The Jasper news

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Material Information

Title:
The Jasper news
Uniform Title:
Jasper news (Jasper, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.M. DeGraffenried
Place of Publication:
Jasper Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Jasper (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hamilton County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hamilton -- Jasper
Coordinates:
30.518889 x -82.951111 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 21, 1890)-
General Note:
Editor: Jno. M. Caldwell, <1890>.
General Note:
Publisher: W.L. Whitfield, <1904>.
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579542
oclc - 33315707
notis - ADA7388
lccn - sn 95047198
System ID:
UF00028306:00581

Full Text






Stephen Martin Luther Kini
Foster Day
celebrated Monday, January 20, 2014
Jeanie (Amanda Caban) has '
her picture taken with these / :
young guests. There will be no school Monday, Jan. 20 fo
d SEE STORY, BELOW schools in observance of Dr. Martin Luthc


SJr. Day


ir Hamilton County
er King Jr. Day.


nflaonline.com


D rnu


Today's Weather
High
51' F ^ ,P-
Precip: 0%o VN-
Sunny skies today with highs around
51 F. Lows today around 35 F.
Winds WNW at 13mph.
Chance of rain 0%.
UV Index: 4- Moderate
For up to the minute weather go to
www.nflaonline.com.


Kidnapped Valdosta woman found safe in Jasper


Armed suspect nabbed in Jacksonville


By Joyce Marie Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@gaflnews.com
The Hamilton County
Sheriff's Office in conjunc-
tion with the Valdosta Police
Department and the Jack-


sonville Sheriff's Office were
successful in apprehending
a kidnap suspect within
hours after an abduction by
gunpoint in Valdosta, Ga. on
Monday, Jan. 13.
According to Hamilton


County Sheriff Harrell Reid,
Charen Waller, a 23-year-old
female student from Wire-
grass Vocational Technical
School in Valdosta, Ga. was
getting into her 2007 black
Toyota Camry at Lincoln Re-
alty Apartments, in Valdos-
ta, around 7:40 a.m. Monday


morning, Jan. 13, when the
suspect, Calvin Lamal
Williams, 38, 1405 West
Michigan St., Orlando, Fla.,
abducted her at gunpoint
and demanded that she dri-
ve him to Florida.
Upon learning of the ab-
duction, authorities in Val-


dosta issued a BOLO (be on
the lookout) to area law en-
forcement agencies.
During the course of the
kidnapping, Reid said,
Williams forced Waller to
drive south on Interstate 75
SEE KIDNAPPED, PAGE 6A


Storm

knocked

out power

to hundreds
Staff
Suwannee Valley Electric
Cooperative reported pow-
er outages which affected
6,375 members in their dis-
tribution region as a result
of severe weather that
passed through Hamilton
County Saturday after-
noon. Of that number, 679
were Hamilton County
consumers.
"Trees were the main is-
sue causing the power out-
ages," said Tom Tuckey,
SVEC community relations
manager. "Our crews
worked as quickly as hu-
manly possible to restore
outages."
Tuckey said the average
time the power was out for
their customers was an
hour and a half.
"By midnight, most of
the power had been re-
stored," Tuckey said.
"Calls that came in after
midnight were mostly iso-
lated individual calls and
by lunch time Sunday,
everyone had been re-
stored."
A tornado warning was
issued Saturday afternoon
but officials said there were
no road blocks or major
damages reported.


3 qualify for

Seat 5 on

Jasper City

Council
Seat 1 LaBarfield
Bryant will run
unopposed in March
By Joyce Marie Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@gaflnews.com
The city of Jasper is hold-
ing an election for council
seats for Districts 1 and 5 on
Tuesday, March, 4, 2014.
Qualifying began Dec. 4
and ended at noon on Jan. 3,
2014. The two seats up for
grabs are currently held by
LaBarfield Bryant (Seat 1)


Great turnout for

Special Olympics basketball


Columbia County Director John Brown and a member of the Hamilton County team hold up the ceremoni-
al torch to begin the games. -Photo: Joyce Marie Taylor


By Joyce Marie Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@gaflnews.com

Special Olympics Florida held
their Area Four Basketball Com-
petition at Hamilton County
High School on Saturday, Jan. 11,
and a large crowd turned out to
cheer on the kids and show their support.
About 200 athletes from Alachua, Brad-
ford, Columbia, Marion and Hamilton coun-


ties were well represented at the games,
which was emceed by Samantha Brown.
After the parade of athletes, the pledge to
the flag and a moment of prayer, Charles
Claridy, vice principal at Central Hamilton
Elementary and Art Bjork, area four program
director gave opening remarks, followed by
a short speech from Hamilton County Direc-
tor Helen Udell.


SEE GREAT, PAGE 2A


MLK Day to be celebrated Monday
By Joyce Marie Taylor....
joycemarie.taylor@gaflnews.comM
The town of White
Springs will be celebrating
their 3rd Annual Martin
Luther King Jr. Day on
Monday, Jan. 20, beginning
at 10:30 a.m. at the Com-
munity Center on US 41,
across from Munchies, and
the public is invited to at-
tend.
White Springs Mayor
Helen Miller noted that Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr. was
the chief spokesman for
non-violent activism in the
civil rights movement,


SEE MLK, PAGE 8A


13 075411 6


A scene from last year's event. -Photo: Joyce Marie Taylor


Farley Brookins


Farley,

Brookins

to resign
White Springs
officials reasoning
not related
By Joyce Marie Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@gaflnews.com
Two town of White
Springs officials have ten-
dered their resignation cit-
ing separate reasons, ac-
cording to Town Hall doc-
uments. Town Manager
Bob Parley and White
Springs Police Chief Ken
Brookins both submitted
letters of resignation to the
town and they were pre-
sented at Tuesday's town
council meeting for public
record.
SEE PROJECT, PAGE 9A


Stephen

Foster Day

celebrated
Crowd gathered at
Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park in White
Springs Sunday
By Joyce Marie Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@gaflnews.com
A standing room only
crowd turned out for the
annual National Stephen
Foster Day, held inside the
Carillon Bell Tower at
Stephen Foster Folk Cul-
ture Center State Park in
White Springs on Sunday,
Jan. 12.
Park Manager Michelle
SEE STEPHEN, PAGE 6A


i/ i

Publix /


For Kids 12 & Under
No Purchase Necessary
Must Present Coupon i
L Limit 1 Per Person


SEE 3 QUALIFY, PAGE 9A


6 197


as


rr











PAGE 2A THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014


Team members pause for a moment of prayer.


Great turnout for Special Olympics basketball


Continued From Page 1A

Zachary Deonath
from the Marion Coun-
ty team led the crowd
in the Special Olympics
Oath. After the coaches
oath, the volunteer
oath and the official


oath, the ceremonial
torch was presented
(unlit as the event was
indoors) by Columbia
County Director John
Brown with a member
of the Hamilton Coun-
ty team.
Then it was time to


"Let the games begin!"
With so many ath-
letes and so little time,
half of them were
transported over to the
Central Hamilton gym
for team skills and 3-
on-3 games, while the
tradition 5-on-5 games


were held at HCHS.
First up was an exhi-
bition game between
the Hamilton County
Stompers and the Mari-
on County Knights. The
Hamilton County
Stompers, in their sig-
nature blue and white
USA uniforms, took the
gold medal at the Spe-
cial Olympics World
Games in Shanghai,
China in 2007.


Emcee and Hamilton
County Special
Olympics Director
Helen Udell.




ARREST RECORDS


The stands were full with spectators. -Photos: Joyce Marie Taylor


848918


Editor's note: The
Jasper News prints the
entire arrest record. If
your name appears
here and you are later
found not guilty or the
charges are dropped,
we will be happy to
make note of this in the
newspaper when judi-
cial proof is presented
to us by you or the au-
thorities.
The following abbrevi-
ations are used below:
DAC Department of
Agriculture Commis-
sion
DOA Department of
Agriculture
DOT Department of
Transportation
FDLE Florida De-
partment of Law En-
forcement
FHP Florida High-
way Patrol
FWC Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission
HCDTF Hamilton
County Drug Task Force
HCSO Hamilton
County Sheriff's Office
ICE Immigration and
Custom Enforcement
JAPD Jasper Police
Department
JNPD Jennings Police
Department
OALE Office of Agri-
cultural Law Enforce-
ment
P&P Probation and
Parole
SCSO Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office
WSPD White Springs
Police Department

Jan. 6, Brandon Mar-


quis Simmons, 21, 3738
NW 109 Ave., Jasper,
Fla., battery dom. viol.,
resist w/o violence, vop,
JAPD-Rickerson
Jan. 7, Wade Casey
Robinson, 31, 6717 SW
99 Ave., Jasper, Fla.,
reckless driving, dwls,
no vehicle registration,
FHP-Hughes
Jan. 7, Adam Christo-
pher Baird, 22, Suwan-
nee CI, Live Oak, Fla., in
for court, HCSO-Mc-
Donald
Jan. 7, Elizabeth Mar-
cano, 36, 5116 NW 20
Dr., Jennings, Fla., war-
rant, lewd, lascivious
battery on child, child
abuse, contributing to
delinquency of minor,
HCSO-Williams
Jan. 7, Larry M. Jenk-
ins, 22, 15815 129th Rd.,
McAlpin, Fla., in for
court, HCSO-McDonald
Jan. 8, Sandra Denise
Keel, 46, 382 NW Garnet
Glen, Lake City, Fla., re-
tail theft, JAPD-Mc-
Gauley
Jan. 9, Juan Jose Vega,
26, 2599 Mural Dr.,
Chamblee, Ga., dwls/r
with knowledge, DOA-
Everett
Jan. 9, Stevie Sizemore
Lee, 18, 422 Connel Rd.
L8, Valdosta, Ga., grand
theft III, credit card
fraud/unauthorized,
HCSO-Smith
Jan. 9, Jessica Bridgette
Montero, 24, 73 North-
ern Blvd., Queens, NY,
no valid DL, JNPD-Har-
vey
Jan. 9, Adriana Milena
Borja, 38, 122-2 18th St.,


College Point, NY, poss.
cocaine, poss. marijuana
less than 20 grams,
JNPD-Harvey
Jan. 10, Tyrone L.
Jones, 28,163 NE Escam-
bia St., Lake City, Fla.,
warrant, false imprison-
ment, felony battery,
HCSO-Capt. Williams
Jan. 10, Cornelious
Jackson, Jr., 66, 2127
Lewis St., Jacksonville,
Fla., dwls, DOA-Poole
Jan. 10, Laney George
Reynolds, 47, PO Box
254, Jasper, Fla., theft,
trespass, JAPD-Akins
Jan. 11, Willie James
Wilson, 43, 1132 SW 3
St., Jasper, Fla., battery
DV, JAPD-Rickerson
Jan. 11, Christine A.
Daniels, 24, 13117 N. 23
St., Tampa, Fla., battery,
HCSO-McDonald
Jan. 12, Charles
Alexander Purvis, 31,
2023 Stone Mountain
Drive, Beaufort, SC, lar-
ceny, HCSO-Hughes
Jan. 12, Joseph Henry
Kirby, Jr., 32, 3834 SW
SR 121, Worthing
Springs, Fla., dwls
knowingly, DAC-Jenk-
ins


STUNNING
BRICK HOME
4Bdrm/2Bth, 1844 sq. ft.,
2 acres, fruit trees, hot
tub, security system,
storage shed, all
Appliances, carport, lake
access.
$129,000 Make Offer,
All Realty Services
850-933-6363


HAMILTON COUNTY

FIRST PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

Hamilton County is considering submitting an application for funding of
up to $700,000 through the Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO)
under the Small Cities Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)
program for FFY 2013. These funds must be used for one of the following
purposes:

1. To benefit low and moderate income persons; or

2. To aid in the prevention or elimination of slums or blight; or

3. To meet other community development needs of recent
origin having a particular urgency because existing
conditions pose a serious and immediate threat to the
health or welfare of the community and where other
financial resources are not available to meet such needs.

The categories of activities for which these funds may be used are in the
areas of housing, neighborhood revitalization, commercial revitalization, or
economic development and include such improvement activities as
acquisition of real property, loans to private-for-profit business, purchase of
machinery and equipment, construction of infrastructure, rehabilitation of
houses and commercial buildings, and energy conservation. Additional
information regarding the range of activities that may be undertaken will be
provided at the public hearing.

For each activity that is proposed, at least 51% of the funds must benefit
low and moderate income persons.

In developing an application for submission to DEO, Hamilton County
must plan to minimize displacement of persons as a result of planned
CDBG activities. In addition, Hamilton County has developed a plan to
assist displaced persons.

The public hearing to receive citizen views concerning the community's
economic and community development needs will be held at the
Commissioners Chambers, 207 NE 1st Street, Room 106, Jasper, FL
32052 on Tuesday, January 21st, 2014, at 6:10 p.m. For information
concerning the public hearing, contact Louie Goodin at (386) 792-6639.

The public hearing is being conducted in a handicapped accessible
location. Any handicapped person requiring an interpreter for the hearing
impaired or the visually impaired should contact the Clerk of Courts Office
at (386) 792-1288 at least five calendar days prior to the meeting and an
interpreter will be provided. Any non-English speaking person wishing to
attend the public hearing should contact the Clerk of Courts Office at least
five calendar days prior to the meeting and a language interpreter will be
provided. To access a Telecommunication Device for Deaf Persons (TDD)
please call (800) 955-8771. Any handicapped person requiring special
accommodation at this meeting should contact the Clerk of Courts Office
at least five calendar days prior to the meeting.

A Fair Housing Workshop will be conducted immediately after the public
hearing on the same date and at the same location.

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYMENT, HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE AND FAIR HOUSING
JURISDICTION. THIS LOCAL GOVERNMENT SUPPORTS THE EMPLOYMENT OF
SECTION 3 & W/MBE PERSONS.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The City of Jasper will hold a public hearing on the final reading of Ordinance 14-01-02:

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF JASPER, FLORIDA, TO SUBMIT TO THE ELECTORS
OF THE CITY OF JASPER, FLORIDA, FOUR PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE
EXISTING CHARTER; SETTING FORTH TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SAID CHARTER;
SETTING A DATE FOR THE ELECTORS OF THE CITY OF JASPER TO VOTE ON SAID
AMENDMENTS; PROVIDING FOR ELECTION PROCEDURES; AND PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.

The Public Hearing will be held at the regular City Council meeting on Monday,
January 27, 2014, at 6:00 P.M. in the Council Chambers, 208 W. Hatley Street,
Jasper, Florida, 32052.

