Group Title: Jasper news (Jasper, Fla.)
Title: The Jasper news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028306/00354
 Material Information
Title: The Jasper news
Uniform Title: Jasper news (Jasper, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jasper news
Publisher: F.M. DeGraffenried
Place of Publication: Jasper, Fla.
Jasper Fla
Publication Date: December 3, 2009
Copyright Date: 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jasper (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hamilton County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hamilton -- Jasper
Coordinates: 30.518889 x -82.951111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 21, 1890)-
General Note: Editor: Jno. M. Caldwell, <1890>.
General Note: Publisher: W.L. Whitfield, <1904>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028306
Volume ID: VID00354
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33315707
alephbibnum - 000579542
lccn - sn 95047198

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Reminder: Christmas Parade and Christmas in the Park is set for Dec. 11

nflaonline.com


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DLa"s


Today's Weather
High
660 F '
Precip: 20%
Cloudy skies early will become partly
cloudy later in the day. High 66F
Winds WNW at 5 to 10 mph.
For up to the minute weather go to
www.nflaonline.com.


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Dancing to the beat. See additional photo, Page 2A. Courtesy photos


Hamilton High


salutes honor

roll students


Old time music

weekend at

Foster Center
WHITE SPRINGS The Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park will host the Suwannee
Old Time Music Weekend Friday through Sunday
on the banks of the historic Suwannee River. This
three-day event offers participants in-depth
instruction in old time music techniques on the
banjo, guitar, fiddle and voice for beginning,
intermediate and advanced students.
This year's special guest instructors and
nationally known performers include Mac
Traynham, Shay Garriock and Jenny Traynham.
Concerts will be held on Friday and Saturday
evenings in the park auditorium at 7 p.m. Tickets
for public admission are $10. Friday evening is the
Florida Masters Concert featuring Tom and Kay
Van Treese, Gail Gillespie and Dwight Rogers.
Saturday evening will feature an Instructor's
Showcase Concert with Florida favorites, Chuck


6 97113 07541 6


Levy, Lloyd Baldwin,
Greg Allen and Chuck
Anton. For more
information and
instructions for
registration, call
Morris Cook at 386-
397-7005.


Students on
the A and A/B
honor rolls at
Hamilton High
were treated
to a cookout
recently, as
we showed
you in last
week's Jasper
News. Here
are more
scenes.


SRWMD
Governing Board
to meet in Bronson
Submitted
The Suwannee River Water
Management District's Governing Board
will meet Tuesday, Dec. 8 at 9 a.m. at
Bronson Town Hall, 650 Oak Street,
Bronson.
(352-486-2354).
The meeting is to consider District
business and conduct public hearings on
regulatory and land acquisition matters.
A workshop with the Levy County
Commissioners will follow the
Governing Board meeting.
All meetings, workshops and hearings
are open to the public.

VFW plans flag
disposal ceremony
Submitted
The Veterans of Foreign Wars, Post
8095, will hold a ceremony to dispose
of old, torn and soiled flags Monday at
9:30 a.m. at the post on State Road
East. The public is invited to attend
and to learn the proper manner of flag
disposal. Those wishing to donate
flags for disposal are invited to bring
them to the ceremony before 9:30 that
morning. Coffee and doughnuts will
be served.
Those wishing to participate but
who cannot attend the ceremony are
asked to call Lamar Royals at 386-792-
3381 for pickup.


DEALS OF T
S1 Acre: $12,90(
5 Acres: $24,90(
6.5 Acres: $32,50(
oc6.8 Acres: $24,90(
REALTY GROUP, INC. 10 Acres: $3990
361792848310A : $39,900


Jasper man



attacked on



morning walk

Staff
A Jasper man was attacked and beaten while on a
morning walk with his wife, say police.
Ralph and Pauline Harvey reached the intersection of SE
5th Street and SE 2nd Avenue at 5:40 a.m. on Nov. 18 when
a man approached Ralph Harvey from behind and
reportedly kicked him in the back of the leg and punched
him in the back of the head.
According to a report from the Jasper Police Department,
Ralph Harvey, 75, turned and recognized the man as Peter
Laga, 62, of 504 SE 2nd Ave., Jasper. Laga then reportedly
fled the scene.
Police say Laga later told them he had been at home all
night and denied involvement in the incident. The Harveys
told police they were certain of the assailant's identity, and
Laga was arrested on a charge of battery, reports show.
Jasper police say they have asked the state attorney to
enhance the charge against Laga to battery on an elderly
person.
Harvey was not seriously injured but did suffer "a golf
ball size knot" to his head, police reports show.



UW campaign report

luncheon set for Dec. 9


Submitted
United Way of
Suwannee Valley will
conduct the December -
and final community
fundraising campaign
report luncheon of the
2009-10 campaign
season at Columbia
County Senior Services'
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center at noon on Dec.


The report luncheon
will feature three Fort White High School students who
visited the United Way affiliated agency locations in
their community and will speak about their experience.
The students, Tiffany Joseph, Virginia Vasquez and Irene
Lang, spent time with both some of the youngest and
some of the oldest participants in United Way agency
programs at Suwannee Valley 4Cs Head Start and at


SEE UW CAMPAIGN, PAGE 2A


FIRST BUCK
Ten-year-old Jacob McLeod Wiser bagged this 8-point trophy
buck, his first, on opening day of gun season with a brand
new rifle, to boot. The buck, shot in Hamilton County, scored
out at 126 5/8th. Courtesy photo


*HE WEE


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FINANCING.
INSTANT APPRO'
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REQUIRED!


RatliffRealtyGroup.com


w


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Publix /
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CK
For Kids 12 & Under I
No Purchase Necessary |
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, 7 -





THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2009


UW campaign report luncheon set for Dec. 9


Continued From Page 1A

Columbia County
Senior Services at the
agencies' Fort White
facilities.
Two United Way of
Suwannee Valley
affiliated agencies will
be featured during the
luncheon. Donna
Fagan, executive
director of Another
Way, will speak about
the services offered by
this United Way
affiliated agency,
which is a state-
certified domestic
violence and sexual
assault center for a
multi-county area.
Happy House students
will perform the
blessing and provide
holiday entertainment
by singing Christmas
songs.
Eddy Hillhouse,
general manager for
Land O'Lakes Purina,
will serve as the
business speaker and
share his company's


involvement in the
community fundraising
campaign. His
company employees
participate both as
donors and as loaned
executives on the
campaign team.
Hugh Giebeig,
administrator of the
Columbia County and
Hamilton County
Health Departments
and a long-time
member of the United
Way of Suwannee
Valley Challengers'
Club, the
organization's
leadership donors, will
speak about investing
in our community as a
member of the
Challengers' Club.
The featured United
Way community
impact initiatives will
be the homeless
coalition, the Homeless
Services Network of
Suwannee Valley.
Bunny Warren and
Chris Tylutki,
employees of


Corrections
Corporation of America
(CCA) and members of
the United Way of
Suwannee Valley
Communications
Committee, will emcee
the event. CCA is the
sponsor for the cost of
the facility for the
event.
The caterer for the
event will be the Blue
Roof Grill, which will
serve a luncheon of
boneless baked pork
chops served with
Asian rice, homemade
yeast rolls, mandarin


orange salad, sour
cream pound cake, tea
and water. The cost of
the luncheon is $10 per
person.
Guests are invited to
bring $5 to participate
in the "Heads or Tails"
50/50 contest.
Reservations for the
luncheon may be made
by contacting the
United Way office at
386-752-5604 by today.
During each month of
United Way's annual
community fundraising
campaign, the local
United Way conducts a


campaign report
luncheon to provide an
opportunity for
campaign team
volunteers, community
citizens, business
representatives and
agency personnel to
learn more about the
partner agency services,
United Way community
impact initiatives and
businesses supporting
our community's well
being through their
support of the United
Way.
United Way of
Suwannee Valley is a


community impact and
fundraising
organization which,
utilizing volunteers on
all levels, advances the
common good by
identifying unmet
community needs and
seeking to alleviate
those needs through
United Way of
Suwannee Valley
initiatives and the
funding of 22 affiliated
health and human
service agencies and
serves Hamilton,
Suwannee, Lafayette
and Columbia counties.


POINSETTIAS MAKE

CHRISTMAS

DECORATIONS EASY!
Fill your home with Christmas cheer by
adding beautiful poinsettias to your
Christmas decor! Our exotic poinsettias
are arriving this week in a new fabulous _-
colors that are sure to match any color
scheme! If traditional colors are more -
your style we offer red, pink or white in
five different sizes and prices! Stop by
today and we'll show you how easy it
is to enjoy poinsettias!
Prices starting at only
$4.99

CHRISTMAS TREES Choose one of our potted living Christmas
THAT CAN BE PLANTED trees! After the Christmas season plant it
AFTER THE HOLIDAYS! and nextyear you'll have a tree to decorate
9248 129th Road Live Oak HWY 90
(386) 362-2333
Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 11TH STREET
Saturday 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Closed Sunday z
"For over 30 Years" Er
WWW.NOBLESGREENHOUSE.COM
564466-F


aB Feff G4 Hh 1i A Kk 2 Mm Nn 00 Pp Qq Rr Ss. Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz


Hamilton County School Weekly
Breakfast & Lunch Menu


Mon.. Dec. 7th

l,:,iled l,-l ah-e
.,iril:, :. I i e d- .
I- i :. :I :.:,I:, i




T.:. i .i j .




hille-,d I[ l.l
imp e


Tues.. Dec. 8th
I-r,,:',- e : ,I-- i|-
I,I illle.lJ H an'
FI _arml :.Fi ,. ll
I-iir 1-1i .111
Shillledj [ lil




I h l l l-ll .- ll llt


Wed.. Dec. 9th


l,, l a
I. I-:.I I- I
hi:.:, r":led .1-' '

T hill. [ I lill




a ; i h1.:.11


Thurs., Dec. 10th

F.. e T 3r,: 3


3. Irl~ldI:-


i-~_irJ I-III


MEAL PAY PLUS
Announcements MEAL PAY PLUS Menu
Free & Reduced Applications ....W go online ... "' published
are' a a fr A th n your students) meal account using a check, credit card,
are available for the 2009-2010 courtesy of.
are a or debit card at www.mealpayplus.com or by calling c y
school year. For more info. call 866-727-3508. You will need the student's school pin number. The Jasper
792-6523 or 792-6503 For more info. call: 792-6523 or 792-6503 News
54018-F


Because

^ time


is Precious


rJ1 Y7~

3 i


/


When faced

with a

life-threatening

injury

or illness,

you need


* Fast Service

* Quality Care

* Caring Hands


For ER waiting times, text ER to 23000
or visit
lakecitymedical.com


LAKE CITY

MEDICAL CENTER

386-719-9000

Consult-A-Nurse 800-525-3248


563936-F


Hamilton High


salutes honor roll students


Reaping the benefits of hard work. Courtesy photo


Fri.. Dec. 4th
Ei E-I r I:.' LT

r.lle


1- 1. 11 1ji H

il lyr:ll:e-


i


PAGE 2A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


Irst.





THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2009


WH TE


is is the sea- decoratioreativity. If you don't kr
S son when the you might well seeing them.
SCChristmas In the hopes that great holi
decorations start. We Christmas light dis e y go s unseen
..have to go to the attic, you send in the general location of y
the closet or the storage will print them so that our readers
alshed and get out the these beautiful decorations. Just ei
r--lights and all the other you don't have email, call me. My
decorations. Husbands phone number are at the end of
and teenagers sometimes grumble but it's really a labor Stephen Foster Park will be at the t
of love and soon, all over town, the magical transfor- need to tell me about it ... it will be
nation takes place and the town lights up like one big than ever!
holiday decoration! It's all so pleasing to the eye and to It's the "First Saturday" of the mo
the soul too. That's why families pile into their cars and means that there will be a large c
ride around, seeing their town and their neighbors' and craft demonstrators at the Stepi
houses and businesses in a whole new light, no pun in- addition to that the park is hosting t
tended. Hidden along the back streets and out of the Weekend and concerts will be held
way places are some spectacular displays of holiday urday evenings in the park auditor:

Progress Energy encourages customers to

themselves the gift of holiday energy saving


Submitted
It's time to string the lights, deck the halls, tie the
bows-and save energy. Put energy savings at the top
of your wish list for a generous gift that will keep on
giving.
It's easy to ensure there's more "green" in your
home than what you see on your Christmas tree.
For example, use a timer to turn off your outdoor
holiday lights at bedtime. Just 10 strands of incan-
descent lights lit for seven hours a day can add $30
to your monthly bill.
Before untangling last year's holiday lights, take a
look at the bulbs. If you're not using light-emitting
diode (LED) lights, you could be wasting energy and
money. LED lights save up to 98 percent of the ener-
gy used to power conventional bulbs.
The Electric Power Research Institute indicates the
average electricity cost to light a holiday tree with
LEDs is 13 to 17 cents per holiday season, compared
to $6 to $10 dollars for incandescent lights. Those
who put up large outdoor displays can realize even
bigger savings. If you are considering new lights,
look into LEDs. Although they cost more upfront,
LED lights last longer than incandescents while de-
livering significant energy savings.
In fact, the Institute estimates that, if seasonal
mini-lights nationwide were replaced with energy-
efficient LEDs, carbon emissions could be reduced
by as much as 400,000 tons per year and electricity



PLAY HARDBALL...

...IN THE NORTH FLORIDA

MEN'S ADULT BASEBALL

LEAGUE

Part of a National Organization
Operated for Adults as Featured in USA
Today and Sports Illustrated
Join 45,000 adults across the nation who are
playing baseball in the Men's Adult Baseball
League (MABL) and the Men's Senior Baseball
League (MSBL). All players are welcome re-
gardless of skill level. Building relationships for
the community's of North Florida that goes be-
yond the white lines.

Games are usually played on Sunday after-
noons.

Individuals and/or established teams are wel-
come.

18 and OVER
New Player/Team Workout:
Begin January 2010
Sign up now for more information.
www.leaguelineup.com/northfloridamabl
850-253-5107
Gregvickers9@yahoo.com


Masonry

Classes

Open

Enrollment

Call

386-647-4210

for more

information.



HAMILTON
TECH N ICAL CENTER
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr.
Live Oak, FL 32064
(386) 647-4210


Building

Construction

Open

Enrollment

Call

386-647-4210

for more

information.



HAMILTON_ '
TECHNICAL CENTER
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr.
Live Oak, FL 32064
(386) 647-4210


cost saving would exceed $250,00
of holiday gift-buying dough!
Speaking of dough, there's no n
baking last all season. An oven cos
to operate. Save time and money b
iday goodies together.
If you're reheating yesterday's
toaster oven or microwave. A toas
7 cents per hour to operate, allow
vor the savings.
Customers hoping for a no-cost
Progress Energy should look no fu
ergyWise program. By enrolling
gram-which allows Progress Ener
cycle power off and on to such
A/C and water heater during tim
demand-customers can save an ac
year.
Long after the gifts are unwrapF
gone and the lights are stored
you'll be glad that you took the ti
this holiday season.
For more than 100 energy-sav
more abut our EnergyWise program
a free Progress Energy Florida Ho
visit www.SaveTheWatts.com.


By Walter M Kenzie




SPRING

lifeinwhitesprings@gmail.co
iow where they are ets for public admission are $10. Friday evening is the
Florida Masters Concert featuring Tom and Kay Van
day decoration or Treese, Gail Gillespie and Dwight Rogers. Saturday
en, I'm asking that evening will feature an Instructor's Showcase Concert
7our favorites and I with Florida favorites Chuck Levy, Lloyd Baldwin,
can go out and see Greg Allen and Chuck Anton. These are nationally
mail me or, only if known and highly acclaimed musicians and singers
email address and and you can bet that you will see me in the audience at
this column. The least one of those nights.
op of the list so no Merri and I enjoyed the long Thanksgiving weekend
e more spectacular so much. Some of you may remember my sister Dena
Bearl from her days living here and running the
)nth again and that Suwannee Bike Tours. Now mind you, we had family
contingent of artists here from Atlanta, Jacksonville, South Carolina and
hen Foster Park. In Mississippi, and they all talked about what a special
he Old Time Music place White Springs is. We canoed on the Suwannee,
on Friday and Sat- too. It is wonderful to see the treasure that is White
ium at 7 p.m. Tick- Springs through the eyes of visitors; it keeps the view
from getting stale!
|give Roselle Brantly had family here over the Thanksgiv-
ing holiday. Her daughter and son in law, Annette and
is Ron Mims from Rockville, Tenn. were here and were
joined by Roselle's niece, Tina Scopa from Pembroke
10,000. That's a lot Pines. Tina is the daughter of Ralph and Oida Hard-
wick. Roselle's family enjoyed the gathering very
ieed to make your much.
ts 33 cents an hour Special Ed Services had a "mystery chef" prepare
y baking your hol- beignets, those wonderful French pastries that are one
of my guilty pleasures, for their holiday staff meeting
treats, opt for the at their offices in the Telford Hotel. John and Boots Vas-
ster oven costs just sar brought in the chef so that they could share some of
ng you to truly sa- the culinary delights they experienced on their recent
visit to the Cafe Du Monde in New Orleans. I'm told
holiday treat from that everyone had a grand time. Thanks go out to John
rather than our En- and Boots for this and for their other community con-
in this free pro- tributions.
gy to temporarily So I've said enough for now, but don't forget to email
appliances as the me where your favorite Christmas decorations are and
ies of high energy you'll see the list next week. In the meantime, Merry
additional $145 per Christmas shopping in White Springs!
Walter McKenzie
ped, the guests are ;f i 1lit, ," lil ..
fnr another r..ar 386-269-0056


me to save energy

ing tips, to learn
m or to sign up for
me Energy Check,


W WELCOME

"CHRISTMAS4

CELEBRATION
WITH
COLBERT AND JOYCE CROFT

















TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2009
H&F Restaurant
Jasper, FL
Special Music by Colbert & Joyce Croft
Sounds of Faith
Ken Williams/Benny Daniels
Ronnie Price
Christmas Buffet $7 per person
7:00 p.m.
FOR MORE
INFORMATION
CALL
386-792-2293i3-F


Changing "Seasons" of Life
May Require Changes in
Investment Strategy


As we make the transition from
autumn to winter, you may be
reminded that seasons don't just
change on the calendar they also
change in your life. And as you
move from one season of your life
to another, you'll find that some of
your goals may have changed.
Consequently, as time goes by, you
may need to adjust your financial
strategies as well.
To illustrate the "seasonal" nature
of your investment strategies, let's
quickly go through a typical life
cycle and look at the differing
financial goals at each stage:
Starting out- When you are
beginning your career, you may not
have a lot of money with which to
invest, but it's important to try to
put away something each month. If
you have a 401(k) where you work,
take advantage of it- your money
is deducted, pretax, from your
paychecks, so it's an easy way to
start investing. And at this stage of
your life, consider investing
primarily for growth. Of course,
when you invest in growth-oriented
vehicles, you typically assume an
above-average degree of risk
because the price of these
investments can fluctuate greatly
over time. However, if you buy
quality investments and hold them
for many years, you may be able to
overcome the "blips" along the way
and benefit from the growth
prospects these vehicles can offer.
Middle years During this
season of your life, things have
likely changed. Your kids may have
already graduated from college or
otherwise left home, so you may
need to re-evaluate your life
insurance needs. You're likely
earning more money and have more
available to invest- which means,
among other things, that you should
consider makingg out" on your IRA
and also putting as much as you
afford into your 401(k) or other
employer-sponsored retirement

-n Josh Akers
Financial Advisor


plan. Because you may have a
decade or more until you retire,
you still may need considerable
growth potential from your
investments. At the same time,
though, you might not want to
invest quite as aggressively as you
did when you started out, so you
may want to increase the
percentage of bonds and other
fixed-income vehicles in your
portfolio.
Retirement years Many
people assume their expenses will
drop when they retire. And some
will drop- but others, such as
health care, will increase.
Furthermore, it's not at all unusual
for people to spend two, or even
three, decades in an active
retirement- and during those
years, inflation can be a factor.
Consequently, even as a retiree,
you'll find that growth-oriented
investments are important,
balanced with others that provide
income. Furthermore, you'll want
to manage the withdrawals you
take from your IRA 401(k) or
other employer-sponsored
rirement plan to help make sure
you don't outlive your resources.
At the same time, you should
consider exploring estate-planning
techniques, such as life insurance
trusts, that can help you leave the
legacy you want without
burdening your heirs with heavy
estate taxes. To help you meet
these needs, work with your tax
advisor and estate-planning
professional.
The seasons of the year change
every three months. The seasons
of your life change much more
slowly, but these changes can have
a big impact on your financial
situation.
This article was written by
Edward Jones for use by your
local Edward Jones Financial
Advisor

www.edwardjones.com MemberSIPC


521 Lakes Blvd Suite B
Lake Park, GA 31636
229-559-0127
564012-F


Edwardjones
I MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING I


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 3A







OPINION

The prrtrnm of kn owkdg





"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers"






Florida Science Olympiad


Submitted


q kIIItH in, rr
Enjoy the beauty of the Sugar
Plum Fairy and her Court, be
enchanted by the swirling
snowflakes and cheer for the
tiny toy soldiers and the
handsome Nutcracker Prince

Sat, Dec. 12
7:00 p.m.
Van H. Priest Auditorium
Madison, Florida
Tickets on Sale Now!
$12 adults/S6 Child
WWW.NFCC.EDU
:I'


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

FAIR HOUSING / EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

It is illegal to discriminate based on race,
color, religion, sex, national origin, age,
disability, or familial status when renting,
selling or financing a home or property.

