The Jasper news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jasper news
Uniform Title:
Jasper news (Jasper, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.M. DeGraffenried
Place of Publication:
Jasper Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Jasper (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hamilton County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hamilton -- Jasper
Coordinates:
30.518889 x -82.951111 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 21, 1890)-
General Note:
Editor: Jno. M. Caldwell, <1890>.
General Note:
Publisher: W.L. Whitfield, <1904>.
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579542
oclc - 33315707
notis - ADA7388
lccn - sn 95047198
System ID:
UF00028306:00590

Full Text






26th Annual Antique Tractor & Engine Show coming April 3-5 I 4A


cr rnuo
nflaonline.com


Today's Weather
High 11-
730 F
Precip: 0%
Partly cloudy. High 73F. Winds
SE at5 to 10 mph.
Chance of rain 0%.
UV Index: 8- Very High
For up to the minute weather
go to www.nflaonline.com.


School board to consider elementary consolidation


Public meeting is April 14 at HCHS auditorium


By Joyce Marie Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@gaflnews.com
School safety and security
was the topic of discussion at


a Hamilton County School
Board workshop held Mon-
day, March 24. Superinten-
dent Thomas Moffses remind-
ed everyone it was a continua-


tion of talks that began a year
ago with regard to school
safety and security issues at
the three elementary schools.
Violet Brown from the Flori-


da Department of Education
(DOE) Facilities Department
gave a presentation to the
Hamilton County School
Board at their Sept. 23, 2013
workshop to address the
SEE SCHOOL, PAGE 17A


2 found dead in

Suwannee River

over weekend
New York couple were camping
at Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park before
launching vessel in river
By Joyce Marie Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@gaflnews.com
An upstate New York couple were found dead in
the Suwannee River over the weekend and investiga-
tors are still searching for clues as to the cause of
_____ ~their deaths, according to the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
Officials servation Commission (FWC).
search for The body of Auburn, N.Y.
search r resident Grace C. Maynard, 73,
clues as was discovered Friday, March
to cause 21, at 9:20 a.m. floating in the
river downstream from the
Highway 51 bridge in Mayo.
She was found wearing a life jacket, but had no iden-
tification on her. About three miles upstream, officers

SEE 2 FOUND, PAGE 2A


Meat processing

plant cited with

health violations


% Bricklaying

draws large

crowd to Veterans

Memorial Park


By Joyce Marie
Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@
gaflnews.com

On Monday, March
17, the Florida De-
partment of Health in
Hamilton County re-
ceived a nuisance
complaint about im-


proper storage of
goat carcasses
against House of Ha-
lal, also known as
Quality Meats, a
USDA meat process-
ing plant located at
5128 Hwy. 41 So. in
Jasper.

SEE MEAT, PAGE 2A


By Joyce Marie Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@gaflnews.com
It was a beautiful morning in
Jasper as throngs of people came
out to Veterans Memorial Park
to place their military memorial


bricks around the American flag
in the center of the plaza on Sat-
urday, March 22. Hamilton
County Veterans Service Officer
Sergeant Major Clay Lambert,
USMC Retired was on hand to
oversee the bricklaying project.


Kathy Avriett is sworn in by Judge Sonny Scarf.


The park is located on U.S. 41
in front of the courthouse annex
in Jasper on a 2-1/2 acre parcel
of land. With nearly 1,300 veter-
ans in the county, the park is a
SEE BRICKLAYING, PAGE 17A


LaBarfield Bryant, with his wife Mary Nell Bryant by his
side is sworn in by Judge Scaff. Courtesy photos


Jasper council members sworn in


By Joyce Marie
Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@
gaflnews.com
Kathy Avriett and
LaBarfield Bryant, who
both retained their seats


6 971


13 07541


on the
Council
election


Jasper City
in a recent
were sworn


four year term.
"This is Avriett's
third term on the Jasper


m P 0b I


City Council," said City
SEE JASPER, PAGE 2A


FDOE chooses
FCAT replacement
By Joyce Marie Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@gaflnews.com

The Florida Department of
Education has selected a re-
placement for the FCAT 2.0
exams to start with the 2014-
15 school year, according to
a statement from the FDOE. Moffses

SEE FDOE, PAGE 2A

Commissioners unhappy
with CR 135 project


By Joyce Marie
Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@
gaflnews.com
The $2.5 million
repaving and bridge
widening project of
County Road 135 in


in by Hamilton
County Judge Ken-
neth N. "Sonny"
Scaff on Monday,
March 17, at a meet-
ing of the town coun-
cil.
Avriett defeated
two challengers for
the District 5 seat
during the election
held March 4, and
will serve another


Hamilton County has
been the subject of
much discussion at
recent county com-
mission meetings
and the board isn't

SEE COMMISSIONERS,
PAGE 2A



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No Purchase Necessary I
Must Present Coupon T.
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Commissioners unhappy with CR 135 project


Continued From Page 1A

happy with the latest de-
velopments which could
cost the county an addi-
tional $606,000.
Dirt shoulders
At the March 4 meet-
ing, Engineer Greg Bai-
ley asked the board if
the county road depart-
ment could provide
some extra dirt for the
shoulders of the road.
Bailey said the contrac-
tor, Anderson-Colum-
bia, would handle the la-
bor. The board agreed
extra dirt was needed
and that the road de-
partment could help
bring in some loads of
dirt from other areas in
the county.
The discussion escalat-
ed at the March 18 meet-
ing of the board when
Commission Chair Josh
Smith asked Bailey to ex-
plain how much dirt
was needed. When Bai-
ley said 176 loads, Com-
missioner Randy Og-
burn was visibly
shocked.
Smith said, mistakenly
or not, he assumed from
the previous meeting
that several loads of dirt
meant about 10-15 loads.
Commissioner Buster
Oxendine said he
thought it meant about
30-40 loads.
When asked if the
county was expected to
haul the dirt to the site,
Bailey said that was go-
ing to be his request. Ox-
endine said he didn't


know if the county even
had that much dirt or if
the road department had
time to haul it.
Later in the meeting,
Bailey explained that the
dirt was not an item in
the original bid. It was
decided to get a quote
from Anderson-Colum-
bia for the dirt, in order
to keep the county road
department from getting
involved in a bid project.
The bridge
The bridge widening
was the biggest issue
for the CR 135 project.
Bailey explained on
March 4, that the plan
was to widen it to the
outside. A metal curv-
ing with guardrail was
to be removed and re-
placed with a DOT ap-
proved safety rail made
of concrete with at-
tached rail.
"On the outside where
we're widening it, we're
going to have a new
structure because our
widening it will support
the new rail," said Bai-
ley. "On the inside
we've got the existing
structure and if he just
puts the bridge railing
on it as it is, it will re-
duce the load capacity of
the bridge 25 percent. If
he makes improvements
to the beam and puts
some metal plates on it,
it will only reduce it 7
percent."
Smith asked if it
would involve extra
costs to the project and
Bailey said he didn't


know yet. Bailey ex-
plained that the 7 per-
cent plan would im-
prove the safety but re-
duce the carrying capac-
ity of the structure.
Semi-trucks with a load
weight over 36 tons
would not be approved
for travel across the
bridge.
Because there is so
much semi traffic on CR
135, the board was
against reducing the
load capacity and asked
Bailey to check with
DOT to see if they could
leave the existing inside
rail as is. Bailey said he
would ask, but said
DOT might not fund it.
He also explained that
during negotiating on
the project, in order to
keep costs down, it was
decided to only widen
one side of the bridge. If
widening of both sides
had been agreed upon,
the new railings and
supports would not be
an issue, nor would
there have been any re-
duction in load limit.
At the March 18 meet-
ing, Bailey said to do
modifications to the
beams on the bridge for
the 7 percent load reduc-
tion option, it would
cost about $16,500. The
option to leave the exist-
ing inside railing as is,
Bailey said, DOT would
not sign off on it at all
because it doesn't meet
current safety standards
and would create a lia-
bility.


"That does not appear
to be an option," said
Bailey.
Bailey said he checked
on the cost of a new
bridge replacement. One
recently constructed in
Baker County is about 4-
5 feet longer than the CR
135 bridge and cost just
under $1.5 million.
With a little over
$800,000 budgeted for
the bridge work in the
bid, Bailey said it would
cost the county an addi-
tional $606,000 to con-
struct a new bridge.
"We don't have a
whole lot of options
when it comes to that
bridge," said Bailey.
Bailey explained there
was about $105,000 left
on the project, which
could cover the bridge
modifications (with the
reduced load capacity)
and additional shoulder
material costs.
The only other option,
he said, is to try to seek
additional funding to re-
place the entire bridge,
although it might take
until next year.
Oxendine questioned
why the contractor quot-
ed a price for the project
if they had no plans for
the bridge and didn't
know what was under-
neath it.
"They evaluated the
bridge," said Bailey.
"The only difference is
the reduction in the load
rating. You can't tell that
until you actually get in
there and do all the


work. That's what
they're tasked with do-
ing, so they couldn't
know ahead of time."
Oxendine disagreed
and said the contractor
should have known that
the bridge needed to be
shored up or have the
load rating reduced
when they submitted
their quote to the county
a year ago. He said had
the county been told at
that time, then they
could have made differ-
ent arrangements on the
project.
Ogburn agreed and
said if the contractor had
no set of plans they
shouldn't have bid the
project.
"I'm just aggravated
with the total job," said
Ogburn. "I don't want
the bridge weight capac-
ity lessened, just like I
said last time, and I
think that Anderson-Co-
lumbia ought to make it
right."
Smith suggested the
county attorneys review
the contract and advise
the board what their op-
tions are to rectify the
situation and the board
agreed.
Other issues
Board members also
had concerns about the
location of some of the
culverts that seemed to
be too close to property
line fences. Bailey ex-
plained that the right of


way on the entire project
was narrow and the
pipes and culverts need-
ed to be 18 feet from the
travel lane. Oxendine
stated that the concrete
walls of the culverts
seemed to be creating
more of a hazard now
than the way the road
was before the project
started. Bailey explained
on average 85 percent of
vehicles that run off a
road can recover before
they reach the concrete
wall of the culvert.
A dogleg in the road
was also broached by
Smith, who believed it
should have been
straightened as part of
the project.
Oxendine said he re-
called having reserva-
tions about the project
originally when only one
bid came in from Ander-
son-Columbia, which
limited their options.
Ogburn said he was
also upset that Ander-
son-Columbia pulled
off the paving job to go
to another project when
they only had one day
of work left. He said he
spoke to the supervisor
and was told there were
high penalties involved
on the other job if they
didn't show up that
day. Bailey said the
crew would be return-
ing by the end of the
week to complete the
repaving.


Meat processing

plant cited with


health violations


The Hamilton County Board of County Commissioners. -Photo: Joyce Marie Taylor


2 found dead in Suwannee River over weekend


Continued From Page 1A

discovered a floating cooler with a
man's wallet inside. The wallet's
identification belonged to her hus-
band James J. Maynard, 74, also from
Auburn, N.Y. His body was found on
Sunday, March 23, floating approxi-
mately 1.6 miles upstream from
Dowling Park, FWC officials said.
The Maynards' truck was found at
the Gibson Park boat ramp outside
of Jasper. Grace Maynard was iden-
tified after officers found the regis-
tration and checked her New York


driver license photo. The Maynards
were registered guests at the
Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park campground in White
Springs, FWC said.
According to investigators, the
Maynards launched a small vessel
from Gibson Park in Jasper. Some-
where along the Suwannee River be-
tween Gibson Park and Hwy. 51 in
Mayo something happened, causing
the Maynards to enter the water.
FWC spokesperson Karen Parker
said officials have not located the
vessel and are asking the public for


help in locating a boat registered to
the Maynards. It is a 13 foot Ghee-
noe-type boat, with New York regis-
tration and a two and a half horse
powered engine. The boat is lime
green and white in color. If anyone
knows the whereabouts of the boat,
please call the Wildlife Alert hotline
at 888-404-3922.
Officials from the FWC, Lafayette
County Sheriff's Office and Suwan-
nee County Sheriff's Office helped in
finding the body of James Maynard.
FWC officials are continuing the in-
vestigation.


FDOE chooses FCAT replacement


Continued From Page 1A

"The new assessment
will measure each
child's progress and
achievement on the
Florida Standards,
which were developed
with an unprecedented
amount of public input,"
said Education Commis-
sioner Pam Stewart.
"This assessment sup-
ports our new stan-
dards, which emphasize
flexibility for teachers to
make their own deci-
sions in classrooms
while preparing our stu-
dents to analyze and
think."
"I am glad the FDOE
has finally made a
choice for the new test-
ing process," said
Hamilton County Super-
intendent of Schools
Thomas Moffses.
In August 2013, Gov-
ernor Rick Scott con-
vened the state's top ed-
ucation leaders and bi-
partisan stakeholders to
discuss the sustainabili-
ty and transparency of
the state's accountability
system in a three-day ac-


countability summit.
Using input from the
summit, Scott issued Ex-
ecutive Order 13-276,
which initiated Florida's
departure from the na-
tional PARCC consor-
tium as its fiscal agent,
to ensure that the state
would be able to procure
a test specifically de-
signed for Florida's
needs without federal
intervention.
Scott also set out eight
goals for the new assess-
ment to ensure the best
outcome for Florida stu-
dents. Among those
eight objectives were an
emphasis on prompt re-
ports of results, no sig-
nificant change in test-
ing time for students, no
significant increase in
costs of the assessments
and an assurance that
testing dates be as close
as possible to the end of
the school year to maxi-
mize learning opportu-
nities. This assessment
meets those goals.
Scott also requested
additional public com-
ments about the stan-
dards, which resulted in


public hearings around
the state and thousands
of comments from
Floridians. In February
2014, the State Board of
Education approved
changes to the standards
that reflected the input.
The new Florida Stan-
dards for mathematics
and English language
arts stress a broader ap-
proach for student learn-
ing, including an in-
creased emphasis on an-
alytical thinking. With
the new and more rigor-
ous standards, a new as-
sessment was needed to
measure student
progress.
The Invitation to Ne-
gotiate was posted for
public review in October
2013 and proposals were
received in December.
An evaluation team re-
viewed five proposals
and narrowed the choice
to three groups. Subse-
quently, a negotiation
team unanimously rec-
ommended the not-for-
profit American Insti-
tutes for Research (AIR)
to Stewart, who an-
nounced her selection of


AIR.
"As a district, we em-
brace accountability.
However, with a new
test, the accountability
used by FDOE also re-
quires a major change,"
said Moffses.
For more information
about the new assess-
ment and its benefits for
Florida students, please
visit www.fldoe.org/ed-
uaccsummit.asp.


Jasper
council
members

sworn in
Continued From Page 1A

Manager Charles
Williams.
Labarfield Bryant,
who ran unopposed
for the District 1 seat
was also sworn in by
Judge Scaff. This will
be Bryant's second
term on the town
council as he serves
for another four
years.


Continued From Page 1A

According to Depart-
ment of Health Environ-
mental Manager Sallie
Ford from the Lake City
office headquarters, a
complaint was filed
with the health depart-
ment against House of
Halal for improper stor-
age of animal carcasses.
A representative from
the health department in
Hamilton County stated
that animal hides were
hanging on the property
fences and there were
bad smells emanating
from the property.
The health depart-
ment went to the site the
same day to investigate
the complaint and cited
the business with two
violations: 1) Animal
hides being stored in a
manner to attract bugs
and flies. 2) Animal
hides being stored in a
manner to cause odors
and flies. Both are viola-
tions of Florida Statute
386.041.
A notice to abate the
sanitary nuisance was
placed on the gate of the
facility, giving the own-
ers 24 hours to make
corrections. The notice
was also mailed to the
owners Mahammad and
Aisha Iqbal of Jasper via
certified mail.
The business was giv-
en until March 18, at 5
p.m. to correct the viola-
tions. Failure to correct
the issues could result in
possible administrative
action by the state of
Florida, according to the
health department.
On Thursday, March
20, USDA Southeast Re-
gional Director Larry
Hortert in Atlanta con-
firmed by e-mail that
House of Halal is still an
active firm and still
USDA inspected.
At the March 18 meet-
ing of the Hamilton
County Board of County
Commissioners, Com-
missioner Buster Oxen-
dine advised the board


members of the situa-
tion, stating he had been
informed by a citizen
who complained about
goat hides, body parts
and carcasses being
piled up at the facility in
a fenced in area.
"I drove out there and
you probably could
have put half of it in this
room," Oxendine said,
referring to the commis-
sion chamber room.
"There was a pile of it,"
he added.
Oxendine said he took
some photos while he
was there.
"Some of them were
covered with tarps and
some of them were
open, decaying...the
smell was unreal," he
said.
After taking the pho-
tos, Oxendine said he
took it upon himself to
call the health depart-
ment in Jasper, who in
turn called their Lake
City headquarters to
speak to Sallie Ford in
Environmental Health.
Oxendine assured the
board that the issue was
being addressed by the
health department.
Ford said by phone on
Wednesday, March 19,
that she had finally
made contact with the
owners and they told
her they were working
on correcting the prob-
lem. A representative
from the Florida Depart-
ment of Health in
Hamilton County went
to the facility on Thurs-
day, March 20, and re-
ported that the site is be-
ing cleaned up, but not
completed yet. As of
Tuesday, March 25, Ron
Taylor from the health
department in Hamilton
County stated that the
site is still in the process
of being cleaned up.
A phone call to House
of Halal on Wednesday,
March 19, and Tuesday,
March 25, were both met
with a recording that the
number is no longer in
service.