All concerned citizens are invited to attend and be heard.
848969


PAGE 2A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014










THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014 THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL PAGE 3A


I S ome people
" '. vsay that
White
Springs has-
n't changed
IIIme over the years. I
_k n, iv that it seems that
t t'o i\ on the surface.
1ia never folks who
r n a!i,,,. long ago moved
State -z Par a y come back to town
for a visit they are comforted by familiar sights.
The town's historical character remains intact and
one is struck by the large number of early and pre-
1900 buildings. One look at the old Adams Coun-
try store is akin to stepping back in time and many
other buildings have a similar effect upon longtime
residents and visitors alike. The Stephen Foster
State Park seems to be much as it was when it was
opened in the 1950's, with its magnificent carillon
tower and museum easily recognized by folks who
last visited here on school field trips fifty years or
more ago. The Suwannee River is a timeless re-
minder of the value of preserving our natural re-
sources and I suspect that if Chief Osceola were to
magically return to White Springs, he would still
recognize his old friend the "Suwani", a Timucuan
Indian word which means Echo River ... River of
Reeds, Deep Water, or Crooked Black Water.
Yes, it seems that little has changed, yet the truth
is that everything has changed. Any close look at
historical records, old photographs or maps, any


[TE SP
li~


conversation an octogenarian, be they a
teacher, hunter, farm business person, civil rights
activist, surveyor, qny rson of numerous other
walks of life, all of this will reveal that we are in a
constant state of change some of it good, some of it
not so good. Times have changed, values have
changed, and people have changed, some for better,
some for worse. So, we should not delude our-
selves into believing that nothing ever changes in
White Springs. We should acknowledge reality and
become part of the process. Be an agent for positive
change. Be an obstacle for negative change. Accept
the things that you must but remember the one
thing that you don't have to accept is the one thing
that you can always change in an instant, your atti-
tude!
Maya Angelou said "If you don't like something,
change it. If you can't change it, change your atti-
tude" and, "We cannot change the past, but we can
change our attitude toward it. Uproot guilt and
plant forgiveness. Tear out arrogance and seed hu-
mility. Exchange love for hate --- thereby, making
the present comfortable and the future promising."
So, as our town changes there are two important
things that we can do to cope.
First, be aware of what is going on. Not the gos-
sip or the rumors, but the truth. How many times
have you heard that somebody died, and then saw
them walking down the street? It has happened to
me so whenever I hear a rumor, especially an accu-


Serious injuries sustained in multi-vehicle crash


By Joyce Marie Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@gaflnews.com

A White Springs man sustained
serious injuries in a multi-vehicle
crash in Columbia County on Fri-
day, Jan. 10, according to the
Florida Highway Patrol.
Reports show that on Friday,
Jan. 10 at 10:10 a.m., a 1997 Volvo
commercial vehicle driven by Al-
varo G. Quesada, 59, White
Springs, was traveling south on
SR 20, south of SW Junction Rd. in
Columbia County when he ap-
proached the rear of another (un-
involved) vehicle too fast. Quesa-


da took evasive action by braking
and steering to the left. The truck
began to jackknife and travel into
the northbound lane striking the
front left portion of a 2012
Hyundai Sonata, driven by Sean
A. Heiser, 28, Cantonment, Fla.
The Hyundai rotated counter
clockwise and came to rest on the
shoulder of the roadway facing
west. Quesada continued into the
northbound lane and came to fi-
nal rest facing north in a jack-
knifed position, FHP reported.
Reports further show that a
third vehicle, a 2001 Toyota Tun-
dra driven by Lori L. Rossi, 46,


Gainesville, was also traveling
north on SR 20 and struck the rear
tractor portion of Quesada's vehi-
cle with its front section.
Quesada suffered serious in-
juries in the crash and was trans-
ported to Shands UF in
Gainesville. Heiser sustained mi-
nor injuries and was taken to
Shands Lake Shore. Rossi also
sustained minor injuries and was
taken to Shands UF, according to
FHP.
FHP stated the uninvolved ve-
hicle had driven onto SR 20 From
SW Utah St. approximately 400
feet north of the crash scene.


By Walter M Kenzie



RIN!
feinwhitesprings@gmai I.cor

station, I remember that sometime reality and what
some folks tell me are two entirely different things.
A little digging will usually reveal the truth.
Second, be involved. You can be a powerful
agent for the health of your town. You can be a
powerful positive influence. We can't keep change
from happening. Change happens every day, ei-
ther because people do something, or because peo-
ple do nothing. Which one are you?
I hope to see you out and about, advocating posi-
tive change and enjoying life in White Springs!

Walter McKenzie
386-269-0056
lifeinwhitesprings@gmail.com


Happy 80th

Birthday


%/~4~oeg426~ c/cry ~
cXc ~ 37~7~$~4,


THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 3A












PAGE 4A THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014


OPINION


Income


Democrats plan to demagogue income
inequality and the wealth gap for political
gain in this year's elections. Most of
what's said about income inequality is
stupid or, at best, ill-informed. Much to
their disgrace, economists focusing on
measures of income inequality bring little
light to the issue. Let's look at it.
Income is a result of something. As
such, results alone cannot establish
whether there is fairness or justice. Take a
simple example to make the point. Sup-
pose Tom, Dick and Harry play a weekly
game of poker. The result is: Tom wins 75
percent of the time. Dick and Harry, re-
spectively, win 15 percent and 10 percent
of the time. Knowing only the game's re-
sult permits us to say absolutely nothing
as to whether there has been poker fair-
ness or justice. Tom's disproportionate
winnings are consistent with his being ei-
ther an astute player or a clever cheater.
To determine whether there has been
poker justice, the game's process must be
examined. Process questions we might
ask are: Were Hoyle's rules obeyed; were
the cards unmarked; were the cards dealt
from the top of the deck; and did the play-
ers play voluntarily? If these questions
yield affirmative answers, there was pok-
er fairness and justice, regardless of the


game's result,
even with Tom's
winning 75 per-
cent of the time.
Similarly, in-
come is a result of
something. In a
free society, for
the most part, in-
come is a result of
one's capacity to


BYWA


serve his fellow
man and the value his fellow man places
on that service. Say I mow your lawn and
you pay me $50. That $50 might be seen
as a certificate of performance. Why? It
serves as evidence that I served my fellow
man and enables me to make a claim on
what he produces when I visit the grocer.
Google founders Sergey Brin and Larry
Page are multibillionaires. Just as in the
case of my serving my fellow man by
mowing his lawn, they served their fellow
man. The difference is they served many
more of their fellow men and did so far
more effectively than I and hence have re-
ceived many more "certificates of perfor-
mance," which enables them to make
greater claims on what their fellow man
produces, such as big houses, cars and
jets.


inequality

A Brin and
A Page and peo-
MINORITY ple like them
UI t. t S ~created wealth

VIEW by producing
services that
improve the
lives of mil-
2014 Creators Syndicate lions upon
2014 Creators Syndicate millions of
LTER WILLIAMS people all


around the
globe. Should people who have improved
our lives be held up to ridicule and scorn
because they have higher income than
most of us? Should Congress confiscate
part of their wealth in the name of fair-
ness and income redistribution?
Except in many instances when govern-
ment rigs the game with crony capitalism,
income is mostly a result of one's produc-
tivity and the value that people place on
that productivity. Far more important than
income inequality is productivity inequal-
ity. That suggests that if there's anything
to be done about income inequality, we
should focus on how to give people
greater capacity to serve their fellow man,
namely raise their productivity.
To accomplish that goal, let's look at a
few things that we shouldn't do. Becom-


ing a taxicab owner-operator lies within
the grasp of many, but in New York City,
one must be able to get a license (medal-
lion), which costs $700,000. There are
hundreds of examples of government re-
strictions that reduce opportunity. What
about the grossly fraudulent education re-
ceived by so many minority youngsters?
And then we handicap them further with
laws that mandate that businesses pay
them wages that exceed their productivi-
ty, which denies them on-the-job training.
Think back to my poker example. If
one is concerned about the game's result,
which is more just, taking some of Tom's
winnings and redistributing them to Dick
and Harry or teaching Dick and Harry
how to play better? If left to politicians,
they'd prefer redistribution. That way,
they could get their hands on some of
Tom's winnings. That's far more reward-
ing to them than raising Dick's and Har-
ry's productivity.

Walter E. Williams is a professor of
economics at G... .-. Mason University.
To find out more about Walter E. Williams
and read features by other Creators Syn-
dicate writers and cartoonists, visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page at www. cre-
ators. com.


I experience the post-holiday giddy


The Moultrie
Observer
Each January
my emails are
inundated with
promotions that .ap.
have an under- i.r
lying theme of
me sending
someone mon-
ey so that they ,,
can tell me
something that I already know or that I
don't want to know.
Now this kind of thing happens all year
long, but January is the grand dragon of
these occurrences.
I think the promoters are trying to key
on the fact that it's a new year and people
tend to "start over" or "make new begin-
nings." Hee hee.


And yes, we do have new faces at the
gym already. I'm skeptical that they will
stick, based on years of observation, but I
encourage them to give it a shot. I
watched a couple of guys who seemed to
be in pain just in the orientation. I think
they were disappointed that no one has
perfected "virtual" weightlifting.
So let me give you an example of what
I saw just this morning in my emails.
"How to avoid the post holiday let-
down."
Let me tell you something people, I
don't have "post holiday letdown." If
;ir.,Iiiii.. I have "post holiday giddy."
I'm ready for it to be over and for things
to get back to normal.
You see in my business you work dur-
ing the holidays. And it's more difficult
because quite a number of the people you
need to contact on a daily basis don't
work during that time.


Not only that, there are only so many
ways you can spice up turkey. And once
you've run the gamut of casseroles and
dips.... well next year I've suggested to
my family that we have a fish fry and re-
ally simplify things. Bring on the Christ-
mas mullet!
"No more crazy dieting."
Yep, they want me to spend money for
them to tell me the only "non crazy" diet
in the whole world. In my opinion all di-
ets are crazy if you don't exercise. My ad-
vice is to eat what you normally eat and
cut the volume by one half. Then exer-
cise.
And to exercise you don't have to join
a gym if you are strapped for money. The
sidewalks are free. Push-ups don't require
equipment. Chinning on a tree limb can
be effective and a way to appreciate the
great outdoors.
These things work. And I didn't charge
you a dime for it. And remember, if it
don't hurt it won't work.
"Five ways to live longer."
Again, you don't have to purchase this
information. I'll give you five for free:
1. Quit smoking.
2. Moderate your alcohol intake or quit
altogether.
3. Don't drive a bulldozer after taking
Nyquil.
4. Don't smoke while manufacturing
meth.


MADISON, FL North lege is looking for talented
Florida Community Col- actors, actresses and back-




a4@ 3asper reni

Published weekly every Thursday. USPS #755-980
Office located at 211 Howard St. E.,
Live Oak, FL 32060
Phone (386) 362-1734 FAX (386) 364-5578
E-mail address: jaspernewsl@windstream.net
Myra Regan ................ Publisher
Monja Slater .................Advertising Manager
Jeff W aters ................. Editor
Joyce Marie Taylor ..........Reporter
Brenda Demarais ............Sales Representative

Periodicals postage paid at Jasper, FL.
Annual subscription rate is $18 in county,
$26 out of county and out of state.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
The Jasper News, P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064


Letter to the editor and Article Policy
Letters to the editor and article submissions can be
mailed or dropped off at the news office at 211 Howard
St. E, Live Oak, FL 32064, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.
until 5 p.m.
Letters to the editor should be typed, brief and to the
point, approximately 150 to 200 words or less. Not all
letters are published. To be considered for publication,
letters to the editor must be signed, include the writer's
address and phone number, and in the news office by
noon on Friday.
Submissions, 400 or less words, should be typed, brief
and to the point. Not all submissions are published.
Letters and submissions may be edited to fit available
space. Well written letters/submissions require less
editing.
You may fax letters/submissions to 386-364-5578.


5. Don't bungi jump and don't text
while you're driving. Actually that's six.
Of course the list could go on but I
don't have the space for it.
"2014 is the year of learning the
Word."
And the beauty of this Bible study pro-
gram is that it is 65 percent off regular
price.
I have a suggestion. Just go to church.
They'll take it from there.
"Learn when to call 911 ."
Now I would have thought that this
would be common sense, but it's not.
We've even seen people being charged
with criminal offenses for repeatedly call-
ing 911 for non-emergency calls.
They can't quite wrap their minds
around the difference in someone break-
ing into their house and their cat being up
a tree. I would have thought Captain Kan-
garoo or Mr. Rogers would have covered
this. I doubt it's something that Sponge
Bob Square Pants would address.
I have noted that I don't typically make
New Year's resolutions. But this year I
decided to become a vegetarian.
But I'm doing it in very small steps.
I've already given up antelope and wilde-
beest.

Dwain Walden is editor/publisher of The
Moultrie Observer, 229-985-4545. Email:
( 11 lik l ,1 d 1 /1'_ ".',1 l. l '. .. '.101


stage technicians of all
ages to audition and volun-
teer for its Community
Theater production of Al-
ice@Wonderland, which
places a 21st century spin
on Lewis Carroll's Alice in
Wonderland. Open audi-
tions will be held Saturday,
Jan. 18 at NFCC's Van H.
Priest Auditorium at 10
a.m.
This modern retelling of
Alice in Wonderland has
all of the characters you
know and love, including
the Mad Hatter, the White
Rabbit and the Queen of
Hearts. The story is laid
out in traditional style,
only Alice is distinctly
contemporary, complete
with cell phone in hand.
Full of references to text
messaging and social me-
dia, the play imagines a
present-day Alice encoun-
tering the Wonderland so
many of us treasure. A
sharply told, crisply paced
ride, this quality adaptation
has been praised for its hu-
mor, modern style and ap-
peal to both children and
adults.
Auditions are open to
community ages 5 and up.
For more information, con-
tact Denise Bell at (850)
973-9481 or
belld@nfcc.edu.


NFCC to hold open auditions


for Alice@Wonderland Jan. 18


AGENDA
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA
Room 112 Courthouse 207 Northeast First Street
Jasper, Florida
MEETING DATE: JANUARY 21, 2014
THE AGENDA ITEMS LISTED BY NUMBER WILL BE TAKEN IN ORDER FROM THE BEGINNING OF THE
MEETING REGARDLESS OF TIME. HOWEVER, THE TIME CERTAIN ITEMS LISTED WITH SPECIFIC TIMES
WILL COMMENCE AT THE SPECIFIED TIME.