You Have Rights!! If you feel you have been discriminated
against when buying or renting a home please contact Mr.
Danny Johnson, County Coordinator at Hamilton County
(386) 792-6639.

Hamilton County is a Fair Housing Advocate as explained in
the Counties Fair Housing Ordinance which outlines steps
that can be taken locally to report housing discrimination.

A copy of this ordinance can be obtained at the County
Coordinators Office in Hamilton County in addition
information on Fair Housing and Fair Housing Law can be
obtained by contacting the Housing Discrimination Hotline
at, 1-800-699-9777 (Voice) 1-800-927-9275 (TTY) or
on the world wide web at
http://www.hud.gov/offices/fheo/index.cfm
531030-F


The Florida Science Olympiad is
an official state chapter of Science
Olympiad, Inc. (a national organiza-
tion, http://soinc.org). The Science
Olympiad is intended to improve
science education through competi-
tions. Middle school and high school
students are able to compete in
teams against other schools in the re-
gion.
In its second year at Lake City
Community College (LCCC), the all-
day event is scheduled for Saturday,
February 27, 2010. Last year approxi-
mately 30 students from the Lake
City Region participated in the
Olympiad which includes 21 coun-
ties in North Central Florida. The re-
gion also includes the college's dis-
trict of Baker, Columbia, Dixie,
Gilchrist and Union counties.
The events cover a range of topics
such as anatomy, chemistry, engi-
neering, environmental chemistry
and earth science. Specific events in-
clude "Science Crime Busters" (stu-


Police Chief


dents perform a series of tests,
"forensics," to solve a crime), "Ele-
vated Bridge" (students try to build
the lightest and strongest bridge to
compete against bridges constructed
by other schools), and "Trajectory"
(students build a device capable of
launching a projectile into a target
area). The event covers abroad
range of topics and includes some
specialized projects such as cell biol-
ogy and protein modeling.
Any middle school or high school
may register to compete. A school
must place at the regional in order to
compete at the state level and place
at the state level to compete at the
national level. To compete, a school
must register online at florida-
scienceolympiad.org. Registration
ends December 31.
For more information about the
event locally, contact Florida Science
Olympiad Regional Director Erin
Scarcelli at HYPERLINK
"mailto:scarcellie@lakecitycc.edu"sca
rcellie@lakecitycc.edu or by calling
(386) 754-4379.


's


Monthly Report


By Ken Brookins, White
Springs Police Chief

I guess I'm running a
little behind this
month by starting off
saying what I am
thankful for, but, I
have to inform you of
some of the things that
are going on around
you. When you finish
reading this I am sure
that you will feel as
thankful as I do.
You would not be-
lieve the work going
on behind the scenes in
this town to solve


problems and get
things done.
First I want to men-
tion Carrol Stob at
"Bud's Suds. As you
know, we lost our
school crossing guard
this year due to budget
cuts. I have noticed on
the mornings that I can
make it to the school
zone that Carrol is
there helping the kids
to cross the street. No
one asked her to do
this; she just saw a
problem and solved it.
Next I want to men-
tion the "Special


Events Committee".
They are working tire-
lessly to get everything
together for the "Festi-
val of Lights" event.
You would not believe
the work and hours
that it takes to arrange
for a parade, buy gifts,
buy food, prepare food
etc., etc., etc. and all of
this is done by a hand-
ful of dedicated citi-
zens.
Then there is the
Neighborhood Watch
group. They are not
only keeping a watch-
ful eye on the commu-
nity but are working
very hard on the"
Summer Enrichment
"program. They have
put on two separate
community functions
that included prepared
meals and made count-
less contacts and
SEE POLICE, PAGE 5A


Go ?CesI 2009



Dec. 14 & 15 Testing $70.00

You must attend a registration session.
Wed., Dec. 9th 9 a.m. or 6 p.m.

Call Lynn Lee at 386-647-4201
to sign up for registration

SU WA'INN L EE- 415 S.W. Pinewood Dr
HAN MLTCN Live Oak, FL 32064
iE- Hi l AL FrjiTEp ,L 386-647-4200


Back-lo-Schooll


Cape 3iaper Xet0
Published weekly every Thursday. USPS #755-980
Office located at 105 NE 2nd Avenue,
Bank of America, Jasper, FL 32052
Phone (386) 792-2487 FAX (386) 792-3009
E-mail address: jaspernewsl@windstream.net
Myra Regan .............. Publisher
Robert Bridges ............. Group Editor
Jo Ross ................... Reporter
Louise Sheddan ........... Administrative Assistant
Periodicals postage paid at Jasper, FL.
Annual subscription rate is $17 in county,
$25 out of county and out of state.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
The Jasper News, 105 NE 2nd Ave., Jasper, FL 32052

Letter to the Editor and Article Policy
Letters to the Editor and news articles can be mailed,
FAXed or dropped off at the news office located in the
Bank of America Building, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.
till 5 p.m.
Letters to the Editor should be typed, double-spaced if
possible, brief and to the point, approximately 150 to 200
words or less. Not all letters are published. To be consid-
ered for publication Letters to the Editor must be signed,
include the writer's address and phone number, and in
the Jasper News' office on Friday before 5 p.m.
News Releases, 400 or less words, should be typed, dou-
ble-spaced if possible, brief and to the point. Not all articles
are published.
Letters and articles may be edited to fit available space.
Well written letters/articles require less editing.
To mail your letter/article, send it to: The Jasper News,
105 NE 2nd Ave., Jasper, FL 32052 or FAX it to: 792-3009.


Norris Notes
By Lillian Norris
Norris Notes will not be running this week. Mrs.
Lillian Norris will be back next week with her col-
umn. Thank you.


PAGE 4A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2009






THURDAY DECMBE 3, 009THEJASPR NWS, aspr, F PAE I


Delivering to Jasper, Jennings

& White Springs daily


Florist


w.


Lake City

755-8606


Mention this ad for free delivery


Obituaries


Kathleen Whittington
08/29/1928 -
11/17/2009
Kathleen Whittington,
81, daughter of the late
Jessie Wilt and James
Appell of Charles Town,
WV, of Jasper, FL
passed away on Tues-
day, November 17, 2009
of a long illness. The
Charles Town, WV na-
tive moved to Jasper in
July from Moorefield,
WV. She worked as a
waitress at Caf6 Bur-
gundy and Roma in
Washington, D.C. Mrs.
Whittington was an avid
collector of coins and
frogs. She also enjoyed
puzzles and fishing. She
supported the Paralyzed
Veterans of America and
was of the Presbyterian
Faith.
Mrs. Whittington is
survived by four daugh-
ters: Marleen Whitting-
ton, Jasper, FL, Sandra
Porter, Mathias, WV,
Bobbie Clayton, Jasper,
FL, and Ginny Deao,
Jasper, FL; two sons: Jim
Whittington, Louisville,
KY, and Ed Whittington,
Gaithersburg, MD;
niece: Susann Menden-
hall, Sulfolk, VA; four-
teen grandchildren;
twenty-four great-
grandchildren; six great-
great-grandchildren;
and many family and
friends.
She is preceded in
death by her sister:
Louise Acosta.
Services for Mrs.
Whittington will be held
at 11:00 am, Saturday,
December 5, 2009 at
Community Presbyter-
ian Church, Live Oak,
FL with Rev. Randy
Wilding officiating.
The family requests
donations be made to
the American Cancer So-
ciety or Haven Hospice.
Daniels Funeral
Homes & Crematory,
Inc., Live Oak, FL in
charge of all arrange-
ments.


Community Calendar


Dec. 5 Gospel Sing, 7:00 p.m. at by the Ju
The Long Branch Congregational County)
Methodist Church on CR 135 in White Dec. 12
Springs. Refreshments served after- Christmas
wards, everyone welcome. Springs a
Dec. 5 Big (flea market style) mul- Ogburn F
ti-family yard sale hosted by the VBS ter. For mi
Churches of White Springs. All day ticipate in
long at the corner of 2nd and Mill 2310.
Streets in White Springs. Something Dec. 12
for everyone. Culture C
Dec. 5 Hamilton County Riding val of Lig
Club presents the Kade Lanier to 9 p.m. $
Leukemia Benefit Jackpot at Hamilton 3 free). 38t
County Arena in Jasper. Exhibitions, tateParks.
horseshoe tournament, 50/50 draw- Dec. 19
ing, concessions and much more. For of Enviroi
more information call Richie McCoy at Foster Fol
386-855-0732, Shelly Head at 386-208- will host
4777, or Jan Kinsey at 229-548-6608. nee, West
Dec. 8 Christmas Celebration with on US 41,
Colbert and Joyce Croft. 7 p.m. at H&F formation
Restaurant in Jasper. Call 792-2293 for 1920.
more information.
Dec. 9-13 NFCC CHRISTMAS AT Month
THE MANSION "Christmas Spec- The Jasp
tacular" OPEN HOUSE Wednesday- meets the
Saturday, Dec. 9-12, 2009 10 a.m.-6 at 6 p.m. i
p.m. OPEN HOUSE Sunday, Dec. 13, Bible B
2009 I 1 p.m.-4 p.m. clothes cl
COOKIES WITH SANTA Satur- each mon
day, Dec. 12, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. (sponsored 0720 for n


HCHS Band

Department needs


your help

Submitted by Anita E.
Jones, HCHS Band and
Choir Director

The season of giving is
here and the Hamilton
County High School mu-
sic department is in need
of funding and instru-
ments to help this de-


Gospel

Sing

December

5th

Submitted
The Long Branch
Congregational
Methodist Church
located on County
Road 135 in White
Springs will be host-
ing a Gospel Sing on
Saturday, December
5th, at 7:00 p.m.
The Classic Coun-
try Singers from
Lake City will be the
guest singers. There
will be refreshments
served after the ser-
vice. Everyone is
welcome.


December Special



( ^ Sofa & Chair
Upholstered in any
fabric we stock! $489.00

Price includes fabric & labor.
More than 300 fabrics to select from!

Price also includes spring & frame repairs,
new padding added to entire piece.
New cushion foam is extra if needed.
NO Seconds NO Close-Outs ALL First Quality Material.
"I personally guarantee all work to suit you"


EARNHARDT & SONS UPHOLSTERY
MADISON, FLORIDA
..... 1-850-973-6006 OR 1-850-973-4667


apartment grow!
There are several stu-
dents with no band in-
struments who are eager
to learn. The band is in
need of instruments,
mouthpieces, and acces-
sories for students to
use. The choir is in need
of funding to purchase
music to sing for the
spring semester.
If you have an in-
strument at home and
you want to get it out of
the closet, or if you wish
to donate funds to pur-
chase necessary items
for the music depart-
ment, please call 792-
6540, ext. 2248.


