Title: Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/01865
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jax air news
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, Fla.
United States Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date: November 12, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028307
Volume ID: VID01865
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33313438
alephbibnum - 000579555
lccn - sn 95047201
lccn - sn 95047201

Full Text









THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2009




FIu n


Adventure Race
MWR Wilderness Challenge
Page 12

www.jaxairnews.com


I I I


VO. 7 O.449NA JCSOVLEF


Event honors Individual



Augmentees and spouses


By Kaylee LaRocque
NAS Jax Deputy PAO


NAS Jacksonville
and the Northeast
Florida Navy i
League Council host-
ed the fourth bi-annual
Individual Augmentee (IA)
Appreciation Luncheon Nov.
5 at the NAS Jax Officers'
Club. The event, honoring
107 IAs and 62 spouses
from the base and tenant
commands, was kicked off
with a welcome from NAS
Jacksonville Commanding
Officer Capt. Jack Scorby
Jr.
"We hold a lot of events
at NAS Jax throughout the
year and I'm proud of all
of them, but quite frankly,
I put this one at the top of
the list for how we honor
our Sailors for what they do (From le
in the service of our nation Master C
and what their sacrifices Jack Scoi
mean for all of us. We look apprecia
at a nation that seeks its part at
heroes as entertainment the spe
and sports figures, but the not be p
true heroes are in this room every on
today," said Scorby. though,
"We have over 14,000 are the
boots on the ground in the they ar
Central Command area left at h
of responsibility. So, obvi- ments i
ously the Navy is doing its to a yea


FRCSE

named Florida

Manufacturer

of the Year

By Marsha Childs
FRCSE Public Affairs
The Manufacturers Association
of Florida (MNI\F) named
Fleet Readiness Center
Southeast (FRCSE) the 2009 Florida
Manufacturer of the Year large
category at its awards banquet
Nov. 5 in Orlando.
The FRCSE manufacturing teams
at NAS Jacksonville are responsible
for fabricating, repairing, and refur-
bishing components for the F/A-18A-F
Hornet and Super Hornet strike
fighters, SH-60 Seahawk, P-3 Orion,
EA-6B Prowler and other military
aircraft as needed.
FRCSE Commanding Office
Capt. Paul Sohl and Industrial
Manufacturing Director Jim
Anderson accepted the award. Sohl
said, "Our mission is critical to the
Warfighter. If these aircraft don't get
to Afghanistan and Iraq, they don't
protect our sons and daughters who
are serving there right now."
Anderson said the award is reflec-
tive of the highly skilled artisans who
are masters of their respective trades.
He also credits lean process improve-
ment initiatives for delivering excep-
tional value to FRCSE customers.
The FRCSE workforce has readily


Photo by Kaylee LaRocque
ft) Bill Dudley, president of the Florida Navy League, U.S. Fleet Forces Command
:hief FLTCM(SW/AW) Tom Howard and NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt.
rby Jr., right, present MA1(SW) Barion Haywood of the NAS Security Department his
tion plaque Nov. 5 at the Individual Augmentee Luncheon.


the 'pointy end of
ar' and we could
prouder of each and
ne of you. That said
it's the spouses who
unsung heroes, as
e the ones who are
ome during deploy-
from nine months
r holding down the


homefront," he continued.
"This is our fourth IA
Appreciation Luncheon and
so far we've honored 357
IAs and 130 spouses. The
idea to hold this event was
born about two years ago
when Bill Dudley, former-
president of the Northeast
Florida Navy League came


to me and asked what they
could to do support our
Sailors. This event is now
being held nationwide, so
thank-you Navy League
members," said Scorby.
ET2(SW) Joshua
McLellan of the Southeast

See IA, Page 10


Photos by Vic Pitts
(From left) FRCSE manufacturing team members Terry Cox, Jim Anderson, Jamie
Childers, Tony Davis, David Ulrich, Norman Day, Ricky Doucette and FRCSE
Commanding Officer Capt. Paul Sohl receive the 2009 Florida Manufacturer of the
Year award Nov. 5 in Orlando.


accepted the challenge of establishing
capability to extend the service life of
these assets. "Our aircraft are being
flown in a way that they were never
intended, beyond their life expec-
tancy and we are manufacturing a
wide range of components that were
never expected to be replaced," Sohl
explained.
During his September site visit,
MAF lead judge Phil Centonze was
very impressed with the facility's

See FRCSE, Page 10
FRCSE Toolmaker Scott McKee uses
a Hydrotel 5-axis Machining Center
at NAS Jacksonville to mill an F/A-18
Hornet wing spar, a part not available in
the Navy's supply system.


Photo by Clark Pierce
Guests arrived early at NAS Jacksonville Heritage Park
Nov. 6 to admire the P-2V Neptune recently restored by
the VP-5 "Mad Foxes" in honor of their "LA-9" aircrew
that was lost Jan. 12, 1962 while on patrol from NAS
Keflavik, Iceland.


'Mad Foxes'


remember


12 of their own

By Clark Pierce
Editor

On a cool and windy Nov. 6, NAS Jacksonville
Commanding Officer Capt. Jack Scorby Jr.
welcomed hundreds of Sailors, families, retir-
ees and other distinguished guests to the unveiling
of a special memorial at Heritage Park in honor and
remembrance of VP-5 crew LA-9.
"Just a few months ago, this Neptune was in seri-
ous distress due to age and corrosion. Since we receive
no government funding to maintain our aircraft at
Heritage Park, we rely on our NAS Jax squadrons to
adopt a historic aircraft and keep it in good condition,"
said Scorby. "When I put out the word on our Neptune
- VP-5 stepped up immediately and told me about
their plan to refurbish the aircraft in honor of 12 'Mad
Foxes' who perished in 1962 while flying a patrol
out of NAS Keflavik,
Iceland."
He added that the
young Sailors who
worked tirelessly
Sto restore the P-2's
appearance, did it for
all the right reasons.
"Their efforts reflect
the dedication, service
and sacrifice made by
their fallen shipmates
of lima-alpha-nine, as
well as their families.
'My thanks and con-
gratulations go out to
VP-5 Commanding
Officer Cmdr. Frank
Naylor, and the VP-5
Conditions for the ceremony Naylor, and the VP-
were cool and clear as Reid restoration team led
Pettway (6) stood with his by Lt. Cmdr. Rob
siblings, Annsley (8) and Huntington, for their
Regan (10) during the colors vision and leader-
presentation by the Clay High ship for making today
School NJROTC Color Guard. a reality," concluded
The Navy Band Southeast A Scorby.
Cappella Quartet performed Naylor reminded
the national anthem. the audience, "One of
the truly remarkable
LA-9 Crew Members aspects of naval life is
Cmdr. Norbert Kozak that we honor tradi-
Lt. John Brown, M.D. tions and we honor sac-
Lt. j.g. Anthony Caswick rifices in ways that our
Lt. j.g. Michael Leahy civilian counterparts
Lt. j.g. Badger Smith III many times do not. It
AT2 Robert Anderson
ADR2 Robert Hurst is that special bond,
ATN3 Alan Millette developed from shared
ADR3 Frank Parker experiences of a group
AT3 Norman Russell Jr. of Sailors, that builds a
AO3 Grover Wells foundation for that tra-
AEAN Joseph Renneberg edition. And it's in that
vein that we gather
here today to pay tribute to our fellow Sailors who
made the ultimate sacrifice in our country's name.

See LA-9, Page 8


TOUCHING Navy College Graduation Native American Heritage Luncheon
Friday at 2 p.m. Nov. 16 at 11 a.m. at NAS Jax Galley

BASE NAS Jax All Saints Chapel Call 542-1548 for more information


MCPON Meeting
Fleet and Force Leadership Conference
Page 3


Rugby Camp
All-Navy Team Trains For Big Meet
Pages 6-7


----I






2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009


Looking back to April 18, 1945...


r~- -~


U.S. Navy photo
The Beech Model 18 or "Twin Beech" as it was better known, was powered by Pratt & Whitney R-985 radial engines
and flown by the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps and the U.S. Army Air Force. This Beech SNB-2H Navigator scout
trainer, assigned to Naval Air Station Jacksonville, was one of a small number of SNB-2s converted to serve as an air
ambulance. The Navy retired its last SNB in 1972.



Grateful for flu shot, not the wait


By Sarah Smiley
Special Contributor

I debated about whether or not to
get my children the H1N1 vac-
cination. Then, I remembered
that I'm a hopeless hypochondri-
ac. Luckily, last week, the Bangor
Regional Health and Community
Services opened a free vaccination
clinic to all school-aged children.
I planned to be the first one in line.
I also planned not to tell my children
where they were going until they
were secured in their seat belts and
unable to runaway. That was the
plan.
Instead, I told the boys their fate
before we left the house. Owen, my
6 year old, flung himself onto the
ground and cried in a new, dramatic
way that I had previously only expe-
rienced watching cartoons. Tears
were literally flying from his eyes and
shooting through the air in rapid suc-
cession. They didn't drip down his
cheeks, they bursted forth. It was
instantaneous as soon as I said the
word "shot."
I didn't want it to come to this, but
judging by the response, I knew dras-
tic measures were necessary. "Owen,
children are dying from this flu, and
although the shot will hurt, it will
hurt worse if you get sick," I said.
"This is important for you, and it's
important for the people around you."
All joking aside, I meant what I
said. Through my diligent research on
the subject, I couldn't find one good
reason not to get my children the vac-
cination. I saw numerous examples of
why I should.
We arrived at the civic center about
five minutes before the 8 a.m. sched-
uled opening, which ended up being
about one hour too late because the


line had already snaked around the
building, through the parking lot, and
down Buck Street. It was like a pre-
mature school reunion for the kids.
As we walked to find the back of the
line, the boys saw friends from their
class, other classes, and even other
schools and sports teams. The excite-
ment caused Owen to momentarily
stop shooting tears.
In the beginning, everyone's mood
was curious, giddy and neighborly.
We knew we'd be in line together for
at least an hour, so we settled in to
make friends with those we didn't
already know. It reminded me of
standing in long lines for gas and
water after a hurricane in Florida.
Although the reason bringing us
together was potentially dangerous
and stressful, for a moment, we rev-
eled in the shared excitement, and
perhaps gratitude, of having our
ordinary lives of routine, bill-paying,
chores and meetings thrown com-
pletely out of whack.
The group's mood deteriorated,
however, when the first hour passed
and we were still on the wrong side
of the building and nowhere close to
the shots. After the second hour, Ford
(8), Owen and I moved with the line
inside the building, where at least
it was warm, but where it also was
plainly obvious that one might catch
the flu trapped in such close quarters
with a several hundred other people.
My husband, Dustin, left with
his youngest son, Lindell (3), to get
snacks and drinks. He was gone for a
very long time, and halfway through
the third hour, I discovered a new def-
inition of torture: waiting in line for


three-plus hours with two children,
only to be herded at one mph past a
vending machine without any money.
By this point, Ford and Owen were
begging, "Can we please just get our
shots and go home?"
Dustin and Lindell returned with
a bag full of Wendy's just as Ford,
Owen and I were introduced to our
newest friend: the kind, patient nurse
(even after all those hours, children
and tears!) who would inoculate my
children against the flu. When we sat
Lindell down in the chair, he thought
it was to eat his lunch. "My chicken,
Mommy?" he said brightly, and then,
bam, the needle went into his muscle.
When Ford and Owen saw the
blood come out of Lindell's arm, there
was more throwing-self-on-floor and
shooting-tears-from-eyes maneuvers.
Thankfully, however, the nurses
worked their magic and gave my boys
the shots they needed. (Later Ford
would say, "Those nurses were the
nicest I've ever seen.") Lindell, who
still thought we were there for lunch,
was absolutely stunned, his mouth
hanging to the floor. For almost an
hour afterward, he occasionally mum-
bled, "My chicken, Mommy?"
Happily, the older boys never real-
ized the irony of waiting in line for
three and a half hours, only to be
poked with a large needle, and get-
ting nothing in return except a cheap
sticker.
They thought the sticker was worth
the wait. Of course, as the parent, I
know different. I know they received
much more than a sticker that morn-
ing. They received a fighting chance
against H1N1.


HEY, MONEYCHIC!

Hey, MoneyChic!
After two years of reckless credit card use, my wife and
I are to the point we are barely making our minimum pay-
ments. We pretty much charged anything that we wanted.
Neither one of us stopped the other from making big pur-
chases, in fact we would encourage one another to buy
things we felt like we needed or deserved. Looking back,
nothing was really essential. Now that we both realize
our mistakes with credit, how do we move forward?
MoneyChick says: The positive I see in your situation
is that both you and your spouse are on the same page.
You both spent and now you both realize your mistakes
and feel something must change. Sounds like you are
ready to put your financial house in order.
Start by writing down all of your credit debts, includ-
ing balance owed and interest rates. You should do this
together.
Next, take a look at your monthly bills and living
expenses. Be realistic about what you are spending on
your food, dining out and entertainment. After account-
ing for all of your monthly expenses what is left to apply
towards your credit debt? Make sure every card receives
a minimum payment and apply any extra funds towards
one credit card bill. It's important to select the bill togeth-
er and focus on knocking out this targeted bill.
You might want to start with your smallest card balance
first or perhaps the card charging you the highest inter-
est rate. As Suze Orman says, Every time you pay off a
card with a 15 percent interest rate, you get a 15 percent
return on your money." Money is often the root of many
problems in a marriage. Make your relationship stronger
by working on getting out of debt as a team. Remember,
credit debt doesn't build up overnight and it takes even
longer to undue bad credit decisions, but it can be done. I
know you can do this, good luck!


FROM THE HOMEFRONT


Chapel Center Calendar
Regular Sunday Services
8:15 a.m. Holy Eucharist Episcopal
9:30 a.m. Catholic Mass
9:45 Protestant Sunday School
10:45 a.m. Catholic CCD
11 a.m. Protestant Worship
"It's All About Me!" for couples
Nov. 14 at 11 a.m. Explore your personality and understand
why others act the way they do. Call 542-3052.
PREP (Prevention Relationship Enhancement Program)
course for couples
Nov. 17 & 18
COMPASS NAS Jax needs five more spouses to participate.
Contact compassjacksonville@nsfamilyline.org
Barracks Bible Study
Join Chaplain Calhoun every Wednesday at 6 p.m.
in the main conference room.
Adopt-A-Sailor
Local organizations wishing to express their gratitude
for the service of single Sailors during the Thanksgiving
and Christmas holidays may call 542-3440.
Weekly Bible Study
Building 749, every Tuesday at 9:30 a.m.
Bring non-perishable donations
Chapel Food Locker at Building 749 in the Chapel Center.
Women of Faith
First Saturday of the month at 10:30 a.m. for fellowship,
study and support. Bring a potluck dish to share.
Officer Christian Fellowship and Bible study
Every Tuesday at 6 p.m. Contact Chaplain Williams
at 542-0024.
Tae Kwon Do with Chaplain Felder
Every Monday and Wednesday at 4:30 p.m.
Monthly men's prayer breakfast
Every second Saturday at 9 a.m. at the chapel.
Help wanted
Volunteer as a lay communion assistant, acolyte, prayer
petitioner and multimedia operator.

NAS Jacksonville Chapel Center
542-3051
Corner of Birmingham Avenue and Mustin Road


The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the
Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@comcast.net.
The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or
comments can be directed to the editor.The laxAIRMEWs can be reached at (904)
542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, email JaxAirNews@comcast.net or write the
axAIR HEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000.
The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The FloridaTimes-Union, a private firm in
no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement
with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every
Thursday by The FloridaTimes-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave.,
Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by
The FloridaTimes-Union.
Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding
advertisements should be directed to:


Ellen S. Rykert, Military Publications Manager
1 Riverside Avenue Jacksonville, FL 32202
904-359-4168
Tom Castle, Advertising Sales Manager 904-359-4336


ABH3(AW) DOMMAR Ruiz

Job title/command:
Aircraft Director


Hometown: West Palm
Beach, Fla.


Favorite duty station/
Why? This duty station,
so far, because it's in Florida.

Last book read: The Perfect Golf Swing

Favorite pastime: Making music on my
Mac computer.

Most interesting experience: Visiting
Thailand.

Who is your hero? My hero is my
mother because she overcame her struggles
and raised me to be an honest and strong
man.




MICHAEL EUBANKS

Job title/command:
GS-1 l/Engineering Tech
S. NAVFAC

3 IHometown: Columbus,
Miss.

Favorite duty station?
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Last book read: Battleground of Mind, by
Joyce Meyers

Favorite pastime: Tennis.

Most Interesting Experience: The birth
of my daughter.

Who is your hero? My wife.


Course provides couples and

families relationship cues

From NAS lax Chapel Center

The NAS Jax Chapel Center offers the "All About
Me" class Nov. 14 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Presented
by the Leadership Growth Institute, participants
learn about different personalities ".
and gain insight into personal value,,
purpose and worth as they relate to
others.
Understand why people they act
the way they do, why they might
annoy you, how to get along with oth-
ers, and how to improve yourself.
A complimentary lunch will be
provided. For more information, call
234-0061.




^jhiGKAir News

NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer.............. Capt. Jack Scorby Jr.
NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer ............................ Capt. Jeffrey Maclay
Command Master Chief....... ............. CMDCM(SW/SS) Jeff Hudson
Public Affairs Officer ....................................................... Miriam S. Gallet
Assistant Public Affairs Officer...................... ..............Kaylee LaRocque
Naval Air Station lacksonville Editorial Staff
Editor ......................................................................................C lark Pierce
Design/Layout.................................... .......... ................. George Atchley
Staff W riter.....................................................AM 3(AW ) Nicole Bieneman
The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military
Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official
views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of
Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising
in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute
endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-
Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in
the publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage
without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital
status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor
of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal
opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse
to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected.


.L







JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009 3


MCPON West calls fleet and



force leadership conference


By Clark Pierce
Editor


More than 50 of the Navy's
most senior enlisted lead-
ers from around the world
gathered at NAS Jacksonville Nov.
1-6 to participate in the inaugural
Master Chief Petty Officer of the
Navy (MCPON) Fleet and Force
Conference.
"This is my first major confer-
ence for fleet, force and region
master chiefs. Like me, they each
work for an admiral, and we're
here to reshape the mess by rais-
ing the level of conversation among
our leadership," said MCPON(SS/
SW) Rick West. "We set an
aggressive agenda that focuses
on a range of deckplate and fam-
ily issues. Our expert speakers
range from flag ranks includ-
ing Chief of Naval Operations
Adm. Gary Roughead and Chief of
Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Mark
Ferguson to master chiefs and
civilian subject matter specialists."
After welcoming remarks
by Commander, Navy Region
Southeast Rear Adm. Tim
Alexander, West and his master
chiefs rolled up their sleeves to
increase their knowledge on topics
such as:
Warfare qualifications "We
want it mandatory for young
Sailors. When you see a Sailor
with a warfare device on his or her
chest, you know that Sailor has
met the requirements to combat or
save that ship, their shipmates or
themselves," said West.
Safe Harbor/Wounded
Warrior/Combat Casualty Care
Suicide Prevention
Personal Financial
Management
NWU "Thanks for your
deckplate leadership in getting our
Navy Working Uniform worn cor-
rectly in the fleet. Thanks to Navy
Exchange and the uniform board,
we're rolling out ahead of schedule
in every region," said West.
Family Readiness and


'pIN


Photo by MC2 Gary Granger
MCPON(SS/SW) Rick West introduces Commander, Navy Region
Southeast, Rear Adm. Tim Alexander, who welcomed 53 master chiefs from
around the world Nov. 3 to the fleet and force leadership conference at
NAS Jacksonville.


Photo by MCI Monica Nelson
Force Master Chief (FORCM)(SCW) Mike Holdcraft of Seabees, Naval
Facilities Engineering Command, Washington, DC, networks with
FORCM(FMF) Ronney Wright of Navy Reserve Force, Norfolk, Va., and
FORCM(EOD/EXW/SW/AW) Farris Foresman of Navy Expeditionary
Combat Command, Norfolk, Va., while attending the MCPON Fleet and
Force Conference at NAS Jacksonville Nov. 4. The five-day conference
included visits by the Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Gary Roughead and
Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Mark Ferguson and focused on deck-
plate concerns.


Deployment Support
Sexual Assault


* Ombudsman Support
* Physical Readiness


Photos by Clark Pierce
MCPON(SS/SW) Rick West welcomes his boss, Chief of Naval Operations
Adm. Gary Roughead, to a dinner event Nov. 4 that was part of the
MCPON Fleet and Force Conference at NAS Jacksonville.


