Group Title: Jasper news (Jasper, Fla.)
Title: The Jasper news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028306/00348
 Material Information
Title: The Jasper news
Uniform Title: Jasper news (Jasper, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jasper news
Publisher: F.M. DeGraffenried
Place of Publication: Jasper, Fla.
Jasper Fla
Publication Date: October 29, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jasper (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hamilton County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hamilton -- Jasper
Coordinates: 30.518889 x -82.951111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 21, 1890)-
General Note: Editor: Jno. M. Caldwell, <1890>.
General Note: Publisher: W.L. Whitfield, <1904>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028306
Volume ID: VID00348
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33315707
alephbibnum - 000579542
lccn - sn 95047198

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Daylight savings ends
Don't forget to fall back an hour on Sunday


Classic cars on display during
inaugural Fall Festival, Page 2A


Ready for

Homecoming?
The Trojans take on The
Villages Friday at 7:30 p.m.
See pages 4-5B for more on
the Homecoming festivities.


/ nflaonline.com -


D rnu


Today's Weather
High ^
880 F
Precip: 30%
A mix of clouds f
and sun with the
chance of an isolated thunderstorm in
the afternoon. Near record high tem-
peratures. High 88F. Winds E at 5 to
10 mph. Chance of rain 30%.
For up to the minute weather go to
www.nflaonline.com.


Biomass plant will bring jobs, officials say


"During the initial phases of construction
and operation, this includes an estimated
700 direct and indirect jobs, including a
combination of permanent on-site and
field jobs, shorter-term construction jobs,
and over 220 indirect or induced jobs
across the Hamilton County economy."

Hamilton County Development Authority
Director Charles Williams



Armed robbery at


Jennings Mini-Mart


Staff
Representatives from Duke
Energy, AREVA and ADAGE
joined Hamilton County
residents and county
representatives Tuesday to
discuss job creation and local
economic development
through ADAGE's planned


biomass project in Hamilton
County. ADAGE, a joint
venture between AREVA and
Duke Energy, is focused on
converting clean renewable
resources into electricity.
"This renewable energy
facility will create much-
needed new jobs, inject


millions of dollars into the
local economy, and bring a
brand-new industry to
Hamilton County," said Sen.
Charlie Dean (R-Inverness),
who participated in the
discussion and serves on the
SEE BIOMASS, PAGE 2A


By Stephenie
Livingston
stephenie.livingston
@gaflnews.com
The Jennings Mini-
Mart was robbed last


night at 8:30pm by two
masked men, one dressed
in black and the other
wearing a pink shirt.
Both men were armed as
SEE ARMED, PAGE 2A


H1N1 flu clinic set for

local health department
Who will be
vaccinated: Influenza A,
*Pregnant pneumonia shots
women available
* Persons who
live with or The Hamilton County Health
provide care for Department now has the Influenza
infants less A flu shot and pneumonia vaccine
than 6 months available. There is no charge to
of age (for you if you are on Medicare. There
example, will be a $20 fee for flu vaccine and
parents, a $45 fee for pneumonia vaccine
siblings and for the general public.
daycare Shots are available Monday
providers) through Friday from 8 a.m.-11 a.m.
* Children and and 1 p.m.-4 p.m.
young adults
aged 6 months to 24 years of age
* Persons aged 25-64 years who have medical conditions
that put them at a higher risk for influenza-related
complications.
* Health care providers with direct patient contact
Location: Hamilton County Health Department
209 SE Central Avenue
Jasper, FL 32052
Clinic dates/hours:
Thursday, Oct. 29, 5 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 31, 8 a.m.-11 a.m.
*There is no charge for these H1N1 Vaccinations.
If you have any questions about the vaccine or
vaccination clinics, please call 386-792-1414 from 8 a.m. to
5 p.m.

First Federal acquires

failed Bradenton bank


Staff
First Federal Bank of Florida
has purchased Flagship
National Bank of Bradenton.
Terms of the deal, which
closed Friday, will be released
at a later date, bank officials
said.
"This acquisition creates
what we believe will be a
valuable proposition for our
SEE FIRST FEDERAL, PAGE 2A


For more
information
on First
Federal Bank
of Florida's
acquisition
of Flagship
National
Bank, visit
www.ffsb.com


DEAL OF THE WEEK
Lt, ,_ REDUCED


Publix I
I I

For Kids 12 & Under
No Purchase Necessary -
Must Present Coupon
L Limit 1 Per Person


REALTY GROUP, INC.
(386) 792-8484
RatliffRealtyGroup.com


as~S


rr





THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


Biomass plant will bring jobs, officials say


Continued From Page 1A

Senate Energy, Environment and Land
Use Policy Committee. "This is the
type of energy project Florida needs.
Locally, it will generate approximately
$105 million in direct local economic
impact during the first two and a half
years of construction and operation-
dollars that will go a long way toward
getting the Hamilton County economy
back on track."
During the roundtable, County
Commission Chairman Randy
Ogburn, North Florida Workforce
Development Board Director Sheryl


Rehberg, the Langdale Company
President Wesley Langdale, and
representatives from AREVA, Duke
Energy and ADAGE discussed
construction, facility operation and
maintenance, and fuel procurement
and transportation jobs. The panelists
also discussed the key findings of Dr.
Julie Harrington, an independent
economist and director of Florida State
University's Center for Economic
Forecasting and Analysis. The analysis
finds that, in addition to creating
direct jobs, the project will also
present opportunities for workers to
indirectly serve Hamilton County's


newest industry.
"ADAGE's investment in our
community provides opportunities for
local contractors and working families
- our greatest resource," said Charles
Williams, director of the Hamilton
County Development Authority.
"During the initial phases of
construction and operation, this
includes an estimated 700 direct and
indirect jobs, including a combination
of permanent on-site and field jobs,
shorter-term construction jobs, and
over 220 indirect or induced jobs
across the Hamilton County
economy."


First Federal acquires failed Bradenton bank


Continued From Page 1A

customers, communities, employees
and board of directors with potential
for market growth and building
relationships," said First Federal
President and CEO Keith Leibfried.
"Our customers can benefit from
greater convenience and a better
value by entrusting us with their
business. Our communities can
benefit because we want to be a
leading contributor of financial,
human and social capital in every
community in which we do
business. Our employees can benefit
from expansion opportunities. We
are being deliberate in our
acquisition and transition. We will
take the time necessary to transition
the bank to put our customers'
interests first, and satisfy their
financial needs and help them
succeed financially."


First Federal acquired all deposits
of Flagship National Bank in an
FDIC assisted transaction. As part of
the purchase, First Federal acquired
Flagship National Bank and certain
assets and liabilities including all
deposit accounts. The FDIC will be
contributing capital to FFBF to help
resolve the failed bank's problems
and guarantee against losses.
Pam Hitt, Executive Vice President
and COO of First Federal, said
Flagship customers will continue to
see the Flagship National Bank
brand in their banking branches and
communities for the near future.
"The key to a successful
integration will be our ability to
provide outstanding customer
service throughout the acquisition,"
said Hitt. "Flagship National Bank
and First Federal Bank of Florida
customers should continue banking
as they do today using the same


bank accounts, payment coupons,
online sign-on, credit cards, ATM
and check cards, checks and bank
branches. We are committed to
keeping customers informed of all
significant changes before they
happen."
First Federal Bank of Florida,
which has 11 community branches
in north Florida,
is ranked as one of the top
performing banks in the U.S. by
TheStreet.com, an independent
ratings firm. First Federal is
examined by the Office of Thrift
Supervision, (OTS) who ranks FFBF
as "Well Capitalized." First Federal
enjoys a solid balance sheet, ample
liquidity and reserves and has
earned a "Superior," "5 star" rating
from Bauer Financial, Inc.
First Federal was founded in 1962,
when it opened as a Savings and
Loan in Live Oak.


Representative Leonard Bembry (D-
Madison), who serves on the House
Economic Development Policy
Committee and has advocated for
creating new job opportunities in the
Hamilton County area added,
"Following the construction period,
the facility will provide over $70
million in economic impact every
year. "With employee income totaling
over $12 million annually and $10
million dollars of revenue to our local
schools over 10 years, Hamilton
County families, businesses, and
schools will benefit significantly from
the project."


Classic cars on
display at inaugural
Fall Festival
Submitted
Jasper's very first Fall Festival will
be held on Friday and Saturday
8 a.m. until. Some of the events
held to celebrate the inaugural
festival include the Haunted Old Jail
Museum, a Haunted Trail, Trunk or
Treat on Central Avenue, ghost
stories and a classic car exhibit. Food
and craft vendors will also be part of
the festivities.
The classic car exhibit will be
presented in downtown Jasper on
Saturday from 8 a.m. until noon. The
exhibit will be located on Central
Avenue (2nd Street and US 41)
between Bit Syo's and Family Dollar.
Participants will receive dash
plaques. There are no entry fees and
refreshments will be served. For
additional information contact David
Anderson at 386-792-2486.


fPum i pkins I






"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


Armed robbery at


Jennings Mini-Mart


welcomes

Board Certified Otolaryngology (ENT)

W. Eric Loch, M.D.
Now Accepting New Patients


Convenient Office Hours
Monday Thursday 9am 5pm
Friday 9am -12:30pm

Special interests include chronic ear
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4551 U. S. Highway 90 Wes
Suite 101
Lake City, Florida 32055
m (386) 719-9993 J ~ ,


LAKE CITY


MEDICAL CENTER


Continued From Page 1A

they walked into the
Mini-Mart and de-
manded the cashier
empty both cash regis-
ters, said Major John
Davis with the Hamil-
ton County Sheriff's
Department. The as-
sailants escaped with a


You
the late



$'

0


currently unknown
amount. Jennings Police
Department and the
Hamilton County Sher-
iff's Department re-
sponded with a K-9
unit and searched the
area. Currently the inci-
dent is under investiga-
tion and no arrests have
been made, said police.


Saint the most in-de)pth coverage
est news and stories that touch ho
We want to give it to you.
I Jll 1 Year In Coun
Subscription


1 Year
Out of Co


Mail or bring payment to:

Sasper Wrnuew
105 2nd Ave., Jasper, FL 32052
386-792-2487
1-800-525-4182 ext. 152


557250-F


e.
ome.

ity



3unty







557909-F


well as a pumpkin
yogurt and a pumpkin
pie flurry.
"Plain pumpkin and
the cinnamon pumpkin
crisp are both pretty
popular this time of
year. We pretty much
don't make them the rest
of the year," Plummer
said.
Pumpkin can be found
in coffees and soups, but
Benjamin Twiggs offers
it by the jar.
Julie Millen said her
Traverse City shop's
pumpkin butter is so
delicious, people want to
devour it "right out of
the jar." The smooth
buttery concoction has
hints of maple syrup and
brown sugar and bursts
with pumpkin flavor.
She recommends it on
toast or used in a
pumpkin butter dip.
"It's like fall in a jar.
That's the best way to
describe it," Millen said.
This dip has a fluffy
whipped cream texture
and a kick of pumpkin
flavor. It's tasty with
gingersnap cookies and
apple slices. We can also
imagine it heaped on top
of pumpkin pie for an
extra decadent fall
dessert.
Vanessa McCray writes
for The Record-Eagle in
Traverse City, Mich. She
can be reached at
: ii... , ,', ..... -, ,i./sl,..com .


Pumpkin
Butter Dip

1 (8-oz.) block of
cream cheese
brought to room
temperature

1 (10-oz.) jar
pumpkin butter

1 small tub (8 ozs.)
of whipped cream
topping, thawed

Beat cream cheese
until smooth, add
pumpkin butter,
fold in whipped
cream, chill

- from Benjamin
Twiggs and
Peppercorn


PAGE 2A


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2009


2





THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2009


Cool costumes, free candy
member how much I love
still enjoy the thrill of Hal
cited the kids are, some
spooky spectacle for the v
of wonderment and bewil
er. These kids are way
sense about traffic and sa
adults. It's our responsib
very seriously. Happy Ha
You probably noticed t
last weekend. I went ove
Stephen Foster Park to n
Cannondale Bicycles was
year's "Fat Tire Festival" a
of the world's premier cy
fornia named "Tinker" Jua


NFCC TESTING
TABE TESTS
Every Tuesday at 1:30 p.m. ex-
cept on holidays TABE (Test of
Adult Basic Education) at NFCC
Testing Center (Bldg. #16), Madi-
son, Florida. TABE is required for
acceptance into vocational/techni-
cal programs. Photo ID required.
Pre-registration is required. Please
call 850/973-9451 to register.
Monday Thursday at 5:00 p.m.
(by appointment): TABE (Test of
Adult Basic Education) at NFCC
Testing Center (Bldg. #16), Madi-
son, Florida. TABE is required for
acceptance into vocational/techni-
cal programs. Photo ID required.


0 0






WHITE


, Halloween is right because ew that Dennis Price's
.around the corner, a highly come e mountain b
'Saturday evening knew Tinker and ha competed w
S here will be lots of lit- ed to see a youngaan i his tw
e monsters out trick Imagine my surprise when I lear
-r treating. For a Juarez, a highly talented cyclist w
' child, Halloween is nificant impacts in the cycling d
1one of the most excit- Racing, Freestyle BMX, and Moi
iLC5 g nights of the year. been competing for over thirty five
,being out after dark! I re- eight years old! He had just reti
ed it! Now, as an adult, I where he had been competing
loween by seeing how ex- renowned "Iron Biker" competition
of them experiencing this gracious and he and I had a g
ery first time, with a sense Sometimes we need a little inspire
lderment all mixed togeth- vated. Meeting Tinker Juarez did i
too excited to have good there I resolved to get in good eno
fety, so that job falls to us to ride in the Fat Tire Festival n
ility and we should take it twenty years older than Tinker is
illoween. tional to see and talk with this su]
he many cyclists in town made me realize, once again, that
2r to their gathering in the ble and that the world really do(
neet the star of the show. Springs.
Sa major sponsor of this We had another extraordinary
and they bought along one Evangelist Tia Jefferson-Carroll
,clists, a fellow from Cali- Beulah Baptist Church's Women's
arez. I wanted to meet him Sunday. By all accounts it was a


Pre-registration & scheduling time
& date are required. Please call
850/973-9451 to register.
CJBAT TESTS
Every Wednesday at 8:30 a.m. &
1:30 p.m. except on holidays CJ-
BAT (Criminal Justice Basic Abili-
ties Test) at NFCC Testing Center
(Bldg. #16), Madison, Florida. CJ-
BAT is required for acceptance into
Corrections & Law Enforcement
programs. Photo ID required.
Pre-registration is required. Please
call 850/973-9451 to register.
Monday Thursday at 5:00 p.m.
(by appointment): CJBAT (Crimi-
nal Justice Basic Abilities Test) at
NFCC Testing Center (Bldg. #16),
Madison, Florida. CJBAT is re-


Medicare 2010 Annual Enrollment Peri

For Part D Drug Plans Begins Soon


quired for accept
tions & Law
grams. Photo
registration & sc
date are requ
850/973-9451 to
COLLEGE PLA
Every Thurs
1:30 p.m. except
lege Placement
Testing Center i
son, Florida. I
Student Service
test. Please call
register.
Monday Th
(by appointment
ment Test (CP'
Center (Bldg.
Madiso
ter in N
od vices 24
For in
call 850