LISTED ITEMS

1) COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC UNAGENDAED APPEARANCES (*)
2) CONSENT AGENDA APPROVAL
3) DISCUSSION OF RURAL HEALTH CLINIC
4) VETERANS MEMORIAL PARK-STATUS REPORT
5) CONTRACT FOR IT SERVICES
6) ENTRANCE AND ACCESS TO LOVE'S TRUCK PLAZA
7) AT&T TOWER LEASE AGREEMENT
8) COMPUTERIZED MAINTENANCE MONITORING SYSTEM PROPOSAL FOR
MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT AND ROAD DEPARTMENT
9) APPROVE BILLS
10) CORRESPONDENCE AND ANNOUNCEMENTS
11) ADJOURN

TIME CERTAIN ITEMS

600 P.M. CALL TO ORDER INVOCATION PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE TO THE FLAG
6:05 P.M. COUNTY ROAD PROJECTS STATUS REPORT
A) DISCUSSION OF COURTHOUSE PARKING LOT
6:10 P.M. SHIP/CDBG PROGRAM STATUS REPORT

DUE TO PUBLICATION DEADLINE, THIS AGENDA MAY NOT CONTAIN ALL MATTERS BEFORE THE BOARD.
A COMPLETE COPY OF THE AGENDA MAY BE OBTAINED AFTER 1:00 P.M. ON WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15,
2014 FROM THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, COURTHOUSE, JASPER, FLORIDA.
An Agenda review meeting will be held, beginning at 12:00 noon, on Monday preceding the above Agenda meeting date,
and will be held in Room 106, Hamilton County Courthouse, 207 NE First Street, Jasper, Florida 32052. In the event that
Monday meeting date should be on the same date as a County Adopted holiday, then the Agenda review meeting will be
on Friday, beginning at 12:00 noon, preceding the above Agenda meeting date at the same office as aforesaid.
Persons appearing before the Board are requested, if possible, to submit in writing the subject matter of their appearance
before the Board not later than Tuesday prior to the Board Meeting the following Tuesday.
(*) NOTICE: Persons appearing before the Hamilton County Board of County Commissioners, not having given notice in
time to be included and shown on the Agenda, and desiring to make a presentation, will be limited to five (5) minutes, in
the interest of meeting time. The Board of County Commissioners will hear and listen to persons appearing whose subject
has not been shown on the agenda; however, action by the Board on any such matter can only be taken upon
determination of an emergency situation. Any identifiable group of three (3) persons or more shall be limited to a total
often (10) minutes per topic.
In accordance with Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes, notice is given that if any person decides to appeal any decision
made by the Board, agency or commission, with respect to proceedings and that, for such purpose, he/she will need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is based.
NOTIFICATION: IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, PERSONS WITH
DISABILITIES NEEDING A SPECIAL ACCOMMODATION FOR ATTENDANCE AT THIS MEETING SHOULD
CONTACT THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, ROOM 106, 207 NORTHEAST FIRST STREET, JASPER, FLORIDA,
TELEPHONE (386) 792-1288, NOT LATER THAN 72 HOURS PRIOR TO THE PROCEEDINGS. IF HEARING
IMPAIRED, TDD (386) 792-0857.
NEXT REGULAR MEETING OF THE BOARD: TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4,2014 AT 9:00 AM.

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
HAMILTON COUNTY FLORIDA
CONSENT AGENDA
January 21, 2013
1) MINUTES-APPROVE:
A) November 19, 2013 Regular Meeting
B) January 7, 2014 Regular Meeting
2) APPROVE PAYMENT OF THE FOLLOWING INVOICE FROM DARABI &
ASSOCIATES:
A) Invoice No. 14-500-01-01 Landfill Monitoring December 2013 $9,034.00
3) APPROVE AND EXECUTE CERTIFICATE OF PUBLIC CONVENIENCE AND
NECESSITY FOR
HAMILTON COUNTY EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES

846447


PAGE 4A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014













Obituaries L Im


Doris Jeanette
Standley Odom
April 2, 1922 -
Jan. 7, 2014

2 oris Jeanette
Standley
OD Odom, April 2,
1922 -Jan. 7, 2014, resi-
dent of White Springs,
Fla., her children are
H.D. "Doug" Odom, Jr.
and wife Candy; David
F. Odom and wife Lor-
raine; Richard G. Odom,
Sr. (who preceded her in
death) and wife Rose;
Debra Odom and part-
ner Khrys.
She passed away
peacefully in her home
surrounded by her fami-
ly. Memorials may be
made in her honor to:
Hospice of Nature
Coast, P.O. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, Fla.,
34464, who provided ex-
pectional support in her
last days. There are no
services scheduled at
this time. Condolence
notes can be sent to the
family at 16362 SE CR
25A, White Springs, FL,
32096. Cremation
arrangements are under
the care of Dees-Parrish
Family Funeral Home,
458 S. Marion Ave., Lake
City, Fla., 32025. Please
sign the online guest-
book at www.parrish-
familyfuneralhome.com

Rhonda Peacock
Register
Dec. 13, 2013

X honda Peacock
Register, age
)q 54, of Jennings,
Fla. passed away at her
home on Dec. 13, 2013.
Rhonda was a home-
maker and member of
Jasper Assembly of God.
After a long illness,
Rhonda went home to
be with the Lord. She
will be greatly missed
by family and friends.
Rhonda was prede-


ceased by her parents,
Elton "Junior" Peacock
and Lavonne Peacock.
Survivors include her
husband, Ray Register
of Jennings; two sons,
Lance and his wife Lisa
and Ray Register III and
his wife Ashley, all of
Live Oak, Fla.; one
brother, Dewayne Pea-
cock and his wife Wan-
da Sue of Jennings; one
nephew, Wayne Pea-
cock and his wife Tina; a
great niece and great
nephew, Brad and Emi-
ly; and five grandchil-
dren. Also surviving is
her father-in-law and
mother-in-law, Ray and
Jacqueline Register.
Funeral services were
held Monday, Dec. 16,
2013 at Jasper Assembly
of God Church. Inter-
ment followed at Ever-
green Cemetery.
Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to
Haven Hospice, 6037
West US 90, Lake City,
Fla. 32055.
Harry T. Reid Funeral
Home, Jasper, Fla. was
in charge of arrange-
ments.

Reverend Colbert Croft
May 4, 1941
Jan. 1, 2014
A Powerful Life.

Iblbert Croft, 72,
of Valdosta, died
Wednesday, Jan.
1, 2014 at South Georgia
Medical Center. He was
born on May 4, 1941 in
Berlin, GA to the late Ar-
ley William (Ira) Croft
and Josephine Griffin
Croft. He led a life ded-
icated and destined to
serve the Lord and love
people. A passionate
and powerful man who
changed lives by intro-
ducing them to Jesus,
the life saver. His life
was a life of proclaiming
the cross and blood of
the Savior thru songs


and sermons. Songs
such as: "I Can't Even
Walk Without You
Holding My Hand", "I
Believe He Died For
Me", "Is That Footsteps
That I Hear?" and "The
First Million Years".
Words flowed from
God thru the pen of a
Godly man and the
help-mate God gave him
so many years ago.
When they married, two
truly became one. He
knew he was on this
earth to preach the
Word of God and he
knew eternity was at
stake for so many peo-
ple. Ministry was not
his vocation, it was his
life. Lessons have been
taught and lives are bet-
ter because of a man
who knew his God-giv-
en purpose and used it
to build the Kingdom of
God.
Colbert loved the
Word and he loved shar-
ing Jesus. His departure
was what his whole life
was about, telling peo-
ple how to get to heav-
en. Even in times of
physical limitations, like
Paul, God was still glori-
fied in his weaknesses.
He was a soldier of the
Lord and a living exam-
ple for his family,
friends, acquaintances
and fellow pastors. He
was a man that stood
tall for the Lord and
never compromised on
his beliefs. What God
accomplished in the last
years of his life only
God knows. Well,
maybe now he knows
too.
For I am now ready to
be offered, and the time
of my departure is at
hand. I have fought a
good fight, I have fin-
ished my course. I have
kept the faith: Hence-
forth there is laid up for
me a crown of right-
eousness, which the


Lord, the righteous
judge, shall give me at
that day: and not to me
only, but unto all them
also that love his ap-
pearing.
2 Timothy 4:6-8 King
James Version
Survivors include his
wife, Joyce Smith Croft
of Valdosta; two sisters
and brothers-in-law,
Mickey and Bill Watson
of Valdosta, Kay and
Mike Sikes of Lakeland;
one sister-in-law, Mil-
dred Croft; a number of
nieces and nephews and
great nieces and
nephews, as well as
many sons and daugh-
ters who were a product
of his ministry. He was
preceded in death by
five sisters, Doris
Walden, Romie Hart,
Joyce Home, Mary Rad-
ney Lyles and Corene
Walters; and one broth-
er, Ira Gene (Buddy)
Croft.
Funeral services were
held at 1 p.m., Tuesday,
Jan. 7, 2014 at the
Perimeter Road Baptist
Church with Rev. Stan-
ley Luke, Dr. Clyde
Stokes, Rev. Jim Schap-
paugh and Rev. A.M.
Anderson officiated. In-
terment followed at 3:30
p.m. in the Evergreen
Cemetery in Jasper, Fla.
The family received
friends at the Carson
McLane Funeral Home
on Monday Jan. 6, 2014
from 5 until 7 p.m.
Flowers will be accepted
or you may make dona-
tions to the Croft Evan-
gelistic Team Ministry,
P.O. Box 4535, Valdosta,
GA 31604 or to the
Lighthouse Children's
Home, 7771 Mahan Dr.,
Tallahassee, FL 32309.
Condolences to the fam-
ily may be conveyed on-
line at
www.mclanecares.com.
Carson McLane Funeral
Home.


Chili cook-off


set for Feb. 1

By Joyce Marie Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@gaflnews.com

The Hamilton County Chamber of Commerce
would like to invite everyone to come out for their
annual Chili Cook-off on Saturday, Feb. 1 at the
Jasper Women's Club beginning at 11 a.m.
The deadline to enter is Thursday, Jan 30.
Entrance fee for contestants is $10 per individ-
ual and $30 per business. Chamber members will
receive a $10 discount on their business entry fee.
Awards will be given to the winners in both cate-
gories.
Admission for spectators is $5 at the door and
will allow you to taste test as many of the chili en-
tries as your heart desires.
The annual chili cook-off is a wonderful oppor-
tunity for everyone to mingle with friends, neigh-
bors and others in the community. For more in-
formation, please call 386-792-1300.


Donate your old cars
People may be think- Clubs really work with
ing of donating their kids in most communi-
old cars as part of a ties and offer a safe
clean up. The Boys and place for them. If you
Girls Clubs would be wish to donate a car,
happy to take their old call 800-246-0493. Not
cars. People donating only will donators be
to the Clubs will not helping the kids, they
only get rid of the un- will be able to take sale
wanted car but will be price as a contribution
contributing to the for income tax purpos-
clubs. Boys and Girls es.


2008 NISSANU
XTEHHAUEIVEY
$9495 $11,99


2000 InC
$28 0 $"500



$5000GMC3EiIIE6
$8pooo S$8p5oo
$6,O00 $1250

sHOOO &^O


386.758.6171


slOfO0 b


THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 5A
















Stephen Foster Day celebrated


Continued From Page 1A

Waterman welcomed
everyone to the event
and said, "I am the
proudest park manager
in the park system be-
cause we have such a
wonderful park here.
Many cultural treasures,
many natural treasures,
the best staff, the best
volunteers and the best
citizen's support organi-
zation."
This year's Stephen
and Jeanie, Alexander
Solomon and Amanda
Caban, were the guests
of honor, accompanied
by pianist Timothy Red-
ding. Solomon and Ca-
ban were contestants in
the 63rd Annual
Stephen and Jeanie vocal
competition last year,
and as part of their reign
they headlined the con-
cert at Stephen Foster
Day in the park. The
competition, Waterman
said, is the oldest com-
petition in the park ser-
vice and the longest con-
tinuously running event
held at Stephen Foster
Park.
Other talented artists
at the concert included
Michael Vickey, who
had everyone mesmer-
ized as he played both
the hammered and Ap-
palachian dulcimer. Jan
Krautheim delighted
everyone with a piano
solo and also accompa-
nied the artists on piano


and guitar.
White Springs local
Johnny Bullard was the
master of ceremonies
and opened the concert
leading the guests in
Stephen Foster's most fa-
mous song, "Old Folks
at Home". Bullard also
sang "Beautiful Dream-
er" later in the afternoon
to the delight of the
crowd, after which he
received a generous ova-
tion. Bullard also offered
some history on the
park, as well as Stephen
Foster, the composer.
Lucy Spencer per-
formed two numbers on
the Carillon bells and af-
ter the concert perfor-
mances were completed,
everyone was invited to
stay a while and enjoy
some tasty refreshments.
Solomon (Stephen)
was born and raised in
Omaha, Nebraska and
attended the University
of South Florida, major-
ing in music perfor-
mance.
"My parents come
from South Africa,"
said Solomon. "I'm ac-
tually the first genera-
tion American in my
family."
Fausto Miro, who won
the Stephen competition
two years ago, is a good
friend of Solomon's who
encouraged him to enter
the competition.
Solomon took runner up
in 2012 and came back to
take first place in 2013.


For the past three
months he has been
studying with teachers
at Juilliard in New York
and the Longy School of
Music in Boston.
"Hopefully, I'll be au-
ditioning to those
schools in the fall," said
Solomon. "Sometime
this year, I'm actually
hoping to get to Europe
and look at schools
there."
Farther into the future,
Solomon said he would
like to create his own vo-
cal and instrumental
chamber group.
"A professional, tour-
ing chamber group that
showcases individual
voices, and we can come
together and do choral
works, travel and per-
form," he explained.
Caban said she just
finished at Stetson Uni-
versity and is now ap-
plying to graduate pro-
grams.
"I have an audition in
March at Mannes School
of Music in Manhattan,"
said Caban. "I'm going
for opera performance.
Ideally, after two years
of graduate school, I'd
like to go to Europe for a
year. That would be re-
ally fun, I think."
There are more photos
online and photos are
available for purchase.
Go to nflaonline.com
and click the photo
gallery link on the left
navigation bar.


Alexander Solomon as Stephen.


Amanda Caban as Jeanie.


Emcee Johnny Bullard. -Photos: Joyce Marie Taylor


Visitors enjoyed an assortment of sandwiches.


Stephen and Jeanie perform a duet together.


Michael Vickey and Jan Krautheim.


Kidnapped Valdosta woman found safe


Continued From Page 1A

into Florida and onto US 129
in Jasper where he made her
turn onto a dirt road in an
area behind Hamilton Coun-
ty High School. At that point,
the suspect forced Waller out
of the car. She attempted to
take her handbag with her,
but the suspect grabbed it
from her and took off, leaving
her behind, Reid explained.
Reid said a Hamilton Coun-


ty citizen happened upon the
frightened woman and took
her to the Hamilton County
Sheriff's Office where she
was interviewed by HCSO of-
ficers and a Valdosta Police
Department Person's Crime
Unit detective who came
down to investigate the kid-
napping.
The victim's cell phone,
Reid said, was in her handbag
that was in the car with the
suspect and authorities were


able to ping the phone and lo-
cate the vehicle. Just a few
hours later the suspect was
apprehended and the car was
recovered by the Jacksonville
Sheriff's Office. Williams was
charged in Jacksonville with
motor vehicle theft.
Reid said there was no con-
nection between the victim
and the suspect and the Val-
dosta Police Department said
there were no reported in-
juries to Waller.