FIRST ADVENT CHRISTIAN
N.W. 15th Avenue Jasper
Rev. Fran Wood
Sunday
Sunday School......................10:00 a.m.
Morning W orship....................11:00 a.m .
Wednesday
Prayer Fellowship ............... 6:30 p.m.
500892-F
l:APJTISTSothrn


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
SR 6 West, 6592 NW 48th St.,
Jennings, FL 32053
938-5611
Pastor:Jeff Cordero
Sunday School............................... 0:00 a.m.
Morning W orship.......................... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship, Youth Happening
RA 's, G A 's.............................. ........... 6:00 p.m .
Wednesday
Supper ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting, Discipleship class for adults
Youth activities, Children's Choirs.....6:30 p.m.
Van pick-up upon request
500896-F


inior Auxiliary of Madison

- Small Town, Ya'll Come,
s Parade in historic White
t 5:30 p.m. On US 41 from
ield to Stephen Foster Cen-
ore information on, or to par-
n, the parade call 386-397-

-31 Stephen Foster Folk
enter State Park hosts "Festi-
,hts". Open daily from dusk
i2.00/person (children under
6-397-4331 or www.FloridaS-
org/StephenFoster.
- The Florida Department
mental Protection's Stephen
k Culture Center State Park
the Swingin on the Suwan-
Coast Swing Dance. Located
White Springs. For more in-
call the park at 386-397-


y Happenings:
per Revitalization Committee
3rd Thursday of each month
n the Jasper City Hall.
aptist Church opens their
oset on the 2nd Saturday of
th from lp.m-3p.m. Call 792-
nore information


Empowering Tabernacle

House of Prayer to host
"Community Awareness"

An invitation to area businesses
& organizations to participate
Submitted

On Saturday December 5th from 10 a.m. until 2
p.m., Empowering Tabernacle House of Prayer Out-
reach Ministry will be hosting "Community Aware-
ness" at the Jasper Civic Center. With this aware-
ness, we are hoping to inform the people of Hamil-
ton County about pressing community issues such
as: chronic diseases, job placements, drugs and alco-
hol, education and many more. We are asking com-
panies/organizations to join them and share their
expertise with the community.
The main objective is for each company/organiza-
tion to have a booth with brochures/literature on
hand that will help increase the community's knowl-
edge in the areas mentioned above and be on hand
to answer any questions that citizens may have.
Donations are also being accepted so that refresh-
ments and items for the elderly (needed during the
winter) can be provided.
If you have questions or want more information,
please send email to: empoweringtabernacle@ya-
hoo.com.
Thanks in advance from Empowering Tabernacle House
of Prayer Outreach Ministry
Pastor Phillip M Jackson and Mother Ledia S. Jackson


Big Yard Sale-flea market style


Submitted by Sweet Home Baptist Church
On December 5, the multi-families of
VBS Churches of White Springs will
host a big, flea-market style yard sale
all day at the corner of 2nd and Mill
Streets in White Springs. There will be


something for everyone: clothing,
shoes, toys, food, greens seeds, collard
plants, etc. Come out, see and enjoy a
treat before Christmas. Thanks in ad-
vance for your participation and sup-
port.


Police Chief's Monthly Report


Continued From Page 4A

phone calls in order to
gain support. Thanks
to their efforts it looks
like our Summer En-
richment Program will
become a reality this
year.
Trust me, you can
not work around peo-
ple such as these and
not feel thankful.
Now, moving into
December, I want to
remind you that


CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1/2 mile East on Hwy. 6, Jasper, Fl 32052
792-2275
Sunday
Sunday School................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship... ...........11:00 a.m.
Children's Church.................11:00 a.m.
Church Training................... 6:00 p.m.
Evening W orship....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting.................. 7:00 p.m.
500893-F

CHURCH OF CHRIST
N.W. 3rd St., Jasper
BIda: 792-2277


Breakfast with Santa,
the Festival of Lights
Parade, and the Hot
Dog supper after the
parade will be held
December 12th. The
tickets for the break-
fast can be picked up
at Town Hall and the
Library. Come on out
and support our com-
munity.
Remember, that if
you are going out of
town for the Holidays
call us and let us know


FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
405 Central Ave., Jasper, FL
Pastor- Dale Ames
Phone -386-792-1122
Sunday
Sunday School.................... ....... 9:45 a.m.
n. 1,:, :I'.: 1 11:00 a.m .
Wednesday
Bible Study.................................. 4:45 p.m .
Choir Practice................................6:00 p.m.
Family Night Dinner 3rd Wednesday
Clothes Closet 4th Saturday 1-5pm
500902-F
NOIENMS NTINA


Sunday BURNHAM CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Sunday School ...................9:30 am. 4520 NW CR 146, Jennings, FL 32053
Morning Worship.....................10:30 a.m. Pasto9381265Carter
Evening Worship......................6:00 p.m. Sunday
Wednesday Sunday School........................... 9:45 a.m.
Evening............................ .... 6:00 p.m. W orship................................ 11:00 a.m .
500897-F Evening Service............................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting.......................... 7:00 p.m.
9-F
cwe'^ ;e^^^%?


so we can keep a
watch on your proper-
ty for you.
In closing let me re-
mind you that I am
here if you need me.
Please feel free to con-
tact me at 386-397-
2222.

Chief Ken Brookins,
WSPD
kbrookins@whitesprings-
fl.us
CRIME STOPPERS:
386-792-8477


FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
204 N.W 3rd Avenue, Jasper, 792-2258
Pastor: Rev. Parrish Jones, 792-8412
SUNDAY
Sunday School ........................ 10:00 a.m.
W worship Service........................... 11:00 a.m.
WEDNESDAY
Prayer in Fellowship Hall...............9:00 a.m.
Choir Practice......................7:00 p.m.
500898-F

ST. THERESE CATHOLIC CHURCH
Three miles north of Jasper U.S. 41
P.O. Box 890, Jasper, FL 32052
Rectory U.S. 90 E., Live Oak, FL
(386) 364-1108
Sunday MASS 8:00 a.m.
500901-F

c&11 (1


Live Oak

362-2776


To list your church on our church directory, please call Nancy at 1-800-525-4182

To place your ad inside

the Church Directory

please call

Louise at

386-792-2487


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2009


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 5A


F8(00.47-6370


I MTHDIT PRSBTEIA


je& yacf







NFCC Artist Series presents The Nutcracker Dec. 12

Dance Alive National Ballet performs

holiday favorite at Van H. Priest

Auditorium


Submitted by: NFCC Office of College
Advancement

MADISON, FL-- It wouldn't be the
holiday season without The Nutcrack-
er. Enjoy this beautifully entertaining
holiday tradition performed by one of
the most distinguished and creative
ballet companies in the Southeast,
Dance Alive National Ballet at North
Florida Community College on Satur-
day, Dec. 12. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
Show begins at 7 p.m.
Become entranced by the beauty of
the Sugar Plum Fairy and her dazzling
Court, enchanted by the swirling
snowflakes and breathtaking snow,
and cheer for the tiny toy soldiers and
their leader, the handsome Nutcracker
Prince.
Based in Gainesville, Fla. Dance
Alive National Ballet is led by Artistic
Director Kim Tuttle and Choreograph-
er in Residence Judy Skinner. The 15


dancers of Dance Alive have a non-
stop energy and love for dance that is
at the source of the company's undeni-
able success. Elegant, exciting, dramat-
ic, virtuosic, and reveling in the pure
beauty of their art, the Dance Alive
dancers are 11111'. committed to bring-
ing the best they, and dance, have to
offer.
"DANCE is not only ALIVE it is ex-
citing, beautiful, vibrant and very
much Americanized. As Russia has the
Bolshoi, England the Royal Ballet,
France the "Comic Opera" so Ameri-
ca has "Dance Alive National Ballet," -
Albany Herald, Albany, GA.
Don't miss The Nutcracker at
NFCC's Van H. Priest Auditorium on
Dec. 12. Tickets are on sale now at the
NFCC College Advancement Office or
call (850) 973-1653. More information
is also available at www.nfcc.edu
(search: Artist Series) or email Artist-
Series@nfcc.edu.


The nutcracker will be staged Dec. 12 at NFCC.


NFCC offers $100 tuition

discounts on select courses

Limited time offer: Register for

select courses by Dec. 7


Florida'

REGISTER NOW


w Spring Schedule available at:
WWW.NFCC.EDU

CALL OR VISIT OUR CAMPUS
850.973.2288
325 NW Turner Davis Dr I Madison, FL


SNorth Florida
COMMUNITY COLLEGE

SmallColfege. (Big Possi6ilities.
565016-F


Submitted by: NFCC Office of College
Advancement
MADISON, FL-- In an effort to make
college tuition more affordable, North
Florida Community College is offering
$100 off tuition for three of its spring
course offerings. This special offer is
available for a limited time only. Stu-
dents must register for these courses
now through Monday, Dec. 7 to re-
ceive the tuition discount for Spring
Term 2009. Spring classes begin Jan. 6.
Tuition discounts apply to Friday's
section of Man and the Environment
(ISC 1147, CRN 20154) held at NFCC;
Monday and Wednesdays section of
Introduction to Creative Writing


(CRW 2001, CRN 20075) held at
NFCC; and the Wednesday section of
Freshman English I (ENC 1101, CRN
20067) held in Jefferson County at
NFCC's Green Industries Institute.
Other sections of these courses may be
available but do not qualify for the tu-
ition discount.
To find out more about NFCC's
course specials, visit www.nfcc.edu
(keywords: Registration Specials) or
contact Dr. Sharon Erle at (850) 973-
1603 or ErleS@nfcc.edu. NFCC's com-
plete Spring Term 2010 class schedule
is also available online or by contact-
ing NFCC Enrollment Services at (850)
973-1622 or admissions@nfcc.edu.


PAGE 6A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2009


FARM)









0 School


^e Sasper Xrs

Section B
Thursday, December 3, 2009


CHE's 2nd annual Character Day


Submitted
Central Hamilton Ele-
mentary celebrated yet
another successful Char-
acter Day on November
20! This was Central's
second year hosting a
Character Day! We had
so many characters pre-
sent such as Fancy Nan-
cy, Amelia Bedelia, Lit-
tle Red Riding Hood,
Barack Obama, Martin
Luther King, Jr., Purpali-
cious, Pinkalicious, Busy
Bee, and many more!
Students were award-
ed by grade level and
received medals and rib-
bons. Afterwards, the
many characters parad-
ed around the school!
The students were very
excited and enjoyed this
event! Thanks to the
Reading Literacy Com-
mittee!