By Walter M Kenzie




SPRING

lifeinwhitesprings@ gmail.co
son, Harlan Price, event! Tia was raised in two Baptist Churches here
like racer himself, in White Springs: St. Luke Free Will Baptist Church
ith him. I expect- and Beulah Baptist Church. She attended school in
venties or thirties. Hamilton County and then graduated from Lake
rned that "Tinker" City Community College. She continued her educa-
vho has made sig- tion in Tallahassee and successfully graduated from
isciplines of BMX Florida A&M University. Tia is the daughter of Mr.
untain Biking has & Mrs. Paul Jefferson and the granddaughter of the
e years and is forty late Mother Bessie Jefferson. Her greatest mentor
turned from Brazil was her aunt, the late Sis. Mary J. McKire. Now re-
g in the world siding in West Palm Beach with her husband, Minis-
n. Tinker was very ter Leroy G. Carroll Jr. and their son Jaylen Jefferson
great conversation. Carroll, Tia was awarded "Community Leader of the
ration to get moti- Year" in 2005 by Governor Jeb Bush. Tia, White
t for me. Then and Springs is proud of you and we hope you will come
ugh cycling shape back soon!
iext year, and I'm White Springs resident and Stephen Foster Park
s! It was motiva- volunteer Pablo Gonzalez has just returned from
perb athlete and it two weeks at the John C. Campbell Folk School in
anything is possi- Brasstown, N.C. where he was studying black-
es come to White smithing. Now Pablo was a pretty fair blacksmith
before he went there and I have seen him make the
visitor last week. hammer and anvil sing while pounding a mighty
vas the speaker at fine and fiery facet onto some red-hot iron. Pablo
Day Program last loves to share his skills, so if you want to learn some
truly inspirational blacksmithing from him call the Stephen Foster Craft
Shop at 397-1920 to arrange a lesson.
stance into Correc- Janet Moses & Company Folk Art and Gallery is
Enforcement pro- offering a Nov 4th class called "Paint a Fall Wreath",
ID required. Pre- where you can learn to paint leaves, grapevine, a
:heduling time and bow and sunflowers on old tin. It's something great
ired. Please call to hang on your door this season. Call 386-365-6216
register. for more information.
CEMENT TESTS White Springs United Methodist Church will cele-
sday at 8:30 a.m. & brate Homecoming on Sunday, November 1, 2009,
on holidays: Col- beginning at 10:45 a.m. The Rev. Herb Underwood,
Test (CPT), NFCC retired Presbyterian minister who married the for-
(Bldg. #16), Madi- mer Frances Wiggins, a White Springs native, will be
Register in NFCC the speaker for the morning worship service. A cov-
s 24 hours before ered dish luncheon will be served in the fellowship
1 850/973-9451 to hall following the worship service. Everyone is in-
vited to attend. White Springs United Methodist
ursday at 5:00 p.m. Church was established in 1850 and the present
it): College Place- sanctuary was built in 1890.
T), NFCC Testing So as you can see, a lot goes on in our little town
#16), 5:00 P.M., and if you can, you should get out and be a part of
n, Florida. Regis- it. If you can't, read this column and we will try to
JFCC Student Ser- keep you informed about the wonderful world of
Hours before test. life in White Springs.


formation please
/973-9451.


Walter McKenzie

386-269-0056


Submitted
Do you know how much your cur-
rent Part D Drug Plan is going to cost
you next year?
Do you know the cost of your drugs
in the Deductible and in the Gap?
Do you know when you will hit the
Gap?
Do you know if there is a less expen-
sive plan out there that covers your
drugs?
Medicare Part D's Annual Enrollment
period runs November 15th to Decem-
ber 31st.


'Chef Robert of Winn-Dixie
Tickets ($50):
Jasper News
Ward's Jewelers
First Street Music
Suwannee Democrat


SHINE, a volunteer Program with the
FL Dept of Elder Affairs, is here to help
answer your questions. Come see us for
free, unbiased, and confidential assis-
tance. Bring your Medicare Card, your
current Part D Plan card, and your pre-
scription drug bottles. There will be a
worksheet to complete. To find a site
near you or to be referred to a volunteer,
call the Elder Helpline at 1-800-262-2243.
Our sites in your area will be:
Friday, November 6th
10:00am-Noon Jasper Library


Chefs Specialty F.qis
Complimentary Wine TastI
Live Music "Harry, Sally, & Billy"
Live & Silent Auctions
SFestival of Trees & Wreaths

Info:
397-0598 or 623-1505
kmccallister@marchofdimes.com


Rountree Moore Toyota
First Federal Bank (90 W & Turner Rd.)


Presenting Sponsors
First Federal Bank of Florida
Rountree Moore Toyota
Silver Sponsors
Baya Pharmacy
Dees-Parrish Family Funeral Home
Lake City Medical Center Auxiliary
Maureen and Vern Lloyd
Momex Foods (Taco Bell/Krystal)
SiTEL
Bronze Sponsors
Campus USA Credit Union
Columbia Grain & Ingredients
Edward Jones Investments (Steve Jones)
Florida Power & Light
Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites
Lake City Medical Center
Magnolia Pediatrics
Shands LakeShore
State Farm Insurance (John Burns III)
C.tat Farm rnc e ranr n Coxv


State Coroorate Partner
Publix

Media Sponsors
Lake City Advertiser
Lake City Reporter
Mix 94.3
NewsTalk 96.5
North Florida Now.com
Oldies 1340
Suwannee Democrat


NOTICE FROM THE

HAMILTON COUNTY

TAX COLLECTOR
The 2009 Tax Roll has been certified to the Tax Collector
by the Property Appraiser, and is open for payment.

The following discounts will apply: November 2-
December 1 4%, December 2-December 31 3%, January
2%, February 1%, and net amount is due in March.

Taxes are delinquent on April 1.

The perforated part of your tax notice must be returned
with your payment!!

Zero tax notices will not be sent.
If needed, contact the Tax Collector's office.

Mary Sue Adams
Hamilton County Tax Collector
386-792-1284
556985-F







(gt t2009



Nov. 16 & 17 Testing 70.00


You must attend a registration session.
Wed., Nov. 4th 9 a.m. or 6 p.m.

Call Lynn Lee at 386-647-4201
to sign up for registration


SUWANNEE-
HAMILTON
TECHNICAL CENTER


415 S.W. Pinewood Dr
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-647-4200 A


W QOIAINlLIUIRU IIlI)IYNO~d tO'\flIRSIJ&VICIhIIYC*IINOlIOiI[(o-5nwm


552163-F


march ofdimes BAN

signature chefs auction" M
holiday magic



Tuesday, November 3,

Rountree Moore Toyota

US 90W, Lake City


0-iW iiE


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 3A


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Available from Commercial News Providers"


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Many veterans and


-. surviving spouses may be


eligible for VA pension


S* Submitted by Bo Beauchemin,
Hamilton County Veteran Service C'(t...
- The Hamilton County Veteran Ser-
-- vice Office wants to inform veterans
that the Veterans Administration non-
service connected pension program
provides a level of financial support to
* wartime veterans or their widow(er).
To qualify, a veteran must have 90 days
or more of active duty under honor-
able conditions during which one day
must have been during a wartime pe-
riod. Service members enlisting after
S 09/07/1980 must serve at least 24
months or the full period for which the
service member was called to active
duty.
Additionally, if under age 65, the
veteran must be unable to secure em-
ployment by reason of disabilities
which are considered by the Veterans
S- -. Administration to be permanent and


totaling disabling. Unlike the veteran,
the widow(er) does not need to be dis-
abled. Veterans 6t years and older are
eligible without regard to disabilities.
The amount of pension depends upon
the total income of the veteran's
household. Additional amounts may
be awarded for those requiring Aid
and Attendance and those who are
housebound.
Generally speaking, a veteran may
be eligible for pension if total annual
household income is $11,830.00 or less
with no dependents or $15, 493.00 with
one dependent. Widow annual income
limits are $7,933.00 with no depen-
dents and $10,385 with one dependent.
Veterans who feel they may be eligi-
ble are urged to call Bo Beauchemin,
Hamilton County Service Officer at
386-792-1272 Tuesday-Thursday for
information and assistance.


Have You Had Your Medicare Part D 2010 Plan Check-up?


ape 3kiaper Xtu0
Published weekly every Thursday. USPS #755-980
Office located at 105 NE 2nd Avenue,
Bank of America, Jasper, FL 32052
Phone (386) 792-2487 FAX (386) 792-3009
E-mail address: jaspernewsl@windstream.net

Myra Regan ............... Publisher
Robert Bridges ..............Group Editor
Jo Ross .................. .Reporter
Louise Sheddan ............ Administrative Assistant
Periodicals postage paid at Jasper, FL.
Annual subscription rate is $17 in county,
$25 out of county and out of state.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
The Jasper News, 105 NE 2nd Ave., Jasper, FL 32052

Letter to the Editor and Article Policy
Letters to the Editor and news articles can be mailed,
FAXed or dropped off at the news office located in the
Bank of America Building, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.
till 5 p.m.
Letters to the Editor should be typed, double-spaced if
possible, brief and to the point, approximately 150 to 200
words or less. Not all letters are published. To be consid-
ered for publication Letters to the Editor must be signed,
include the writer's address and phone number, and in
the Jasper News' office on Friday before 5 p.m.
News Releases, 400 or less words, should be typed, dou-
ble-spaced if possible, brief and to the point. Not all articles
are published.
Letters and articles may be edited to fit available space.
Well written letters/articles require less editing.
To mail your letter/article, send it to: The Jasper News,
105 NE 2nd Ave., Jasper, FL 32052 or FAX it to: 792-3009.


Meet Jared,

your new Baya Pharmacy Manager.


He's Jared Allison, son of owners
Carl and Joan. At Baya, we're
ensuring the care of your family
with a family member of our own.


Jared Alison, Pharm.D.
University of Florida Graduate






pharmacy



Jasper
1150 U.S. Hwy 41 NW
(386) 792-3355


Submitted

SHINE, a volunteer program with the FL Dept of
Elder Affairs, is here to assist you in making the
best informed decision for your 2010 Medicare
Part D drug plan. SHINE provides free, unbiased,
and confidential counseling.
Low Income Medicare beneficiaries should ask
about programs to help pay for your 2010
Medicare Prescription Drug Plan costs.
Be sure you are aware of the cost changes in
your plan. You will receive information from your
Plan about the changes for 2010 early November.
Do you know the full costs of your drugs in the
Gap? Do you know when you will enter the Gap?
Ask a SHINE volunteer.
Enrollment in Medicare 2010 Part D plans is
from November 15 to December 31, 2009.
If you decide not to change plans, do nothing!
Your plan will roll-over into 2010 at the new costs.
Bring your Medicare Card, your 2009 Part D
Plan card (if any), and all your Prescription drugs
to a site near you for assistance in finding out your
Part D Drug Plan options for 2010

Come See a SHINE Volunteer At:


Columbia County
Ft. White
Tuesday 11/10 10:30am-11:30am CCSS, FT
White
Lake City
Wednesday 10/28 12:30pm-2:00pm Lifestyle
Enrichment Center
Thursday 11/05 -
10:00am-Noon Seniors
United
Friday 11/13 -
12:30pm-3:30pm Lake


-fl


City Library, Columbia Avenue
Wednesday 11/25 12:30pm-5:00pm -
Lifestyle Enrichment Center
Wednesday 12/09 2:30pm-5:00pm Lake City
Library, Columbia Avenue
Thursday 12/17 12:30pm-5:00pm Lifestyle
Enrichment Center

Hamilton County
Jasper
Friday 11/06 10:00am-Noon Jasper Public Li-
brary
Thursday 12/03 Jasper Public Library

Lafayette County
Mayo
Friday 10/30 10:00am-Noon Mayo Public Li-
brary

Suwannee County
Branford
Friday 11/20 9am-Noon Branford Public Li-
brary
Friday 12/18 9am-Noon Branford Public Li-
brary
Dowling Park
Wednesday 11/04 10:00am-Noon Advent
Christian Village-Phillips Center
Live Oak
Thursday 11/12 1:30pm-3:00pm Live Oak Pub-
lic Library
Monday 11/23 5:00pm-8:00pm Live Oak Pub-
lic Library
Friday 12/11 1:30pm-5:00pm Live Oak Public
Library

If you are unable to come to a SHINE site, please
call 1-800-262-2243 for a site near you or you can be
referred to a SHINE volunteer.


Submitted
Biologists with the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission's
(FWC) Fish and Wildlife Research Insti-
tute and the University of Florida need
assistance with a statewide largemouth
bass research study. This year-long pro-
ject is an interactive way for the public
to help biologists obtain critical infor-
mation necessary to manage the large-
mouth bass fishery for quality and tro-
phy-sized fish.
From this study, biologists hope to
learn how frequently bass are caught
and harvested. They also hope to learn
more about the size range of fish
caught.
Beginning this month, biologists are
tagging largemouth bass with small,
yellow tags along the back of the fish
just below the dorsal fin. These tags
carry a printed telephone number, e-
mail address, tag number and reward
value. Anglers should carefully exam-
ine all bass caught in Florida lakes for
reward tags, as biologists will tag fish
in numerous lakes throughout the


state.
Biologists encourage anglers to re-
move these tags by cutting them as
close to the fish as possible and then
treat the fish as they would normally.
Once anglers remove a tag, they should
immediately report it to the FWC An-
gler Tag Return Hotline at 800-367-4461
or e-mail TagReturn@MyFWC.com.
Anglers participating in the study
will receive a reward for each large-
mouth bass tag they return to the FWC.
When reporting the tag, anglers should
provide the following information: the
species of fish, tag number, fish length,
date and time of capture, name of the
lake where the fish was caught, and
whether the angler kept or released the
fish.
Anglers should mail the tags to the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission, Attn: LMB Tagging
Study, 601 W. Woodward Ave., Eustis,
FL, 32726.
To learn more about FWC research
projects, visit
http://research.MyFWC.com.


O -


- 1e


Biologists ask anglers to report tagged largemouth bass


1


PAGE 4A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2009


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THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


Ervin Donaldson accepted into People

to People Academic Program


Ervin Donaldson
Photo: Submitted


Submitted

Ervin Donaldson, a student in Cairo High School,
will join a select group of students representing
their schools, communities, and country as People
to People Student Leaders.
Ervin is the son of Pastor and Mother Ervin Don-
aldson, Jr., and the grandson of Bernice Jackson,
Charles Walls, Ervin Donaldson, Sr., and the late
Barbara Donaldson.
Donaldson has been accepted into the People to
People Student Leadership Summit in UCLA-Los
Angeles, California July 7-16, 2010. People to Peo-
ple Student Leaders complete an academically rig-
orous program focused on leadership development


and global awareness. Donaldson was nominated
and accepted for the honor based on outstanding
scholastic merit, civic involvement, and leadership
potential.
The People to People Leadership Summits bring
together outstanding student leaders from around
the globe to focus on leadership, teambuilding,
community service, college admissions, and profes-
sional aspirations. Students learn how to effectively
make a difference in their communities, develop
skills to help them lead tomorrow's world, and
build their college resumes, with the chance to earn
academic or service-learning credit.
Participants also gain insights to guide their edu-
cational and professional careers, and benefit from
a strong focus on college admissions. Through
workshops, presentations, excursions, and discus-
sions, student leaders attain a clear advantage as
they pursue their selected fields of interest. Stu-
dents will have the opportunity to meet with ad-
missions officers and gain valuable advice for nav-
igating the college application process. In some lo-
cations, students will be able to tour several area
universities.
The 2010 People to People Leadership Summits
will convene at Columbia University, George Wash-
ington University; John Hopkins University, Har-
vard University, Stanford University, Rice Universi-
ty, University of Chicago, University of Pennsylva-
nia, and University of California-Los Angeles.
The program is coordinated by People to People
Ambassador Programs to fulfill the vision Presi-
dent Dwight D. Eisenhower had for fostering world
citizenship when he founded People to People In-
ternational during his presidency in 1956. For addi-
tional information visit peopletopeople.com/lead-
ership.


