Group Title: Jasper news (Jasper, Fla.)
Title: The Jasper news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028306/00347
 Material Information
Title: The Jasper news
Uniform Title: Jasper news (Jasper, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jasper news
Publisher: F.M. DeGraffenried
Place of Publication: Jasper, Fla.
Jasper Fla
Publication Date: October 22, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jasper (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hamilton County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hamilton -- Jasper
Coordinates: 30.518889 x -82.951111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 21, 1890)-
General Note: Editor: Jno. M. Caldwell, <1890>.
General Note: Publisher: W.L. Whitfield, <1904>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028306
Volume ID: VID00347
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33315707
alephbibnum - 000579542
lccn - sn 95047198

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Dnrnm


Today's Weather
High
850 F
Precip: 30% "
Partly cloudy skies. High near 85F.
Lows in the mid 60's. Winds east at 5
to 10 mph. Chance of rain 10%.
For up to the minute weather go to
www.nflaonline.com.


I 18T YARNUBE 45THRSAYOCOBR 2,2093 SCTON 32PAES50


LADY TROJAN VOLLEYBALL
The Lady Trojans end their regular season
tonight in Jasper against Newberry. District
play begins next week in Tallahassee. Page 1 B.


US 41 north of White Springs
to be closed all day today
Page 7A


PCS CUTTING 168 JOBS


20% of workforce will be idled


Grant to help UF
doctors deliver
cancer care to
needy Floridians
Page 5B


By Stephenie Livingston
stephenie.Iivingston@gaflnews.com
PotashCorp of White Springs, or
PCS, is reducing staffing levels at its
phosphate facility by 168 full-time
positions, or nearly twenty percent
of its current work force.
As a result of excess global supply
of phosphate and significantly re-
duced phosphate margins in the
wake of the global economic down-
turn, PCS is unable to support cur-
rent staffing levels. Mike Williams,


manager of public affairs at PCS,
said the company is not cutting pro-
duction, but rather matching
staffing levels with production lev-
els.
"While this is regrettable, we must
match staffing with production, and
every effort is being made to assist
affected employees through this
transition," Williams said.
"In making these workforce re-
ductions, the company will offer
separation incentives to both
salaried and hourly employees."


"It is a difficult time for the White
Springs team," said General Manag-
er Keith Thornton in a press release.
"The company has made every ef-
fort to avoid taking this action;
however market conditions dictate
we make these changes. Many excel-
lent employees are being affected by
this decision and we will work to
help them make a successful transi-
tion."
The plant currently employs about
900 workers from throughout the re-
gion.


H1N1 vaccinations


set for this week


Who will be vaccinated:
Pregnant women
Persons who live with or
provide care for infants less
than 6 months of age (for ex-
ample, parents, siblings and
daycare providers);
Children and young


Hamilton County
School District's
"All-Star School
Lunch" campaign
Page 2B



High-speed

accident

takes a life
Lake City man killed in
single-vehicle accident
Staff
A Lake City man died in a
high-speed crash in Hamilton
County early Sunday, accord-
ing to FHP. Willard Craig Bus-
by, 59, died at the scene of the
4 a.m. accident about 9 miles
north of White Springs, re-
ports show.
According to FHP, Busby
was traveling south at more
than 90 mph on CR 135 near
SE 182nd Boulevard when he
failed to negotiate a right
curve. Busby's 2007 Ford F-150
pickup entered the grassy left
shoulder, at which point he
swerved right and then left in
an attempt to regain control,
FHP said. The pickup then
reentered the left shoulder
and struck a telephone junc-
tion box, a cattle fence and a
power pole before overturn-
ing.
Busby, who was not wear-
ing a seatbelt, according to
FHP, died at the scene shortly
after being extricated from the
vehicle.


September jobless rate up in
Hamilton, Suwannee, Lafayette
Staff
Unemployment in Hamilton, Suwannee and
Lafayette counties rose in September, according to
figures released by the state Friday.
Hamilton County reported a jobless rate of 11.3
percent, from 11 percent in August. The September
2008 rate was 7.6 percent.
SEE SEPTEMBER, PAGE 7A


S l i IL 1-4 p \ ,J.1 I, k 24
i Lh dlit'LLL pfALlLIL Lu11LtL.

Location:
Hamilton County Health
Department
209 SE Central Avenue
Jasper, FL 32052
Clinic Dates/Hours:
Thursday, Oct. 22 5 p.m.


- l F', Ill
11uLI C-I V k ll t -' 't L I
- ll 'p I'
bALuifda, OLL. 31 b a.m.
-11 a.m.
There is no charge for
these vaccinations.
If you have any questions
about the vaccine or vacci-
nation clinics, please call
386-792-1414 from 8 a.m.
until 5 p.m.


After college, Hawkins took a trip to America, anticipating a short vacation.
Instead she ended up stranded with a mixed up visa and no way home.
"I was an illegal immigrant in Miami," said Sue. "I lived off of saltine crackers and
mayonnaise. I was living in a hotel room on South Beach, for God's sake."


MAKING HER MARK

Tattoo artist Susan Hawkins took the long way to Jasper
By Stephenie Livingston -
stephenie.Iivingston@gaflnews.com
"Come on you, just one more
copy," says Sue Hawkins,
pounding on a copy machine as
a stencil of Metallica lead singer
James Hetfield's screaming face "
finally prints. "I bet Kat Von D
doesn't have to deal with this." .
Hawkins, a McAlpin rancher k
and owner of Outwest Tattoo in
Jasper, then rubs a stick of de-
odorant on a customer's arm ,
and places the stencil on. She. .-
turns on the tattoo gun.
"Doing okay there, Ed?" she
asks as the tattoo gun she's load-, ,
ing with ink sputters.
"What's wrong with that
thing?" Ed asks. ....
"Overworked and underpaid," (.
Sue says with a grin. A r
Before she began slinging ink
in Jasper and tending to rescued
wild horses on her McAlpin Tattoo artist Sue Hawkins at work in her sho. Outwest Tattoo


- Photo: Stephenie Livingston


SEE MAKING, PAGE 2A


DEAL OF THE WEEK


REALTY GROUP, INC.
(386) 792-8484
RatliffRealtyGroup.com


Jennings


man dies


in crash
Collides with Live Oak
driver on US 90
By Carnell
Hawthorne Jr.
carnell.hawthorne@
gaflnews.com
A Jennings man died
in a Madison County car
crash last Thursday, ac-
cording to a Florida
Highway Patrol report.
Porcoro Ortega-Uolla,
45, was headed south on
NE Drew Way in a 1986
Chevy when he attempt-
ed a left turn onto US 90
and drove into the path
of an oncoming SUV at
about 8:30 a.m., the re-
port stated.
Tomas Pascual
Ramirez, 39, of Live Oak,
the driver of the second
vehicle, was traveling

SEE JENNINGS, PAGE 7A

Autumn fun
at Suwannee
River Regional
Library
Submitted
A variety of programs
are scheduled for the
school year at Hamilton
County libraries. Come
join us for a variety of
programs to help instill
the love of reading and
books.
Preschool programs
are offered at all of our li-
braries. After-school ac-
tivities such as crafts and
games are presented at
SEE AUTUMN, PAGE 2A

----------



Publix /



For Kids 12 & Under I
No Purchase Necessary I
Must Present Coupon I
L Limit 1 Per Person


as


rr







MAKING HER MARK Tattoo artist Susan Hawkins took the long way to Jasper


Continued From Page 1A

ranch, Sue was born Susan Hawkins in
England in the late 70s. After college,
she took a trip to America, anticipating
a short vacation. Instead she ended up
stranded with a mixed up visa and no
way home.
"I was an illegal immigrant in Mia-
mi," said Sue. "I lived off of saltine
crackers and mayonnaise. I was living
in a hotel room on South Beach, for
God's sake."
To pass time she started doing mu-
rals on the streets of Miami. "That's
how I found out I could paint," Sue
said as she went to work on Ed's arm.
Later, by a quick turn of luck, Sue was
offered an apprenticeship at a tattoo
shop. Finding fulfillment in painting
on skin rather than canvas, she was
soon working in an 1,800 square foot
shop in West Palm Beach. Before too
long, she owned it.
After over a decade of tattooing, she
decided to take a vacation in 2004. A
vacation that morphed into a road trip.
The road trip was planned, sort of.
"We pointed at a map and flipped a
coin," said Sue. Then fate took over. "I
went on a road trip and ended up buy-
ing a house." Sue fell instantly in love
with a 1900s farmhouse and ranch in