At his fleet and force conference Nov.4 at NAS Jacksonville, MCPON(SS/
SW) Rick West congratulates Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery
FORCM(FMF) Laura Martinez for receiving the 2009 Pioneer Award at
the recent Women of Color Science, Technology, Engineering and Math
Conference in Dallas, Texas.


UniformGram "This new
communications tool will soon be
issued with rules for apparel and


accessories like backpacks, purses

See MCPON, Page 5


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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009


VP-16 forms family readiness group

By Lt. j.g. Zach Goldstein
VP 16 Public Affairs Officer W& A


The "War Eagles" of VP-16
hosted their inaugural Family
Readiness Group (FRG) meet-
ing Oct. 6, with more than 20 family
members in attendance. The squadron
held its second FRG meeting Nov. 2 to
get a jump on preparing for the squad-
ron's 2010 summer deployment. The
FRG program is designed to establish
a line of communication and support
for family members while the squad-
ron is home but especially when the
squadron is deployed.
In attendance were spouses, par-
ents and several children of VP-16
Sailors. The group is open to any and
all family members of current VP-16
sailors. The meeting began with
comments from VP-16 Commanding
Officer Cmdr. Anthony Corapi, fol-
lowed by remarks from Command
Master Chief Adrian Andrews. Also
in attendance was the squadron's
ombudsman team of Tiffany Mayer
and Wendy Kondos.
Corapi and Andrews discussed
the importance of family readi-
ness and how the larger "War Eagle
Family" can make a positive impact
on the squadron, whether at home or
deployed.
"We cannot do our jobs effectively
without the love and support of our
families. FRG will directly support
our mission by providing guidance
and a communication link between
the command and our loved ones. I
am very excited to see it finally tak-
ing form," said Corapi.


Photos courtesy of VP 16
Family and friends of VP-16 gather for the inaugural meeting the "War Eagles'"
Family Readiness Group Oct. 6 where they got a jump-start on the squadron's 2010


summer deployment.
Laura Hunter, former VAW-126
ombudsman and spouse of Petty
Officer First Class Michael Hunter,
volunteered to be the FRG communi-
cations liaison.
She stated, "Embracing the criti-
cal need for an outlet that promotes
diversity and fellowship is more than
a plan that addresses our current per-
sonnel and their families. This FRG
leaves a legacy for our future War
Eagle families, long after we have
moved on to new adventures with our
service members' military careers."
The squadron is working to ensure
that parents of single Sailors par-
ticularly 'first cruisers' and par-
ents that physically reside with their
Sailor here in Jacksonville are includ-
ed. Any legal guardians who will be
caring for children of single Sailors
are also encouraged to be a part of the
VP-16 FRG.
The Nov. 2 meeting focused on plan-
ning future activities and establish-


Photo courtesy of VP-10
VP-10 "Red Lancers" construct Orion Town facilities in Qatar.


VP-10 helps construct new


- ] P-3 maintenance facility


By Lt. j.g. Sean Kearney
VP-10 PAO


VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr.
Anthony Corapi (gesturing) welcomes
spouses and children to the squadron's
Oct. 6 Family Readiness Group meeting.
ing volunteer positions for interested
participants. While FRG involvement
is encouraged, it is entirely option-
al. If you would like to be added to
the FRG distribution list and phone
tree, please contact Laura Hunter at
VP 16FRG@gmail.com.
For other information, visit the
VP-16 website at www.vpl6.navy.mil/
FRG.


'Pro's Nest' Sailors bring sweets to community


From VP-30 Public Affairs
D ozens of VP-30 sail-
ors volunteered
their time Oct. 28
and 30 to visit children at
The Oaks at Durkeeville
Early Learning Center,
senior citizens at the
Mary L. Singleton Senior
Center and members
of the Association of
Retarded Citizens (ARC) of
Jacksonville.
The Oaks at Durkeeville
Early Learning Center is a
five-star, nationally accred-
ited pre-school program
run by the Jacksonville
Public Housing Authority.
It serves approximately 90
children between the ages
of 1 and 5 who live in low-
income housing.
The Mary J. Singleton
center is one of 19 senior
centers in Jacksonville that
arranges social and edu-
cational activities, meals,
continuing education oppor-
tunities, and other services
for people over the age of
60. It provides approxi-
mately 180 meals per day
and hosts over 200 visiting
seniors in various groups,
including retired veterans.
The ARC of Jacksonville
helps more than 400 indi-
viduals with intellectual
and developmental disabili-
ties unlock their potential
to take on valued roles in
the community. Their ser-
vices help enhance the
quality of life of the indi-
viduals they serve while
offering real options within
their control.
While visiting these
facilities, the VP-30






march of dimes'
marchofdimes.com/vfw
a FC particparticipnt Provided as a public service


Photos by VP 30 Public Affairs
(From left) AWOAN Ruby Lopez, AZ3 Justin Patt (Spider
Man), AZAN Ebbie Rugers, AWOAN Lauren Isley, AWOAN
Amber Liberty, AWOAN Corey Goldsboro, AZ2 Joshua
Williams, AWO2 Neil Young, ADAR Catherine Cameron,
AD3 Lauren Hildreth, Florida State Representative Audrey
Gibson, Lt. j.g. Ryan Field, ADCS Jeff Waters, AZ2 Emily
Delaguila, ATAA Daniel Marion, and HM2 Arlene Cruz
brought Halloween treats to The Oaks at Durkeeville Early
Learning Center.

PP(From left).AZ3 Justin Patt,


The Air Force Reserve Continue to build close
is offering part-time friendships, serve your country
opportunities with excellent and participate in experiences
benefits, including choice unique to the military.
of home base, education
assistance, secure employment Accomplish extraordinary things
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you will not be transferred. 63
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retain your rank and do not need
to repeat basic training. Specific
jobs come with signing bonuses.


Sailors handed out bags
of candy, read books, and
spoke to the children
about Halloween safety.
They also had the oppor-
tunity to speak about the
Navy and share sea-sto-
ries with retired veterans.
These Sailors' commitment
to serve their community
through voluntary outreach
activities helps display the
Navy's core values of honor,
courage and commitment.


Maintaining high standards of readiness and mis-
sion performance is just another typical day on
deployment for the "Red Lancers." But in the
final week of October, the VP-10 team was asked to add
to their maintenance and aircrew duties to help con-
struct a new P-3 maintenance facility in Qatar.
Orion Town, affectionately named "Glick's Gulch" by the
Red Lancers, will house squadron maintenance and flight
operations departments. The facility, which will consist
mostly of tents, is being pieced together by Sailors during
off duty hours. Squadron members handle the majority of
facility construction themselves, with building crews con-
sisting of off-duty aircrew members and detachments from
the maintenance department. The Red Lancers are on
schedule to complete the project during their remaining
month in theater in order to facilitate a smooth transition
with their relief squadron, VP-1, who will be the first to
use the new facilities.
Also during the week, the squadron held the Navy's bi-
annual physical fitness assessment. This extra scheduled
event was met with great determination and effort by the
Sailors of VP-10. The squadron performed admirably on
this task, with nearly 100 percent of Sailors succeeding.
Events of the PFA had to be scheduled to avoid the day's
heat, which can climb to over 100 degrees, making daily
schedules and duties even more difficult.
Ralph Waldo Emerson, the famous American poet,
once said "We are never tired, so long as we can see far
enough." As the end of deployment draws near, the
squadron has begun to see the figurative "light at the end
of the tunnel," with the goal of finishing deployment well
and returning to loved ones and family in mind. The Red
Lancers will never tire as they continue to rise to every
challenge and maintain their superior mission perfor-
mance.


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JAX AIR NEWS, NASJACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009 5


Great Americans 'get by'


By Beth Wilson
Special Contributor


This week we celebrate Veterans
Day. Perhaps it is the elongation of
our current conflicts or perhaps I'm
just missing my World War II vet father -
but, regardless, I want to share with you
resources I've discovered that impact how I
will honor our veterans this year.
There is a proverb that says 'Give honor to
whom honor is due." I think you will agree
with me that our nation's vets, whether
WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Bosnia, Gulf War,
Iraq or Afghanistan, deserves acknowledg-
ment and honor.
I invite you to visit a Website dedicated to
showcasing and honoring our defenders and
first responders. Go to www.greatameri-
cans.com and view the videos of not only
today's defenders of freedom, but also inspir-
ing stories of heroes from WWII through
Vietnam. I'd like to recommend that you
search for your favorite branch and check
out the videos of Medal of Honor recipients.
Each generation has its heroes and WWII
vets are so dear to my heart. I want to intro-
duce you to a documentary about three
members of "The Greatest Generation." The
Way We Get By (www.thewaywegetbymovie.
com) is a recently released documentary of
three senior citizens, troop greeters, who
gather daily at a small airport in Maine to
thank returning or deploying American sol-
diers.
This is far more than a movie about troop
greeters; it is a compassionate look at aging,
loneliness, war, mortality and giving back.
Joan is a grandmother of eight, one of whom
is serving in Iraq. Jerry faces mounting
health and financial challenges, but is hero-


SPOUSE'S PERSPECTIVE

ic in his ability to keep his spirits up in the
face of such challenges. Bill struggles taking
care of himself and freshly contemplates his
mortality. You will not be the same after
viewing this movie.
The cast and producers of The Way We
Get By will be my guests for our Veterans
Day broadcast, 10 a.m. (PST) Nov. 10 on
Navy Homefront Talk (my Internet talk
show for military spouses). Join us live or
listen to the podcast at www.blogtalkradio.
com/nht.
My final recommendation is Brothers
at War (www.brothersatwarmovie.com); a
movie for and about us today's warfight-
ers and families. Director Jake Rademacher
hails from the heartland. His two broth-
ers are soldiers serving in Iraq one an
officer, the other enlisted. The documen-
tary opens with Jake's motivation for the
movie, "My two brothers are putting their
lives on the line. I need to know why..."
This movie follows not only the experience
of those serving, but also the families they
left behind. After watching this movie, my
husband said, "This is my story, this is our
story." Brothers at War will soon be released
on DVD. Check the website for release dates
and to pre-order your copy. You will be glad
you did.
As military families, we are intimately
acquainted with the price of freedom. As we
approach and celebrate Veterans Day I want
to thank each of you for your service, for
your sacrifice. Thank you.
Contact Beth with questions or comments
at beth@homefrontinfocus.com.


GUIDE TO MILITARY TRAVEL

Your Walt Disney World adventure awaits


By Erica Pefia-Vest and Ryan Vest

ll you have to do is say the name
"Disney" and automatically your
mind turns to fantasy and fun.
For those of us stationed in Jacksonville/
Kings Bay, we are less than three hours
away from the world's most popular vaca-
tion destination and with their 'Salute to
the Armed Services' promotion (visit ITT
for more details), it is a destination that's
tough to pass up.
Twenty miles southwest of Orlando,
you'll find a magical, enchanting place
that stretches more than 47 square miles
of Florida land. It is made up of four
theme parks, two water parks, a "down-
town" area, six golf courses, two spas,
a wedding pavilion, a sports complex,
31 resort hotels, and a whole lot of pixie
dust. We know it as the Walt Disney
World Resort.
To most people who have never been
there, the word Disney conjures up images
of Mickey Mouse and the Magic Kingdom,
but Disney has much more to offer. The
wide variety of theme parks, water parks,
resorts, shopping and recreation pro-
vide endless opportunities to tailor your
vacation to the desires of your family,
and guarantee that no two trips to Walt
Disney World will ever be the same.
With so much to choose from, it is
somewhat overwhelming trying to plan
a vacation to Walt Disney World. Even
with a travel guide, the vast number of
resorts and parks leaves even the most


seasoned of Disney vacationers discom-
bobulated. However, I am ready to assist
you when planning your trip.
There are four theme parks and two
water parks in Walt Disney World.
The most popular of these parks is the
Magic Kingdom, a near perfect copy of
Disneyland in California. Inside the
gates of the Magic Kingdom, you will
find the heart and essence of Walt
Disney World. Thunder Mountain and
Space Mountain will thrill the roller
coaster fan in the family while rides like
the Pirates of the Caribbean and The
Haunted Mansion will spark the imagi-
nation of adults and children alike. The
Magic Kingdom offers entertainment for
everyone in the family in one truly magi-
cal location.
At Epcot, you can take a stroll around
the lake visiting Canada, the United
Kingdom, France, Japan, the United
States, Italy, Morocco, Germany, Norway,
China, and Mexico. Each land offers
authentic cuisine and shopping, along
with exhibits to learn about the land and
culture of each country. The seasoned
traveler won't want to miss "Maelstrom,"
a boat ride through troll country located
in the Norway pavilion. One of the best
attractions in the World Showcase is the
restaurants. Italy, China, France and
Mexico all offer first-rate restaurants
and you don't want to miss the pastries
in the Norway pavilion!


See TRAVEL, Page 10


MCPON: 'Candor is valued and each point of view carries equal weight'


From Page 3


and earphones. Ball caps may not
be worn with NWU because they
just don't look good. As for cover-
alls, I want to get them back on
ships and in hangars," said West.
He continued, "Our success will
be gauged through deckplate lead-
ership, with a significant focus on
junior enlisted development. One
key will be the level of conversa-
tion between all our leaders. In the


U.S. Navy, every chief in the mess
has a voice and I view this confer-
ence much the same way. Like a
chiefs mess, candor is valued and
each point of view carries equal
weight."
West stressed, "Communica-
tions is key but you have to
choose the right media. I'm fond
of saying that I'm not a 'big meet-
ing' guy because today's technol-
ogy allows us to push information
out via so many different chan-


nels. When I send something out
to the fleet, my expectation is that
it hits the deckplate and gets down
to our junior Sailors. On the other
hand, there may also be commu-
nications where I ask you to 'hold
this close' so it's received only by a
select audience.
As many of you know, I also
have a Facebook page where
Sailors can directly communicate
with me. But I also get questions
from high school students consid-


ering a career in the Navy and
that's something we can all engage
on."
When West asked attendees
how they liked the Navy tri-base
area in Northeast Florida and
Southeast Georgia, he received a
hearty "hoo-yah!"
"I'm somewhat amazed that
we have a few folks who have not
been here before but that's good,
because you get to meet some fine
people and see how things are laid


out here. You'll see why people sta-
tioned at Jacksonville, Mayport
and Kings Bay enjoy their mili-
tary lifestyle so much in fact,
it's hard to get them out of here.
Special thanks go to Jeff Hudson,
NAS Jacksonville command mas-
ter chief, and Joe Curtain, Navy
Region Southeast command mas-
ter chief, for pulling this confer-
ence together so successfully," said
West.


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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009


All-Navy Rugby Team Head Coach ET1 (SW/AW/DV) Rod Hanks ensures his players are in the correct positions in the scrum.


* *: "*. ..


All-Navy Rugby hold


training camp at NAS Jax

By Kaylee LaRocque
NAS Jax Deputy PAO

rT7he All-Navy Rugby Team held its annual training camp at NAS Jacksonville Oct.
30 through Nov. 8 for the third consecutive year. The camp brings rugby play-
ers here from all parts of the world to practice their skills and teamwork before
heading the Armed Forces Rugby Championships, which take place this week at Fort
Benning, Ga.
"We are really excited to be here and to be able to have a place to call home after mov-
ing around for so many years. The accommodations and the service we get at NAS Jax
are great," said All-Navy Rugby Team Head Coach ET1(SW/AW/DV) Rod Hanks.
"We spend the week here working on drills, practicing our skills and learning to play as
a team. Then we drive up to Georgia to play our armed services counterparts throughout
the week. On Friday, we'll either play in the championship game or consolation game.
Then we have some team
,7 activities planned before
.... we head home," continued
Hanks.
S, Having the team prac-
tice on the base, allows
spectators to view a sport
that is not something they
would normally see. While
rugby has been around the
military for a number of
years, it is mostly played in
.Europe.
"It's a fun training camp.
S ... .Three years ago, I put our
name in to host the team
Head Coach Rod Hanks checks for alignment during one of and the ye to become t
t te and they've been coming
the drills of pushing a van across the field. an her vein e comn
here ever since. It's become
a continued tradition to host them here," said NAS Jax Athletic Director Tim McKinney.
"We provide them with all the logistics including housing, transportation and supplies.
Everything is reimbursed by Commander, Navy Installations Command Navy Sports, so
it really doesn't cost us anything. It's great to be able to host them here."
NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Jack Scorby Jr. visited the team to welcome them
to the base early in the week. "I've always enjoyed watching rugby. We pride ourselves on
hosting people well here so if there is anything you need let us know. Anything we can do
to make this better for you all. I know you have training all week. I wish you all the best,
congratulations on coming here and making the team," he said.
The team is comprised of Navy personnel from all walks of life including pilots, law-
yers, doctors, Navy SEALS, seamen, all extremely talented players. Many have traveled
the world playing rugby. "Our team looks good this year. We have a lot of younger guys,
so it's kind of a rebuilding year for us, but I think we have a lot of good talent here,"
added Hanks.
For HS-11 pilot Lt. Red Miller, being a member of the team is something he's been try-
ing to do for a while now. "I was training with my squadron the previous years, so I didn't
get the chance to try out for the team. This year, it worked out because our squadron is
not in any kind of workup right now and my skipper was all for it. So I applied, made the
team and here I am. I'm glad to be here. It's a lot of work, but two weeks off to play rugby;
it's a great deal for me," said Miller, enthusiastically.
Miller, who began playing the sport during flight school, is also a member of the local
rugby team, the Jacksonville Ospreys. "It's a fun sport, one heck of a PT workout and I
get to meet people from all walks of life," Miller continued.
During the week, players participated in three training sessions each day. Each morn-
ing began with physical fitness exercises, and then practices consisting of skills training
such as ball handling, lineout maneuvers, lifting techniques, situational moves, penalties
and team concepts.
The team also participated in a rugby scrimmage against the University of Florida
Men's Club in Gainesville, Fla. on Friday to allow the players to compete as an actual
team.
"While coordinating the team's events on base, I contact some of the local rugby teams
to see if they are interested in a scrimmage. It gives our Navy team a chance to compete
and practice the skills they worked on all week," said McKinney.
"Camp went really well. We are definitely excited and are really coming together as a
team. We've had a couple injuries including a broken hand and nose, some pulled muscles
and regular muscle soreness. Most of the injuries tend to come during the championship
because it's such a vigorous regimen of games," explained Hanks.
The sport of rugby or rugby union football began in 1823 when William Webb Ellis
caught a ball and began running while playing a form of football at Rugby School


See RUGBY, Page 7


f


&j.







JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009 7


............. ...........
I., .;.,,:. ..:.,.... ..o-,. .-,.. ,.A. ... -......."''.::" '? i im ~ l


II.Z1.


Members of the All-Navy Rugby Team gather with NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Jack Scorby Jr. (front, center) and NAS Jax Athletic Director Tim McKinney (front left) the first
day of training camp at NAS Jacksonville.


Photos by Kaylee LaRocque amdAM3 Nicole Bieneman


. ..- *^ .* v re.;. i ,* P .* I--,'r; (From left) AGC Mark Miller, Lt. Christopher Pisel. Lt. Steven '
MM1 Michael Fussell tackles Lt. David Owens during the All- Preator and Lt. j.g. Jeffrey Brill work on maneuvers on the IT2 Kendal Moores makes a perfect catch as the All-Navy
Navy Rugby Training Camp at NAS Jax Nov. 2. field. Rugby Team practices their skills.


RUGBY: Players hope to

make it to Rugby World Cup

From Page 6

in England. The game soon evolved into one of the most
popular sports in Europe.
A rugby union team consists of 15 players (eight forwards
and seven backs). The role of the forwards is to gain and
retain possession of the ball. They take part in set pieces of
the scrum and the lineout. The role of the backs is to move
the game forward by running or kicking the ball.
Scoring occurs by achieving either a try or a
goal. A try involves touching the ball to the ground
over the goal line at the opponent's end of the field.
A goal results from kicking the ball over the crossbar
between the upright goal posts.
Three different types of kicks at goal can score points:
the goal kick after a try has been awarded (which if suc-
cessful becomes a conversion); the drop kick; and the pen-
alty kick. A union match lasts 80 minutes, with the win-
ner scoring the highest number of points.
To compete on a national level and eventually in the
World Cup, military rugby players go through a pipeline,
which begins at training camps for each of the armed ser-
vices and eventually brings them together at the Armed
Forces Championship.
During championship games, individual players from
the various armed services are scoped out to create an all-
star team to compete against several national and regional
civilian teams. From there, players are selected to join the
U.S. National Rugby Team to play in the Rugby World Cup
which is held every four years.
Most other military sports programs eventually end up
at the Conseil International du Sport Militaire (CISM)
championships where U.S. military teams compete against
military teams from other countries, but there is no CISM
venue for rugby at this time.





























Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Jones is tackled by SB1 Brian Bidder as he
attempts to run the ball down the field.
,,o- . ,






8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009

LA-9: Flew fateful mission from NAS Keflavik on Jan. 12, 1962
From Page 1


"I want to give you a taste of what
life was like when LA-9 went down
in 1962. Fortunately, former VP-5
Commanding Officer Capt. Bob
Smyth kept a journal of the events
of that day and was kind enough to
share it with us," said Naylor.
"Winter weather in Iceland is very
unpredictable in an hour it can
go from a hellish artic blizzard to a
'springtime in the Rockies' kind of
day. On Jan. 12, 1962, LA-9 set out on
a routine mission from NAS Keflavik.
At about 1030, the squadron duty offi-
cer reported no position report in the
last hour. LA-9 had taken off at 0800
on a routine anti-submarine patrol in
the Denmark Strait. The aircraft was
flown that day by our new XO, Cmdr.
Bert Kozak. This was his first opera-
tional patrol out of Keflavik. We had
put an additional experienced VP-5
navigator aboard. LA-9's flight plan
was to fly northwest from Keflavik
across the Denmark Strait and across
the east coast of Greenland and over
the ice flows for about 500 miles and
then return home. It was a nine-hour
flight covering about 1,500 miles.
At 1130, we still had had no con-
tact. Every radio station in Iceland,
Greenland and Europe was trying to
contact LA-9. The clock crept ahead
- no position reports. Its estimated
arrival time of 1600 passed, but LA-9
did not return. A couple aircraft were
sent out to look for the Neptune, but
had to return due to deteriorating
weather.
The next day, we sent out eight
search and rescue (SAR) aircraft. On
Jan. 14, we sent 16 aircraft out. I was
on the first SAR mission that swept
the Denmark Strait and all kinds of
experts were called in. The weather
finally cleared and there was a report
of footprints. We flew very low and the
prints turned out to be a polar bear.
The search went on for a very long
week and was called off Jan. 19. LA-9
and its crew had vanished. They were
declared lost at sea but that was not
the end of the story. VP-5 kept looking
every day until our return to the U.S.
in May 1962."
Naylor continued, "Four and a
half years later, on Aug. 6, 1966,
the wreckage of LA-9 was found on
Greenland's remote Kronborg gla-
cier by an Oxford University geologi-


Photo by Miriam Callet
The VP-5 "hands on" restoration team included (from left)
AM3 Lance Nyffeler, AD3 Zach Barnett, AM3 Christopher
Merrill, AM2(AW) Brad Barnes and AM3 Xian Wu.


Photos by Clark Pierce
(From left) VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Frank Naylor, NAS Jax Commanding
Officer Capt. Jack Scorby Jr., Robert Pettway, CPRW-11 Capt. Mark Turner and
CPRW-11 Chaplain (Lt. Cmdr) Atticus Taylor unveil a commemorative plaque Nov.
6 on the fuselage of the "Mad Foxes" LA-9 exhibit in NAS Jax Heritage Park.


cal survey team led by Charles Kent
Brooks.
Brooks, who attended the ceremony
from his home in Denmark, recalled,
"We noted the location of the debris
field -but since we had no radio com-
munications capability with our party
-it was four weeks before we arrived
at Reykjavik, Iceland and reported
our discovery to the American embas-
sy," said Brooks.
Fast forward to 1975, when Brooks
revisited the crash site via helicop-
ter. He was shocked to find human
remains that had been missed in the
1966 recovery effort.
"Later, I was contacted by Robert
Pettway, a former VP-5 petty officer,
about participating in a final expedi-
tion to bring the crew of LA-9 home
once and for all. He teamed up with
Patricia Masciantoni, Mike and
Peter Kozak -the LA-9 pilot's surviv-
ing children and other volunteers,
including VP-5 alumni, to make it


happen in 2004," said Brooks.
At the Nov. 6 ceremony, Robert
Pettway received a special recognition
medal and plaque from Commander,
Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11
Capt. Mark Turner.
"Though it took two recovery mis-
sions over 47 years, we thank God
that the men of LA-9 are home," said
Pettway.
"This was a team effort and I had a
wonderful crew working with me over
all these years, including the Kozak
family, Dr. Kent Brooks, retired
Marine Corps Maj. Gene Cole (who
led the 1966 recovery mission), VP-5
alumni Donald Lattimer and Don
Good, and retired Navy Capt. Tom
Sparks (who led the 2004 recovery
mission)."
Pettway concluded, "Very few things
in life are perfect but today's cer-
emony and this plane comes as close
to perfect as anything I've ever expe-
rienced. Thank you all."


Photo by Miriam Callet
NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Jack Scorby Jr.
congratulates Robert Pettway on completing the mission to
commemorate the final recovery of the LA-9 crew from VP-5.


Photo by Clark Pierce
For his leadership in bringing home the crew of LA-9, Robert
Pettway (center) was presented the Department of the
Navy Superior Public Service Award by Commander, Patrol
and Reconnaissance Wing 11 Capt. Mark Turner and VP-5
Commanding Officer Cmdr. Frank Naylor.


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FRCSE: 'What we

saw at FRCSE was

high performance'

From Page 1 i ,'


manufacturing capabilities and its ability
to meet unique requirements that support
mission readiness.
Centonze said, "Any manufacturer who
is a MAF finalist should really be proud of
their programs, systems and people. What
we saw at FRCSE was high performance."
FRCSE won the award due to its
Computer Numerical Control (CNC)
machining capabilities. CNC Machining
and Tool and Die Shop Supervisor
Terry Cox said, "We are reactive to the
Warfighter. When a part breaks on an
older platform, it's not likely that part is
on the shelf."
FRCSE artisans specialize in fabricating
replacement components not available in
the Navy supply system or elsewhere.
The facility does not compete with pri-
vate industry, but FRCSE will assist origi-
nal equipment manufacturers with sup-
porting a Government contract when their
suppliers cannot meet production require-
ments. Industrial Business Management
Specialist Tony Davis stated, "We are the
last source of manufacturing for many mil-
itary aircraft parts."
Precision manufacturing is the key in
quality assurance. Coordinate Measuring
Machine Toolmaker Rickey Doucette man-
ufactures the parts and performs the final
inspection for a production run.
The depot boasts six, five-axis machine
centers, a large capacity (up to 30,000
pounds) horizontal boring mill, and
advanced CNC turning and grinding capa-
bilities up to 60 inches in diameter.
The CNC Strippit 30-ton punch and
laser cutter used for flat pattern, panel


Photos by Vic Pitts
FRCSE Machinist Allen Chisholm removes a
boot strap, the structural member of an F/A-
18 Hornet horizontal stabilizer, from a 5-axis
horizontal machining center.

and sheet fabrication, can accommodate
sheets up to 100 inches long by 50 inches
wide with thicknesses up to 3/8 inch. Sheet
Metal and Layout Shop Supervisor Jamie
Childers said, "We do our own CNC pro-
gramming to reverse-engineer the flat pat-
tern parts."
Artisans use an eight-axis CNC press
brake for fabricating complex sheet metal
components. The brake has a bed with a
capacity for material up to 144 inches wide
and is networked with the file server to
ensure instant error-free job programming.
Thanks to the dedication of its experi-
enced workforce, FRCSE has earned a stel-
lar reputation for on-time, on-budget deliv-
ery and remains the best value for aircraft
maintenance, repair and overhaul solu-
tions to the U.S. Navy in support of the
Warfighter.
FRCSE is the largest industrial employ-
er in Northeast Florida and Southeast
Georgia with a workforce of about 4,000
Sailors and civilians.
MAF is an advocacy organization that
serves to improve the business climate for
manufacturers in Florida.


TRAVEL: Disney vacation offers something for everyone


From Page 5


Future World in Epcot
offers many attractions
that are fun and educa-
tional, focusing on scien-
tific achievement. Families
can visit The Living Seas,
a large aquarium complex,
the Land, a series of green-
houses to show innovative
ways of raising crops and
then walk across the park
to Test Track where you
can see how modern auto-
mobiles are designed and
tested (while going along
for the ride as a crash test
dummy) and Mission Space,
where you can experience
the thrill of being launched
into space
The Hollywood Studios
(formerly Disney-MGM stu-
dios) theme park is the per-
fect answer for the movie
buff in the family. The
park is themed to look like
Hollywood in the 1940's,
the golden age of the sil-
ver screen. Here you will
find some of the best shop-
ping in all of Disney World,
as well as some fantas-
tic rides. Attractions here
take a couple of different
forms. There are rides like
Star Tours and Muppet
Vision 3D where you can
enjoy the magic of the mov-
ies. There are also sev-
eral attractions including


Indiana Jones Epic Stunt
Spectacular and the back
lot tour where you get to
see some of the behind the
scenes magic that create
the special effects we see in
movies today. For the thrill
seeker there is the Tower of
Terror and the Aerosmith
Rock 'n' Roller Coaster. If
there is one thing you must
see at Disney-MGM, it is
the nightly performance of
Fantasmic! Fantasmic is
a show that combines live
action, fireworks and ani-
mated characters (projected
onto fountains of water) in
a show that you will never
forget. Check the daily
park listings for show time,
and plan to arrive at the
amphitheater early, as seat-
ing fills up quickly. If you
are interested in dinner,
check out the Brown Derby,
which has a dinner and a
show offer, where they
will reserve your seats for
Fantasmic while you eat!
The last of the four
theme parks is The Animal
Kingdom. This park
sprawls across 500 acres,
giving you the opportunity
to see real exotic animals in
their natural habitat. There
is a lot to learn, and lots of
funs to be had as Disney
characters mingle with vis-
itors moving between the
jungles, forests and savan-


nahs in the five themed
lands of the park. Must
see attractions include the
Tree of Life, and the Kali
River Rapids. If you decide
to brave the rapids, be pre-
pared to get wet, and you
will definitely want to lock
up your camera and any-
thing else that isn't water-
proof in lockers near the
ride.
Fall is the best time to
visit, as it is when the mass
of visitors from other parts
of the world and other parts
of the country retire to the
"real world." Those of us
living nearby in Florida/
Georgia get to enter the
world of fantasy year round.
Just think, we live next
door to the most dreamed
about family vacation des-
tination in the world. We
should definitely take
advantage of our proximity
(and the free ticket offer). It
will be a memory your fam-
ily will always treasure. For
more information, visit our
website at www.guideto-
militarytravel.com or your
local ITT office.


IA: Luncheon held

From Page 1

Regional Calibration Center,
an IA who recently returned
from a nine-month tour in
Afghanistan, also offered
some remarks. "When you
hear about the wars in Iraq
and Afghanistan, people
really don't think about the
Navy because they don't
think about us as fighters,
but we are changing that
public opinion because, as
all of us know, the Navy is
fighting side by side with
the Army, Marines and Air
Force. We are out there and
we are doing our jobs. The A02(AI
Navy is much more than Technic
deploying ships. Sailors are Forces (
working all over the world," on rece
stated McLellan. "When Individu
I was in Afghanistan, you Officer
could often look up in the "In earl
sky and see a Navy 'Prowler' ship wa
or F/A-18 and that was a ness th
way that we, as, boots on tions in
the ground, knew that the Afghan:
Navy was there with us. It's the Arm
quite exhilarating when you so the
are out there on the ground to help
knowing that you have that combat
support there," he added. you've
"The Navy is pretty much has bee
everywhere. We are under our nai
the sea, on the sea, in the our Arr
air and on land. I don't rotation
think any other service Forces i
can say that. We are fight- for the
ing side by side with our we are
military counterparts," Chief co
said McLellan, who to mak
worked with the Provincial runs ri
Reconstruction Team (PRT) "It's re
in Khost, Afghanistan. talking
"PRTs are working with the today t
Afghan citizens to rebuild mand
their country. Under nor- contact
mal conditions, that doesn't their fa
sound like a hard job, but gram is
considering you have to do time so
this in one of the most war- critical
torn countries on earth and we get
under constant opposition, to Sail
it's a whole different strat- input n
egy. You can't just build there on
something and go home, ing on
because many of our proj- coming
ects were often blown up." able ii
"So before we deploy as IAs can ma
we go through combat train- ter," e
ing to teach us skills we may "Today
need over there. I volun- our Na
teered for this assignment As IAs
and enjoyed my experience, other s
It was also made a lot better means
with the support of my wife Sailor.
and my command. I can def- unexpei
initely say that during my Navy w
time there, I never felt that age and
my command forgot about lived ui
me. It was almost like they sion of
were working there next to sion, p:
me. And most of all, I have of the
to thank my wife for her love peace a
and support and care pack- out the
ages," concluded McLellan. it in
Guest speaker U.S. Fleet Navy w
Forces Command Master "No oth
Chief FLTCM(SW/AW) Tom such a
Howard also remarked on of their
the importance of Navy IAs. role ai


Photos by Kaylee LaRocque
W) Wayne Toth of the Center for Naval Aviation
cal Trainng Unit Jax is congratulated by U.S. Fleet
Command Master Chief FLTCM(SW/AW) Tom Howard
iving his certificate of appreciation for serving as an
ual Augmentee, as NAS Jacksonville Commanding
Capt. Jack Scorby Jr. looks on.


ly 2005, Navy leader-
as beginning to wit-
e stresses that rota-
and out of Iraq and
istan were placing on
my and Marine Corps
decision was made
out with non-direct
t missions. What
done serving as IAs
n a blessing for both
tion at war and for
my and Marine Corps
tal forces. U.S. Fleet
.s the executive agent
e IA program and
responsible to the
of Naval Operations
e sure this program
eight said Howard.
assuring that by
to the Sailors here
hat everyone's com-
has made special
with these IAs and
imilies. The IA pro-
s not going away any
on. One of the most
ways to assure that
it right, is to listen
lors like you. Your
natters. You've been
n the front lines, tak-
the hard tasks and
away with a valu-
nsight on how we
[ke the process bet-
xpressed Howard.
, we are deploying
vy a bit differently.
you have shown the
services just what it
to be an American
You've completed an
cted deployment, the
ay, with honor, cour-
[ commitment. You've
p to the Navy's mis-
deterring :i.:. r.--
reserving freedoms
seas and promoting
nd security through-
world. But you did
a non-traditional
ray," added Howard.
ler service has made
significant step out
historically defined
nd in the process,


ET2(SW) Joshua McLellan
of the Southeast Regional
Calibration Center at NAS
Jacksonville gives some
remarks about his year-long
Individual Augmentee (IA)
tour in Afghanistan during
the bi-annual IA Luncheon at
NAS Jacksonville Nov. 5.
you've made us all proud,"
he said. "I'm honored to be
in your company and thank-
you. We asked you to do
something harder than you
signed on to do and what
you've done cannot be over-
stated, it's huge," he con-
tinued. "It's one of the big-
gest changes we've seen
in the Navy, being able to
drop what you are doing in
a command, pick up with
another service and go as
an individual and serve
with other units. We value
your service and sacrifices
and support of your families.
To the spouses, your per-
sonal sacrifices are just as
grand as that of your Sailor."
YN2(AW) Ian Earls of
HS-11, who recently
returned from Kuwait,
said, "I think this is real-
ly great. It's nice to be
noticed for what we've done."
Each IA was presented
with a special plaque and
coin from the Northeast
Florida Navy League
Council and thank-you let-
ters from Congressman
Ander Crenshaw, Sen.
George LeMieux and Sen.
Bill Nelson. Each spouse
was also presented with
a letter of appreciation.
As the IAs gathered for the
luncheon, a special slide
show displayed photos of
them on their IA assign-
ments.


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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009 11

NAS Jax made most of Energy Awareness Month A.eu n. Inc


By Cliff Plante
NAVFAC Southeast Resource Efficiency Manager

NAS Jacksonville had a very
productive Energy Awareness
Month in October. We had the
opportunity to see the latest technol-
ogy in water conservation with the
Green Trailer being at the base Oct.
13-15. This display showcased the
low-flow aerators, toilets and urinals.
In addition, they had a ground-
source heat pump which showed the
energy savings one can realize by uti-
lizing a ground water loop system.
Ground water in Northeast Florida
maintains an average 70-degree
year-round temperature. Geothermal
heat pumps are more efficient than
air-source heat pumps and air condi-
tioners using approximately 25 to 50
percent less energy. Initial cost for a


CLIFF'S ENERGY NOTES


geothermal heat pump is higher than
that of a conventional air-source heat
pump, which is one of the reasons that
you do not see them more frequently
installed.
Other technologies that were dem-
onstrated during the month included
the lighting technology that was set
up at the Navy Exchange Food Court.
Different types of lighting from the
standard incandescent to compact
fluorescent, light emitting diode and
inductance types were displayed to
show the difference in not only illu-
mination but also the energy savings
that could be achieved by each type.
We also had the solar-powered


Global Electric Vehicle on display and
this also created a lot of interest.
On Oct. 31, BRITE, the offi-
cial mascot of Energy Awareness,
participate in the NAS Jax 70th
Anniversary/Monster Dash 5K run.
Brite did quite well given the tem-
perature and humidity that day and
finished the run in a not so inspiring
53:17!
Just because Energy Awareness
Month is over is no reason not to stay
vigilant in our goal to reduce water
and energy consumption. This is
something that we must all do togeth-
er each and every day to reduce our
dependence on foreign oil.


NEX features jewelry, watch promotions in time for holidays
From Navy Exchange
Command

T he Navy Exchange
(NEX) is hosting
a holiday jewelry
and watch special event
exclusively for its shop-
pers. From Nov. 27 -
Dec. 31, customers using I
their MILITARY ST Card /,
to purchase jewelry or
watches priced over $199
will receive no interest,
no down payment with
no payments for three
months.
The MILITARY ST Card
offers many benefits includ-
ing 10 percent off the first
day's purchases (up to the
customer's credit limit),
no annual fee, low interest
rate and 24-hour custom- Photo by Miriam S. Called
er service including online NAS Jax Navy Exchange (NEX) Jewelry Department Sales Associate Sarah Long assists AC2(AW)
access. Brandon Robinson of Air Operations Air Traffic Control Division as he tries on a TAG Heuer
MILITARY ST Card Link Chronograph watch Nov. 6. "I'm not Tiger Woods and I don't have a golf game, but I love
.ii .this watch," remarked Robinson. "It is not heavy and the design is very stylish. I recommend
applications are available the ladies buy this watch for their significant other and this includes my wife." NAS Jax car-
at any NEX. ries 25 different brands of watches with more than 200 styles.

Did you know that...


imaR un l ur.


Does low-carb diet


equal healthy eating?

By Capt. Joe McQuade, MD
NH Jax Director for Public Health

Q: If I purchase
only low-carb prod-
ucts, am I done wor-
rying when it comes
to losing weight?
First, remember
that the term "low- k
carb" has not yet
been defined by the
U.S. Food and Drug
Administration leav-
ing the definitions for
now to food manu-
facturers. And just
because a product is
labeled "low-carb" does
not mean it contains
fewer calories. In fact,
some low-carb prod- Capt. Joe McQuade, MD
ucts contain more fat
and calories than products that aren't marked low-carb.
Your best guide to what's in your food is the nutrition
facts panel on the food label. Be a smart consumer and
read the this panel before you purchase your foods. On
average, men need around 2,200 to 2,400 calories and
women need 1600 to 1800 calories per day.
Do you eat when you're anxious? Does food make
you feel better?
If so, you may have been conditioned to turn to food for
comfort. For many people, eating is something to do when
you're bored, tired, anxious or dealing with emotions.
Often these behaviors can lead to over eating. But eating
to cope with emotions can lead to more negative feelings
(guilt, lack of personal control and poor self esteem) and
perhaps to a cycle of mood-triggered eating.
If you eat because of emotions, start keeping a food
record of what you eat, when you eat and why you eat.
Recognizing what triggers eating can often make it easier
to make changes.
Capt. Joe McQuade, M.D. is Naval Hospital
Jacksonville's Director for Public Health. This col-
umn contains information from the American Diabetes
Association Public Relations Team.