Suwannee Valley collects gifts for Samaritan's Purse and
the world's largest Christmas project
Nov. 16-23: Suwannee Valley Region Hopes to Gather
17,500 Gift-Filled Shoe Boxes for Hurting Children Over-
seas

Submitted
Suwannee Valley Region and North FL Area, FL,
Oct. 26, 2009-Christmas is arriving early all over
the Suwannee Valley, as a local church prepares to
serve as a collection point for Operation Christmas
Child. Soon, with the help of Suwannee Valley vol-
unteers, the site will be brimming with festively
wrapped shoe boxes full of gifts.
Through Operation Christmas Child, the world's
largest Christmas project, Suwannee Valley residents
are packing shoe box gifts for children in more than
100 countries suffering from natural disaster, war,
terrorism, disease, famine and poverty. From Live
Oak, the shoe box gifts will be sorted and sent using
whatever means necessary-sea containers, trucks,
trains, airplanes, boats, camels, even dog sleds-to
reach suffering children around the world.
"Operation Christmas Child is a unique opportu-
nity to do something as simple as packing a shoe box
that will have a lasting impact on a child a world
away," said Bob Pettigrew, Operation Christmas
Child Collection Center coordinator. "We are excited
about the 2009 collection season as many communi-
ty members have already begun packing shoe box
gifts."
Operation Christmas Child uses tracking technol-
ogy that allows donors to "follow your box" to the
destination country where it will be hand-delivered
to a child in need. To register shoe box gifts and find
out what country they are delivered to, use the EZ
Give donation form found at www.samari-
tanspurse.org.
LOCAL COLLECTION SITE:
Live Oak Collection Center
Suwannee Station Baptist Church (386) 362-2553
3289 101st Lane
Live Oak, FL 32060
Contact: Bob & JoAnn Pettigrew (386) 755-1958 or
Cell (386) 397- 4684
Hours: Mon, Nov. 16 thru Mon., Nov. 23:10:00 am
-5 pm
Or visit one of Suwannee Valley Operation Christ-
mas Child's eleven well-located Relay Centers
through out Baker, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist,







OctoberSpecial


Sofa & Chair
Upholstered in any
fabric we stock! $489.00

Price includes fabric & labor.
More than 300 fabrics to select from!

Price also includes spring & frame repairs,
new padding added to entire piece.
New cushion foam is extra if needed.
NO Seconds NO Close-Outs ALL First Quality Material.
"I personally guarantee all work to suit you"


EARNHARDT & SONS UPHOLSTERY
MADISON, FLORIDA
556660cp, 1-850-973-6006 OR 1-850-973-4667


Hamilton, Lafayette, Levy, Madison, Suwannee, and
Taylor Counties. These Relay Centers have been
placed for your convenience so you can drop off
filled shoe box gifts for suffering children. For more
information about location of Relay Centers plus
days/hours open, please call 1-800-409-1665 or visit
www.samaritanspurse.org.
Since 1993, Operation Christmas Child, a project of
international Christian relief and evangelism organi-
zation Samaritan's Purse, headed by Franklin Gra-
ham, has delivered more than 69 million gift-filled
shoe boxes to needy children in some 130 countries
WHAT YOU CAN DO TO GET INVOLVED:
*PREPARE-Enlist families, churches, scout
troops, community groups and businesses to take
part in creating shoe box gifts for needy children
worldwide.
*PACK-Fill shoe boxes with school supplies,
toys, necessity items, hard candy and a letter of en-
couragement. Step-by-step shoe box packing in-
structions are available at
www.samaritanspurse.org.
*PROCESS-Sign up to join Operation Christmas
Child volunteers at the collection site in Suwannee
Valley Region as part of the effort to prepare millions
of shoe box gifts for delivery to underprivileged kids
on six continents.
*For more information on how to participate in
Operation Christmas Child, call 1-800-409-1665 or
visit www.samaritanspurse.org. National Collection
Week is Nov. 16-23.


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2009


HoRiecoming services at First

Baptist Church of Jasper
Submitted
First Baptist Church of Jasper will hold their
Homecoming services this Sunday (November 1st).
Sunday School starts at 9:45 a.m. and Homecoming
church service will begin at 10:45 a.m. Great food
will follow!


Community Calendar
*Oct. 8-Nov. 6 Artist John Rice retrospective ex-
hibit of his work at Levy Performing Arts Center in
Lake City. Sponsored by Art Matters, public invited
to attend. Call 386-697-4622 for more information.
*Oct. 29 Hamilton County Brotherhood will be
meeting at 7:00 at the 1st Baptist Church in White
Springs. All are invited. Any questions, call Chuck
Fultz at 386-855-1737.
*Oct. 30, 31 First Annual Fall Festival, Central
Avenue, downtown Jasper from 8:00 a.m. until.
Some of the events planned are an antique car show,
haunted old jail museum, haunted trail, trunk or
treat on Central Avenue, ghost stories, food and craft
vendors.
*Oct. 30, 31 Alapahoochee Historic and Farm
Heritage Days, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at 1424 Culpepper
Road, Echols County, Lake Park, Georgia. Antique
tractor show and swap meet.
*Nov. 7 The Florida State Beekeepers Associa-
tion and North Florida Community College's Green
Industries Institute are sponsoring a free community
event "A Day in the Bee Yard" at Green Industries
Institute in Monticello, Florida. The event is open to
the public from 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. and will feature a
variety of events for the entire family. The event will
feature bees, beekeepers and a host of activities,
classes, demonstrations, vendors, food and art.
CONTACT/MORE INFO: Patricia Garner, (850) 973-
1668, email garnerp@nfcc.edu
*Nov. 9 The Suwannee Chapter of the Florida
Trail Association will hold its monthly meeting at the
Suwannee River Water Management District from 7-
9 PM, on US 90 and CR 49, 2 miles east of Live Oak.
The Public is welcome!
*Nov. 10 Bellville Volunteer Fire Department
will be holding their annual business meeting at 6:00
p.m. The public is invited to attend.

Monthly Meetings:
The Jasper Revitalization Committee meets the 3rd
Thursday of each month at 6 p.m. in the Jasper City
Hall.
Bible Baptist Church opens their clothes closet on
the 2nd Saturday of each month from lp.m-3p.m.
Call 792-0720 for more information


-!e' yoym
INMo PEBTRA


FIRST ADVENT CHRISTIAN
N.W. 15th Avenue Jasper
Rev. Fran Wood
Sunday
Sunday School.... ................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship...................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday
Prayer Fellowship...............6:30 p.m.
500892-F
l:PTIS (Sout


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
SR 6 West, 6592 NW 48th St.,
Jennings, FL 32053
938-5611
Pastor:Jeff Cordero
Sunday School............................... 0:00 a.m.
Morning W orship.......................... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship, Youth Happening
RA's, GA's 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Supper 6:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting, Discipleship class for adults
Youth activities, Children's Choirs.....6:30 p.m.
Van pick-up upon request
500896-F


CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1/2 mile East on Hwy. 6, Jasper, Fl 32052
792-2275
Sunday
Sunday School.....................10:00 a.m.
Morning W orship................... 1 :00 a.m .
Children's Church................. 1 :00 a.m.
Church Training................... 6:00 p.m.
Evening W orship.... ............. 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Prayer M eeting.......................7:00 p.m .
500893-F

CHURCH OF CHRIST
N.W. 3rd St., Jasper
BIda: 792-2277


FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
405 Central Ave., Jasper, FL
Pastor- Dale Ames
Phone -386-792-1122
Sunday
Sunday School.............................. 9:45 a.m .
".1,:, I in, ',J ,:-, : 1:, 11:00 a.m .
Wednesday
Bible Study 4:45 p.m.
Choir Practice 6:00 p.m.
Family Night Dinner 3rd Wednesday
Clothes Closet 4th Saturday 1-5pm
500902-F
NOIDEOSI NTINA


Sunday BURNHAM CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Sunday School.............................9:30 a~m. 4520 NW CR 146, Jennings, FL 32053
Morning Worship.................... 10:30 a.m. Pasto9381265Carter
Evening Worship..................... 6:00 p.m. Sunday
Wednesday Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Evening 6:00 p.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.
500897-F Evening Service..... ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting 7:00 p.m.
L a 9-F
cw' Le~~ye


To list your church on our church directory, please call Nancy at 1-800-525-4182


To place your ad inside

the Church Directory

please call

Louise at

386-792-2487


FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
204 N.W 3rd Avenue, Jasper, 792-2258
Pastor: Rev. Parrish Jones, 792-8412
SUNDAY
Sunday School ............................10:00 a.m.
Worship Service........................ 11 :00 a.m.
WEDNESDAY
Prayer in Fellowship Hall...............9:00 a.m.
Choir Practice 7:00 p.m.
500898-F

ST. THERESE CATHOLIC CHURCH
Three miles north of Jasper U.S. 41
PO. Box 890, Jasper, FL 32052
Rectory U.S. 90 E., Live Oak, FL
(386) 364-1108
Sunday MASS 8:00 a.m.
500901-F

C3HURCH F GO


ETERNAL HOPE
CHURCH OF GOD
Glen R. Barrs, D.D. Pastor
Church Phone 386-792-HOPE (4673)
SUNDAY
Worship & Praise................10:30 a.m.
Classes for Kids............... 11:00 a.m.
Celebration Praise ................6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Wednesday (FTH)................. 7:00 p.m.
Everyone Welcome! 552202-F


PAGE 5A


LORDY,

LORDY,

LOOK

WHO'S

FORTY!

Love,
Mom, Dad
and Taylor
55698-F


Operation Christmas Child


~9~-;"
L:


~5C~





THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


NFCC Bee yard

Enjoy "A Day in the Bee Yard" November 7 at Green
Industries
Florida State Beekeepers Association and NFCC plan
community event in Monticello


Submitted

MADISON, FL -- The Florida State
Beekeepers Association and North
Florida Community College's Green
Industries Institute are sponsoring a
free community event "A Day in the
Bee Yard" on Saturday, Nov. 7 at Green
Industries Institute in Monticello,
Florida. The event is open to the public
from 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. and will feature a
variety of events for the entire family.
"Stop by and enjoy the beautiful
Green Industries grounds, participate
in a variety of activities, and have a fun
day learning about the amazing life of
bees," said Patricia Garner, Director of
NFCC's Green Industries Institute.
"We are excited to co-sponsor and host
this Florida State Beekeepers Associa-
tion event and invite the community to
stop in and enjoy a fun day with us at
Green Industries."
The event will feature bees, beekeep-
ers and a host of activities, classes,
demonstrations, vendors, food and art.
Some highlights of the day include
How to Become a Beekeeper demon-
stration with an Ask the Experts and
Kids Corner component, a live bee


hive under glass for close viewing, free
honey sticks for children, honey and
beeswax candles and other items for
sale, as well as food vendors, art work,
and more. Green Industries will also
showcase its facilities and grounds; its
indoor and outdoor classrooms, green-
houses, fruit and nut gardens, and ob-
servatory featuring a 16' Richie
Creighton telescope will all be open to
the public during the event.
Folk artist Janet Moses will offer a
Bee Themed Folk Art Painting Class at
the "A Day in the Bee Yard" event.
There is a $45 charge for the painting
class and those interested in participat-
ing must register in advance by calling
(850) 997-3974.
There will be free admission and free
parking on Nov. 7 for the "A Day in the
Bee Yard" event. Join in the fun and
learn a ton about an amazing and im-
portant little creature-the bee. Green
Industries Institute is located at 2729
West Washington Street in Monticello.
For more information, contact Patricia
Garner at (850) 973-1668, email gar-
nerp@nfcc.edu or visit www.nfcc.edu
(search: Green Industries).


Many veterans and surviving

spouses may be eligible for VA pension
Submitted by Bo Beauchemin, vice Office wants to inform veterans
Hamilton County Veteran Service Officer that the Veterans Administration non-
service connected pension program
The Hamilton County Veteran Ser- provides a level of financial support to


LEAVING WORK EARLY

MAY BE AN OPTION

If you are facing a buyout or early retirement offer, you
may have a lot of questions. Can I retire now? Do I need
to look for another job? What are my options?

Edward Jones can help.

We'll start by getting to know your goals. Then we'll sort
through your current situation and work with you face
to face to help you determine how a buyout or early
retirement offer can affect your retirement goals.
To make sense of how your offer can affect your
retirement decisions, call your Edward Jones financial
advisor today.
E Josh Akers
Financial Advisor
521 Lakes Blvd Suite B
Lake Park, GA 31636
229-559-0127

www.edwardjones.com MemberSIPC


EdwrS Se


556362-F


NOTICE OF INTENDED EMPLOYMENT
AND REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS.
The Hamilton County Landfill gives notice of
intent to employ a person for the position of
Equipment Operator II.
This is a highly skilled position in the operation
of complex and heavy motor-driven, earth-
moving equipment. Employees in this class are
responsible for the safe and efficient operation of
very heavy construction equipment. Work in this
position requires high degree of skill in working
to engineering grades and working efficiently so
as not to impede the progress of related oper-
ations. Supervision consists primarily in job
performance checks made at work site by the
Solid Waste Director. In addition, the position
requires a current and valid Class A Florida
Commercial Driver's License with Tanker
Endorsement with a good driving record. A
complete copy of the job description for this
position may be obtained from the Office of the
Clerk of Circuit Court, 207 Northeast First Street,
Room 106, Jasper, FL 32052.
An application may be obtained at the Hamilton
County Landfill, 4652 SW 107th Ave., Jasper, FL
32052; the Office of Clerk of Circuit Court, 207
Northeast First Street, Room 106, Jasper, FL
32052; and the county's website at
www.hamiltoncountyflorida.com. Applications
may be submitted to the Office of the Clerk of
Circuit Court, 207 Northeast First Street, Room
106, Jasper, FL 32052 or Hamilton County
Landfill, 1652 SW 107th Ave., Jasper, FL 32052.
For more information, contact Dale I. Jackson,
Director, Hamilton County Landfill at 386-792-
1020.
For consideration, all applications must be
received no later than 3:00 pm on Monday,
November 9, 2009.

Hamilton County is a Drug Free Workplace and
an Equal Opportunity Employer. Veteran's
preference will apply, in accordance with Section
295.07 Florida Statutes.
557383dwv


wartime veterans or
their widow(er). To qual-
ify, a veteran must have
90 days or more of active
duty under honorable
conditions during which
one day must have been
during a wartime peri-
od. Service members en-
listing after 09/07/1980
must serve at least 24
months or the full period
for which the service
member was called to
active duty.
Additionally, if under
age 65, the veteran must
be unable to secure em-
ployment by reason of
disabilities which are
considered by the Veter-
ans Administration to be
permanent and totaling
disabling. Unlike the
veteran, the widow(er)
does not need to be dis-
abled. Veterans 6t years
and older are eligible
without regard to dis-
abilities. The amount of
pension depends upon
the total income of the
veteran's household.
Additional amounts
may be awarded for
those requiring Aid and
Attendance and those
who are housebound.
Generally speaking, a
veteran may be eligible
for pension if total annu-
al household income is
$11,830.00 or less with
no dependents or $15,
493.00 with one depen-
dent. Widow annual in-
come limits are $7,933.00
with no dependents and
$10,385 with one depen-
dent.
Veterans who feel they
may be eligible are
urged to call Bo Beau-
chemin, Hamilton Coun-
ty Service Officer at 386-
792-1272 Tuesday-
Thursday for informa-
tion and assistance.















PI ,gIi
i i l ',


Pancake Supper to benefit Jasper

Presbyterian Youth Missions


Submitted

A pancake supper will be held on
Tuesday, November 10, 2009 at the
J.R.E. Lee Cafeteria from 4:30 p.m. un-
til 7:00 p.m. Tickets are $6.00 each and
can be purchased in advance at Dr. Ben


Norris' office, SunSations, or D&S
Signs. Tickets can also be purchased at
the door.
All proceeds from the event will go
to the Jasper Presbyterian Youth Mis-
sions. The pancake supper is support-
ed by the former Lions Club members.