Williams was not a wanted
criminal, Reid added, but he
has an extensive criminal his-
tory.
"Our people did an excel-
lent job in a timely fashion
and we were able to take
steps to locate the vehicle and
the suspect, which resulted in
a quick arrest before any
more crimes could be com-
mitted," said Reid.
In a press release from the
Valdosta Police Department


in Jasper

on Jan. 13, it states that arrest
warrants have been issued for
Williams for armed robbery,
kidnapping, aggravated as-
sault and possession of a
firearm during commission of
a crime.
Williams is currently being
held without bond at the
Jacksonville jail and will
eventually be sent back to
Valdosta to face charges
there.


dL


PAGE 6A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014















First Federal and employees give $66,498 to local agencies


This year, First Federal
Bank of Florida employ-
ees donated $33,201 to lo-
cal community agencies
through First Federal's
employee contribution
program, First Federal
Way. The $33,201 dona-
tion facilitated a match of
the same amount by First
Federal for a total of
$66,498 contributed to
community agencies.
Through First Federal
Way, employees elect to
contribute a portion of
their paycheck to one or
more participating non-
profit agencies. At the
end of each year, First
Federal matches the total
contribution and awards
it to the selected agencies.
First Federal Bank is
proud of our generous,
compassionate employ-
ees. Our employees con-
tinued to give back to
their communities this
year, despite a weak
economy. For some First
Federal employees like
Amanda Smith, she feels
blessed that we can sup-
port our community or-
ganizations which return
such happiness and val-
ue to so many. Other em-
ployees like Sally Hug-
gins and Lindsay Lee, be-
lieve it is a privilege to
give back to the commu-
nity and are proud of
First Federal's matching
donation which enables
their contribution to be
more than they could
give on their own.
At a recent check pre-


sentation, Keith
Leibfried, President and
CEO of First Federal, ex-
pressed gratitude to the
different agencies for all
the dedicated services
they provide to our com-
munity. "I am also grate-


ful to the First Federal
employees who gener-
ously shared their hard
earned income and to
First Federal's Board of
Directors for authorizing
a match of our employ-
ees," Leibfried said.


"Most importantly, I am
grateful to the loyalty of
our customers who en-
able us to be such a good
community partner."

First Federal Bank of
Florida offers a compre-


hensive portfolio of
products and services for
personal and business
customers, and is com-
mitted to helping local
communities flourish.
Founded in 1962, First
Federal has 20 branches


located in Amelia Island,
Bonifay, Bradenton,
Chipley, Dowling Park,
Graceville, Jasper, Lake
City, Live Oak, Macclen-
ny, Marianna, Mayo,
Sarasota and Yulee,
Florida.


First Federal Way agency representatives, First Federal executives and employees. Agencies represented are American Red Cross; ARC North Florida;
Boy Scouts of America; CARC; Christian Service Center of Columbia County; Columbia County Senior Services; Take Stock in Children/FGC; Guardian
Ad Litem (Voices for the Children), Habitat for Humanity Columbia County; Happy House; Heritage Parks & Gardens; Haven Hospice; Homeless Services
Network of Suwannee Valley; Lake City Humane Society; Love, Inc.; March of Dimes; Pregnancy Care Centers of Lake City & Live Oak; Suwannee Coun-
ty Parks & Recreation: Suwannee Valley 4C's; Suwannee Valley Humane Society and Vivid Visions. Agencies not pictured are the American Cancer So-
ciety; Children's Home Society; Salvation Army and Suwannee County Animal Shelter.


Stay healthy when the sick season of sneezes and sniffles arrives


The cold weather brings with it a season of smiles, the first snowfalls and,
unfortunately, cold and flu outbreaks. While everyone else is suffering, there are
ways you can make it through the season unscathed.

It is estimated that a billion people across North America will succumb to the cold
virus this year, says Medline. Considering there is no cure for cold and flu viruses,
prevention remains a person's best option at fending off cold and flu. There are
different precautions to take that can help protect you against getting sick or at
least reduce the frequency and severity with which cold and flu strikes.
Although there is no magic pill to take that will prevent you from catching a cold or
the flu, there are ways to improve your odds.
* Wash your hands the right way. Washing your hands frequently remains the
single-best way to keep viruses and bacteria that can make you sick from
infiltrating the body. Washing your hands for at least 20 seconds can effectively
remove any dirt, grime and invisible invaders.
* Skip antibacterial products. Because colds and the flu are the result of viruses,
which are different in behavior and structure from bacteria, they will not be killed of
with the use of antibacterial products. What you may succeed in doing is killing off
any beneficial bacteria on your hands as well as creating resistant bacteria that
form with over-use of antibiotics and antibacterial products.


* Avoid sick
people.
KidsHealth.org
states that flu
viruses and T'-,
colds can travel \
up to 12 feet
(from a sneeze
or cough). Steer
clear of anyone
exhibiting
symptoms,
especially
someone who
is frequently
sneezing or The elderly are more at risk for serious side effects form the cold and flu
coughing.
Parents should keep children home from school if they are sick. Do so until
symptoms subside so as not to infect others.
f
* Use a sanitizer product. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advise
that when hand-washing is not readily available, a good way to kill germs is to use
an alcohol-based sanitizer lotion. While not as effective as washing hands in warm,
soapy water, sanitizing products can be used in a pinch while you're on the go.


* Get the flu shot. There is no vaccination to prevent the common cold, but there
are immunizations that can help reduce your risk of getting the flu or help minimize Cough into your sleeve. Rather than coughing or sneezing into your hands, do so
its severity. Doctors' offices, clinics and even pharmacies all offer annual flu shots, into the crook of your elbow since this area rarely touches anything else.
* Use sanitizer on items around the house. Surfaces that are frequently touched by Skip the buffet lunch. Buffet-style offerings are convenient and offer variety, but
all members of the household should be wiped down with a disinfectant product. A they are also a breeding ground for illnesses. These foods may have been sneezed
bleach-and-water solution is an effective sanitizer. Surfaces to sanitize include or coughed on. Also, the serving spoons have been touched by dozens of people.
phones, doorknobs, light switches, remote controls, computer keyboards, faucets,
toys, and countertops. There are many different ways to avoid getting a cold or the flu this season.
Diligence is one of the keys to staying germ-free.


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MANTOOTH,

D.D.S, P.A.
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak, FL

(386) 362-6556

1-800-829-6506
(Out of Suwannee County)


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I


THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 7A










PAGE 8A THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014


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NOTES


Governor, First Lady announce

2014 Black History Month

student and teacher contests


TALLAHASSEE, Fla. Gov. Rick
Scott and First Lady Ann Scott invited
K-12 students to participate in the 2014
Black History Month art and essay
contests. Students, parents, teachers
and principals have also been invited
to nominate full-time African-Ameri-
can educators in elementary, middle
or high schools for the Black History
Month Excellence in Education
Award.
Governor Scott said, "This month is
a great opportunity for Florida stu-
dents to learn about the significance of
Black History to our nation's fabric.
The 2014 Black History Month contests
will provide our students with a
chance to enhance their educational
experience and encourage them to be-
come better leaders."
First Lady Ann Scott said, "The
Black History Month art and essay
contests will allow Florida students
the opportunity to express their cre-
ativity and learn more about what
makes Florida such a unique and spe-
cial place. I encourage Florida stu-
dents and teachers to participate. I
would also like to thank Ms. Rose Jef-
ferson for being the featured artist for
this year's Black History Month."
The student contests focus on the
theme "Dr. Martin Luther King's
Dream: 50 Years in Action." Students
are asked to respond to how they are
influenced and inspired by Dr. Martin
Luther King's "I Have a Dream"
speech. Information about the contests
and Florida's Black History Month is
available on Florida's Black History
Month website, www.FloridaBlack-
History.com.
This year's Black History Month
featured artist is Rose Jefferson. She
was born in Alexandria, Louisiana
and grew up in Houston, Texas. She
pursued her passion for painting and
drawing after her mother passed
away in 1999. Her artwork has been
exhibited mostly in the southeast and
she currently resides in Melbourne,
Florida.


About the student contests
Art Contest for Grades K-3 The
Black History Month art contest is
open to all Florida students in grades
K-3, and two winners will be selected.

Essay Contest for Grades 4-12 The
Black History Month essay contest is
open to all Florida students in grades 4
through 12. Three winners will be se-
lected: one elementary student (grades
4-5), one middle-school student
(grades 6-8), and one high school stu-
dent (grades 9-12). Winners will re-
ceive a four-year Florida College Plan
scholarship provided by the Florida
Prepaid College Foundation.

About the Excellence
in Education award
Governor Scott's annual Black His-
tory Month Excellence in Education
Award Contest is open to all African-
American, full time educators in an el-
ementary, middle or high school in
Florida. Three winners will be select-
ed: one elementary (K-5) teacher, one
middle school (6-8) teacher and one
high school (9-12) teacher.

All entry forms and guidelines for
the contests can be found at
www.FloridaBlackHistory.com.

Contest entries and nominations
Student Contests and Educator
Nomination forms must be mailed to:

Volunteer Florida
Attention: Black History Month
3800 Esplanade Way
Suite 180
Tallahassee, FL 32311

All entries must be mailed to Volun-
teer Florida and postmarked on or be-
fore Jan. 31, 2014.

For additional information about
Florida's Black History, contests and
other related events, please visit
www.FloridaBlackHistory.com.


SRWMD develops partnerships with
electrical companies for agricultural
water use monitoring program


The Suwannee River Water Manage- signed a
ment District (District) is currently allow fc
working with electric companies data, fo
throughout its 15-county region to tion to r
provide electrical consumption data ships pr
that will be used to determine agricul- enable ti
tural water use. without
The District requires monitoring and cultural
reporting of groundwater and surface payers r
water withdrawals for new, renewed, The D
and modified permits. The require- with oth
ment applies to permitted with- this vita
drawals from wells with an inside di- manner.
ameter of 8 inches or greater and to partner
surface water pumps with an outside electric
diameter of 6 inches or greater, in those
The District is pursuing an innova- participate
tive, cost-efficient means to obtain ac- ments w
curate water use data from agricultur- to prov
al producers. Agriculture is the largest methods
permitted water use in the District. "We a
The water use data is critical to plan consume
for future water supplies and manage hance it
water resources, gram,"
Agricultural producers electing to Coopera
participate in this program will autho- cer Eddi
rize the participating electric utility to "We
provide electrical consumption meter Central
data for each water pump. The District Inc., in p
will then be able to accurately deter- provide
mine the water use. the mos
Central Florida Electric Cooperative, lect accu
Inc., and another cooperative have trict Exe


MLK Day to be

celebrated Monday
Continued From Page 1A

which successfully protested racial discrimina-
tion in federal and state law. The campaign for a
federal holiday in Dr. King's honor, she said, be-
gan soon after his assassination in 1968. President
Ronald Reagan signed the holiday into law in
1983, and it was first observed three years later. It
was officially observed in all 50 states for the first
time in 2000.
In keeping with Dr. King's words, "Life's most
persistent and urgent question is: what are you
doing for others?", the event will honor two local
leaders with the town's Beautiful Dreamer
Award. The program will include music, dance
and storytelling.
After the formal program, lunch will be served.
For additional information, please call town
hall at 386-397-2310 and ask to speak with Mrs.
Anita Rivers who is coordinating the event.


agreements with the District to
or the transmittal of electrical
allowing customer authoriza-
elease the data. These partner-
rovide essential data that will
he District to assess water use
additional costs to our agri-
producers and save our tax-
noney.
districtt is presently working
her electric companies to obtain
1 information in a cost-efficient
Once the other companies
with the District to share the
1 data, agricultural producers
service areas will be able to
ate in the monitoring require-
vhile avoiding additional costs
ide the data through other
S.
re happy to provide electrical
option data to the District to en-
Is water use monitoring pro-
said Central Florida Electric
Ltive, Inc., Chief Financial Offi-
ie Thomas.
appreciate the leadership of
Florida Electric Cooperative,
partnering with the District to
us this information, which is
t cost-effective method to col-
arate water use data," said Dis-
cutive Director Ann Shortelle.


College Placement Tests
Monday Thursday at 5
p.m. (by appointment):
College Placement Test
(CPT), NFCC Testing Cen-
ter (Bldg. #16), 5 p.m.,
Madison. Register in
NFCC Student Services 24
hours before test. For infor-
mation please call 850-
973-9451.

TABE tests
Monday Thursday at 5
p.m. (by appointment):
TABE (Test of Adult Basic
Education) at NFCC Test-
ing Center (Bldg. #16),
Madison. TABE is required
for acceptance into voca-
tional/technical programs.
Photo ID required. To reg-
ister please call 850-973-
9451.