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McAlpin. "I moved in with only a lawn
chair, blow-up mattress and the dogs."
After contemplating what to do with
her newly acquired ranch, she decided
to adopt "seven wild great, big horses"
from Canada that would have other-
wise been slaughtered, following the
old French saying "Il vaut mieux faire
que dire," which translates "doing is
better than saying."
"I decided to put my money where
my mouth was and make a bit of a dif-
ference, or try," said Sue.
Other animals followed, including a
wolf-hybrid dog named Loki after the
Norse god of mischief, his best friend a
Jake Russell named Gismo, and a bald
chicken Sue calls Josephine Dirt.
"We've been trying to find a little
mullet wig for her," joked Sue. And
let's not forget, an entire herd of Ten-
nessee fainting goats, one or two of
which Sue sometimes finds legs up -
fainted on her back porch.
"It's like a giant petting zoo, but a lit-
tle on the retarded side," she laughed.
"We were up to 90 animals at one
point, but we've since made some cut
backs."
After settling into her new rancher
lifestyle, Sue quickly established Out-
west Tattoo. "My dad really likes west-
erns," she clarified. Sue opens her shop


at noon so she has plenty of time to
cook breakfast for her animals. "Oh yes,
I cook them breakfast. I make a stew of
carrots in a big pot. I'm lucky to get a
granola bar," she admits while holding
back laughter. "I used to make the hors-
es cookies, but I just don't have time
anymore."
"What did you say?" a customer in-
terrupts.
"I'm speaking me Britishes," she
laughs.
Sue is definitely not a stereotypical
tattoo artist, nor is her shop exactly
what one might expect.
"We try to change it up here," Sue
said. "No drugs or obscene signs." In
the past, tattoo artists and the tattooed
have had the reputation of being oust-
ed artists, misfits or outlaws. Shows
like Miami Ink have changed these pre-
conceived notions, however, according
to Sue.
Today, tattoos are common and even
trendy. Everyone from schoolteachers
to rock singers are getting inked. "Peo-
ple have been doing this since ancient
times, used with some form of spiritu-
ality or rite of passage," Sue said. "It is
nothing new."
Sue's own tattoos remain hidden un-
til she's coaxed into revealing an orien-
tal flower on her shoulder and a design
on her stomach, both of which she did
herself. "My neck hurt for a week after
my shoulder tattoo," she said.
On the flip side, Sue's apprentice Ed-
die Pike lets his piercing and tattoos fly.
"Eddie fits the stereotype better than I
do," said Sue. "I've never even seen a
horror movie." Eddie, an Army veter-
an, is nearing the end of his apprentice-
ship. "He's got his little wings. I think


my turkey can fly," she said affection-
ately.
Sue calls her journey to Suwannee
and Hamilton counties the completion
of a "natural progression north" that
started in Miami years ago.
"People here are cool as hell," Sue
said. "It is not like a touristy place
where people come in, demand and
leave. People see it as artwork and that
you can actually come up with some re-
ally cool stuff. Not just a heart with
mom written in it."
Her shop, hidden on SW 1st Ave in
Jasper, draws one's attention with the
word TATTOO and a large bright blue
Dodge truck, Sue's, parked just outside.
"I wanted my shop to be small and inti-
mate," Sue says as Gloria Sadler walks
in.
Gloria, who has a terminal form of
cancer, is quick to pull back her shirt
and show off her "Majestic Guardian
Angel" sketched and tattooed on her
back by Sue. "She is my angel who
helps me fight the cancer," said Gloria.
"The day I got her it was just me and
Sue. Totally private."
"We get the saddest stories," Sue said
after Gloria left.
Many people get tattoos because it
is a self-administered pain, Sue ex-
plained. It is a pain one can control
that is apart from that which life in-
flicts.
"It's very therapeutic in a weird kind
of sense," said Sue. "The crazier the
world gets, and more unstable, the
more people are looking for something
tangible."
To make light of a dark conversation,
Sue quipped, "Times are tough, get tat-
tooed," and smiled.


Autumn fun at Suwannee River Regional Library


Continued From Page 1A

the Jennings, Greenville, Live Oak,
Branford, and Madison libraries.
Movies will also be presented at
most of our libraries for families.
Teen volunteers may apply at their
local branches to help with puppet
shows, creating displays, prepping
crafts, reading to children, learning job
skills and having fun. Volunteer
hours may be used for community ser-
vice credits.
Jasper Library 386-792-2285
Preschool StoryTime (Ages 3-5)
Tuesday at 10 a.m.
After School @ The Jasper Library!


Family Movie Monday at 3
After School Fun Tuesday at 3

Jennings Library 386-938-1143
Preschool StoryTime (Ages 3-5)
every other Wednesday at 10 a.m.
After School @ The Jennings Li-
brary!
Family Movie Wednesday at 2:30
White Springs Library 386-397-
1389
Preschool StoryTime (Ages 3-5)
Thursday at 10 a.m.
For more information check out our
Web page, www.neflin.org/srrl or call
a Suwannee River Regional Library
near you.


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for a


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Luncheon
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How does ANY

exercise affect

my Breast Health?

Tuesday, October 27th
12:00 Noon
Jasper Women's Club
403 6th Avenue NW, Jasper, Florida


Come dressed in pink
relax and enjoy lunch
and meet a new "Breast Friend"


There is limited seating. Please call to RSVP

1-800-525-3248
Other times and dates available in surrounding communities

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AT LAKE CITY MEDICAL CENTER


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Register on-line today!


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Thursday, October 29, 2009

6:30 p.m.


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For information, contact:
Abbey Taylor- 792-6540 or 386-209-1442


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*


PAGE 2A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22,2009





THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009


Hello again! I do be-
lieve fall is here, seems
almost like winter for
this part of the country,
but it feels good to me.
It seems to be easier for
me to get warm than to
get cool (maybe it is be-
cause I grew up, and
lived the earlier part of
my life, in a colder cli-
mate, as I have said be-
fore, dressing in layers is
good for me, and I just
put on another sweater
or coat. Later, as gas
prices go up (I heat with
gas as well as driving a
car) my feelings may
change.
Writing this on Mon-
day afternoon, just re-
turned home from hav-
ing a very special lunch
time at the VFW, mem-
bers with the help of
their wives and other
ladies, cooked and
served fish with all the
trimmings for us, it was
offered for widows of
Veterans and also wives
of Veterans. I will not
begin to name all the
VFW members, assis-
tants and others who
provided this feast, we
certainly would not want
to leave anyone out, but
understand from Lamar
Royals that approximate-
ly 56 or 57 persons en-
joyed the feast, and enjoy
it we did, the food and
fellowship were tops.
Thanks for all you all do
for our community, it
was great to visit with


WHITE


T his is an- area. Thi eek about a hundred
other one town for the Su ee Bike Asso
of those Festival. If you are d ing and se
Rtt -weeks them a friendly wa and ive the
.where people from all spare when you pass them on the
"over Florida and be- really appreciate it
I yond are visiting Last Sunday I spoke to a group
"*--White Springs. It nev- tourists at the Telford Hotel. They
& r ceases to amaze a part of their tour of The Suwann
Trail and I had the honor of giving
cyclists to White Springs about White Springs. I told them
a a lot of benefits for our er fitting that tourism is coming ba
ard a few isolated com- because we were the original tour
they don't spend any mon- Florida when tourism first got star
up the roads." It's just the late 1800's. It all started here,
ters, they love the commu- ed around the spring.
nade donations of bikes I called the audience's attention
This year again they will the spring no longer flows, that th
ht brand new bikes to south of us are experiencing dimii
our local hotels and B&Bs, Then I asked the question, "How n
it canoes, shop at our springs have to go dry before we r
omes and property in the lost?" David Still, director or the


AY.Y.Y.Y.

NOT E

...............
............


...............


ley Stre
enue, it
sible, ai
from Fi
ing Hal
either d
picks u
point b
traffic 1
Have
let me h
L
risl


people from all around
the county.
Be prepared to be
hearing from First Pres-
byterian Church Youth
as they are getting ready
for the annual pancake
supper, with their en-
deavors, it is hoped that
this fun and filling event
will continue, having
been started many years
ago (I do not remember
when; before I moved
here, I think), but I am
sure Dr. Mickler and oth-
er members of the Lions
Club could tell you, it is
always an anticipated
event of November, and
they would like to keep
it going. Tickets may be
purchased at D&S Signs,
members and youth of
First Presbyterian
Church, and others, the
price will be $6.00, pan-
cakes served from 4:30 -
7:00, or until......... This is
a fund-raiser for the
youth mission work of
FPC, they will be plan-
ning work where they
feel it is needed to help
those in need, and will
keep us informed as to
their endeavors. COME,
HAVE FUN, EAT AND
VISIT.
Linda Law and
Leslie McCauley of Val-
dosta (formerly of Jen-
nings), Wayne and Su-
san Bradshaw of Jen-
nings, and Marshall and
Joan Thomas of Valdos-
ta, along with the Senior
Citizens Group of Val-


dosta, just returned from
a ten-day trip of the New
England States. They
visited Vermont, New
Hampshire and Maine.
Some of the leaves had
started turning, they vis-
ited many points of inter-
est while they were gone.
They had 90 Senior Citi-
zens who went, they had
to take two buses, every-
one enjoyed the beautiful
scenery and the great fel-
lowship.
On Wed. October
13th, Anna Cameron's
granddaughter Chris and
her friend John came for
a visit; stayed in Valdos-
ta with Chris' mother,
Leslie McCauley and her
Aunt Linda Law. On
Thursday they went mo-
torcycle riding with the
Ole Spokes Motorcycle
Club of Valdosta. They
left on Friday to return to
Charleston, South Caroli-
na.
I like to see what the
city is doing with the
paving of Third Street. I
can go all the way from
where I live to the other
end of town without hit-
ting the traffic through
downtown, and get any-
where I want or need to
go from this street.
However, this may
change when some of the
streets are made one-
way. I have tried to veri-
fy with some of my 'con-
tacts' that there was once
a traffic light at the cor-
ner of what is now Hat-


me.
Cooler weather brings c
and they bring with them
town. In the past, I've he
plaints to the effect that "
ey here and they just clog
simply not true. For star
nity and for years have m
and helmets to kids here.
be donating seven or eigl
needy kids. They stay at
eat at our restaurants, ren
stores and have bought h


Something To Smile About!