Submitted

The 14th semi-annual Alapa-
hoochee Historic and Farm Heritage
Days will be celebrated on October 30
and 31 from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m.
at 1424 Culpepper Road in Echols
County, Lake Park, Georgia. Admis-
sion is free, no alcoholic beverages are
allowed.
The event will include an antique
tractor show and swap meet. Visitor
camping is available; please call 229-


Sister Katherine Mclntyre
Pastor Phillip M. Jackson, Church
Mother Ledia S. Jackson, along with
the Empowering Tabernacle House of
Prayer family, wants to say "Congratu-
lations" to two wonderful members
that have made a transformation in
their personal live. Sister Katherine
McIntyre and Sister Jasmine Howell
have both decided to take their lives
into positive directions.
Sis. Katherine McIntyre is currently
in the Navy and resides in Virginia and
Sis. Jasmine Howell, who just passed
basic training in Ft. Jackson, South
Carolina, is now headed to Virginia as


559-5665 or email antiquedays@ya-
hoo.com for more information.
Other exhibits and vendors include
cane grinding/syrup cooking, fresh
ground corn meal and grits, antique
exhibitors, tractor parades, plow-
ing/harrowing, antique and other
farm machinery displays, fly-wheel
engine displays, tractor owner sales,
tractor part vendors, Candle-lady
sales, Mr. Franklin's Antique Sales,
Rocky and His Anvil Cannon, and
flea market vendors.


Norris Notes



By Lillian Norris


Again I am reminded that no one
should ever complain about not hav-
ing anything to do here. It is a full
day, and I love it, it is just a little
harder as we get older, but thankful
that I can still "go".
We were privileged on Sunday to
have Patrick Murphy as the guest
speaker at First Presbyterian Church
on Sunday morning. He is certainly
an inspirational speaker, he had a
great message for all of us. Patrick is
a teacher and coach at Hamilton
County High School. He was accom-
panied and supported by his wife,
Sally, also a teacher at HCHS. We are
fortunate to have them in our school
system.
On Sunday evening the annual fall
festival was held at First Presbyterian
Church, some artistic work done by
the young people, sometimes with the
assistance of the adults, a lot of fun,
later toasting hot dogs and marshmal-
lows, there was chili, sandwiches and
all kinds of goodies, including a cake
walk with all trying for a chance to
get one of Martha's cakes in the cake
walk. Later children of all ages went
on a hay ride, coming back in time for
all to get ready for going home, after
an evening of fun and fellowship.
It was interesting to me to read in
the Baptist newsletter that Margie
Dedge had talked with their youth
music director about "Give Me That
Old Time Religion". It is hard to be-
lieve that there are some Baptists who
are not familiar with that song. I re-
member it in past revivals, there was
a tabernacle in town a few blocks
from our home, Billy Graham
preached there once in the days when
no one much had ever heard of him.
Recently I received some papers from
the house where I grew up and in
them was a newspaper clipping about


his revival there but there was no date
on it, don't know why it was saved at
the time but it must have impressed
one of the members of our family.
Maybe me, I just do not remember.
A song I was not familiar with in
the past few years came to mean a lot
to me as I heard it on TV from a
Methodist Church in Albany, Georgia.
I could not find it but Roger Hutto
found it for me, and it is now in the
Presbyterian Hymnal in recent song
books that were donated to the
Church by Mary Frances Lewis' fami-
ly, "Take My Hand, Precious Lord".
Later, I also found that hymn on a
CD which I had purchased a few
years ago at a concert put on my
Montreat College Choir at First Pres-
byterian Church in Lake City (the late
Nell Rhoden and I had attended and
enjoyed it so much). My sister, the late
Martha Jones Gibson, was a graduate
of Montreat College, a Presbyterian
College located near the Billy Graham
Home, she attended Church there
where the Graham family attended,
and we attended summer conferences
there every summer when we were
young.
I have recently learned that the Bill
and Linda Taylor family has an ex-
change student from Kitar living with
them, he is a Junior at Hamilton
County High School, hope to learn
more abut this, it is my understanding
that he will have to go back home for
his senior year.
I will try to have a report on Sister-
hood for next week, sorry I was un-
able to make it last week.
Hope to hear from y'all soon.
Lillian Norris
792-2151
NORRIS NOTES
norrislw@windstsream.net


well. Empowering Tabernacle House
of Prayer Outreach Ministry just wants
to say Congratulations to these women
who have matured and made some
great achievements in their lives. We
pray that they continue doing well and
that they know that their church fami-
ly is praying for them.

Submitted by
Pastor Phillip M. Jackson ,
Church Mother Ledia S. Jackson
Empowering Tabernacle House of Prayer
Outreach Ministry Family


Alapahoochee-14th semi-annual

historic and farm heritage days


Empowering Tabernacle House of

Prayer says "Congratulations"


PAGE 6A


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2009









Audubon of Florida honors FWC bird advocate


Nancy Douglass spends little time in her office, but when she does her love for shorebirds


is evident

Submitted

Nancy Douglass walks softly but
carries a loud voice for Florida's
shorebirds and seabirds. For her pas-
sion in defending and conserving
some of Florida's signature bird
species, Douglass will receive the Guy
Bradley Award, one of Audubon of
Florida's highest honors. Douglass
works as a non-game biologist with
the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser-


vation Commission (FWC), where
she's been an advocate for birds for 20
years.
The Guy Bradley Award is named
after the man hired by the Audubon
Society in 1902 to protect South Flori-
da's wading birds from hunters.
Bradley, a Monroe County deputy,
traveled the Everglades extensively to
guard its wading birds and to protect
them from hunters seeking feathers
for the fashionable women's hats of


the time. In his quest to protect the
birds, Bradley was shot and killed as
he attempted to arrest a plume-hunter
for killing egrets on Cape Sable. His
name on this award symbolizes the
bravery and determination of Flori-
da's greatest conservationists.
"These conservation leaders not
only fight for the birds on their own,
but they recruit others to the cause,"
said David Anderson, executive direc-
tor of Audubon of Florida. "We are
pleased to recognize Nancy Douglass
this year not only for her commitment
to the plight of Florida's declining
coastal birds, but for her vision of a
collaboration between state wildlife
regulators and concerned citizens to
improve the future for these species."
Douglass received the award on
Oct. 23 at Audubon of Florida's annu-
al state conference in St. Petersburg.
One of her latest projects with the
FWC resulted in the creation of the
Florida Shorebird Alliance, whose
goal is to improve shorebird manage-
ment statewide. At the conference,
Douglass also will participate in a
panel on a new collaborative project
between Audubon of Florida and the
alliance, focused on local government
coordination on the southwest coast
of Florida.
"Shorebirds desperately need our
help, and until recently, very few peo-
ple recognized their plight," Douglass


said. "This recognition from Audubon
of Florida is important to me because
it will help raise awareness for our
fragile and unique shorebird and
seabird populations in Florida and
help them survive and thrive."
Audubon's state conference, Oct.
23-24 in St. Petersburg, brought to-
gether conservation leaders and sci-
entists, as well as policymakers and
business people from across Florida.
Participants discussed strategies to
protect Florida's coasts, birds and
wildlife, while ensuring quality of
life for Florida's human residents.
Besides Douglass, the FWC was
well represented at the conference.
Nick Wiley, FWC assistant executive
director, was featured in two ses-
sions. Along with Florida's Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection Di-
rector Mike Sole, Wiley participated
in a panel discussion on climate
change and coastal conservation, and
in a workshop that addressed the
threats to Florida's wildlife posed by
invasive exotic species. Doug Par-
sons, the coordinator for the FWC's
climate change steering committee,
joined Greg Butcher, National
Audubon Society director, for a
workshop on climate change and
birds.
Visit MyFWC.com for information
about the FWC's programs for birds
and climate change efforts.


AAA urges adult halloween partygoers to designate a sober driver

Motor club says safe driving to and from parties will help ensure a happy Halloween


Submitted
With nearly one in three adults planning to attend
or host a Halloween party this year, AAA urges par-
tygoers to plan in advance by designating a sober
driver before enjoying the festivities.
"Partygoers and hosts will most likely take full ad-
vantage of the fact that Halloween falls on a Satur-
day this year. It's important to designate a sober dri-
ver, and refrain from drinking alcohol if you don't
have a safe plan to get home," said Leticia Messam,
manager, traffic safety programs, AAA Auto Club
South.
According to the National Retail Federation, Hal-
loween parties for adults have been growing in pop-
ularity over the past decade. This year about 30 per-
cent of all adults will be celebrating with others, and
an estimated sixty-two percent of those ages 18-24
will attend or host a party.
With legions of child pedestrians and their adult
escorts in neighborhoods for trick-or-treating this
weekend, and many costume-clad adults taking to


the roads to attend holiday parties, it is imperative
that everyone involved in the celebration think
about the importance of traffic safety, AAA said.
Fifty-eight percent of all traffic fatalities in the U.S.
on Halloween night last year involved a driver or
motorcycle rider with a blood-alcohol content (BAC)
of 0.08 or higher, which is illegal in every state.
To help keep the roadways safe this Halloween
weekend, AAA offers a few easy tips:
*Designate a sober driver in advance. If intending
to drink alcohol, plan ahead to get home safely by
selecting a designated driver or ensuring cab service
is available from the party location. Never ride with
a driver who has been drinking.
*Consider an overnight stay. If attending a party
at a friend's home, consider asking to stay overnight.
If participating in festivities in a downtown or com-
mercial area, look into hotel accommodations within
walking distance. Many hotels offer special Hal-
loween weekend rates and promotions.
*Do not let impaired guests drive. If hosting a


Halloween party, remind guests to plan ahead and
designate their sober driver. Offer alcohol-free bev-
erages and do not allow impaired guests to drive.
Prepare a list of local taxi companies in advance to
have ready should guests need to call one.
*Avoid traveling through residential areas. If pos-
sible, try to avoid cutting through residential areas
where trick-or-treaters are likely to be present. If pro-
viding directions to a party, try not to route guests
through residential areas unnecessarily.
*Watch for children in the street. While trick-or-
treating, children may not pay attention to traffic
and might cross mid-block or between parked cars.
Motorists should scan far ahead when driving in res-
idential areas, watch for children and cautiously
monitor their actions.
Obey the speed limit. Motorists should obey the
posted speed limit. When driving through residen-
tial areas were trick-or-treaters are likely out, consid-
er driving five miles per hour less than the posted
speed limit.


AGENDA
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS,
HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA
Room 112 Courthouse 207 Northeast First Street
Jasper, Florida
MEETING DATE: NOVEMBER 3, 2009
THE AGENDA ITEMS LISTED BY NUMBER WILL BE TAKEN IN ORDER FROM THE BEGINNING OF
THE MEETING REGARDLESS OF TIME. HOWEVER, THE TIME CERTAIN ITEMS LISTED WITH
SPECIFIC TIMES WILL COMMENCE AT THE SPECIFIED TIME.
LISTED ITEMS
1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC- UNAGENDAED APPEARANCES (*)
2. CONSENT AGENDA APPROVAL
3. 2008-09 CDBG PROGRAM
4. REPORT ON ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS AND REQUESTS
5. APPROVE BILLS
6. CORRESPONDENCE AND ANNOUNCEMENTS
7. ADJOURN
TIME CERTAIN ITEMS
9:00 A.M.- CALL TO ORDER- INVOCATION- PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE TO THE FLAG
9:05 A.M. BETTY JEAN LAMB- COMPLAINT REGARDING THE HAMILTON COUNTY ROAD
DEPARTMENT
9:15 A.M. COUNTY ROAD PROJECTS- STATUS REPORT
DUE TO PUBLICATION DEADLINE, THIS AGENDA MAY NOT CONTAIN ALL MATTERS BEFORE
THE BOARD ON NOVEMBER 3, 2009. A COMPLETE COPY OF THE AGENDA MAY BE OBTAINED
AFTER 1:00 P.M. ON WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009 FROM THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF
CIRCUIT COURT, COURTHOUSE, JASPER, FLORIDA.
Persons appearing before the Board are requested, if possible, to submit in writing the subject matter of their
appearance before the Board not later than Tuesday prior to the Board Meeting the following Tuesday.
(*) NOTICE: Persons appearing before the Hamilton County Board of County Commissioners, not having
given notice in time to be included and shown on the Agenda, and desiring to make a presentation, will be
limited to five (5) minutes, in the interest of meeting time. The Board of County Commissioners will hear and
listen to persons appearing whose subject has not been shown on the agenda; however, action by the Board on
any such matter can only be taken upon determination of an emergency situation. Any identifiable group of
three (3) persons or more shall be limited to a total of ten (10) minutes per topic.
In accordance with Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes, notice is given that if any person decides to appeal any
decision made by the Board, agency or commission, with respect to proceedings and that, for such purpose,
he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is based.
NOTIFICATION: IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, PERSONS
WITH DISABILITIES NEEDING A SPECIAL ACCOMMODATION FOR ATTENDANCE AT THIS
MEETING SHOULD CONTACT THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, ROOM 106, 207 NORTHEAST FIRST
STREET, JASPER, FLORIDA, TELEPHONE (386) 792-1288, NOT LATER THAN 72 HOURS PRIOR TO
THE PROCEEDINGS. IF HEARING IMPAIRED, TDD (386) 792-0857.
NEXT REGULAR MEETING OF THE BOARD: TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2009 AT 6:00 P.M.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
HAMILTON COUNTY. FLORIDA
CONSENT AGENDA
NOVEMBER 3, 2009

1) MINUTES APPROVE: October 20, 2009 Regular Session
2) DEPARTMENT HEADS- ACTION ITEMS:
3) DEPARTMENT HEADS- INFORMATION ITEMS:
A) ROAD DEPARTMENT:
1) Fuel Reports September 2009 file
4) APPROVE PAYMENT OF THE FOLLOWING INVOICES BAILEY BISHOP & LANE:
A) Invoice No. 13810 I-75/SR 6 $10,500
5) APPROVE PAYMENT OF THE FOLLOWING INVOICE FROM SALSER CONSTRUCTION, INC.
AT THE RECOMMENDATION OF BAILEY, BISHOP & LANE, INC.:
Pay Request No. 5- SR 6/I-75 Wastewater Collection System $57,162.89
546517-F


Because


For ER waiting times, text ER to 23000

or visit lakecitymedical.com


LAKE CITY


MEDICAL CENTER
www.lakecitymedical.com

386-719-9000

Consult-A-Nurse 800-525-3248


556412-F


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2009


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 7A




THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


V


-------- -- ----


C W November Special 10 off all heaters in stock
SUIJWANNIEE
l HARDI)WARE & FEl)D
S16660 Spring SI.. While Springs Under the neii oii nerrshrp
I 386-397-2551 o.. Don & Celeste tVi/',n
I--- --- --- -------- J


Cros .strets nly at onran
f iaao alk hnvr a. a


4


I


November Special 1 free month with purchase
Sof 6 month subscription to the
^ O al .11aspr Nwnus
105 2nd Ave.. Jasper 36-70 '-2'4- 7 7
m m m m m m m m m m m m mm 'm- Ul


>11


I
I
Free delivery with coupon

\ppliaince N
\\areIouss; It
i313 N\\ Halle Sll'reel. Jasper.: Florida 321152 386-792-2725
*---------------^.- -J
M M M.K y INN.MjM
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20 off retail purchase through November 15th


I
I
Ia
--


S*-SunSations
Tannin * Nail, (illt
110 Hatley St., Jasper 386-792-3538
mMil---------


Mae ur t rik-r-rat hl
thee s til lgh otsde


Free cookie and cup of tea with coupon.
Offer good through 11/06/09


p The Jasper Marketplace
SAntiques-Collectibles-Gifts- 107 Central Avenue, SW Jasper
Home Decor 86466244
Quality Consignments Welcome 86558351 -
NIL- =MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM


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November special wlcoupon 10% off pre-made arrangements
(Excluding funeral bouquets)


S Brown's Flowers & Gifts
106 SW 1st St., Jasper 386-792-1120
Margie & Carlton Brown, Owners
_.I -= -mmmmm Im I m5 54==IJ


15 off any Tanning Package through December
7 SALON &
a J-e ;t BOUTIQUE
-Tanning Available
Jamie Barker, owner/stylist 1150 NW US 41, Suite 1, Jasper I
Bonnie Lawson, stylist *792-1244 558356-F
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Insurance Plus
SR 22 & FR 44
Low Down Payment, Tag, Title & Notary Service
Income Tax services available after
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104 W. Hatley St., Jasper 386-792-3580 55344 U
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I T jn---
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*r


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* W $5.00 off $25.00 purchase 10/29 thru 11/6 w/coupon
I This coupon not valid with any other offer.
~Jasper Hardware
*i & Supply Co., Inc.
202 Northwest Central Ave., Jasper, FL 32052
I 386-792-1052 -558345F
INOOOONONOOO NmmmmOEM


a


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'tu ru llD iDO iiui- l' a IIi- UIIIyj November

Afterh as & OTn


IAfter-hours appointments & Tanning available
Walk-ins welcome
117 S. Central Avenue, Jasper 386-638-9919
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5 0 7i
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10 off a 1-hour massage
ST e Therapeutic Massage
and Bodywork
SStephanie Adams, BS, RN, LMT 3650 NW 50th Place, Jennings
License # MA50575
Member NCTMBAMTA 386-938-4732 or 386-466-8711
ripped orm openmwrapper
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D & S Signs
SH111 SW Central Ave., Jasper, FL
SCREEN PRINTING, DIGITAL PRINTING & TROPHIES
Phone: (386) 792-1354 e-mail: ds signs@windstream.net
Denice & Scott Hughes 558343-F
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McCook, 114 Hatley St., Jasper
ar/Teacher 386-590-05358339
-- ~=.-. .- .'.