PAGE 8A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014


I













Former HamCo judge fills void in Bradford County
Former HamCo judge fills void in Bradford County


By Joyce Marie Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@
gaflnews.com

Richard B. Davis Jr.,
better known around
Hamilton County simply
as R.B. Davis, has been
appointed by Florida
Governor Rick Scott to


Jasper Legals
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 24-2012-CA-000412
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
vs.
CLINTON W. MINTER AND UNKNOWN
TENANTS/OWNERS.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final
Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff
entered in this cause on December 20,
2013, in the Circuit Court of Hamilton
County, Florida, I will sell the property
situated in Hamilton County, Florida de-
scribed as
LOT 14, OF WYNN FARMS, A SUBDIVI-
SION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
2, PAGE 67, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF HAMILTON COUNTY,
FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT
CERTAIN 1999 SPRI DOUBLE-WIDE
MOBILE HOME, VIN(S)
G A F LW34A 2 8003S L22 &
GAFLW34B28003SL22.
commonly known as 5157 SW 44TH
AVE JASPER, FL 32052, including the
building, appurtenances, and fixtures loc-
ated therein, at public sale, to the highest
and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held
in lobby of the main courthouse, on
January 29, 2014, at 11 am
Dated this 26th day of December, 2013
(Court Seal) Clerk of the Circuit Court
Greg Godwin
By /s/ Cynthia Johnson
Deputy Clerk
01/09, 16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2013 CA 222
FLORIDA CREDIT UNION
Plaintiff,
vs.
RANDALL L. PADGETT AND
MELINDA G. PADGETT,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
Notice is hereby given that the under-
signed, Clerk of Circuit Court, Hamilton
County, Florida, will on the 29th day of
January, 2014, at 11 00 a m, atthe Front
Lobby door of the Hamilton County Court-
house, 207 NE First Street, Jasper, Flor-
ida, offer for sale and sell at public outcry,
one by one, to the highest bidder for
cash, the property located in Hamilton
County, Florida, as follows
THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF
THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTH-
WEST 1/4 OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP
1 NORTH, RANGE 13 EAST, HAMILTON
COUNTY, FLORIDA AND ALL THAT
PORTION OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE
NORTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4
OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION
27, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 13
EAST, HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA,
LYING EAST OF A NORTH/SOUTH
COUNTY GRADED ROAD
TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1988
DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME ID#
GAFLH54A00060LP AND ID#
GAFLH54B00060LP WHICH IS PER-
MANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE LANDS
ABOVE DESCRIBED AND AS SUCH IS
DEEMED TO BE A FIXTURE AND A
PART OF THE REAL ESTATE
pursuant to the Final Judgment of Fore-
closure entered on December 20, 2013,
in the above-styled cause, pending in said
Court
Any person claiming an interest in the


serve as Bradford County
Judge. Davis is currently
chairman of the Hamil-
ton County Economic
Development Authority,
where he has served for
many years. He is also on
the board of trustees for
North Florida Communi-
ty College and is active in


Jasper Legals
surplus from the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of the date of the
lis pendens must file a claim within 60
days after the sale
(Court Seal) W Greg Godwin, Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court
By /s/Cynthia Johnson
Deputy Clerk
01/09, 16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
FILE NO. 10-147-CA
THE REID FAMILY PARTNERSHIP L.P.,
A FLORIDA LIMITED PARTNERSHIP,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DAISY PARKS; HAZEL WATERS; LOIS
GILLIAM; BARBARA WOODTON; MAR-
GARET JACKSON; GRACE PITTMAN;
SANDRA KERSHAW; JESSE HENDER-
SON; and ALL PARTIES CLAIMING IN-
TERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR
AGAINST ANY OF THE DEFENDANTS
NAMED HEREIN, and ALL PARTIES
HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY
RIGHT, TITLE, OR INTEREST IN THE
PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to
a Judgment of Partition dated November
5, 2013 entered in Civil Case No
2010CA-000147 of the Circuit Court of
the Third Judicial Circuit in and for
Hamilton County, Florida, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at the
Hamilton County Courthouse located at
207 NE 1st Street, Jasper, Florida 32052
on the 31st day of January, 2014 the fol-
lowing described property as set forth in
said Judgment of Partition, to wit
All of S 1/2 of SW 1/4 of NE 1/4 of Sec-
tion 18, Township 2 North, Range 11
East, less and except the West 44 yards
thereof, the lands hereby conveyed con-
taining 18 acres more or less
The sale will be held on January 31,
2014, at 11 00 a m on the sale date to
the highest and best bidder for cash, at
the front entrance of the Courthouse, 207
Northeast 1st Street, Jasper, Florida
32052 in accordance with the Florida
Statutes
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE
PROPERTY OWNER MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
Notice
In accordance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), disabled
persons who, because of their disabilities,
need special accommodation to particip-
ate in this proceeding, should contact Ms
Carrina Cooper, Court Operations Con-
sultant, 173 N E Hernando Street, Room
108, Lake City, Florida 32056-1569, Tele-
phone Number (386) 758-2163, Fax (386)
758-2162 not later than five business
days prior to such proceeding
Dated January 2, 2014
(Court Seal) W GREG GODWIN
Clerk of the Court
By /s/ Cynthia Johnson
As Deputy Clerk
01/09, 16
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
The District Board of Trustees of North
Florida Community College will hold its
regular monthly meeting Tuesday, Janu-
ary 21, 2014 at 5:30 p.m. in the NFCC
Board Room, NFCC, 325 NW Turner
Davis Dr Madison, FL A copy of the
agenda may be obtained by writing
NFCC, Office of the President, 325 NW
Turner Davis Dr, Madison, FL 32340 For
disability-related accommodations, con-
tact the NFCC Office of College Advance-
ment, 850-973-1653 NFCC is an equal
access/equal opportunity employer
01/16


the local VFW, as well as
a member of New Hope
Baptist Church outside
the city limits of Jasper.
"He accepted that posi-
tion and will only serve
temporarily until the next
election," said Susan
Ramsey, director of the
development authority.
"He won't be seeking re-
election and he's still a
part of our development
authority board."
Appointed by Gov.
Scott on Dec. 2, 2013,
Davis fills the vacancy
created by the passing of
Judge Johnny R. Hobbs
until a local election can
be held. He started his as-
signment on Wednesday,
Dec. 11, 2013, at the Brad-
ford County Courthouse.
Davis presides over all
county court matters, in-
cluding misdemeanor,


criminal traffic, civil traf-
fic, and county civil cases,
and serves on the Brad-
ford County Canvassing
Board. As an acting cir-
cuit judge, he also pre-
sides over juvenile de-
pendency and delinquen-
cy cases. He is assisted by
Diane Moore.
This will be the third
time Davis will have
served as a judge. He
completed the US Army's
Military Judges Course in
1989, and was appointed
to serve as a military
judge for the Florida Na-
tional Guard. Then Gov-
ernor Jeb Bush appointed
Davis to the Hamilton
County Court bench in
2004, where he also
served as an acting circuit
judge, presiding over civ-
il, criminal, domestic vio-
lence, drug court and ju-


3 qualify for Seat 5 on


Jasper City Council


Continued From Page 1A

and Kathy Avriett, (Seat
5).
According to City
Clerk Jennifer Hightow-
er, LaBarfield Bryant
was the only one who
qualified for Seat 1. He
will run unopposed and
his name and Seat 1 will
not be on the ballot.
Those qualifying for
Seat 5 are Kathy Avriett,
Gordon Rogers and
Gadon Smith.


New council members
will be sworn in at the
March 10 meeting of the
Jasper City Council.
Other council mem-
bers currently holding
seats are Darnell Lump-
kin, Seat 2; Ann Less-
man, Seat 3; and Mary
Kay Dunaway, Seat 4.
As a reminder, the
Jasper City Council
holds their regular
monthly meetings on the
second Monday of every
month at 6 p.m.


Farley, Brookins

to resign


Continued From Page 1A

Farley said by phone
on Saturday that it's just
coincidental that both he
and Brookins happened
to submit their resigna-
tion letters at about the
same time.
Chief Brookins, Farley
explained, is resigning
from the police depart-
ment so that he can pur-
sue a private business
venture with his broth-
er. Brookins' last day at
work will be Feb. 26 and
his official resignation
date will be March 3.
Farley, who is 65, said,
"I'm just getting old and
I need to retire."
Farley stressed that
his resignation has more
to do with physical rea-
sons than the job itself.


He said he informed the
town that even after he
retires in June he will be
available by phone to
help if needed.
"I want to make this as
smooth as possible," Far-
ley said.


Judge R.B. Davis. Courtesy photo


venile court cases. He is
one of the few, if not
only, Florida judges to
have been appointed by
two different governors
to two different county
judgeships.
In 1973, Davis prac-
ticed law in North Flori-
da; in private practice, as
a mediator, and as a part-
time state attorney in the
Third Judicial Circuit. He
also served on active
duty in the United States
Army Infantry from
1967-1970, and as an offi-
cer in the U. S. Army (Re-
serve and Florida Army
National Guard) Judge
Advocates General
Corps from 1983-2005,
where he attained the
rank of Colonel.
Davis's extensive mili-
tary career includes a
tour as State Judge Ad-
vocate for the Florida
National Guard from
2003-2005, and as a mili-
tary judge from 1989-
2005. He was mobilized
in September, 2001 and
remained on active duty
until August, 2003. He
served in Vietnam in
1969-70, Saudi Arabia,
Korea, the National
Capitol Region, and
Kuwait during his mobi-
lization from 2001-2003.
He served as General
Council and State Judge


Advocate for the Florida
Department of Military
Affairs until his retire-
ment from the National
Guard in 2005. He con-
tinued to serve as Hamil-
ton County Court Judge
until 2007.
Davis graduated with
an undergraduate degree
in political science from
Taylor University (Indi-
ana), and received his Ju-
ris Doctorate from Flori-
da State University Col-
lege of Law in 1972. He is
married to the former
Cecil Hardy of Colum-
bia, S.C., whom he met in
Vietnam where she
worked as Club Program
Director for the U.S.O.
They have two sons, both
of whom graduated from
the U.S. Military Acade-
my at West Point, NY.
One son, Jeffry, died in
the service of our nation
in 2001. Their surviving
son, Heyward, continues
to serve on active duty.
They have five grand-
children, five monkeys
and a princess.
There will be a recep-
tion welcoming Judge
Davis on Thursday, Jan.
9, from 5-7 p.m. at the
Bradford County Senior
Citizen Center, located at
1805 North Temple Av-
enue in Starke.


Dacier Manor Assisted Living

at Advent Christian Village

I know Mom is being taken care of by a professional,
caring staff 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. She's not
sitting alone in her home she's with her peers. And
she's still close by. Mom is much happier now, and so am I.


Call (386) 658-5291 or visit

www.acvillage.net/assistedliving


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EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
846329


THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 9A










PAGE 1OA THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014


Around the


Banks of the


'TEvery time Ifeel the spirit
Movin in my heart, I will pray.
Every time Ifell the spirit
Movin in my heart, I will pray."
(Lyrics to Traditional African American Spiritual)

On Monday, Jan. 20, 2014, our nation
will celebrate a national holiday
honoring the memory of the late
Rev. Dr. Martin Luther, King Jr.,
Nobel Peace Prize winner, and slain
civil rights leader. Long before Dr. King delivered
his famous "I Have a Dream" speech during the late
summer of 1963 in Washington, D.C., the Supreme
Court of the United States repealed a historic civil
rights decision of Plessy vs. Ferguson, 1898, that had
created, for all intents and purposes, the "Separate
but Equal" doctrine which was the one of the ruling
"mores" of Southern society for over a half century.
Plessy was repealed in 1954 when the Supreme
Court in Brown vs. Board of Education stated that
separate facilities for educating children was, in and
of themselves, "Unequal".
The Supreme Court decision in Brown did not
bring an end to segregation throughout the South,
but Southern legislators while shouting "segrega-
tion" from the roof tops saw that the days of total
segregation were coming to a close. That is the rea-
son that during the mid to late fifties, there was a
huge increase in building and construction funds
that went into building more modern up-to-date all
black schools. Federal legislators knew, even then,
whether local people did or not, that these schools
would, very soon, have to be used to house students


of all races, not just African American students.
In Hamilton County, Carver High School, White
Springs, J.R.E. Lee High School, Jasper, and Jerry
Jackson High School, Jennings, were all built during
these years. Go look at the plaques on the front of the
buildings; well, there is still one at the former J.R.E.
Lee High School, and you will see the year the
school was constructed.
Carver High School in White Springs, part of
which is still standing, was built in 1954. Students
from grades 1-12 attended school there. As a high
school, it had a short history. Only about 11 senior
classes graduated from there, but as a presence in
the White Springs community, it endured for over a
decade and a half serving students in grades K-8, af-
ter the high schools of both white and black students
were consolidated in 1965 and students were trans-
ported to Jasper. During that time, the school was
served by many outstanding educators; the late Mr.
and Mrs. E.W. Graham Sr., Mr. Graham was the
principal, and Mrs. Graham (the former Mary
Williams) from White Springs was the stalwart sup-
port and pillar behind Mr. Graham. They were both
outstanding educators who did much to promote
and perpetuate a system of quality education for the
children and community in which they lived and
faithfully served.
Also serving the White Springs community at the
Carver School as teachers, and these are those who
were part of the White Springs community, the late
Mrs. Sadie M. Williams Turner, the late Mrs. Sallie
M. Reddick, the late Mrs. Mary Jefferson McKire,
Mrs. Rosa Jefferson Roundtree, and Mrs. Dorothy L.
Bryant. Many of these educators worked hard to


"bridge the gap" that "was" the early days of racial
desegregation and to bring understanding to both
communities. I don't know what went on in other
communities, but I do know in our small communi-
ty of White Springs these fine educators did their
part to bring about a peaceful transition during very
uncertain times in our nation's history.
They did not bring this transition to fruition alone,
they were joined by their white professional col-
leagues who worked "with" them to ensure that the
educational programs and experiences for children
was kept intact and moving along. They succeeded.
In other communities throughout North Florida,
there was friction, fights, upheaval, but not in White
Springs, Florida. In White Springs, we said the
pledge of allegiance, had school programs, dia-
grammed sentences, sang songs, had a school foot-
ball and basketball team, a cheerleading squad, a
Halloween Carnival and talent show, and, as chil-
dren, enjoyed being children supervised by out-
standing educators who were, and shall always in
my mind, be outstanding examples of what profes-
sional educators should be.
My hat is off to these early pioneers of education
and for the effort they put forward to bring to reali-
ty the "dream" that was so much a part of the speech
of the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Many of
these great educators now rest under the sandy soil
of North Florida near the banks of the Suwannee
River, but their legacy lives on in the lives of many
students. Their influence is felt to this day in the
lives of those they taught, and, more than that,
loved.
There are students, grown people in today's world
who have no idea the price that was paid for them to
be able to vote, sit in any restaurant, or attend any
school or college they choose. These were not rights
that were easily given and, like so many things "tak-
en for granted" were paid for with pain, tears, blood,
and even countless thousands of lives not only in the
South but throughout the nation.
As we approach the national holiday honoring the
late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther, King Jr., let us remem-
ber the sacrifices made by many to help make our
nation a more tolerant, better place to live and let us
ask ourselves, how well we have succeeded.
Remember the words of the late Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr., "Life's most persistent and urgent question
is 'What are you doing for others?'"
His life was about service to his fellow man, to his
community, to the nation. Let us be about making
the place we live a better place today and tomorrow.
In that way, we, like these early and marvelous pio-
neers of public education in a small town "Way
down upon the Suwannee River" can, indeed, be he-
roes, in our own way, just as each of them, at least in
my eyes, will forever be heroes.
From the Eight Mile Still on the Woodpecker
Route north of White Springs, wishing each of you a
day filled with joy, peace, and, above all, lots of love
and laughter.


Interested in

having your teeth

straightened?
The UF Orthodontic Research Clinic is looking for
participants for an orthodontic study. Two screening
visits are needed to determine eligibility. Qualified
participants must be able to come to the clinic for
nine visits in 12 weeks.

You may be eligible if:
*You are between 18 and 40 years old.
*You are in good general medical and dental
health.
*You have all your upper front teeth with some
that are crooked.
*You have most of your upper back teeth.
*You have not smoked within the last six months.
*You do not take daily pain medications, estrogen
or medications for osteoporosis or other medication
that may interfere with tooth movement.
*You are available to come to the research clinic
for nine appointments over 12 weeks.
*You are not pregnant.