Readers,
Submit your
smile photo for










"Please, no more photos for now. Someone bring me a latte'" jaspernewsl @windstream.net

Area businesses:

Take this high profile opportunity to promote

your business, products, services.

Call Louise for more information. 792-2487
551126-F


I r ma t. ne.


SMYDoER MOTOR SALES
& EQUIPMENT


*hne(3a)46-58

wwwsmde s co Fa(8).6-18
1I2 1 U 4 ,Al c u ,F 32 11


By Walter M Kenzie




SPRI

lifeinwhitesprings@gmail.co
cyclists will be in Water Management District echoed these concerns
citation's Fat Tire and the audience was very attentive and very con-
ze these folks, give cerned. The next day, they changed their itinerary
em some room to so that they could spend some time visiting the old
road. They will spring house. Included in the group were State
Representatives Ron Shultz, Debbie Boyd, Leonard
of very interested Bembry, Rich Glorioso, M. Rehwinkle Vasilinda,
y were in town as and members of their staffs. Their visit was good
iee Wilderness for our town and, I hope in the long run, good for
g a short talk our springs.
that it is altogeth- The Suwannee Hardware Store in White
ack to our town, Springs has new owners, Don and Celeste Wilson.
ist destination in Don is originally from Lake City and, talk about a
rted in the state in small world, Celeste told me that she's "a Live Oak
and it all originat- girl" and took home economics from my wife Merri
when Merri taught at Suwannee High. Celeste said
n to the fact that she still has her class notebook and still uses the
ie springs to the recipes. The Wilsons now live in Genoa and are re-
nished flows, ally looking forward to being part of our communi-
many more ty. They like the idea of a "mom and pop" hard-
realize what we've ware store, a small business that gives that level of
Suwannee River personal service you don't often get at the big
chains. In addition to hardware, they will continue
to carry feed and seed and their hours are M-F 8:30-
5:30, Sat. 8:30-3:30. Stop by to see them soon and
you'll be so glad that you don't have to drive thirty
miles round trip when you need something to fin-
ish up a project.
Saturday, October 24th at 3:00 pm will be "family
and friends day" at Beulah Baptist church, First
Street, Rev. Rickey Hutcherson, pastor. The speak-
er will be Apostle Shirley White of Pensacola. Din-
ner will be served following the program. The
chairperson of the program is Sister Bobbie Jean
Henderson.
*et and First Av- On Sunday at Beulah Baptist there will be a
is almost impos- "women's day program" at 11:00 am. The speaker
nd scary, to get will be evangelist Tia Jefferson Carroll of West
first Avenue cross- Palm Beach. Dinner will follow the service. The
tley Street, from chairperson for the program is Sister Yvonne
direction, traffic Bryant. Beulah Baptist invites you to come and en-
p around this joy these programs.
between the two Well, once again I've said enough but will be glad
ights downtown. to say some more when I hear from you. In the
a good week and meantime, get out and enjoy life in White Springs.
hear from you.
,illian Norris nor- Walter McKenzie
w@windstream.net lifeinwhitesprings@gmail.com
386-792-2151 386-269-0056


Norris Notes



By Lillian Norris


r-I


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 3A








OPINION


American idea











"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


Researcher receives major grant


for research targeting tuberculosis


Published weekly every Thursday. USPS #755-980
Office located at 105 NE 2nd Avenue,
Bank of America, Jasper, FL 32052
Phone (386) 792-2487 FAX (386) 792-3009
E-mail address: jaspernewsl@windstream.net

Myra Regan ............ . .Publisher
Robert Bridges ............. Group Editor
Jo Ross ................ . .Reporter
Louise Sheddan ............ Administrative Assistant
Periodicals postage paid at Jasper, FL.
Annual subscription rate is $17 in county,
$25 out of county and out of state.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
The Jasper News, 105 NE 2nd Ave., Jasper, FL 32052

Letter to the Editor and Article Policy
Letters to the Editor and news articles can be mailed,
FAXed or dropped off at the news office located in the
Bank of America Building, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.
till 5 p.m.
Letters to the Editor should be typed, double-spaced if
possible, brief and to the point, approximately 150 to 200
words or less. Not all letters are published. To be consid-
ered for publication Letters to the Editor must be signed,
include the writer's address and phone number, and in
the Jasper News' office on Friday before 5 p.m.
News Releases, 400 or less words, should be typed, dou-
ble-spaced if possible, brief and to the point. Not all articles
are published.
Letters and articles may be edited to fit available space.
Well written letters / articles require less editing.
To mail your letter/article, send it to: The Jasper News,
105 NE 2nd Ave., Jasper, FL 32052 or FAX it to: 792-3009.


By Amy Winters Mast
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -
- A Florida State Univer-
sity researcher has re-
ceived a major research
grant from the National
Institutes of Health
(NIH) to screen small
molecules that could be
potential drug targets in
the fight against tuber-
culosis, a common and
deadly infectious dis-
ease that kills nearly 2
million people world-
wide each year.
Timothy A. Cross, the
Earl Frieden Professor of
Chemistry and Biochem-
istry at Florida State and
director of the Nuclear
Magnetic Resonance
(NMR) program at the
National High Magnetic
Field Laboratory,
www.magnet.fsu.edu,
has received $3.1 million
to advance his research,
which will take place
predominantly at the
magnet lab. The funds
are part of a larger NIH
grant -- $9 million --
awarded to a group of
collaborating institu-
tions that also includes
the University of Alaba-
ma; the Burnham Insti-


SThe Jasper Marketplace

OPENING THURSDAY, OCT. 1 st
Tues.-Fri. 9 a.m. 6 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m. 12 noon
C. ,ii, ,. Antiques, Gifts and Lots More
I 4 cate [ookinaz oT nod.
Lovely old building in historic Jasper, Florida has a place for you.
We have spaces available for selling collectibles, antiques, jewelry, I
crafts, church crafts, art work, home decor, beauty items, old toys,
books, dolls, vintage .1. .111. furniture and more.
Don't wait any longer to turn that passion or hobby
into a money making venture.
We share the work and expenses making your
new business a real possibility.
107 Central Ave SW, Jasper, Fl 380-400-2344
L -552057-F



PUBLIC NOTICE

The City of Jasper has adopted Resolution 09-09-01,
designated certain portions of Central Avenue West,
Central Avenue East and First Avenue Southeast
as One Way Streets.
Beginning November 1, 2009
1. First Avenue SE from MLK Drive North to Hatley Street
shall be designated as a one way street with traffic to flow in a
northern direction
2. Central Avenue West from MLK Blvd North to Hatley Street
shall be designated a one way street with traffic to flow in a
southerly direction
3. Central Avenue East from MLK Blvd North shall be
designated as a one way street with traffic flow in a northerly
direction
554523-F


tute; the University of
California, San Diego;
and Harvard Universi-
ty. Cross heads up that
collaborative effort.
It has been 40 years
since the development
of new drugs to treat
TB, a contagious bacter-
ial infection that pri-
marily attacks the lungs.
And according to the
U.S. Centers for Disease
Control, one in five new
cases of TB is drug-re-
sistant. Finding mole-
cules that can effectively
bind to and deactivate
tuberculosis proteins is
an important step to-
ward the eventual de-
velopment of drugs to
combat the disease.
"These proteins are
essential to the life of
the bug," Cross said.
"Knock out just one of
them and the bug dies."
Tuberculosis is a for-
midable opponent. Ac-
cording to the World
Health Organization,
more than 2 billion peo-
ple -- almost one-third
of the world's popula-
tion -- are infected with
the microbes that cause
the disease. In 2007, the
most recent year for
which statistics are
available, there were
9.27 million new cases;
that same year, 1.77 mil-
lion people died of TB.
The spread of HIV has
led to millions of new
TB infections, particu-
larly in sub-Saharan
Africa, making TB the
leading cause of death
for people infected with


HIV/AIDS.
Cross and his col-
leagues have been
studying TB for about
seven years. Most of
that time has been spent
building up the technol-
ogy and methodology
to get to this point, and
in the next five years,
researchers may be able
to isolate as many as
five to 10 potential drug
targets using the NMR
facilities at the magnet
lab. NMR science can
provide scientists with
intimate portraits of a
protein's structure and
clues to its function.
"Although the work is
still basic research,
years away from what
is commonly referred to
as the drug discovery
stage, it lays the foun-
dation for that step",
Cross said.
"The combination of
scientific skills in Flori-
da State's Department
of Chemistry and Bio-
chemistry and the mag-
net lab's second-to-none
technology develop-
ment position this mul-
ti-institutional effort to
make significant ad-
vances in TB research,"
he said.
Significantly, the team
of young scientists
(many of them Florida
State University gradu-
ate students) will con-
duct much of the re-
search through their
doctoral education pro-
gram.
"The high quality of
the graduate students


here at FSU, and the
ability of our staff and
faculty to teach, train
and pass along knowl-
edge during this re-
search process, leads to
not only an expanded
body of knowledge for
this disease and the
tools and technology to
further advance such re-
search, but will also
lead to the development
of the next generation of
faculty and scientists for
our state and country,
Cross said.
The National High
Magnetic Field Labora-
tory develops and oper-
ates state-of-the-art,
high-magnetic-field fa-
cilities that faculty and
visiting scientists and
engineers use for re-
search. The laboratory is
sponsored by the Na-
tional Science Founda-
tion and the State of
Florida. To learn more,
visit
www.magnet.fsu.edu.