PAGE 2A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014











THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014 THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL PAGE 3A


By Walter M Kenzie




WH!TE SPRING


'. businesses
have opened
R in White
Springs and
.w ,s w. V are an outdoor en-
thu-,,,,qor just someone
e 5 ahm oii appetite for good
'... you should check
"t IIIIII ',t soon!
This-K inooauurers Outfitters has
opened shop at 16529 Hamilton Ave, which is the next
street past the Adams Country Store after you turn off of
US 41 onto Bridge Street at the caution light by the store.
Roosters features hunting, hiking, and camping gear and
a complete line of fishing gear and live bait, including
minnows, shiners, worms and crickets. Roosters is open
early, 5 a.m., for you fishermen.
This is no ordinary outfitter and the owner, Keith
Knipp, is no ordinary guy. A retired veteran, Keith is a
bamboo fly rod builder with 42 years of experience and a
master's license in bamboo fly rod building. He sells to
fishermen and collectors all over the world and his hand-
crafted fly rods are truly beautiful, one of a kind works of
fine craftsmanship. You will enjoy visiting with him and
learning more about his craft and while you are there you
will see that Roosters Outfitters also has archery, decoys,
deer blinds and stands, and many more items too nu-
merous to mention here. This business is a perfect fit for
our region and I hope that you will stop by soon! For
more information call Keith Knipp at 386-234-0249.
On your way to or from Roosters, you ought to stop at


Sharon's Et1 -' ;'., \L tL, Lii \dams Country Store and
the Suwann, i;,!k,, .\-.\.. iit.n on Bridge Street. I've
heard sow, m.1-iht4 \'% ii, n.--J about their menu from
some reliable sources and I will be stopping there to try
out their much praised Cuban sandwich soon! Great to
see another restaurant in White Springs!
Are you looking for something different for your fam-
ily to do on Saturday nights, more exciting and entertain-
ing than sitting at home in front of the TV and much,
much cheaper than going to the movies? If so, the
Stephen Foster Park Campfire Program Series may be
just the answer for you.
In the coming months Park Rangers will be presenting
programs on several different topics including campfire
basics, folk story-telling, prehistoric technology, the ori-
gins of food and much more, all around the glow of a
campfire. This is an opportunity to spend time with fam-
ily and friends while learning about some of Florida's
natural and cultural heritages. These programs are fun,
educational, entertaining and inexpensive too! All pro-
grams are free with a $5.00 per carload park admission
fee. Programs will take place at the fire circle across from
the campground in the Stephen Foster Park at 7:00 p.m.
When you come you should bring your own blanket or
lawn chair and dress according to the weather. Here are
the Campfire Programs scheduled for April.
"Turtle on Turtles" Saturday, April 12th at 7:00 p.m.
Turtles play an important role in many ecosystems and in
many ancient belief systems. Park Ranger "Turtle" in-
vites you to learn why chelonian, commonly called tur-


\I iteinwn itesprings(g gmai I.corry


tles, tortoises, and terrapins, are so important, how they
have been portrayed in several Native American cul-
tures, and how and where you can best see Florida's tur-
tles in their natural environments.
"A Truly Traditional Campfire Program" Saturday,
April 19th at 7:00 p.m. Join us around the campfire at
Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park for an
evening of good old-fashioned Florida folk culture high-
lighting the tradition of storytelling and campfire songs!
"The Wild Flowers of White Springs" Saturday, April
26th at 7:00 pm. Wildflowers are in bloom here in White
Springs and now is the time to brush up on a little wild-
flower identification! Join a park ranger around the
campfire circle for some Native American Wildflower
Folklore as well as some picture guides of wildflowers
you may encounter while on the trails in White Springs
and at the Stephen Foster Park.
It has been a pleasure to report on the opening of three
new businesses in the past month! The Telford Hotel,
Roosters Outfitters and Sharon's Eatery and all the other
businesses in White Springs have something in common.
They are here to serve you and they want to earn your
business. I hope that you will show them your support.
I look forward to hearing from you and I hope to see you
out and about, experiencing nature, supporting com-
merce, and enjoying culture, health and life in White
Springs!
Walter McKenzie
386-269-0056
lifeinwhitesprings@gm ail.com


United Way annual meeting and awards banquet set for April 3

Call the United Way office at 752-5604 x 102 by March 28 to make reservations at $25 per person.


United Way of Suwan-
nee Valley will celebrate
its 2013-14 annual meet-
ing and awards banquet
on Thursday, April 3, at
Florida Gateway College
Howard Conference
Center. The event will
begin with a social time
from 5:30 to 6 p.m. Din-
ner will be served at 6
p.m., and the meeting
will be conducted from 6
to 7:30 p.m.
All individual contrib-
utors as well as organiza-
tional contributors are
invited to attend this an-
nual membership meet-
ing. Call the United Way
office at 752-5604 x 102
by March 28 to make
reservations at $25 per
person. Tables may be
reserved for groups of
eight.
The event will include
the recognition of out-
standing community
volunteers and local
company giving cam-
paigns as well as the


election of the 2014-15
Executive Committee
and Board of Directors.
The luau themed meal
selected includes
Hawaiian pork tender-
loin, seasonal rice dish,
sauteed corn with sweet
red peppers, Hawaiian
sweet rolls and butter,
garden salad tossed with
a vinaigrette dressing,
ranger cookies, key lime
cheesecake bites, banana


cupcakes, chocolate truf-
fle brownies, sweet and
unsweetened tea, coffee,
water and tropical fruit
punch.
An annual highlight of
the event is the recogni-
tion of the Presidential
Volunteer Service
Award recipient select-
ed by United Way of
Suwannee Valley. The
Presidential Volunteer
Service Award is the


Arrest Record


Editor's note: The
Jasper News prints the
entire arrest record. If
your name appears here
and you are later found
not guilty or the charges
are dropped, we will be
happy to make note of
this in the newspaper
when judicial proof is
presented to us by you
or the authorities.
The following abbrevi-
ations are used below:
DAC Department of
Agriculture Commission
DOA Department of
Agriculture
DOT Department of
Transportation
FDLE Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforce-
ment
FHP Florida High-
way Patrol
FWC Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission
HCDTF Hamilton
County Drug Task Force
HCSO Hamilton
County Sheriff's Office
ICE Immigration and
Custom Enforcement
JAPD Jasper Police
Department
JNPD Jennings Police
Department
OALE Office of Agri-
cultural Law Enforce-
ment


P&P Probation and
Parole
SCSO Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office
WSPD White Springs
Police Department
March 17, Antwain
Leon Strawder, 25, 1215
Bee St., Jennings, Fla.,
VOP o/c criminal mis-
chief: HCSO A. Beck
March 18, Labrentae
Sirtez Daniels, 24, 10760
NW 37th Trail, Jasper,
Fla., VOP o/c agg. bat-
tery w/ deadly weapon:
HCSO Moody
March 19, James
Michael Beard, 50, 2608
B 58th Ave., Jennings,
Fla., out of county war-
rant Suwannee County
VOP 08-199CF marijua-
na-sell: HCSO T. Mur-
phy
March 20, John Joseph
Kalafut IV, 28, 7707 S.
Roberts Road, Apt. 2E,
Bridgeview, Illinois,
poss. of drug para., poss.
of more than 20 grams
marijuana, out of county
warrant Brevard: Walls
March 20, Eric Calvin
Burke, 29, 501 SE 18th
St., Gainesville, Fla., in to
serve 1 year sentence
from court: HCSO Bak-
er
March 20, Paul Vin-
cent Free, 29, 4414 NW


24th Ave., Jasper, Fla.,
U22387 violation parole:
HCSO Howell
March 20, Joshua Dy-
lan Barwick, 21, 3878
NW 91st Lane, Jasper,
Fla., in to serve 60 days
(11-71CF): HCSO Walk
in
March 20, Marcus D.
Harrington, 32, 9945 80th
Terrace, Live Oak, Fla.,
VOP 12-160CF (battery
on LEO, felony DWLS,
poss. less 20 grams of
cannabis): HCSO -
McKire
March 20, Michael
James Roberts, 35, 4322
NW CR 143, Jennings,
Fla., DUI, flee/elude
LEO: JNPD Smith
March 21, Tipacio
Denize Butler, 33, Santa
Rosa C.I., in for court:
HCSO Akins
March 21, James Hen-
ry Whestberry, 22, 2971
NW US 129, Jasper, Fla.,
in for 1 day of remaining
sentence (five days):
HCSO Walk in
March 23, Sammy Es-
parza, 26, 9974 NW 42nd
Dr., Jasper, Fla., Battery
(D.V.): HCSO Hughes
March 23, Kristin R. Ei-
dson, 25, 231 SE Cole-
man St., Madison, Fla.,
flee and eluding: HCSO -
Burnam


premier volunteer
awards program, en-
couraging citizens
through presidential
recognition to live a life
of service.
United Way of Suwan-
nee Valley is a commu-
nity impact and
fundraising organiza-
tion which, utilizing vol-
unteers on all levels, ad-
vances the common
good by identifying un-


met community needs
and seeking to alleviate
those needs through
United Way of Suwan-


nee Valley initiatives
and the funding of affili-
ated health and human
service agencies.


Month of February- Suwannee

Valley Nursing Center
Rickey Starr started out the month of Kline, Cassandra Hunter and Jan
February with singing and dancing in- Yancey from First Baptist Church in
volving residents and staff at Suwan- Jasper provided special entertain-
nee Valley Nursing Center on the 5th. ment.
Crafts Day included Valentine On Feb. 18, activity assistant Brianna
Hearts made out of Velcro and but- Register baked her great 7-up biscuits.
tons. The February birthday party, spon-
February 11 was a beautiful day, and scored by New Hope Baptist Church,
a van load of residents went out for was enjoyed by all the residents.
lunch bunch to Red Lobster in Valdos- Thanks for a wonderful party.
ta, Ga. We had special singing on Feb. 25 by
On Feb. 13, Charlie Reid and his wife the "Freeman Singers", which includ-
from Soddy Daisy, Tenn. entertained ed guitar and fiddle music. Bible Bap-
with singing and music trivia. Silver tist held a service on Feb. 28 with an
dollars were handed out for winners evangelist from Kentucky.
of the music trivia. That afternoon Championship Bingo winner for
Black History biographies and stories February is Ruby Morgan. Staff of the
were read for a celebration of black month were Caroline Young, Dietary
history month, and Mary Long, LPN. Congratula-
On Valentines Day the trio Arletta tions.


S I j wi


^ March 28th & 29th, 2014
Where: Raisin' Cane Gates open at 5 pm
Rodeo starts at 7:30 pm Rain or Shine
Adults '10 I Child 15 (ages 4-12) I 3 & Under Free

Advanced tickets available at Raisin' Cane.
All Advanced ticket purchases will be entered into
a drawing to win a trip to Destin Florida!


NT
NASWIILJE
TRACTOR
FORAY


3350 Newsome Road Valdosta
Just off Hwy 41 South JA L
At Raisin' Cane
At R aisin Cne CAR TRUCKK CENTER
MORE INFORMATION 229-559-5302


Humane Society

Public Notice
Beginning in March, the Hamilton Humane So-
ciety will be holding its public board meetings
the 3rd Thursday every month at 6:30 p.m. at our
temporary headquarters (North Florida PAWS,
just off US Hwy. 41 in Jennings).
You and anyone you know who may be inter-
ested in what we're doing are most welcome to
attend. Any questions, just e-mail HamiltonHu-
maneSociety@yahoo.com or call 386-938-4092
(please leave a message if you get voicemail).


.. .1 1


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 3A













OPINION


Bizarre arguments and behavior


Some statements and arguments are so asinine
that you'd have to be an academic or a leftist to
take them seriously. Take the accusation that Re-
publicans and conservatives are conducting a war
on women. Does that mean they're waging war on
their daughters, wives, mothers and other female
members of their families? If so, do they abide by
the Geneva Conventions' bans on torture, or do
they engage in enhanced interrogation and intimi-
dation methods, such as waterboarding, with fe-
male family members? You might say that leftists
don't mean actual war. Then why do they say it?
What would you think of a white conservative
mayor's trying to defund charter schools where
blacks are succeeding? While most of New York's
black students could not pass a citywide math pro-
ficiency exam, there was a charter school where 82
percent of its students passed. New York's left-
wing mayor, Bill de Blasio, is trying to shut it
down, and so far, I've heard not one peep from the
Big Apple's civil rights hustlers, including Al
Sharpton and Charles Rangel. According to
columnist Thomas Sowell, the attack on successful
charter schools is happening in other cities, too
(http:/ /tinyurl.com/nxulxc).
U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder recently stat-
ed that we must revisit the laws that ban convict-
ed felons from voting. Why? According to a recent
study by two professors, Marc Meredith of the
University of Pennsylvania and Michael Morse of
Stanford, published in The Annals of the Ameri-
can Academy of Political and Social Science
(http://tinyurl.com/pgolu8x), three-fourths of
America's convicted murderers, rapists and
thieves are Democrats. Many states restrict felons
from voting; however, there's a movement afoot to
eliminate any restriction on their voting. If suc-


A

MINORITY

VIEW


( 2014 Creators Syndicate
| BY WALTER WILLIAMS

cessful, we might see Democratic candidates cam-
paigning in prisons, seeking the support of some
of America's worst people.
Decades ago, I warned my fellow Americans
that the tobacco zealots' agenda was not about the
supposed health hazards of secondhand smoke. It
was really about control. The fact that tobacco
smoke is unpleasant gained them the support of
most Americans. By the way, to reach its second-
hand smoke conclusions, the Environmental Pro-
tection Agency employed statistical techniques
that were grossly dishonest. Some years ago, I had
the opportunity to ask a Food and Drug Adminis-
tration official whether his agency would accept
pharmaceutical companies using similar statistical
techniques in their drug approval procedures. He
just looked at me.
Seeing as Americans are timid and compliant,
why not dictate other aspects of our lives -- such as
the size of soda we may buy, as former Mayor
Michael Bloomberg tried in New York? Former
U.S. Department of Agriculture spokesman John
Webster said: "Right now, this anti-obesity cam-


paign is in its infancy. ... We want to turn people
around and give them assistance in eating nutri-
tious foods." The city of Calabasas, Calif., adopted
an ordinance that bans smoking in virtually all
outdoor areas. The stated justification is not the
desire to fight against secondhand smoke but the
desire to protect children from bad influences --
seeing adults smoking. Most Americans don't
know that years ago, if someone tried to stop a
person from smoking on a beach or sidewalk or
buying a 16-ounce cup of soda or tried to throw
away his kid's homemade lunch, it might have led
to a severe beating. On a very famous radio talk
show, I suggested to an anti-obesity busybody
who was calling for laws to restrict restaurants'
serving sizes that he not be a coward and rely on
government. He should just come up, I told him,
and take the food he thought I shouldn't have from
my plate.
The late H.L. Mencken's description of health
care professionals in his day is just as appropriate
today: "A certain section of medical opinion, in
late years, has succumbed to the messianic delu-
sion. Its spokesmen are not content to deal with
the patients who come to them for advice; they
conceive it to be their duty to force their advice
upon everyone, including especially those who
don't want it. That duty is purely imaginary. It is
born of vanity, not of public spirit. The impulse
behind it is not altruism, but a mere yearning to
run things."
Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at
George Mason University. To find outmore about
Walter E. Williams and read features by other Cre-
ators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page at
www.creators.com.


Increased opportunity for producers as part of new Farm Bill

Farm Loan Program modifications create flexibility for new and existing farmers and ranchers alike


WASHINGTON -
Agriculture Secretary
Tom Vilsack announced
on Monday increased op-
portunity for producers
as a result of the 2014
Farm Bill. A fact sheet
outlining modifications
to the U.S. Department of
Agriculture's (USDA)
Farm Service Agency
(FSA) Farm Loan Pro-
grams is available at
http://www.usda.gov/
documents/ 2014-farm-
bill-changes-to-flp.pdf.
"Our nation's farmers
and ranchers are the en-
gine of the rural econo-
my. These improvements
to our Farm Loan Pro-
grams will help a new
generation begin farming
and grow existing farm
operations," said Secre-
tary Vilsack. "Today's an-
nouncement represents
just one part of a series of
investments the new


Farm Bill makes in the
next generation of agri-
culture, which is critical
to economic growth in
communities across the
country."
The Farm Bill expands
lending opportunities for
thousands of farmers and
ranchers to begin and
continue operations, in-
cluding greater flexibility
in determining eligibility,
raising loan limits, and
emphasizing beginning
and socially disadvan-
taged producers.
Changes that will take
effect immediately in-
clude:
Elimination of loan
term limits for guaran-
teed operating loans.
Modification of the de-
finition of beginning
farmer, using the average
farm size for the county
as a qualifier instead of
the median farm size.


Modification of the
Joint Financing Direct
Farm Ownership Interest
Rate to 2 percent less
than regular Direct Farm
Ownership rate, with a
floor of 2.5 percent. Pre-
viously, the rate was es-
tablished at 5 percent.
Increase of the maxi-
mum loan amount for
Direct Farm Ownership
down payments from
$225,000 to $300,000.
Elimination of rural


residency requirement
for Youth Loans, allow-
ing urban youth to bene-
fit.
Debt forgiveness on
Youth Loans, which will
not prevent borrowers
from obtaining addition-
al loans from the federal
government.
Increase of the guaran-
tee amount on Conserva-
tion Loans from 75 to 80
percent and 90 percent
for socially disadvan-


LAKE CITY The Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection on Tuesday met with local govern-
ments, scientists, environmentalists, agricultural op-
erators and other stakeholders in the Suwannee and
Santa Fe basins to move forward in solving local bac-
teria water quality problems. At the meeting, the De-
partment presented a first-of-its-kind-in-Florida
basin-wide approach to setting a restoration goal,
also called Total Maximum Daily Load.
Seventeen creeks, streams, and sinks in the two
basins have been verified to be impaired, not meeting
water quality standards, for fecal indicator bacteria-
nine in the Santa Fe and eight in the Suwannee. The
presence of the indicator bacteria in amounts greater
than Florida's water quality criterion, 400 bacteria
counts per 100 milliliters of water, indicates the pos-
sibility of human or animal waste contamination.
Fecal coliform bacteria themselves are generally
not harmful, but their presence suggests that disease-
causing organisms may also be present in the water.
Sources of bacteria may include wastewater treat-
ment facilities, concentrated agricultural operations,
stormwater runoff associated with urban develop-
ment, and natural sources like wetlands, forests, and
wildlife.
Historically, the Department has adopted a single
rule for each impaired waterbody. In this case, that
would involve 17 separate rulemaking efforts and all
of the process that goes along with them. As an alter-
native, DEP is proposing basin-wide TMDLs, which
will be accompanied by reports of the bacteria reduc-


staged borrowers and be-
ginning farmers.
Microloans will not
count toward loan term
limits for veterans and
beginning farmers.
Additional modifica-
tions must be implement-
ed through the rulemak-
ing processes. Visit the
FSA Farm Bill website for
detailed information and
updates to farm loan pro-
grams.
USDA is an equal op-


portunity provider and
employer. To file a com-
plaint of discrimination,
write: USDA, Office of
the Assistant Secretary
for Civil Rights, Office of
Adjudication, 1400 Inde-
pendence Ave., SW,
Washington, DC 20250-
9410 or call (866) 632-
9992 (Toll-free Customer
Service), (800) 877-8339
(Local or Federal relay),
(866) 377-8642 (Relay
voice users).


26th Annual Antique Tractor & Engine

Show coming April 3-5


Antique tractor parade
is Saturday, April 5
By Joyce Marie Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@gaflnews.com

It's almost time for the 26th
Annual Antique Tractor & En-
gine Show, which runs from
Thursday, April 3 through Sat-
urday, April 5, from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m., at Stephen Foster Folk Cul-
ture Center State Park in White
Springs.
Visitors are invited to explore
the park where there will be ed-
ucational exhibits and demon-
strations showcasing over 200


years of rural America's farming
history. Show participants will
demonstrate the craftsmanship
and durability of American farm
machinery, as well as compete in
tractor races.
There will also be demonstra-
tions of wheat threshing, shingle
milling, corn grinding and un-
usual engines for everyday pur-
poses. Exhibits will include col-
lections of flywheels, hit and
miss engines, water pumps, vin-
tage pedal tractors, antique cars
and farm equipment.
Adult visitors are invited to
compete in tractor pulls, barrel
races and a blind race. Children


can participate in pedal-pow-
ered tractor races, an old-fash-
ioned game of needle-in-a-
haystack or a rooster-crowing
contest.
Don't miss the Saturday after-
noon antique tractor parade
where you'll see everything
from customized lawn tractors
to restored farm machinery.
Food concessions will be avail-
able featuring root beer floats,
hamburgers, hot dogs, barbecue
and kettle corn.
Admission for the event is $5
per vehicle with up to eight pas-
sengers. For more information,
call 877-635-3655.


tions required for each waterbody.
"When there's a better, faster way to improve wa-
ter quality, DEP wants to be first in line to deploy it,"
said Tom Frick, Director of the Division of Environ-
mental Assessment and Restoration. "Cutting unnec-
essary process means we can move quickly to
restoration."
While basin-wide TMDLs are not appropriate for
every pollutant, they are ideal for addressing bacte-
ria problems because the path to restoration general-
ly involves the same basic actions no matter the
scope of the problem.
Restoring waterbodies with high levels of bacteria
does not typically require unique engineering solu-
tions. The approach involves identifying potential
bacteria sources and risks, like aging or poorly man-
aged wastewater and stormwater infrastructure, sep-
tic tanks, livestock waste, pet waste, and trash. Some
of the sources are obvious, others require an inten-
sive survey of the area to identify hidden problems.
The Department's new bacteria source tracking
methods, including DNA analyses, will help identify
whether fecal bacteria are related to human activities
or other sources. By isolating the sources of bacteria,
stakeholders can more carefully, and more cost-effec-
tively, target the highest risks and plan and imple-
ment the right projects to clean up the problem.
More information on the basin-wide bacteria
TMDL proposed for the Suwanee and Santa Fe
basins can be found on the Department's website at
http://www.dep.state.fl.us/water/tmdl.