Eligible participants will receive an oral examina-
tion and will have one tooth moved slightly during
the study. At the conclusion of the study, partici-
pants will be treated with either braces or clear align-
ers at no cost. If interested, please call the UF Ortho-
dontic Research Clinic at (352) 273-7960 between 9
a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, or visit the
study's website for more information.
https:/ /ufhealth.org/research-study/effect-ac-
celedent-aura-orthodontic-tooth-movement-aligners


PAGE 10A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014











THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014 THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL PAGE hA


Lopez-Cantera selected


as Lt. Governor


Carlos Lopez-uantera


MIAMI Governor Rick
Scott announced Tuesday
that he is appointing Mia-
mi-Dade Property Apprais-
er Carlos Lopez-Cantera as
Lieutenant Governor. Gov.
Scott said Lopez-Cantera
would use the next few
weeks to transition from his
current role and begin serv-
ing as Lieutenant Governor
of Florida on Feb. 3.
Governor Scott said,
"Carlos Lopez-Cantera will
be a major part of our agen-
da to build an opportunity


economy in Florida. Carlos
has two daughters, like I
do, and he is focused on
how we can transform our
economy so we aren't just
creating jobs, we are creat-
ing careers and opportuni-
ties that will be here for our
children and our children's
children. I am confident
that we took the right
amount of time to find the
right person to serve as
Florida's Lieutenant Gover-
nor. Carlos' leadership ex-
perience will make him a
vital part of ensuring the
passage of our $500 million
tax cut package this year.
And his business experi-
ence and expertise in cut-
ting taxes and government
regulations will support
small business growth and
success."
Carlos Lopez-Cantera
said, "I am honored to have
been chosen by Governor
Scott to serve Floridians as
their Lieutenant Governor.
I look forward to leveraging
my experience with small
businesses and government


tax reform to help further
Governor Scott's mission of
economic growth and job
creation."
Carlos Lopez-Cantera
was elected as the Miami-
Dade Property Appraiser in
2012. He previously served
eight years in the Florida
House. As a legislative
member, he chaired the
Committee on Business
Regulation and the Govern-
ment Affairs Committee,
and served as Majority
Whip from 2009-10 and as
Majority Leader from 2010-
12. He is a licensed realtor
and has worked in real es-
tate for 15 years and is also
the president of a small
business. Lopez-Cantera is
a graduate of Miami-Dade
Community College (1994)
and the University of Mia-
mi (1996) with a degree in
B u s i n e s s
Administration. Born in
Spain and raised in Florida,
he and his wife Renee re-
side in Miami with their
two young daughters, Sab-
rina and Sofia.


Jim Stafford to perform at Levy

Performing Arts Center on the


Florida Gateway
Jim Stafford was raised in
Winterhaven, and still resides
there when he is not on the road
or performing in his own the-
atre, The Jim Stafford Theatre, in
Branson, Mo.
Jim Stafford wrote and
recorded his first chart-making
song, The Swamp Witch, pro-
duced by his boyhood friend
Kent LaVoie a/k/a Lobo in
1974. He followed with a gold
single, Spiders and Snakes,
which stayed on the American
pop charts for 26 weeks. The
hits just kept coming and in-
cluded My Girl Bill, Wildwood
Weed, and the wonderfully
satirical Cow Patti, written for
the Clint Eastwood movie Any
Which Way You Can, in which
Jim appeared.
Jim launched his television ca-
reer with The Jim Stafford Show
on ABC in 1975. His numerous
television appearances included
music specials, variety shows,
and talk shows. He co-hosted
the popular prime-time show
Those Amazing Animals with
Burgess Meredith and Priscilla
Presley. Jim also hosted 56
episodes of Nashville on the


Hamilton County Spelling Bee
These are the Spelling Bee winners for each school in
Hamilton County.


Hamilton County High School:
1st place-Bryan Cribbs
2nd place-Tionne Williams
3rd place-Albino Lopez

Central Hamilton Elementary:
1st place-Mykelti White
2nd place-Justen Fourie
3rd place-Rachel Armstrong

North Hamilton Elementary:
1st place-Kaylee Boatwright
2nd place-Ramsey Reynolds
3rd place-Zachary Driggers

South Hamilton Elementary:
1st place-Azaria Thompkins
Alternate-McKenzie Shipp


Hamilton County
Spelling Bee Winner,
McKenzie Shipp from
South Hamilton Ele-
mentary.


Hamilton County Spelling Bee participants. Courtesy photo


ClHIllui-iInION )


Rountree Moore
Automotive Group est.1924F bo
-- ^*Sif",eboolk


0. .U .- .-


THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 11A


College campus
Road and made 26 appearances
on the Tonight Show. In 1987
and 1988 Jim was a regular per-
former and head writer/produc-
er for the Emmy-nominated
Smothers Brothers Comedy
Hour. He has also worked with
Joan Rivers, Tina Turner, Sam-
my Davis Jr., Bruce Springsteen,
Glenn Campbell, Gallagher and
many others.
Please join him for a special
night of music, comedy and giv-
ing to the United Way. Tickets
are only $25 and can be pur-
chased at the United Way of
Suwannee Valley. The United
Way office is located at 325 NE
Hernando Ave., NW, Lake City,
Fla. The phone number is 386-
752-5604.
United Way of Suwannee Val-
ley is a community impact and
fundraising organization which,
utilizing volunteers on all levels,
advances the common good by
identifying unmet community
needs and seeking to alleviate
those needs through United
Way of Suwannee Valley initia-
tives and the funding of 22 affil-
iated health and human service
agencies.














c4(onst ga at'Water for Nature,



U~hIPT ~7Water for People'


Submitted
"Water for Nature, Water for Peo-
ple" is a phrase that embodies the pur-
pose of the Suwannee River Water
Management District (District). And it
is our motto for good reason. It repre-
sents a delicate balance that we take
very seriously.
The District employs both resource
management and regulatory measures
to ensure that our water resources are
protected, and that there is an ade-
quate water supply for reasonable and
beneficial uses.
Resource management measures in-
clude implementing and encouraging
water conservation, offsetting ground-
water withdrawals with alternative
sources such as reclaimed water,
recharging the aquifer with clean wa-
ter to increase water levels and flows
in springs, rehydrating wetlands and
ponds, improving water quality, and
data collection and analysis. Regulato-
ry measures include minimum flows
and levels (MFLs) and our permitting
programs.
During the past fiscal year, the Dis-
trict worked with agricultural produc-
ers and local governments to reduce
water use through improved efficiency
and water conservation. These part-
nerships resulted in an estimated
groundwater water savings of 9.74
million gallons per day (mgd). Nearly
half of the groundwater savings oc-
curred in the Santa Fe River Basin.
The District also conducts projects
such as the recently initiated the Mid-
dle Suwannee River and Springs
Restoration and Aquifer Recharge pro-
ject that will rehydrate ponds and wet-
lands, enhance surface water storage
and enhance aquifer recharge to bene-
fit agricultural water supply and
spring flows along the Middle Suwan-
nee River.
Establishing MFLs is a science-based
process to ensure water availability for


the present and future and to prevent
significant harm to the area's natural
resources. The District is committed to
establish MFLs on its priority water
bodies by 2016. The priority water
bodies include our rivers, first magni-
tude springs and second magnitude
springs on publicly-owned lands, and
large lakes. Currently the District is es-
tablishing MFLs for the Lower Santa
Fe River, Ichetucknee River, and asso-
ciated Priority Springs.
A common misconception is that
water use permits are granted with lit-
tle evaluation or consideration of our
natural resources. This is simply not
the case. Water use permit applica-
tions are evaluated to ensure existing
legal users are protected, to ensure the
use is reasonable and beneficial, and to
ensure the use is in the public interest.
During the last fiscal year the District
upgraded its assessment tools which
greatly improved the application eval-
uation process.
Very few water use permit requests
are new applications or for new water
use. The majority of the requests are
for transfers and modifications, and
these frequently do not involve addi-
tional or "new" water. For example,
last fiscal year the District allocated
only 19.17 mgd of "new" water use
throughout our 15 county area. And
although this may sound like a lot, it is
actually less than 2 percent of the per-
mitted water allocation District-wide.
Net water allocations within the Dis-
trict actually declined in two counties,
Levy and Alachua.
The District has been tasked with
managing water resources to protect
the health of springs, rivers, and the
aquifer while ensuring adequate water
supplies are available for all reason-
able and beneficial uses. That is an
awesome responsibility which we are
fully engaged and committed to up-
holding.


Diffie, Kershaw, Tippin to

perform at Florida Gateway

College this month


1 4 P RL E T. ,



LVERADO

k PW CAB,
W-O~kk% -- AT ALT


4 APPLY ONm t
LENDING REPRESENTATIVES
AVAILABLE TO PROCESS LOANS
FOR IMMEDIATE DISPOSAL


LAKE CITY, FLA. The new year
kicks off with a bang as three country
music legends perform at Florida
Gateway College on Jan. 24.
The Roots and Boots Tour, featuring
Joe Diffie, Sammy Kershaw, and
Aaron Tippin, will take place in the
Howard Conference Center for an un-
forgettable Friday night performance.
Tickets for the concert are still avail-
able.
The show is sponsored by Shands
Lake Shore Regional Medical Center
and CMS Professional Staffing, Inc.
The trio of musicians has combined
for 16 gold and platinum albums and
42 top ten singles, and this January
performance will feature more than
just the music you've come to love -
the trio, on-stage together throughout
the show, will also share stories from
their lives and careers.
During the past 20 years, Diffie, Ker-
shaw, and Tippin have been some of
country music's hottest acts, though
their paths to fame have taken differ-
ent roads.
An Oklahoma native, Diffie signed
with Epic Records in 1990, and be-
tween then and 2004, he charted 35
songs on the Billboard Hot Country
Songs chart, including five number
one singles: "Home," "If the Devil
Danced (In Empty Pockets)," "Third
Rock from the Sun," "Pickup Man,"
and "Bigger than the Beatles."
The Louisiana-born Kershaw over-
came several adversities in life, in-
cluding drugs and alcohol, to become
one of country music's most recogniz-
able stars. He had more than 25 sin-
gles enter the Billboard Hot Country
Songs Top 40 chart, including the No.
1 hit, "She Don't Know She's Beauti-
ful." Other hits include "Queen of My
Double-Wide Trailer" and "I Can't
Reach Her Anymore."
Originally a songwriter, the Florida
native Tippin hit it big in 1990 with his
debut single, "You've Got to Stand for
Something," which became a popular
anthem for American soldiers fighting
in the Gulf War. In his career, Tippin
has charted more than 30 singles, in-
cluding "There Ain't Nothin' Wrong
with the
Radio" and "Kiss This."
Tickets can be purchased by calling
(386) 754-4340 or by visiting www.fg-
centertainment.com.


Joe Diffie


Sammy Kershaw


Aaron Tippin


I All prices plus tax, Ie & license, (I I&L). all rebates and incentives assigned to dealer. mIhotos lor illusiration
purposes only. Not responsible for errors in lypography or photography.


PAGE 12A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014














REACH 68,000 SHOPPERS EACH DAY IN PRINT & ONLINE!

NORTH FLORIDA







SIFEEc

Place A Classified Call: Hours:
386.362.1734 or M-F 8am-5pm
Toll Free: 1.800.525.4182or Closed
Fax: 386.364.5578 Sat & Sun We Accept:


View the Classifieds Online at: www.classifiedmarketplaceonline.com


Announcements

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS
*PROOF READ YOUR AD
Any error must be reported the
first day of publication. Should
the error inhibit response,
credit will apply only to the first
run date. The South Georgia
Media Group is not liable for
any loss or expense that
results from publication or
omission. We reserve the right
to edit, reject or refuse any and
all advertising submissions.
SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT
CLASSIFIED DEADLINE:
FOR WEDNESDAY EDITION:
NOON ON FRIDAY
FOR FRIDAY EDITION:
NOON ON WEDNESDAY
CALL 386-362-1734
EXT. 102
(800-525-4182)
EMAIL:
louise.sheddan@gaflnews.com

Help Wanted
ACCOUNTANT/
PAYROLL SPECIALIST
SREC -Administrative Office
GENERAL RESPONSIBILITIES:
Responsible for the performance
of all payroll functions including
routine accounting functions:
Proof all time sheets for proper
completion and accuracy, pro-
cessing all of pay data for all em-
ployees on the bi-weekly payroll
computer system and all other
payroll functions. Perform audit-
ing and checking functions in ac-
cordance with instructions, issue
vendor payments as necessary,
and prepare and issue financial
reports as directed. The incum-
bent will process financial trans-
actions of the organization on the
General Ledger computer sys-
tem, perform audit and checking
functions in accordance with in-
structions, issue vendor pay-
ments and travel reimburse-
ments as necessary and prepare
and issue financial reports.
DESIRED QUALIFICATIONS:
1. Four years of college training
or experience in Accounting or
Business.
2. Training and experience in
computer operations, experience
with Excel, Word and Sage Fund
Accounting System.
3.Two years experience in payroll
processing and general book-
keeping work.
4. Mature and emotional stability
with the ability to get along with
people and follow directions.
SPECIAL QUALIFICATIONS:
* Bondable
* Must pass Background & Drug
Screening Test
* Must have valid driver's license
and insurance
Submit Resume to: Suwannee
River Economic Council, Inc., P.
0. Box 70, Live Oak, FL 32064
Or e-mail to: bpepin@suwan-
neeec.net
Equal Opportunity Employer.
Persons with disabilities are en-
couraged to apply for employ-
ment. Should special accommod-
ations be necessary, please call
(386) 362-4115 Voice/TDD.
Deadline for Receipt of Resume:
January 17, 2014 at 12:00 p.m.




Home Inspections
4pt Insurance Inspections
Wind Mitigation
Call
Paul Dial
C.R.P.I.
386-364-4434 or
386-590-6534
Certified
State of FL License #HI1804 784025


Help Wanted

CASUAL CUSTODIAN
Suwannee County is currently
accepting applications for a cas-
ual custodial worker to work on
an as needed basis. This posi-
tion is open until filled. Applica-
tions are available at the
Suwannee County Building
Department, 224 Pine Avenue,
Live Oak, FL 32064, (386) 364-
3407 or at Public Works,
13150 80th Terrace, Live Oak,
FL 32060, (386) 364-3400. The
Suwannee County Board of
County Commissioners is an
equal employment opportunity
employer that does not discrim-
inate against any qualified em-
ployee or applicant because of
race, color, national origin, sex,
including pregnancy, age, disab-
ility, or marital status. Spanish
speaking individuals are encour-
aged to apply. All applicants
subject to a pre-employment
physical. Successful completion
of a drug test is a condition of
employment. EEO/AA/V/D


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
The Suwannee Chamber of
Commerce is now accepting
applications for the Executive
Director position. The person
is responsible for marketing
and promoting business and
tourism for Suwannee County,
FL. See full job description
and requirements at
www.suwanneechamber.com


EXPERIENCED MILKER
NEEDED in NW Suwannee
County area
Call 386-842-5166


FIRE FIGHTER II
The City of Madison, Florida has
two openings for the position for
Fire Fighter II. Apply at
www.employflorida.com or visit
your local workforce office.