Your Navy-Marine
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active and retired Sailors,


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12 JAX AIR NEWS, NASJACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009

NAS Jax athletes rise to the 'Wilderness Challenge'
From NH ]ax Public Affairs P. -


A fiercely competitive four-man
team from NAS Jax traveled to
ayetteville, W.Va. Oct. 8 to compete
in the ninth annual Wilderness Challenge
hosted by Navy MWR Mid-Atlantic Region.
"Team Jax-Rafts, Legs & Gears" trained
together for less than three months before the
competition. HMC Joshua Davidson of Naval
Hospital Jax and AW2(NAC/AW) Ashley
George from VP-5 competed in this event
last year and have competed in several other
adventure races, both military and civilian.
Their two new team members, AT1(NAC/
AW) Jeffrey Laban of the Center for
Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit
(CNATTU) Jacksonville and Lt.j.g. Steven
Peck of NH Jax, had never competed in
adventure racing but both had strong
running and sports backgrounds. Their
team took second place in the Bear
Adventure Race in Green Cove Springs,
Fla. in September.
The team trained diligently on running,
mountain biking and kayaking in prepara-
tion for the race. NAS Jax Morale, Welfare
and Recreation (MWR) Fitness Director
Tim McKinney and the Mulberry Cove
Marina staff assisted the team all along
the way. Davidson said, "We really appreci-
ate them for their continuous support."
The 2009 Wilderness Challenge was
hosted by ACE Adventure Resort of
F.,i..111ville. The team arrived just in time
to experience the beautiful fall foliage in
the mountains.
The event kicked off Oct. 9 with the
8K mountain run. This rigorous course
included gruelingly steep downhills with
sharp rocks and other debris for the com-
petitors to negotiate. They wound their way
through the woods to the finish line over-
looking the New River Gorge.
In the whitewater event, each team was
assigned a guide to take them down the
river, which is very dangerous due to the
sharp rocks and the fast currents.
"High on its banks and fast flowing, we
went through several Class-5 rapids," said
George, who was thrown from the raft
along with the guide. Team Jax-Rafts, Legs
& Gears was in 32nd place after day one.
Day two dawned cold, wet and miser-
able perfect weather for adventure racing
according to Laban.


Photos courtesy of Team Jax Rafts, Legs & Gears
Lt. j.g. Steven Peck (left) and AW2 Ashley George (right) with their assigned guide, wait for their team to push off in the whitewater rafting
competition.


"The competition started off with a
10-mile mountain bike course that was all
up and down," he said. "Many times you
had to get off your bike and push it up the
hills. There was a lot of loose gravel and
several sharp rocks that could easily take
out your tires. There was mud all over
us and it made this event very difficult
because you could not see. The ride ended
with a fast, two-mile descent."
After the bike race, the team quickly
transitioned into life jackets and wetsuits
and grabbed their paddles to compete in
the seven-mile 'duckie' river event (an
inflatable kayak that's very difficult to
handle in white water).
"This is where we really moved up," said
Peck. "It's critical for each team member to
paddle together. Our synchronized duckie
paddling made the difference in the cold


HMC Joshua Davidson paddles hard to help
keep his team's kayak on course during the
"Duckie Race" at the MWR Wilderness
Challenge.
water, even though we finished with our
teeth chattering.


See WILDERNESS, Page 15


Team Jax-Rafts, Legs & Gears: (stand-
ing) HMC Joshua Davidson and ATI(NAC/
AW) Jeffrey Laban; (kneeling) Lt.j.g Steven
Peck and AW2(NAC/AW) Ashley George.
The team recently placed 10th in the recent
MWR Wilderness Adventure Challenge in
Fayetteville, W.Va.


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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009 13


Photos courtesy of the NAS Jax Security Department
Members of the NAS Jax Security Department gather at
Nease High School Oct. 31 to volunteer their time judging,
grading and mentoring NJROTC students during the Nease
High School Inter-Service Drill Meet. This is the third con-
secutive year the department has volunteered to help with
the event which hosted more than 900 students from 20
schools.


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THIS IS OUR WAY OF SAYING
THANK YOU FOR ALL THAT YOU DO.


For more Community information
call 877-746-9830 or visit


LENNAR.COI M/Jacksonville


CLAY COUNTY
*COVENTRY AT
OAKLEAF PLANTATION
Townhome-sltyle Condos
From the $120s
15 miles from Jax
Naval Air Station
*HAMILTON GLEN AT
OAKLEAF PLANTATION
Single-family homes
From the $190s
15 miles from Jax
Naval Air Station


DUVAL COUNTY
*WYNNFIELD LAKES
Single-family homes
From the mid s200s
10 miles from
Mayport Naval Station
*LEXINGTON PARK
Single-family homes
From the upper $100s
25 miles from
Mayport Naval Station


ST. JOHNS
COUNTY
*CHANCELLOR'S RIDGE
Single-family homes
From the mid $200s
*THE VILLAS AT
HERITAGE PARK
Designer Townhomes
From the mid $100s


ST. JOHNS
COUNTY
*WILLOWCOVE
AT NOCATEE
Single-family homes
From the $300s
*JOHN CREEK II
Single-family homes
From the $200s


*Offers, incentives and seller contributions are subject to certain terms, conditions and restrictions, which may include use of designated
lenders and closing agents. Offer good for a limited time only. Lennar reserves the right to change or withdraw any offer at any time.
See a Lennar New Home Consultant for further information. Offer is subject to borrower meeting approval guidelines. Prices subject
to change without notice. See a Lennar New Home Consultant for further information. A | a -
Copyright 2009 Lennar Corporation. Lennar and the Lennar logo, are registered 1 l Al IU L.
service marks or service marks of Lennar Corporation and/or its subsidiaries. saM WlONM UNIVERSAL AMERICANMORTGAGE COMPANY
CGC#1507526, CBC#059530. 7/09


Hard at work


AM3 Ronald Page works on Dusty 610 in Hangar 116
at NAS Jax Oct. 23. The SH-60F "show bird" is flown by
HS-7 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Sean Mordhorst. Page
explained that it is undergoing a 224-day maintenance
check that involves tearing down and inspecting every
major component of the Seahawk.


Photo by Clark Pierce


I~ I FJ


jjI _


December 19
12pm 4pm
Mulberry Cove
Marina

FREE
Snow Sledding

Refreshments
Call 778-9772 for more details.
Then head on over to
The Zone for
Children's Holiday

oll NBingo
SINaGO Doors open at 4pm
a 22 32 s 7 Games start at 5pm
I 27 s53 7 $15 per child
7 25 31 37 57 Ages 3 17 *Must be able to
13 23 33 52 72 daub on their own.
Includes Bingo cards, dauber,
hot dog, chips and a drink.
For more information call 542-5007.


*

*


HI! MY NAME IS


VERONICA MITCHELL
















.













I am your new account executive
forJax Air News.
I am happy to help you meet
all of your military advertising needs.
Call me at 904-359-4676
or contact your Times-Union representative.




xlA irNews
Published by The Florida Times-Union 696659






14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009


Jacksonville Jaguars recognize military members


Sailors from various NAS Jacksonville commands are all smiles after meeting Jacksonville
Jaguars Running Back Maurice Jones-Drew prior to the game Nov. 8 at Jacksonville
Municipal Stadium. After the photo-op, Jones-Drew signed autographs. From left, CM1
William Cook of CBMU-202 Det Jax, AW1 Frederick Baker of CPRW-11, IT1(AW) Stacey
Thinn and MA1(SW) Barion Haywood of NAS Jax, Jones-Drew, HM3 Jason Cowan of VP-8,
LS2 Agustina Medina of Fleet Industrial Supply Center Jacksonville, AM1 Travis McMahan of
VP-62 and CS3 Lendell Rogers of NAS Jax.


Photos by Miriam S. Called
Jaguars salute to the military. Eight NAS Jacksonville Sailors had the honor of carrying the
American flag as they escorted the Jacksonville Jaguars out of the tunnel and onto the field
Nov. 8. The Jaguars scored a 24-21 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs.


(From left) CS3 Lendell Rogers of NAS Jax, Jaguars game vol-
unteers, CM1 William Cook of CBMU-202 Det Jax and IT1
Stacey Thinn of NAS Jax hold American flags at the south end
zone during the playing of the national anthem prior to the
start of the Jaguars and Chiefs game.





Great American Smokeout Nov. 19



DoD challenges service



members: 'You're tougher



than tobacco'


By Andre Bell
Special Contributor


The U.S. Department
of Defense (DoD)
urges military per-
sonnel to put themselves
to the test on November
19. That's the day smokers
join the Great American
Smokeout (GASO), to
stomp out their butts and
take on one of the biggest
personal challenges they
may ever face.
"Our service members
are famous for being the
toughest bunch of men and
women out there, which
means they are tough
enough to quit tobacco


when they commit to it.
There's no better time to
get the jumpstart needed to
succeed," said Capt. David
Arday, a physician and U.S.
Public Health Service offi-
cer and chairman of the
DoD Alcohol and Tobacco
Advisory Committee.
The initiative is part of
the DoD's tobacco cessation
campaign, Quit Tobacco
- Make Everyone Proud.
"When you quit smoking,
you show that you are
tough enough to conquer
what some claim is merely
a bad habit, but what sci-
ence and research tell us is
a strong addiction," Arday
said.


Getting support is a pow-
erful weapon in winning
the battle against tobacco.
In addition to the support
at medical treatment facili-
ties, prospective quitters
can find cessation resources
at the Website http://www.
ucanquit2.org.
A special GASO section
features an online pledge
that enables service mem-
bers to publicly announce
that they can and will
- stop smoking on Nov. 19.
In doing so, they connect to
others on their installation
and across the country.
The award-winning
Website offers resourc-
es, peer support, games


and live help with trained
tobacco cessation coaches,
as well as personalized,
downloadable quit tools.
Users can also find social
networking links to Twitter
(http://www.twitter.com/
ucanquit2), Facebook and
YouTube.
The Great American
Smokeout is the American
Cancer Society's nation-
ally recognized day when
it advocates for people to
put down their cigarettes,
cigars, spit tobacco and
other tobacco products.


COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Florida Fallen Heroes Banquet Nov. 13 at 6:30 p.m. at Jacksonville
Firefighter's Hall, 2516 Phyllis Street, Jacksonville. Call Dave
Seamans at 535-0747.
Craft Show at Mayport USO Nov. 14 from 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Crafters'
booths still available. Call Deanna Garrity at 904-219-1881.
Antique Car Show Nov. 14, 10 a.m. 2 p.m. at Cecil Pines Senior
Community. Call 771-8839.
Creeks Baseball Club tryouts Nov.14 for ages 8 to 16. This non-
profit, travel baseball organization is located at the Rivertown Baseball
Complex in St. Johns County. For more information, call Lt. Cmdr.
Steve Mauro at 509-8791 or email stevemauro@creeksbaseballclub.
com.
Bears Motorcycle Run Nov. 14 at 9 a.m. Bring new teddy bear or
other stuffed toy to VFW Post 8255, 2296 Aster Ave., Middleburg.
Call Steven Schneider at 904-866-7702
Tour de St. Johns Fun Ride Nov. 21 at 3 p.m. in Avondale. Visit
www.TourdeStJohns.com for information and registration.
Disabled American Veterans, Chapter 38, 470 Madeira Dr., Orange
Park, "Welcome Home" barbecue for Iraq/Afghanistan veterans and
their families. Nov. 21 at 3:30 p. m. RSVP at 269-2945.
Seeking Bachelors and Bachelorettes to be auctioned off at
Leukemia & Lymphoma Society St. Valentine's Day event. Call
Sharon Griffin at 386-0240 by Dec. 25.
Navy Wives Clubs of America Jax No. 86 meets the first Wednesday
of each month at 7 p.m. in Building 857 (at NAS Jax main gate behind
Navy Marine Corps Relief Society). Not So New Shop open Tuesday
and Thursday (9 a.m. to 1 p.m.). Call 542-1582 for info.
Navy Wives Clubs of America DID No. 300 meets the second
Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Oak Crest United Methodist
Church Education Building at 5900 Ricker Road. Call 387-4332 or
272-9489.
Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290 monthly meeting is the first
Thursday at 8 p.m., 390 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach. Call 246-6855.
Military Officers Association of America N.E. Florida Chapter meets
the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the NAS Jax Officers'
Club. RSVP to retired Capt. Larry Sharpe at 262-3728 or e-mail
Isharpel @comcast.net.
National Naval Officers Association meets the fourth Thursday of
each month at 5 p.m. at the Urban League, 903 W. Union Street.
Contact Lt. Cmdr. Paul Nix at 422-8480 or email Paul24navy@aol.
com.
Disabled American Veterans Chapter 38 meets the second
Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at 470 Madeira Dr., Orange Park.
Service officers available Tuesday and Wednesday from 9 a.m 4
ooo


p.m. to help with VA claims, call 269-2945 for appointment. Bingo
every Thursday from 6:30-9:30 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. 3
p.m. The public is welcome.
Association of Aviation Ordnancemen meets the third Thursday of
each month at 7 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Center on Collins Road.
Call AOC Robert Price at 542-2849 or Jim Bohac at 542-2939, or visit
www.aao9.com.
Retired Activities Office (RAO) at NAS Jax Fleet and Family
Support Center (FFSC) needs volunteers to assist military retirees
and dependents. Work three hours a day, one day per week. Call
542-2766 ext. 126 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays to volunteer.
Navy Jacksonville Yacht Club meets the first Wednesday of
every month at 7:30 p.m. at the clubhouse (Building 1956) adjacent
to Mulberry Cove Marina. Open to active duty, reserve and retired
military, plus, active or retired DoD civilians. Call 778-0805 or email
commodore@njyc.org.
Orange Park Lions Club meets the second and fourth Monday
at 7 p.m. at 423 McIntosh Avenue, Orange Park, Fla. For more
information, call 298-1967.
COMPASS Spouse-to-Spouse Military Mentoring Program
by Naval Services Family Line. Help others help themselves. Call
Melanie Cullum at 904-200-7751 or email: COMPASSMayport@
NSFamilyLine.org
National Active and Retired Federal Employees Westside
Jacksonville Chapter 1984 meets at 1 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of
each month at the Murray Hill United Methodist Church, (Fellowship


Blanding Flowers & Gifts
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Hall Building) at 4101 College Street. Call 786-7083.
National Active and Retired Federal Employees Clay County
Chapter 1414 meets at 12:30 p.m. on the second Tuesday of each
month at the Orange Park Library, 2054 Plainfield Avenue. Call 276-
9415.
Ladies Auxiliary of Fleet Reserve Unit 126 meets the second
Thursday of each month at 10 a.m. at the Fleet Reserve Building,
7673 Blanding Blvd. Call 771-6850.
Retired Enlisted Association meets the fourth Wednesday of each
month at 1 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Hall at 7673 Blanding Blvd. Call
772-8622 or 771-8696.


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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009 15


Before hiring a credit counselor,



answer five questions


By J.]. Montanaro
Special Contributor


iT o stop a downward
financial spiral, you
S. may think turning
to a "debt counseling ser-
vice" is the answer. Before
you go, do your homework
to avoid digging an even
deeper hole.
"When consumers find
themselves in financial dis-
tress, it is critical that they
^- face the problem head on.
Many benefit from sitting
down with a trained and
certified credit counselor,"
says Gail Cunningham
with the National
Foundation for Credit
Counseling (NFCC).
- Be careful when selecting
a service, she warns. Some
counseling services charge
high fees and can actually
damage your credit while
they help you pay off your
debts.
To ensure you're hir-
photos.com ing a legitimate service,


Credit Tips


Know what you owe. Gather up your
bills and statements and total up your
debts and monthly obligations.
Don't dig any deeper. Stop using cred-
it cards immediately. Be cautious of zero
percent balance transfer offers. Read the
fine print to see if fees are charged and if
the interest rate bumps up after an intro-
ductory period.
Contact your creditors. They may be
willing to offer you lower interest rates or
revised payment plans. Find the customer
service number on the back of your credit


Cunningham recommends
asking these five questions.
1) Is the agency affiliated
with a national organiza-
tion, like the NFCC, which
requires strict financial and
ethical standards for mem-
bership?
2) What fees are associat-
ed with the services? No fee
should be charged before
the service is provided. Any
set-up fee or monthly fee
should be in the $50-or-less


card or on your loan statement.
Attack debt systematically: First, pay
off credit cards with the highest interest
first. Then, roll that payment to the next
card, and keep repeating the step.
Seek free help. Use online calcula-
tors like USAA's Debt Analyzer or e-mail
a USAA financial advisor to help identify
strategies you hadn't considered.
Free financial advice is also available
at your Fleet and Family Support Center
and the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society.


range, with monthly fees in
the $25 range.
3) How long does a coun-
seling session last? Avoid
quick, "drive-by" counsel-
ing. An initial session
should last at least one
hour to assess your income,
expenses and debts ade-
quately.
4) What happens to your
first payment? It should go
toward your debt. It should
not be used as a donation to


the agency.
5) Will the full amount
of your payments be dis-
bursed to your creditors?
The full amount should
go toward the repayment
of your debts, with no por-
tion going into the agency's
pocket.
An extra word of caution:
Check your Better Business
Bureau (www.bbb.org) for
unresolved complaints
against the organization.


WILDERNESS: NAS

Jax athletes challenged

From Page 12

They quickly changed into dry clothing
and ascended up the side of a mountain
before running deep into the wilderness."
George said, "The 15-mile trail run was
definitely back woods," George said. "I am
not sure how they would have rescued us
in some of these areas. There were several
ups and downs during this event, but the
team kept moving through the mud and
muck. We finally crossed the river using
a rope and grudged through the last mile-
and-a-half to the finish," she said.
The evening concluded with an awards
banquet where Team Jax-Rafts, Legs &
Gears moved from 32nd place the first day
to a victorious 10th place overall out of
54 teams from the Army, Navy, Air Force,


www.loc.gov


Photos courtesy of Team Jax-Rafts, Legs & Gears
Lt. j.g. Steven Peck of NH Jax pauses for
a moment to enjoy the beautiful mountain
scenery during the 15-mile MWR Wilderness
Run.
Marines and Coast Guard. The team fin-
ished third out of 24 Navy teams.
The team meshed well together from
the start and we encouraged each other
to the end. All of us can't wait until next
year when we can compete again," said
Davidson.


*Piigsubjct o cang wihou noice Miitayd scontgienattie f uchsewih ald iltayID. Owershi of poductis-o-ai -------------eedSpymen
proramhasben cmplte. Tisma e -rnala -met- -nscto. All-pictures in ad.are.representative-onl. Ntrsosbe o yorpiclerr na.


qcoI c






16 JAX AIR NEWS, NASJACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009



Navy commissions amphibious




transport dock ship New York

From Department of Defense I


The Navy commissioned the
newest San Antonio class
amphibious transport dock
ship New York (LPD 21), at a
Nov. 7 ceremony in New York
City. The ship is named New
York in honor of the state and
the courage and heroism of New
Yorkers during and after the
tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001.
A unique characteristic of the
ship is the use of 7.5 tons of steel
salvaged from the World Trade
Center wreckage that was incor-
porated into the construction pro-
cess. The steel was melted and
formed to make the bow stem of
the ship. Use of this steel sym-
bolizes the spirit and resiliency
of the people of New York. The
ship's motto is "Strength forged
through sacrifice. Never forget."
Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton delivered the
principal address. Secretary
of the Navy Ray Mabus and
Chief of Naval Operations Adm.
Gary Roughead, also delivered
remarks.
Dotty England, wife of former
secretary of the Navy and for-
mer Deputy Secretary of Defense
Gordon England, is serving as the


U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jesse Johnson
Marines assigned to Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force 26 and sailors assigned to the amphibious
transport dock ship Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) New York (LPD 21) man the rails as the ship arrives in New
York Nov. 2. The ship has 7.5 tons of steel from the World Trade Center in her bow and was commissioned Nov. 7
in New York City.


ship's sponsor. In a time-honored
Navy tradition, she will give the
order to "man our ship and bring
her to life!"
Designated as LPD 21, New
York is the fifth amphibious


transport dock ship in the San
Antonio class.
Four previous ships have been
named New York. The first,
a gondola that served in 1776;
the second, a frigate that served


1800-1814; the third, an armored
cruiser that served 1893-1938;
and the fourth, a battleship that
served 1914-1946.
As a critical element in future
expeditionary strike groups, the


ship will support the Marine
Corps' "mobility triad," which
consists of the landing craft air
cushion (LCAC), the expedition-
ary fighting vehicle (EFV) and
the Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft
(MV-22). The ship will provide
improved warfighting capabilities
including an advanced command-
and-control suite, increased lift-
capability in vehicle and cargo-
carrying capacity and advanced
ship-survivability features.
Cmdr. F. Curtis Jones, a native
of Binghamton, N.Y., is the first
commanding officer of the ship,
leading a crew of approximately
360 officers and enlisted person-
nel.
The ship is capable of embark-
ing a landing force of up to 800
Marines. New York will be home-
ported in Norfolk, Va., as a part
of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet.
Built by Northrop Grumman
Shipbuilding Avondale
Operations in Louisiana, New
York is 684 feet in length, has an
overall beam of 105 feet, a navi-
gational draft of 23 feet and dis-
places about 24,900 tons. Four
turbo-charged diesel engines
power the ship to sustained
speeds of 24 knots.