CJBAT tests
Monday Thursday
Monday Thursday at
5 p.m. (by appointment):
CJBAT (Criminal Justice
Basic Abilities Test) at
NFCC Testing Center
(Bldg. #16), Madison. CJ-
BAT is required for ac-
ceptance into Corrections
& Law Enforcement pro-
grams. Photo ID re-
quired. Pre-registration
& scheduling time and
date are required. To reg-
ister please call 850-973-
9451.


DO YOU CARE ABOUT THE FUTURE OF YOUR
YOUTH AND THE SAFETY OF YOUR COMMUNITY?
DO YOU WANT TO HELP MAKE POSITIVE
CHANGES?
IF YOUR ANSWER IS YES.


"YOU ARE INVITED TO ATTEND:
THE HAMILTON COUNTY ALCOHOL AND OTHER
DRUG PREVENTION COALITION MEETING"


TIME: 9:30 AM


DATE: OCTOBER 27, 2009


PLACE: HAMILTON COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
MEETING ROOM
JRE LEE COMPLEX, SCHOOL BOARD MEETING
ROOM
4280 SW COUNTY ROAD 152
JASPER, FL 32052
554521-F


PAGE 4A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22,2009








THURSDAYOCTOBER22,2009bitH A R WariespeFAE


Rebecca Ann Davis
Hamm and Ivey Lynn
Walden

Rebecca Ann Davis
Hamm, age 31 of Cov-
ington, Georgia passed
away Friday, Oct. 9,
2009. Her daughter, Ivey
Lynn Walden, age 3,
also of Covington passed
away Saturday, October
10, 2009, both suffering
fatal injuries sustained in
an automobile accident.
Rebecca was a 1996
graduate of Columbia
County High School in
Lake City,
FL. She loved being a
mother to her four chil-
dren. Her favorite things
to do were arts and crafts
and taking walks in the
woods where she would
teach her children about
nature. She also enjoyed
fishing and camping
with her family.
Ivey Lynn was very
compassionate and
thoughtful even at such a
young age and loved to
take care of you when
you were sick.
Because of her moth-
er's love of nature, Ivey
loved little creatures es-
pecially frogs.
Rebecca's survivors in-
clude her children Aliece
Hamm, Kaleck
Hamm, Will Walden
all of Covington Georgia;
parents, Phillip and
Teresa Harris Smith of
Ochlocknee, Georgia,
(former residents of
Hamilton and Columbia
County); maternal
grandparents, Ivey and
Mary Harris of White
Springs, Florida.
Ivey's survivors in-
clude her father,
Howard Walden; sisters,
Nicki Danieki (Patrick),
Casey Walden, Aliece
Hamm; brothers, Jacob
Walden, Adam Walden,
Sam Walden, Kaleck
Hamm, and Will
Walden, all of Coving-
ton, Georgia; maternal
grandparents, Phillip
and Teresa (Harris)
Smith, Ochloknee, Geor-
gia; paternal grandmoth-
er, Virginia Walden of
Covington, Georgia; ma-
ternal great-grandpar-
ents, Ivey and Mary Har-
ris, of White Springs,
Florida. Ivey was pre-
ceded in death by her
grandfather, Howard
Walden, Sr.
Graveside services for
Rebecca and Ivey were
held Tuesday, Oct.
20, 2009 at Harris
Cemetery near White
Springs, FL. with Bishop


Frank Allen officiat-
ing, assisted by Elder
Brent Wainwright and
Elder Bruce Wilson.
Condolences may be
conveyed online at
www.harrytreidfh.com.
Harry T. Reid Funeral
Home, Jasper, FL. was in
charge of arrangements.

Procoro Ortega

Procoro Ortega, age
45, of Statenville, Geor-
gia passed away Thurs-
day, October 15, 2009
from injuries sustained
in an automobile acci-
dent in Madison County,
Florida. Mr. Ortega was
employed by Pilgrim's
Pride and was a member
of San Jose Catholic
Church in Lake Park,
Georgia.
Survivors include two
daughters, Michelle Or-
tega and Lynn Ramos; a
step son, Gilbert Torres;
his parents, Guadealupe
and Pureza Ortega; five
brothers, Manuel,
Guadalupe, Gavino,
Jaime and Ruben Ortega;
four sisters, Eloina Nava,
Nina Concepcion, Emilia
Ortega and Maria Orte-
ga; four grandchildren,
Mia and Gage Torres
and Analeigh and Alexis
Andrade.
Funeral services were
held Monday, October
19th at St. Therese
Catholic Church near
Jasper with Father
Richard Perko officiat-
ing. Interment followed
at Evergreen Cemetery
in Jasper.
Condolences may be
conveyed online at
www.harrytreidfh.com.
Harry T. Reid Funeral
Home was in charge of
arrangements.

Tony Russell Maine

Tony Russell Maine,
age 48, of Echols County,
Georgia, passed away
Friday, October 16, 2009
from injuries sustained
in an automobile acci-
dent. Tony proudly
served his country with
four years of service in
the United States Marine
Corps. He enjoyed his
work as a logger, and
loved hunting and fish-
ing.
He is survived by his
wife, Donna Maine of
Statenville, Georgia; his
mother and step-father,
Eloise and Frank Helton,
of Statenville, two sons,
Eric Bolesta and Chance
Maine, also both of
Statenville, two daugh-


ters Casey Herndon
(Dennis) and Brandy
Maine, both of
Statenville, and two
brothers, Spencer Helton
and Jessie Helton (Ton-
da) both of Statenville.
Funeral Services were
held on Monday, Octo-
ber 19, 2009 at Sardis
Baptist Church, in
Statenville, Georgia. In-
terment followed at
Carter Cemetery.
Condolences may be
conveyed online at
www.harrytreidfh.com.
Harry T. Reid Funeral
Home, Jasper, Florida,
was in charge of all the
arrangements.

A CELEBRATION
OF LIFE

A daughter, a sister, a
wife, a mother, a grand-
mother, or perhaps a
business colleague, and
best friend. Each of
these describe my moth-
er, Linda Gayle Linton,
but above all, she was a
woman of wisdom,
compassion, grace,
beauty, and selflessness.
Linda Gayle Tanner
Linton was born in
Tampa, Florida in 1944.
She was one of four chil-


Submitted by Chief Burke

Everyone is invited
and welcomed to gather
for some good eats (cat-
fish, hush puppies and
plenty of coleslaw to go
with them...yum) and
share Indian Tradition
on Saturday, November
7th at the home of Chief
Burke located at 2735
NW 61st Avenue in Jen-
nings, FL. Profits from
the fundraiser will bene-
fit both the United
Cherokee People Land


dren born to Evelyn
Johns Tanner of Mac-
Clenny, Florida and the
late Remer Tanner. She
had two sisters, Diane
Greatrex of Beverly
Hills, Florida, and
Frances Headrick of
Lake City, Florida and
one brother, Larry Tan-
ner of MacClenny, Flori-
da.
On a lovely Septem-
ber evening in 1965, she
married her husband of
43 years, Robert Lamar
Linton. In this, Linda
gained a mother & fa-
ther-in-law, Betty and
the late Robert Linton of
Marianna, Florida, and
a sister-in-law, Frankie
Stewart of Marianna,
Florida. After several
years of marriage,
Lamar and Linda had
three children, Robert
Christopher Linton of
Branford, Florida,
Daleann Linton Wor-
thington of Jasper, Flori-
da, and Jerrette Lamar
Linton of Mayo, Florida.
She worked with
Lamar many years in
the logging business in
Branford, Florida and
owned a Napa auto
parts store in Jasper,
Florida. Linda lived,