PAGE 8A


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2009


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SSports


Xe asper urr

Section B
Thursday, October 29, 2009


Lady Trojan Volleyball


"Gabby




44


I" Moody, center with parents Tracy, left, and Willie, right.


Junior Varsity Team: front row, L-R: Crystal Coleman, Courtney Moody,
Katelyn Mitchell, Sherry Campbell. Back row, L-R: Kyunda Johnson, Kaley
Fenneman, Coach Kim Fenneman, Madihah Tamoney, Angelica Gallegos.


Submitted by Donna Beauchamp

The Lady Trojan Volleyball Teams
met Madison County Tuesday, Octo-
ber 20. The varsity team was defeated
in a close match; however, the junior
varsity brought home the victory.
The Lady Trojans hosted Newberry


on Thursday. The ladies won one
game but Newberry came back to
take the match.
Coach Hannah Perez said, "Of
course I'm upset that the girls didn't
win the games on Thursday, but they
should feel some sense of accom-
plishment to win one game and have


a close second to a team that easily
beat them at the beginning of the sea-
son."
Thursday evening was senior night
and hopefully a special one for
Gabrielle "Gabby" Elizabeth Moody.
She is the daughter of Willie and Tra-
cy Moody. Her hobbies include play-


ing volleyball and going to church.
Gabby plans to attend VSU after high
school and major in sports medicine.
Gabby finished off her regular season
of play with five service points.
District games will be held in Talla-
hassee this week and will wind up
the season.


New portable computer lab at C.H.E.


SHES News


Students become laptop computer "savvy"


4~ S

B I


- -..


Mrs. Butler's class enjoying the new computer lab at C.H.E. Photos submitted.


Submitted
Mrs. Bulter's class was the first
group to use the new portable comput-
er lab at C.H.E. What a great time the
class had in learning how to handle the
laptops and how to use them for writ-
ing and taking Accelerated Reading
Quizzes.
As Mrs. Butler was handing out the
laptops, Mrs. Marlowe gave instruc-
tions about how to handle them and
explained to the students the impor-
tance of taking care of the computers.
Once the computers were on the stu-
dent's desk, the students were very at-
tentive in listening to instructions
about how they could log-on and start


writing a paragraph that they had
written earlier in the week.
This was quite an experience for the
students! Not only did they have to
use their typing skills, or lack of skills,
they had to have a "finished" piece of
writing. Once they had written their
paragraph they could take Accelerated
Reading Quizzes. Taking the Acceler-
ated Reading Quizzes is always an ex-
citing time.
The class is looking forward to the
next time they will get the lab in their
room. A special "thanks" goes to all
those responsible for making it possi-
ble for our school to have the mobile
lab.


Filling the Community

will Kindness and Food

GS Canned Food Drive


Girl Scout Troop 1162 would like
to remind you of their Chili/Soup
Canned Food Drive. The Girl
Scouts will use these items (toma-
toes, chili powder, chili beans, veg-
etables, crackers, napkins, spoons,
bowls,) to feed the community on


Wednesday, November 25th.
Look for the boxes in local busi-
nesses as well as churches. Any-
one who is interested in help please
contact Leslie Carter at lesliej-
carter@windstream.net or Sandra
McCormick @ 386-855-4058.


Submitted by Waylon Bush,
SHES principal
South Hamilton Elementary Mus-
tangs. You read it right, Mustangs! As
a result of Positive Behavior Support
(PBS), SHES students were afforded
the privilege of selecting a new mas-
cot. The PBS team selected three mas-
cots for consideration as the new mas-
cot, the Bears, the Red Wolves, and the
Mustangs. The students voted and the
"Mustangs" was the overwhelming fa-
vorite. Now, we have got to get some
MUSTANG shirts (just for clarifica-
tion, this Mustang is the wild horse
type, not the car).
South Hamilton Elementary wel-
comes Mrs. Annie Pinello as our new
Guidance Counselor. For a number of
years, SHES has not had a full-time
guidance counselor, but Mrs. Dorothy
Bryant, a cornerstone of SHES, has ful-
filled those duties on a part-time basis.
With the student growth that SHE has
experienced, the district recognized
the need to fill this position on a full-
time basis. Mrs. Pinello hit the hall-
ways running and has already had a
tremendous impact upon the students,
staff, and administration. We welcome
her and are elated to have this addition
to our staff. On the other side of the
coin, we say goodbye to a very dear
friend, Mrs. Dorothy Bryant. I have
known Mrs. Bryant for many years
and she has been such a resource and
support for my time here. We love you
Mrs. Bryant and I think we may see
more of you in the future than you
think!
Also, Ms. Faye Corbett has been
added to our staff as a Turnaround
Specialist. Ms. Corbett's duties in-
clude providing professional develop-
ment to our staff. Ms. Corbett has also
been very busy since starting her new
duties and has been an inspiring


source to our staff. We welcome Ms.
Corbett and are very appreciative of
this new staff position and the work
she is doing for our teachers.
Once again we offer our thanks to
Potash Corporation for helping us.
PCS donated a sound system to SHES
including wireless microphones. We
can never say enough about how good
PCS has been to this school. We appre-
ciate PCS!
The district maintenance crew re-
cently made upgrades to our auditori-
um. Approximately fifty lights were
inoperative in our auditorium and
many of the ceiling tiles needed re-
placing. Maintenance replaced the
tiles and changed the fluorescent bulbs
and made other necessary electrical re-
pairs. This was quite an event due to
the height of the ceiling and slope of
the floor, but the job was completed
quickly and safely. Wear your sun-
glasses next time you visit our audito-
rium!
This has been Red Ribbon week and
Mrs. Bryant coordinated the week of
activities that empower students to
live a "drug free" life. The culmination
of the week's activities ended with a
pep rally by the youth league cheer-
leaders from White Springs and Red
Ribbon prizes were awarded to the
students. The Town of White Springs
Police Chief Ken Brookins addressed
the students and challenged them to
live a drug, alcohol, and tobacco free
life. We greatly appreciate Chief
Brookins taking time from his hectic
schedule to bring a powerful message
to our students.
Finally, we express our gratitude to
Mrs. Shun Reynolds, Mrs. Martha
Fultz, and Mrs Sharon Gay, for coordi-
nating and inoculating (with parental
permission) SHES students against the
H1N1 Flu.


Researchers examine benefits

of frugality during rough times


Submitted

Tallahassee, Fla. < While news me-
dia across the country are document-
ing the changes in personal spending
triggered by recent economic turmoil,
researchers at the Florida State Uni-
versity College of Business are exam-
ining the effects of saving and spend-
ing philosophies established prior to
the recession on work and home life.
Wayne Hochwarter, Florida State's
Jim Moran Professor of Management,
and research associate Christian Pon-
der examined the saving and spend-
ing philosophies of more than 1,500
full-time employees who experienced
increased job insecurity over the past
12 months.
"At some point, all of us have been
told the importance of saving money
for a rainy day," Hochwarter said.
"We were interested in comparing


work and home anxiety of both
spenders, and savers, to see if the
message still rings true when faced
with work uncertainty."
Statistically significant results con-
firmed the value of family thriftiness.
Compared to financially conservative
individuals (savers), less thrifty em-
ployees (spenders):

Experienced less enjoyment in
the tasks they performed at work
Were less interested in seeking
out ways to improve the company
Had difficulty concentrating on
tasks and were more easily distract-
ed
Reported that completion of job
tasks has been repeatedly delayed be-
cause of increased job-search activity
at work


SEE RESEARCHERS, PAGE 6B






THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2009


Jasper Legals
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 09-64-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
TINA LOUISE DIXON, deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Tina
Louise Dixon, deceased, whose date of
death was July 31, 2009, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Hamilton County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is
207 NE First Street, Jasper, FL 32052.
The names and addresses of the person-
al representative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of the first publication of this no-
tice is October 15, 2009.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/: Paul Hendrick
PAUL HENDRICK
Florida Bar No. 142421
Law Office of Ralph R. Deas
306 NE First Street
Jasper, FL 32052
Telephone: 386-792-2755
Fax: 386-792-7395

Personal Representative:
By /s/: Thomas J. Murphy
Thomas J. Murphy
1766 NW 3rd Way
Jennings, FL 32053
10/22, 10/29
PUBLIC AUCTION
Date: 11-17-2009
Time: 8:00 A.M.
1998 Ford
vin # 1FTYR14U3WPB60580
1998 Ford
vln # 2FMZA5140WBD83220
1993 Nissan
vin # 1N4EB31POPC815374
2006 Mitsubishi
vln # 4A3AB26F46E033937

Location: Dennis Garage
8109 CR 146 NW
Jennings, FL 32053
10/29
NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING

The Board of Commissioners of the
Northwest Florida Regional Housing Au-
thority will hold a Special Meeting, No-
vember 10, 2009 in the Regency Room of
the Ramada Inn North, 2900 North Mon-
roe St., Tallahassee, Florida. Meeting will
begin at 1:00 p.m. E.S.T The meeting
will be open to the public.
10/29 11/5

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS
CONCERNING AMENDMENTS TO
THE HAMILTON COUNTY LAND
DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS
BY THE PLANNING AND ZONING
BOARD OF HAMILTON COUNTY,
FLORIDA, SERVING ALSO AS THE LO-
CAL PLANNING AGENCY OF HAMIL-
TON COUNTY, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to Sec-
tions 163.3161 through 163.3215, Florida
Statutes, as amended, and the Hamilton
County Land Development Regulations,
as amended, hereinafter referred to as
the Land Development Regulations, ob-
jections, recommendations and com-
ments concerning the amendments, as
described below, will be heard by the
Planning and Zoning Board of Hamilton
County, Florida, serving also as the Local
Planning Agency of Hamilton County,
Florida, at public hearings on November
10, 2009 at 7:00 p.m., or as soon there-
after as the matter can be heard, in the
County Commission Meeting Room,
County Courthouse located at 207 North-
east First Street, Jasper, Florida. Amend-
ment No. LDR 09-3 was previously no-
ticed for a public hearing on October 13,
2009.

(1) LDR 09-3, an application by the Board
of County Commissioners to amend the
text of the Land Development Regula-
tions by amending Section 4.2.20.4 enti-
tled, Performance Standards, Heat, cold,
dampness, or movement of air and Sec-
tion 4.2.20.5, entitled Performance Stan-
dards, Noise to add "EPGF" Electri-
cal Power Generating Facility zoning dis-
trict to the list of zoning districts where
standards shall be applied at the bound-
aries of the districts and not at the lot lines
of the individual properties located within
the districts, and by adding a new section,
Section 4.22, entitled, "EPGF" Electrical
Power Generating Facility to establish a
new zoning district to allow for electrical
power generating facilities and related
uses.

(2) LDR 09-4, an application by the Board
of County Commissioners, to amend the
Official Zoning Atlas of the Land Devel-
opment Regulations by changing the zon-
ing district from AGRICULTURAL-4 (A-4)
and COMMERCIAL, HIGHWAY INTER-
CHANGE (CHI) to ELECTRICAL POWER
GENERATING FACILITY (EPGF) on
property described, as follows:

From AGRICULTURAL-4 (A-4) to ELEC-
TRIAL POWER GENERATING FACILITY
(EPGF):

A parcel of land lying within Sections 1
and 6, Township 1 North, Range 12 and
13 East, Hamilton County, Florida, being
more particularly described as follows:
Commence at the Northeast corner of the
Southeast 1/4 of said Section 1; thence
South 0059'04" East, along the East line
of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 1, a
distance of 1,862.91 feet to the Westerly
right-of-way line of State Road 6; thence
South 34 06'09" West, along the Wester-
ly right-of-way line of said State Road 6, a
distance of 260.53 feet to the South side
of a South Georgia Natural Gas pipeline


easement; thence North 85052'30" West,
along said South line, a distance of
1,096.72 feet; thence South 00059'04"
East 648.99 feet to the North side of
Northwest 44th Street, a county graded
road; thence South 89036'42" West,
along said Northwest 44th Street, 100.00
feet; thence North 00059'04" West 656.89
feet to the South side of said South Geor-
gia Natural Gas pipeline easement;
thence North 85 52'30" West, along said
South line, 612.53 feet; thence South
0000'00" West 705.07 feet to the North
side of said Northwest 44th Street; thence
South 89036'42" West, along said North-
west 44th Street, 718.13 feet; thence
South 8907'29" West, along said North-
west 44th Street, 455.59 feet; thence
North 31 54'09" West 1,537.30 feet;
thence North 90 00'00" East 699.93 feet;
thence North 00010' 17" East 749.30 feet;
thence South 8905'51" West 608.05
feet; thence North 38036'35" West 708.06
feet to the North line of the Southwest 1/4
of said Section 1; thence North 8905'51"


East, along said North line of Southwest
1/4 and the North line of said Southeast
1/4 of Section 1, a distance of 2,920.95
feet to the Southwest corner of the West
1/2 of Southeast 1/4 of Northeast 1/4 of
said Section 1; thence North 00038'09"
West, along the West line of the West 1/2
of Southeast 1/4 of Northeast 1/4 of said
Section 1, a distance of 1,325.69 feet to
the Northwest corner of the West 1/2 of
Southeast 1/4 of Northeast 1/4 of said
Section 1; thence North 88059'40" East,
along the North line of said West 1/2 of
Southeast 1/4 of Northeast 1/4 of said
Section 1; a distance of 665.69 feet to the
Northeast corner of the West 1/2 of
Southeast 1/4 of Northeast 1/4 of said
Section 1; thence South 00039'23" East,
along the East line of the West 1/2 of
Southeast 1/4 of Northeast 1/4 of said
Section 1, a distance of 1,105.37 feet;
thence North 6550'15" East 660.52 feet;
thence South 45046'27" East 150.00 feet;
thence North 50 47'32" East 290.39 feet
to the Southwesterly right-of-way line of
County Road 146; thence South
4548'14" East, along the Southwesterly
right-of-way line of said County Road
146, a distance of 355.24 feet; thence
South 42022'42" West 32.47 feet; thence
South 1 17'47" East 30.00 feet; thence
South 88042' 13" West 506.21 feet;
thence South 1 23 '31" East 247.36 feet
to the Point of Beginning.