DEP hosts Suwannee and Santa Fe basin

restoration goal development rule workshop

Stakeholders disJ iss basin-wide ?pp ',?i, to setting bii ,I a t, ,iti'r q c ii itjy iir'l'yiii'nt goals


4t 3aspapXr Nus

Published weekly every Thursday. USPS #755-980
Office located at 211 Howard St. E.,
Live Oak, FL 32060
Phone (386) 362-1734 FAX (386) 364-5578
E-mail address: jaspernewsl@windstream.net

Myra Regan ................ Publisher
Monja Slater .................Advertising Manager
Jeff W aters ................. Editor
Joyce Marie Taylor ..........Reporter
Brenda Demarais .............Sales Representative

Periodicals postage paid at Live Oak, FL.
Annual subscription rate is $18 in county,
$26 out of county and out of state.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
The Jasper News, P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064


Letter to the editor and Article Policy
Letters to the editor and article submissions can be
mailed or dropped off at the news office at 211 Howard
St. E, Live Oak, FL 32064, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.
until 5 p.m.
Letters to the editor should be typed, brief and to the
point, approximately 150 to 200 words or less. Not all
letters are published. To be considered for publication,
letters to the editor must be signed, include the writer's
address and phone number, and in the news office by
noon on Friday.
Submissions, 400 or less words, should be typed, brief
and to the point. Not all submissions are published.
Letters and submissions may be edited to fit available
space. Well written letters/submissions require less
editing.
You may fax letters/submissions to 386-364-5578.


PAGE 4A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014











THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014 THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL PAGE 5A


As I have watched the
weather channel this
winter, I am more
thankful than ever to
live in Florida! There
were many days when
our little state was the
only ground not literal-
ly covered with snow
and ice. And yet, my
feet stay cold from No-
vember till April. Be-
tween that and my thick
southern accent, I
would have to stock up
on wool socks and find
a translator to survive
up North!
So, I'm wondering if
you have enjoyed the
few warm afternoons
lately teasing us toward
spring as much as I
have. I think spring is
the season that yells
"NEW" to us like noth-
ing else. After months
of everything looking
dead, life begins to
reappear. Miraculously,
God is up to a new thing
as He renews the earth!
And yet, too often we
take it for granted. Per-
haps we just get used to
the routine, and stop re-
ally seeing it. Listen to
the words of Isaiah
43:16-19:
This is what the
LORD says- He who
made a way through the
sea, a path through the
mighty waters, who
drew out the chariots
and horses, the army
and reinforcements to-
gether, and they lay
there, never to rise
again, extinguished,
snuffed out like a wick:
Forget the former
things: do not dwell on
the past. See, I am do-
ing a new thing! Now it
springs up, do you not
perceive it? I am mak-
ing a way in the desert
and streams in the
wasteland...I provide
water in the desert and
streams in the waste-
land, to give drink to
my people, my chosen,
the people I formed for
myself that they may


Goolsby

reunion
All decedents and rela-
tives of the following:
Crayton Goolsby,
Charles (Fudge) Gools-
by, Tom Goolsby, Jack
Goolsby are cordially in-
vited to a reunion at
David Goolsby's camp
kitchen on April 12, 2014
at 11 until. Please bring
a picnic lunch and enjoy
the fellowship.
If you have any ques-
tions call Dottie Goolsby
Lombardi at 386-792-
2414 or Glenda Goolsby
Roberts 386-362-4474.

Smith family
reunion
All decedents and rela-
tives of J. Addie Smith
Burtus Monroe Smith are
cordially invited to come
to their annual reunion
on April 19, 2014 @ Divo-
nia Baptist Church at 11 -
until. Please come and
bring a picnic lunch. Any
questions call Dennis
Smith 386-792-2608 or
Glenda Roberts 386-362-
4474.

Travel baseball
team
North Florida River
Rats lOu and llu Travel


baseball team is looking
for players. If interested,
please contact
Jamie Allbritton @ 386-
209-0166


HEART


MATTERS
proclaim my praise."
For generations, the
children of Israel had
repeated the testimony
of God delivering them
from slavery in Egypt
by way of the Red Sea.
Indeed, He parted those
mighty waters and they
walked through on dry
ground. He also closed
those waters over
Pharaoh's army and
sent the Israelites on
their way (Exodusl4).
At the time of Isaiah's
writing, the Israelites
have once again found
themselves enslaved.
Not by Egypt this time,
but by Babylon. No Red
Sea, just a lot of sand.
And God wants them to
trust Him to deliver, but
they can't see how He
can. According to verse
22: "Yet you have not
called upon me..." they
are just used to the rou-
tine. This is where we
are, this is how it is.
If we aren't careful,
we can make an idol out
of our routine. We hold
on to it so tight that we
can't see God doing a
new thing all around
us, or IN us! What new
thing does God want to
do in your life? Renew
your marriage? Make a
new friend or heal a
broken relationship? Is
it time to get serious
about taking care of
your health, get your fi-
nances under control, or
just break a bad habit?
If you are honest, you
already have an idea of
what He wants to do;
you just haven't been
willing to change. We
settle with "this is
where I am, this is how
it is" because change is
such a scary word and
an even scarier thought.
But what if the change
is worth the change?
What if you had help?
"This is what the LORD
says He who made
you, who formed you in
the womb, and who will
help you: Do not be
afraid..." (Isaiah 44:2).
This may be where you
are, but it doesn't have
to be where you stay.
Let Him do a new thing
so that you may pro-
claim His praise!
Because your heart
really does matter,

Angie

Heart Matters is a
weekly column written
by Angie Land, Director
of the Family Life Min-
istries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association,
where she teaches
Bible studies, leads
marriage and family
conferences and offers
Biblical counseling to
individuals, couples
and families. Contact
Angie with questions or
comments at
angieland3@
windstream.net


Last week we asked the ques-
tion "Is Russia on the Move?" I
don't know if this is the first step
toward Israel, but if it is, that
means the stay of the church on
earth is very short. We stated
that a study of Ezekiel 38 and 39
will reveal that at some point
Russia will march on Israel. We
can with confidence make four
sure statements concerning this.
1. This invasion will take place
in the "latter days". Eze. 38:8:
"After many days you will be
visited. In the latter years you
will come into the land of those
brought back from the sword
and gathered from many people
on the mountains of Israel,
which had long been desolate;
they were brought out of the na-
tions, and now all of them dwell
safely." Eze. 38:16: "You will
come up against My people Is-
rael like a cloud, to cover the
land. It will be in the latter days
that I will bring you against My
land, so that the nations may
know Me, when I am hallowed
in you, 0 Gog (Russia's end time
ruler), before their eyes." And
when Israel is dwelling in safety,
feeling secure. Eze. 38: 10 & 11:
"Thus says the Lord GOD: 'On
that day it shall come to pass
that thoughts will arise in your
mind, and you will make an evil
plan: You will say, I will go up


Obituary
Cecil Larry Hillhouse, II
Nov. 20,1979
March 22, 2014

O ecil Larry Hill-
I _house, II better
u nown as
"Bu age 34, of Lake
City, Fla. passed away
from complications of
Myotonic Muscular Dys-
trophy a very rare form


against a land of unwalled vil-
lages; I will go to a peaceful peo-
ple, who dwell safely, all of them
dwelling without walls, and hav-
ing neither bars nor gates..."
Eze. 38:14: "Therefore, son of
man, prophesy and say to Gog,
'Thus says the Lord GOD: "On
that day when My people Israel
dwell safely, will you not know
it?" We know for sure today a
peace treaty is being prepared,
but will not be ratified until the
Church is raptured out and the
man of sin (Antichrist) is re-
vealed. Shortly after, the Holy
Spirit is set aside (2nd Thess.2).
This peace will come for a short
time.
2. This invasion will come
from the north. Remember last
week I wrote if you draw a line
on a map from Jerusalem
straight north it would go to
Moscow.
3. Other nations will join with
Russia to defeat Israel. Eze.
38:15 "Then you will come from
your place out of the far north,
you and many peoples with you,
all of them riding on horses, a
great company and a mighty
army." Who will they be? We
can't name all the nations that
will join in with Russia, but some
are clear. Persia is present day
Iran. We know they hate Israel.
Cush and Put are most likely the
nations adjacent to Iran. Gomer
is almost universally known as
present day Germany. Toga-
rmah is usually identified as
Turkey. Of course many others
that hate Israel will join in the
battle.
4. God will be glorified
before the world of mankind as
He brings about the overwhelm-
ing defeat of the invaders. (Eze.
38:16 as reference in number 1
above.} Eze. 38:22 & 23: "And I
will bring him to judgment with
pestilence and blood shed; I will


of Muscular Dystrophy
March 22, 2014 at Haven
Hospice.
Buck was born in Lake
City, Fla. on Nov. 20,
1979. He was a graduate
of Hamilton County
High School and served
in the United States
Army. He was a former
resident of Suwannee
County, Fla.


New Hope to host Share
Saturday, March 29
New Hope Baptist Church in Jennings will host its
annual "Share Saturday" on Saturday, March 29 at the
church. The hours will be 8 a.m. until noon. Household
goods, toys, and clothes sized from children to adults
will be available free of charge. Any donations re-
ceived, however, will be put in the benevolence fund
to help needy families in the area.
New Hope is located off State Road 6 west of the in-
terstate. The address of the church is 6592 NW 48th
Street, Jennings. The public is invited to attend.


Congressman Yoho to
hold town hall in Madison
The Madison County town hall is
scheduled for Monday, March 31.
Doors open at 6 p.m.
Town hall starts at 6:30 p.m., Ends at 7:30 p.m.
Location: Madison County Extension Office,
184 College Loop, Madison, FL 32340


ANNUALS OR

PERENNIALS?
That is always the question. The answer
is both!
Perennials provide the longevity and
durability that everyone wants but most
will bloom for a specific period of time.
Annuals are usually for one season but
will provide flowers from start to finish.
Their jobs are not quite the same so for
the very best garden let us help you pick
out just the right mix of annuals and pe-
rennials for your special situations!


9248 129th Road Live Oak
(386) 362-2333
Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Saturday 8:30 a.m.-5:00 pmn.
Closed Sunday
We deliver to Lake City every week!
"For over 30 Years"
WWW.NOBLESGREENHOUSE.COM


Funeral services were
held on Monday, March
24, 2014 in the chapel of
Harry T. Reid Funeral
Home with Rev. Gerald
Smith officiating. Inter-
ment followed at Hebron
Cemetery near Jasper.
Survivors include his
wife, Cathy Shaw Hill-
house and step son, An-
drew Shaw, both of Lake
City, Fla.; his father and
step-mother, Cecil Larry
Hillhouse (Jeanice),
White Springs, Fla.; his
mother and step-father,
Rhonda Hunter Brown
(Randy), Lake City, Fla.;
a sister, Aundrea Hill-
house Carlton, Norman
Park, GA.; a step brother,
Kendall Brown, Jasper,
Fla.; two step sisters,
Crystal Smart and
Kaylee Smart, Lake City,
Fla.; paternal grand-
mother, Ms. Estelle Hill-
house, Live Oak, Fla. and
maternal grandmother,
Doris Hunter, Jasper,
Fla.; nieces, Chloe
Bryant, Auburn, AL. and


rain down on him, on his troops,
and on the many peoples who
are with him, flooding rain, great
hailstones, fire, and brimstone.
"Thus I will magnify Myself and
sanctify Myself, and I will be
known in the eyes of many na-
tions. Then they shall know that
I am the Lord."
If this is the time, are you
ready to meet the Lord?
Hugh G. Sherrill
ems-hugh43@comcast.net
Pastor Philippi Baptist Church
1444 SE County Road 18,
Lake City


16TH

ANNUAL

LAWN

MOWER

RACE
March 29, 2014,
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
John's Lawn Equipment
US 129 North, Live Oak
Support The Arc North Florida
and individuals with intellectual
and developmental disabilities.
Challenge your community com-
petition and race for the lead posi-
tion. Prizes for the top individual
and team money raiser. Trophies
for the top individual rider and top
team.
For details and online registra-
tion, visit www.arcnfl.com/LMR
or call 386-362-7143.
Proceeds go to support individu-
als in The Arc North Florida pro-
grams to receive the necessary
training to function as indepen-
dently as possible and each client is
provided opportunities to partici-
pate fully in the community.


Gracie Carlton, Athens,
GA.
Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to
Haven Hospice, 6037
U.S. 90 West, Lake City,
Fla. 32055.
Harry T. Reid Funeral
Home was in charge of
arrangements.


Death Notice
Rev. Dr. James Burton
Gayler
March 19, 2014

7 he Reverend
r. James Bur-
on Gayler went
home to be with The
Lord on March 19 after a
long and courageous
fight with cancer. Funer-
al services were held at 2
p.m. Saturday, March 22,
2014, with a visitation
one hour prior at Oxford
United Methodist
Church, Oxford, FL. A
full obituary may be
viewed at www.hiers-
baxley.com


Elizabeth A. Barrett I
March 6, 1913 March 10, 2014


My dear Mother,
I am sending a ^ _Jj
dove to heaven with -
a parcel on its wings. Be careful
when you open it. It's full of
beautiful things. Inside are a
million kisses wrapped up and a
million hugs to say how much I
miss you already and send all my
love. I hold you close within my
heart and there you will remain
to walk with me throughout my
life until we meet again.

Forever loved, always missed
Peggy and your family.
77^ -- 3_26Y.


Is Russia on the Move? Part 2


[eaaasBEENOS


11 11 -oo I--,


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 5A














Westwood Christian School visits T.A. Thompson


Middle School in Nassau, Bahamas


_...-- .


~D-rn~p., -


Westwood Warriors with some of the students of the TA. Thompson Middle School in Nassau, Bahamas.


The middle and high
school students from
Westwood Christian
School in Live Oak par-
ticipated in a cultural ex-
change program with
T.A. Thompson Middle
School in Nassau, Ba-
hamas. The program
started in August when


the schools exchanged
email addresses, and the
students received e-pals
and traded information.
The highlight of the ex-
change program was a
visit to the school in Jan-
uary. Thirty-eight stu-
dents and chaperones
boarded the Carnival


Fascination in Jack-
sonville, Florida, and
sailed on a five day
cruise to the Bahamas.
Upon entering the port
in Nassau, the Westwood
group traveled by bus
into the heart of the city
to the middle school.
They were met by over


860 Bahamian students
in the school courtyard.
The local high school
band was on hand to
give the visitors a taste of
a Bahamian Festival,
Junkanoo. The band
donned colorful cos-
tumes and played Ba-
hamian tunes on brass in-


I.E.


struments as well as
conch shell horns and oil
barrel drums. After the
Junkanoo parade, the
school presented a stu-
dent led program for the
visitors that included a
warm welcome from the
principal, student stories
and poems, and a tradi-
tional island dance per-
formed by the school
dance class. The Ameri-
can students joined in
and sang the Bahamian
National Anthem,
"March On, Bahama-
land".
The teachers and staff
at T.A. Thompson Mid-
dle provided an unusual
authentic Bahamian
lunch for the students
and chaperones. The de-
licious meal consisted of
barbecue chicken and lo-
cal favorites such as
conch fritters and fried
plantains. Each student
was given a goody bag
that contained a school t-
shirt, Bahamian treats,
and souvenirs.
Through the generosi-
ty of Westwood Baptist
Church, Westwood
Christian School Board,
Community Presbyterian
Church, Covenant First
Presbyterian Church, the
Suwannee County
School System, and indi-
vidual donations, the stu-
dents from Westwood
Christian were able to


provide much-needed
school supplies, art sup-
plies, and books for their
sister school in the Ba-
hamas. WCS students
quickly learned that they
are very blessed when
they visited the island
school. The local public
school had no glass or
screens in the windows,
no air conditioning, no
books, no school buses,
and no cafeteria. All stu-
dents in the islands wear
uniforms and walk to
class. However, the Ba-
hamian students were
extremely well-man-
nered, polite, and friend-
ly.
The highlight of the
day was the opportunity
for the students to locate
their e-pals and talk to
the students one on one.
Although four or five
cruise ships a day dock in
Nassau, many of the stu-
dents had never talked to
an American tourist. The
Westwood visitors were
fascinated to find that the
Bahamian teenagers
were just like American
teenagers. After many
hugs and photos, the lo-
cal students headed back
to class and the West-
wood students headed
back to the cruise ship.
Although the day passed
too quickly, the memo-
ries made in the islands
will last a lifetime.


State park to host Chili Cook-Off
and Springs Celebration
Alachua County, Fla. Alachua County, The
Friends of O'Leno, and the Santa Fe River Springs
Basin Working Group invite citizens to the O'Leno
Ole' Chili Cook-Off (from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.) and
Springs Celebration (from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.), on Sat-
urday March 29, 2014, at O'Leno State Park (410 SE
O'Leno Park Road). Admission to the park is free
with the donation of one can of food per person to
benefit a local food bank.
The events include: a chili cook-off, live music,
model train exhibits, children's activities, and envi-
ronmental exhibits. Participate in an Exhibit Scav-
enger Hunt and win a prize. Chili tasting kits will be
on sale for $5 and all proceeds assist the Friends of
O'Leno, Inc. a non-profit organization with their
mission of supporting the park.
"The Springs Celebration is a great event for every-
one to learn how their actions are connected to the
health of our springs, even when they live tens of
miles away from them." said Stacie Greco with the
Alachua County Environmental Protection Depart-
ment. She continued, "When we use a lot of water,
fertilize inappropriately, or neglect our septic sys-
tems we may be harming the springs of the Santa Fe
River where we all enjoy recreation."
For more information visit the Alachua County
Springs Protection website, or call Stacie Greco at
352-264-6829, or go to www.friendsofoleno.org.