THIS WEEK IN NAVY HISTORY


From Navy History &
Heritage Command

Nov. 12
1912 Lt. Theodore
Ellyson makes first suc-
cessful launching of an air-
plane (A-3) by catapult at
the Washington Navy Yard.
1940 CNO Adm. Stark
submits memorandum to
Secretary of the Navy on
four plans if U.S. enters
war. He favors the fourth,
Plan Dog, calling for strong
offensive in the Atlantic
and defense in the Pacific.
1942 First day of the
three days of fight-
ing in the Naval
Battle of Guadalcanal.
1943 President Franklin
D. Roosevelt embarks on
USS Iowa (BB-61) to go to
the Allied conferences at
Teheran, Iran, and Cairo,
Egypt.
Nov. 13
1776 Capt. John Paul
Jones in Alfred with brig
Providence captures British
transport Mellish, carrying
winter uniforms later used
by Washington's troops.
1942 Loss of USS Juneau
(CL-52) during Battle
of Guadalcanal results
in death of five Sullivan
brothers.
1943 Fifth Fleet car-
riers begin long-range
night bombing attacks
on Japanese posi-
tions in Gilbert and
Marshall islands in prep-
aration for landings.
1957 First firing of
Regulus II bombardment
missile.


U.S
The five Sullivan Brothers on I
Juneau (CL-52) at the time of
missioning ceremonies at the
Navy Yard, Feb. 14, 1942. All
with the ship following the Nov
Naval Battle of Guadalcanal.
ers are (from left) Joseph, Fran(
Madison and George Sullivan.

Nov. 14
1846 Naval forces cap-
ture Tampico, Mexico.
1910 Civilian Eugene
Ely pilots first aircraft to
take-off from a ship, USS
Birmingham (CL-2) at
Hampton Roads, Va. He
lands safely on Willoughby
Spit, Norfolk, Va.
1941 Order to with-
draw Marines at
Shanghai, Peiping
and Tientsin, China.
1944 Carrier aircraft
attack Japanese shipping
in Philippines sinking five
ships and damaging one.
Nov. 15
1882 Lt. Cmdr.
French Chadwick
reports to American
Legation in London as
first Naval Attache.
1942 Although U.S. lost
several ships in Naval
Battle of Guadalcanal,


Naval Force
under Rear
Adm. Willlis
Leeo, USS
Washington
(BB-56), turns
back Japanese
transports try-
ing to reinforce
Guadalcanal.
The Japanese
never again try
to send large
S. Navy photo naval forces to
oard USS Guadalcanal.
her com-
New York 1960 First
were lost Fleet Ballistic
. 13,1942 M i s s i 1 e
The broth- Submarine,
cis, Albert, USS George
Washington
(SSBN-598),
leaves Charleston, S.C. on
initial fleet ballistic missile
patrol.
Nov. 16
1776 First salute
to an American flag
(Grand Union flag) fly-
ing from Continental
Navy ship Andrew Doria,
by Dutch fort at St.
Eustatius, West Indies.
1942 Navy's first
night fighter squadron
(VMF(N)-531) established
at Cherry Point, N.C.
1963 President John
F. Kennedy on USS
Observation Island wit-
nesses launch of Polaris
A-2 missile by USS Andrew
Jackson (SSBN-619).
1968 Operation Tran
Hung Dao begins
in Mekong Delta.
1973 Launch of Skylab 4
under command of Lt. Col.
Gerald Carr, USMC. The


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Recovery by USS New
Orleans (LPH-11).
Nov. 17
1917 USS Fanning (DD-
37) and USS Nicholson
(DD-52) sink first enemy
submarine, U-58, off
Milford Haven, Wales.
1924 USS Langley,
first aircraft car-
rier, reports for duty.


1941 Congress amends
Neutrality Act to allow
U.S. merchant ships to
be armed. Navy's Bureau
of Navigation directs
Navy personnel with
Armed Guard training to
be assigned for further
training before assign-
ment to merchant ships.
1955 Navy sets up Special
Projects Office under Rear
Adm. William Raborn to


develop a solid propellant
ballistic missile for use in
submarines.
Nov. 18
1890 USS Maine,
first American battle-
ship, is launched.
1922 Cmdr. Kenneth
Whiting in a PT sea-
plane, makes first catapult
launching from aircraft
carrier, USS Langley, at
anchor in the York River.


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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009 17


NEX helps holiday shoppers


By Kristine Sturkie
NEXCOM Public Affairs Officer
This holiday season,
customers can expect
to find the best
brands at the best buys at
their local NEX.
"Heading into our second
holiday season with uncer-
tainty over the economy,
our NEXs continue to be
sensitive to our customers'
needs for the best value
when making purchas-
es," said Tess Paquette,
senior vice president, chief
merchandising officer,
Navy Exchange Service
Command (NEXCOM).
"Our most recent annual
pricing survey proves that
we save customers an aver-
age of 23 percent over other
retailers and that's on top
of no sales tax."
NEXs offer a wide variety
of items in all price ranges
including prestige brands,
national mass brands and
private brands.
"There are a lot of stores
that offer best brands and
many that offer best buys,
but only the NEX offers
both," said Paquette. "We
are extremely aware of our
customer-base from retir-
ees with two incomes to
enlisted personnel living on
one income. We want our
customers to know that the
NEX carries merchandise
in all prices ranges. So, no
matter what their econom-
ic circumstance, we have
something to fit their bud-
get."
Additionally, NEX's have
a price-matching guarantee
policy that ensures the best
value on merchandise. The
NEX will match the price of
any identical in-stock item
sold locally same brand,
manufacturer, size and
model number.
The price match policy
gives the NEX the flex-
ibility to accept verbal price


challenges based on a cus-
tomer's word that a local
competitor's price is lower.
Price differences up to $5
will be honored on the spot
at any NEX cash regis-
ter. A price difference over
$5 will require model and
price verification by a store
supervisor. Customers
are asked to have a copy
of the current, local com-
petitor's ad for the identi-
cal item being priced. Bring
a competitor's sales flyer
to the NEX showing the
price difference on a spe-
cific item and the NEX will
match the price on the spot.
However, depending on the
dollar amount, approval by
a supervisor or the store
manager may be required.
Overseas, NEXs also
accept price challenges on
items sold at local retail-
ers. NEXs overseas will
also match prices from cat-
alog and Internet sites from
JC Penney, Wal-Mart and
Sears. Freight charges, if
applicable, will be added to
competitor's retail price.
The NEX also offers a
14-day Price Guarantee on
any item originally pur-
chased from the NEX. If
the identical item is offered
at a lower price by the
NEX or a local competitor
within 14 days of purchase,
the customer is entitled to
a refund on the difference.


who choose to use credit,
we encourage looking into
the favorable interest rate
and benefits of the Military
Star* Card."
For customers who prefer
not to use credit, the NEX
offers a layaway program.
A minimum deposit of 10
percent of the purchase
a price plus a $5 non-refund-
able layaway fee is all that
is required. Once all pay-
ments are made, customers
can bring the merchandise
photos.com home. Depending on the
Customers are required to category of merchandise
bring a copy of the adver- purchased, payments can
tisement and receipt to be spread over 180 days.
the NEX customer service Customers are encour-
counter. aged to check with their
For customers who local NEX for other specific
choose to purchase holiday details relating to layaway
gifts with a credit card, as some stores may limit
the Military Star* Card, the number of items per-
the military exchanges in- mitted on layaway due to
house credit card is a great space constraints.
option for added savings. In addition to the value
Among the card's many gained from shopping the
benefits are a lower inter- NEX, customers also ben-
est rate than many other efit from the quality of life
retail credit cards, 10 contributions to Morale,
percent off the first day's Welfare and Recreation
purchases (up to the cus- (MWR). In 2008, that
tomer's credit limit) for amount totaled more than
new card holders, 24-hour $45 million.
Customer Service including "As a quality of life
online access, zero-percent resource for the Navy,
interest promotions and no the NEX is very aware of
annual fee. the sacrifices and chal-
In addition, the Military lenges faced by our Sailors
Star* card has a reduced and their families, espe-
interest rate program cially in a challenging eco-
for qualifying Navy and nomic environment," said
Marine Corps personnel. Paquette.
Monthly payments are "We have a dual mission
waived and interest rates to both provide our custom-
are reduced for account ers with quality goods and
holders through the dura- services at a savings as
tion of an assignment over well as provide dividends to
90-days to a contingency MWR. I think we do a good
area. job of balancing both parts
"We want our custom- of our mission to ensure we
ers to make wise purchas- provide the best to our cus-
ing decisions based on tomers."
their own financial situa- For more information on
tion," said Paquette. "Using the benefits the NEX has to
credit for purchases isn't offer, log on to www.navy-
for everyone, but for those nex.com.


E 9009CDILC EVLL


[03MER33339S2


E920. HEVTAILBLAZER


E.207 ODG CARG


"0%" DOWN MILITARY FINANCING


E9079UUK AYA A


"0%" DOWN MILITARY FINANCING


Folding the American flag
Courtesy of CNRSE Public Affairs

The following is a very interesting, moving and
little-known part of our military tradition.
Do you know that at military funerals, the
21-gun salute stands for the sum of the numbers in the
year 1776? Have you ever noticed that the honor guard
pays meticulous attention to correctly folding the
American flag exactly 13 times? You probably thought
it is done to symbolize the 13 original colonies, but we
learn something new everyday!
The first fold of our flag is to symbolize life. The
second fold is a symbol of our belief in eternal life.
The third fold is made in honor and remembrance of
the veterans departing our ranks who gave a portion
of their lives for the defense of our country to attain
peace throughout the world. The fourth fold represents
our weaker nature, for as American citizens trusting
in God, it is him we turn in times of peace as well as in
time of war for his divine guidance.
The fifth fold is a tribute to our country, for in the
words of Stephen Decatur, "Our country, in dealing
with other countries, may she always be right; but it
is still our country, right or wrong". The sixth fold is
for where our hearts lie. It is our heart that we pledge
allegiance to the flag of the United States of America,
and to the republic for which it stands, one nation
under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.
The seventh is a tribute to our Armed Forces, for
it is through the Armed Forces that we protect our
country and our flag against all her enemies, whether
they be found within or without the boundaries of our
republic. The eighth fold is a tribute to the ones who
have entered the valley of the shadow of death, that
we may see the light of day.
The ninth fold is a tribute to womanhood and moth-
ers. For it has been through their faith, their love, loy-
alty, and devotion that the character of the men and
women who have made this great country has been
molded. The 10th fold is a tribute to the father, for he
too has given his sons and daughters for the defense of
our country since they were first born. The 11th fold
represents the lower portion of the seal of King David
and King Solomon and glorifies in the Hebrews' eyes,
the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. The 12th fold
represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies, in the
Christians' eyes, God the father, the son and the holy
spirit. The 13th fold, or when the flag is completely
folded, the stars are uppermost reminding us of our
nation's motto, "In God We Trust".
After the flag is completely folded and tucked in, it
takes on the appearance of a cocked hat, ever remind-
ing us of the soldiers who served under Gen. George
Washington, and the Sailors and Marines who served
under Capt. John Paul Jones, who were followed by
their comrades and shipmates in the Armed Forces of
the United States, preserving for us the rights, privi-
leges and freedoms we enjoy today. There are some
traditions and ways of doing things that have deep
meaning. In the future, you'll see flags folded and now
you will know why.


"0%" DOWN MILITARY FINANCING


",-nj 17 7 F'w
DOWN CALL NOW FOR PRE-APPROVAL! B -
PAYMENT AS 904-387-0800 9 www.networkautosales.COM LES, and AD
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DiscountH!
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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NASJACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009


AUTO

SKILLS CENTER
Call 542-3227 for
information.
Complete auto work shop
with 22 work bays!
ASE certified master
mechanic is available for
assistance.
Open Monday, Thursday
and F,'id.iy 12-8 p.m.
Saturday Sunday 9 a.m.
5 p.m.

FREEDOM LANES

BOWLING CENTER
Call 542-3493 for
information.

Wednesday
Free Bowling for active
duty
11 a.m. 1 p.m.
Color Pin Bowling
5-10 p.m. $2 games

Saturday Night Extreme
Bowling
7-9 p.m. & 9:30 p.m. -
midnight
$11 per person, includes
shoe rental

Sunday
Family Day Special
11 a.m. 5 p.m. $1.25
games
Color Pin Bowling
5-10 p.m. $2 games

NAS Freedom Lanes
Youth Bowling League
Fall / Winter Session going
on now!
Ends January 30, 2010
Leagues Bowl Saturdays at
10:30 a.m.
Open to all youth age 4 and
up
Youth bowling is a
sport that everyone can
participate in and compete
in regardless of their skill
level. Call 542-3493 for
more information

THE ZONE

COMPLEX
Call 542-3521 for
information.

Texas Hold'em
Tournaments
Budweiser Brew House
Monday & Thursday 7 p.m.
Zone gift certificates
awarded!

Trivia Night
Budweiser Brew House
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.

Karaoke
Budweiser Brew House
Wednesday & Friday
7:30 p.m. until close

Lunch Bingo
Monday F,'id.i
11:15 a.m. 1 p.m., 10
games, $1 per card per
game
Enjoy lunch while you play!

Direct TV Sunday Ticket
Come out and watch you
favorite NFL game at the
Bud Brew House.
Enjoy one of our Pizza
specials or just order off the
menu.
Open to all MWR patrons
and their guests
Families welcome!
Doors open at 12:30 p.m.

Children's Holiday Bingo
Dec. 19
Ages 3- 19, child must be
able to daub on their own
Doors open at 4 p.m.
Games start at 5 p.m.
$15 per person

FITNESS &

AQUATICS
Call 542-2930 for


information.

Family Fitness Center
Located above the Youth
Center Gym
Monday F,'id.i1y, 9 a.m. -


1 p.m.
Tuesday & Thursday, 4-7
p.m.
Work out while your
children enjoy the play
area.

Jingle Bell Jog
Dec. 11 at 11:30 a.m.
Pre-register at the base
gym

TRX Suspension Training
Class is now at the Base
Gym
Class is offered Monday
through Thursday at 11:15
a.m. and on F,-id.i% at 4:15
p.m.

Battle the Bermuda
triangle
Swim incentive program:
November 1 February 1
Swim 15,000 yds = swim
cap
Swim 30,000 yds = t-shirt
Swim 60,000 yds = swim
bag
Register at the Base Gym

I.T.T. EVENTS
Call 542-3318 for
information.

FCCJ Artist Series
Broadway
Stomp
Dec. 12, 8 p.m. ($51.75) 1st
Orchestra seating)
A Chorus Line
Jan. 23, 2 p.m. ($60), 8 p.m.
($61)
The Wizard of Oz
Feb. 27, 2 p.m. ($57.75), 8
p.m. ($59.50)
Feb. 28, 1:30 p.m. ($57.75)
Mamma Mia
March 27, 2 p.m. & 8 p.m.
($62.50)
Grease
May 1, 2 p.m. ($61), 8 p.m.
($74.50)
Chicago
May 22, 8 p.m. ($62.50)

Jacksonville Jaguars
tickets now on sale
Section 147 $58.25 per
person
200 Level $54 per person
400 Level $42 per person
Jag Shuttle $12 per person

Gator Bowl Patch
$5 for great savings at the
following locations,
Adventure Landing, Bono's
Pit Bar-B-Q, Dave &
Busters, Domino's Pizza,
The Golf Club at Fleming
Island, McAlister's Deli,
McDonalds,
Sneaker's Sports Grille,
Windsor Parke Golf Club
and the Champions Club at
Julington Creek.

Capital One Bowl in
Orlando, Fla.
Florida Citrus Bowl
Stadium
Jan. 1 at 1 p.m. $68.50

Champs Bowl in Orlando,
Florida
Florida Citrus Bowl
Stadium
Dec. 29 at 8 p.m. $47.50

Club Resort Vacation
Condo Rentals
Low as $329 per week / per
unit over 3,500 locations
in 80 countries www.
afvclub.com or call 1-800-
724-9988 reference #62 for
NAS Jax

Military Rolex 2-day
Jan. 30 & 31
$12 military members
$40 for all others

Bud Shootout
Feb. 2
$33 for unreserved

Camping World 300
Feb. 13
$59


Daytona 500 Tickets
Feb. 14
Keech Box and DePalma -
$152
Sprint Fan Zone $75


Photo by Shannon Leonard
MWR employee Marisol Safar, left, hands Ernestine Cunningham some Bingo cards she purchased during the lunch program
Oct. 29 at The Zone. Lunch time Bingo is offered Monday through Friday from 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.. There are 10 games at $1
per card per game, win $50 minimum per game and enjoy lunch while you play! For more information, call 542-5007.


Superstretch $59
Turns tower $165
Petty Tower $350

Dane Cook
Veteran's Memorial Arena
Feb. 5 at 7:30 p.m.
$81.50 for club seating

Trans-Siberian Orchestra
Veteran's Memorial Arena
Dec. 3
$68.50 for club seating

Gator Bowl Pre-Sale
Jan. 1
Section 124, $30 per person

Orlando Magic tickets
Level H (Blue,Black or
Silver) Adult/Child
$104-$94-$78
Level I (Blue, Black or
Silver) Adult/Child $91-
$80-$70
Level J (Blue, Black or
Silver) Adult/Child $73-
$62-$52
Level M (Blue, Black or
Silver) Adult/Child $60-
$50-$39
Level N (Blue, Black or
Silver) Adult/Child $46-
$36-$25

The World Famous
Lipizzaner Stallions
Jan. 3 at 2 p.m. at the
Veteran's Memorial Arena
$32 per person, buy one get
one free

Ringling Brothers and
Barnum and Bailey Circus
Jan. 23, 3:30 p.m. and 7:30
p.m., $13 per person


Monster Truck Jam
Feb. 27, 7:30 p.m., $32
per person, club seating,
includes pit pass

LIBERTY COVE

RECREATION
Trips, activities and costs
may be restricted to El-E6
single or unaccompanied
active duty members. Call
542-3491 for information.

Comedy Zone Trip
featuring Jeff Ross
Tomorrow night
Free admission and free
appetizers!

Planet Fest Trip
Saturday
Departs Liberty at 10 a.m.

Learn to Fly at the Navy
Jax Flying Club
Nov. 15
Free introduction to the
program

NAS JAX

GOLF CLUB
Golf course info: 542-3249
Mulligan's info: 542-2936

Military Appreciation Days
at NAS Jax Golf Club
$17 per person, includes
cart & green fees
Nov. 17 for active duty.
Nov. 19 for retirees and
DoD personnel.

Christmas Eve Golf
Scramble
Dec. 24, 10 a.m. shot gun


start
$40 military/DoD, $50
civilian guest

Senior Military Invitational
Golf Tournament
Dec. 9-10, 9 a.m. shot gun
start
$75 per person

Sunday Brunch now at
Mulligan's, 10 a.m. 2 p.m.

0-CLUB & T-BAR
For information on booking
command or private
functions at the O'Club or
T-Bar, call the Officers'
Club main office, 542-3041.

T-Bar Social Hours
Monday Friday, 3:30-7:30
p.m.
Reserve Drill Weekends,
3:30-7:30 p.m.

YOUTH CENTER
Call 778-9772.

Free open recreation for
children in kindergarten
through age 17
Tuesday Frid.ily, 6:15-8
p.m.
Saturday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.
Must register at the Youth
Center.

Military Family
Appreciation Carnival
Saturday, 11 a.m. 5 p.m.

I *~W1IR

U-ZE JWLR


Alleghany Softball Field
Free games, food and
prizes!

Christmas Tree Lighting
Patriot's Grove
Dec. 4 at 4:30 p.m.
Free photos with Santa,
face painting, tree lighting,
refreshments and more!

Tropical Freeze
Mulberry Cove Marina
Dec. 19, noon 4 p.m.
Free snow sledding, food
and beverages!

NAS JAX

FLYING CLUB
Call 777-8549/6035.

Private Pilot Ground School
$450 includes instruction
and books
Jan. 4- Feb. 10

CHILD

DEVELOPMENT

HOMES

For more information, call
542-5381.

Be your own boss!
Provide quality childcare in
your home.
Become a Navy Child
Development Home Care
Provider.