CHE Character Day Judges Photos submitted


Mrs. Kathy Combass and Alexis Owens (6th grade student
-1st place winner in 6th grade)


4th grade winners


5th grade winners


dra grace winners


1st grade winners


2nd grade winners


CHE Basketball


Submitted
Central Hamilton El-
ementary traveled to
South Hamilton on No-
vember 17. Students
were very anxious and


excited about compet-
ing against South in a
basketball game!
CHE students played
very hard and showed
great sportsmanship!
Even though, the Eagles


fell short of a win, we
are very proud of our
students and look for-
ward to competing
against North and
South! Way to go Ea-
gles!


Scenes from CHE vs SHE basketball game on November 17th


Ir li-y ,







PAGE 2B


Jasper Legals
PUBLIC AUCTION

Date: 12-22-2009
Time: 8:00 AM

2001 Ford Vin# 1FTZF17211NBO9915
1998 Lincoln V I n #
5LMRU27L2WLJ59514


Date: 12-24-2009
Time: 8:00 AM

1983 Chevy Vin#
1GCCS14B5D21721799


Date: 12-29-2009
Time: 8:00 AM

1998 Dodge Vin#
1B3EJ56HOWN224136

Location: Dennis Garage
8109 CR 146 NW
Jennings, FL 32053
12/3

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 09-65-CP

IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOHN PAUL COLLINS,

Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of JOHN
PAUL COLLINS, deceased, whose date
of death was August 1, 2009; Number 09-
65-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for
Hamilton County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is 207 NE 1st
Street, Room 106, Jasper, FL 32052. The
names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth below.

All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.

All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERI-
OD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publication of this notice
is: November 26, 2009.

James H. Burgess, Jr.
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 280763
Burgess, Harrell, Mancuso,
Olson & Colton, PA.
1776 Ringling Blvd.
Sarasota, Florida 34236
Telephone: 941-366-3700

LORRIE BEATRICE
Personal Representative
5901 Java Plum Lane
Bradenton, Florida 34203
11/26, 12/3

NOTICE OF INTENT TO USE UNIFORM
METHOD OF COLLECTING
NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS

The Hamilton County, Florida (the "Coun-
ty") hereby provides notice, pursuant to
section 197.3632(3)(a), Florida Statutes,
of its intent to use the uniform method of
collecting non-ad valorem special assess-
ments to be levied within the County, for
the cost of providing fire protection ser-
vices, emergency medical services, and
solid waste services commencing for the
Fiscal Year beginning on October 1, 2010
and continuing until discontinued by the
County The County will consider the
adoption of a resolution electing to use
the uniform method of collecting such as-
sessments authorized by section
197.3632, Florida Statutes, at a public
hearing to be held at 6:30 p.m. on De-
cember 15, 2009 in the Board Meeting
Room, 207 NE 1st Street, Jasper, Florida.
Such resolution will state the need for the
levy and will contain a legal description of
the boundaries of the real property sub-
ject to the levy Copies of the proposed
form of resolution, which contains the le-
gal description of the real property sub-
ject to levy, are on file at the Office of the
Clerk of Court, 207 NW 1st Street, Room
106, Jasper, Florida. All interested per-
sons are invited to attend.

In the event any person decides to appeal
any decision by the County with respect


to any matter relating to the consideration
of the resolution at the above-referenced
public hearing, a record of the proceeding
may be needed and in such an event,
such person may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the public hearing is
made, which record includes the testimo-
ny and evidence on which the appeal is to
be based. In accordance with the Ameri-
can with Disabilities Act, persons needing
a special accommodation or an inter-
preter to participate in this proceeding
should contact the Office of the Clerk of
Court, Hamilton Count, at (386) 792-
1288, 72 hours prior to the date of the
hearing.

Board of County Commissioners
Hamilton County, Florida
11/19, 11/26, 12/03, 12/10


LEGAL NOTICE

Madison Superstorage, 298 SW Martin
Luther King Drive, Madison, Florida and
Jasper Superstorage, 1213 US HWY
129N, Jasper, Florida, will have a liquida-
tion sale on delinquent storage units on
December 12, 2009.

Storage units to be sold in Madison are:
Annie Lee Pursley Unit# 10B
Otillo Aceveda Unit# 10E
Stephanle Scott Unit# 7E

Storage units to be sold in Jasper are:
Sharon Dedge Unit# 44
Cheryl Johnson Unit#44
Elizabeth Cherry Unit# 38 & 11.

Contents are believed to be household
items.
12/03, 12/10

NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING

The Board of Commissioners of the
Northwest Florida Regional Housing Au-
thority will hold a Special Meeting, De-
cember 15, 2009 in the Regency Room of
the Ramada Inn North, 2900 North Mon-
roe St., Tallahassee, Florida. Meeting will
begin at 1:00 p.m. E.S.T The meeting will
be open to the public.
12/3, 10
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 24-2008-CA-000321

U.S. BANK NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE FOR ASSET-BACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2007-AH1

PLAINTIFF

VS

ROBERT BRISBANE;
MARY K. HENDERSON-BRISBANE;
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;
ACCREDITED HOME LENDERS,
INC. F/K/A AAMES FUNDING
CORPORATION D/B/A
AAMES HOME LOAN; JOHN
DOE AND JANE DOE
AS UNKNOWN TENANTS
IN POSSESSION.
DEFENDANTS)

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to
a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated November 20, 2009 entered in
Civil Case No. 24-2008-CA-000321 of the
Circuit Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in
and for HAMILTON County, Jasper, Flori-
da, I will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at the South Front Door of the
Courthouse at the HAMILTON County
Courthouse located at 207 NE 1st Street
in Jasper, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the
17th day of December, 2009 THE FORE-
CLOSURE SALE SHALL NOT BE HELD
BETWEEN THE DATES OF DECEMBER
19, 2009 AND JANUARY 3, 2010) the fol-
lowing described property as set forth in
said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit:

BEGINNING AT A POINT 130 FEET
WEST OF THE SOUTHWEST CORNER
OF THE INTERSECTION OF CENTRAL
AVENUE AND SMITH STREET AS A
STARTING POINT AND FROM THENCE
RUN WEST ALONG THE SOUTHERN
EDGE OF SMITH STREET 123 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 180 FEET; THENCE
EAST 123 FEET; THENCE NORTH
180FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; SAID LANDS BEING LOCATED IN
THE CITY OF JASPER, FLORIDA, IN
SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH,
RANGE 14 EAST HAMILTON COUNTY,
FLORIDA, ALSO BEING DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS: A TRACT OF LAND IN
SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH,
RANGE 14 EAST, IN THE CITY OF
JASPER, HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORI-
DA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE
AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE
SOUTH LINE OF 10TH STREET SW
(SMITH STREET) AND THE WEST LINE


OF SOUTHWEST CENTRAL AVENUE;
THENCE RUN SOUTH 89022" WEST
ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF 10TH
STREET SOUTHWEST A DISTANCE OF
132.17 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; THENCE SOUTH 0006'35" EAST,
180.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
89022'00" WEST 119.35 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 116'17"WEST 180.03 FEETTO
THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID 10TH
STREET; THENCE NORTH 89022'00"
EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE 123.00
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING,
HAMILTON COUNTY FLORIDA.


Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Iis
pendens, must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Dated this 20th day of November, 2009.

SEAL

GREG GODWIN
Clerk of the Circuit Court

By:/s/Cynthla Johnson
Deputy Clerk

THE LAW OFFICES OF
DAVID J. STERN, PA.
ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF
900 South Pine Island Road, Suite 400
Plantation, FL 33324-3920
(954) 233-8000

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERI-
CANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT persons
with disabilities needing a special accom-
modation should contact COURT ADMIN-
ISTRATION, at the HAMILTON County
Courthouse at 386-792-1288, 1-800-955-
8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770, via Flori-
da Relay Service.
12/03, 12/10

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 3RD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 2009CA000190

DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST
COMPANY,
AS TRUSTEE OF INDYMAC RESIDEN-
TIAL
MORTGAGE BACKED TRUST SERIES
2006-L1,
RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE BACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-L1

Plaintiff,

Vs.

LUIS JORGE LOPEZ; GUILLERMO
ARAGON; MARTHA PARDO; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF LUIS JORGE
LOPEZ; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
GUILLERMO ARAGON; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF MARTHA PARDO; UN-
KNOWN PERSONS) IN POSSESSION
OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY,

Defendants

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to
a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
November 20, 2009, and entered in Case
No. 2009CA000190, of the Circuit court of
the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for HAMIL-
TON County, Florida. DEUTSCHE BANK
NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS
TRUSTEE OF INDYMAC RESIDENTIAL
MORTGAGE BACKED TRUST SERIES
2006-L1, RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE
BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2006-L1, is Plaintiff and LUIS JORGE
LOPEZ; GUILLERMO ARAGON;
MARTHA PARDO; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF LUIS JORGE LOPEZ; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF GUILLERMO ARAGON,
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARTHA PAR-
DO; UNKNOWN PERSONS) IN POS-
SESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPER-
TY; are the defendants. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash AT THE
SOUTH FRONT DOOR OF THE COUR-
THOUSE, AT 207 NE 1ST STREET,
JASPER IN HAMILTON COUNTY,
FLORIDA, at 11:00 a.m., on the 17th day
of December, 2009, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:

PARCEL 9

PART OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 2
NORTH, RANGE 12 EAST, HAMILTON
COUNTY FLORIDA, BEING MORE PAR-
TICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS: FOR POINT OF REFERENCE,
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF SAID SECTION 20;
THENCE RUN N 89042'27" E ALONG
THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION
20, A DISTANCE OF 751.20 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE
RUN S 0000'23" W, A DISTANCE OF
237.80 FEET; THENCE RUN N 89042'27"
E, A DISTANCE OF 577.32 FEET;
THENCE RUN S 0000'23" W, A DIS-
TANCE OF 1005.37 FEET; THENCE
RUN S 8616'15" W, A DISTANCE OF
23.94 FEET; THENCE RUN S 0343'10"
W, A DISTANCE OF 363.56 FEET TO
THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF
COUNTY ROAD NO. 152, SAID NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY BEING IN A CURVE
CONCAVED NORTHWESTERLY HAV-
ING A RADIUS OF 1869.86 FEET;
THENCE RUN ALONG AND AROUND


Register Now!


Automotive Tech


or Auto Body


Repair

Earn your ASE today!

Classes start January 21st

Call (386) 647-4210

to schedule TABE test


SUWANNEE-

HAMILTON
TECHNICAL CENTER

415 S.W. Pinewood Dr.,

Live Oak, FL 32064
FINANCIAL AID IS AVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED. APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING BENEFITS. ACCREDITED BY THE
COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC.