PAGE 6A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014














Jake Rush kicks-off Republican primary

challenge to incumbent Yoho


Jake Rush, Alachua


Jake Rush


Cooking School
The Home and Community Education Club, an af-
filiate of UF/IFAS, will be holding its annual Cook-
ing School on Thursday, April 17, from 6-8 pm. This
year the event will be held in the Dining Room area
of the Advent Christian Village at Dowling Park.
Cliff Burr, director of Dining Services, will share
facts and information on selecting, sanitizing, cook-
ing and storing fresh fruits and vegetables. There
will demonstrations by 4-H members and Suwannee
County Extension staff. Good bags, door prizes, and
samples of food will be available to those attending.
For more information, please call Donna Wade at
963-3516.


To test or not to test? Florida

school choice proponents split


By Mary C. Tillotson I Watchdog.org
While Florida's Legislature considers expanding
its tax-credit scholarship program, it's unclear
whether the expansion will include tighter standard-
ized testing requirements for students receiving the
scholarships.
AND THE ANSWER IS: While Florida considers
expanding its tax-credit scholarship program, school
choice proponents debate whether scholarship recip-
ients should be required to take state tests.
This year, 34,000 families had yet to complete the
application when all the scholarships had been given
out. Corporations can receive tax credits for donations
made to Step Up for Students, a nonprofit that gives
scholarships to low-income students who want an op-
portunity outside their traditional public school. This
year, 60,000 students received scholarships. The ex-
pansion would allow Step Up for Students to receive
more donations, which means more students could
receive scholarships before funds run out.
Senate President Don Gaetz said he supports the
program, but that scholarship students should be re-
quired to take "valid and reliable assessments of
their academic performance."
Scholarship students are currently required to take
a nationally norm-referenced standardized test, but
can choose from a variety of tests. Gaetz said tests
students are taking don't allow parents to assess
how their children's new private school is perform-
ing compared to their neighborhood public school.
In addition, he said, "the real value in testing is to
provide diagnostic information so that teachers can
customize instruction ... and also to help taxpayers
understand the value of what they're paying for
when taxpayers subsidize these scholarships in pri-
vate schools."
Not all school choice proponents support testing
for scholarship students.
Most private and parochial schools already hold
their students to rigorous standards and require
some sort of testing, said Kara Kerwin, president of
Center for Education Reform, and Jeff Reed, commu-
nications director for the Friedman Foundation for
Educational Choice.
"They have options to use tests that match their
school's instructional styles and communities, so pri-
vate schools, in a large part, are employing a testing
regime. The concern with imposing a state test in pri-
vate schools with the imposition of the state test,
strings are attached to that, and it's those strings that
will incentivize private schools to teach to the test,
then all of a sudden the very things that made the
private school successful are suddenly changed,"
Reed said.
"It doesn't give teachers freedom to give kids
holistic education in the classroom and instruction
based on what they're seeing with diverse student
bodies. We need more diversification, not more stan-
dardization."
Because of this, many private schools may opt out
of participating in the program entirely, Kerwin said.
This results in fewer options for students.
"If they're all of a sudden required to change
everything and find a new way to test kids, think
about the resources that would take for the school to
do that," she said.
Michael Brickman, national policy director at the
Fordham Institute, said this wouldn't necessarily be
an issue.
"I wouldn't assume that just because there's a test,
people are going to be teaching to the test," he said.
"You should be teaching to the standards and mak-
ing sure students are ultimately getting an education
with the goals set by the school or by the state or
what have you."
Testing is an important measure to assess student


learning, he said.
"You want to make sure there's a high quality as-
sessment in place, and you want to make sure that
there's a good comparable measure to find out if stu-
dents are learning," Brickman said. "I think that
there are different approaches. We put out a toolkit
that suggested it should be the same test because it
makes things easiest, but I wouldn't say that's neces-
sarily doctrine."
School choice itself is accountability, Reed said. He
referred to More Than Scores, a study the Friedman
Foundation published last fall, which found that test
scores were near the bottom of parents' priority list
when they chose schools.
Parents care most about discipline, good learning
environment, smaller class sizes, better safety and
more individual attention, said Ben Scafidi, senior
fellow with the Friedman Foundation and coauthor
of the study.
Almost all parents said their decision "would" or
"might" be impacted if a school didn't provide them
with the information they wanted, he said.
"Ultimately, the goal should be to have schools ac-
countable to students and their needs, not a one-size-
fits-all regulation by the government," Reed said.
Instead public schools' accountability measure -
test scores being imposed on private schools, pub-
lic schools should open up to private schools' ac-
countability measure, he said: choice.
"Give all those parents the ability to leave," he
said. "We're not saying they will leave, but when
they have that option, that will provide a healthy in-
centive for every school to meet its customers' needs.
If your school's as good as you say it is, prove it."
Sen. Bill Galvano, sponsor of the tax-credit schol-
arship expansion bill, didn't return calls for com-
ment.
Contact Mary C. Tillotson at mtillotson@
watchdog.org.


[.ADIV-TJHSl


FIRST ADVENT CHRISTIAN
N.W. 15th Avenue Jasper
Rev. Wayne Sullivan
Sunday
Sunday School......................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship..................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday
Bible Study............................ 7:00 p.m.
784022


ST. THERESE CATHOLIC CHURCH
Three miles north of Jasper U.S. 41
PRO. Box 890, Jasper, FL 32052
Rectory U.S. 90 E., Live Oak, FL
(386) 364-1108
Saturday MASS 4:00 p.m.
784014

B P IT(o ten


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
SR 6 West, 6592 NW 48th St.,
Jennings, FL 32053 784oI3
938-5611
Pastor: Jeff Cordero
Sunday School............................... 10:00 a.m.

R&A & GA .......................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting, Teen Kids, Youth........6:00 p.m.


*I BPS(ot


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
"Where Friends become Family"
207 N.E. 2nd Street, Jasper 792-2658
Pastor: Roger Hutto
Sunday
Sunday School............................ 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship...................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship......................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Supper......................................6:00 p.m.
Children, Youth & Adult Programs6:30 p.m.
784012


CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH
11320 C.R. 6 East Jasper FL 32052
Pastor: Rev. Ronald Prueter
Home: 386-938-5912
Church: 386-792-3267
Morning Service:
Sunday School..................... 10:00 a.m.
W orship................................. 11:00 a .m .
Children's Church................. 11:00 a.m .
Evening Training Union...........6:00 p.m.
W orship................................... 7:00 p.m.

Wednesday


W orship.................................. 6:00 p.m.


Van pick-up upon request 835547


FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
405 Central Ave., Jasper, FL
Pastor Dale Ames
Phone- 386-792-1122
Sunday
Sunday School..............................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship.........................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday
Family Night Dinner 3rd Wednesday
Clothes Closet 4th Saturday 1-5pm
NONDENMIATINA


BURNHAM CHRISTIAN CHURCH
4520 NW CR 146, Jennings, FL 32053
938-1265
Pastor: Johnny Brown
Sunday
Sunday School.............................. 9:45 a.m.
W orship........................................ 11:00 a.m .
Evening Service............................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Youth Program ...............................5:30 p.m .
784003

To list your church on

our church directory,

please call Brenda at

386-362-1734


IPESBTERAN


FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
204 N.W. 3rd Avenue, Jasper 792-2258
Pastor: Shelton Steen
SUNDAY
Sunday School................10:00 a.m.
Worship Service............... 11:00 a.m.
WEDNESDAY
Choir Practice..................... 7:00 p.m.
834981


~iiH


County based congres-
sional candidate, kicks
off a Republican prima-
ry challenge to unseat
one term incumbent
Ted Yoho in Florida's
Third Congressional
District.
"Conservative voters
in North Central Flori-
da are tired of being
disappointed and em-
barrassed by their con-
gressman," said Jake
Rush. "As an Alachua
County Sheriff's deputy
and attorney who prac-
tices Constitutional and
federal law, I have seen
firsthand the overreach-
ing authority of our
government and the
need to stand strong
against it."
"There is a problem in
America, and it ain't
you, the voters. It's not
you, it's not me, but it's
Ted Yoho and every
promise he broke, every
misguided vote he's
cast, and every ridicu-
lous thing he's
said. There's a problem
and it's Ted Yoho," said
Rush.
The Jake Rush for
Congress campaign
kicked off the campaign


Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative
Lighting the way since 1937

STATEMENT OF
NONDISCRIMINATION

Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc. is the
recipient of Federal financial assistance from the
Rural Utilities Service, an agency of the U.S.
Department of Agriculture, and is subject to the
provisions of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964,
as amended, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of
1973, as amended, the Age Discrimination Act of
1975, as amended, and the rules and regulations of
the U.S. Department of Agriculture which provide
that no person in the United States on the basis of
race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, or
disability shall be excluded from participation in,
admission or access to, denied the benefits of, or
otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any
of this organization's programs or activities.

The person responsible for coordinating this
organization's nondiscrimination compliance efforts
is the Executive V.P./CEO. Any individual, or specific
class of individuals, who feels that this organization
has subjected them to discrimination may obtain
further information about the statutes and regulations
listed above from and/or file a written complaint with
this organization; or write USDA, Director, Office of
Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400
Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C.
20250-9410, or call (202)720-5964 (voice or TDD).
"USDA is an equal opportunity provider and
employer." Complaints must be filed within 180 days
after the alleged discrimination. Confidentiality will
be maintained to the extent possible.
860080


I I


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 7A


with a two day, old
fashioned, barn-storm-
ing tour of the dis-
trict. March 24 (Day 1)
consisting of announce-
ments at On Top of the
World in Marion Coun-
ty (9:30 a.m.), Veterans
Park in Alachua County
(12:30 p.m.), and Or-
ange Park in Clay
County (5 p.m.). March
25 (Day 2) included an-
nouncements in Lake
City (9 a.m.), Jasper (10
a.m.), Live Oak (11
a.m.), Branford (12:30
p.m.), Bell (1:30 p.m.),
Trenton (2:30 p.m.),
Chiefland (3:30 p.m.),
Bronson (4:30 p.m.), &
Newberry (5:30 p.m.).
"This campaign is not
going to get out-
worked. Jake Rush has
a strong, conservative
message, and our re-
search and experience
shows us that when the
voters are simply made
aware of incumbent
Yoho's activities in
Washington, they aban-
don him in droves,"
states Alex Patton, the
campaign general con-
sultant.
The Republican pri-
mary will be decided by
voters on Aug. 26.


About Jake Rush
Jake Rush is a conser-
vative Republican from
Alachua, Fla. He is a
former Alachua County
Sheriff's deputy and a
current attorney prac-
ticing federal and Con-
stitutional law. Jake
and his father, Alachua
attorney Robert Rush,
successfully defended
the first "Stand your
Ground" case in North
Central Florida. Jake is
SWAT qualified and
served as an Alachua
Sheriff Reserve Officer
again after returning
from law school. From
2010 to present Jake has
been elected to serve on
the Board of Governors
for The Florida Bar,
Young Lawyers Divi-
sion, as the representa-
tive for the Eighth Judi-
cial Circuit. There he
has served as chair and
co-chair of various
committees including
Public Interest Law.
Jake is a lifelong con-


Find us on


Facebook


servative Republican
and known as an hon-
est, straight shooter in
the law enforcement
and legal communi-
ties. Learn more about
Jake on the campaign's
w e b s i t e
www.JakeRushfor-
Congress.com.
About Florida's Third
Congressional District
The Third Congres-
sional District of Flori-
da is an electoral dis-
trict of the United
States House of Repre-
sentatives located in
the U.S. state of Florida.
It presently compris-
es a large section of
northernmost Florida,
including the entire
counties of Bradford,
Columbia, Dixie,
Gilchrist, Hamilton,
Lafayette, Levy,
Suwannee, and Union,
along with the majority
of Alachua and Clay
counties, half of Madi-
son county, and a sec-
tion of Marion county.


I EH ODIST E I^











PAGE 8A THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014


REFRESH YOUR ROUTI NE


he changing season evokes a sense of renewal, inside and out, making it the perfect
opportunity to rejuvenate you and your surroundings. It's time to let a little sunlight in
and celebrate the warmer months ahead.
From trying a bold, new hue with living room accents to taking a yoga class, there are numerous
ways to reinvent yourself and your surroundings as you mentally prep for the season ahead -
even if the weather is saying otherwise. Use your senses and embrace the unbridled joy that comes
with the change of seasons from the bright pops of color that enliven your home to the comfort-
ing floral scents that enhance your mood. Use these simple tips to transition into this exciting and
vibrant time of year.


Freshen up your home
From the drapes that adorn your windows
to the artwork that lines the walls your
home is a true reflection of your personality
and style. As you break free from last season's
routine, be sure to update your space too. Store
away old decor and make room for more
upbeat, invigorated gear. Add vibrant pops of
color and bright patterns with new accessories
for a simple update that feels fresh.

Wake up your senses
Fragrance offers another easy way to invigor-
ate your routine. Choose fragrances that
embody the rejuvenation and excitement of
the season. The new Glade Limited Edition
Spring Collection for example, is a refreshing
assortment of five fragrances inspired by the
uplifting feelings of the season, such as Lift
Off and Let Loose.

Make time for hobbies you love
As the weather warms up, you will likely find
yourself attending more get-togethers, outdoor
sporting events and other celebrations with
friends and family. As schedules become
increasingly hectic, be sure to set aside time
for the hobbies you love most. Whether it's


gardening, cooking or reading, scheduling time
for the activities you enjoy will help ensure
they happen. After all, making "me time" a
priority can benefit your overall happiness in
more ways than one.

Try something new
This is a time of new beginnings and what better
way to start fresh than by trying something new?
Work a new hobby into your routine, such as
yoga or painting. Or, attempt something you've
always been afraid to try. The thrill of accom-
plishing something you haven't done or feared
doing will leave you feeling empowered.

Feel the breeze
When the birds are chirping and the tulips
are blooming, take advantage of the beautiful,
mild weather. Incorporate more outdoor
activities into your schedule and find ways
to enjoy time outside each day. Some fun
outdoor activities include biking to work,
hosting a dinner party on your patio or planting
a garden. And while you're at home, be sure
open up those windows and welcome the
lovely breeze inside.
For more fresh ideas to embrace the season,
visit www.glade.com.


Make it a
scent-filled season
According to a recent survey
conducted by Glade, nearly
90 percent of Americans say
that scent has the power to
inspire feelings. Experience
the powerful effect fragrance
can have on everyday life by
following these tips:
* Create everyday
indulgences
Freshen up your bathroom
by adding soaps or room
sprays in your favorite
fresh scents, like lavender
or citrus.
* Invigorate your senses
Liven up your home with
fragrance, while awakening
your taste buds by trying
new recipes with seasonal
fruits, vegetables and spices
like refreshing mint, zesty
grapefruits and sweet
cherries.
* Bring in some buds
Plant a window garden
using your favorite herbs or
grab some fresh-cut flowers
from your garden for an
instant pop of color and a
burst of fresh fragrance.


Be sure to set aside time for the hobbies you love most.


FAMILY FEATURES












THURSDAY MACT2,214TEgAPRoES JserMLPAE9

P'll': G10 b
IV0r A


Owner Estes Altman (5th from left) is all smiles at the grand reopening of his store. -Photos: Joyce Marie Taylor


Jasper Auto Supply celebrates




NAPA connection


By Joyce Marie Taylor
joycem arie.taylor@
gaflnews.com

For the last 49 years
the Altman family has
been serving the auto-
motive needs of the
town of Jasper and sur-
rounding communities
as Jasper Auto Supply,
located at 308 West Hat-
ley Street in the center
of downtown Jasper.
On Thursday, March
20, owner Estes Altman
was smiling ear to ear as
a huge crowd showed
up for the official grand
reopening ribbon cut-
ting for the business,
while he stood under-
neath the new NAPA
Auto Parts sign on the
building.
"I started September
1, 1965," said Altman.
"From there it's just
been wonderful. Jasper
has just been super to
us. We've had such a
wonderful time."
Altman said he start-
ed his business in the
building behind Bruce
Glueck Chevrolet.
"We were there prob-
ably 15 years," he said.
Then he bought the
current building on
Hatley Street, which
used to be a service sta-
tion, a restaurant and
other assorted business-
es years ago, and re-
modeled it.
"I've been here like 30
years now," he added.
"It was a good move,
moving here."
The reasoning behind
the grand reopening,
Altman explained, is
that after running the
operation as an inde-
pendent for so many
years, he decided to
take the corporate route
and team up with
NAPA.
"This is the first time
we've ever been with a
national company," said
Altman.
One distinct advan-
tage, he said, is that he
now gets more national


Entire families came out to show their support.


advertising.
"Our business has re-
ally improved since we
changed over," he said.
"It's real good. It's been a
good change."
To celebrate the re-
opening, the town was
invited to come out and
enjoy some free barbe-
cue, sausage, potato sal-
ad, cole slaw and baked
beans.
"All the good stuff,"
Altman said.
Guests also had the
opportunity to drool
over a variety of beauti-
ful sports and antique
cars that lined both sides
of the street just outside
the store.
Members of the
Hamilton County Cham-
ber of Commerce, along
with Jasper City Manag-
er Charles Williams,
were on hand to perform
the ceremonial ribbon
cutting.


A huge crowd came out to help celebrate.


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 9A







PAGE 1OA THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014


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2004 MAZDA MAZDA6 S
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2002 GMC ENVOY SLT
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2005 FORD E-150

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2007 MERCURY MILAN PREMIER
J1
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2009 CHEVROLET COBALT LT

2006 VOLKSWAGEN GTI 1.8T
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2008 GMC ENVOY SLE


2006 CADILLAC SRX V6
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2007 FORD MUSTANG GT
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2008 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE GS


$7,999 $8,999 $10,499


PAGE 10A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014


a i j


.tS^













Congratulations to the 2014 Miss NHE Queens and their Courts


Tiny Miss NHE Little Miss NHE
2nd Runner-up: Ava Honeycutt 2nd Runner-up: Carley Morgan
1st Runner-up: Allison Norris 1st Runner-up: Maya Mallett
2014 Tiny Miss NHE: Hayleigh Capps 2014 Little Miss NHE: Denyla Cherry


Junior Miss NHE Miss NHE
2nd Runner-up: Jasmine Griffith 2nd Runner-up: Elizabeth Smith
1st Runner-up: Brianna James 1st Runner-up: Logan McCulley
2014 Junior Miss NHE: Jenna Tolle 2014 Miss NHE: Megan Murphy


Band of Brothers, Justin Case Band

this weekend at SOS Music Park
VP w :tUW.in i"m 7 in kftt IEk


. Band of Brothers


2014 Miss NHE Ticket Queen: Me'Lesha Jones


CJBAT tests
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment):
CJBAT (Criminal Justice Basic Abilities Test) at
NFCC Testing Center (Bldg. #16), Madison. CJBAT
is required for acceptance into Corrections & Law
Enforcement programs. Photo ID required. Pre-reg-
istration & scheduling time and date are required.
To register please call 850-973-9451.

College Placement Tests
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment):
College Placement Test (CPT), NFCC Testing Center
(Bldg. #16), 5 p.m., Madison. Register in NFCC Stu-
dent Services 24 hours before test. For information
please call 850-973-9451.