LIONELe
SALES SERVICE
HOBBY WORLD
7273 103rd St. Jax 772-9022
175 Blanding Blvd. OP 272-6315
www.hobbyworld.biz


MI Nlews


LOCATION
ABC LIQUORS
AMERICAN LEGION
BONDS BBQ
BONUS DOLLAR
BP
CECIL PINES ADULT COMMUNITY
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
CHEVRON GAS STATION
CITGO
COMFORT INN
ECKERD DRUGS
FAMILY DOLLAR
FCE BP
FCE SHELL
FCE SHELL
FCE SHELL
FCE SHELL(DAILY'S)
FIDDLERS GREEN GOLF COURSE
FLEET RESERVE
FOOD LION
FOOD LION
FOOD LION
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
GATE
VYSTAR CREDIT UNION
VYSTAR CREDIT UNION
VYSTAR CREDIT UNION
VYSTAR CREDIT UNION
VYSTAR CREDIT UNION
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE


I nInATInll


ADDRESS
5541 ROOSEVELT BLVD.
5443 SAN JUAN AVE.
1179 PARK AVE.
7628 103RD ST.
6842 WILSON BLVD
6008 LAKE COVE AVE.
1734 KINGSLEY AVE.
206 PARK AVE.
1313 BLANDING/KNIGHT BOXX
341 PARK AVE.
1952 PARK AVE.
4603 BLENDING BLVD.
6510 NORMANDY BLVD.
6409 SAN JUAN AVE
6970 103rd ST
11 BLENDING BLVD
620 CHAFFEE RD
CECIL FIELD
5391 COLLINS RD.
6260 103RD ST.
7900 103RD ST.
1670 WELLS RD.
5480 COLLINS RD
511 BULLS BAY HWY
10980 NEW KINGS RD(US 1)
4511 SAN JUAN AVE
7023 103rd ST
640 STOCKTON ST
277 BLENDING BLVD
500-60 HWY 17 & CR 220
4420 WABASH AVE.
4441 WESCONNETT BLVD.
7254 103RD ST.
CECIL FIELD
182 BLENDING BLVD.
1441 DUNN AVE
821 BLENDING BLVD
7313 LEM TURNER RD
132 BLENDING BLVD
1548 PARK AVE
634 BLENDING BLVD
1585-B ISLAND LANE


AnnRrlDe


JIFFY LUBE
JIFFY LUBE
JOHNSON FAMILY FLEA MARKET
KANGAROO
KANGAROO
KANGAROO
KANGAROO
KANGAROO
KANGAROO
KANGAROO
KRYSTALS
LIBRARY
LIL CHAMP
LIL CHAMP
LIL CHAMP
LIL CHAMP
LIL CHAMP
LIL CHAMP
LIL CHAMP
MOVIE STOP
MURRAYS TAVERN
POST OFFICE
RAE'S DINER
ROWE'S
SAFECO
SAMS ST. JOHNS SEAFOOD
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
SPRINT
STAR FOOD
VFW
WESCONNETT LIBRARY
WINN DIXIE
WOODY'S BBQ
YELLOW WATER HOUSING
Updated: FEBRUARY 1,2007


rITv


2692 BLENDING BLVD MDG
1445 S 6th ST MACCL
5800 RAMONA BLVD JAX
2688 OLD MIDDLEBURG JAX
7603 103rd ST./RICKER JAX
3137 SR 220/RUSSELL MDG
2584 SR220 & COLLEGE MDG
5105 SR218W/MALLARD MDG
2816 BLANDING/PEPPERGRASS MDG
4305 HWY 17 & RAGGEDY PT OP
208 BLENDING BLVD. OP
KINGSLEY AVE. OP
9763 103rd ST./CONNIE JEAN JAX
636 McDUFF AVE. S. NEAR 1-10 JAX
770 N McDUFF NEAR BEAVER JAX
102 SUZANNE OP
2468 BLENDING & SCENIC MDG
338 COLLEGE & OLD JENNINGS OP
1312 BLANDING/OAK OP
8635 BLENDING BLVD JAX
4527 120TH ST. JAX
1335 KINGSLEY AVE. OP
CECIL FIELD JAX
5435 BLENDING BLVD JAX
6407 103RD ST. JAX
1464 PARK AVE. OP
10401 NORMANDY BLVD. JAX
4152 OLD MIDDLEBURG JAX
8181 103rd ST. JAX
4856 PARK ST./CASSAT JAX
3895 OLD JENNINGS/LONGBAY MDG
2682 BLANDING/218 MDG
4486 MIMOSA/218 MDG
804 BLANDING/CAMP JOHNSON OP
2816 HENLEY RD LKASBURY GCS
3075 HWY 17/MAHAMA GCS
6935 HWY 17/HIBERNIA GCS
756 PARK AVE. OP
187 ARORA BLVD. OP
103RD ST./ HARLOW JAX
5647 ROOSEVELT BLVD. JAX
4291 ROOSEVELT BLVD. JAX
CECIL FIELD JAX


I ICKU YU JXAIR EWSAT ANYO HS OATINS


OFF-BASE PICKUP LOCATIONS


LUGAI IUN AVUHM Wly


F













Turkey Shoot Racquetball
Tournament Nov. 16 20
Open to authorized base gym patrons over
18. Recreational and competitive divisions
for men. Open division for women. Matches
begin at 5 p.m. Winners receive awards. Call
542-2930 by Nov. 11 to sign up.
Turkey Trot 5K Nov. 20
at 11:30 a.m.
Perimeter Road/Antenna Farm, open to all
personnel
Sign up at NAS Gym or Fitness Source prior
to race day and receive t-shirt.
Race day registration 10 -11 a.m.
Awards given to the top-three male and
female runners for age groups: 29 & under;
30-37; 38-44; 45-49; and 50 over.
Captain's Cup 4-on-4 Flag
Football Meeting Dec. 2 at 11:30
a.m. at Gym
Open to active duty, command DoD
personnel and selective reservists. Have
your command athletic officer or designated
representative attend the meeting and
receive five captain's cup points.
Captain's Cup 3-on-3 Basketball
Tournament Dec. 7
Open to active duty, selective reservists,
command DoD and DoD contractors
from NAS Jax. Teams are comprised of a
maximum four players from their respective
commands and can enter multiple teams.
The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Gym.
Sign up by Dec. 4.
Join one of these Captain's Cup sport
leagues, now forming:
* Kickball
* Greybeard Basketball (ages 30 & up)
* Intramural Basketball


NAS JAX SPORTS

Sports officials and scorekeepers
needed
North Florida Military Officials Association
needs individuals to officiate basketball,
soccer, softball, football, volleyball and
wrestling at NAS Jax. Experience not
required.
For more information, call Bill
Bonser at 542-2930/3239.



STANDINGS


Team
MWR -
MWR -


Intramural Badminton
as of Nov. 6
Wins Lc
Blue 6
Red 4


RLSO
HS-11
VR-58
MWR White


Team
Air Op
VR-58
Naval
Great
CNAT
Wolf F
NOS(
VPU-
CNAT
SERC


losses
1
1


4 2
4 2
3 3
2 2


Intramural Fall Volleyball
as of Nov. 6
i Wins Los
ps Gold 8 C
8 5 3
Hospital 4 3
t Whites 4 3
TU Gold 3 2
Pack 3 5
C 3 3
1 3 4
TU Blue 2 4
DC 1 4


ses
)
3
3
3
2
_>
5
3
4
4
4


The Navy Exchange wants to help its customers
pay for their children's college education through
its A-OK Student Reward Program. Four times
per school year, four students will be the recipients of
a $5,000, $3,000 $2,000 or $1,000 U.S. savings bond,
denominations at maturity. The next drawing will be
held at the end of November 2009.
Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point
average equivalent or better, as determined by their
school system, may enter the drawing. Eligible students
include dependent children of active duty military mem-
bers, reservists and military retirees enrolled in first
through 12th grade. Dependent children without an indi-
vidual Dependent Identification Card must be accompa-


JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009 19


Golf tourney


Team
CNAT
CNRS
CNAT
VP-30
VP-5
VP-16
AIR O
NMSC
VPU-1


Team
VP-16
VR-58
HSM-7
CNRSE
NRSE
VPU-1
FRCSE
VP-30
HS-5
Air Ope
FRC-S
HS-11
FANG
Rabid I
FRCSE
Dirty B
HITRO
NAVFA
PSD
VP-5 V


Greybeard Fall Softball
as of Nov. 6
Wins Los
TU Gold 8
E 5
TU Blue 5
5
3
3
PS/SERCC 3
1
1


Intramural Fall Softball
as of Nov. 6
Wins LoE
14
12
70 12
E/NRD 10
RCC 10
9
E 400 9
E's 8
8
rations 8
ERCC 7
5
5
Possums 4
E Black 4
irdz 4
)N 3
\C 3
3
Vhite 2


sses
0
3
3
3
4
4
5
6
6


sses
1
2
4
4
4
4
5
6
4
5
8
8
9
7
3
4
11
12
13
11


nied by their sponsor to submit their entry. Each student
may enter only once each grading period and must re-
enter with each qualifying report card.
To enter the drawing, stop by any NEX with a current
report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum
grade average. Then fill out an entry card and obtain an
A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons
for NEX products and services.
The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM)
has been offering students a chance to win a savings
bond through its A-OK Student Reward Program since
1998. Since the program began, NEXCOM has awarded
$460,000 in savings bonds to 152 students with the help of
its generous vendor partners.


Photo courtesy of MWR
Participants in the Nov. 3 Capt. Karl Rau (commanding
officer, Fleet and Industrial Supply Center Jacksonville)
Golf Tournament held at NAS Jax Golf Club. Rau (bot-
tom row, third from right) retired Nov. 6 after 28 years
of Service.




Deer crossing


Car buying: beware of these six slippery sales strategies


By Howard Krueger
Special Contributor


Even with the suc-
cess of the "Cash for
Clunkers" program,
the auto industry is limp-
ing through the recession,
most car dealers are still in
need to make sales. It may
be a buyer's market, but
that's no reason to let your
guard down in the show-
room. Experienced sales-
people have one goal in
mind: to put you in a new
car today. And it's their job
to get as much profit out of
every sale as possible.
While most car salespeo-
ple are honest and forth-
right, others may be look-
ing to take you for a ride.
So before you set foot on
the lot, be aware of sales
tactics that could bait you
into paying hundreds or
thousands more than you
should.
The Four Square: A
salesman puts four num-
bers in front of you: the
new vehicle price, your
trade-in value, your down
payment, and the monthly
payment. He's looking for
your "hot button." When
you focus on one of the
numbers (say you demand
more for your trade-in) he
knows he can hook you by
meeting your terms on that
part of the deal. Problem
is, the other three numbers
are already inflated to favor
the dealer. (Provide graph-
ic example of four squares
with inflated figures and
one highlighted (trade-in
value)).
The Waiting Game:
"Let me go talk to my man-
ager and see what I can
do," says the salesman. It's
a classic technique. After
what seems like ages, the
salesman returns, ostensi-
bly exhausted from negoti-
ating on your behalf. "My
boss is willing to come
down this is the best deal
we've given anyone on this
car." Don't bite. The deal-
er's betting that the longer
you sit, the more anxious
you'll be to reach an agree-
ment.
The Turnover House:
ooo


Sometimes the sales man-
ager comes to talk to you
himself. Now that you're
talking to the boss, the
thinking goes, you'll know
you're getting the best pos-
sible deal. The truth is, the
"boss" is a professional clos-
er, brought in to win you
over when the first string
can't. It's not uncommon
to go through three layers
of sales people before you
reach the dealer's true best
offer.
The Sympathy Play:
"Hey, I need to make a lit-
tle money on this deal, too,"
he says, citing the strug-
gling economy or, worse,
four kids to feed. It's only
fair for the dealer to make a
reasonable profit, but don't
be guilted into paying too
much. Rest assured the
dealer won't knowingly lose
money just to earn your
business.
The Now-or-Never:
"This deal is only good for
today." Or "there's anoth-
er buyer interested in this
car." Whatever the sales-
man's story, some dealers
rely on fear tactics to rush
you into a sale. You know
better.
The Free Extras: To
sweeten the pot, your sales-
person might throw in pin-
striping, rust-proofing, or
fabric protection at no extra
cost. But unbiased experts
agree that these add-ons
aren't worth much, despite
what the dealer usually
charges for them. Your best
bet is to ignore them.
Being street-smart about
sly sales techniques is one
thing; sticking to your guns
and actually getting a good
deal is another. So how can
you tilt the odds back in
your favor? The answer is
simple: research, research,
research.
The Internet has leveled
the playing field for con-
sumers. And thanks to sites
like Edmunds.com and
member-based resources
such as USAA's Car-Buying
Service, you can enter the
dealership armed with
more information than the
salesman himself.
Not only can you research


your preferred vehicle and
every available bell and
whistle, you can find out
the dealer's invoice (also
known as dealer's cost) and
uncover special incentives
and rebates.
It's also smart to know
the fair value of your
trade-in (visit Kelly Blue
Book at kbb.com), get a
quote for insurance on the
new vehicle, and get pre-
approved for auto financ-
ing. Lining up these num-
bers in advance simplifies
your negotiation in the
sales office. Still, be sure
to set aside plenty of time
for your visit to the dealer-
ship, and avoid distractions
while you focus on getting
the best deal.
An even simpler approach
to consider is having the
price negotiated for you
before you step foot on the
car lot. Taking advantage
of car-buying programs that
offer these special member
prices and services can save
you time, money, and the
hassles of negotiations.
With solid knowledge
about what you want and
how much it should cost,
you'll know how to spot a


good deal. And all the slick
salesmen in the world won't
be able to change your
mind.
Howard Krueger is a
manager of Internet auto


sales with USAA, a full-
service financial services
company serving military
personnel and their fami-
lies. Prior to joining USAA,
Krueger spent eight years


NEX rewards students with its A-OK Student Reward Program
From Navy Exchange Command


Photo by Joe Carreiro
A 6-point buck stands on the No. 1 fairway of the
red course at NAS Jax Golf Club on the evening
of Nov. 3.


selling cars at a traditional
dealership.


VISIT OR CALL TODAY
*Westland Oaks 904-779-0790
6451 Pemberly Ln. Jacksonville 32244






20 JAX AIR NEWS, NASJACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009



Horse therapy for




wounded warriors


By Patti Tebow
Special Contributor


Winston Churchill once said, "The
outside of a horse is good for the
inside of a man." This has
proven true time and again, especially
when horses help those with physical and/
or mental challenges.
It has been shown that equine therapy
significantly helps individuals with a vari-
ety of special needs by improving muscle
tone, balance, posture, coordination, motor
skills and emotional well being.
Northeast Florida HORSE Therapies,
Inc. is a not for profit therapeutic riding
program serving people with special needs
including our wounded military service
personnel and veterans.
Though there are many equine thera-
peutic riding programs across the country,
only four serve our military.
HORSE Therapies is unique in that it
would help fill a need for our veterans
through the "Wounded Warriors" and


"Horses for Heroes" programs -as well as
the community at large. In the past, horses
carried our soldiers into battle. We now
have the opportunity for horses to allow
our wounded heroes to continue to be car-
ried with honor.
The Florida equine industry is one of
the largest in the United States. There
are over 3,000 horses in Florida and the
horse industry produces goods and services
valued at $2.2 billion annually.
Many of these horses are retired or
slightly injured and need a home where
they can continue to serve a useful life. A
therapeutic program provides a place for
these horses where they can be cared for
while continuing to help people.
NE Florida HORSE Therapies, Inc. and
NFHJA invite you to be a part of this new
and innovative program. Help be a part of
improving lives in our community.
Please join us Nov. 14 for the annual
"Dinner in the Dirt" fundraiser as we kick
up our heels for those who cannot.


Green Cove Springs, Florida


Northeast riorida Kqu.estria. Society Ad North Florida Uuteriji..per As.ociatio


Northeast Florida Equestrian Society And North Florida Hunter/ljumper Association
proudly present


Wesbmdito r. WurIie
November 14, 2009


Clay County Fairgrounds


Daytime Equestrian Activities starting at 8:00 AM
Hunter-Jumper Horse Show Children's activities
Horsemanship clinics with Petting Zoo
James Malcolm and Phil Rogers Meet & Greet the Lipizzan Horses
Food Vendors Meet Florida's first Guide Horse, "JBR Princess Confetti"
"Toys for Tots" Drop off Center
Daytime admission and parking fees waived/ Donations accepted
Plus
Evening Equestrian Entertainment starting at 7:00 PM

Herrmann's Feturing Dhy Chapml S

ROal uipizzan stalo1S iiIl iwe
Therapeutic
Horse
Demonstrations

Military "-_
Color Guard .. .


General Admission Ticket Prices
For Evening activities starting at 7:00 PM
Advance Gate
Adult ForfurtherInformotion _
Sr. & Military caoi 904 612-1404
Child 6-14
Children under free


Advance purchase tickets are available from these fine businesses:
Lisa's Feed 282-4341 Two Time Tack and Feed 262-7574 Feed N' Time 825-1783
2905 Blanding Blvd. Middleburg 7420 Rosco Ave, Bayard 6355 Cr 208 St Augustine
The Gift Horse 529-8225 Bent Creek Feed 777-3838 Russell's Feed 291-5725
716 N Orange Ave, Green Cove Springs 10777 103rd St, Jacksonville 4479 CR 218 Middleburg


4


Websites: www.jaxequestrian.org and www.nfhja.org For more info contact: Peggy Fuller 904 612-1404


All proceeds benefit Northeast Florida H.O.R.S.E. Therapies, Inc. (Helping Others Rehabilitate Through the Services of
Equines). H.O.R.S.E. Therapies, Inc. is a not for profit Equine Therapeutic Program to benefit people with special needs
and to serve our Military personnel through "Horses for Heroes" and the "Wounded Warriors" programs


Photos by MC2(SW/AW) Sunday Williams
A member of the U.S. Army Special Operations Command Black Daggers Parachute
Demonstration Team spirals down displaying Old Glory during the singing of the national
anthem Nov. 8 at the 2009 Sea and Sky Spectacular part of the "Week of Valor" celebration
during military appreciation month in Northeast Florida.
The U.S Navy
Blue Angels
fly two
upside down
and two
right side up
Nov. 8, dur-
ing the 2009
Sea and Sky
Spectacular
as part of
the "Week
of Valor"
celebrated at
Jacksonville
Beach, Fla.


I


The U.S. Coast Guard demonstrates how they conduct a search and rescue in Atlantic waters
during the 2009 Sea and Sky Spectacular at Jacksonville Beach Nov. 8.


Come Discover Our "Homes Ready Now"
and Help Us Spread Joy by Donating a
New Toy to a Deserving Tot.
Great prices and low interest rates have combined to
make this the best season ever to buy a new Drees
home. In addition, if you're looking to move quickly,
Drees has a great selection of "Homes Ready Now."
Finally, while shopping for your new home, Drees
invites you to bring a new, unwrapped toy for "Toys for
Tots." Hurry! All toys must be collected by December
12. For a complete list of Drees' communities and our
designated toy drop-off centers, visit dreeshomes.com
Homes now from the $120's-$300's

DreesBUL
HOMES

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Syndicated Content *

from Commercial News Providers


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Sea and Sky Spectacular


"Dinner in the Dirt"
Cocktails & hours d'oeuvres at 5:30 PM
Dinner at 7:00 PM by "Le Pavillion"
Live Music
We must receive your reservations no later than
November 1, 2009
Forfurther information coll 904 612-1404


. Mr. -
aw".0 "






JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009 21


New law protects tenants


of homes facing foreclosure
By Lt. j.g. Andrew Clayton, JAGC expanding tenants' rights.
Special Contributor 1. The new owner usually must abide
by the terms of the existing lease: Unlike
A newly-enacted federal law has great- under previous laws, the lease continues
y increased the rights of tenants to have legal effect after the foreclosure
iving in homes owned by landlords process. Therefore, the new owner must
facing foreclosure. Previously, under most generally allow the tenant to remain for
state laws, such tenants could be evicted at least the duration of the lease, the ten-
within a matter of days or weeks once the ant must continue to pay rent, and the
foreclosure process was completed. new owner must maintain the property as
Now, however, the Protecting Tenants required of the original landlord.
at Foreclosure Act of 2009, signed by The one exception to this rule is if the
President Barack Obama on May, 20, 2009, new owner, or someone to whom the new
allows qualifying tenants to stay in their owner sells, intends to live in the home as
home for at least 90 days. a single family residence. In such a situa-
There are three primary requirements tion, the original lease agreement will no
for tenants to qualify for the protections of longer control the tenant's rights.
the act: 2. The tenant cannot be forced to move
1. The tenant must have signed the lease out without at least 90 days notice: This
before the landlord received a notice of fore- protection applies even if tenants are in
closure: Landlords may hide the fact that a month-to-month lease or the new owner
they are facing foreclosure. You can usu- intends to live in the home as a single-
ally check with your county's land records family residence.
office (the exact procedure may vary by The result of these two protections is
state) to determine if your landlord is fac- that, if the tenant qualifies for protection
ing foreclosure before you sign your lease, under the act, the tenant may stay in the
Landlords often require tenants to consent home for at least 90 days, and possibly for
to background checks before agreeing to the duration of the lease.
the lease; it makes sense for tenants to Tenants living in a home facing fore-
check up on their landlords as well. closure have other rights as well. The
2. The tenant must be a "bona fide" Servicemember's Civil Relief Act requires
tenant: The lease must be between un- banks to follow particular procedures
related parties and the tenant must pay fair before evicting active duty service mem-
market value for rent. Children, spouses, bers. Furthermore, the Joint Federal
and parents of the landlord are automati- Travel Regulations Manual currently
cally barred from protection under this act. authorizes a local Household Goods Move
Furthermore, tenants receiving substan- for tenants forced to move because of a
tially reduced rent from a friend, relative, landlord's foreclosure.
or other such person are also not protected. Landlord/tenant law has always been
Tenants receiving government subsidies, complicated, and new protections created
such as Section 8 housing, however, are as a result of the national foreclosure crises
exempt from the fair market value require- have added an additional layer of difficulty.
ment and will usually qualify for protection. If you rent a home that is being foreclosed
3. The landlord must have had a "feder- on, consult a legal assistance attorney to
ally related loan": This will include the make sure that your rights are protected.
vast majority of normal loans, but you may Get help from your local legal assistance
not qualify if your landlord's mortgage was office at NAS Jacksonville by calling 542-
with an individual person and not a bank 2565, Ext. 3006.
or credit union. This article is not intended to substitute
If a tenant qualifies for protection under for the personal advice of a licensed attor-
this Act, there are two main provisions ney.

