying hours.
BSN, FL RN license or
eligibility, and 5 years of
Nursing experience
required. Job #7297.
Responsibilities for both
positions above include
designing, implementing
& directing hospital-wide
infection control pro-
grams; setting policies &
standards; & evaluating
compliance for practices
associated with preven-
tion & control of health
care associated infec-
tions.
Please apply online
referencing Job # above:
e-baptisthealth.com/careers
EOE

r %BAPTIST
U" HEALTH
Depend On Us For Ltfe



ME HE
Wolfson
Childreffn's
HOSPITAL


BAPTIS HEALTH





SR. GLOBAL FRAME-
WORK DEVELOPER
Jacksonville, FL
Opportunity now avail-
able for a Senior Global
Framework Developer in
Jacksonville, Florida with
CEVA Logistics U.S., Inc.
Duties: Leads the devel-
opment and support of
tools and utilities for
Company internal use,
such as intranet, data-
bases, software applica-
tions, and hardware;
design/program solid
technical solutions for
projects; mentor and
train new staff and plan
their career development,
communicate technical
solutions to clients and
internally; formulate and
generate client business
requirements; and
research and implement
new technologies.
Requires U.S. equivalent
of Bachelor's degree in
Software or Mechanical
Engineering and 5 years
of experience in software
engineering utilizing the
following applications:
C#.NET, including
user-configurable pricing,
rating and business rule
engines and building
applications for logistics
and transportation GIS
EDI electronic invoicing
standards and interfaces;
and JDE, SAP or similar
general ledger integra-
tion. M-F 8:00am-5:00pm.
Please apply online at:
iobs.cevalogistics.com/
candidates or fax resume
to Lisa MacDonald at
(904) 928-1547 EOE


- -eneral


Job Fairs
Resume Services
Accounting/Bookkeeping
Advertising/Media
Architecture/Interior
Design/Graphics Design
Automotive Sales/Service
Aviation
Civil Service/Government/
Public Administration
Computer Hardware/
Software/Programming
Construction
Customer Service
Dental
Domestic Services/
Caregiving
Delivery Driver
Education/Teaching/
Training
Engineering
Entertainment
Executive/Management
Finance/Investment
General Employment
Hotel/Hospitality/Tourism
Industrial Trades
Insurance
Landscaping/Grounds
Maintenance
Law Enforcement/
Security/Safety
Legal
Maintenance/Janitorial
Services
Management/Professional
Marketing
Mechanics
Medical/Health Care
Marine/Trade
Nurses/Nurses Aides
Office/Clerical/
Administration
Part-Time
Personal Services/Beauty
Real Estate/Property
Management
Recreation/Sports/Fitness
Restaurant/Bar/Club/
Food/Beverages
Retail
Sales
Science/Research
Social Services/Counseling
Technical Support
Telemarketing
Transportation
Warehouse/Inventory
Work at Home
Positions Wanted


a-I

House
Supervisor
(Full-Time)
A Northeast Florida hos-
pital is currently seeking
a House Supervisor.
Qualified candidate must
have a Bachelor's in
Nursing; 2 years of expe-
rience as a House Super-
visor; and a BLS & ACLS.
Please email resume to
shires@or.hodes.com
indicating #22461
EOE/AA


CAN YOU
MAKE
PEOPLE 1
SMILE?
High energy, friendly,
money motivated per-
son required. Must have
reliable transportation,
have a clean criminal
record & be able to start
immediately. Call
224-1085 or send resume
by fax to 268-9663 or
email resume your to
hrdept@abmrktg.com