TABE tests
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment):
TABE (Test of Adult Basic Education) at NFCC Test-
ing Center (Bldg. #16), Madison. TABE is required
for acceptance into vocational/technical programs.
Photo ID required. Pre-registration & scheduling
time & date are required. To register please call 850-
973-9451.


It's time again for Band of Brothers and the
Justin Case Band to take over the weekend at The
Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak Fri-
day, March. 28 and Saturday, March 29.
Make plans and reservations now. Get those
boots and dancing shoes ready because it's going
to be a great weekend.
Reservations for both nights are suggested if you
want a table as large crowds are expected both
nights. Call 386-364-1703 to reserve. If you don't
make a reservation, come anyway. Come early and
enjoy a delicious dinner Friday of prime rib,
friendly service, warm atmosphere and meet your
friends for an evening of dancing and music en-
joyment. Saturday night is regular menu. Full ser-
vice bar both nights.

Band of Brothers
Band of Brothers of Mayo has taken North Flori-
da country music by storm. These six guys play for
their own enjoyment but now, we all get to share
in the stupendous country music played by these
Mayo music makers, among the best in country
music in North Florida. Band of Brothers packs the
house at the Music Hall when they take over the
stage and rocks the house from 8 p.m. midnight.


If you haven't enjoyed this band's music yet,
now's the time. You will love this band.

Justin Case Band
Justin Case Band members of Live Oak have
played country music most of their lives. This
band is one of the favorites at The SOSMP. Danc-
ing is a big part of the show so don't forget those
dancing shoes. Justin Case's members are all ca-
reer musicians and several of them are songwrit-
ers. This band has the touch, the music, the fans, so
don't be late with your date Saturday for Justin
Case Band. JCB takes the stage at 8 p.m. mid-
night.

SOS Cafe and Restaurant will open at 6 p.m. for
dinner Friday and Saturday, shows begin at 8 p.m.
SOSMP is the place to be this weekend. Again,
reservations are highly recommended for seating
when these two bands are in the house.
For more information about The Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park call 386-364-1683, email
spirit@musicliveshere.com or go to www.musi-
cliveshere.com. The Spirit of the Suwannee Music
Park is located at 3076 95th Drive 4.5 miles north of
Live Oak.


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 11A










PAGE 12A THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014


Photo courtesy of Getty Images


EASY-TO-MAKE


am and


FAMILY FEATURES
ith fresh inspiration from the season's juiciest, most delicious
fruits, you can create jams, jellies and other spreads with ease
right from your own kitchen.
For many, the thought of turning their favorite fruits into sweet and
scrumptious jams and jellies may sound like countless hours in a hot,
stuffy kitchen. But creating your own, homemade fruit spreads can be
quite simple with the right ingredients and tips.
"Any cook can create delightful jams and jellies, regardless of their
canning abilities," said Shirley Camp, M.S., registered dietitian, licensed
dietitian nutritionist and retired U'ni'ersitv of Illinois Extension master
canner and educator. "There are so many great products, such as Mrs. Wages
No Cook Freezer Jam Fruit Pectin, which allow you to whip up homemade
spreads, without cooking, saving time without a messy kitchen."







For the best results for your canning creations, follow these four simple tips
for canning success:


1.Pick 'em right.
When picking berries, keep in mind these
fruits have high water content and are very
fragile. So, use smaller containers when
picking them so the berries do not get
crushed under their own weight.
2.Rinse, don't soak.
Due to their fragile nature, the berries should
be lightly "rinsed" to remove surface dirt.
Do not allow them to sit in water for very
long because they tend to take on more
water and will become mushy.
3.Firm and ripe
When selecting berries for jellied products,
ripe berries are best, but not overripe ones.
Choose those that have good flavor and are
still firm to the touch. For strawberries,
look for the smaller, juicier berries instead
of larger types that are available today.


4.Mix flavors.
While many people
prefer their jams to be
one flavor, mixing two
or more different types
of berries together
produces great jams
with good flavor. Try
a mix consisting of
blackberry and red
raspberry, or strawberry
with red raspberry.
Another great combi-
nation includes pureed
berries and peaches
mixed together to make
jam. Red raspberry
peach jam is always a
huge hit.


e


Recipes


Fresh, flavorful canning recipes


Whether you need a sweet topping for a slice of break-
fast toast or a dollop for thumbprint cookies, these
simple jam and jelly recipes are sure to please everyone
in your family. From the ease of Fast Fruity Freezer Jam
to the cool blast of Mint Jelly, these recipes all feature
Mrs. Wages fruit pectin, which provides the perfect
consistency to enhance all your favorite fruit flavors.

Best Blue Ribbon Basil Jelly
Yield: 6 half pints
4 cups water
2 cups firmly packed fresh basil leaves,
finely chopped
1 package Mrs. Wages Fruit Pectin Home Jell
3 drops green food coloring, optional
5 cups sugar
In large saucepan, bring water and basil to a boil.
Remove from heat, cover and let stand for 10 min-
utes. Strain and discard basil. Return 3 2/3 cups liquid
to pan. Stir in pectin and food coloring, if desired.
Return to rolling boil over high heat. Stir in sugar.
Boil for 1 minute, stirring constantly.
Remove from heat. Skim off any foam that forms
on top of jam. Ladle mixture into hot, clean jars,
leaving 1/4-inch headspace. Remove air bubble.
Wipe jar rims and threads. Cover with two-piece lids.
Twist lid bands so not loose but not too tight. Process
for 15 minutes in boiling water bath canner.

Best of Show Apricot-Pineapple Jam
Yield: 8 pints
51/2 cups prepared fruit (about 21/2 pounds
apricots and 11/2 pounds pineapple)
1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
1 package Mrs. Wages Fruit Pectin Home Jell
1/2 teaspoon butter
8 cups granulated sugar
Pit unpeeled apricots, then finely chop or grind.
Measure exactly 3 cups apricots into 8-quart sauce-
pan. Cut, peel, core and finely chop pineapple.
Measure exactly 2 1/2 cups pineapple into saucepan
with apricots. Mix well. Add lemon juice. Add pectin
and butter and stir over high heat until reaches rolling
boil. Add sugar and stir thoroughly until reaches
rolling boil. Continue cooking for four minutes, stir-
ring constantly to avoid scalding.
Remove from heat. Skim off any foam that forms
on top of jam. Ladle mixture into hot, clean jars, leav-
ing 1/4-inch headspace. Wipe jar rims and threads.
Cover with two-piece lids. Twist lid bands so not
loose but not too tight. Process for 10 minutes in boil-
ing water bath canner.


Fast Fruity Freezer Jam
Yield: 5 half pints
11/2 cups sugar or Splenda No Calorie
Sweetener (Granular)
1 package Mrs. Wages No Cook Freezer
Jam Fruit Pectin
4 cups crushed fruit, fresh or frozen
Combine sugar or Splenda No Calorie Sweetener
(Granular) and pectin in bowl. Blend well. Stir in
crushed fruit. Stir for three minutes. Ladle mixture
into clean jars, leaving 1/4-inch headspace.
Wipe jar rims and threads. Cover with two-piece
lids. Twist lid bands so not loose but not too tight.
Let stand for 30 minutes to thicken. Refrigerate up
to three weeks, freeze up to one year.

State Fair Strawberry Rhubarb Jam
Yield: 6 half pints
4 cups crushed strawberries
2 cups chopped rhubarb
1/4 cup fresh squeezed lemon juice
1 package Mrs. Wages Fruit Pectin Home Jell
51/2 cups sugar
1/2 tablespoon butter
Combine strawberries, rhubarb, lemon juice and
pectin in large saucepan. Bring to a boil over high
heat. Add sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to
rolling boil and add butter. Boil hard for 1 minute,
stirring constantly.
Remove from heat. Skim off any foam that forms
on top of jam. Ladle mixture into hot, clean jars, leav-
ing 1/4-inch headspace. Wipe jar rims and threads.
Cover with two-piece lids. Twist lid bands so not
loose but not too tight. Process for 10 minutes in boil-
ing water bath canner.

Serrano Cherry Jam
Yield: 8 pints
1/4 cup olive oil
1 cup Serrano peppers, seeded and minced
16 cups cherries, fresh or frozen and thawed
4 cups sugar
4 cups water
1 package Mrs. Wages Fruit Pectin Home Jell
In large pot on high heat, pour olive oil in and bring
to almost smoke point. Add peppers and blister. Add
cherries and sugar, reduce heat, then pour in water.
Bring to a simmer to dissolve sugar. Add pectin and
continue to cook for 15 minutes.
Remove from heat. Skim off any foam that forms
on top of jam. Ladle mixture into 16-ounce containers
or freezer safe zipper bags.


For canning or preservation questions, call the Mrs. Wages Customer Care
Center at 1-800-647-8170, Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. CST. For
additional canning recipes and how-to information, visit www.mrswages.com


PAGE 12A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014













DEP begins two year nutrient removal pilot

study at Ichetucknee Springs State Park


FORT WHITE The Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection
launched a two-year pilot study Tues-
day at Ichetucknee Springs State Park
in an effort to improve septic tank per-
formance. In many areas, deep and
sandy soils provide minimal treatment
of nitrogen as it infiltrates to ground-
water. As a result, septic tanks, espe-
cially in higher-density neighborhoods
in vulnerable areas near springs, can
contribute to elevated nitrate levels.
Nitrogen is a naturally occurring nu-
trient, necessary for the plants and an-
imals living in surface waters. But ex-
cessive levels of nitrate, a form of ni-
trogen, can cause algal mats and de-
press oxygen levels, leading to an im-
balance in the aquatic life of an ecosys-
tem. This is the current case in many
springs across Florida, where nitrate
levels have been increasing for many
years.
The Department has launched the
pilot study because basic septic sys-
tems provide limited nitrogen re-
moval. Placing a carbon source below
a drainfield should provide additional
nitrogen removal through microbial
treatment. This expectation is support-
ed by preliminary results of the Flori-
da Department of Health's ongoing
study on septic system nitrogen reduc-
tion options. A passive technology,
like the one being employed for the pi-
lot study, offers the potential of an ef-
fective, low-cost means of reducing ni-
trogen loads from septic systems.


"Excessive nutrients are a problem to
surface and ground waters in many ar-
eas in Florida," said Drew Bartlett,
DEP Deputy Secretary for Water Poli-
cy and Ecosystem Restoration. "This
pilot project will give us useful infor-
mation to better target nutrient reduc-
tion strategies and protect and restore
our watersheds, particularly vulnera-
ble spring systems."
For the project, the Department is in-
stalling a new drainfield at the State
Park Manager's residence, which is
currently served by a conventional
septic tank and drainfield. The new
drainfield will include an underlying
reactive layer consisting of wood
chips, a source of carbon.
The Department has worked closely
with the Department of Health, the
agency that regulates septic tanks in
Florida, to meet its requirements. A di-
verter box will be installed to allow
routing septic tank effluent back to the
existing, conventional drainfield in the
event of failure or needed modification
of the new drainfield.
The Department will sample water
quality quarterly to assess the effec-
tiveness of the reactive wood-chip
layer in nitrogen treatment and re-
moval. We will also evaluate the con-
struction cost and long-term viability
of the reactive media. The pilot study
is expected to last about two years,
but we are optimistic that interim re-
sults will tell us much of what we
want to know.


Wood chips may be low cost solution for reducing nitrogen loads from septic
systems.


IJH,1,19kiIiA$UNUoP 1 j


Rountree Moore Lak
Automotive Group est 1924
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m I "S II "I I *LJ


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 13A












SRWMD Governing Board


favors MFLs Recovery


The Suwannee River
Water Management Dis-
trict (District) Governing
Board on March 11 ac-


cepted the Recovery
Strategy for the Lower
Santa Fe and Ichetuck-
nee Rivers and Priority


Springs Minimum Flows sented to the St. Johns
and Levels (MFLs). A River Water Manage-
summary of the Recov- ment District Governing
ery Strategy was pre- Board on the same day.


Recov
require
lished
body is


Strategy
very strategies are jected to fall below a
ed to be estab- MFL. The MFLs devel-
when a water oped for the Lower Santa
below or is pro- Fe and Ichetucknee
Rivers and Priority
Springs indicate that they
are in need of protective
actions to ensure proper
water flow to prevent
significant harm to the
ecology.
The District, in con-
junction with the St.
Johns River Water Man-
agement District and the
Florida Department of
Environmental Protec-
tion (DEP), developed
the MFLs and Recovery
Strategy. Additionally,
input was received from
the North Florida Re-
gional Water Supply
Stakeholder Committee,
which is comprised of
representatives from
stakeholder groups
throughout North Flori-
da.
The MFLs for these wa-
ter bodies were devel-
oped using the best avail-
able science. An indepen-
dent peer review of the
data, science, and conclu-
sions was then conduct-
ed by the University of
Florida Water Institute.
The DEP is in the
process of adopting the
MFL and the regulatory
provisions of the Recov-
ery Strategy. Once adopt-
ed by rule, the MFLs will
be applicable in both dis-
tricts.


Freckles are a common skin condition


Whether it's a light smattering of spots over the bridge of a person's nose or tiny spots covering
his or her arms and legs, freckles are a reality for thousands of people. Despite their prevalence,
many people are unsure just why freckles form or who is most likely to have them on their
bodies.
Freckles are spots on the skin that are produced from concentrations of melanin, which is the
pigment in the skin that gives it its color. Freckles generally show up on people who have fair
skin. Melanin is derived from the amino acid tyrosine, which helps with protein production in the
body. Melanin is usually a black-brown shade and is produced as a defense against the harmful
UV rays of the sun.
In the body, the melanocortin 1 receptor on the MC1 R gene helps produce melanin that tans the
body. Variants of the MC1 R gene will lead to freckles. Melanin is produced in two
types:pheomelanin and eumelanin. Individuals who primarily produce pheomelanin tend to have
freckles. Freckles also are largely genetic, and some identical twins may have similar freckle
patterns.
There are two basic forms of freckles. These include simple freckles and sunburn freckles. Both
are made more prominent by exposure to the sun. Simple freckles are usually small, tan and
round. Sunburn freckles are larger, darker and more irregular in shape. You'll find them usually
on the upper back and shoulders. Lentigines is the medical term for darker sunburn freckles that


Oe-


Freckles are very common on light-skinned people.
They form from exposure to the sun.


do not tend to fade in the winter.
Freckles, although most common on the face, can occur anywhere on the body that is repeatedly exposed to sun. While
freckles are not harmful and rarely lead to skin cancer, people who who have freckles are at a higher risk for other skin
conditions, which in turn may increase their risk of skin cancer. That's because a person with the pheomelanin type of melanin
has a lower concentration of photoprotective melanin that
guards against the harmful effects of UV radiation. People
Physical Therapy with freckles tend to burn more easily and need to rely on
::: 4-ao.f!a0TF-., sunscreen and covering their skin to prevent damage.
j / ^t/ o^, -f/na. When freckles are present, they may fade when the skin
"_tinA4J 1fL'^oa'yjzaiL&tik VE" gets less exposure to the sun. But some freckles will remain.
Physical Therapy Specializing In Arthritis Fibromyalgia Those who are embarrassed by freckles can be diligent
e Geriatrics Spinal & Joint Pain Sports Injuries Work Injuries about covering up in the sun. There are various topical
Pediatrics Manual Therapy Lymphedema
creams that can bleach freckles and lighten them over time.
Locally Owned & Operated There also are dermatological laser treatments to lighten or
Live Oak 208-1414 Medicare, Protegrity eliminate freckles.
Lake City 755-8680 Blue Cross, Av Med
aMediar C-ertified RehaBiita tio Agen Freckles are a skin condition primarily for those of light skin
A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency
who are exposed to sunlight. They are largely hereditary and
John Palmer, Physical Therapist rarely harmful. Those who have concerns about the
S,,, D,1, D,,,-,1 T ,1..-, A 4.,appearance of freckles can visit a dermatologist to discuss
T R n "" i T -J nI ~T VJIATc-tq Tkal "/-yr-nnic A- /InL-c^-ic -a r


their options.


Family Dentistry


HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH,
D.D.S, P.A.

602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak, FL
(386) 362-6556
1-800-829-6506
(Out of Suwannee County) 783927


-uacy C adiicy, rIi ai S I iciapI Lt AiStauLt

North Fluorida

Pharmacy
Medical
Equipment
SOxygen

"JEverything For Your)
-Icm e Recovery"
Locally Owned & Operated
305 SW U.S. Hwy. 27, Branford, FL= 32008
(386) 935-6905
229 W. MIvain St., IVIMayo, FL 3206 6
(386) 294-3777


PAGE 14A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014













THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


Norris



Notes

By Lillian Norris


It was a beautiful, perfect morning in Jasper last Sat-
urday for honoring the service persons from Hamilton
County who have honorably and faithfully served our
country in peacetime and wartime. There were many
people in attendance, some local and some who came
to Jasper for the sole purpose of honoring loved ones,
as well as visit with family members and chat with
friends. We look forward to Joyce Marie Taylor's cov-
ering of this event. She does a super job of bringing
news and pictures of these events. Thank you, Joyce.
Cindy and Ana Eatmon attended the UF Ropin' in
the Swamp last Saturday in Gainesville. They enjoyed
visiting with Haley and watching the different ropers
competing. Ginny Godwin was there also. They all en-
joyed seeing Sara Godwin in competition. James and
Shelley Head attended the Ropin', also. They are such
good supporters of events of this kind. They love the
horses and the riders.
Jill Adams, Seth and Sarabeth; Nancy Mathis, Tris-
ton and Lance; Hallie and Luke Davis, and Nicole Par-
rish had a great trip to New York. All went in celebra-


tion of Sarabeth's birthday and got to ride in a limo
and visit Cake Boss! That sounds good. They arrived
in New York on Thursday and came home on Sunday.
Oh, well, back to Jasper. It was fun!
In case you do not want to cook on Sunday, March
30, we would love to have you join us at First Presby-
terian Church for spaghetti with Chef Ron Hall in con-
trol. The spaghetti is only $5 per plate, with funds be-
ing raised for youth projects for the church. Serving
will start immediately after morning worship ends.
If you are looking for something to do this weekend,
join the folks at New Hope Baptist Church in their
Share program; a great program sponsored by the
church and a worthwhile project with a chance to visit
and fellowship. It is this Saturday, March 29 from 8
a.m. until noon in Jennings.
Also on March 29, is the ARC North Florida 16th
Annual Lawn Mower Race at John's Lawn Equipment
on 129 North in Live Oak.
In White Springs there will be an Antique Tractor
Show April 3-5.
Spring Break is over and the last events of the school
year will be gearing up in full force. Hope the next few
months will be happy times for all students as they
prepare for the closing of the school year, and plan-
ning for the summer and future. Cherish every mo-
ment, week, and month.
I am asking y'all to help me get the news out, so
please email me at norrislw@windstream.net; or call
386-792-2151.


Share Saturday

is this weekend

Elizette Smith, daughter of Tia and Lindsey Smith
looks over some of the toys donated for Share Sat-
urday at New Hope Baptist Church. Share Saturday
will be held from 8 until noon on Saturday, March
29, at New Hope Baptist Church in Jennings. The
public is invited.