SAID CURVE A CHORD BEARING AND
DISTANCE OF N 80o13'37" W, 389.69
FEETTO THE POINTOF TANGENCY OF
SAID CURVE; THENCE CONTINUE
ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE, N 7417'04" W, A DISTANCE
OF 5.04 FEET; THENCE RUN N
09020"03" E, A DISTANCE OF 88.76
FEET; THENCE RUN S 81044'48" E, A
DISTANCE OF 180.58 FEET; THENCE
RUN N 0915'12" E, A DISTANCE OF
212.86 FEET; THENCE RUNW 8837'12"
W, A DISTANCE OF 213.67 FEET;
THENCE RUN 2 0923'31" W, A DIS-
TANCE OF 261.96 FEET TO SAID
NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE;
THENCE RUN N 74017'04" W, ALONG
SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE, A DISTANCE OF 572.30 FEET;
THENCE RUN N 00010'58" E, A DIS-
TANCE OF 452.36 FEET; THENCE RUN
N 74020'45" W, A DISTANCE OF 299.67
FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE OF NORTHWEST 54TH
ROAD; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID
EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF
FOLLOWING COURSES; N 0041'02" E,
190.41 FEET; N 0327'51" E, 122.05
FEET; N 0600'46" E, 189.17 FEET; N
08013'27" E, 170.39 FEET; N 1145'22" E,
97.37 FEET TO THE TERMINUS OF
HEREIN DESCRIBED COURSES;
THENCE RUN N 89012'38" E, A DIS-
TANCE OF 218.62 FEET; THENCE RUN
S 7817'31" E, A DISTANCE OF 212.12
FEET; THENCE RUN N 78023'23" E, A
DISTANCE OF 130.96 FEET; THENCE
RUN N 5000'10" E, A DISTANCE OF
122.58 FEET; THENCE RUN N 19048'07"
E, A DISTANCE OF 11.94 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.

A person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Dated this 23rd day of November, 2009.

GREG GODWIN
As Clerk of said Court

By:/s/Krlsty Morgan
As Deputy Clerk


' w*-






























On NFCC's campus, history instructor Jay Welch presents
history of Florida in the Civil War


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2009


In accordance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a
disability who needs any accommodation
in order to participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to you, to pro-
visions of certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Court Administrator at 207 NE 1st
Street, Rm 106, Jasper, Fl 32052, Phone
No. (386) 792-0857 within 2 working days
of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if
you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-
8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call
1-800-955-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay
Services).

Kahane & Associates, PA.
8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000
Plantation, FL 33324
Telephone: (954) 382-3486
Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380
12/03, 12/10
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR HAMILTON COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 2009 CA 156

BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COM-
PANY,

Plaintiff,

Vs.

CLAUDIA CALONGE; THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF CLAUDIA CALONGE;
MEYER PINCHASSON; IF LIVING, IN-
CLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMAR-
RIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RE-
SPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DE-
VISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PER-
SONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DE-
FENDANT(S);

Defendant(s)

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a
Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure


entered in the above-styled cause, in the
Circuit Court of Hamilton County, Florida,
I will sell the property situate in Hamilton
County, Florida, described as:

Lot 37, Trammel Dees Farm, according
to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 2, Page 62, of the Public Records
of Hamilton County, Florida.

AK/A
Lot 27 Trammel Dees Farm
Jasper, Fl 32052

At public sale, to the highest and best bid-
der, for cash, at the South Front Door of
the Hamilton County Courthouse, 207 NE
First Street, Jasper, FL 32052 at 11 a.m.
on December 17, 2009.

DATED THIS 23rd DAY OF November,
2009.

Any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Iis
pendens, must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Witness my hand and seal of this court on
the 23rd day of November, 2009.

GREG GODWIN
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT

By: /s/ Krsty Morgan
Deputy Clerk

THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9024 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Phone: 813-915-8660
Attorneys for Plaintiff

In accordance with the American with Dis-
abilities Act of 1990, persons needing a
special accommodation to participate in
this proceeding should contact the ASA
Coordinator no later than seven (7) days
prior to the proceedings. If hearing im-
paired, please call (800) 95-8771 (TDD)
or (800) 955-8770 (voice), via Florida Re-
lay Service.
12/03, 12/10


Submitted by: NFCC
Office of College
Advancement


MADISON, FL--
North Florida Com-
munity College his-
tory instructor Jay
Welch recently gave
a two part presenta-
tion series about the
Civil War in con-
nection with Ad-
vent Christian Vil-
lage in Dowling
Park, which accord-
ing to Welch
brought the past to
life as well as differ-
ent community
members together.
The first part in-
cluded a lecture on
Florida in the Civil
War that was deliv-
ered at Dowling
Park. The second
part, held on cam-
pus at NFCC, was a
hands-on living his-
tory about the uni-
forms and equip-
ment of soldiers in
the Civil War.
"I really enjoyed
being able to see
and touch all these
Civil War items,"
said NFCC student
Chris Welch.
NFCC history stu-
dents and guests
from Dowling
Park's Advent
Christian Village at-
tended the second
lecture.






History students and
Dowling Park residents
gather to hear Civil
War history of uni-
forms and equipment.
Photo:s Submitted


Your Community, Your Life.


Read the public notices in this newspaper.





School District Budgets Local Tax Changes


Property Auctions


Adoptions


Public Hearings


Search Florida's notices online at:


www.floridapublicnotices.com


551304-F


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


NFCC Instructor gives presentation


on Florida in the Civil War


NOW OPEN IWYj4





BaDonna' BaDonna

Salon Oxendine

A (ormer Owner/Stylist
e-- -Gretchen's Salon)


I





THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2009


NFCC takes area youngsters on a trip down

the rabbit hole with "Alice in Wonderland"


Submitted by: NFCC Cmi., of College
Advancement
MADISON, FL-- North Florida
Community College Children's The-
ater recently entertained over 1200 lo-
cal school children, grades K-3rd,
from Madison, Hamilton, Jefferson
and Taylor counties as they enjoyed a
magical journey through Wonderland.
Three performances of "Alice &
Wonderland" by Bits N Pieces Puppet
Theatre were offered to area children


Friday, November 6 and Saturday,
November 7 at the Van H. Priest Au-
ditorium.
The larger-than-life musical mixed
nine-foot-tall body puppets, costumed
characters and traditional puppetry
into the classic tale of "Alice in Won-
derland".
For more information about the
NFCC Children's Theater call
850.973.1653 or email
artistseries@nfcc.edu.


Chris Brynes 1st grade class from Perry Primary enjoy lunch on the lawn after the 11 a.m.
show of "Alice in Wonderland"


South Hamilton's 1st grade classes enjoy "Alice in Wonderland"


Local youngster Ragan Crosby meets Alice after the Saturday show.


County Central School stu-
dents Emily Gary, Felipe
Perez, Darius Henley and
Ashley Wiggins spend a lit-
tle time back stage with Hol-
ly Rubin, who stars as Alice.


Local children meet
the characters that
bring "Alice in Won-
derland" to life after
Saturday's show. -
Photos submitted


Culinary Arts and REGISTER NOW!
Commercial Foods Program Early Childhood Education Program
Earn Your CDA Today!
Classes starting January 21st Day & Evening Clasess
TABE testing must be completed prior to enrollment Classes starting January 21st
STABE testing must be completed prior to enrollment


NFCC Children's Theater Coordinator Kim Scarboro and
nieces Kaylee and Taylor Zebiker meet the March Hare and
the Mad Hatter after the Saturday performance of "Alice in
Wonderland".


SUWANNEE-
HAMILTON
TECHNICAL CENTER
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr., Live Oak, FL 32064
(386) 647-4210
FINANCIAL AID IS AVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED. APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING .
BENEFITS. ACCREDITED BY THE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC. 4


SUWANNEE-
HAMILTON.BPM81
TECHNICAL CENTER
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr., Live Oak, FL 32064* (386) 647-4210
FINANCIAL AID IS AVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED. APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING
BENEFITS. ACCREDITED BY THE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC


National Certified

MEDICAL

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1200 hours for
Hair Design


Classes start Jan. 21st Classes start Jan. 21st

Call 386-647-4210
to Schedule TABE Test


SUWANNEE-
HAMILTONB

TECHNICAL CENTER
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr., Live Oak, FL 32064
FINANCIAL AID IS AVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED.
APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING BENEFITS.
ACCREDITED BY THE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC.


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THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 3B





THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2009


You'd better listen


Submitted by David H.
Matier, Doctor of Pastoral
Counseling

What made the ancient
Jews stand out to their
neighbors wasn't their
own strength and mili-
tary prowess but God's
movement in their midst.
Early on in their history
when they approached
Jericho, while they were
faithful to the Lord, Ra-
hab the harlot told the
spies Joshua sent to spy
out the land, "I know that
the Lord hath given you
the land, and that your
terror is fallen upon us,
and that all the inhabi-
tants of the land faint be-
cause of you. For we have
heard how the Lord dried
up the water of the Red
sea for you, when ye
came out of Egypt; and
what ye did unto the two
kings of the Amorites,
that were on the other
side Jordan,..." (Joshua
2:9, 10). When Israel
walked with God, He
fought their battles be-
cause they were His cho-
sen people!
It is obvious that God
has chosen to bless our
nation. It doesn't appear
to be any accident that a
little nation started by
renegade soldiers fighting
one of the greatest armies
in the world at that time -
the British Army; the Red
Coats, would ever have
been accomplished with-
out the hand of God in
the mix. Great men of
God sacrificed their lives
to write the Constitution


of the United States -
Most of whom were
Preachers of the Word of
God. They believed that
the Bible you and I have
the privilege of reading is
the Word of God and did
their best to obey; obeyed
the Word of God like the
early Israelites did and as
long as they listened to
God, God blessed.
Do you think it is any
accident that our country
has been blessed to have
automobiles massed pro-
duced, thanks to Henry
Ford and FREE ENTER-
PRISE, to be the first in
flight, commercial avia-
tion. It is because God
blessed our nation be-
cause, at least until the
last 30 or 40 years Ameri-
ca has had churches that
have taken a stand on the
teachings of the Bible.
Pastors didn't act like
anything goes. At one
time a preacher didn't
have to be told that life
starts in the womb that
it is a child not a fetus. He
didn't have to be told that
homosexuality is wrong
because the Bible makes
it very clear (Soon if your
pastor preaches the Word
of God it is possible he
could be arrested for a
hate crime because he op-
poses "same sex" mar-
riage, etc.). Some church-
es have even scummed to
homosexual pastors!
These churches definitely
are not listing to God's
Word! God communi-
cates with you through
His word! You are not
listening!