FirstDay
Coordinator for XCEL-IT
TAACCCT program wanted
at North Florida Community
College, Madison FL. See
www.nfcc.edu for details.



Lost & Found


FOUND PIG: Small pot-bellied
pig on Hwy 129 & 128th St in Mc-
Alpin, FL area. Call Brenda or
Tim at 386-362-5757 & describe
pig.






You can Reach
Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper
Network in Florida
and throughout
the Nation.
Call Treena at

386-362-1734
1 784079


Must have a positive attitude and enjoy
working with people. $100K+ possible.
Apply In Person, ask for Jeff or Dino.

CHEVY CHEVY



CHEW. CADILLAC NISSAN 848385


-FOR RENT-


GREAT RATES FOR NICE LOOKING
RENTALS STARTING AT $300 PER MONTH
FOR SINGLEWIDES AND $450 PER MONTH
FOR DOUBLEWIDES. WATER, SEWER,
AND GARBAGE INCLUDED. NO PETS.
386-330-2567 784075


Lost & Found
LOST DOG: Female, black & tan
German Shepard. Approx 8 yrs
old, medium size. Lost in the vi-
cinity of 89th Rd in McAlpin, FL.
REWARD OFFERED. Call 423-
202-2620.

Livestock
REGISTERED
BLACK ANGUS BULLS
12 to 16 months old.
Call 850-856-5544 or
Cell 850-508-5805

Educational
Start Your New Year--With A
New Career. Be a CNA! Quest
Training offers a 4Ohr., nurse
taught, prep class. No GED req'd
if age 18. Day and evening
classes. 386-362-1065

Wanted to Buy
CASH FOR FLORIDA
LICENSE PLATES!
$1000 for Lafayette Co Tags
dated 1911-17, $100 each for FL
tags starting with #62 for years
1938,40,42,43,45,47,48,49,51,
52, and 54. Jeff Francis
gobucs13@(aol.com or 727-424-
1576.
www.floridalicenseplates.com

WANTED: WHOLE JUNK CARS
$300 & UP. NO TITLE NEEDED.
FREE PICK UP.
386-878-9260 OR
386-752-3648

Garage/Yard Sales
18341 CR 136, Live Oak, FL. 8
mi W of roundabout. Big 3 day
moving sale. Rain or Shine.
Jan 16, 17, & 18. Lots of fur-
niture, beautiful bedroom set, liv-
ing room & dining room. Piano &
bench & antiques. Lots of collect-
ibles, glassware, pictures, paint-
ings, household items, bicycles.
Everything must go!

Campers/RV/Sales

WE BUY
USED RVS !
CALL 229-740-0375


Apartments for Rent
NEW YEAR'S SPECIAL: First
Month Free. 1 & 2 Bdrm Apart-
ments. $450.00 moves you in.
Call 386-364-1140.

Rooms for Rent

FirstDay
ROOMMATE WANTED to share
nice home in great neighborhood
in Live Oak, FL. $450/mo. Call
386-362-3768.

Houses for Rent
Four Bd/Two Ba in Suwannee
County, Florida. Some appli-
ances included. $1,100 per
month, security deposit req'd.
Call 386-209-2349.
Rural beauty & privacy near 1-10
& US 90 NW of Live Oak, FL.
3Bd/1.3Ba. $775/mo. Optional
pasture available. 626-512-5374

Mobile Homes for Rent
LIVE OAK 2 Bedrooms
from $350/mo. NO PETS. HUD
accepted. Security Deposit Re-
quired. Call 386-364-7660.
One Bd/one Ba w/loft & full kit-
chen, WD hook-up. Next to Lake
Peacock, Live Oak, FL. Call 386-
209-5991.
Very nice & clean. 3bd/2ba. 1 mi
from Live Oak, FL. $650/mo, 1st,
last & $300 sec dep. NO PETS!
Call 318-840-4802 or 386-362-
3002.

Homes for Sale
In downtown Live Oak, FL.
3Bd/2Ba on double lot w/pecan
trees and grapevine, dbl-car gar-
age. On high ground. $150,000.
Call 386-397-0602.

Mobile Homes for Sale
DOUBLE WIDES
28x74 5bd/2ba, $34,900
28x52 3bd/2ba, $29,900
SINGLE WIDE
*16x80 3bd/2ba, $19,900
14x60 3bd/1 ba, very clean,
$10,500 (limited time only)
Delivery & setup will be
arranged.


ADOPTION

A childless, young,
successful woman seeks
to adopt. Will be HANDS-
ON Mom! Financial
security. Expenses paid.
Visit:www.j odi2adopt.web
s.comcall Jodi 1-800-
718-5516 or text
609-770-1255.
Adam Sklar #0150789

UNPLANNED
PREGNANCY?
Adoption-A brave &
selfless choice. Medical,
living & counseling
expenses paid. Choose the
loving & financially
secure family.
Compassionate Atty.
Lauren Feingold 24/7
866-633-0397
www. fklhearttoheart.net
#0958107

AUCTION

Public Auction
Schmann Casters &
Equipment Company Inc.
LIVE & ONLINE
Tuesday, January 28th at
10am
1299 W Beaver Street,
Jacksonville, Fl 32204
Tremendous amount of
New Material Handling
Equipment, Forklift, Boat
Trailers, Racking, Scrap
Metal, Steel
Casters,Dollies, Conveyor
& much more. ABC Case
No.: 16-2013-CA-010616.
Details at
www.moeckerauctions.co
m (800) 840-BIDS. 15%-


Mobile Homes for Sale




See all photos at Repo123.com
Call 229-460-5362
LIKE NEW! 24X64 3BD/3BA,
Double wide total refurbished on
1 acre of land in N. Lowndes Co.;
Country Living, Very Private, tall
pine trees, gold fish pond.
$69,900. Possible owner finan-
cing with 25% down. No credit
check. CALL 229-460-5362


DWMH on 2 acres in Jennings,
FL. at 3639 NW 60th Ave.
3Bd/2Ba. 4 storage buildings in-
cluded. A must see! Call for more
information 615-210-2555.


SWMH, 14X66, on 2 ac. in Tim-
berlake Subdivision, Jennings,
FL. 3BD/2BA. Incl. 3 storage
bldgs. $35,000. Call 229-412-
6315.


Acreage/Land/Lots Sale
FIVE ACRES DOWLING PARK
Well, Septic, Power, Paved Rd
frontage. Owner financing. NO
DOWN $59,900 $526/mo.
352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


FOUR ACRES
O'BRIEN/McALPIN AREA
Beautiful Secluded Country Set-
ting. High & Dry. Owner Finan-
cing NO DOWN $29,900
$307/mo 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


Lots on the Santa Fe & Suwan-
nee Rivers in Hamilton County,
FL. On high ground (100' or >
above sea level). Call 386-397-
0602 for more information.


ONE ACRE PAVED
ROAD FRONTAGE
Beautifully Wooded, Owner Fin-
ance, No Down. $14,900. Only
$153/mo 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


18% BP, $100 ref. cash
dep. Subj to confirm.
AB-1098 AU-3219,
Eric Rubin

BUILDING
SUPPLIES

STEEL BUILDING
CLEARANCE:
5 0nly25x32, 30x40,
40x60, 60x 100,100x240.
Straightwalls! Choose
Color! FREE
Freight!Local Office:
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THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 13A











PAGE 14A THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014


The Hamilton County Board of County Commissioners. -Photo: Joyce Marie Taylor


COUNTY COMMISSION ROUND-UP


By Joyce Marie Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@gaflnews.com

Following are the highlights of the
Jan. 7 meeting of the Hamilton County
Board of County Commissioners:
Suwannee Valley Electric: Tom
Tuckey was again recognized by the
entire board for his service to the com-
munity over the years. His last day
representing SVEC was Jan. 7 and his
official retirement date is Jan. 31.
Commission Chair Josh Smith told
Tuckey, "We couldn't have asked for a
better representative or better person
to help this board and guide us."
"It's kind of a bittersweet feeling
right now," Tuckey said. "I'm looking
forward to retirement. You've got a
good man coming on board who is go-
ing to be the community relations
manager for SVEC and he'll do a great
job. His name is Baynard Ward."
Ward joined SVEC in September and
has been training under Tuckey to
learn the ropes.
"My goal is to build upon the great
things he's done," said Ward of Tuck-
ey. "I'm going to miss working with
him, but I know he'll have more fun
doing what he's planning on doing."
Senator Bill Nelson: Lynn Bannister,
director of outreach for Senator Bill
Nelson (D-Fla.) reminded the board
that she was available to listen to is-
sues and concerns that she would pass
on to the senator.
CR 135: Engineer Greg Bailey ad-
vised that construction on CR 135 con-
tinues with work on pipe extensions
and shoulders. Sometime toward the
end of the month or early February the
road will be closed for repaving. Signs
will be posted in advance to alert mo-
torists.
Bailey also said he had conversa-
tions with the Florida Department of
Transportation (FDOT) before the hol-
idays.
"On these projects they're going to
start having a little more oversight
than in the past," said Bailey. "They're
going to expect us to start doing things
very close to what they do. We had a
bit of poor administrative work on our
part, I guess, to deal with all that
stuff."
Bailey said FDOT wants to review
county plans prior to construction,
which is something they are institut-
ing statewide.
Economic Development: Hamilton
County Economic Development Au-
thority (EDA) Director Susan Ramsey
advised the board that the EDA is ac-
tively working on trying to bring more
businesses into the county and they
are currently working on several
prospects, however, they take time,
she added.
"I have discussed with some of you,
individually, a couple of things," said
Ramsey.
One business, Ramsey said, might
be breaking ground in the summer
and others are still doing research.
Love's Truck Stop: Bailey updated
the board on the ingress and egress
congestion issues at Love's and said
there was a meeting at the county co-
ordinator's office right before the holi-
days between county staff, the city
manager, Ramsey and the property
owners who might be affected by the
proposed changes.
"Love's wasn't able to attend," said
Bailey.
Bailey said two different proposed
layouts were presented and were re-
ceived well, but at the end of the meet-
ing a third option was suggested. Re-
locating the retention pond was part of
the discussion.
Commission chair Josh Smith want-
ed to be sure Love's and everyone else
knows that the proposed changes are
to improve and enhance Love's busi-
ness and that the county isn't trying to
give them a hard time.
"This board is not trying to hinder
what that business is trying to do,"
said Smith. "We're trying to help them
out as much as possible. If that re-
quires some funding, this board is
willing to do whatever it can do to as-
sist."
"For this to be successful, there


needs to be a partnership between the
property owners, the county, the de-
velopment authority and the city,"
said Bailey. "I think we can do it."
Once the third proposed layout is
prepared, cost estimates can be written
up and there will be consultation with
FDOT to see if they can assist in any
way. The matter will remain on the
commission agenda until option three
can be presented and discussed.
County Coordinator Louie Goodin
reminded everyone that Love's needs
to be a part of the discussion once op-
tion three has been mapped out.
Enterprise Zone: Dennis Price pre-
sented the board with proposed new
maps for Jasper, Jennings and White
Springs that show redrawn lines for
the Enterprise Zone.
"We've been working on this a
while," said Price. "Our task was to re-
draw the lines and maybe increase the
areas that could be included into the
Enterprise Zone."
The Jennings map had minor
changes and the Jasper map had revi-
sions to exclude property recently
bought by PCS on US 129, as well as
other changes. The White Springs map
was changed to exclude some areas in
floodplains, as well as some state-
owned land. Other areas near Big
Shoals were added, as were some
small parcels in the center of town.
Price said he thought the next step
was for the commissioners to approve
the maps before a survey drawing can
be made. Attorney John McCormick
agreed, but added that the maps need-
ed to be in legal description, in writ-
ing. Upon final approval by the com-
missioners, at that point, it can be sub-
mitted to the state for approval.
According to the Enterprise Florida
website, the program offers an assort-
ment of tax incentives to businesses
that choose to create employment
within an enterprise zone, which is a
specific geographic area targeted for
economic revitalization. Tax incentives
include a sales and use tax credit, tax
refund for business machinery and
equipment used in an enterprise zone,
sales tax refund for building materials
used in an Enterprise Zone, and a sales
tax exemption for electrical energy
used in an enterprise zone. Local gov-
ernments can provide additional in-
centives for a zone located within their
boundaries.
It was agreed that the matter would
be kept on the agenda for approval of
the new maps at the next board meet-
ing.
Hiring procedures: The board en-
gaged in a lengthy discussion about
whether or not to change existing hir-
ing procedures for county employees.
Hiring from within has been a priority
in the past and continues to be, how-
ever, the commissioners agreed that
by opening the application process to
the public at the same time a job open-
ing is posted in-house, it would en-
large the pool of experienced appli-
cants and shorten the time to two
weeks to replace an open position. The
board unanimously agreed to make
the changes and it will be adopted at
the next meeting of the board.
Courthouse wheelchair lift: The
wheelchair lift inside the courthouse,
which was installed over 10 years ago,
has not been operational for quite
some time and the board agreed it
needed to be addressed. Earlier efforts
to repair it were unsuccessful, as the
contractor who installed it went out of
business and the county couldn't get
anyone to come out and even look at it
to give an estimate on repairs.
County Clerk Greg Godwin said the
lift itself, when it was operational, was
complicated to use. Since his office is
right across from it, Godwin said he
and his staff always had to come out
and help the person use it.
To remove the lift and replace it with
a ramp did not seem to be an option,
either, as it would interfere with the
entrance into the property appraiser's
office.
It was agreed that the county coordi-
nator would attempt to find someone
to repair it at a reasonable price.
Library wage raises: Suwannee Riv-


er Regional Library Director Betty
Lawrence was on the agenda, howev-
er, she was not able to attend. Goodin
briefly explained that she was to speak
about the impasse over wage increases
the board wants to give to library em-
ployees in Hamilton County. Since the
library employees fall under the juris-
diction of Suwannee County, Smith
said Lawrence was concerned that
some laws may have been broken last
year when Hamilton commissioners
gave lump sum bonuses to Hamilton
County library personnel. Suwannee
County, Smith said, has already final-
ized their budget and did not include
raises for library personnel this year,
but they told Lawrence they would
take another look at it.
Commissioner Randy Ogburn said


he didn't think it was fair for library
staff not to get raises when all other
Hamilton County employees do.
Smith said Lawrence is interested in
changing the interlocal agreement be-
tween the counties because she wants
them to get the raise, but she is in a
precarious position.
Lawrence is scheduled to be at the
February day meeting to discuss the
matter. Goodin was voted to serve on
the Suwannee River Regional Library
board, along with Commissioner
Buster Oxendine to represent Hamil-
ton County, which is supposed to meet
about three times a year, but has been
lax in the past.
The next meeting of the Board of
County Commissioners is Tuesday,
Jan. 21 at 6 p.m.