Red Cross opening ceremony


& ribbon cutting

North Central Florida Red Cross opens new location in Lake City


The North Central
Florida Chapter of the
American Red Cross will
hold the opening ceremo-
ny & ribbon cutting for its
new Lake City Red Cross
office on Thursday,
March 27, from 4 to 6 p.m.
Afternoon activities in-
clude a ribbon cutting and
a meet and greet with
community partners, Red
Cross officials and volun-
teers. Light refreshments
and hors d'oeuvres will be
served.
The new facility, locat-
ed at 971 West Duval St.,
has been donated to the
Red Cross by the Colum-
bia County Board of
Commissioners and will
allow the Red Cross to
provide better service
throughout the communi-
ty. Some enhanced ser-
vices include increased
volunteer and training
opportunities, as well as a
better setting in which to
provide disaster assis-
tance, when needed.
American Red Cross Office
March 27 from 4 to 6 p.m.
971 West Duval Street,
Lake City, FL 32055
Fiscal year 2013 was a
busy year for the Red
Cross. In our own back-
yard, the North Central
Florida Chapter provided:
more than 260 families
with food, clothing and
shelter as they fell victim
to house fires, floods and
other disasters
preparedness presenta-
tions to more than 6,000
residents on how to keep
themselves, their business-
es and their homes safe
nearly 500 services to
US military members and
their families including
emergency communica-
tions, emergency loans,
grants and counseling or
referral services
lifesaving training to
more than 2,600 people in
programs such as, CPR,
first aid, aquatics, babysit-
ting and Nurse Assistant
Training
Across the country,
chapters responded to
more than 70,000 disas-
ters, including the launch
of major relief operations
for wildfires that burned
hundreds of thousands of
acres; tornadoes that de-
stroyed entire towns; and
flooding that left commu-
nities under water.
More than 90 percent of
our total work force is
composed of volunteers.
We rely on people like
you to carry out our hu-
manitarian work. You can
assist victims of hurri-
canes, tornadoes, floods,
wildfires and home fires
with shelter, food, com-
fort and other services;
help members of the mili-
tary, veterans and their
families; or teach a health


& safety course.
Becoming a Red
Cross volunteer is easy.
We provide a general
orientation to the entire
organization, as well as
intensive training spe-
cific to each position.
For more information
or to join our team,
please call (352) 376-
4669 or visit us
at www.redcross.org/fl


/gainesville.
About the American
Red Cross:
The American Red
Cross shelters, feeds
and provides emotional
support to victims of
disasters; supplies more
than 40 percent of the
nation's blood; teaches
skills that save lives;
provides international
humanitarian aid; and


supports military mem-
bers and their families.
The Red Cross is a not-
for-profit organization
that depends on volun-
teers and the generosity
of the American public
to perform its mission.
For more information,
please visit redcross.
org or join our blog at
http:/ /blog.redcross.
org.


Artisans and Growers Market


opens in the Wirick-Simmons Garden


At the corner of Pearl and Cherry
Streets
This market will be open the first
Saturday of each month from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m.
If you Make it -- Bake it -- Grow it -
- or Sew it, you can sell it here
$5.00 for your table We furnish
three canopy tents


$10.00 for 12x12 space on lawn for
your tent or pick-up
All proceeds benefit the Monticello
Old Jail Museum
For more information Contact:
Anne H. Holt
Phone: 850-576-0721
E-Mail: ahholt@ahholt.com


Jasper Legals Jasper Legals
PUBLIC AUCTION vs.


Location Dennis Garage
8109 CR146 NW
Jennings, FL 32053
Date 04-14-2014
Time 800AM
1994 MERC
VIN #2MELM74W1 RX688936
03/27
PUBLIC AUCTION
Location Dennis Garage
8109 CR146 NW
Jennings, FL 32053
Date 04-21-2014
Time 800AM
1994 NISS
VIN #1 N6SD16S3RC363901
03/27
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2013-CA-277
GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, A FOR-
EIGN LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY
AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN
THE STATE OF FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
vs.
SHANAY RILEY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF SHANAY RILEY; JOHN DOE;
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO THE FOLLOWING DEFENDANTSS:
SHANAY RILEY
315 7TH AVE SW
JASPER, FL 32052
3351 IMPERIAL HILL DR
SNELLVILLE, GA 30039
945 6TH ST SW APT 3B
JASPER, FL 32052
946 6TH ST SW APT 38
JASPER, FL 32052
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SHANAY RILEY
315 7TH AVE SW
JASPER, FL 32052
3351 IMPERIAL HILL DR
SNELLVILLE, GA 30039
945 6TH ST SW APT 3B
JASPER, FL 32052
946 6TH ST SW APT 38
JASPER, FL 32052
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the following
property in HAMILTON County, Florida
LOT SEVEN (7) BLOCK ONE HUN-
DRED THREE (103) ACCORDING TO
LANGS RETRACT PLAT NOW ON FILE
IN THE CLERKS OFFICE PARCEL
#6426-000 ALSO DESCRIBED AT 0 R
BOOK 499, PAGE 183 PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF HAMILTON COUNTY,
FLORIDA
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on the attorney for
the Plaintiff VESCHIO LAW GROUP,
LLC, 2001 W KENNEDY BLVD, Tampa,
FL 33606 EMAIL FOR THIS FILE
FORECLOSURE@VLGFL COM within 30
days of the first publication of this notice
of action, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before service
on Plaintiff's attorneys or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief deman-
ded in the Complaint
DATED on March 6, 2014
(Court Seal) GREG GODWIN
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
HAMILTON County
ROOM 106 JASPER, FL 32052
By Is/Cynthia Johnson
Deputy Clerk
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISAB-
ILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODA-
TION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN
THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE EN-
TITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSIST-
ANCE PLEASE CONTACT ADA CO-
ORDINATOR JACQUETTA BRADLEY,
P 0 BOX 569, LAKE CITY, FL 32056
386-719-7428 AT LEAST SEVEN (7)
DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED
COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDI-
ATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTI-
FICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE
SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS
THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS, IF YOU ARE
HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL
711
03/20, 27
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2012CA000479
JIM JEAN AND SONS, INC.,
a Florida corporation
Plaintiff,


THOMAS E. VEALEY and KAREN E.
VEALEY; IF THEY OR EITHER OF
THEM BE LIVING, AND IF THEY OR
EITHER OF THEM BE DEAD; THEIR
RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, LEGATEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, OR TRUSTEES,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: THOMAS E. VEALEY
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS
11115 Stafford Lane
Riverview, Florida 33578
KAREN E. VEALEY
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS
10935 Juarez Drive
Riverview, Florida 33569
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a Mortgage on the following de-
scribed property
Lot 5, GRAHAM ACRES a subdivision ac-
cording to the plat thereof recorded in Plat
Book 3, page 15, public records of
Hamilton County, Floria
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of written de-
fenses, if any, to it on Eddie M Anderson,
Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is Post
Office Box 1179, Lake City, Florida
32056-1179, no later than thirty (30) days
after the first publication of this notice,
and file the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately thereafter, other-
wise, a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the complaint
There may be money owed to you after a
foreclosure sale You may contact the
clerk of the court at (386) 792-1288 for in-
formation on what you need to do to get
the money You do not need to hire an at-
torney or other representative to get this
money
DATED ON March 18, 2014
(Court Seal) GREG GODWIN
Clerk of Court


03/27, 04/03


By /s/Cynthia Johnson
As Deputy Clerk


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2012CA000480
JIM JEAN AUCTIONS, INC.,
a Florida corporation
Plaintiff,
vs.
THOMAS E. VEALEY and KAREN E.
VEALEY; IF THEY OR EITHER OF
THEM BE LIVING, AND IF THEY OR
EITHER OF THEM BE DEAD; THEIR
RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, LEGATEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, OR TRUSTEES,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: THOMAS E. VEALEY
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS
11115 Stafford Lane
Riverview, Florida 33578
KAREN E. VEALEY
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS
10935 Juarez Drive
Riverview, Florida 33569
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a Mortgage on the following de-
scribed property
Lot 2, JENNINGS ACRES SUBDIVISION,
a subdivision according to plat thereof re-
corded in Plat Book 2, page 70, Public
Records of Hamilton County, Florida
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of written de-
fenses, if any, to it on Eddie M Anderson,
Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is Post
Office Box 1179, Lake City, Florida
32056-1179, no later than thirty (30) days
after the first publication of this notice,
and file the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately thereafter, other-
wise, a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the complaint
There may be money owed to you after a
foreclosure sale You may contact the
clerk of the court at (386) 792-1288 for in-
formation on what you need to do to get
the money You do not need to hire an at-
torney or other representative to get this
money
DATED ON March 18, 2014
(Court Seal) GREG GODWIN
Clerk of Court
By /s/ Cynthia Johnson
As Deputy Clerk
03/27 04/03


PAGE 15A


AGENDA
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA
Room 112 Courthouse 207 Northeast First Street
Jasper, Florida
MEETING DATE: APRIL 1, 2014

THE AGENDA ITEMS LISTED BY NUMBER WILL BE TAKEN IN ORDER FROM THE
BEGINNING OF THE MEETING REGARDLESS OF TIME. HOWEVER, THE TIME
CERTAIN ITEMS LISTED WITH SPECIFIC TIMES WILL COMMENCE AT THE
SPECIFIED TIME.

LISTED ITEMS

1) COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC UNAGENDAED APPEARANCES (*)
2) CONSENT AGENDA APPROVAL
3) HAMILTON COUNTY DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY STATUS REPORT
4) BOARD APPOINTMENT SUWANNEE RIVER ECONOMIC COUNCIL, INC.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
5) DISCUSSION OF ADDING A SIXTH ROAD GRADER
6) VETERANS MEMORIAL PARK-STATUS REPORT
7) DISCUSSION OF CROSSROADS FIRE DEPARTMENT BUILDING REPAIRS
8) APPROVE BILLS
9) CORRESPONDENCE AND ANNOUNCEMENTS
10) ADJOURN

TIME CERTAIN ITEMS

9:00 A.M. CALL TO ORDER INVOCATION PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE TO THE
FLAG
9:10 A.M. COUNTY ROAD PROJECTS STATUS REPORT
9:15 A.M. SHIP/CDBG PROGRAM STATUS REPORT

DUE TO PUBLICATION DEADLINE, THIS AGENDA MAY NOT CONTAIN ALL
MATTERS BEFORE THE BOARD. A COMPLETE COPY OF THE AGENDA MAY BE
OBTAINED AFTER 1:00 P.M. ON WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, 2014 FROM THE OFFICE
OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, COURTHOUSE, JASPER, FLORIDA.

An Agenda review meeting will be held, beginning at 12:00 noon, on Monday preceding the
above Agenda meeting date, and will be held in Room 106, Hamilton County Courthouse,
207 NE First Street, Jasper, Florida 32052. In the event that Monday meeting date should be
on the same date as a County Adopted holiday, then the Agenda review meeting will be on
Friday, beginning at 12:00 noon, preceding the above Agenda meeting date at the same office
as aforesaid.

Persons appearing before the Board are requested, if possible, to submit in writing the subject matter of their appearance
before the Board not later than Tuesday prior to the Board Meeting the following Tuesday.
(*) NOTICE: Persons appearing before the Hamilton County Board of County Commissioners, not having given notice in
time to be included and shown on the Agenda, and desiring to make a presentation, will be limited to five (5) minutes, in the
interest of meeting time. The Board of County Commissioners will hear and listen to persons appearing whose subject has
not been shown on the agenda; however, action by the Board on any such matter can only be taken upon determination of
an emergency situation. Any identifiable group of three (3) persons or more shall be limited to a total of ten (10) minutes per
topic.
In accordance with Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes, notice is given that if any person decides to appeal any decision made
by the Board, agency or commission, with respect to proceedings and that, for such purpose, he/she will need to ensure that
a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is
based.
NOTIFICATION: IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, PERSONS WITH
DISABILITIES NEEDING A SPECIAL ACCOMMODATION FOR ATTENDANCE AT THIS MEETING SHOULD
CONTACT THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, ROOM 106,207 NORTHEAST FIRST STREET, JASPER, FLORIDA,
TELEPHONE (386) 792-1288, NOT LATER THAN 72 HOURS PRIOR TO THE PROCEEDINGS. IF HEARING
IMPAIRED, TDD (386) 792-0857.

NEXT REGULAR MEETING OF THE BOARD: TUESDAY, APRIL 15, 2014 AT 6:00 P.M.


BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
HAMILTON COUNTY. FLORIDA
CONSENT AGENDA
March 18, 2014

1) MINUTES -APPROVE:
A) March 18, 2014 Regular Meeting

2) SUWANNEE RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT MONTHLY
HYDROLOGICAL CONDITIONS REPORT FEBRUARY 2014 FILE
850130











PAGE 16A THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014


Around the



Banks of the



SSuwannee


Memories, like the corners of my mind,
Misty water colored mem ries,
Of the way we were.
Scattered pictures of the smiles we left behind,
Smiles we gave to one another,
For the way we were.
Can it be that it was all so different then,
Or has time re-written every line?
If we had the chance to do it all again,
Tell me, would we?
Could we?
Mem 'ries may be beautiful and yet,
What's too painful too remember,
We simply choose to forget.
So, it's the laughter,
We will remember,
Whlicuczvcr we remember,
The way we were...The way we were.

The lyrics of the Barbara Streisand classic rever-
berated through my mind this morning as I remem-
bered some humorous things from the past. So, to-
day I will share some of that humor with you. I
wish I could have made this up and probably could
have, but it wouldn't have been as funny. However,
these things really and truly did happen, and they
are part of the rich patchwork fabric that makes life
so uniquely special here in the Suwannee River Val-
ley "Around the Banks of the Suwannee."
Here's the first one...
I am not going to say "who", but let's just say,
two good old boys who are friends of mine had
been out deer hunting. This was not too long after
the Florida Lotto was in its early days and the jack-
pot was substantial.
One told the other one, "I am going to run in
(which means drive) into town for a few minutes
and check and see what numbers fell last night. I
will be back in a few minutes and bring the re-
sults."
No hot deer race going on at that time in the
woods. Most of the dogs had been picked up and
were in the box. The one headed to town had al-
ready seen his friend's lottery ticket numbers and
had written a series of six down on a slip of paper
from one of his buddy's lottery picks before leav-
ing.
In a little while, he says, "I have the numbers
right here. Let's spread our tickets out there on the
hood of the truck and check our numbers."
So he begins calling them out and this is just an
example "16-20-22,", and the other says, "Yes, Yes,
I've got those right here." He goes on, "42, 43," and
the other man now more excitedly yells, "Yes! Yes!"
He calls the last one, "48."
The other grabs his chest and screams to where
you could have heard him in town. "My Lord, oh,
my dear, Lord, I've won it! I'm a millionaire! Oh,
Lord!"
The one man told me his friend fell into the sand
road and literally rolled around and screamed, he
was so happy. Then, he told him, "I fooled you."
Of course, the one who had been fooled was mad
enough to fight, but I could just picture that in my
mind and it tickled the fun out of me.
Now, this next one truly happened when I was
assistant principal in charge of curriculum at
Suwannee Elementary East in 1999. April Fools Day
was upon us and the state of Florida had just begun
to get really serious about making sure all lesson
plans for teachers were cross referenced with the
Sunshine State Standards. I knew we were getting
there, but not everybody was doing it, and this was
not a "gotcha" situation. It was an April Fools joke.
I asked Dr. Jeff Robinson, who was the principal
then, if I could go on the intercom and make an an-
nouncement to the staff, and we'll say, "Dr. Sarah
V. Wilson was here in Suwannee County from the
Florida Department of Education and I have just re-
ceived a phone call from Mrs. Nancy Roberts (who
was then the Director of Elementary Education in
the Suwannee County School District and who is,
by the way, one of the most outstanding and finest
educators with whom I ever had the privilege, and
I do mean the privilege of working). So given the
permission and the "green light" I announced:
"Mrs. Nancy Roberts, Director of Elementary Ed-
ucation for the school district has informed me that
Dr. Sarah V. Wilson, representing the Florida De-
partment of Education, Accountability and Assess-
ment Division, will be arriving within the half hour
here at East School. She will be randomly checking
teacher lesson plans to make sure we are in full
compliance with the cross reference of our instruc-


tional plans with the Sunshine State Standards and
that all is documented. I am fully confident all is
well and we will come through this with flying col-
ors. Let me add what a great honor this is for our
school to be selected. Mrs. Roberts, Dr. Robinson
and I are so very honored, pleased and gratified."
I knew full well that some of us would not be in
compliance. These were the early days, mind you.
Well, I made the announcement and throughout the
building you could hear scurrying. Some folks were
wanting to leave school because they were not feel-
ing well. Folks hurriedly grabbed lesson plan books
and some made adjustments. When I saw a couple
of teachers, who were practically in tears, I went on
the intercom again, probably 10 minutes later be-
cause Mr. Russell Mapp, the school district psychol-
ogist who was there, told me to give it at least that
long to "sink in". Then I said, "April Fools to all of
you."
My office was bombarded with teachers who told
me they would get me back. She would not mind
me writing this, but Penny McCall did. Penny Mc-
Call was one of the finest educators with whom I
ever worked. She had a true gift for relating to spe-
cial needs children, and she and Linda Cheshire
and Angie Townsend who were, at that time, her
teacher assistants, were taking their children out to
Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park on a field trip
and a picnic. So off they went.
About 1 p.m., my phone rings and it is Mrs. Lin-
da Cheshire.
"Mr. Bullard, one of our students (we'll call him
Sam) has gone missing. We can't find him. We've
looked everywhere. He may be in the river. We
have scoured this campground and this park and
even Mr. Cornett and his staff are helping us."
My word, I had chills come on me the size of pee
wee marbles and felt sick, nauseous.
Now, stay with me. In the background on the
phone I hear this screaming, moaning, "Sammy, oh,
God, Sammy, my baby!"
I asked, "Who is that, Linda? Is that the child's
mother?"
"No, sir, that's Mrs. McCall. She is beside herself.
You are going to have to call Sam's parents."
My mouth ran full of hot water. I darted down to
the room where Glaythia Collins, another wonder-
ful and outstanding, exceptional education teacher
with whom I had the privilege of working, was
keeping some of Mrs. McCall's students and some
of hers in the classroom showing them a reward
movie.
I screamed, I mean screamed, "Mrs. Collins, give
me that emergency information! Now! I need it
now!"
Glaythia saw I was shaken...more than shaken,
and I used the phone in Penny's classroom. I was
just about to phone, then Suwannee County Sheriff
Al Williams, but I thought, I will try Penny and see
if, by chance, they've found the child.
So I phoned her and said, "Mrs. McCall, I am
right before dialing for the Sheriff to come out to
the park and aid in this search. I am going to call
Mrs. Diane Williams, his wife, and I am just about
in tears now. Bless his heart, have you found little
Sam? Sheriff Williams will go out there directly,
and I will call the child's parents. Please tell me if
you've found the child."
"Johnny," Mrs. McCall says very coyly. "Before
you call, I have something to tell you."
"Yes ma'am. Oh, Penny, please don't tell me the
child has drowned."
"No, Johnny. Listen very carefully....April Fools!"
"What!" I responded. "You are kidding!"
"I told you I would get you back for that an-
nouncement this morning. Payback is the devil!"
Then, Penny McCall cackled with that unmistak-
able Penny McCall cackle.
Well, I can tell you, my goat had been gotten. My
"goose cooked" and I mean she got me back "good
fashion". I will never forget that and many other
wonderful memories.
I told her, "I would like to beat you with a cured
gallberry switch until I got tired."
She just howled, and again, "April Fool!"
A final third story. True again, and I don't think
the folks will mind me writing about this. My dad-
dy, the late Wade Bullard, was a great storyteller.
One of the best. This is a gator hunting story. He re-
lated it this way...
"Just north of our house on the Woodpecker
Route, the late Mr. "Boss" Ed Wells and his wife
Mrs. Nina had a big cypress pond on their proper-
ty, and in that pond was a huge alligator. They