In Jeremiah chapter 13,
the prophet Jeremiah is
told to hide a "girdle"
and after many days the
Lord tells him to go back
and get the "girdle." And
then Jeremiah discovers,
"...behold, the girdle was
marred, it was profitable
for nothing. Then the
word of the Lord came
unto me saying, Thus
said the Lord, After this
manner will I mar the
pride of Judah, and the
great pride of Jerusalem.
This evil people, which
refuse to hear my words,
which walk in the imagi-
nation of their heart, and
walk after other gods, to
serve them and to wor-
ship them, shall even be
as this girdle, which is
good for nothing," (Jere-
miah 13:7-10). Will Amer-
ica's "Pride" soon be
marred? Is there an up-
coming, coming? We
must listen to God or ex-
pect the consequences.
Look around. Quit
blaming the situation
America is in on the
politicians (of course they
are as responsible as any-
one else when it regards
whether or not they are
willing to listen to God),
But America listen to
God! You'll keep the
blessing the way you got
it even if it is too late for
II Chronicles 7:14 because
what you are witnessing
is what men of old told
you would see as the end
approached (Romans
1:18-32)
David H Matier, DPC
dmatier@windstream.net


FWC warns against dangers of cold water


Submited
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission (FWC) cau-
tions boaters and other outdoor recre-
ationists to be aware of the dangers of
falling into cold water during the fall,
winter and early spring months. Cold-
water immersion initially shocks the
body, then causes the victim to lose
motor skills and will eventually lead
to hypothermia. Cold-water immer-
sion is life-threatening, especially
when it is sudden.
"Many people would not expect
cold water to be an issue in Florida,"
said Capt. Carol Keyser, FWC's Boat-
ing and Waterways Section. "Howev-
er, the effects of cold water, particular-
ly when they occur rapidly, can be-
come an issue even if the water tem-
perature is in the 60-degree range."
Most people would assume hy-
pothermia is the greatest risk in cold
water. However, the effects of cold-
water immersion often lead to death
by drowning before the effects of hy-
pothermia take hold. Sudden im-
mersion into cold water can cause car-
diac arrest, even for those in good
health. The shock of cold water also
can cause one to gasp, inhale water
and drown. Once in cold water, vic-
tims quickly lose muscle coordination
and the ability to swim or tread water.
Water at 59 degrees Fahrenheit or less
can rapidly cause these effects.
"If cold-water immersion occurs, get
out of the water as soon as possible,"
Keyser said. "If it is not possible to get
out of the water, do not swim if you
don't have to, because this will speed
up the loss of body heat."
According to the International Life
Saving Federation (www.ilsf.org),
cold water removes heat from the
body 25 times faster than cold air.

e
VALDOSTA MONUMENT CO
A tradition since 1908
SAVE! Buy Direct From The Manufactu
3403 Bemiss Road Valdosta, Geor
229-242-8873
or Contact Harry T. Reid Funeral Home


WAREHOUSE SALE
First Saturday of the Month
Huge Selection of Comforter Sets @ $50.00
*Pole Top Draperies *Valances *Pillows
*Chairpads *Placemats -Napkins

Doors Open 8 AM 12 Noon
707 Gil Harbin Industrial Blvd.* Valdosta, GA
800-633-2215 564091dw


Having a life jacket on when in the
water reduces the need to swim or
move as much, which in turn, reduces
the loss of body heat. It also helps in-
sulate the body, keeping in warmth. If
a victim should have a heart attack, a
life jacket will keep the victim afloat
and will prevent the victim from swal-
lowing water.
"Should you fall into the water, you
will survive longer if you're wearing a
life jacket, whether the water is cold or
not," Keyser said. "It is extremely im-
portant, and possibly a matter of life
and death, to wear a life jacket at all
times while on the water. Protection
against the cold is just one more good
reason to wear one."
Though the effects of rapid cold-wa-
ter immersion are more immediately
life-threatening, hypothermia will oc-
cur eventually if a victim remains in
the cold. Hypothermia can occur in
water or on land.
Hypothermia exists when the body
loses heat faster than it can replenish
it, which can result in death. Symp-
toms of hypothermia include paleness
of the skin and slow, shallow and er-
ratic breathing. Victims should seek
medical attention if exposed to the
cold for a prolonged period of time.
To prevent hypothermia, in addi-
tion to moving as little as possible,
huddle if there is more than one per-
son in the water or if together on land.
Ironically, if hypothermic, an individ-
ual may feel inclined to remove cloth-
ing; however, it is important to keep
clothes on for warmth. If floating in a
life jacket, fold arms and legs to con-
tain the body's warmth. Concentrate
on normal breathing to avoid hyper-
ventilation, which can lead to uncon-
sciousness.
"Preparation is the key to having a
positive outdoor experi-
ence," Keyser said. "If
IMPANY the weather is in-
clement, postpone your
rer SAVE! activity. When going
outside in cold weather,
gia dress appropriately, and
when boating, always
at 792-2669 wear a life jacket."
___ ea4-F/. '


TAPPIN' INTO THE GOOD LIFE!


Submitted by Miss Shannon, Dance
Works
The 2009 Dance Works Competition
Team attended the Dance Makers, Inc
Workshop & Competition, in Daytona
Beach on November 21st & 22nd.


Both groups performed tap routines in
their age division and both earned first
place rankings, automatically qualify-
ing them to compete again at Nation-
als, in Myrtle Beach this upcoming
June. Congratulations Girls!!!


Pop Teen Line Tap: 1st Place
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JR Group Tap : 1st Place
Front: Catherine Moffses, Abby Mickler, Julianna Wheeler, Tyler Carter, Back: Lexi Parks,
Callie Adams, and Abigail Barthelmes


Hunters, be careful cleaning wild hogs


Submitted

The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC) is
reminding hunters to take precau-
tions when dressing and handling
harvested wild hogs.
Wild hogs, though not originally
native to Florida, are now found
within all 67 counties, and like any
wild animal, can carry parasites and
other diseases some of which can be
transmitted to people. One such
disease for hunters to be concerned
with is swine brucellosis.
The FWC is advising hunters han-
dling wild hog carcasses to take pre-
cautions to protect themselves from
exposure to brucellosis and other
diseases. For instance, avoid eating,
drinking or using tobacco when
field-dressing or handling carcasses,
and use latex or rubber gloves when
handling the carcass or raw meat.
Also, avoid direct contact with
blood, reproductive organs and fecal
matter. Wearing long sleeves, eye
protection and covering any scratch-
es, open wounds or le-
sions will help provide
protection. Another
precaution is to clean
and disinfect knives,
cleaning area, clothing
and any other exposed
surfaces when finished,
and wash hands fre-
quently with soap and
water.
When cooking wild
hog, as with any wild
game, care in handling
is an important part of
disease prevention.
Raw meat should be
handled with gloves
and contact surfaces
and utensils thorough-
ly cleaned. The meat


should be cooked thoroughly to 170
degrees. Swine brucellosis is not
transmitted through properly
cooked meat.
"Hunters shouldn't be overly con-
cerned with swine brucellosis, but
they should practice these good-hy-
giene, safety precautions when field-
dressing wild hogs," FWC wildlife
veterinarian Mark Cunningham
said.
Brucellosis in people is called un-
dulant fever and could be transmit-
ted if a hunter cuts himself while
field-dressing a wild hog and is ex-
posed to the animal's blood or bodi-
ly fluids. Symptoms may include a
recurrent fever, chills, night sweats,
weakness, headaches, back pain,
swollen joints, loss of appetite and
weight loss.
Hunters who exhibit these symp-
toms or may have been exposed
should contact a physician. Contact
your county health department for
further information about swine
brucellosis.



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PAGE 4B


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL





THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2009


Extension Service News...


Notes from the County Agent's Desk


By Allen B. Tyree

A good crowd turned out at our recent beef cattle meeting. Our next event will
be held in late winter/early spring. If you are a cattleman/woman, and don't re-
ceive our meeting announcements, give us a call at 792-1276. We'll add you to our
mailing list. I've tentatively planned a field corn meeting for the winter. Keep your
eyes posted.
We had a pretty good peanut crop this fall. For those peanuts that didn't get ru-
ined by the rain after being dug, the yields were good (2 -3 tons) and the grades
were pretty good. For those peanuts already sold, runner peanuts brought around
$424.40 per ton this year. Some growers are going to have to make some alter-
ations in their gypsum (landplaster) applications, however.
If you had a brown or dead looking bermudagrass hayfield near the end of the
season, you probably had Helminthosporium disease, as I observed and con-
firmed by the UF/IFAS Plant Pathology Lab. Pythium was the secondary disease
detected by the lab. I saw these two diseases in, at least, 5 hayfields in the county.
I believe the Helminthosporium was mainly due to the wet cloudy days we had
late in the season. There are no fungicides available to treat the disease. Too low
potassium rates and too high nitrogen rates can cause Helminthosporium or
Pythium to "flare up." Burning off your hayfield in the wintertime can help with
disease control, too. You get rid of the foliage where disease is present. If you need
additional information, feel free to contact me.
I have quite a bit of information on biomass or energy production. This includes
information resources and sites, potential financial resources, crops, and trees.
Contact me, if you need any of this information.
Hamilton County is now home to, at least, five (5) certified organic farms. We're
having some decent iron clay pea yields but prices, so far, have been in the dol-
drums.
The National Weather Service (NWS) expects El Nino to strengthen and persist
throughout the winter months. The NWS predict below average temperatures
across the Southeast, including Florida. Above average precipitation is expected
though in Florida. We'll see how accurate the NWS is.
Kiplinger's reports that most cow-calf operations will finally achieve modest
profits next year (2010). Feeder cattle nearby futures will pass $100/CWT by year-
end. The US cattle herd is still contracting. As of July 1, cattle numbers were at
32.2 million head, down 450,000 or 1.4,. from a year ago.
Swine operators will keep taking heavy losses until herds are reduced. Cash
prices are predicted not to reach profitable levels until well next year. Poultry pro-
ducers also face a bad market.
Pulpwood prices for northeast Florida ranged from $19-$28 a cord or $7 to
$11/ton for the third quarter of 2009. Chip'n'saw averaged $33-46 a cord or $12 to
$17/ton. Sawtimber was $63-$94 a cord or $23 to $35/ton. According to F & W
Forestry Services, a forestry consulting company that has served the Southeast for
decades, it expects pulpwood prices to improve in the future. Why? Tree planti-
ng has declined dramatically, to levels not seen since the 1950's. Harvesting from
natural forests has declined. Pulpwood will come, primarily, from pine planta-
tions. Demand for pulp and new demand for energy should help prices go up.
Kiplinger's Agriculture Newsletter reports that virtually all livestock sites in the
US will be spared from greenhouse gas reporting regulations that take effect Jan-
uary 1, 2010. EPA says around 100 huge livestock operations will have to report.
By definition, EPA excludes sites with fewer than fewer than 34,100 swine or 3,200
dairy cows. The number of beef cows wasn't provided. It's probably about the
same number as dairy cows. The herd size benchmarks gives livestock owners cer-
tainty about who must comply.
According to the 2007 Census of Agriculture, there are 41,407 farms in Florida
that operate with less than 179 acres each. The average size of farms has decreased
by 1.'-. from 236 acres in 2002 to 195 acres in 2007. USDA defines a small farm as
one having gross sales less than $250,000. Ninety-three (93) percent of Florida