Containing 215.00 acres more or less

Less and Except

A parcel of land lying within Sections
land 6, Township 1 North, Range 12 and
13 East, Hamilton County, Florida, being
more particularly described as follows:
Commence at the Northeast corner of the
Southeast 1/4 of said Section 1; thence
North 01 23 '31" West 247.36 feet;
thence North 88042' 13" East 142.92 feet
to the Point of Beginning; thence continue
North 88042' 13" East 363.29 feet; thence
North 01 17'47" West 30.00 feet to the
Southwesterly right-of-way line of County
Road 146; thence North 4548'14" West,
along the Southwesterly right-of-way line
of said County Road 146, a distance of
355.24 feet; thence South 50047'32"
West 328.48 feet to the Point of Begin-
ning.

Containing 1.04 acre, more or less

Said lands containing 213.96 acres, more
or less.

From COMMERCIAL, HIGHWAY INTER-
CHANGE (CHI) to ELECTRICAL POWER
GENERATING FACILITY (EPGF):
A parcel of land lying within Sections
land 6, Township 1 North, Range 12 and
13 East, Hamilton County, Florida, being
more particularly described as follows:
Commence at the Northeast corner of the
Southeast 1/4 of said Section 1; thence
North 01 23'31" West 247.36 feet; thence
North 8842'13" East 142.92 feet to the
Point of Beginning; thence continue North
8842'13" East 363.29 feet; thence North
01 17'47" West 30.00 feet to the South-
westerly right-of-way line of County Road
146; thence North 4548'14" West, along
the Southwesterly right-of-way line of said
County Road 146, a distance of 355.24
feet; thence South 50047'32" West
328.48 feet to the Point of Beginninig.

Containing 1.04 acre, more or less.

All said lands containing 215.00 acres,
more or less.

The public hearings may be continued to
one or more future dates. Any interested
party shall be advised that the date, time
and place of any continuation of the pub-
lic hearings shall be announced during
the public hearings and that no further no-
tice concerning the matters will be pub-
lished, unless said continuation exceeds
six calendar weeks from the date of the
above referenced public hearings.

At the aforementioned public hearing, all
interested parties may appear to be heard
with respect to the amendments.

Copies of the amendments are available
for public inspection at the Office of the
Land Use Administrator, located at 204
Northeast First Street, Room 1, Jasper,
Florida, during regular business hours.

All persons are advised that if they decide
to appeal any decision made at the above
referenced public hearings, they will need
a record of the proceedings, and that, for
such purpose, they may need to ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings
is made, which record includes the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the ap-
peal is to be based.

STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENT
TO ISSUE PERMIT

The Department of Environmental Pro-
tection gives notice of its intent to issue a
permit to PCS Phosphate White Springs
to Mr. W K Thornton P.O. Box 300, White
Springs, FL 32096. Operation renewal is
authorized for an existing 27.8 MGD
(Suwannee River) and 26.9 MGD (Swift
Creek) discharge consisting of treated
process wastewater, contaminated non-
process wastewater (CNPW), sanitary
wastewawater, storm water, clay settling ar-
eas, and the phosphogypsum stack sys-
tems. Wastewater is generated from
open-pit mining of phosphate rock, bene-
ficiation of the rock in the mining areas,
manufacture of sulfuric acid and phos-
phoric acid, production of fertilizer com-
ponents and animal-feed supplements,
storm water runoff, clay settling areas,
and the phosphogypsum stack systems.
The facility is located at latitude 3024'40"
N, longitude 8246'57" W on P.O. Box
300, White Springs, FL 32096 in Hamilton
County.

The intent to issue and application file are
available for public inspection during nor-
mal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m., Monday through Friday, except le-
gal holidays, at Northeast District Office,
7825 Baymeadows Way, Suite 200B,
Jacksonville, FL 32256-7590.
The Department will issue the permit with
the attached conditions unless a timely
petition for an administrative hearing is
filed under Sections 120.569 and 120.57,
Florida Statutes, within fourteen days of
receipt of notice. The procedures for pe-
titioning for a hearing are set forth below.

A person whose substantial interests are
affected by the Department's proposed
permitting decision may petition for an ad-
ministrative proceeding (hearing) under
Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida
Statutes. The petition must contain the
information set forth below and must be
filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of
General Counsel of the Department at
3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mall
Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-
3000.

Under Rule 62-110.106(4), Florida Ad-
ministrative Code, a person may request
enlargement of the time for filing a petition
for an administrative hearing. The re-


quest must be filed (received by the clerk)
in the Office of General Counsel before
the end of the time period for filing a peti-
tion for an administrative hearing.

Petitions filed by any persons other than
those entitled to written notice under Sec-
tion 120.60(3), Florida Statutes, must be
filed within fourteen days of publication of
the notice or within fourteen days of re-
ceipt of the written notice, whichever oc-
curs first. Under Section 120.60(3), Flori-
da Statutes, however, any person who
has asked the Department for notice of
agency action may file a petition within
fourteen days of receipt of such notice,
regardless of the date of publication.

The petitioner shall mail a copy of the pe-
tition to the applicant at the address indi-
cated above at the time of filing. The fail-
ure of any person to file a petition or re-
quest for enlargement of time within four-
teen days of receipt of notice shall consti-
tute a waiver of that person's right to re-


quest an administrative determination
(hearing) under Sections 120.569 and
120.57, Florida Statutes. Any subsequent
intervention (in a proceeding initiated by
another party) will be only at the discretion
of the presiding officer upon the filing of a
motion in compliance with Rule 28-
106.205, Florida Administrative Code.

A petition that disputes the material facts
on which the Department's action is
based must contain the following informa-
tion:

(a) The name, address, and telephone
number of each petitioner; the name, ad-
dress, and telephone number of the peti-
tioner's representative, if any; the Depart-
ment permit identification number and the
county in which the subject matter or ac-
tivity is located;
b) A statement of how and when each pe-
titioner received notice of the Department
action;
(c) A statement of how each petitioner's
substantial interests are affected by the
Department action;
(d) A statement of all disputed issues of
material fact. If there are none, the peti-
tion must so indicate;
(e) A statement of facts that the petitioner
contends warrant reversal or modification
of the Department action;
(f) A concise statement of the ultimate
facts alleged, as well as the rules and
statutes which entitle the petitioner to re-
lief; and
(g) A statement of the relief sought by the
petitioner, stating precisely the action that
the petitioner wants the Department to
take.

Because the administrative hearing
process is designed to formulate final
agency action, the filing of a petition
means that the Department's final action
may be different from the position taken
by it in this notice. Persons whose sub-
stantial interests will be affected by any
such final decision of the Department
have the right to petition to become a par-
ty to the proceeding, in accordance with
the requirements set forth above.

In addition to requesting an administrative
hearing, any petitioner may elect to pur-
sue mediation. The election may be ac-
complished by filing with the Department
a mediation agreement with all parties to
the proceeding (i.e., the applicant, the De-
partment, and any person who has filed a
timely and sufficient petition for a hear-
ing). The agreement must contain all the
information required by Rule 28-106.404,
Florida Administrative Code. The agree-
ment must be received by the clerk in the
Office of General Counsel of the Depart-
ment at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard,
Mall Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-3000, within ten days after the
deadline for filing a petition, as set forth
above. Choosing mediation will not ad-
versely affect the right to a hearing if me-
diation does not result in a settlement.

As provided in Section 120.573, Florida
Statutes, the timely agreement of all par-
ties to mediate will toll the time limitations
imposed by Sections 120.569 and 120.57,
Florida Statutes, for holding an adminis-
trative hearing and issuing a final order.
Unless otherwise agreed by the parties,
the mediation must be concluded within
sixty days of the execution of the agree-
ment. If mediation results in settlement of
the administrative dispute, the Depart-
ment must enter a final order incorporat-
ing the agreement of the parties. Persons
seeking to protect their substantial inter-
ests that would be affected by such a
modified final decision must file their peti-
tions within fourteen days of receipt of this
notice, or they shall be deemed to have
waived their right to a proceeding under
Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida
Statutes. If mediation terminates without
settlement of the dispute, the Department
shall notify all parties in writing that the
administrative hearing processes under
Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida
Statutes, remain available for disposition
of the dispute, and the notice will specify
the deadlines that then will apply for chal-
lenging the agency action and electing
remedies under those two statutes.
10/29


Arrest


Reports


Editor's note: The
Jasper News prints the en-
tire arrest record each
week. If your name ap-
pears here and you are lat-
erfound not guilty or the
charges are dropped, we
will be happy to make note
of this in the newspaper
when judicial proof is pre-
sented to us by you or the
authorities.
The following abbre-
viations are used below:
DAC Department of
Agriculture Commis-
sion
DOA Department of
Agriculture
DOT Department of
Transportation
FDLE Florida De-
partment of Law En-
forcement
FHP Florida High-
way Patrol
FWC Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission
HCDTF Hamilton
County Drug Task Force
HCSO Hamilton
County Sheriff's Office
ICE Immigration
and Custom Enforce-
ment
JAPD Jasper Police
Department
JNPD Jennings Po-
lice Department
OALE Office of
Agricultural Law En-
forcement
P&P Probation and
Parole
SCSO Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office
WSPD White
Springs Police Depart-
ment


Oct. 19, Manitee Mob-
ley Baker, 58; 1294
Stephens Street, Jen-
nings; 2 counts sale of
cocaine, 2 counts pos-
session of cocaine;
JNPD
Oct. 19, Terry De-
wayne Wethington, 236
Jones Road, Oceilla,
Georgia; violation of
probation; HCSO
Oct. 19, Eden Ro-
driguez, 25; 14662 Lon
Eagle Drive, Orlando,
Florida; hold for Orange
County S.O.; OCSO
Oct. 19, Joshua C.
Moore, 22; 5 259 Images
Circle, Kissimee, Flori-
da; hold for Orange
County S.O.; OCSO
Oct. 19, Cesar Rene
Ferrer-Mendoza, 31;
3025 LeFlore Lane, Or-
lando, Florida; hold for
Orange County S.O.,
OCSO
Oct. 20, Joshua
Emanuel Jones, 20; 3973
NW 100th Drive, Jasper;
violation of probation;
HCSO
Oct. 20, James Grego-
ry McCall, 29; 10068 SW
41st Terrace, Jasper; vio-
lation of probation, tres-
pass of occupied struc-
ture, battery; JAPD
Oct. 20, Errol George
Ricketts, 62; 1117 Galli-
tine Avenue NE, Palm
Bay, Florida; driving
while license suspend-
ed; DOT
Oct. 21, Quadarius
Lamar Pavast, 20; PO
Box 1095, Jasper; viola-
tion of probation; HCSO
Oct. 23, Dennis J. Lar-
ry, Jr., 28; PO Box 1373,
McClenny, Florida; 2
counts carrying a con-
cealed weapon; WSPD
Oct. 23, Martin Luther


Clay, Jr., 18; 1245 Bee
Street, Jennings; aggra-
vated assault with
deadly weapon, posses-
sion of weapon in com-
mission of crime, carry-
ing a concealed
weapon, violation of
probation; HCSO
Oct. 23, Cortyne De-
wayne Dunn, 23; 12910
W. US 90, Lot 32, Live
Oak, Florida; violation
of probation, failure to
appear, hold for Colum-
bia County; HCSO
Oct. 23, Dwayne Mar-
celle White, 47; 358 SW
10th Avenue, Lot 3,
Jasper; serving 3rd of 10
weekend sentence;
HCSO
Oct. 23, Robert Allen
Mullens, 44; 187 NW
Layton Way, Lake City;
serving 14th weekend;
HCSo
Oct. 24, Dontarrius
Travontay Thomas, 20;
1630 Cobbler Drive,
Lutz, Florida; hold for
Pasco County; HCSO
Oct. 24, Floriberto
Abarca, 1846 Hamilton
Avenue, Jennings; ex-
ceeding speed limit ( 71
in 55), no valid drivers
license; HCSO
Oct. 24, Gail Hawkins,
49; 116 SW 6th Street,
Jasper; burglary of oc-
cupied dwelling, petit
theft; JAPD
Oct. 25, Charles S.
Schroeder, 45; 4215 Con-
necticut Street, St.
Louis, Missouri; driving
while license suspend-
ed/revoked; DOA
Oct. 25, Desiree Coop-
er Black, 26; Cannady's
Trailer Park, Jasper; vio-
lation of probation;
HCSO


$3.6 million federal grant to address


integrating solar energy into electric grid


Submitted


TALLAHASSEE, Fla. It's a
problem faced by electric utilities
nationwide: As more and more
renewable energy enters the
power grid, the benefits of offer-
ing "clean" electricity come at the
price of unpredictability. Now, to
help address some of the techni-
cal hurdles specifically facing so-
lar photovoltaic (PV) energy re-
sources, the U.S. Department of
Energy is providing a major re-
search grant to a consortium of
Florida researchers, utilities,
manufacturers and engineers.
With a $3.6 million award from
the department, The Florida State
University, University of Central
Florida and University of South
Florida are teaming up with
Florida utilities and solar indus-
try suppliers to launch the Sun-
shine State Solar Grid Initiative
(SUNGRIN), a five-year project
to investigate the effects of inte-
grating high levels of solar PV
energy resources into the electric
power grid.
Florida electric utilities partici-
pating in the SUNGRIN initiative
are Florida Power & Light Com-
pany (FPL), Tampa Electric, JEA
(formerly the Jacksonville Elec-
tric Authority), the Orlando Utili-
ties Commission, Gainesville Re-
gional Utilities, Lakeland Electric
and the Florida Municipal Power
Agency, with coordination and
involvement from the Florida Re-
liability Coordinating Council
(FRCC). Also participating are
leading solar technology suppli-
ers SunPower Corp. and Satcon
Technologies, as well as system
integration and engineering firm
AMEC.
"Solar energy is the largest
non-dispatchable renewable en-
ergy resource in Florida," said
Steinar Dale, director of the Cen-
ter for Advanced Power Systems

(CAPS) at Florida State. "This
grant will allow us to better un-


derstand how high penetration of
solar energy, both on the cus-
tomer side and on the grid, will
affect the grid system operation,
and how it affects the dispatch of
traditional power generation
from nuclear, coal and natural
gas sources."
Non-dispatchable energy re-
sources are those, such as solar
PV or wind turbines, from which
electric power system operators
cannot expect on-demand deliv-
ery of a specific guaranteed pow-
er output at any given time.
"We are most pleased that this
Florida-led team will have the
opportunity to work with the De-
partment of Energy_s Office of
Energy Efficiency and Renewable
Energy to make important contri-
butions toward accelerating clean
solar energy deployment and di-
versifying the nation's electricity
supply," said Rick Meeker, man-
ager of DOE programs and in-
dustry partnerships at CAPS and
leader of the SUNGRIN initia-
tive. "It seems only fitting that
the Sunshine State play a key role
in charting a successful future for
the integration of solar PV."
Sarah Rogers, president and
CEO of the Florida Reliability
Coordinating Council, added that
"the FRCC and its members are
pleased to support this important
initiative by increasing the
awareness, coordination and effi-
ciency between Florida universi-
ties and the industry."
With the state's utilities pursu-
ing a number of major projects
and initiatives, Florida is poised
to become a national leader in in-
stallations of grid-connected so-
lar PV. While solar energy can
help reduce greenhouse-gas
emissions and reduce reliance on
fossil fuels, it can also pose chal-
lenges to a power grid that was
not built to accommodate large
amounts of intermittent resources
such as solar PV energy. In Flori-
da and across the country, it is in-
creasingly important to more ful-


ly understand and address the
implications this may have rela-
tive to continued secure and reli-
able operation of the power sys-
tem.
"High-level penetrations of so-
lar PV are likely within utility
planning horizons, so very soon,
we need to understand the re-
sulting grid response," said Bob
Reedy, director of the Solar Ener-
gy Division at the University of
Central Florida's Florida Solar
Energy Center. "My guess is we
will go beyond making PV ac-
ceptable to the grid operators
and actually see the unique ad-
vantages of PV become desirable
in improving grid reliability."
Reliable and cost effective inte-
gration are keys to ensuring in-
creased penetration and sustain-
ability of customer and utility-
owned PV resources within the
diverse mix of the nation's exist-
ing generation supply.
"The SUNGRIN effort is partic-
ularly timely given the need to
determine how smart-grid devel-
opment being considered for
wide-scale installation can be
made to enhance the effective-
ness of our solar-energy produc-
tion portfolio," said Alex Domi-
jan, director of the Power Center
for Utility Explorations
pages/index.htm> at the Univer-
sity of South Florida.
The center's deputy director,
Arif Islam, agreed, "The time is
now to plan for new solar PV in-
stallations with interaction stud-
ies with the rest of the power sys-
tem as it begins to be trans-
formed to a smart grid," he said.
"Certainly our new efforts in
smart grids, energy storage and
demand response, among others
at the Power Center for Utility
Explorations will find a synergy
developed by this joint effort
with the Center for Advanced
Power Systems and the Florida
Solar Energy Center."