Area Sales
COME ON PEOPLE
This is ridiculous! Week
after week I run ads for
different departments in
my organization & get
limited response. There
are no gimmicks, no
surprises & and no hid-
den factors. We have
everything anybody else
can offer, in other
words, not just a great
income, but all the good-
ies too! Commissions &
Incentives, vacations,
trips, rewards, health,
dental, life & vision
insurance and a 401(k).
Starting income, up to
$45K-$75K per year. You
can even qualify for a
$2,500.00 signing bonus.
Sounds good so far,
doesn't it? That's why I
can't understand why in
the world you wouldn't
investigate this opportu-
nity. This week I'm hir-
ing for sales in our
Jacksonville office: No
Experience necessary,
we will train you.
Call Harold, 680-0577
or email resume to
hrdept@a bmrktg.com
or fax your resume to
904-268-3170




GET MILES WHILE
THEY'RE HOT!
Stable driving opportuni-
ties open NOW at:

*ALSO HIRING
TEAM DRIVERS*
to fulfill customer's
requirements. Pay range
is $.36-$.40 cpm split
based upon experience.
Team Drivers must have
HazMat Endorsement.
t Guaranteed Home time
SGreat Pay,Equipment
& Benefits
> Paid Vacation &
Holidays
> Class A CDL Required
Call 1-800-800-3920 or
1-800-831-7926
For More Information
www.superserviceinc.net


AC, Heating, Fuel
Antiques
Appliances
Arts & Crafts
Auctions
Building Supplies
Business/Office Equipment
Clothes
Collectibles
Computer
Craft/Thrift Stores
Electronics
Estate Sales
Farm/Planting
Fruits/Vegetables
Furniture/Household
Garage Sales
Garden/Lawn
Hot Tubs/Spas
Jewelry/Watches
Kid's Stuff
Machinery & Tools
Medical
Miscellaneous Merchandise
Musical Merchandise
Photography
Portable Buildings
Public Sales
Sporting Goods
Tickets
Trailers
Wanted to Buy or Trade



SWeather King A/C
Condensor 3 ton,
like new, not a heat
pump. $400obo.
904-786-4591



, Tommy Hilfiger
Ladies pants. Med.
Navy, Irg pockets,
casual dress style.
$25. Call 904-808-7120



COLLECTIBLES
GALORE from around
the world 18th-20th,
Furniture, Fine China,
Silver, Crystal. Appt
only 904-410-0918

WANTED TO BUY- War
souvenirs, medals,
patches etc., Old USMC
uniforms 477-6412



D DELL INSPIRON
1010 Mini laptop
w/extended USB
B rand new $385.
Ki~m 9OA-m01-9n8


F Beautiful
m piece |
SCherry
"Bedroom Set'
$300
S904-644-0498


BED A BARGAIN
QUEEN SETS $105
SKINGS $155 365-0957

4 Bed extender for
2002 Ford Ranger
Edge pickup never
used $100.
912-576-3130
Hand crafted eight
seater poker table
$400. Evening
SHouse # 912-882-3257
KING SIZE PILLOW TOP
MATTRESS SET $200
New 904-644-0498 $200
Queen EuroTop Mattress
Set Still in Plastic $130
(904) 644-0498
4 Solid wood headbrd,
footbrd, rails, Sealy
posture pedic mat-
tress, dresser, mir-
ror, six drawers, twin
set. $550obo. 904-491-7996
4 Vintage Love seat
pink, blue fabric
$250. Hall tree dark
wd $250. Child's
small love seat $90.
269-5883



BALDWIN- Multi Family
Christmas decor, piano
music, books, dog stuff,
ed & crafts materials,
hsehold, new/gift items,
675 2nd St. Fri/Sat. 9a-4p
t MANDARIN
Fri/Sat, 8-5pm.
F urn, tools,
collect's. San Jose,
South to Marbon follow
signs to 12166 Blackfoot
Ct. 268-2482
WESTSIDE Garage Sale
Sat. only Dec. 5th, 8a-2p
4666 Birkenhead Rd.
Westside- Rummage Sale
& Festival Sat. 8a-8p &
Sun. lp-5p CIths, furn,
HH items, toys & more!
HUGE Sale! Games,
crafts, food & fun.
Sacred Heart Parish
Hall, 5752 Blanding Blvd
BARGAIN HUNTERS
GALORE
This Sat & Sun Have
Your Garage Sale at
The Market Place!