wanted the gator out. They had gotten in touch
with the late Mr. Ray and his brother, the late Mr.
Lonnie Morgan, both from White Springs, and Mr.
Ray and Mr. Lonnie, both expert gator hunters,
were going to kill the gator for Mr. Wells.
Daddy said Mr. Lonnie said to Mr. Ray, "Brother
Ray, you ease up behind old Bull through them
reeds at the edge of the pond and you take that
cord in your hand and wrap it around old Bull's
head. When you do, give me the high sign and I
will shoot him with this rifle in the head between
the eyes, and we'll name old Bull, Cabbage (mean-
ing he would be dead)."
Well, Daddy said that he, along with my paternal
uncle, the late Warren Bullard, and the late Mr. Ed
Wells, longtime friend and neighbor, were standing
on the opposite side of the pond hearing all this
and watching it. It was about dusk dark.
The late Mr. Ray Morgan was a marvelous hu-
man being and a wonderful friend; a very talented
man who could make all kinds of things, and a
great farmer. I loved him and his wife, the late
Aunt Nancy Fouraker Morgan. Their grandson
Kevin Morgan was my classmate all through eight
years of school at South Hamilton in White Springs
and is still a dear friend to this day. I loved all the
family, dear friends.
Another grandson, Kerry Waldron, is the city
manager for Live Oak and plays music and sings
with my my brother Jerry Lawrence and me.
Mr. Ray Morgan lost a leg to cancer. Dr. Strick-
land of Live Oak, father to the late Mrs. Horry
Hair, Sr., amputated his leg and had an artificial
(prosthetic) leg, but it never stopped him from
working hard and being one of the best people I
ever knew. It never, that I saw, hindered him in
any way. He was a great storyteller, too, but keep
in mind, now, about the artificial leg. Don't lose
sight of the artificial leg.
His brother, the late Mr. Lonnie Morgan, was one
of the most proficient Suwannee River fishermen I
ever knew. He could catch fish from the Suwannee
River when nobody could. If you wanted a mess of
fish and you had not gone fishing, and you wanted
to buy some, go see Mr. Morgan, as he had them.
He sold a lot of fish to restaurants, too. He was
great and a colorful character in his own right.
Back to the gator hunt...
Daddy said Mr. Ray did ease up behind "Old
Bull", wrapped the cord around his head, gave the
high sign and Mr. Lonnie shot the rifle. About that
time, that gator "popped that tail" around and hit
Mr. Ray with it, and that artificial leg shot about 50
feet up in the air at the same time Mr. Lonnie fired
that rifle.
He said Mr. Ed Wells said, "Dear, God, Lonnie,
you've shot your brother's leg off." Except he said
it with a few expletives.
Well, Daddy said they did kill the gator and went
out in the pond and got Mr. Ray's leg for him, but
that was a night and the story of the gator hunt. No
matter how many times Daddy told that story, I
laughed until tears rolled down my face, and I
heard him tell it many times.
Our region is full of funny, local color stories,
and I do love them and love hearing people relat-
ing them. The funniest stories are usually true and
we all need more laughter in our lives. I know I do.
I hope these have provided you with a couple of
chuckles this week.
From the Eight Mile Still on the Woodpecker
Route north of White Springs, wishing you all a
wonderful day filled with joy, peace, and above all,
lots of love and laughter. So blessed to be in the
number "one more time."





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Wednesday, April 16,11:00 A.M. CDT
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PAGE 16A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014











THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


Bricklaying draws


C


continued From Page 1A


welcome sight for all
who have served in the
military, as well as for
Hamilton County veter-
ans and the entire com-
munity. Although still
under construction, the
park is shaping up beau-
tifully.
A total of 277 memori-
al bricks with a lot of fa-
miliar surnames have
been sold so far, accord-
ing to Lambert, and
many of those who
made purchases were at
the park Saturday to lay
the engraved paver
bricks of their loved
ones who have served
our country in the mili-
tary.
The bricks, Lambert
said, are guaranteed for
life by the manufactur-
er. Once all the bricks
have been laid, the
crevices in between
each one will be leveled
and filled in with sand,
and then a sealer will be
poured on top to help
preserve the bricks.
Even though there
was no formal ceremo-
ny on this day, it didn't
keep folks from hang-
ing around a while to
catch up with friends
and neighbors, as well
as marvel at all the
work that has been
done in the park so far.
Many were searching
for just the right spot
around the plaza to
place their bricks and
others were trying to
keep family members'
bricks clustered togeth-
er. From the Civil War
to the War on Terror,
every branch of the mil-
itary is represented
around the U.S. Flag.
Jasper News colum-
nist Lillian Norris was
in attendance and she
proudly laid a brick for
her late husband Wade
Norris who fought in
WWII with the First
Marine Division.
Among other notable
guests were Hazel and
Lamar Royals, County
Commissioner Buster
Oxendine, County
Clerk Greg Godwin,
Judge R.B. Davis, Cecil
Davis, Supervisor of
Elections Laura Dees
and Jasper Town Coun-
cilman LaBarfield
Bryant.
There is still work
that needs to be done at
the park, which in-
cludes the granite
Memorial Wall of Hon-
or that will be about 20
feet in length and five
feet high in the center.
It will be built near the


large crowd to Veterans Memorial Park

tion to the Park Founda- pervisor of Elections, or 32052. chase. Go to nflaon
tion can do so by con- mail a check to 1153 There are more pho- line.com and click the
acting Clay Lambert- NW US Highway 41, tos online and photos photo gallery link oi
VSO or Laura Dees-Su- Suite 1, Jasper, Fl. are available for pur- the left navigation bar.


I-
e
1


edge of the circular
plaza area where the
memorial bricks are
laid. A 20X40 covered
pavilion with an elevat-
ed stage is also in the
works that will accom-
modate a podium and a
place for guest speakers
during special events,
such as Memorial Day
and Veterans Day.
"Some of the church-
es have talked about
maybe having movie
nights on Fridays
where people can come
out with their lawn
chairs," Lambert said.
"Or it can be used as a
bandstand," he added,
speaking of the pavil-
ion.
Lambert is hoping the
park gets used, "but
we've got a long way to
go," he said.
Sidewalks will be
constructed in certain
areas of the park, com-
pliments of the county
road department. There
will also be a handi-
capped entrance near
the annex parking lot.
The front entrance
has been completed for
the most part, but fu-
ture plans are to install
a wrought iron gate be-
tween the two cement-
ed brick posts, as well
as add lighting. Prelim-
inary work for those
two projects has al-
ready been completed.
On a grander scale,
Lambert said, ideally he
and the park committee
would like to see the
entire park fenced with
wrought iron fencing
around the circumfer-
ence, but that will re-
quire a lot more money.
There may also be a
trail constructed
through the park with
raised placard memori-
als, perhaps some
benches and much
more as funds are avail-
able.
"We're trying to think
ahead," said Lambert.
Memorial Day, May
26, Lambert said, is the
projected date for the
official ribbon cutting
for Veterans Memorial
Park. If all goes as
planned, the entire pro-
ject should be complet-
ed or nearly completed
in time for a spectacular
Memorial Day celebra-
tion.
For anyone who has
served or is currently
serving in the military,
or for family members
who wish to recognize
their loved ones, there
is still time to purchase
a brick. Anyone who
desires to make a dona-


R.B. Davis gets down on his knees to lay some bricks.


School board to consider elementary consolidation


Continued From Page 1A

county's educational fa-
cilities and how the DOE
may be able to help.
"They recommended
to the board at that time
that the board had the
opportunity for a single
construction project,"
said Moffses. "Since
then, we have discussed
the facilities through a
safety and security
standpoint numerous
times, as recently as a
couple months ago. We
had workshops that
were available at South,
Central and North."
Parents and members
of the community of
White Springs attended
the workshop at South,
but there was no atten-
dance other than board
members and the school
administrative team at
the workshops held at
Central and North,
Moffses said. Video
footage of the issues at


the three schools were
shown at each work-
shop.
"If we are going to
participate in a construc-
tion project, we have nu-
merous items that have
to be completed and pre-
pared to deliver to the
DOE by August," Moffs-
es told the board.
The first item, which
was the survey of the fa-
cilities, has already been
done. The second item
is to make a decision as
to where a new facility
will be built. Moffses
said the school district
currently owns three
parcels of land that
could possibly be used
for the construction of a
new elementary school;
1) The northern portion
of land at the high
school that the FFA is
currently utilizing. 2) A
portion of the property
that used to house the
old high school, specifi-
cally the gymnasium


and the ball field. 3) The
old school district ad-
ministrative complex.
Due to water and wet-
lands issues at the high
school property over the
last 10 years, Moffses
said he would not rec-
ommend it to the board.
To use the property at
the old high school,
Moffses said the only
way it could be done
was if they could get
some of the property
back from the county
and then make the new
building a two story fa-
cility.
The old administrative
complex, Moffses said, is
a full city block and 40
acres in size and would
be his choice to recom-
mend.
"With a new construc-
tion project, they do in-
clude that dollars can be
provided to remove fa-
cilities prior to construc-
tion," said Moffses.
If the board does not


like any of those three
options, the school dis-
trict would have to
move quickly to obtain a
new parcel of land,
Moffses explained.
In order to move for-
ward with the project,
the board must formally
approve the DOE's sur-
vey recommendation,
which is to construct one
school that will accom-
modate all of the coun-
ty's elementary stu-
dents, as well as agree to
close North, South and
Central. Moffses ex-
plained that all three
schools are at a critical
juncture and the board is
aware of it.
"This isn't the first
time that the DOE facili-
ties team has come in
and shared that informa-
tion," said Moffses. "We
have gone through all
the process to get to this
point. I'm just sharing
with you that the next
step is to bring it to the


board for a vote. At that
time, each of the mem-
bers can do as they
choose."
In order to meet the
timeline to be on the
agenda with the DOE
and all the teams that
will have to come in and
review, the board has to
vote yea or nay on the
project, Moffses ex-
plained.
"The teams may come
in and say there is not a
critical need and at that
point, that's the end of
the process," said Moffs-
es.
The board agreed to
place it on the agenda
for further discussion
and pending action at
the April 14 meeting of
the school board, which
will be held at 6 p.m. in-
side the Hamilton Coun-
ty High School Auditori-
um. Information will
also be available that de-
tails what is involved
and how much money


would be needed to
make upgrades at the
three schools, rather
than opt for the new
school / consolidation
project.
Moffses invited the
public to view the
videos that were taken
at the three elementary
schools, which show the
safety and security is-
sues at each facility.
They are located on the
School District's
YouTube page using
these links:
SHE Video--Hamilton
County School District
Board Workshop
http:/ /youtu.be/-
V61cOnqQRQ
CHE Video--Hamilton
County School District
Board Workshop
http://youtu.be/q4ko
6asb0cs
NHE Video--Hamilton
County School District
Board Workshop
http://youtu.be/NC
mIvIzneNw


Veterans Service Officer Clay Lambert adjusts some bricks. -Photos: Joyce Marie Taylor


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014


PAGE 17A


J I


- - - 0 -- .- -














Expert tips for keeping kids' smiles healthy,


even through the spring candy rush


Dr. Jennifer Salzer


In terms of candy con-
sumption volume, the
Easter holiday is second
only to Halloween.
While baskets full of
chocolates and candies
can seem like a child's
dream come true, par-
ents may cringe at the
prospect of their little
ones' mouths filled with
so much sugar.
The American Dental
Association recognizes
that early childhood
cavities are a significant
public health problem.
In fact, tooth decay is
still recognized as the
most common chronic
disease affecting chil-
dren in the United
States.
Fortunately, parents
can help their children
avoid dental issues like
cavities by establishing
healthy routines early.
Dr. Jennifer Salzer, a
dentist, orthodontist
and mom, offers the fol-


lowing tips to help par-
ents keep children's
smiles healthy all year.
See the Expert
Speak to your pedia-
trician about when to
schedule baby's first
dental visit.
A good rule of
thumb is to schedule a
visit by their first birth-
day with regular visits
every six months.
Lead by Example
Set a good example
and let your kids learn
by watching and imitat-
ing you as you brush,
rinse and floss.
If you need to brush
up on your own oral
care knowledge, check
out the Oral-B Stages
"Parent's Guide" avail-
able online at
oralb.com/stages.

Mirror Mirror
Encourage your kids
to brush in front of a
mirror; it will help them


ventable -- even if about Oral-B Stages and ucts is available at
sweets are plentiful. Crest and Oral-B Pro- oralb.com/stages and
More information Health FOR ME prod- crestprohealth.com.


'p
w





I
*


see spots they may oth-
erwise miss.
To help keep track
of their oral care routine
enlist the help of a
brushing chart to record
each time your child
brushes.
Offer Choices
Have plenty of oral
care supplies on hand
for your kids in the fla-
vors and designs they'll
be excited to use to en-
courage proper oral hy-
giene.
The Oral-B Stages
line is designed for kids
four months to seven
years of age. It features
Disney(R) characters
and fun flavors to pro-
vide an appealing op-
tion for young children.
For older kids, 8
years and up, who feel
too grown up for "baby
products", there is the
Crest and Oral-B Pro-
Health FOR ME line
which comes in tween-
friendly flavors and de-
signs.
Brace Face
Show kids with
braces how to brush us-
ing a two-step approach
-- from the top down,
and then the bottom up
-- to help dislodge any
food that may be stuck
in the brackets.
Provide your tween
with great products like
the Oral-B Pro-Health
FOR ME CrossAction
Toothbrush which
helps clean hard-to-
reach areas and the
Crest Pro-Health FOR
ME Anti-Cavity Rinse
which reaches where
brushing may miss.
Oral health is an im-
portant issue, particu-
larly for kids. Luckily,
with good habits and
the right tools, dental
health issues like cavi-
ties are largely pre-


VcV N~w


*SH.,^^ ' ^ -- ,, <~.




Parents can help children establish healthy oral care routines early to aid in pre-
venting cavities.




Jamie Sortevik


joins SRWMD


Jamie Sortevik recently
joined the Suwannee River
Water Management Dis-
trict (District) as an engi-
neer in the Resource Man-
agement Division. In this
capacity, she will review
water use permit applica-
tions, evaluate data, ana-
lyze aquifer tests and com-
puter modeling of ground-
water systems, and calcu-
late the effects of with-
drawals on water levels.
She will also conduct field
reviews of existing and
proposed water use sys-
tems to collect data and de-
termine compliance status.
Prior to joining the Dis-
trict, Sortevik held various
jobs in the food industry.
Sortevik was also a volun-
teer with the New Orleans


Food and Farm Network,
where she traveled to
Louisiana to help build
free raised garden beds for
low-income families with-
out access to local, healthy
food. In addition, she in-
terned with the Florida Or-
ganic Growers association,
helping to develop a 1-acre
community garden in
downtown Gainesville.
Sortevik obtained her
B.S. in Agricultural and Bi-
ological Engineering from
the University of Florida.
"We welcome Jamie
Sortevik to the District and
look forward to using her
engineering expertise in
our Resource Manage-
ment Division," said Dis-
trict Executive Director
Ann Shortelle.


Sortevik


PAGE 18A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014


a








THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


Cracking


in


time


f


egg myths
or Easter

or Easter


Easter eggs are a centerpiece of many family
traditions come Easter Sunday. Easter eggs
symbolize fertility and rebirth to some, but
many people associate Easter eggs with young-
sters scouring the yard in search of treasure.
Whether Easter eggs are associated with sec-
ular or religious beliefs, these colorful staples
of Easter Sunday are an integral part of spring-
time holiday decor and celebrations. Certain
misconceptions about Easter eggs have devel-
oped over time, and the following are some of
the more common myths about Easter eggs that
have made the rounds.
Myth: Easter eggs are safe to eat after your
egg hunt is over.
Fact: Hard-boiled eggs generally remain safe
to eat at room temperature for about two hours.
If the temperature outside or indoors is very
warm, the eggs should be eaten within one
hour. People risk food-borne illnesses if they
consume Easter eggs that have been left out for
several hours or overnight. It is better to dis-
pose of colored eggs after the annual egg hunt
or at least keep hard-boiled eggs refrigerated
until the hunt begins.
Myth: It is unsafe to eat all dyed Easter eggs.
Fact: Whether dyed eggs are safe or not de-
pends on the type of dye used. Many kits use
vegetable-based dyes that are food-safe. These
same pigments are used in traditional food col-
oring. Even if the dye has penetrated beneath
the shell, it should still be safe for consump-
tion. Kits for blown-out eggs may use dyes that
are not food-safe. Also, people who are allergic
to certain food dyes might want to avoid eating
dyed eggs.
Myth: Pastel-colored eggs have long-rooted
religious significance.
Fact: An Easter egg hunt is a tradition that
originated with pagan spring festivals. But like


many pagan practices, Easter egg hunting was
eventually adopted by Christians and assigned
religious significance. In the Orthodox and
Eastern Catholic Churches, Easter eggs are
dyed red to represent the blood of Christ shed
on the cross. The hard shell of the egg sym-
bolizes the sealed Tomb of Christ for many. In
A.D. 1610 under Pope Paul V, the Christian
Church officially adopted the Easter egg cus-
tom that the eggs symbolize the resurrection.
Myth: An Easter egg roll is an American tra-
dition.
Fact: In Germany, England and other coun-
tries, children traditionally rolled eggs down
hillsides at Easter. This practice may have ini-
tially symbolized the rolling away of the rock
from Jesus Christ's tomb before his resurrec-
tion. When European immigrants arrived in
North America, they brought these Easter egg
traditions with them. One of the more popular
Easter egg rolls of modern day takes place on
the White House lawn, where children push
an egg through the grass with a long-handled
spoon. Some say this tradition was established
by Dolly Madison in 1814.
Myth: A raw egg will stand on end during
the spring equinox.
Fact: It is believed that because the sun is
equidistant from the south and north poles on
the spring equinox, special gravitational
forces apply on this day. These forces should
make it possible to balance an egg on its end
only on this day. However, eggs can be bal-
anced at other times of the year. Perhaps in-
stead of hiding eggs for Easter, families may
choose to hold egg-balancing competitions.
Easter eggs are a lasting tradition and one of
the more popular symbols of the holiday. Al-
though many myths surround Easter eggs, the
truth is just waiting to be unhatched.


What's the Difference?


There are four things different between Picture A
and Picture B. Can you find them all?