Representative Leonard Bembry appointed

Democratic Ranking Member of the Agriculture

and Natural Resources Policy Committee


Tallahassee, FL Representative
Leonard Bembry (D-Greenville) has
been appointed Democratic Ranking
Member for the Agriculture and Nat-
ural Resources Policy Committee for
the 2010 Legislative Session. The
Agriculture and Natural Resources
Policy Committee deliberates and
votes on legislation involving agricul-
ture and natural resources matter for
the State of Florida.
When making the appointment,
Speaker of the House Larry Cretul
said "I appreciate your continued
commitment to the Florida House of
Representatives and to the citizens of
your district. I am certain both will
be well served by this appointment."
As Ranking Member Representative
Bembry will inform fellow Democrat
members about issues and legislation


Arrest

Reports

Editor's note: The Jasper
News prints the entire ar-
rest record each week. If
your name appears here
and you are later found not
guilty or the charges are
dropped, we will be happy
to make note of this in the
newspaper when judicial
proof is presented to us by
you or the authorities.
The following abbrevi-
ations are used below:
DAC Department of
Agriculture Commission
DOA Department of
Agriculture
DOT Department of
Transportation
FDLE Florida De-
partment of Law En-
forcement
FHP Florida High-
way Patrol
FWC Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission
HCDTF Hamilton


pertinent to natural resources and
agriculture and work with House De-
mocratic Leadership to get member
bills on the agenda for discussion in
the Committee and the House Floor.
"I am honored to be appointed to a
position that allows me to have a pos-
itive impact on agriculture and natur-
al resources in the State of Florida and
District 10 in particular", said Bem-
bry.
In addition to being Ranking Mem-
ber for the Agriculture and Natural
Resources Policy Committee, Repre-
sentative Bembry is a member of Nat-
ural Resources Appropriations Com-
mittee and the Economic Develop-
ment Policy Committee.
Florida House Committees meet
once a month until the start of the
Legislative Session in March 2010.


County Drug Task Force
HCSO Hamilton
County Sheriff's Office
ICE Immigration and
Custom Enforcement
JAPD Jasper Police
Department
JNPD Jennings Police
Department
OALE Office of Agri-
cultural Law Enforce-
ment
P&P Probation and
Parole
SCSO Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office
WSPD White Springs
Police Department

Nov. 23, Mario Pirez,
35; 3973 SW 91st Lane,
Jasper; no valid drivers
license; HCSO
Nov. 23, Calneh Sidae
Akins, 29; 1220 SW 3rd
Street, Jasper; contempt
of court (2 counts);
HCSO
Nov 23, Desmond An-
drew Thumbtzen, 22;
19505 2nd Avenue, S.,
Des Moines, WA; no
valid drivers license;
JAPD


Nov. 24, Barbara Ann
Warren, 25; 407 1st Av-
enue NW, Jasper; viola-
tion of probation; HCSO
Nov. 24, Christopher
Rayford, Sr., 52; 304 SW
8th Avenue, Jasper; vio-
lation of probation;
Nov. 27, Kenneth
Jerome Taylor, 43; 300
Chanbridge Drive,
Jasper; burglary of struc-
ture, grand theft; JAPD
Nov. 27, Henry
Bukenya, 38; 2526 Camp
Norwood Circle, Kissim-
mee, FL; driving while
license suspended;
HCSO
Nov 27, Charles Jerald
Butterfield, 28; 462 Cofer
Road E., Cordele, GA;
driving while license
suspended, attached tag
not assigned, by pass
agriculture station; DOA
Nov. 28, Ricky Lamar
Davis, 45; 3600 NW
104th Avenue, Jasper;
disorderly intoxication,
resisting arrest without
violence, battery on law
enforcement officer;
JAPD


farms fall into this category.
Hamilton County had 322 farms in 2007, an increase of ':.. from 2002 (239
farms). I am skeptical about having this large of an increase in five years. The av-
erage size of the farms in Hamilton County decreased to 201 acres. It was 218 acres
in 2002. The total market value of all commodities sold increased from $12,169,000
in 2002 to $14, 417,000 in 2007. Government payments also increased. (Now, how
accurate is this information? As the old saying goes, "It's only as good as you what
you put in.") You can get statistical information on selected items from the 2007
Census of Agriculture by zip code.
The debate over health care reform is making Senate approval of climate change
legislation this year unlikely. That's according to Doane's Agricultural Report.
Monsanto announced the week of September 18 that it is cutting Roundup costs
by half.
Algae oil may edge out soybean oil as the most cost-effective biodiesel feed-
stock. That's according to energy and agriculture experts.
Carbon futures trading could become a $2 trillion market under the proposed
climate change legislation, according to the US Commodity Futures Trading Com-
mission. The carbon cash market would total around $200 billion. Land-grant
agricultural university ag economists are saying net costs to farmers for the cap
and trade legislation would be a 2,.. rise (I would like to know what that is in a
dollar amount. ABT). Livestock owners would be hurt the most, while farmers
that use no-till could get $8 per acre. Folks that have grass pastures or hayfields,
too, could also receive monies. Tree plantings could bring in $80.00 per acre.
USDA says farmers would pick up $1 billion a year with such incentives within
the decade. Seven senators have introduced legislation that spell out agricultural
offsets and protections on the climate change bill. Under the proposed plan, the
carbon offsets would be managed by USDA, instead of the current Carbon Climate
Exchange. USDA would run conservation easement and carbon offset funds for
projects that reduce greenhouse gas emissions or sequester carbon.
According to two agricultural news sources, anhydrous ammonia and di-
ammonium phosphate (DAP) prices have declined about 6 11.. from late last fall.
Potash prices have dropped at least .i I., as of 9/4/09.
Net farm income is projected to be .',.. lower in 2009 than it was in the record
setting year of 2008.
Here is some not too positive information on the biofuels boom. The National
Biodiesel Board says that two-thirds of the U. S. production sits unused, with ca-
pacity far in excess of demand for several years. Ethanol, the largest biofuel sector,
is also in financial trouble, due to too low gas prices for them (not too low for us,
the consumer) to make a profit, but longstanding government support keeps it go-
ing. Big biofuel plant fraud scandals have frightened investors. For instance, a fed-
eral jury in Alabama found that Cello Energy, a recent plant-fiber-based biofu-
el producer upstart, defrauded investors. It was recently ordered to pay $10.4 in
punitive damages alone.
USDA has published the first ever cash rental rates by county or agricultural dis-
trict. The information includes average rental rates for non-irrigated cropland and
pastureland in 2008. Hamilton County is in the Northeast agricultural district of
Florida. The information can be found at www.nass.usda.gov. Landowners and
renters, let me know how accurate this data is. To me, the figures aren't that accu-
rate.
Baby boomers are leaving cities. This action will create yet another demograph-
ic bulge. The increase in the number of people aged 55 to 75 in rural areas will dou-
ble in the U. S. from 2010 to 2020.
Farmer's slice of the food sales dollar is shrinking again. Raw commodity prices
at the farmgate represented 2 ,.. of retail food prices a year ago. At the end of "09,
it was :2 ".. -- close to what the share was back in '05 and '06.
According to USDA, 64 percent of the US farms have computer access. Fifty-
nine (59) percent have internet access. I don't believe it's that high yet in Hamilton
County.
In early September, the EPA announced it will set legal, numeric limits for ur-
ban and farm runoff of fertilizers and animal wastes for Florida. This is already oc-
curring in four other states. Therefore, the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection (DEP) is considering whether it would be prudent to continue its own
rulemaking making efforts on the issue. "To ensure that there no duplication of
work, we will continue to work with EPA in the same manner they have worked
with us as they develop the criteria. We look forward to EPA presenting its crite-
ria to both DEP and the stakeholders of Florida," Florida DEP Secretary Michael
Sole said. The EPA has until January 14, 2010 to set new limits for Florida's creeks,
rivers, and lakes. The rules will be finalized by October 2010.
Walmart is getting on the environmental "bandwagon." Walmart is going to
start putting an ecological rating on the products it sells. The index will highlight
product efficiency, which includes longevity, performance, and how it was pro-
duced. Of course, this will affect food and plant providers. Its suppliers was sup-
posed to have completed phase one of the survey by October 1.
Florida had the highest yields in flue-cured tobacco again this year. It's uncer-
tain if we will grow as much tobacco as we have in the last few years, however.
Philip Morris is no longer going to sign any contracts with Georgia or Florida
growers.
According to a University of Arkansas ag. economist, seed costs will be up in
2010.
If you have a commercial agriculture, home/garden, 4-H, or Family and Con-
sumer Science problem or question, don't hesitate to give us a call at 792-1276.


American Red Cross-North Central Florida
Chapter-Lake City Office
2009 Schedule of Health and Safety Training
Courses
(386) 752-0650 www.redcrossncfc.org
All total class hours listed are approximate.
DECEMBER 2009
Adult CPR/AED ($35) 5 hours within 1 year after expiration. Card
December 5 Saturday 9:00 must be shown upon arrival to
AM class. If you do not have a valid
December 7 Monday 6:00 card, you will not be admitted.
PM Adult CPR/AED Review ($35)
Dec. 10-REVIEW Thursday OR Adult/Child/Infant
6:00 PM CPR/AED Review ($55)
December 15 Tuesday 6:00 OR Adult/Child/Infant
PM CPR/AED & First Aid Review ($65)
Adult CPR/AED & First Aid ($55) December 10 & 11 Thurs/Fri
7 hours 6:00 PM
December 7 & 8 Mon/Tues CPR/AED for the Professional
6:00 PM Rescuer ($60) 8 hours
December 15 & 17 Tues/Thurs (Equivalent t AHA BLS Class)
6:00 PM December 2 & 3 Tues/Wed
Adult/Child/Infant CPR/AED ($55) 6:00 PM
7 hours Babysitter Training ($40) 7 hours
December 5 Saturday 9:00 (Must be age 11-15 years old &


AM will need to bring lunch)
Dec. 10 & 11-REVIEW December 12 Saturday 9:00
Thurs/Fri 6:00 PM AM
First Aid ($30) 4 hours Classes are held at the Lake City
December 8 Tuesday 6:00 office located at 264 NE Hernando
PM Avenue, Suite 102. Payment and
December 17 Thursday 6:00 registration required before course
PM date. For more information or to
REVIEW CLASSES Must have register for classes, call 386-752-
current Red Cross certification or be 0650.


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 5B




THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2009


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THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


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