Furniture/
MefChdfldiSe I Household


20 out of a 100


The military community makes up 20 percent of the total
population for Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia.
That means that 20 out of every 100 people you meet are
somehow connected with the military.

Get your message to them by advertising in one or all of
the publications distributed at the local bases in the area.


For advertising information,
call 904-359-4336,
Fax 904-366-6230.


-MJ xjurNss Mirror -Periscope


Navy

Classified

Ads



THE FLEET

MARKET

ADVERTISING
RULES

Please fill out
this form in
black or blue ink.


DEADLINES


JAX AIR

NEWS



Noon

Monday


Rank/Grade:
Name (please print):


JOHN DEER SELF
Propelled 21" Lawn
Mower. 5hp motor.
912-729-5802



SGenuine Turquoise

earrings, bracelet.
European style. $199obo.
904-808-7120



4 Craftsman Tool Box
4drwr, 12Wx15Hx26L
bottom 5 drwr,
18Wx29Hx26L has
15" folding work bench
$100. 781-1532



Electric Bottled
Water Cooler,
Deluxe Free- Stand-
ing, Floor Model,
white color, accepts all
sizes bottled water used
very little, like new
Owners Manual $299
obo. 904-808-7120,
803-9942
A Men's black Ithr
Cowboy boots.
Never worn. $50.
912-576-3130



GUN SHOW Clay County
Fairgrounds Dec 5, Sat
9-5, Dec 6, Sun 9-4 Con
ceased Weapons Classes
Daily. Bring your GUNS
to sell or trade
GunTraderGunShows.com



Gators, Daytona 500,
Orlando Magic
www.sstickets.com
904-725-5045



Adopt a Pet
Pets & Supplies
Livestock & Supplies
Animals Wanted



CHIHUAHUA PUPS CKC
reg. 9wks, F, $325.
904-221-3730; or 610-5897
English Bulldog Pups AKC
Champion lines, all colors
avi now. $1350 904-607-4488
FREE adorable grey kit-
ten, 8 weeks old, female
Call 904-683-7229

*T.8 Billion
Is the economic
impact of the mili-
tary in Northeast
Florida and
Southeast Georgia.
Advertise in
the military
publications
distributed at
the local bases
in the area.
To advertise
Please call
904-359-4336,
Fax 904-366 6230.

, FREE GOLD FISH
Diff. sizes, bring
own container.
269-5883 for appt.

German Shepherd Pups
AKC $650. 904-677-9190
Italian Greyhound Pups 2/MA
1/F wonderful puppies
Ready to go. 904-248-9081
Mini Dachshunds blue/fawn
dpl $300 HC AKC
(pet only)10wks 707-2219
Min Pins Pom Shih-tzu
Maltese Yorkie Chi
Delivery to Jax 904-349-5814
SHIHTZU CKC- Female
8wksold, S&W, cute &
playful $375. 904-778-0356



Quarter/Paint Horses,
start at $800. Hay and
Tra n ing, lessons
904-266-4339 237-3694



WE ARE LOOKING FOR
a CHOW CHOW PUPPY
to love 8wks to 12months
only. Call 386-446-5287