Fund and Shawn Burke
Initiative; both are 501(c)
3s.
Tribal land is coming
along slowly and we will
make it a place for our
people with your help
and support. This is a
way for you to get in-
volved without grabbing
a shovel or rake. Re-
member, this is to bene-
fit who we are and what
we stand for.
There will be an auc-
tion, raffles, 50/50 draw-
ings and some items for


worked, and loved the
quaint town of Jasper.
So much so, that she
made Jasper her prima-
ry residence with her
husband Lamar. For
over 25 years they lived
in Branford, Florida,
where they raised their
children and presently
have a farm.
Linda was able to wit-
ness many wonderful
things in her life, such
as the marriages of their
oldest son, Chris to
Brandi Waters, their
only daughter, Daleann
to Doyle Worthington
Jr. and their youngest
son, Jerrette to Frankie
Starling.
Through the years,
she enjoyed seven
grandchildren: Taylor
and Lucus Linton chil-
dren of Frankie and Jer-
rette Linton; Reagan,
Chloe and Trevor Lin-
ton children of Brandi
and Chris Linton, and
Anna-Marie and Doyle
Worthington III. twins
of Daleann and Doyle
Worthington.
Six weeks after being
diagnosed, Linda lost
her battle with cancer
on September 6, 2009.
Her memorial was held


sale. We are planning
something for all ages;
singing, dancing and
loads of fun. All we ask
is that you bring some-
thing lovingly-used-
and-no-longer-needed
for the raffle table, a cou-
ple bucks donation for
the eats, and a big heart's
desire to benefit our
journey towards unity
and cultural ceremony
and exchange.
Call 386-938-1294 for
more information. Will
we see you there?


College Placement Tests at NFCC
Monday Thursday
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): College Placement Test
(CPT), NFCC Testing Center (Bldg. #16), 5 p.m., Madison. Register in NFCC
Student Services 24 hours before test. For information please call 850-973-9451.


at Burnham Christian
Church in Jennings,
Florida, where she was
a member, on Septem-
ber 9, 2009. Johnny
Brown and Elder
Arnold Johns officiated
the beautiful morning
service. Following the
ceremony, a luncheon
social was hosted by nu-
merous ladies in the
church community in
the fellowship hall.
We will miss her
so....donations can be in
her name to Burnham
Christian Church, 4520
NW County Road 146,
Jennings, Florida 32053.




Thank You
The family of Bever-
ly Mickler thanks
everyone for the many
ways you gave to com-
fort, support and en-
courage us during our
time of mourning.
Your kindness and
compassion have been
a blessing and a source
of strength during
some very difficult
days. May God bless
you all.



Hamilton

County

Tobacco-Free

Partnership

Meeting
The Hamilton
County Tobacco-Free
Partnership, in con-
junction with SWAT
(Students Working
Against Tobacco),
RCS (Rose Consulta-
tion Services), and the
Florida Department
of Health, will host a
meeting on October
26, 2009 at 4 p.m. The
meeting will be held
in the Meridian Be-
havioral Healthcare
Facility located at 406
10th Avenue, Jasper.
Contact Emmy Lou
Slaughter at 352-250-
5010 or email her at
emmy@roseconsulta-
tion.com with ques-
tions or for further in-
formation.


VALDOSTA MONUMENT COMPANY
A tradition since 1908
SAVE! Buy Direct From The Manufacturer SAVE!
3403 Bemiss Road Valdosta, Georgia
229-242-8873
,or Contact Harry T. Reid Funeral Home at 792-2669








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EARNHARDT & SONS UPHOLSTERY
MADISON, FLORIDA
555334. 1-850-973-6006 OR 1-850-973-4667


FIRST ADVENT CHRISTIAN
N.W. 15th Avenue Jasper
Rev. Fran Wood
Sunday
Sunday School....... ........ 10:00 a.m.
Morning W orship..................11:00 a.m .
Wednesday
Prayer Fellowship.............6:30 p.m.
500892-F
l:PTIS (Sout


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
SR 6 West, 6592 NW 48th St.,
Jennings, FL 32053
938-5611
Pastor:Jeff Cordero
Sunday School........................1....10:00 a.m.
Morning W orship.... .. ............. 11:00 a.m .
Sunday Evening Worship, Youth Happening
RA's, GA's 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Supper 6:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting, Discipleship class for adults
Youth activities, Children's Choirs.....6:30 p.m.
Van pick-up upon request
500896-F


CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1/2 mile East on Hwy. 6, Jasper, Fl 32052
792-2275
Sunday
Sunday School........1.......0:00 a.m.
Morning W orship...................11:00 a.m .
Children's Church.................11:00 a.m.
Church Training...................... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship.................... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Prayer M meeting ......................7:00 p.m .
500893-F


CHURCH OF CHRIST
N.W. 3rd St., Jasper
BId.: 792-2277


FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
405 Central Ave., Jasper, FL
Pastor- Dale Ames
Phone-386-792-1122
Sunday
Sunday School.............................. 9:45 a.m.
".1,:, :, : I': 11 :00a.m .
Wednesday
Bible Study 4:45 p.m.
Choir Practice 6:00 p.m.
Family Night Dinner 3rd Wednesday
Clothes Closet 4th Saturday 1-5pm
500902-F
SI S *SI NTINA


Sunday BURNHAM CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Sunday School....................9:30 a.m. 4520 NW CR 146, Jennings, FL 32053
Morning Worship........................ 10:30 a. m. 938- 1265 a
Pastor: Robert Carter
Evening Worship..........................6:00 p.m. Sunday
Wednesday Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Evening 6:00 p.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.
500897-F Evening Service.......................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting 7:00 p.m.
9-F

cw' ^ ^?


To list your church on our church directory, please call Nancy at 1-800-525-4182


To place your ad inside

the Church Directory

please call

Louise at

386-792-2487


FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
204 N.W. 3rd Avenue, Jasper, 792-2258
Pastor: Rev. Parrish Jones, 792-8412
SUNDAY
Sunday School ... ................. 10:00 a.m.
W worship Service........................ 11:00 a.m.
WEDNESDAY
Prayer in Fellowship Hall...............9:00 a.m.
Choir Practice 7:00 p.m.
500898-F

ST. THERESE CATHOLIC CHURCH
Three miles north of Jasper U.S. 41
PO. Box 890, Jasper, FL 32052
Rectory U.S. 90 E., Live Oak, FL
(386) 364-1108
Sunday MASS 8:00 a.m.
500901-F

C3HURCH F GO


ETERNAL HOPE
CHURCH OF GOD
Glen R. Barrs, D.D. Pastor
Church Phone 386-792-HOPE (4673)
SUNDAY
Worship & Praise................10:30 a.m.
Classes for Kids.................. 11:00 a.m.
Celebration Praise................6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Wednesday (FTH).................7:00 p.m.
Everyone Welcome! 552202-F


Fundraiser to benefit The United

Cherokee People land fund and

Shawn Burke Initiative


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22,2009


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 5A


I METHODIST I PRESBYTERIAN I


& 0 yveiE





THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


FWC NEWS


FWC fills top law


enforcement position


I R- ,-
Col. Jim Brown is the new director of the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission's Division of Law En-
forcement. He will lead more than 700 sworn law enforce-
ment officers. (FWC photo by Tim Lewis)


Submitted
Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) Ex-
ecutive Director Ken
Haddad announced
Thursday that Lt. Col.
Jim Brown got the nod to
pin the colonel's eagle
insignias on his uniform
and assume command of


the agency's law enforce-
ment division.
Brown began his con-
servation law enforce-
ment career in 1981, pa-
trolling the Florida Keys.
Over the years, he
worked his way up the
ranks and served as the
FWC's boating law ad-
ministrator, Special Op-


FWC continues public

comment period on imperiled

species listing changes
Submitted
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) encourages the public to
view draft rules for the state's imperiled species
listing process and make comments by Nov. 6.
Comments will be reviewed and used to revise
the draft rules before presentation to the Com-
mission at the December meeting in Clewiston.
The goal of the new draft rules is to provide for
a comprehensive and cohesive approach to man-
aging species so they will thrive, rather than be-
come extinct. The draft rules focus on improving
the management system and listing process for
Florida's imperiled species and link species pro-
tection to science, while using a balanced ap-
proach through collaboration and partnerships.
The imperiled species listing team worked with
stakeholders and the public during the process of
drafting the new rules, which are a streamlined
process that avoids duplication with the federal
listing process and provides for the highest level
of conservation for species through management
plans. As the FWC continues to work on the draft
rules, stakeholder and public meetings will con-
tinue.
"The input received so far has been invaluable,
and as a result, we've made significant changes to
the original draft after working with the public
and stakeholders," said Dr. Elsa Haubold, leader
of the FWC's imperiled species listing team. "This
process has been an excellent example of partners
coming together and working on the issues,
which will ensure a Florida where no species goes
extinct and wildlife thrives."
The draft rules are available for reviewing and
comment at MyFWC.com/WILDLIFEHABI-
TATS/imperiledSpp_index.htm. Public com-
ments on the draft rules may be sent to imper-
iled@MyFWC.com no later than Nov. 6 at 5 p.m.
EST.