Charity bike ride this Sunday


From staff


The 26.2-mile National Marathon to
Finish Breast Cancer Inc. begins
at 8 a.m. this Sunday at Willocove
Park in Nocotee.
The "Bike 26.2 with DonnaTM" will
donate 100 percent of proceeds to the Mayo
Clinic and Donna Foundtion. Helmets are


mandatory and cyclists must be at least
13 years old. A water stop and bike repair
station will be located at the turnaround
point.
After the ride, cyclists may enjoy comple-
mentary fruit, bagels, snacks and bever-
ages.
Register online at https://register.breast-
cancermarathon.com/bike.


Trusts: Do you really need one?


By Jeffrey Gott, Esq.
Special Contributor


Routinely encounter people who
believe probate to be an awful, hor-
rible thing, to be avoided at all cost.
They think a trust, all by itself, can avoid
probate. This is simply not true.
Probate is a process whereby property
owned by a deceased individual is trans-
ferred to others. In order for a probate to
occur one needs to own property in their
individual name.
If I own an asset, e.g. a bank or
investment account, car, boat,
or home, and only my name
appears on the title to that
asset, then upon my death a
probate is the only way to
transfer it to my parents,
spouse, children, etc.
Exactly who will
get the assets will
be determined by
my last will and tes-
tament or, if I do not
have one, by state
law. Usually, the latter
makes every effort to keep
a deceased's property in the
family.
A trust is a legal arrangement
where an individual puts some-
thing of value under the control of
another for the sole purpose of ben-
efiting a third party.
A common example is a charitable
trust where someone who is fabulously
wealthy puts money with an investment
advisor that is to be used to promote can-
cer research, support underprivileged chil-
dren, or other good works.
All trusts have three things in common -
(1) they contain something of value, (2) are
managed by a third party, and (3) exist to
benefit individuals or charity.
Avoiding probate is totally dependent
upon how one owns their property and
assets. Remember, in order for a probate
to be required you have to leave this world
owning property in your individual name.
For example, where a husband and a
wife own everything together and one
spouse dies, the surviving spouse will


receive the assets without invoking the
probate process.
The same is true with life insurance.
After the insured person dies, the life
insurance company pays the designated
beneficiary based on a contractual obliga-
tion; probate is not involved.
Accordingly, the easiest and most has-
sle-free way to transfer property at death
without probate is often for an individu-
al to own all assets jointly with a spouse
or other intended beneficiary, or to have
a beneficiary designated for each asset,
such as "Pay on Death" designees for
bank accounts.
A living trust, on the other hand,
avoids probate by placing all of
the individual's property in the
trust so that upon death the
Deceased owns nothing in
their individual name; it
A is all in their trust.
Thus, creation of a
living trust is only
the first step in such
a process. The sec-
ond step is to transfer
everything one owns into
the living trust.
When this is completed, all
of the individual's real estate,
bank accounts, investment
accounts, automobiles, personal
effects, and the like must be titled in
the name of the living trust.
Retirement assets, life insurance, and
anything else subject to a beneficiary des-
ignation must name the living trust as
beneficiary.
As new assets are acquired they too
must be placed into the living trust. If any
asset does not go in the living trust, and an
individual dies owning one or more assets
in their own name, then a probate will be
required.
Estate planning can be a bit daunting. If
this all seems overwhelming contact a local
legal assistance provider for more informa-
tion.
Contact your local legal assistance office
at 542-2565, Ext. 3006 for more informa-
tion. This article is not intended to substi-
tute for the personal advice of a licensed
attorney.


Iou have a child with special



Do you need respite care?


needs?


Early Learning Coalition
of Duval


oj Ouval's respite care program may be


able to e


This program is funded through a grant from Navy Headquarters
and provides EFM families with 40 hours of free respite care for
children with diagnosed level 4 or 5 special needs.

For more information contact Liliana Ruiz-Rivera at
Iruizrivera@elcofduval.org or (904) 208-2044 ext. 209

Qualifications:
Navy Families
Child is NACCRRA diagnosed
level 4 or 5 special needs


This program is made possible through a NACCRRA grant to Navy Headquarters






"WE BRING THE MILITARY


MARKET To You!"
F-yMPMf tIsa ;;,An WU W


MILITA Military Publications reach

PBC I 810% of the military community





Myu s Military Community

Includes 92,103 A dive-

Duty, Reserves, Retirees and
Contradors








Working On Base -
50,6o11


Active-Duty, Reserves, Civilians, Contractors


I W. ..rE. ewsto

Published by
Ehle floridat ims-inion 312830







22 JAx AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 12, 2009






Jax Air News


ssie


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We Appredate You!
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424-6066 Eric
18 years EXPERIENCE.
Notice of
Termination of
practice of
Alexander
Milanick, DDS.
Copies of records may
be obtained in this
county(Duval) by
written request to his
father, Mr. Milanick,
P. 0. Box 1724,
Flagler Beach, FL
32136-1724 (904)
347-3473. You may be
billed for the actual
cost of copying,
mailing, or delivering
records that shall be
available at and
within reasonable
times.




Open Houses
Argyle
Arlington
Avondale/Ortega
Beaches
Downtown
Fernandina/Amelia Island
Intracoastal West
Keystone Heights/Melrose
Mandarin
Middleburg
North Jacksonville
Orange Park/Clay County
Riverside
San Marco
Southside
Springfield
Westside
Waterfront
Condominiums
Manufactured Homes
Lots
Farm Acreage
Investment Property
Retirement Community
Baker County
Georgia Real Estate
Nassua County
Putnam County
St. Johns Open Houses
St. Johns Homes
St. Johns Waterfront
St. Johns Oceanfront
St. Johns Intracoastal
St. Johns Marshfront
St. Johns Condos
St. Johns Duplex/
Townhouses
St. Johns Manufactured
Homes
St. Johns Lots/Acreage
St. Johns Active Adult


artments Furn shed
ApartmentsUnfurnished Enjoysingle story living at 2of ORANGE PARK S. Northside HANDYMAN Orange Park Foxridge Beautiful House for WESTSIDE- White House
SCondominiums our Iocationscloseto NSJA 2bd/2ba, 2car gar $800mo Rent To Own, 2 or 3/1 $237 /Blanding 4br/2ba DR, sale in Mandarin 4/2 2/1 duplex, ch&a, w/d For Rent two and three
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Homes rnise driveway on 1/2ac lot, no cleaner, owner will help hurry don't miss our
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Mobile Home Lots Budget friendly Rental $1000mo Cyndy 561-302-6200 $750mo. 904-859-7536 B line 3/2, 2cgar, irg ------
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utes fromdownto Min Management/RentalServices ARLINGTON Adobe $25App. Fee! Call771-1243 roomscarpeted, appli-
New Windows, New St. JohnsApartmentsFurnished $400. 1/1 $450. 2/1 $625. FERNANDINA ceiling fans thru-out, frpic, fncd, All Appl, T A K S 4/2, SF home, close to base,
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driveway, Brick'exte- Townhomes SPECIALS THIS WEEK ONLY WESTSIDE Off 103rd fenced yard, $650mo. --------------------_____
ior with maintenance St. Johns Retirement Com- SI I 2BR DUPLEX, FENCED 4/2,2 car ar, $200. Southside $9953r/2ha TIMUQUANA 3r/2.ba
free vinyl overhang, munities Hilliard COUNTRY LIVING YARD, NO W/D CONN. Maxxum Realty 505-6203 1290 sqft tile floors, 2 car Fireplace, fenced back

a, lu m Renta $545MO.904783 0288U T Syportu .rn.shed,


overlooking backyard St Johns Houses Bedroomsin/90 Startng @ $450 JoseBlvd ANGPARK2 Pio Beach 241- 5221, Mand268-0035 ESTSIDE Of03rd ROOMMATE
and patio, Attached Unfurnished EASTWOOD OAKS APTS WEBlvThDeqtc county bohood g9B0vd&9ACaII4ic8e-97l0arm n or Immnaculate home



onecar garage, Fire St JohnsMobleHome/Lot 37149 Cody Circle, Hilard F sun on lake Ir 482-10995384BR & 2BR $595 & $695, $650. a month call now $500m. Amenities
place, plus more... Rental (904) 8452922 setting, water included. hspta www.signaturerealestatejacksonville.com Fnced ard N W/ hook andpay only $31.00 for center located near 95,
you're bU 1BR 9sf Call special ratescall SandyCE T 0-695-2255 904-338-1931
__________ St. St. Johns Roomsto Rent ros.s. fm s$d.ep o 9 p,_Rie789 yu1tohrn__F.
St. JohnsBOceanfront/Waterfront $57mo. 904-349-8706 AVAILABLE FROM $700-$3000/MO. dogs 707-9690 or 382-7570 Be5B
mSt.cJohns Vacatin Rental ORANGE PARK 3/2 Pao Beach 241- 5221,Mand 268- 0035 ETDO1r F Rent largei3/



Ro Andrade Fu e MURRAY HILL LARGE 2rd2b w/ boarsrne GREAT
t.SAN JOSE- Quaint fur- 1 age/ andain/904 2 BR Apts. Cable Ready, 1200sf $925m 904-465-7970 LOCs Wsid 482-1099 R, $595 $ATONa month
nished ap dCable and all Carpet, Kit Equip. 384-1472 WESTSIDE Riverfront
$275dep. 904-739-2573 Murray Hill- Affordable 2/2, boat slip, ramp, SWESTSIDE off Blanding
SAN MARCO 911 Riviera Income LimitARGE Apply sun rdtm on $895mo 251-4778 ake p I
uostudioafe65riwrk 90s4-u Cal-d4pecM7a rtTY ORANGE PARK Nakee wpt in The military community makes up 20 percent of the total
If r locating, u 6 3505 corb ay Apt., 733-3730 $ smo. 9045050665 F population for Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia.
sellingaoryRelocationgfirstilNext to Goodby's Boat Ramp ORANGE PARK Twnhse, F






specialist USN (re t) r fresh pn D hkups, gated community, new carpet & paint, That means that 20 out of every 100 people you meet are
904-264-7597mmunity pool, 2nd floor corner unit *somehow connected wth the mtary
randrade@ inc1 & 2 BRAts Cable Ready, eluded Washer/Dr2s er, microwave, *



wasonreatycorp.com Like new bd apt. C 12 ba $650.00,2 Kt qud 2 ba $700.00. 4rn i e 1472 diswathsh ostoveveneigertor. Get your message to them by advertising in one or all of
uIilCpincId. $595m &1 - WESTSIDE Riverfront *Wt siog. of







WtuealtA w/d hkup, near OP Mall & 1-295,sec dep,no petS ARGYLE, 3/2, LR, DR, Available immediately. the publications distributed at the local bases in the area.
$275dep. 904-739-2573 Murray Hill- Affordable 2/?, boat slip, ramp, oflndinl8 .



Apt. HoesOrange Park, FL 32003 Age & priv pkng, 1st fira, secd just north ofCntact Bambi (561)302.



SAN MARCO 911 RiviWELCOME 904278-736. no crdt $895o 2514778
Arlington/ Ft. Caroline For advertising information,
i s 4br/2ba, near amQenities e(904) 269-7100 call 0Ia2w0apecd
to shops, cafes, river, 904 6381-4817/711 TTY ORANGE PARK N u a336,




Military RelocatApplon ai A rlington 3bdr, tile baths, For Rent 3and bed1/2 2 bath, 1157sf apt inFax 90430
Specialist USN (ret) ,' fresh pnt, WD hkups, *gated community, new carpet & paint, That means that 20 out of every 100 peoeyou meet are









Direct Line 904264Depos759it! ak itenplian 3 BR's starting at $755
--H(904) 662- t.al5030O n6-,507 $300 Look and Lease Special smh ci t h m ry




$0 DOW N! Immediate Approval with allotment. Av1ailD c. n 1stease... ....
rand raisy CrRe@ ,7mo.904-568-2517 included r/DrWasherconn/Dryer, microwave, actions
watsonrealtycorp co rn Like new 2bd IW Ia Sb650.00,2 bd b $700.00. *dishasher, stove/oven, refrigerator. Get your message to them by advertising in one or all of











LUV HOMES Clay Couny schools! E ARLINGTON 4br,2ba 2 Pools w Jacuzzi's and Playground pets/No smoking. $950/month.
4-772-8039 US HWy 17S N aStatn& BeachAvailable immediately the publications distributed at the local bases in the area.es
gfirplc, ceiling fans, scorned Contact Bambi (561)302-8474.












Good or Bad Credit? MaxAMLY LOOKING to 1863 Wells Road, Oran Park, FI 3207 covered patio, fenced yard
payments Arlington FStop pt. ayingCaroline rti g inf atin,
rent come see us Great hood pref'd. 904-485-7397
l t....... Iv...... GAle aio. In 4br2ba, near amenities ( 4) 2697100 all 904- 943 6,







Call now 904-222-8028 everything! $1500mo. mo+dp 904 6576186
1258 Monte lo DriArlington dr, 1 and 1/2904-768-9964
Fo-OROMEPAYM s aLocatedoffBlandingBlvd.IRCOAS WEST M
$250will get you the Keys & thBeautifu /2 L., fencedR, GR,
ura es apNo Deposit! yarent has new carpet- INTRACOASTAL 3/2, paintAPARTMENT GRO P
Call n 0 -8028all kitchen appliances 3 BR's starting at $755








OWNER WILL FINANCE bar, back yard and patio. MANDARIN 3br/2bd,


rh Bld. PolPark 3004 n eas MIDD EBUiaRG 3br/2ba, Pool and Recreational Areas
$0 DO N Feemonthmediatent with all2months lease. o Avome. 1east s4ec. oLocat ed iOa i teg. ark Pla... e
you haveland or 5 off ur Lowest Price on each floorplan dep. Call 904-461-3474 Large Units with Spacious Floor PlansBacks to C










bt ene See The Starners for Rel Estate Madison @ Bay Pointe 2 & 3 Bedroom Townhomes
oW bile H fead, your Rent includes water, sewer, trash and pest control. R Maint.a Provided. Racquetball




















S i $1,795/m. 9045682517 W 4500 Baymeadows Rd. Washer-Dryer ConnectionsDryer connections
Banging Qua ome and Jacksonvlle, FL 32217 On-Site Maintenance
7.8 anon Q ed Buyem Togethe 866-721-8505rent tn i
I s the economy see Great hood prefd. 9044857397 Located in Ba meadows Area Off295
Isteeconomic t_.._ o_ _^- c.. Located in Baymeadows Area Off 295


St. Johns Investment impact of the mili-
Income Property tary in Northeast GoMobile' Text: SeeStamner To: 87778
Miscellaneous
Out of Area/Town/State Florida and E-mail: SeeTheStamers@SeeStamer.com
Real Estate Wanted Southeast Georgia. tCl 904- 214629 M O.
Georgia Advertise in Cell: 904-214-62
RaEs tthe military 3 y ...... I4 I.
FOLKSTON GA, publications ........ LEAI D100
3/2,d e ibrn g distributed at 904436-1432 Serving Northeast Florida : "
r oom, fpl, brick
.ranch, Irg scrnd the local bases
bck porch, front porch,
single car gar., $177,000. in the area.
1.34acres. 912-288-4670
To advertise] ,


COME ON BY!
OPEN WEEKENDS i9
622 Filmore Street c
Orange Park, FL
I: Fimore St.. J


A e iIlad Please call
4 904-3594336, | Navy
4BR1/3.5BA Lg Florida Rm 904-359-4336Navy
sionaly decorated Fax 904-366 6230. C aSsified
from beach 803-606-93584C classified
Home loan solutions from Ads
Bank of America
Competitive rates THE FLEET
A wide range of home financing solutions
Easy application process
C-.M.M MARKET Rank/Grade: Work Phone # Organization: Date Submitted:
SMourieLonfer ADVERTISING Name (please print): Signature:
904.463.2065 ADVERTISING
.u P/ oo.ankof .Wiep r RULES 1. Free advertising in the Fleet Market is restricted to active duty and retired military 6. Ads appearing to be in the promotion of a business or which do not meet the above
personnel (or their dependents) and civilian employees assigned to Naval Air requirements will be billed. The publisher reserves the right to omit any or all ads.
.. Please fill out Station, Jacksonville. 7. Additional readership in other publications can be arranged for a nominal fee by calling
BankofAmerica 1 this form in 2. Advertising in the Fleet Market is a free service provided by the publisher to help 366-6300 or 1-800-258-4637 (toll free), or enclosing your phone number.
Hne Lons black or b k. qualified personnel dispose of unwanted personal articles. Service ads such as 8. Faxed ads will be accepted at 904-359-4180, however, they must be completed on an
Hom;eLo 707854 lack or blue ink. sharing rides to work or on leave, announcing lost and found Items, and garage original form.
-_ L. .. .. _... sales will be accepted. ADS PERTAINING TO GUN SALES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Select the number of weeks ad is to run: U 1 wk U 2 wks U 3 wks U 4 wks
,,1 U W L IW W W WWL W LU[ L h J DEAD I ES ANIMAL OR PET ADS WILL ONLY BE ACCEPTED IF THE ANIMALS ARE OFFERED
Carlos Berrios LI FREE. CHILD CARE PROVIDERS CANNOT DISCRIMINATE. REAL ESTATE ADS WILL To renew your ad after the allotted time, you must re-submit your ad to Jax Air News.
Realtor, USN RET BE LIMITED TO ANNOUNCEMENT OF HOMES FOR SALE OR RENT BY QUALIFIED NOTE: (1) This form must be clipped (not torn) along the outside border. (2) No more than
Cell: (904) 563-1824 1 JAX AIR INDIVIDUALS WITH PERMANENT CHANGE OF STATION (PCS) OR "OFFICIALLY one word (or abbreviation for one word) per block. (3) Only two free ads per family, per
Office: (904) 733-3003 A REASSIGNED" ORDERS. REAL ESTATE ADS MUST CONTAIN ONE OF THOSE STATE- week. (4) Select the category for the ad by referring to the Classified Index.
-.1 www.gotoaelosbernouosT.om N EW S MENTS IN THE BODY OF THE AD OTHERWISE THEY WILL BE BILLED.
Hablo Esparfol 3. All information requested must be included and readable. All ads should be written Category:
T1To ( independent of other information contained on this form.
BLOA KILUA 4. Ads received after the above time will run in the following week's issue.
NEXIT ISTOP. REALTY TodaY! o Noon 5. Completed forms should be delivered or mailed to the Fleet Market, Jax Air News, Bldg.
922EIT STOP RETY 1, Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Jacksonville, FL 32212, or to Jax Air News, One
JacksonvifleFL 32256 FREE Monday Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202
BUYER REPRESENTATION One Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville FL 32202
fh FREE CMA, MARKETING PLAN --
oo o 1 ,1 o L L LILdLl. 7T


Commercial Real Estate Pets/Animals


mm


9E 9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE 9 FREE e FREE 9 FREE 9 1


I








JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, 'I 1.I. 1,, November 12, 2009 23


S

Pics+VilualTouat
BwiciasJacksonvieBeachRentalscm




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Run your ad
more than one day.
There are different people
in the market for goods,
services,
and jobs every day
Don't miss a hot prospect!
Place your ad today








III

Job Fairs
Resume Services
Accounting/Bookkeeping
Advertising/Media
Architecture/Interior
Design/Graphics Design
Automotive Sales/Service
Aviation
Civil Service/Government/
Public Administration
Computer Hardware/
Software/Programming
Construction
Customer Service
Dental
Domestic Services/
Caregiving
Delivery Driver
Education/Teaching/
Training
Engineering
Entertainment
Executive/Management
Finance/Investment
General Employment
Hotel/Hospitality/Tourism
Industrial Trades
Insurance
Landscaping/Grounds
Maintenance
Law Enforcement/
Security/Safety
Legal
Maintenance/Janitorial
Services
Management/Professional
Marketing
Mechanics
Medical/Health Care
Marine/Trade
Nurses/Nurses Aides
Office/Clerical/
Administration
Part-Time
Personal Services/Beauty
Real Estate/Property
Management
Recreation/Sports/Fitness
Restaurant/Bar/Club/
Food/Beverages
Retail
Sales
Science/Research
Social Services/Counseling
Technical Support
Telemarketing
Transportation
Warehouse/Inventory
Work at Home
Positions Wanted


Asst. Nurse Manager
Asst.Nurse Manager/
Nurse Managers
Baptist Medical Center
Downtown currently has
the following positions
available:

ANM -
Surgical
Services
Neuroservice
Coordinator
Position with variable
days and shifts available
in the Main OR for an
Assistant Manager for
Neuro Surgical Services.
Requirements include 3-5
years experience in neu-
rosurgery, FL RN license
and ACLS/BLS. Previous
management experience,
CNOR and BSN pre-
ferred. Job #7605.