Work Phone #


1. Free advertising in the Fleet Market is restricted to active duty and retired military
personnel (or their dependents) and civilian employees assigned to Naval Air
Station, Jacksonville.
2. Advertising in the Fleet Market is a free service provided by the publisher to help
qualified personnel dispose of unwanted personal articles. Service ads such as
sharing rides to work or on leave, announcing lost and found Items, and garage
sales will be accepted. ADS PERTAINING TO GUN SALES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
ANIMAL OR PET ADS WILL ONLY BE ACCEPTED IF THE ANIMALS ARE OFFERED
FREE. CHILD CARE PROVIDERS CANNOT DISCRIMINATE. REAL ESTATE ADS WILL
BE LIMITED TO ANNOUNCEMENT OF HOMES FOR SALE OR RENT BY QUALIFIED
INDIVIDUALS WITH PERMANENT CHANGE OF STATION (PCS) OR "OFFICIALLY
REASSIGNED" ORDERS. REAL ESTATE ADS MUST CONTAIN ONE OF THOSE STATE-
MENTS IN THE BODY OF THE AD OTHERWISE THEY WILL BE BILLED.
3. All information requested must be included and readable. All ads should be written
independent of other information contained on this form.
4. Ads received after the above time will run in the following week's issue.
5. Completed forms should be delivered or mailed to the Fleet Market, Jax Air News, Bldg.
1, Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Jacksonville, FL 32212, or to Jax Air News, One
Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202


Tfdl~~fdtOD ombUCKeD


I V U U 3 1/L- U0
1OnIy 60k mi's
exceptional condi-
tion, all power options
incldg sunroof, leather,
XM radio, 3rd row
$12,500. 904 566-4666

CADILLAC SEDAN 1994
Tuxedo black with gold
package, very sharp,
garaged kept beauty,
$2900. Call 262-6456


4 LEXUS GS430 '02-
very good cond. all
pwr options incldg
sunroof, navigation,
Ithr, chrome, 22's,
$12,500. 904-566-4666


Chevy Malibu Classic
Gold, 2004, Automatic_.W ne
Good condition, runs
great. Power windows,
doors, & locks. Tilt CASH FORJUNK CARS
wheel. 77,643 miles. Free Pickup 237-1657
$5000 or Best Offer
CALL 904-207-0900 T ve e
____________| To advertise |


Aviation
Boats
Sailboats
Boat Dockage & Rentals
Marine Equipment
& Supplies
RV Rentals
RV's & Suppliers
Motorcycles & Mini Bikes
Auto Brokers
Auto Parts
Antiques/Classics
Automobiles
Trucks/Trailers/SUVs
Vans/Buses
$2000 or Less
Commercial Vehicles
Misc. Auto
Autos/Trucks Wanted
Auto Rent/Lease




4LHARLEY for
Christmas, 2003
V-Rod, mint cond.,
only 3000mi's,
accessories incl. alarm
and cover. Asking $10K.
904-264-1001/904-349-5573




A Under cover bed-
cosilver forblack,04 askin08
$26,000Ford 150 5.5' bed,
$350obo. 904-642-0881





4,1971 CORVETTE
COUPE Numbers
t1IM watching Show
Winner 4spd, A/C,
PB/PS TiltTele alarm,
silver, black, asking
$26 000obo. 904-571 -6008


650,620






Hours




Besides protecting our country, military


personnel stationed in our communities


donated 650,620 hours of volunteer


service in Northeast Florida and


Southeast Georgia last year. Their time


was given to community organizations,


church groups, youth activities, scouting


and more.



Thank you!





j JrAiNews


TH1NS MAYPORT. FLORIDIA




THUPeriscope


Organization:
_- Signature:


B


Date Submitted:


6. Ads appearing to be in the promotion of a business or which do not meet the above
requirements will be billed. The publisher reserves the right to omit any or all ads.
7. Additional readership in other publications can be arranged for a nominal fee by calling
366-6300 or 1-800-258-4637 (toll free), or enclosing your phone number.
8. Faxed ads will be accepted at 904-359-4180, however, they must be completed on an
original form.
Select the number of weeks ad is to run: 1 1 wk U 2 wks Q 3 wks U 4 wks
To renew your ad after the allotted time, you must re-submit your ad to Jax Air News.
NOTE: (1) This form must be clipped (not torn) along the outside border. (2) No more than
one word (or abbreviation for one word) per block. (3) Only two free ads per family, per
week. (4) Select the category for the ad by referring to the Classified Index.