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may have a lot of questions. Can I retire now? Do I need
to look for another job? What are my options?

Edward Jones can help.

We'll start by getting to know your goals. Then we'll sort
through your current situation and work with you face
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retirement offer can affect your retirement goals.

To make sense of how your offer can affect your
retirement decisions, call your Edward Jones financial
advisor today.
Josh Akers
Financial Advisor
521 Lakes Blvd Suite B
Lake Park, GA 31636
229-559-0127


www.edwardjones.com MmeSP


I A IGS ES OF IVS T S


556365-F


erations Program coordi-
nator, and section leader
in the Office of Boating
and Waterways. He has
served as the FWC's law
enforcement deputy di-
rector of operations since
2006.
Brown studied crimi-
nology at Miami Dade
Community College and
sociology at the Univer-
sity of Miami. He is also
a boat captain licensed
by the U.S. Coast Guard
to operate 100-ton ocean-
going vessels.
"Col. Julie Jones
(Brown's predecessor)
spent seven years as our
director of law enforce-
ment, building standards
and expectations that
few other agencies any-
where can match," said
FWC Chairman Rodney
Barreto. "She led FWC
officers through the gru-
eling accreditation
process and did an excel-
lent job of ensuring the
division's depth of lead-
ership into the future.
When Jones accepted
the job as executive di-
rector of the Florida De-
partment of Highway
Safety and Motor Vehi-
cles, the FWC faced the
challenge of finding a re-
placement for her who
could maintain FWC of-
ficers' distinguished rep-
utation in the law en-
forcement profession.
"Col. Brown was an
excellent choice to fill the
position," Barreto said.
"He's worked 28 years in
conservation law en-
forcement, performed
brilliantly as a team
leader and has extensive
training in a variety of
law enforcement opera-
tions. He has what it will
take to continue building
the traditions we've
started."
Brown grew up in
Homestead where he
spent his time hunting
and fishing the area from
Lake Okeechobee
through the Florida
Keys. These days, he
spends his off-duty time
fishing in Apalachicola
Bay with his wife, Karen.



Stone crab


season


is open
Submitted
The commercial and
recreational harvest sea-
son for stone crab claws
in Florida opened on
Thursday, Oct. 15. The
season will remain open
through May 15.
Stone crab claws must
be at least 2 3/4 inches
in length to be harvested
legally, and claws may
not be taken from egg-
bearing female stone
crabs. Recreational har-
vesters are allowed to
use up to five stone crab
traps, and there is a dai-
ly bag limit of one gal-
lon of claws per person
or two gallons per ves-
sel, whichever is less.
More information re-
garding the recreational
harvest of stone crab
claws is available online
at MyFWC.com/Rules
m/RULESANDREGS / S
altwater_Regulations_re
cstonecrab.htm> (click
on Fishing Saltwater).


Commercial stone
crab regulations and li-
censing information is
also available online at
the same location.


Apply for spring turkey quota


hunt permits November 1


Submitted
Hunters looking to
turkey hunt on Florida's
wildlife management ar-
eas during the 2010
spring turkey season
need to apply for quota
hunt permits beginning
10 a.m. November 1.
Quota hunt permit
worksheets are available
now from the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission
(FWC) regional offices
and online at
MyFWC.com/ Hunting
m/Hunting> (click un-
der Limited Entry
Hunts).
Applicants must apply
through the FWC's Total
Licensing System.
Hunters may apply on-
line at www.wildlifeli-
cense.com/fl or present
their completed work-


sheets to any tax collec-
tor office or license
agent. All applicants, re-
gardless of when they
apply, have the same
chance of being selected,
as long as they submit
their applications within
the application period.
Applicants must apply
by 11:59 p.m. November
30 to be included in the
random drawing.
"When you submit
your application, you
will receive a receipt
showing the hunts you
have applied for and
your preference status,"
said FWC quota hunt co-
ordinator Eddie White.
Hunters also may ap-
ply as a group. A group
leader must first apply
to create the group. The
group's number will be
printed on the group
leader's receipt. Each


person wishing to join
the group must submit
his own application us-
ing the unique group
number assigned to the
leader.
If chosen, applicants
will receive, by mail, a
spring turkey quota
hunt permit. Applicants
not chosen in Phase I
may reapply during
Phase 2 for any hunts
not filled and will still be
eligible for the prefer-
ence drawing next year.
Applicants may check
drawing results at
MyFWC.com / Hunting,
under Limited Entry
Hunts, click Check Per-
mit Availability and
Drawing Results.
For more information
on how to apply for
spring turkey quota
hunt permits, visit
MyFWC.com/ Hunting


Florida Fish and Wildlife
ConMrvatlon CarnmllAon
My5FWC.om


Migrating birds seek cooler


temps as climate changes


By Patricia Behnke,
Florida Fish and I \1i1liiy.'
Conservation Commission
(,,Fji\-C.com)
Autumn in Florida
brings relief from the
suffocating heat and
dripping humidity of
summer. We Floridians
begin to venture outside
once again just in time
for the seasonal arrival
of unique and abundant
migratory birds.
Some of those birds
that fly south only rest in
Florida before heading
to Central and South
America. Some
stay for a couple of
months until their
breeding and nest-
ing grounds up
north thaw come
spring. Then there
are those snow-
birds that return to
the Sunshine State
to breed and nest,
remaining with us
for six months or
more.
However, studies are
showing these patterns
are shifting as a result of
warmer overall tempera-
tures. The analogy of the
canary in the coal mine
is an apt one-birds often
are the first harbingers
of changing habitats.
"We see trends first in
birds because it is so
easy to see," said Elena
Sachs, with the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission's
Florida Bird Conserva-
tion Initiative. "We can
monitor migration,
breeding and timing pat-
terns in migratory birds.
For everything to contin-
ue to work in sync, the
birds, insects, plants and
wildlife must change at
the same rate. That does-
n't always happen."
Several studies across
the nation point to one
thing: rising tempera-
tures over the past 40
years have resulted in
drastic changes in mi-


gration patterns among
some species of birds.
The National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Ad-
ministration (NOAA)
records show the aver-
age temperatures for
January rose more than
five degrees Fahrenheit
in the continental United
States over the past 40
years.
Audubon's annual
Christmas Bird Count
has resulted in one of the
largest repositories of
bird-migration data in
the world. Audubon re-
leased a study compiling
the citizen scientists'
findings. The data, in
conjunction with statis-
tics on rising tempera-
tures, is startling: 305
widespread bird species
in North America "have
moved dramatically
northward toward cold-
er latitudes over the
past four decades".
"We were able to look


NAiL


at the trends for almost
four decades using our
counts and NOAA's fig-
ures," said Greg Butcher,
director of bird conser-
vation at the National
Audubon Society. "If
there is no further
warming then it's just a
fun study; but that's not
what the experts say.
They say this warming
trend will continue."
According to another
study from the Universi-
ty of California at Berke-
ley, changes in precipita-
tion levels also have an
impact. The study sug-
gests as warmer and
wetter weather has oc-
curred in parts of the
Sierra Nevada Moun-
tains, the vast majority
of birds there have shift-
ed their ranges accord-
ingly.
With predications of
increased rainfall in
parts of Florida and an
increase in the intensity
of hurricanes in the next


50 years, our little feath-
ered friends will be
forced to adapt faster
than a hummingbird
flaps its small, yet mighty
wings.
"It's the pace of climate
change," Sachs said.
"When evolution occurs,
species have time to
catch up, but the speed at
which temperatures are
rising and precipitation
patterns are changing
presents some prob-
lems."
Butcher cautions that
some birds will go back
to breeding grounds too
soon. In Canada, as tem-
peratures rise, some
birds will stay put, and
when the other birds
come too soon, precious
habitat will be filled with
displaced birds.
"Some will adapt,"
Butcher said. "Species al-
ready endangered or on
the fringe won't do well
and will suffer. Florida
will be particularly
vulnerable with its
coastal shoreline
and huge amount
and variety of win-
tering shorebirds."
Butcher urges in-
dividuals to volun-
teer with local
groups working to
t protect natural ar-
eas. He also sug-
gests participating
in the annual
Christmas Bird Count.
The 110th Christmas
Bird Count runs from
Dec. 14 to Jan. 5. The
Audubon Society's Web
site will have specific in-
formation by November.
Visit www.audubon.
org / Bird / cbc
org/Bird/cbc> and click
on "Get Involved". You
also can contact your lo-
cal Audubon chapter for
further information on
how to get involved. If
you are a backyard bird-
er with little experience,
a fun way to get involved
is through eBird, a Web
site devoted to compiling
records of bird sightings.
Just register at
http://ebird.org and fol-
low the simple instruc-
tions for reporting your
birding information.
You'll be learning about
birds and assisting the
experts as they address
the impacts of climate
change.