PAGE 2B


Trojan~1llll








Empowering Tabernacle House of Prayer Outreach Ministry

Celebrates 2nd annual "Come Fellowship with me Day"


Pastor Phillip M. Jackson and Dr. Kendrix Gardner


Dr. Kendrix Gardner bringing forth the word "press for- Sis. Linda Roberson of Empowering Tabernacle was the
ward" from Philippians Chapter 3 Mistress of Ceremonies


Empowering Tabernacle House of Prayer Praise Dancers getting ready for their perfor- Empowering Tabernacle Praise Dance Team performs to "Encourage Yourself"
mance.


Members of Christian Love Bible Church singing selections photos: submitted


NOPE lights up the night to remember those

lost to and suffering from addiction


Submitted
The NOPE Task Force, Narcotic Overdose Preven-
tion and Education's 3rd Annual National Candle
Light Vigil will take place in communities across the
Nation on Thursday, October 29th, during Red Rib-
bon Week, a week to raise awareness of drug abuse.
The Hamilton County Vigil will be held in the
Jasper City Park at 6:00 p.m. Thursday, October 29,
2009. The vigil is held in memory of those lost to and
suffering from substance abuse.
"By hosting the NOPE Candle Light Vigil, we
demonstrate the importance of partnering with like-
minded government officials, drug prevention pro-
fessionals and impacted citizens to get this critical
warning to our nation's communities. We are doing
everything possible to prevent further tragedies, "
states Karen Perry, Executive Director.
Former Director Bill Janes, of the Florida Office of
Drug Control will serve as the Key Note Speaker for
the event.
NOPE organizers are expecting between 100-300
people at each vigil location. "Nearly everyone has
been affected by the disease of addiction, either per-
sonally or by a family member or friend," says Per-
ry.
Attendees who have lost friends and family mem-


IIssIIIIsqsasmMU


FOR SALE
Baldwin Piano
In good condition
$400.00
386-855-2018
no


Puppies for Sale
Two Australian Cattle Dog
puppies, 7 weeks old, blue in
color. CKC registered.
1 male, 1 female. $125 each.
Call 386-938-4501
557907-F
Advertise
your YARD SALE,
VEHICLES
OR UNWANTED
ITEMS IN THE
CLASSIFIED.
,Call 386-792-2487
to place your ad
today.
499061-F


bers to drug-related deaths will be acknowledged
and others will recognize the significance and long
lasting consequences of this unrecognized national
epidemic.
Families who have lost loved ones to substance
abuse may add their stories to the memorial video
and wall by contacting NOPE. For more information,
visit www.nopetaskforce.org or contact NOPE at
866-612-NOPE. Contact Abbey Taylor, 386-209-1442
or 386-792-6540 or Grace McDonald, 386-938-4911
for local information.
NOPE Task Force is a non-profit organization
formed in Palm Beach County, Florida in 2004. The
cornerstone of the NOPE mission is the high impact
presentations delivered to middle and high school
students regarding the consequences of substance
abuse. NOPE initiatives include: student presenta-
tions, university forums, parent/caretaker forums,
support for families who have lost loved ones to
drug related incidents, anti-drug legislation and
community awareness campaigns including Nation-
al Candle Light Vigil and Multimedia Public Service
Announcement Campaign.


Sis. Keyona Bennett of Empowering Tabernacle welcomed
all guests.

TOWN OF WHITE SPRINGS
HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP)

Legal Services for the Town of White Springs, Florida
The Town of White Springs, Florida, is accepting
proposals from qualified offeror's at Town Hall, 10363
Bridge Street, White Springs, Florida 32096, until
5:00 p.m. on November 19, 2009. Proposals will be
opened November 24, 2009 by the Town Council and
interviews will be scheduled December 1, 2009.
Legal Services for the Town of White Springs, Florida
All proposals received after the time and date stated
above will be returned unopened to the proposer. All
proposers are invited to attend the opening.
Facsimile responses are unacceptable.

ONE MARKED ORIGINAL and five (5) photocopies
of the RFP shall be submitted in a sealed envelope
to the address referenced above, and REQUEST
FOR PROPOSALS, LEGAL SERVICES FOR THE
TOWN OF WHITE SPRINGS, FLORIDA, clearly
marked on the outside. Those submitted otherwise
may be deemed unresponsive.

For general inquiries or technical questions regarding
this proposal, please contact the Town Clerk, Shirley
Heath, at 386-397-2310. To obtain a proposal
package, please contact Shirley Heath at (386) 397-
2310.

The Town of White Springs, Florida, reserves the
right to reject any or all proposals, to waive any
informality or irregularity in any proposal received, to
re-advertise for proposals, or to take any such
actions that may be deemed in the best interest of
the Town.
557199akv


mi66"


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2009


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 3B




PAGE 4B THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


I


Trojans vs. The Villages


October 30, 2009 7:30 p.m.


Homecoming Parade

line up
The parade will start at 2:30 p.m. Street closings at 2:15
p.m. The parade will begin at the old Hamilton County
High School, cross US Highway 41 and travel west on East
15th Avenue, turn left at the caution light and travel south
on MLK Drive. The parade will then turn left and travel
east on 5th Avenue, turn right at the S&S store and proceed
south on US Highway 41/Hatley Street. The parade will
end just beyond the Bank of America parking lot.
While the parade is on MLK Drive traffic will detour
onto US Highway 41. While the parade is on US Highway
41, traffic will detour onto MLK Drive.


SISUWANNEE
IHAR DIWARE
& FEED)
16660 Spring St., White Springs
386-397-2551
GO TROJANS!!
SUnder the new ownership of
S Don & Celeste Wilson



117 S. Central Avenue, Jasper
S 386-638-9919
S Sue Thornbury, owner/stylist
Chasity Padgett, stylist
After-hours appointments & Tanning available
Walk-ins welcome 558310-F


springg Street

Antiques
Antiques Gifts Concrete Garden Statuary


/rewinl Creatiols
Florial Designs for all occasions
Delivery & 16842 Spring St.
Consultations White Springs, FL
Available 386-397-2142



Dance Works
Ages 3-17
Ballet Tap Jazz
Kinderdance Acrobatics
114 Hatley St., Jasper Shannon McCook,
386-590-0535 Owner/Teacher
iGo Trojans! 0F


Spring Street
Emporium
Check us out for thrift, gifts, art, & antiques


16543 Spring Street,
White Springs, FL
386-397-4385


November Special
25% OFF Jewelry
old, new, &
special orders


558317-F


16544 Spring Street,
White Springs, FL
Wed.-Sat., 10 a.m. 5 p.m.


New
merchandise
weekly!
558318-F


Bass 'ses
Furniture & Appliance Warehouse
See- "i Am Vo Wt Aazei&c fVt
Carolyn, Jay, Cindy
.. 303 NW Hatley Street
Jasper, Florida 32052
GO Phone: 386-792-2725
TROJANS! Fax:386-792-6635 .


D & S Signs
111 SW CentralAve., Jasper, FL
SCREEN PRINTING,
DIGITAL PRINTING & TROPHIES
Phone: (386) 792-1354
, e-mail: dssigns@windstream.net
Denice & Scott Hughes 558322
558322-F


Insuring Automobiles
Ensuring Peace of Mind
SR 22 & FR 44
Low Down Payment, Tag, Title & Notary Service
Income Tax services available after the first of next year
Insurance Plus
aBi~ 104 W. Hatley St., asperJO
386-792-3580 23855
"^^*^^^^* K^ c--m'ici-'^^558323^ ^^


BUILDING CENTER HARDWARE LAWN & GARDEN
386-792-2443 386-792-1052 386-792-1135
Jasper Hardware
& Supply Co., Inc.
202 Northwest Central Ave.,
Jasper, FL 32052
Go Team!


SSunSations
Tanning Nails Gifts
Massage with Rosanne by appointment
10 Hatley St., Jasper
386-792-3538
Have a great Homecoming!
558329-F


9 .~ SALON &
i k ~BOUTIQUE
Tanning Available
Jamie Barker, owner/stylist
Bonnie Lawson, stylist
1150 NW US 41, Suite 1, Jasper, FL 32052
oos, 792-1244 X
TROJANS! 792-1244


Brown's Flowers & Gifts

CO TROJANWS'
For All Occasions
106 SW 1st St., Jasper
386-792-1120
Margie & Carlton Brown, Owners

The Jasper Marketplace

107 Central Avenue, SW Jasper
Antiques-Collectibles-Gifts-Home Decor
Quality Consignments Welcome
Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Go Saturday 9 a.m-noon Go
Trojans! s86-466-2344a Trjans
558331-F


iO


Go


-m-


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2009 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2009


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL PAGE 5B


bbb323


I


5531-





THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


Each year, adults get in touch with their inner child
come the end of October and dress up for Hal-
loween. While they may no longer go door-to-door
begging for candy, many still cling to the tradition of
dressing up for Halloween. No costume proved
more popular than a witch, as more than 5 million
adults dressed up as a witch in 2008. According the
National Retail Federation, the following costumes
proved the most popular among adults in 2008.
Witch = 14.9 percent
Pirate =4.4 percent
Vampire = 3.3 percent
Cat = 2.5 percent
Fairy = 1.7 percent
Nurse = 1.7 percent
Batman = 1.5 percent
Political (Barack Obama, John McCain, etc.) =
1.5 percent
Ghost = 1.4 percent
Angel = 1.3 percent


Classic Halloween Movies


Did You Know?


Though many people
might feel as though
they're purely fictional,
haunted houses have ac-
tually found their way
into the American legal
system. In 1991, the
Supreme Court of New
York, Appellate Division
ruled, in the case of
Stambovsky v. Ackley,
that a seller must dis-
close that a house has a
reputation of being
haunted because such a
reputation could impair
the value of the home.
While the decision did-
n't claim haunted houses
are real, the ruling did
acknowledge that repu-
tation for being haunted
requires disclosure to
@ any prospective buyers.


Few nollaays nave proven a more rignttul
fit with film than Halloween.

Other than Christmas, perhaps no
holiday proves better with film than
Halloween. Be it a movie about Hal-
loween or the popular genre of scary
horror films, the following films are a
perfect choice for fright night.
It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie
Brown. Initially appearing in 1966,
this kids' classic has been a staple of
Halloween for American children for
more than 4 decades. As Linus awaits
The Great Pumpkin, his good friend
Charlie Brown famously gets rocks in
his trick-or-treat bag.
Halloween. One of the scariest
films ever made, "Halloween" first
caused shrieks in 1978 and has
spawned numerous sequels and
screams ever since. Escaping from a
mental institution in 1978, the crazed
Michael Myers wastes little time ter-
rorizing his hometown of Haddon-
field, Illinois, including a young Jamie
Lee Curtis, in one of her earliest and


most recognizable roles.
The Amityville Horror. Based on a
true story, this 1979 classic focuses on
a pair of young newlyweds and their
children who move into their Long Is-
land dream house, only to discover
they've made a terrible choice. Star-
ring James Brolin and "Superman"
vixen Margot Kidder, "The Amityville
Horror" is sure to scare the living day-
lights out of horror fans young and
old.
Carrie. Another film from what
many consider the Golden Age of
horror films, this 1976 classic based on
the Stephen King bestseller finds
young Carrie White ridiculed by
classmates, who soon find out they
don't know who they're messing with.
A horror classic, "Carrie" also boasts
one of the most memorable scenes in
film history when Carrie, played mas-
terfully by Sissy Spacek, attends her
senior prom.
A Nightmare on Elm Street. Pro-
ducing a 1980s icon and one of hor-
ror's most famous characters, "A
Nightmare on Elm Street" introduced
the world to Freddy Krueger, a terror-
izing character who manages to infil-
trate the nightmares of his victims,
each of whom is a child of the people
who played a part in killing the actual
Freddy Krueger years before. Eventu-
ally spawning six sequels, the original
is considered by many horror affi-
cionados to be famed writer and di-
rector Wes Craven's masterpiece.
The Exorcist. Destined to scare
viewers even today, nearly 40 years
after its release, "The Exorcist" fea-
tures screen legends Ellen Burstyn
and Max von Sydow, who somehow
manage to have the show stolen from
them by a then 14-year-old Linda
Blair, who plays a young girl obsesses
by an evil spirit. Adding to the film's
status as a legend of horror is a series
of mysterious happenings that appar-
ently occurred during the film's pro-
duction.


Easy Halloween Decorating Ideas

That Are All Treat No Trick!


Spooky Jack-O-
Lanterns. Scary witches.
Things that put fright it
your night. It's easy to
capture the Halloween
spirit by decorating
your home. All you
need is some paint and
a little imagination.
Here are some ideas
from the decorating ex-
perts at Rust-Oleum:
Welcome the neigh-
bors. Use spray paint to
create posh pumpkins
to line the pathway to
your door. Use rich, au-
tumn inspired colors,
like Painter's Touch Ul-
tra Cover 2X Kona
Brown and Universal
Metallic Pure Gold, and
give your outdoor
spaces a sophisticated
look. Then customize
your entryway with a
menagerie of photos
from Halloweens-past.
Pick up some inexpen-
sive frames and paint
them with Rust-Oleum
Glow-in-the-Dark Paint
and insert the photos.
It's a great way to add a
personalized, spooky
touch to your entryway.
Halloween crafts for
your kids. Plastic
pumpkin pails have be-
come the standard "can-
dy carrier" for kids
every Halloween. Why
not surprise your kids
with personalized buck-
ets to store their trick-
or-treat loot? Pick up a


Capture the Halloween spirit
imagination.

few plastic pails from
your local craft or dis-
count store and paint
them. Give your fairy
princess a pretty pail
with Universal Metallic
Titanium Silver or Pure
Gold. What about your
little superhero? Use
Universal Cardinal Red
or Cobalt Blue. When
the pails are dry, have
your kids add their per-
sonal finishing touches
with bows, ribbons, and
stickers.
Put a twist on the
traditional Jack-O-
Lantern. Pick up a few


with some paint and a little


pumpkins from your lo-
cal store and paint them
with black Rust-Oleum
Chalkboard Spray
paint. Draw faces or
words on the pumpkins
with chalk. The chalk-
board surface can be
easily erased, so it's
easy to draw on new
faces!
Need more inspira-
tion? Visit
www.paintideas.com
for Halloween decorat-
ing ideas and projects
for every room in your
home.