Category:


One Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville FL 32202


N HE PRIVACY OF YOUR HOME


ACCREDITED


ENROLL TODAY


9 9 9 4. iI


FREE e FREE o FREE o FREE e FREE o FREE e FREE e FREE e FREE e FREE e FREE e


15% DISCOUNT FOR ACTIVE MILITARY ON PARTS J

WHEN YOU HAVE $100 ORMORE IN REPAIRS I


11 Automobi


automobiles

--, -J I


IFNINK 9 IFRINS 9 FREE 9 FREE


4A N 1= 4A N


I


mM































ISUZU 2004- 14' Box
Truck, NPR 4cyl,
A turbo, diesel, 51k
ai's, good cond,
Robert 912-673 7995
0 LANDROVER
RANGE ROVER
'07 Sport Super-
charged $44,980 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
STOYOTA TACOMA
'07, SR-5, Pre-Run-
*F Ithr, bedliner, run-
ning boards, below 0 m7ar-
ket $20,999 904-731-8533
ia" ra;F,Y


ppp"W

.0000







24 lAx AIR NEWS. NAS JACKSONVILLE. I .1I 1,, December 3. 2009


**N1 Chrwyser .Je p Dod e ealer

FroiwnAtManmta wt Southa FmoridaN!w_

* Five Star Customer Service Largest Selection
* Knowledgeable Sales Staff Guaranteed money for your trade
W World Class Serwice Facuilaty Loiwest interest Rates

COME OUT AND SEE FOR YOURSELF WHAT WE'VE ALREADY RESEARCHED FOR YOU...


To list your dealership,

please call

904-359-4193


Before you buy, shop these dealerships first!


TOM BUSH BMW
JACKSONVILLE
9850 Atlantic Blvd.
725-0911

TOM BUSH BMW
ORANGE PARK
6914 Blanding Blvd
777-2500



GARBER BUICK
Green Cove Sprngs
264.4502
www.garberautomall.com

KEY BUICK
4660 Southside Blvd. 642-6060

JACK WILSON BUICK
2250 US1 South
797-4577


CADILLAC-SAAB OF
ORANGE PARK
7999 Blanding Blvd. 778-7700
www.cadillacoforangepark.com

CLAUDE NOLAN CADILLAC
4700 Southside Blvd. 642-5111
www.claudenolan.com



NIMNICHT CHEVY
1550 Cassat Ave.
425-6312
www.nimnichtchevy.com
GARBER CHEVY
Green Cove Springs 264-4502
www.garberautomall.com


GORDON CHEV
1166 Banding Blvd. 272-2200

JACK WILSON CHEVROLET
2255 US1 South 797-4567

JERRY HAMM CHEV
3494 Philips Hwy. 398-3036





ATLANTIC CHRYSLER
www.atlanliceep.com
2330 US1 South 354-4421


GARBER CHRYSLER
Green Cove Springs 264-2416
www.garberautomall.com

JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS. 493-0000

RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Fem Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com