PAGE 6A


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22,2009





THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009


28th Annual
Submitted
Celebrating its 28th
anniversary in 2009, the
"Downtown Festival &
Art Show", proudly pre-
sented by the City of
Gainesville Department
of Parks, Recreation and
Cultural Affairs, is one
of the nation's premier
outdoor fine arts festi-
vals. The historic, tree-
lined streets of down-
town Gainesville, from
City Hall to the Hippo-
drome State Theatre,
will be transformed into
a celebration of art and
creativity on Saturday,
November 14 and Sun-
day, November 15 from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The
Festival offers visitors
the opportunity to meet
the exhibiting artists,
sample fine cuisine and
enjoy live, continuous
entertainment.
The Festival will de-
light the entire family,
encouraging children to
spend an entire day im-
mersed in a world of art
and creativity as they
visit the Imagination
Station. Children can
discover their own artis-
tic talents by participat-
ing in a large selection
of hands-on art activi-
ties including sidewalk-
chalk drawing, painting,
mask design, puppet
and button creation and
clay sculpting. The
Imagination Station fea-
tures a performance
area featuring puppet
shows, magic and mu-
sic.
Near the steps of the
Hippodrome State The-



US 41

north of

White

Springs

to be

closed

all day

today

US 41 between White
Springs and Jasper is
scheduled to be closed
to all traffic all day to-
day to accommodate the
relocation of a dragline
used by PCS Phosphate.
The road will be
closed at CR 132 on the
south end (north of
White Springs) and CR
137 North (south of
Jasper). The closure will
begin at 7 a.m. and end
by 5 p.m.
The closure will allow
a dirt ramp to be built
across the two-lane
roadway, the adjacent
railroad tracks and a
natural gas transmission
line. The actual move-
ment of the dragline,
scheduled to take about
an hour to complete,
will begin about 11 a.m.
Once the dragline is
moved across the three
areas road, railroad
and gas line the dirt
berm will be removed
and the area cleaned up.
All traffic will be de-
toured southbound to


Downtown Festival & Art Show brings out the best in Gainesville
atre, more than 40 non- For music lovers, Central Florida Blues and open to the public www.gvlculturalaf-
profit organizations there will be continu- Society. all weekend. For more fairs.org or call 352-334-
will showcase their pro- ous, live entertainment Festivities are free information, visit ARTS.


grams and services.
With more than 20 di-
verse food vendors, vis-
itors can indulge in a
wide selection of multi-
cultural dishes ranging
form Bloomin' Onions
to Pad Thai cuisine.


on three stages by local
bands, solo musicians
and dance companies.
The Festival weekend
kicks off Friday night at
7 p.m. with a Down-
town Blues Festival pre-
sented by the North


September jobless rate

up in Hamilton,

Suwannee, Lafayette


Continued From Page 1A

Suwannee County un-
employment hit 9.8 per-
cent, up from 9.3 in Au-
gust. The September
2008 figure was 6.1 per-
cent.
The jobless rate rose in
Lafayette as well, to 7.2


percent from 7 percent in
June. The August 2008
figure was 5 percent.
The jobless rate in
Florida in September
was 11 percent, up
slightly from 10.7 in Au-
gust. The September
2008 jobless rate in Flori-
da was 6.7 percent.


Jennings man dies in crash


Continued From Page 1A

west on US 90 at the
time.
According to the re-
port, the front of the
1992 Ford SUV struck
the left side of the truck
driven by Ortega-Uolla.
Both vehicles traveled
off of the south side of
the roadway and onto
the grassy shoulder.
The vehicle carrying


Ortega-Uolla came to
rest facing northeast,
while the vehicle carry-
ing Ramirez ended up
facing south.
The Madison County
Sheriff's Office, Madison
County EMS and the Lee
Fire Department re-
sponded at the scene.
Ortega-Uolla died as a
result of the accident,
FHP said. Ramirez re-
ceived minor injuries.


Page 3A
By Walter NMcKenznc
WHkITE SPRINGS


march


of dimes


signature chefs auction"
holiday magic


S i F L RFL IDA

ROUNTREE
MOORE


Tuesday, November 3, 5O30pm

Rountree Moore Toyota Showroom

US 90W, Lake City


Chef Robert of Winn-Dixie
Tickets ($50):
Jasper News
Ward's Jewelers
First Street Music
Suwannee Democrat
Rountree Moore Toyo
First Federal Bank (90


Presenting Sponsors
First Federal Bank of Florida
Rountree Moore Toyota
Silver Sponsors
Baya Pharmacy
Dees-Parrish Family Funeral Home
Lake City Medical Center Auxiliary
Maureen and Vern Lloyd
Momex Foods (Taco Bell/Krystal)
SiTEL
Bronze Sponsors
Campus USA Credit Union
Columbia Grain & Ingredients
Edward Jones Investments (Steve Jones)
Florida Power & Light
Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites
Lake City Medical Center
Magnolia Pediatrics
Shands LakeShore
State Farm Insurance (John Burns III)
Stat eFarm Inciuranrce (Kn Cnox


Chefs Specialty Foods.
Complimentary Wine Tasting
Live Music "Harry, Sally, & Billy"
Live & Silent Auctions
Festival of Trees & Wreaths

Info: t
397-0598 or 623-1505 V
kmccallister@marchofdimes.com 0.

ta
W & Turner Rd.)


State Corporate Partner \
Publix

Media Sponsors
Lake City Advertiser
Lake City Reporter
Mix 94.3
NewsTalk 96.5
North Florida Now.com
Oldies 1340
Suwannee Democrat


,,,L,,"HF1I:I) I tflSl P' Mutm 552163-F


CR 137 North and
northbound to either CR
137 South or to CR 132.
CR 137 is a loop road
that joins US 41 at two
different locations, both
north and south of CR
132.
This is the second
movement of the PCS
dragline in the last year.
On Oct. 30, 2008, the
road was closed to allow
the 8 million pound
dragline to be moved
across the road.


FARM
BUREAU
INSURANCE


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 7A


)ww rdFITI IFINUFdllke tKell VXJ


*N.




THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


IJ II


w w


w


The roadshow expert buyers have been
searching for items you may have. Prices
have never been higher, and we are ready
to pay for your coin and the other precious
items.


We have the collector's need to
fill and you may have the items. We need it
all and have paid thousands of dollars for a
single coin. Who knows what you have
been hiding in the corners of sock drawers.
Bring your items to us. We pay the highest
prices.
A*A A


* Do you want money?
We have money


* We pay cash


* Highest prices ever


* We pay the Appraised value
* We make selling to us easy


SILVER
SETS


us this weekend


in Live Oak


FLATWARE All Silver

Old Paper
Money ,.
Foreign i-'
Coin


Diamonds


Date & Time


Fri., Oct. 23,
Sat., Oct. 24,
Sun., Oct. 25,


10 a.m. 6 p.m.
10 a.m. 6 p.m.
10 a.m. 4 p.m.


Military Collectible
Firearms
and other /
Military Items


Best
Western
onolodge
EO Huddle House = Hwy. 129

LiveO a Walmart


See


PAGE 8A


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22,2009


1pr










Community
Thursday, October 22, 2009 YSection B


0 Sports


Lady Trojans suffer


two more losses


Submitted by Donna Beauchamp
Matches this week for the Lady Tro-
jans Volleyball Team proved to be un-
successful as they were defeated by
Lafayette and Suwannee Counties.
The Lady Trojans started strong but
seemed to lose momentum as the games
progressed. "They've shown many times,
win or lose, the ability to execute the
skill it takes to win but must show con-
sistency," Coach Hannah Perez said. "I
found myself satisfied after the match
against Lafayette County, despite the
loss. Lafayette has a tough team but for
the first time our girls truly looked like a
team of six on the court and not six indi-
vidual players."
Coach Perez went on to say, "Thurs-
day night was a disappointment. I truly
felt we had what it would take to beat
Suwannee but the ladies couldn't keep
their heads in the game. In this building
season the most important thing my
girls can learn is that they can win, but it
takes an entire game of hard, focused
playing to achieve that."
Combined for both games, MiKayla
Byrd was the service point leader with
eleven. Co-Captain Blake Daniels fol-
lowed with eight and Captain Jasmine
Dobson with five.
The Lady Trojans will end their regu-
lar season Thursday, October 22, (this
evening) hosting Newberry. District
games will be held in Tallahassee next
week.
Please join us in showing your support
for the 2009 Lady Trojans Volleyball
Team and end their regular season with
great families and fun!


CHE parents and teachers met recently to discuss issues relating to students' achieve-
ments. Photos submitted


GLeLL- LQvLEd at

Getting Involved at CHE!