White Springs selected to


participate in

Town to receive
$40Kfrom DEO

By Joyce Marie Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@gaflnews.com

The town of White Springs has
been selected as one of only four
communities in the state to partici-
pate in the first year of the Competi-
tive Florida Partnership Program un-
der the auspices of the Florida De-
partment of Economic Opportunity
(DEO).
"Based on our assessment of assets
and challenges, and the vision we
have for the town of White Springs,
out of all the communities in the state
of Florida, White Springs was select-
ed to participate as one of the four
cities in this pilot program," said
White Springs Mayor Helen Miller.
As a pilot community, White
Springs will be offered (at a mini-
mum) the following support package
from the DEO:
A DEO team to meet with town
staff to facilitate the process.
$35,000 in technical assistance
grant funding to provide contractual
support for asset mapping develop-
ing or updating an economic devel-
opment strategy and resource match-
ing to implement actions.
$5,000 in technical assistance
grant funding to create a case study
that details the community's experi-
ence with Competitive Florida, in-
cluding challenges and recommenda-
tions for improvement in the future.
Travel funding to support up to
two members of the community to at-
tend a community collaboration
meeting where the four pilots can
share their experiences and learn
from each other.

On Monday, Jan. 6, the DEO offi-
cially announced via a press release
the four rural communities partici-
pating in the pilot program; the city
of Port St. Joe, the city of Newberry,
the city of White Springs, and Desoto
County.
Governor Rick Scott said, "The
Competitive Florida Partnership pro-
vides our rural communities with the
tools they need to work together and
encourage economic development
throughout the state."
All four communities, Scott said,
should be congratulated for being the
first communities to participate in the
program and for their commitment to
creating jobs and opportunities for
Florida families.
The Competitive Florida Partner-
ship will help these rural communi-
ties value and market local assets and
challenge them to set realistic goals
for advancing their economic devel-
opment vision. The four participating
communities will design and develop
innovative strategies that promote
partnerships, community design, and
a viable local economy.
"Our goal is to help create an op-
portunity economy in Florida, in
which every community can offer


pilot program
jobs for the next generation," said
Jesse Panuccio, Executive Director of
the Florida Department of Economic
Opportunity. "Competitive Florida
will help rural communities map
their strengths and identify what
makes them distinctive. DEO under-
stands there is power in collabora-
tion, and this program will build an
active network of passionate commu-
nity leaders who share ideas and
learn from each other's experiences."
Asset-based economic develop-
ment is a bottom-up approach that
focuses on developing and promot-
ing existing local resources to
strengthen the local economy. This
approach focuses on a rural commu-
nity's tangible and intangible assets
combined with economic advantages
and how these can be leveraged into
sustainable economic growth and
prosperity. Assets in a community
may include but are not limited to:
individuals and human capital; asso-
ciations and voluntary networks; po-
litical advocates; historical and cul-
tural resources; natural landscapes
(including renewable and nonrenew-
able material resources); financial as-
sets; the built environment including
transportation networks, communi-
cations facilities, utilities, public fa-
cilitates and commercial buildings;
institutions such as schools, hospitals
and government agencies. DEO will
work with the selected rural commu-
nities to identify and market these as-
sets and facilitate promotional op-
portunities to bring economic devel-
opment to their community.
The program is designed to help
communities value their assets and
challenge them to set realistic goals
for advancing their economic devel-
opment vision.
"What this provides to the town is
technical and financial assistance to
begin the implementation of a revi-
talization plan for the town of White
Springs, which is a really good
thing," said Miller.
This program, she said, is coming
at an opportune time, as the town has
just taken over the lease of the
tourism center.
"We can use these next 12 months
in terms of developing a manage-
ment plan which deals with the state
properties as well as the private sec-
tor proposals in our plan and get the
help of professionals from the DEO
to help us move forward," said
Miller.
The White Springs Town Council at
their December meeting voted unani-
mously to accept the proposal from
the DEO to participate in the Com-
petitive Florida Partnership Program.
"This is a golden opportunity,"
said Vice Mayor Walter McKenzie.
"We are currently working with
DEO staff to develop the agenda for
our first partners' meeting, which is
scheduled for February 1," said
Miller. "We are excited about DEO
support in prioritizing and imple-
menting our economic revitalization
plans based on cultural heritage and
eco-tourism."


PAGE 14A


THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL











THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014 THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL PAGE 15A


Junior Combine


highlights 3


Submitted
Three juniors from
Hamilton County High
School participated in
the Blue Grey All Amer-
ican Football Junior
Combine Saturday at
Raymond James Stadi-
um, home of the Tampa
Bay Bucs.
Hunter Hill, La'Mar-
cus Webb and Marcus
Williams were the three
that were selected to
play.
Hamilton County
High School football
coach Blair Armstrong
escorted the three ju-
niors to the Junior Com-
bine.
"These guys are next
year's seniors and repre-
sent a very good upcom-
ing class that has the po-
tential to do big things,"
said Armstrong. "If our
whole team works as
hard and is as dedicated
as these guys are, it will


be a great ride next year.
We have several other
events that are open to
ninth graders and above
that we will be encour-
aging our young men to
participate in."
All three were in the
top of their positions of
the 425 plus junior class
attendees at the Com-
bine from all over the
state of Florida and the
Southeast. Webb ran a
4.45 sec. 40 yard dash to
rank as the second
fastest in the camp
overall. Hill was in the
top five of his group
and was one of the few
to be undefeated in the
one on one pass, rush
drill. Williams was in
the top three of the de-
fensive linemen in the
40 and bench press,
with a 5.07 second 40
yard dash and pressing
185 pounds 27 times in
a row.


Trojans to play in



East/West All-Star Game

Kickoff is Saturday at 4 p.m. at Fort White Stadium
Submitted
Three Hamilton County Trojans have been se-
lected to play in the East/West All-Star Football
Game that will be played Saturday, Jan. 18, at 4
p.m. at Fort White Stadium.
Markevious Davis, senior running back and
return man, along with Jacari Washington, se-
nior defensive back and running back and se-
nior offensive/defensive lineman William
Shackelford were the selectees for this event.
Hamilton County High School football coach
Blair Armstrong said several other seniors were
selected but they are scheduled for very impor-
tant district basketball games that are upcoming.
Armstrong appointed coach Mario Drayton to
represent the Trojan staff for the East team and
he was selected as the head coach of the East by
his peers. Congratulations to Drayton and good
luck to the Trojans.
Fort White High School is located at 17828 SW
SR47, Fort White. Tickets are $5.
Markevious Davis


Pictured trom let: Hunter Hill, LalvMarcus vveDD ana iviar-
cus Williams.


FWC NEWS:

Releasing Florida's biggest Tri
Bass anglers in Florida ary 2013, Williams
have more reasons than booked a trip on Rodman
ever to practice catch- Reservoir with bass fish-
and-release. To help en- ing guide Sean Rush from
courage the angling pub- Trophy Bass Expeditions.
lic to document and re- It was a bitter cold morn-
lease largemouth bass, 8 ing in Florida with tern-
pounds or larger, a pro- peratures in the low 20s,
gram called TrophyCatch and neither Williams nor
rewards participating an- Rush could have fath-
glers for their environ- omed how the day would
mental stewardship with unfold. After casting a
a range of fishing-related live shiner around a clus-
prizes, including the first ter of lily pads, the New
ever championship ring. Jersey angler hooked and
TrophyCatch is the landed the fish of a life-
conservation/angler re- time, a 13-pound, 14-
wards component to the ounce largemouth bass.
Florida Fish and Wildlife Rush, a seasoned Flori-
Conservation Commis- da fishing guide, imme-
sion's (FWC) Black Bass diately put the giant fish
Management Program. in an aerated live well
The biggest bass legally and called the Trophy-
caught, properly docu- Catch hotline: 855-FL-
mented and released in TROPHY (358-7674). The
Florida waters in 2013 FWC immediately dis-
earned one lucky Florida patched TrophyCatch co-
tourist an award fit for a ordinator KP Clements as
true champion a ring well as biologists Allen
with some bling! The Martin and Dan Dorosh-
American Outdoors eff to document and cele-
Fund TrophyCatch Flori- brate the catch and re-
da Champion's Ring is lease of Williams' fish.
made by the same corn- The first year of the
pany that makes rings for TrophyCatch program
Super Bowl, World Series required FWC staff or
and Bass Master Classic volunteers to verify a
champions. It also has the Hall of Fame-caliber
winning angler's name as catch that was 13 pounds
well as the weight and or heavier. The new re-
date of the winning catch quirements for the sec-
engraved on it, so there is ond year of competition
no mistake about who are for a photo of the en-
has bragging rights to the tire bass on a scale where
biggest bass of the sea- the weight can be read.
son. Williams received ap-
At a presentation made proximately $1,000 in
at Bass Pro Shops in Or- prizes for releasing his
lando, the American Out- Hall of Fame catch, and
doors Fund TrophyCatch he has watched the Tro-
Florida Champion's Ring phyCatch website intent-
was awarded to Bob ly since February to see if
Williams from Alloway, the fish would hold up as
N.J. While on a Florida the biggest of the season.
fishing vacation in Febru- Bigger fish were report-


William Shackelford


Jacari Washington


rophyCatch earns angler bling and u


ed, but none were verified, mean-
ing Bob Williams would earn his
place in Florida's Bass Fishing Hall
of Fame as the first ever Trophy-
Catch Champion.
Williams recently returned to
Florida to receive his award and go
on another bass fishing trip with
his favorite guide, Rush. After be-
ing awarded the American Out-
doors Fund TrophyCatch Florida
Champion's ring, Williams praised
the program as a great way to pro-
mote environmental stewardship
and ensure great bass fishing in
Florida for generations to come.
Launched in October 2012, Tro-
phyCatch was created as a way to
document the number of trophy-
class largemouth bass caught in
Florida while providing valuable
data to fisheries biologists to help
them determine which manage-
ment practices are working best
and to promote the safe handling
and release of trophy-class bass. It
is important to release these trophy
fish so they may continue to breed
and pass their DNA on to future
generations. Over time, the act of
releasing these trophy-class fish,
along with good management


practices, should result in an im-
provement in the overall quality of
Florida's freshwater fisheries.
It's no secret that fishermen like
to brag about their catches, and
even though TrophyCatch is con-
sidered a conservation program
first, those with a competitive spir-
it treat it like a year-long tourna-
ment for the ultimate bragging
rights to the biggest bass caught,
documented and released in Flori-
da every year.
In the inaugural TrophyCatch
season, thousands of resident and
visiting anglers registered for Tro-
phyCatch and many of them
caught big bass, documented them
for the FWC and released them to
thrive in the same bodies of water
where they were caught. Every
qualifying bass submitted earns
registered anglers TrophyCatch re-
wards.
Visit TrophyCatchFlorida.com to
register and become eligible for a
random drawing for a Phoenix
bass boat powered by Mercury,
and to submit your trophy Florida
bass for rewards, including com-
peting for this year's TrophyCatch
ring. Don't forget to like Trophy-


iate bragging rights
Catch on Facebook and check out
the YouTube channel Trophy-
Catch Florida
http://youtu.be/fm_6RNh-2g4 -
where you can see a video of the
awards presentation.
The American Outdoors Fund is
committed to conservation as well
as creating, enhancing and sup-
porting programs that provide, im-
prove or enhance opportunities for
veterans, first responders, children
and families to experience the fun,
healthy, educational and therapeu-
tic value outdoor recreation pro-
vides.
Through documentary, educa-
tional, instructional and experien-
tial programs and events, the
American Outdoors Fund helps
guide and facilitate outdoor recre-
ational opportunities across Amer-
ica and promotes and supports ini-
tiatives that inspire others to do the
same.
Keith Allen provided the materi-
alfor this release. He is founder of
the American Outdoors Fund,
which has been a partner to Tro-
phyCatch since before the program
began in 2012. Contact him at
kapro@mac.com.


THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 15A









PAGE 16A THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014


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"j'IStLVERADO 1500
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SC140050
4.3LE,:,:,TE,: EP,'PI E -
POWER Wirio,:,wl/L,:,:K jJ l l ,,F-JDO A C
KEILE::ERiA. iil,' O
CHRI:IM.E PK,'. 'e3L || I /"ol l
MsP z~n .6o __I 1
MSRP S25.650 i! I)
DISCOUNT -4.056 A


i


.L f SILVER
^4x4,,


4 DooR ,J .J SILVERADO
L HEAVY DUTy.,,
^ LM'3


VW1404006
ALL-STAR EDITION % / / ALL-STAR EDITION C1t4/ 0 /
18"ALuMWnttL: ,-)' n (1O1llJ 5.3LV818"ALUM 1* IoJ lO,.Ji
REAR CRMEnRa WHEELS. REAR CAMERAr
RE M.:. n.. SAR REM OTESTARTE
& & MORE!


no9,
3D-i CHEVY EXPRESS VAN
POWER WINDOWS,
DOORS & LOCKS
S- REARVIEW CAMERA
PERFECT FOR
| YOUR BUSINESS!
L
r n016


2013 CHEVY
LUXURY PKG.,
HEATED LEATHER SEATS
20" WHEELS, NHlI
P *fAi LlFii 1 ^ ^ Ak_
M:Ap S51,650
DB:Cou'i i -S6,0014 -


VY EQUINOX


j13035 CHEVY CAMARO
.119 % CHEVY CAAUO


'-I


"wC130251
1.8L ECOTEC ENGINE
AUTO TRANSMISSION
POWER EQUIPMENT GROUP
CHEVY MYLINK
BLUE TOOTH


32 MPG
( PER WINDOW STICKER)
LUE TOOTH WIRELESS
USB PORT,2. ,SIDI
SIRIUS/MPi3 PLAYER


27% Increase per Chevrolet 2013 Year End Results. All prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3
and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Vehicles may be located at either of our Quitman or
Valdosta dealerships.Vehicle prices include Trade-In & GM Loyalty Rebate (owners of 1999 or
newer GM vehicles. All prices good through January 18, 2014 or until vehicle is sold, whichever
comes first. Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price.


3 a94

864 HWY 84 WEST


2DOa RAM


15T
L- .


AMIE 4 DR


" L,.J SILVERADOMOO 4 DooR LT


)R 4x4


2013


ANLT


PAGE 16A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014


Monon
140g=16


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