ATLANTIC DODGE
www.atlanticjeep.com
2330 US1 South 354-4421

JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS. 493-0000

GARBER DODGE TRUCK
Green Cove Spdngs 264-2416
www.garberautomall.com


ORANGE PARK DODGE
7233 Blanding Blvd. 777-5500

RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com





PAUL CLARKFORDERCURY
1-95 N. Exit 129 (Yulee)
225-3673

GARBER FORD-MERCURY
Green Cove Springs 264-4502
www.garberautomall.com

MIKE SHAD FORD
At The Avenues
10720 Philips Hwy.
904-292-3325

MIKE DAVIDSON FORD
AT REGENCY
9650 Atlantic Blvd. 725-3050

MIKE SHAD FORD
OF ORANGE PARK
7700 Blanding Blvd. 777-3673


NIMNICHT PONTIAC-GMC
11503 Phillips Hwy 854-4826


.GARBER GMC TRUCKS
Green Cove Springs
264-4502
www.garberautomall.com


JACK WILSON PONTIAC
BUICK GMC
2250 US1 South
797-4577

I0 ] V '7, P

DUVAL HONDA
1325 Cassat Ave. 899-1900

LOU SOBH HONDA
OF THE AVENUES
11333 Phillips Hwy. 370-1300




KEY HYUNDAI
4660 Southside Blvd. 642-6050




ATLANTIC INFINITE
10980 Atlantic Blvd. 642-0200




ATLANTIC JEEP
www.atlantcjeep.com
2330 US 1 South 354-4421

GARBER JEEP
Green Cove Sprngs 264-2416
www.garberautomall.com

JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS. 493-0000

RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Fem Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com


KIA OF ORANGE PARK
6373 Blanding Blvd.
771-6078


LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
10259 Atlantc Blvd. 721-5000

LEXUS OF ORANGE PARK
7040 Blanding Blvd. 77-5100
www.lexusoforangepark.com



NORTH FLORIDA
UNCOLN MERCURY
4620 Southside Blvd. 642-4100


MIKE SHAD FORD
LINCOLN MERCURY
7700 Blanding Blvd. 77-3673



TOM BUSH MAZDA
9850 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911

MAZDA CITY
6916 Banding Blvd. 779-0600



BRUMOS MOTOR CARS INC.
10231 Atlantic Blvd. 724-1080

MERCEDES BENZ
of ORANGE PARK
7018 Blanding Blvd. 77-5900



TOM BUSH MINI
9875 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911


MIKE SHAD NISSAN OF JAX
1810 Cassat Ave.
389-3621

MIKE SHAD NISSAN OF OP
7447 Blanding Blvd. 269-9400

NISSAN OF ST. AUGUSTINE
755 US 1 South 1-866-New-Nissan
www.nissanofstaugustne.com




GARBER PONTIAC
Green Cove Springs
264-4502
www.garberautomall.com

JACK WILSON PONT1AC
BUICK GMC
2250 US1 South
797-4577

NIMNICHT PONTIAC GMC
11503 Phillips Hwy.
8544826



BRUMOS MOTOR CARS INC.
10100 Atlantic Blvd. 725-9155



KEITH PIERSON TOYOTA
6501 Youngerman Circle.
771-9100
ERNIE PALMER TOYOTA
1310 CassatAve. 389-4561


TOM BUSH VW
9850 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911
O'STEEN VOLKSWAGEN
11401 Philips Hwy. 322-5100


O'STEEN VOLVO
2525 Philips Hwy. 396-5486


GT LEASING
Comnemial Leang Since 1955
2810 St. Augustine Rd.
398-5000
www.gtleasing.com

PROFESSIONAL
AUTO LEASING
10231 Atlantic Blvd. 722-1694





AUTO LINE
A Family owned Business
autolinepreowned.com
2126 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach
904-242-8000

BEACH BLVD. AUTOMOTIVE
www.beachblvdautomotive.com
6833 Beach Blvd. 724-3511

BRUMOS MOTOR CARS
PRE-OWNED AUTO CENTER
10211 Atlantic Blvd. 724-1080

LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
PRE-OWNED CENTER
10384 Atlantic Blvd. 998-0012


TOM BUSH BMW
CERTIRED PREOWNED
9910 Atlantic Blvd. 371-4381

TOM BUSH MINI USED CAR
SUPER CENTER
9875 Atlantic Blvd. 371-4877
WORLD IMPORTS CERTIFIED
PRE-OWNED AUTO CENTER
www.woddimportsusa.com
11650 BEACH BLVD.
998-9992


O'STEEN VW CERTIFIED
PRE-OWNED CENTER
11401 Philips Hwy.
322-5100


742848


TO


LIST


YOUR


DEALERSHIP


PLEASE


CALL


904-359-4193




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