Is lour leen Reall for an AfterSchool Job?


Giving teens the chance to earn
money outside of the home can cer-
tainly be worthwhile. Jobs teach the
value of money and hard work, and
also the importance of timeliness and
time management.
While having a job gives teenagers
independence and buying power of
their own, that extra money should
also teach money management, such
as allocating funds for the things
kids want (clothing, electronics, etc.)
and the things they need (gas for the
car).
While a teenager should be given
some leeway, parents should encour-
age kids to save for college or big-
ticket items in the future. Oftentimes,
kids feel like they aren't making a
bundle of money, so that makes it all
disposable income. However, open-
ing a savings or checking account can
help kids amass savings and see just
how much they could be saving in-
stead of spending.
In addition to bringing in money
and teaching responsibilities, jobs
can also help teenagers acquire new
skills. Be it an after-school or sum-


mer job, the position could expose
children to new computer, machinery
or clerical skills, or even plant a seed
for a potential career down the road.
Once kids are deemed ready to
work, parents should encourage the
submission of applications to places
teens might be interested in. Include
a resume with past experience --
even if it is mowing lawns. Some
great first-job opportunities include
working in libraries, fast-food chains,
restaurants, movie theaters, retail
stores, and summer camps.
When teenagers score that initial
interview, offer help in preparing for
that meeting but let kids dictate how
much assistance parents give. Teach
kids about the importance of appear-
ance and punctuality, as well as the
value of being articulate during job
interviews.
Discuss how a teenager's skills
might translate into the job market.
For example, a child used to cooking
dinner for the family might be an
ideal fit for the restaurant business,
while a voracious reader might be a
perfect fit for the local library.


Researchers examine benefits

of frugality during rough times


Continued From Page 1B

More frequently re-
ported that work was
"nerve-racking"
More work-family
imbalance
Were increasingly
concerned that future fi-
nancial obligations will
go unmet
Felt more down-
hearted and irritable at
work; and,
More frequently ac-
knowledged having a
"shorter fuse" at home.
"The research also
confirmed that less-con-
servative employees set
aside fewer financial re-
sources to cushion the
family in the event of an
emergency or change in
work status," Ponder
said.
For example, less-con-
servative workers indi-


cated they would main-
tain a comparable stan-
dard of living for 10
months, on average, in
the event of a layoff,
with almost half report-
ing one month or less.
On the other hand, con-
servative employees re-
ported almost five years
of continued lifestyle.
Hochwarter concludes
that the documented
long-term financial sta-
tus of less-frugal indi-
viduals was not surpris-
ing but unfortunate.
"Unquestionably,
companies will benefit
by helping employees
recognize the value of
thriftiness and teaching
tangible financial man-
agement skills," he said.
"Our research confirms
that doing so may con-
tribute to higher levels
of performance and


more-stable home rela-
tions."
Despite its confirmed
benefits, the researchers
recognize that thrifti-
ness is frowned upon in
American culture, with
those opting to save
rather than spend often
ostracized by their
peers.
"Sadly, our past re-
search shows that soci-
ety determines an indi-
vidual's worth and suc-
cess more by the accu-
mulation of toys, cars
and houses that many
are simply unable to af-
ford than by personal
character and dedica-
tion to one's family,"
Hochwarter said. "Per-
haps a silver lining of
recent economic woes
will be a renewed com-
mitment to the latter
rather than the former."


Costume Choices That Win

the Popularity Contest


No costume proved more
popular among adults in
2008 than the witch cos-
tume.


PAGE 6B


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2009


- I





THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2009


FWC hosts CSI in the swamp


Florida Fish and Wildlife
Coenervaton Commsnn on
MyFWC.com


A conservation otticer interviews a "hunter" during a re-cre-
ated hunting incident training exercise.

Submitted
The scene is disturbing. A hunter finds a lifeless
body in the woods. He sees a 12-gauge shotgun next
to the dead, middle-aged man. The hunter notifies
conservation law enforcement officers, and when
they arrive, he tells them he was hunting when he
came upon the body. He says he heard shooting pri-
or to the discovery, but observed no one other than
the deceased.
It is up to the officers to determine if this death is
a result of natural causes, suicide, murder or an un-
wanted discharge of the victim's firearm.
This is an actual case, which occurred in Iowa, re-
created by the International Hunter Education As-
sociation (IHEA) for training. In the humid, damp
woods of North Florida, actors played out the sce-
nario to help educate conservation officers on how
to investigate hunting-related incidents in the field.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) hosted the training at the Pat
Thomas Law Enforcement Academy in Quincy, and
the Joe Budd Aquatic Education Center in Midway,
just outside Tallahassee. Fish and wildlife officers
from around the country made up the class of 36.
"Last year, hunting incidents in Florida doubled,
and we want to change that," said Bill Cline, direc-
tor of hunting safety for the FWC. "We call this
training CSI in the woods", or in Florida, CSI in the
swamp." This training helps us look for clues as to
what happened at a hunting incident. If an injury or
death could have been avoided, we want to pass on
to hunters what we learned, so they know how to
avoid similar behavior."


Like most any outdoor activity, there is the risk of
injury. With firearms involved, the injury may be
more serious. Nevertheless, nationwide, for every
100,000 hunters, there are only five hunter inci-
dents. Overall, hunting is safe. Tim Lawhern, presi-
dent and co-director of the International Hunter Ed-
ucation Association, stands by this.
Lawhern has been with the Wisconsin Depart-
ment of Natural Resources for more than 20 years
and knows a thing or two about hunting safety.
"International statistics indicate that the chance of
a hunter getting killed while hunting is exactly the
same as the chance of any person getting struck by
lightning," Lawhern said.
He also knows that not everything is as it appears.
"Sometimes a murder, suicide or attempted suicide
is disguised as a hunting incident," Lawhern said.
This happened in the case of the hunter finding a
body. Evidence at the scene revealed that the man
had committed suicide. He attempted to make his
death look like a hunting accident so his wife and
two children could collect on his life insurance pol-
icy. He was also religious and his religion forbids
suicide.
In another recreated scenario, a turkey hunter
shot a Georgia conservation law enforcement offi-
cer. The officer was checking to see if the hunter, ac-
companied by his unarmed daughter, was hunting
over bait, which is illegal. The shooter fired at the
officer from 28 yards away, believing he was shoot-
ing at a turkey. The officer was hit on the lower
part of his body, and he nearly bled to death. Be-
cause of his injury, the officer had to retire. The
hunter broke one of the cardinal rules for hunter
safety: be certain of your target.
"There are four rules that every hunter, or anyone
else with a firearm, needs to follow," Lawhern said.
"First, treat every firearm as if it were loaded, even
if you think it is not. Second, always point the muz-
zle in a safe direction. Third, be certain of your tar-
get and what's beyond it. And fourth, keep your fin-
ger outside of the trigger guard until you are ready
to shoot."
For one instructor at the IHEA training, hunter
safety is particularly personal. On two separate oc-
casions, a decade apart, a hunter shot Capt. Mike
Van Durme of the New York Department of Envi-
ronmental Conservation. A man in a boat who was
shooting frogs with a .22 rifle shot the 34-year vet-
eran in 1986. The shooter didn't see Van Durme,
who was in uniform and in plain view, standing on
a dike. When the man shot at the frog, the shot ric-


ocheted off the water and struck Van Durme in the
ear.
Van Durme was more seriously injured when he
was shot a second time in 1996 while he was hunt-
ing, off-duty. As Van Durme was walking through
short grass, a deer ran between him and another
hunter. Though Van Durme was wearing the re-
quired bright orange vest and hat, the hunter failed
to look beyond the deer and fired. In an instant, Van
Durme realized he was being shot at and turned
away. The slug ran along his left shoulder. His in-
jury could have been fatal, but his instantaneous re-
action likely saved his life.
"It was my crime scene, but I was the victim," Van
Durme said. "The shooter was with four other peo-
ple, and when he realized what he did, he tossed his
shotgun into the woods. I had to sort that out and
make arrests; two of the hunters were felons, and it
is unlawful for felons to possess firearms."
Though Van Durme made arrests and collected
evidence immediately after being shot, nearly 24
hours later it hit him how close he had come to
death. "I was in my church choir the next day,
singing the closing song," Van Durme said. _"Then
I thought, I don't want to be a part of being a victim,
or having people congratulate me and telling me
how great I was. I just felt my life energy leave me.
Being shot is traumatic." It took a while for Van
Durme to get back to hunting, but eventually he
did. He uses his near-death experience to improve
hunting safety.
"I've been instructing at IHEA since 2000," Van
Durme said. "I instruct at every academy in my
state, and my incident has led to a comprehensive
12-page report on hunting incidents."
Though a stranger shot Van Durme, IHEA presi-
dent Lawhern says that in the majority of cases, a
friend or family member shoots the victim. He also
stresses that one-third to one-half of the time, hunt-
ing-related shooting injuries are self-inflicted. These
are the things that Lawhern and others who investi-
gate shooting incidents have learned and train oth-
ers to investigate.
"Every crime scene should be investigated as if a
member of your family was the victim," Lawhern
said.
FWC's Cline stresses that safety needs to be the
No. 1 priority for hunters. "Hunting is a great
sport," Cline said. "We want everyone to come
home from hunting, safe and sound; bagging some-
thing is secondary to that."


FWC: Boating legislation protects people and resources


Submitted

New laws aimed at boating safety
and protecting natural resources are
in effect. The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission
(FWC) and other law enforcement
agencies throughout state are out to
alert Floridians to new laws and en-
hancements to existing laws that
deal with boating under the influ-
ence, boating safety education, wa-
terway markers, possession of gaso-
line on a vessel and destruction of
coral.
The enhanced penalty for BUI is


the same as it is for driving under
the influence. The blood-alcohol lev-
el or breath-alcohol level of 0.20 that
was a violation in the past has
changed to 0.15.
Beginning Jan. 1, 2010, any boater
born on or after Jan. 1, 1988 will be
required to take an approved boat-
ing safety course and possess an
FWC-issued boating safety identifi-
cation card. Anyone born on or after
Jan. 1, 1988 and purchases a boat
will have 90 days from the purchase
date to obtain a boating safety iden-
tification card.
Another prohibited activity is


placement and use of a waterway
marker that does not conform to the
U.S. Aids to Navigation System and
does not have an FWC permit. It's
also unlawful for boaters to moor to
government-placed waterway mark-
ers or lawfully placed waterway
markers except in emergency situa-
tions or with written consent of the
marker's owner.
Also, it is illegal to possess or op-
erate a vessel with nonconforming
or unapproved gasoline containers
or to transport gasoline in an unven-
tilated or improperly ventilated
compartment.


Laws regarding titling, numbering
and registration now apply to any
vessel operated, used or stored on
state waters except vessels lawfully
stored at a dock or marina.
Boaters who damage coral reefs
are required to notify the Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection. In
addition, boaters who damage coral
reefs are required to cooperate with
that department to remove their ves-
sels and to assess and restore the
coral reef.
To learn more about Florida's boat-
ing requirements, visit
MyFWC.com /Boating.


Governor Supports Manatee Protection; Signs Proclamation For Manatee Awareness Month


Submitted

Governor Charlie Crist recently is-
sued a proclamation recognizing
November 2009 as Manatee Aware-
ness Month, a tradition supported
by Florida's governors for many
years. Manatees are listed as en-
dangered at the state, federal, and
international levels. The proclama-
tion states, "Manatees face the risk
of extinction due to human related
threats."
Patrick Rose, Executive Director of
Save the Manatee Club, credits Gov-
ernor Crist with helping to bring
much needed attention and support
to protect Florida's official marine
mammal at a time when it is criti-
cally needed.
"More than 374 manatees have
died from all causes, and historical-
ly, collisions with watercraft repre-
sent nearly 34% of all manatee
deaths where a cause of death could
be determined. Clearly, first and
foremost, we must expand our ef-
forts to raise public awareness
about the presence of manatees in
our waters and to reach more peo-
ple about how to help prevent their
deaths, including the millions who
vacation here from outside Florida
and around the world."
Another serious threat to the man-
atee population is the potential loss
of warm-water winter habitat, such
as natural springs and the outfalls
of power plants, where manatees
gather to keep warm during winter
cold spells. Manatees cannot toler-
ate prolonged exposure to water
temperatures below 68 degrees
Fahrenheit.
"Governor Crist's commitment to
proclaim November as Manatee
Awareness Month puts the endan-


gered manatee in the spotlight, and
highlights the threats to their long-
term survival and how we can all
help," added Rose. "There is much
we can do together to safeguard
Florida's docile and defenseless
manatee, like obeying posted speed
zones and properly disposing of our
trash when boating. Thankfully,
manatees are cherished by so many,
and for that we remain hopeful and
optimistic."
The Club provides a variety of
ways for the public to help with
manatee protection. Florida shore-
line property owners can request a
free aluminum dock sign from Save
the Manatee Club which says,
"Please Watch for Manatees: Oper-
ate with Care." E-mail
education@savethemanatee.org, or
call toll free at 1-800-432-JOIN
(5646) and include contact informa-
tion plus the address where the sign
will be posted.
Also, the Florida boating public
can request a free "Please Slow:
Manatees Below" waterproof ban-
ner, which helps to alert other
boaters whenever manatees are pre-
sent.
Free boater awareness posters and
posters discouraging harassment are
also available to dive shops, mari-
nas, businesses, visitor centers,
schools and libraries interested in
displaying them in areas to help ed-
ucate others about manatee conser-
vation.
Manatee protection tips are avail-
able on the Club's website at
www.savethemanatee.org/boater-
tips.htm. For more information on
manatees, the Adopt-A-Manatee
program, or to sign up for the
Club's free E-Newsletter, visit
www.savethemanatee.org. You can


follow Save the Manatee Club using
Twitter http: / /twitter.com/ savethe-
manatee, Facebook
http:/ / www.facebook.com/pages/S


ave-the-Manatee-Club / 66640207299,
and MySpace http:/ /www.my-
space.com/savethemanateeclub.


Biologists rescue manatee with


watercraft injuries


Submitted
Biologists with the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission's
(FWC) Fish and Wildlife Research In-
stitute rescued a manatee in Shell Key
Bay near Goodland in Southwest
Florida on Tuesday.
Staff from the Rookery Bay Reserve,
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and
citizen volunteers helped FWC biolo-
gists and law enforcement officers
pull the approximately 8-and-a-half-
foot, adult female aboard the manatee
rescue boat.
After the rescuers brought the man-
atee to shore, they transported it to


Lowry Park Zoo for rehabilitation.
Biologists performed the rescue be-
cause of visible watercraft injuries.
The manatee was listing to one side,
which meant a punctured lung filled
the body cavity with air. Fresh
wounds on the manatee's left side,
may have resulted from an encounter
with boat propellers and engines.
To report a dead or distressed man-
atee, call the FWC Wildlife Alert hot-
line at 888-404-FWCC (3922). For
more information on manatee re-
search, visit
http: / research.MyFWC.com /mana-
tee.


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 7B





I TT-iT di 1 r FM iTr ITYT~UriYT ~ iT TM~'A Tk X y i I


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www.sunbeltchryslerjeepdodgeofliveoak.com
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PAGE 8B


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2009




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