Experienced
Nurse
Managers
We are also seeking
experienced Nurse Man-
agers for the Heart
Observation Unit and the
Med/Surg Telemetry
Unit. Requirements
include 4-5 years experi-
ence in the appropriate
specialty, FL RN license,
BSN and ACLS/BLS.
Master's degree and pre-
vious supervisory/man-
agement experience pre-
ferred. Job #7498 & 7479
Please apply online
referencing Job # above:
e-baptisthealth.com/careers
EOE



r BAPTIST
LY HEALTH
Depend On Us For Lfe



87.8 Billion
Is the economic
impact of the mili-
tary in Northeast
Florida and
Southeast Georgia.
Advertise in
the military
publications
distributed at
the local bases
in the area.
To advertise
Please call
904-359-4336,

Fax 904-366 6230.

MED SURG DIRECTOR

jPUTNAM
CommunityMedicalCenter
Putnam Community
Medical Center has been
providing quality patient
care to our community
for over 30 years.
Come be a part of
our team and help
make a difference.
Med Surg
Director FT
A Bachelor's degree in
Nursing, FL RN license,
2-3 years of previous
acute care Med Surg
management experience,
and strong leadership and
communication skills are
required. A Master's
degree is preferred.
Please apply online at
www.pcmcfl.com
EOE/AA


SUNDANCE
REHABILITATION
SunDance is the excep-
tion when it comes to
delivering quality care.
by constantly evolving
and elevating our care,
we empower patients and
employees to reach their
fullest potential. We are
currently seekign to fill
the following full time
positions:

Savannah: OT's, COTA,
PT & PTA

Hazlehurst: OT & SLP

Folkston: OT & SLP
PRN Available for all
positions.
To ioin our exceptional
team of resident advo-
cates, please contact:
Veda Mullins-Davis
P: 866-357-2739
F: 505-468-9151
veda.davis@sunh.com
We are an EOE.




Education

Faculty/ Adjunct / PT
Strayer University
Jacksonville, FL
The Baymeadows Cam-
pus of Strayer University
has an immediate need
for p-t/adiunct Faculty to
teach courses in the
Business, CIS, & Crimi-
nal Justice disciplines.
For consideration, a ter-
minal degree in the disci-
pline sought is req. Quali-
fied candidates may
email a cover letter, cur-
riculum vita or resume, &
transcripts to: iames.
cash@strayer.edu, Attn:
Campus Dean. Position
title should be stated in
the subject line of the
e-mail. No phone calls,
please. EOE














%Mantic Marine Florida, LLC
EXCELLENT
BENEFITS &
TOP PAY!


Security
Upscale
Security Officers for
Prestigious Account!
Great Pay Rates!
G4S Wackenhut, provid-
ing quality, customer-
focused security solu-
tions and outstanding
careers for over 50
years, is now hiring
Upscale Security Offic-
ers for one of our
renowned clients. Candi-
dates must be over 18
years old and have a high
school diploma/GED or
higher and a strong work
history; military wel-
come! Join the team and
earn great benefits,
including medical, dental
and life insurance, paid
vacation, free Class "D"
training and free uni-
forms. Combine that with
having one of the highest
paid security salaries in
north Florida and you've
got a iob to be proud of!
For more information,
please contact Human
Resources at G4S Wack-
enhut, 3974 Woodcock Dr.,
Ste. 100, Jacksonville FL
32207, (904) 398-1640.
For a complete listing of
the basic qualifications
for this position, visit
www.wackenhut.g4s.com.


EOE.MFDV.DFW II


7J Wackenhut


Fo advertising infoimialion,
please call 904-359-4336,
Fax 904-366-6230.






CAN YOU
MAKE ( S
PEOPLE _
SMILE?
High energy, friendly,
money motivated per-
son required. Must have
reliable transportation,
have a clean criminal
record & be able to start
immediately. Call
224-1085 or send resume
by fax to 268-9663 or
e-mail resume your to
hrdept@abmrktg.corn


GET MILES WHILE
THEY'RE HOT!
Stable driving opportuni-



*ALSO HIRING
TEAM DRIVERS*
requirements. Pay range
is $.36-$.40 cpm split
based upon experience.
Team Drivers must have
HazMat Endorsement.
H- Guaranteed Home time
>- Great Pay,Equipment
& Benefits
>- Paid Vacation &
Holidays
>- Class A CDL Required
Call 1-800-800-3920 or
1-800-831-7926
For More Information
www.superserviceinc.net


Me.8 Billion
Is the economic
impact of the mili-
tary in Northeast
Florida and
Southeast Georgia.
Advertise in
the military
publications
distributed at
the local bases
in the area.
To advertise
Please call
904-359-4336,

Fax 904-366 6230.






4,HAPPY HANDS
CHRISTIAN CHILD
CARE- 20% off of
Tuition for all
active duty personnel.
786-4622. 2017 Lane Ave,


WILL CLEAN APTS T -
FOR SENIORS. *
1-Day a week. Write Bea utiful
Name, Address & Phone i .A. *
to: Kyser, 6017 Roosevelt piece
#182, Jax.,FL 32244 Cherry

Bedroom Set'


AC, Heating, Fuel L 90 4-64449J
Antiques
Appliances BED A BARGAIN
Arts& Crafts QUEEN SETS $105
Auctions KINGS $155 365-0957
Building Supplies Lm 6
Business/Office Equipment Bernhardt D/R James Isl
Clothes style China Cab, Buffet,
Dbl Ped Tbl, 8 uphlst
Collectibles chairs. Value $21,875.
Computer 0 F F E R E D $9950.
mpur 904-519-9730 or
Craft/Thrift Stores ryesusan@bellsouth.net
Electronics Hand crafted eight
Estate Sales sweater poker table
arm/rPlranting$4E$400. Eve n i n g
Farm/Planting House #912-882-3257
Fruits/Vegetables KING SIZE PILLOW TOP
Furniture/Household MATTRESS SET 200
Garage Sales New 904-644-0498 $200
Garden/Lawn Queen EuroTop Mattress
Hot Tubs/Spas Set Still in Plastic $130
Jewelry/Watches (904) 644-0498-
id's Stuff et of Designer
Kid's Stuff Lamps, Contemp.
Machinery & Tools style, black round,
Medical tan shades, exc.
Medic cond., Pd $350. Asking
Miscellaneous Merchandise $200obo. 491 7996
Musical Merchandise AR GO B U N K
Photography | BED SET w/stor-
age unit, ladder &
Portable BuildingS newer mattress.
Public Sales $200. Call 904-223-5935
Sporting Goods GIRLS TWIN BED,
Tickets hdbrd, ftbrd, rails,
Sealy mattress,
Trailers boxsprings, dresser,
Wanted to Buy or Trade mirror, real wood, anti.
white, moving $550.
491-7996


3 TON AIR CON-
DITIONER Exc.
cond. for house or
mo bile home.
904-215-7397

, GAS PROPANE
MOBILE HOME
FURNACE NEW
$800. 904-215-7397





HOLLY HILLS- Includes
2 caskets, opening and
closing, $6500. Call
904-625-5288




RCA color 35" TV,
remote & book $250.
Kenwood surround
system w/4spkrs,
remote & book $100.


ARGYLE Church of
Christ corner of Collins
& Rampart Rd. Annual
Boy Scout Multi-Family
Sale Sat. 11/14, 7am-2pm
Westside Fri, 7-3/Sat 7-?
5035 Havenwood Oaks
Terr Xmas, hsehid,misc
BARGAIN HUNTERS
GALORE
This Sat & Sun Have
Your Garage Sale at
The Market Place!
7059 Ramona, 786-FLEA



SCelebrity Electric
Scooter never used,
lnew $2400, 4 wheels
baskets included.
912-674-0068



AALL TYPES OF
ELECTRONICS for
sale-Receivers,
AMPS, Speakers,


. Disney Princess
Bike $30. Graco
baby carrier $25.
Stroller $30. Jog-
ging Stroller $60. Lil
Tyke playset. 269-4312
FLAG BOX, dog-
house style, solid
wood, walnut finish,
like new, L27" H20"
$40. 904-781-7076
GARFIELD GLASS
MUGS (40) $25.00
904-781-7076

HUFFY Basketball
Goal, base, net,
pole, roll wheels,
ver y goo d
cond-moving 904-491-7996
1/2 Truck Load oak
tree fire logs, you
pick-up $40. 491-7996

S Adult leather West-
Sern saddle w/blan-
lket & tack, good
'cond. $250. Adult
English saddle-good
cond. $100. 904-829-9102



Gators, Daytona 500,
Orlando Magic
www.sstickets.com
904-725-5045




Adopt a Pet
Pets & Supplies
Livestock & Supplies
Animals Wanted




Bichon- Poodles- Yorkie
Poms- Maltese- Chihuahua
CKC regist. 904-349-5814
Bostons, Chihuahuas,
Yorkiepoos, Schnauzers,
Morkies, Chorkies. $300up
All T-cups. 850-443-8046
BOXER PUPS- 7wks M/F
full blooded, beautiful,
S/W, POP, $400. 568-0223
Chihuahuas $200 CASH
CKC reg, S/W, M/F, 10wks
all colors 904-755-8815
French Bulldog, Shiba Inu,
Chihuahua, Puggle,
T-cup Yorkie & etc.
BIG PUPPY SALE**
Starting @ $299. 997-9909
www.pamperedpawsonline.com
HAVANESE AKC
Ch. lines $800+ San Jose
area. 923-7966 or 733-1784
LAB AKC PUPS Ready
now $300. Yellow M & F
S/W HC POP 904-813-0841
PEKINGESE- M 2yrs &
F 3yrs, shot u-t-d, CKC
regist $200ea abo 722-1056
Rat Terrier Pups UKCI,
many colors $300-$400.
www.mccartysratterriers.com


lri iiiii i il


ROLL-OFF DRIVERS
WITH EXPERIENCE
Class A or B req'd
Call 904-786-5503



16' RenKen w/85hp
SYamaha w/tilt+
trim outboard
S $26000bo. Gaiv. trir
& GPS w/boat! Dan
912-674-9113
17' MANDATE
BOWRIDER 88hp
T/T Johnson Gaiv.
trier, good running
cond., great river boat,
strong running motor.
All Coast Guard eqpt.
$1500obo. 904-521-5665





22010 TRAVEL
TRAILERS Over
40 to choose.
All sizes &fir
plans including
Ultra Lites SAVE
THOUSANDS.
CALL GENERAL RV,
904-458-3000 1577 WELLS RD.
S ATTENTION RV
BUYERS!
c.11, 1Before You
BUY Your Next
I RV, Shop at
GENERAL RV
1577 WELLS RD.
"Guaranteed Best Buys."
See us before you Buy
Call 904-458-3000
SNEW 2010
CLASS A & C
Motor homes.
Don't make a
$10K -$20K
mistake." Put
General RV on
your list." 904-458-3000
1577 Wells Rd.





HD ROAD KING'02
28Kmi's, lots of
extras, $11,000obo.
Rich 904-548-1161





A NT I Q U E 1930
FORD "A" 2dr
sedan looks good,
runs good, $10K obo
Drive It Away
912-510-0345 St. Marys, GA


Get results!
Run your ad
more than one day.
There are different people
in the market for goods,
services,
andjobs every day
Don't miss a hot prospect!
Place your ad today






Automobile


r PONTIAC G5 '08
COUPE $12,980
998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE

'98-$1750, AT, Ithr,
lAlloy wheels, CD,
AM/FM. Runs fine!
224Kmi's. Dan Pease
912-674-9113
A SATURN SL-2 '98-
$1750, Ithr, Alloy
whis, CD, AM/FM,
S runs fine! 224k
mi's, Dan 912-674-9113
1 MAXIMA GLE
'96-4dr, AT, beige,
$3350, good cond.,
221-0710
Fre TOYOTA CAMRY
'08 LIKE NEW!
$17,490 904-998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE





ACURA MDX '08
Tech Package
Fully Equip $37,990
998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
CADILLAC SRX '05
White/Tan $19,490
998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
(7 FORD F150 '07
Only 20,000 Miles
$19,980 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
4 FORD LIGHT-
t N I N G 0 1 -
white/gray, 15kmi's,
$18,000. 904-298-2436
FORD RANGER
XLT Supercab
'94-V6, AT transom,
great student or
work truck. $3000.
James 904-505-7455
y JEEP WRAN-
GLER RUBICON
'08 Only 800 miles
Hard Top, Only 15k mi
Navi, $26,980 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
(y 1 TOYOTA
A4RUNNER '06
Sport White/Tan
Fully Equpt $23,980
998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
STOYOTA TACOMA
'07, SR-5, Pre-Run-
ner V6, 6k mi's, AT,
Ithr, bedliner, run
ning boards, below mar-
ket $20,999. 904-731-8533

A TOYOTA AVALON
cond. 169,000mi,
Drives great cold
air needs some repair.
783-0197 Bill







24 JAx AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, I 1. I .1 ,, November 12, 2009


To list your dealership,

please call

904-359-4193





Before you buy, shop these dealerships first!


TOM BUSH BMW
JACKSONVILLE
9850 Atlantic Blvd.
725-0911

TOM BUSH BMW
ORANGE PARK
6914 Blanding Blvd
777-2500



GARBER BUICK
Green Cove Springs
264-4502
www.garberautomall.com

KEY BUICK
4660 Southside Blvd. 642-6060


JACK WILSON BUICK
2250 US1 South
797-4577


CADILLAC-SAAB OF
ORANGE PARK
7999 Blanding Blvd. 778-7700
www.cadillacoforangepaik.com

CLAUDE NOLAN CADILLAC
4700 Southside Blvd. 642-5111
www.claudenolan.com



NIMNICHT CHEVY
1550 Cassat Ave.
425-6312
www.nimnichtchevy.com
GARBER CHEVY
Green Cove Springs 264-4502
www.garberautomall.com


GORDON CHEVY
1166 Blanding Blvd. 272-2200

JACK WILSON CHEVROLET
2255 US1 South 797-4567

JERRY HAMM CHEVY
3494 Philips Hwy. 398-3036





ATLANTIC CHRYSLER
www.atlantlcjeep.com
2330 US1 South 354-4421


GARBER CHRYSLER
Green Cove Springs 264-2416
www.garberautomall.com

JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS. 493-0000

RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, FemrnBch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com





ATLANTIC DODGE
www.atlanticjeep.com
2330 US1 South 354-4421

JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS. 493-0000

GARBER DODGE TRUCK
Green Cove Springs 264-2416
www.garberautomall.com


ORANGE PARK DODGE
7233 Blanding Blvd. 777-5500

RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com






PAUL CLARK FORDERCUR
1-95 N. Exit 129 (Yulee)
225-3673

GARBER FORD-MERCURY
Green Cove Springs 264-4502
www.garberautomall.com

MIKE SHAD FORD
At The Avenues
10720 Philips Hwy.
904-292-3325

MIKE DAVIDSON FORD
AT REGENCY
9650 Atlantic Blvd. 725-3060

MIKE SHAD FORD
OF ORANGE PARK
7700 Blanding Blvd. 777-3673


NIMNICHT PONTIAC-GMC
11503 Phillips Hwy 854-4826


.GARBER GMC TRUCKS
Green Cove Springs
264-4502
www.garberautomall.com


JACK WILSON PONTIAC
BUICK GMC
2250 US1 South
797-4577



DUVAL HONDA
1325 Cassat Ave. 899-1900

LOU SOB HONDA
OF THE AVENUES
11333 Phillips Hwy. 370-1300





KEY HYUNDAI
4660 Southside Blvd. 642-65050




ATLANTIC INFINI
10980 Atlantic Blvd. 642-0200




ATLANTIC JEEP
www.atlanticjeep.com
2330 US 1 South 354-4421

GARBER JEEP
Green Cove Springs 264-2416
www.garberautomall.com

JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS. 493-0000


RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com


KIA OF ORANGE PARK
6373 Blanding Blvd.
771-6078


LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
10259 Atlantic Blvd. 721-5000

LEXUS OF ORANGE PARK
7040 Blanding Blvd. 777-5100
www.lexusoforangepark.com



NORTH FLORIDA
LINCOLN MERCURY
4620 Southside Blvd. 642-4100


MIKE SHAD FORD
LINCOLN MERCURY
7700 Blanding Blvd. 777-3673




TOM BUSH MAZDA
9850 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911

MAZDA CITY
6916 Blanding Blvd. 779-0600



BRUMOS MOTOR CARS INC.
10231 Atlantic Blvd. 724-1080

MERCEDES BENZ
of ORANGE PARK
7018 Blanding Blvd. 777-5900



TOM BUSH MINI
9875 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911


MIKE SHAD NISSAN OF JAX
1810 Cassat Ave.
389-3621

MIKE SHAD NISSAN OF OP
7447 Blanding Blvd. 269-9400

NISSAN OF ST. AUGUSTINE
755 US 1 South 1-866-New-Nissan
www.nissanofstaugustine.com

GOLDEN ISLES NISSAN
912-264-3825
www.goldenislesnissan.com
1-mi. east of 1-95 exit 38
Brunswick, GA



GARBER PONTIAC
Green Cove Springs
2644502
www.garberautomall.com

JACK WILSON PONTIAC
BUICK GMC
2250 US1 South
797-4577

NIMNICHT PONTIAC- GMC
11503 Phillips Hwy.
8544826



BRUMOS MOTOR CARS INC.
10100 Atlantic Blvd. 725-9155




KEITH PIERSON TOYOTA
6501 Youngerman Circle.
771-9100


ERNIE PALMER TOYOTA
1310 CassatAve. 389-4561


TOM BUSH VW
9850 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911
O'STEEN VOLKSWAGEN
11401 Philips Hwy. 322-5100


O'STEEN VOLVO
2525 Philips Hwy. 396-5486


GT LEASING
Conmmrcial Leasing Since 1955
2810 St. Augustine Rd.
398-5000
www.gtleasing.com

PROFESSIONAL
AUTO LEASING
10231 Atlantic Blvd. 722-1694






AUTO LINE
A Family owned Business
autolinepreowned.com
2126 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach
904-242-8000

BEACH BLVD. AUTOMOTIVE
www.beachblvdautomotive.com
6833 Beach Blvd. 724-3511

BRUMOS MOTOR CARS
PRE-OWNED AUTO CENTER
10211 Atlantic Blvd. 724-1080

LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
PRE-OWNED CENTER
10384 Atlantic Blvd. 998-0012


TOM BUSH BMW
CERTIRED PRE-OWNED
9910 Atlantic Blvd. 371-4381

TOM BUSH MINI USED CAR
SUPER CENTER
9875 Atlantic Blvd. 371-4877
WORLD IMPORTS CERTIFIED
PRE-OWNED AUTO CENTER
www.worldimportlsusa.com
11650 BEACH BLVD.
998-9992


O'STEEN VW CERTIFIED
PRE-OWNED CENTER
11401 Philips Hwy.
322-5100

GOLDEN ISLES NISSAN
912-264-3825
www.goldenislesnissan.com
1-mi. east of 1-95 exit 38
Brunswick, GA


CAL


-in943


702635




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