A


inanq ilmus u sAiamolJ "p
iypnq vllaiqwnum uo alpum1 8u.ss14 Fg uaaiS
aiv sioog "7 aldind s.si iapvf uw "[ :siamsuV


0


r


* "'.


THIS DAY IN...



H sroa

HISTORY
1812: THE CITY OF
CARACAS, VENEZUELA
IS DESTROYED BY AN
EARTHQUAKE.

1971: EAST PAKISTAN
DECLARES ITS
INDEPENDENCE FROM
PAKISTAN TO FORM THE
PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
BANGLADESH.

*1978: MUCH OF THE
EQUIPMENT IN THE
CONTROL TOWER OF
JAPAN'S NARITA INTL
AIRPORT IS DESTROYED.


0O!


ENGLISHMAN SAMUEL FOX
INVENTED THE STEEL RIBBED
VERSION OF THIS DEVICE, WHICH
IS HANDY IN A RAINSTORM.


SHEEN

a soft luster
on a surface


ENGLISH: Cloud

SPANISH: Nube

ITALIAN: Nuvola

FRENCH: Nuage

GERMAN: Wolke


RAIN AND OTHER PRECIPITATION IS
PART OF THE ONGOING WATER .
CYCLE OF THE PLANET. WATER ,,
EVAPORATES FROM OCEANS ( ff
AND LAKES, FORMS
CONDENSATION IN CLOUDS,
THEN FALLS BACK TO THE EARTH.


F GET THE

.PICTURE?
Ik l


Can you guess what
the bigger picture is?


V773YlWgV0 :iMGNV


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014


PAGE 19A


viimigvl "-3MGNV












THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


Announcements

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS
*PROOF READ YOUR AD
Any error must be reported the
first day of publication. Should
the error inhibit response,
credit will apply only to the first
run date. The South Georgia
Media Group is not liable for
any loss or expense that
results from publication or
omission. We reserve the right
to edit, reject or refuse any and
all advertising submissions.

SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT
CLASSIFIED DEADLINE:
FOR WEDNESDAY EDITION:
NOON ON FRIDAY
FOR FRIDAY EDITION:
NOON ON WEDNESDAY
CALL 386-362-1734
EXT. 102
(800-525-4182)
EMAIL:
louise.sheddan@gaflnews.com

Do you need help with elderly
care or housekeeping? Refer-
ences available. Call Kay @ 386-
288-0415.


Help Wanted

ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
White Springs, Florida
Verifiable job history. Strong
computer skills. Able to be
trained in our specialty. Able to
perform without constant su-
pervision. Must be flexible and
team player. Great communic-
ation skills. Must want to work
for a stable company.
POSITION NEEDS TO
BE FILLED IMMEDIATELY
Please email resume to
hr@speced.org


FirstDay
ALTERNATE COLLECTION
SITE ATTENDANT
Suwannee County is currently
accepting applications for an Al-
ternate Collection Site Attend-
ant to work on an as needed
basis. This position is open until
filled. Applications are avail-
able at the Building Depart-
ment, 224 Pine Avenue, Live
Oak, FL 32064, (386) 364-3407
or at Public Works, 13150
80th Terrace, Live Oak, FL
32060, (386) 364-3400. The
Suwannee County Board of
County Commissioners is an
equal employment opportunity
employer that does not discrim-
inate against any qualified em-
ployee or applicant because of
race, color, national origin, sex,
including pregnancy, age disab-
ility, or marital status. Spanish
speaking individuals are encour-
aged to apply. All applicants are
subject to a pre-employment
physical. Successful completion
of a drug test is a condition of
employment. EEO/AA/V/D

BOOKKEEPER/SECRETARY
for retail business in Lake City,
FL. Computer skills required. QB
Pro exp. +. Email cover letter, re-
sume, references & salary req. to
ken_n_steve@yahoo.com or mail
: Atten. Human Resources, 466
SW Deputy J. Davis LN, Lake
City, FL. 32024

DIETARY AIDE
Seeking mature, dependable
person for weekend, evenings.
Part time position. Must have
good work reference. Smaller,
highly rated skilled nursing fa-
cility.
Apply to Valerie McVeigh
Lafayette Health Care Center
512 W. Main St., Mayo, FL.

FirstDay
Driver
Roger Cartage Company
is looking for Class "A"
Liquid Drivers for our
Jacksonville, Fl terminal.
10-14 days out then 2-3 days
home.
Must have Class "A" CDL.
Medical benefits from $36-$95
week.
Tank and HAZMAT endorse-
ments required.
Practical Miles- 43 loaded/
.34 unloaded.
Hourly pay for loading and un-
loading of trailers.
No liquid experience neces-
sary.
Orientation and training
in Jacksonville
Call Brian at 800-507-8848
www.tankstar.com


Help Wanted

FAMILY SUPPORT WORKER
The Levy County Health De-
partment is seeking a Family
Support Worker, Position
#64000015 to work The
Healthy Families Program in
Suwannee County. This posi-
tion may also provide services
in Dixie, Gilchrist and Levy
counties. Position will provide
basic social services to indi-
viduals and families participat-
ing in the Healthy Families
Program. Must be willing to
travel. Must have good Eng-
lish language skills both verbal
and written. Applicants who
are also fluent in speaking and
writing Spanish are preferred
but not required. Must be fin-
gerprinted. May be required to
work extra hours or days in the
event of an emergency. Salary
is $772.50 biweekly. Applica-
tions will be accepted online at
www.peoplefirst.myflorida.c
om State of Florida applica-
tions may be mailed to State of
Florida, People First, Staffing
Administration, PO Box 44058,
Jacksonville, Fl 32231 or faxed
to (904) 636-2627 by 3/28/14.
EEO/AAN/VP Employer


INDUSTRIAL CONSTRUCTION
Experienced Supervision /
Craftsman Needed
Minimum of 3 Years Crafts-
man Experience Required.
Structural Welders, Pipe Weld-
ers, Pipe Fitters, Industrial
Maintenance Workers, Mill-
wrights, Ironworkers, Riggers,
and NCCCO Operators. Weld-
ers must pass weld test, Temp
to Permanent Positions Avail-
able Filling positions immedi-
ately, White Springs, Fl. area.
Background Check, EOE M/F
H/V Drug Free Workplace. Fax
Resume to 904-714-0008
Phone: 904-714-1376 or E-
mail at
industrialtrades@ymail.com

LIBRARY TECHNICIAN I /
MANAGER BRANFORD, FL
Suwannee River Regional Lib-
rary is seeking applicants for the
permanent full time position of
Library Technician I Manager
at the Branford Public Library,
Branford, FL. Applications are
available at the Branford Lib-
rary, the Suwannee County
Building Department, 224 Pine
Avenue, Live Oak, FL 32064;
386-364-3407 or the Public
Works office, 13150 80th Ter-
race, Live Oak, FL 32060; 386-
364-3400. Applicants are en-
couraged to submit resumes,
letters of reference, or other bio-
graphical information with their
applications. All applications
must be returned to the Public
Works office. This position is
open until filled. The Suwannee
County Board of County Com-
missioners is an equal employ-
ment opportunity employer that
does not discriminate against
any qualified employee or ap-
plicant because of race, color,
national origin, sex, including
pregnancy, age, disability, or
marital status. Spanish speak-
ing individuals are encouraged
to apply. "Successful comple-
tion of a drug test is a condition
of employment." EEO/AA/V/D.
3/17/2014

LPN/RN
Full time position open. Smaller
skilled nursing facility that has
excellent ratings for services.
Low turn over allows you to get
to know patients and staff.
Seeking person with excellent
performance history and attend-
ance record.
Contact: Jennifer Avery,
Layfayette Health Care Center,
512 W. Main St. Mayo, FL


V A 1
SO

You can Reach
Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper
Network in Florida
and throughout
the Nation.
Call Treena at

386-362-1734
784079


-FOR RENT-


GREAT RATES FOR NICE LOOKING
RENTALS STARTING AT $300 PER MONTH
FOR SINGLEWIDES AND $450 PER MONTH
FOR DOUBLEWIDES. WATER, SEWER,
AND GARBAGE INCLUDED. NO PETS.
386-330-2567 784075


Help Wanted

MAINTENANCE PERSON
Convenience Store Group is
seeking an experienced Main-
tenance person. Job will in-
clude pressure washing, paint-
ing and general maintenance
of property to maintain excel-
lent curb appeal.
Electrical, plumbing and car-
pentry experience would be a
plus.
Competitive pay paid weekly,
vacation, and the opportunity
to join a progressive and fast
growing company.
For more specifics about the
job description and locations)
call 352-494-7550.
Apply on line at:
fasttrackstores.com
Location 410-
Apply as manager


FirstDay
World Class
CEMENT MANUFACTURER
in need of experienced
Mechanical Maintenance
Technician
for hands on work, motivated
team player to join fast paced
manufacturing operation
Mechanical skills should include:
welding, fabrication, millwright
and/or machinist skills
Position reports to the
Maintenance Supervisor and works in
team to maintain machinery in reliable
condition Operate mobile equipment
and assist with department needs as
necessary Position requires working
rotating shifts, holidays, weekends,
overtime & accept call-ins after hours
Suwannee American Cement
Branford, FL.
Competitive salary and
excellent benefits
EOE & Drug Free Workplace
Qualified applicants send resumes to
resumes@suwanneecement com or
fax to Human Resources
(407) 536-2053


PART TIME COOK
Seeking reliable, experienced
person for evening shift and
weekends. Smaller skilled
nursing facility, roomy, well
equipped and stocked kitchen.
Apply to Valerie McVeigh
Lafayette Health Care Center
512 W. Main St., Mayo, FL.


NORTH FLORIDA COM-
MUNITY COLLEGE,
Madison, FL has the follow-
ing positions available:
Project Coordinator
of Healthcare Information
Program;
Curriculum Developer
for Automation Production
Program:
Faculty Position
for Registered Nurse.
See www.nfcc.edu
for details.


Lost & Found

LOST DOG: Male, small (61b)
Yorkie, black & brown in color.
Lost in the vicinity of 52nd Street
in Live Oak, FL. He's a therapy
dog and greatly missed. RE-
WARD OFFERED. Call 386-364-
5936 & leave message.


Livestock

BULLS FOR SALE
We have a nice selection of pure
bred Angus and Semi Angus.
We also have September Club
Calfs for sale. Call Ed Wasdin at
229-873-1230 or 229-769-3964

Appliances
Easter Egg Treasure Hunt Clue:
Backhand, chop,
default and deuce

Misc. Merchandise
THREE-SHELF
CIGAR HUMIDOR
in excellent condition.
Like new, used less than
3 weeks. Asking $50.
Paid $124. Call 386-249-9432

Wanted to Buy
CASH FOR FLORIDA
LICENSE PLATES!
$1000 for Lafayette Co Tags
dated 1911-17, $100 each for FL
tags starting with #62 for years
1938,40,42,43,45,47,48,49,51,
52, and 54. Jeff Francis
gobucs13@(aol.com or 727-424-
1576.
www.floridalicenseplates.com

WANTED: WHOLE JUNK CARS
$300 & UP. (For FL Residents
only) NO TITLE NEEDED. FREE
PICK UP. 386-878-9260 OR
386-752-3648

Garage/Yard Sales
141st Drive, 92nd Trail, 141st
Lane, Live Oak, FL. Sat, April 5
(Rain Date: April 12). 8 a.m. to 1
p.m. Foxboro Annual Yard
Sale. 88 Family Community.

Campers/RV/Sales

WE BUY
USED RV'S!
CALL 229-740-0375


Apartments for Rent
Apartments for rent in Live
Oak, FL. Mobile Homes for rent
in Fort White & White Springs,
FL. Call 386-362-9806 or 386-
623-3404.

Houses for Rent


TWO houses for rent in Live
Oak, FL. 2Bd/1Ba. NO PETS!
$750/mo & $700/mo: 1st, last &
$300 sec. dep. req'd. 318-840-
4802 or 386-362-3002.

Mobile Homes for Rent
LIVE OAK 2 Bedrooms
from $350/mo. NO PETS. HUD
accepted. Security Deposit Re-
quired. Call 386-364-7660.

Homes for Sale
In downtown Live Oak, FL.
3Bd/2Ba on double lot w/pecan
trees and grapevine, dbl-car gar-
age. On high ground. $150,000.
Call 386-397-0602.


Auctions


ONLINE ONLY
AUCTION Buses,
Tractor & Equipment &
More for Sale! Ends April
3rd @
7PM. Gulf Bay Auctions:
251-600-9595 or Visit
GulfBayAuctions.com,
AU3301 For SPL Internal
Use
Method of Payment
Comments: Satellite
Prolink,


Absolute Auction-2
log cabins,farmhouse,
cottage, 20+/ -acres in
Alabama overlooking
Tennessee River,
between Huntsville and
Chattanooga,vacation
rental history,April 1,
1:00 pm. Details
Gtauctions.com,
1.205.326.0833,Grange
r, Thagard & Assoc. Inc.,
Jack F Granger, #873.


Educational Services


AIRLINE CAREERS
begin here- Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Technician
training. Housing and
Financial Aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
CALL Aviation Institute
of Maintenance 877-
741-9260
www.Fixlets.com


Help Wanted


Mobile Homes for Sale
DOUBLE WIDES
28x74 5bd/2ba, $34,900
28x52 3bd/2ba, $29,900
SINGLE WIDE
*16x80 3bd/2ba, $19,900
14x60 3bd/lba, very clean,


Vans for Sale
DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN SXT 2014,
Maroon, navigation, DVD,
loaded, 6500 miles,
clean carfax, $19,900.
call 850-559-7370


$10,500 (limited time only) ---------
Motorcycles/ATV/Golf Cart
Delivery & setup will be
arranged.
EZGO Txt Electric Golf
ACart 2007
Factory refurbished, like new,
1 yr old Trojan batteries
OEM light kit, 4 inch lift kit,
See all photos at Repo123.com Rear flip seat, $4650,
Call 229-460-5362 Call 229-591-2027
Can be seen at Shiver Golf
SINGLE WIDE Carts in Tifton
16x80 3bd/2ba, $19,900
14x60 3bd/1lba, very clean,
$10,500 (limited time only)
DOUBLE WIDES
*28x74 5bd/2ba, $34,900
28x52 3bd/2ba, $29,900


Acreage/Land/Lots Sale

ECONFINA RIVER WATER-
FRONT LOTS FOR SALE:
Two pristine waterfront lots in
River Place Subdivision Econ-
fina, Florida. The Econfina
River feeds directly into the
Gulf of Mexico. Lots D19 and
D20 are side by side on River
St. These properties are ap-
proximately % mile from the
Econfina River Resort. The
Resort features an equestrian
trail, convenience store, club-
house, in ground pool, bait &
tackle shop and a double boat
ramp. Enjoy the serenity of a
small non-commercialized laid-
back community. This is the
perfect destination for fishing,
scalloping, and kayaking. Eco-
nfina is the perfect location for
hunters with ATV's. Owner fin-
ancing @ 3% with 10% down.
Lots are 99,500 each.
Cell 229/325-3699 FL Home
850/584-6147 GA Home
229/423-1175
FIVE ACRES DOWLING PARK
Well, Septic, Power, Paved Rd
frontage. Owner financing. NO
DOWN $59,900 $526/mo.
352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FOUR ACRES
O'BRIEN/McALPIN AREA
Beautiful Secluded Country Set-
ting. High & Dry. Owner Finan-
cing NO DOWN $19,900
$205/mo 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
ONE ACRE PAVED
ROAD FRONTAGE
Beautifully Wooded, Owner Fin-
ance, No Down. $14,900. Only
$153/mo 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

Autos for Sale
CHEVROLET
CRUISE LT1 2014
8k miles, Dark Red,
clean carfax,
$14,900.
call 850-559-7370
JEEP WRANGLER 1999 Soft
Top, 6cyl, auto, cold AC, High
millage, $4,900.
Call 912-266-1623
MITSUBISHI LANCER 2014
3200 miles, Black,
clean car fax,
13,900
call 850-559-7370


DRIVER TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!Learn to
drive for US Xpress! Earn
$700 per week! No
experience needed!
Local CDL Training. Job
ready in 15 days! 1-
888-368-1964


Experienced OTR
Flatbed Drivers earn
50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on
to Qualified drivers.
Home most weekends.
Call: 843-266-3731 /
www.bulldocihiway.com
EOE


CDL-A Team Owner
Operators: $2,500
Lease Incentive! Team
Dedicated Routes. Great
Revenue & Regular
Weekly Home Time!
888-486-5946 NFI
Industries
nfipartners.com


Miscellaneous


NURSING CAREERS
begin here- Get trained
in months, not years.
Small classes, no
waiting list. Financial aid
for qualified students.
Apply now at Centura
Institute Orlando
(888)220-3219


YOU HAD A STROKE
and now you have
shoulder pain.We may
have an option for
you:Learn more about a
clinical study to evaluate


650. 19,000 miles. Bike has
footrest, crash bar, windshield,
and luggage rack. Asking
$2800.00 OBO. Call 386-209-
7000.
FirstDay


white Yamaha Virago 750 w/very
nice, safe helmet. Turnkey, ready
to ride, clear title. Only 38K mi.
No rips/tears in seat. $2500.00.
386-249-0164


YOUR WORDS
YOUR TIME YOUR AD

YOUR WAY!









6'ni


SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT


Pace Classified Ads at YOUR fingertips
online & in print from ONE SITE!


a potential treatment at:
www.PainAfterStroke.co
m Call 1-800-269-
0720


Real Estate


Blue Ridge Mountain
Log Cabin Sale! Only
$84,900. New 1200sf
ready to finish log cabin
on 1+ acres with
spectacular views and
private access to US
National Forest.
Excellent financing. Call
now 1-866-952-5303,
Ext 201


Real Estate/ Land for
Sale


Up to 9 acres from
$14,900. Mountain
cabin only $89,900.
Access to lake and trout
stream. Views of the
Atlanta skyline. 45
minutes from Northern
Atlanta. Priced below
developer cost! Call
888-260-0905 Ext. 17.


ANF


A


ADVERTISING NETWORKS OtfLORIDA

Classified I Display Metr0o by "Y


SStatewide Classified Ad for
Week of 03-24-14 03-31-14.

850115


THE MEADOWS APARTMENTS

1600 S.E. HELVENSTON ST. E-1
LIVE OAK, FL 32064

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR 1, 2 AND 3 BEDROOM
APARTMENTS

RENT IS BASED ON INCOME

Call Us At (386) 362-6397
tSY TDD Number: 711
OPPORTUNTY Monday Friday 9am-5pm
"This Institution Is An Equal
Opportunity Provider And Employer"
"Equal Housing Opportunity" 859484


PAGE 20A


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014









I Save Thousands During Truck Month With Prince


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857704


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YOUR CHOICE...


Jay Prince


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 21 A


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include $1000 rebate when financed with Chrysler Capital. Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price.
888-304-2277 2013-2014 Motor Trend of the Year Back-to-Back 888-463-6831
88 3-U427- I First Time Ever per Motor Trend Magazine. 8 D O-4V3- 8O31
801 E. SCREEN ST' QUITMAN, GA 4164 N. VALDOSTA RD. VALDOSTA, GA
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@AAR


PAGE 22A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014


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