4 1


Submitted
Parents, community
members, teachers, and
students gathered on
Tuesday evening during
the SAC/PTO meeting
held at Central Hamilton
Elementary. The meet-
ing opened with Mrs.
Betty Ann Sumner, Prin-
cipal discussing the new-
ly formed Parent, Stu-
dent, Teacher Compact,
and issues related to Ti-
tle I.
The group was also
enlightened during a
presentation by Mrs.
Doretha Jackson of the
Parental Information
and Resource Centers
(PIRCs). The purpose of
the presentation was to
help implement effective
parental involvement
policies, programs, and
activities that will im-
pact children's academic
achievement. Mrs. Jack-


son will be returning to
conduct more parent
workshops in addition
to Florida Comprehen-
sive Assessment Test
(FCAT) Training.
The goal of Central
Hamilton Elementary
and the Parental In-
volvement Committee is
to strengthen the part-
nerships among parents,
teachers, principals, ad-
ministrators, and other
school personnel in or-
der to meet the academic
and social needs of the
children we serve. The
Parental Involvement
Committee members are
Kathy Griffin ( Chairper-
son), Janell Warfel,
Charles Claridy,
(Parent Liaison), Linda
Ledyard, and Norman
McCall.
The meeting was very
productive and enjoyed
by all attendants. Re-


freshments were provid-
ed by Mrs. Phyllis Sim-
mons and the cafeteria
staff as well as other staff
members. Parents and
members from the com-
munity voiced their
opinions and concerns.
Those concerns were
charted and recorded,
and will assist in form-
ing policies for parental
involvement and future
professional develop-
ment activities. The next
meeting will be held on
Tuesday November 10,
2009 @ 4:30 PM. We ask
that all members of the
community come out
and support Central and
all of the positive things
that are being imple-
mented to raise the acad-
emic achievement of stu-
dents.
Kathy J. Griffin
School Advisory
Council, Chair


Jamee Daniels up for the block


Rebecca Hunter


returning serve


CHE parents and teachers met recently to discuss issues relating to students' achieve-
ments. Photos submitted


Counselor's Corner


"Elvis Presley" was an assembly hit at HCHS


Mr. Howell shares his high expectations with students.


By Paula G. Williams, Counselor
Hamilton County High School

When the students at Hamilton
High met with principal Howell in
the auditorium on last Wednesday,
they were amazed when our very
own "Elvis" appeared on stage. After
giving a short pep talk in that Ten-
nessee drawl, he heated things up by
singing "Ain't Nothing but a Hound
Dog" with the following lyrics:
Nothin' but an FCAT, crying all the
time,


You ain't nothing but an FCAT, cry-
ing all the time
You ain't never gonna beat me
And that sure ain't no lie.
They said you was a hard test
That was just lies
This time I'm gonna hit you
Right between the eyes.

It was evident the students were
engaged in the performance and they
were trying to catch on to the lyrics.
"Elvis" talked a little more before
singing another hit, "It's Now or Nev-


er" with the lyrics:

It's now or never, Let's do this right
Let's pass this FCAT Let's get it
right.
Tomorrow will be too late.
It's now or never We just can't
wait
I seem to remember, Words and
numbers.
My head was spinning, My stom-
ach churning
I then heard crying, But that was
me
FCAT beater I will be.

After "Elvis" completed his show to
zoom back to Memphis, Mr. Howell
talked to the students about the up-
coming testing season and the impor-
tance of doing well. "If you think you
can, you can. If you think you can't,
you can't and either way you are
right." Think positive and use all of
your skills to make this thing happen.
It is so important that you do your
best and not settle for anything less.
Our expectations are high and we be-
lieve in you," Howell said. Ms.
Williams thanked Mr. Doug Clayton
for making sure "Elvis" arrived, and
she reviewed test taking skills with
the students before they participated
in a FCAT chant.
Good luck to our students who will


be taking the ACT on Saturday, Octo-
ber 24th. Remember the end of the
first grading period is October 26th.
ASVAB will be given on October
27th. Students should contact Lt. Col.
Davis or Sgt. Snipes for more infor-
mation.
Next week is homecoming at
Hamilton High. HAPPY HOME-
COMING TROJANS!





THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


Florida to Observe National Teen


Driver Safety Week Oct. 19-25


The children posed for a group photo on the fire truck. Photos submitted


all
Submitted
The 4-H
School at I
on Thursd
Hamilton (
fice in Jasp
topic for C
ty. Allen B
Departmei
and Chad
Forestry) p


*H F.I.S.H. learn

about fire safety
with several tips on fire safety.
F.I.S.H. (Families in The children enjoyed learning
Home) held a meeting about the safety equipment on a
ay, October 15 at the fire truck and they enjoyed ac-
County Extension Of- tually getting to sit in the fire
)er. The educational truck. The children would like
)ctober was Fire Safe- to give a big thanks to these
lanton (Jasper Fire gentlemen for taking the time to
nt) and Robert Marvin teach them important tips about
Burnett (Division of what they should do in case of a
)resented the children fire.


Ar
Allen Blanton of the Jasper Fire Department, Robert Marvin and Chad Burnett
of the Division of Forestry explain to the 4-H F.I.S.H. group about fire-fighting
equipment.


Submitted
The Florida Department
of Transportation (FDOT)
Safety Office announces
that October 19-25, 2009 has
been designated National
Teen Driver Safety Week.
Florida recognizes that
motor vehicle crashes are
the leading cause of teen fa-
talities in this country.
Teens are involved in three
times as many fatal crashes
as all other drivers nation-
wide. Inexperience and im-
maturity combined with
speed, alcohol, lack of use
of safety belts and distract-
ed driving are key factors in
many teen crashes. It's vital
for parents to take an active
role in teaching their teens
to drive safely. Teens often
learn by example.
"Despite efforts aimed at
increasing belt use among
teens, safety belt use among
teens and young adults is
low. In Florida in 2008,
68.1 .. of children ages 0-17
killed in vehicle crashes
were not using either a
child passenger seat or a
safety belt. We must all
make every effort to reverse
this deadly trend and teach
our teens safe driving habits


and to make wise decisions
when riding with other
teens," said Marianne
Trussell, FDOT Chief Safety
Officer.
In 2008, 18-year-old dri-
vers in Florida had the
highest rate of crash in-
volvement in all crashes,
while 19-year-old drivers
had the highest rate of fatal
crashes.
Nationwide in 2008,
.Y.7.. of 15-20 year old dri-
vers involved in fatal crash-
es were speeding.
Nationwide in 2008,
passenger vehicle occu-
pants ages 10 to 24 involved
in fatal crashes had the low-
est restraint use rate ('=:-' ..).
Nationwide in 2008,
4,054 teens between the
ages of 13-19 years of age
died in motor vehicle crash-
es.
In the United States,
teens account for only 6.3
percent of the population
but are involved in 14 per-
cent of the total number of
traffic fatalities.
Distractions are deadly
for teen drivers. Distrac-
tions are the No. 1 reason
new drivers crash.
While all teens are at a


high-risk of experiencing a
fatal crash, young males,
pickup truck drivers and
passengers, as well as peo-
ple living in rural areas are
among those least likely to
buckle up.
61' .. of teens know inex-
perience heavily influences
safety, but only 1 .. correct-
ly view their peers as inex-
perienced drivers.
The high fatality and low
seat belt use rates among
teens and young adults is
why the Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation is
joining with the National
Highway Traffic Safety Ad-
ministration, the Governors
Highway Safety Associa-
tion, and other state and lo-
cal highway safety and law
enforcement leaders across
the nation to bring this issue
to the forefront of every-
one's minds, especially
teens and their parents and
guardians. Together we can
help remind teens, particu-
larly during National Teen
Driver Safety Week, to al-
ways buckle up, day and
night, to insist everyone in
your vehicle is buckled up,
and to avoid in car distrac-
tions.


Hamilton County School District's "All-Star School Lunch" campaign


Submitted
National School Lunch Week, October 12-
16, 2009 was celebrated as Hamilton County
School District hosted the "All-Star School
Lunch" a NBA-inspired campaign to help
students learn the importance of eating
healthy school lunches and staying active.
Students who visit www.allstarschool-
lunch.org will find a full court press of activ-
ities and information on the nutrition cam-
paign, sponsored by the non-profit School
Nutrition Association and the Milk Proces-
sors Education Program (MilkPEP). The site
features the All-Star School Lunch Team
choices of participating NBA/WNBA play-
ers-well-balanced, nutritious lunch menus
including fruits and vegetables, whole grain
pastas and breads, as well as vegetarian fare.


Serving nearly 31 million children every
school day, the federally-funded National
School Lunch Program (NSLP) provides nu-
tritionally balanced low-cost and free meals
to students. The program requires school
meals to meet federal nutrition standards: no
more than 11i r.. of calories from fat and less
than l1 '.. from saturated fat, weekly lunches
must provide 1/3 of RDA of protein, Vita-
min A and C, iron, calcium and calories.
Also, well-balanced school lunches must be
served in age-appropriate portions and in-
clude protein, fruits and vegetables, grains
and low-fat milk.
Central Hamilton Elementary School
would like to thank Jasper Mayor, Ann Less-
man, for participating in their School Lunch
Week.


Ann Lessman, Mayor of Jasper, participated in "School Lunch Week" at
Central Hamilton Elementary School. photo submitted


Because


.PRIMARY



CARE CENTER


of Live Oak

an affiliate of Lake City Medical Center


Daniel J. Messcher, M.D.
Board certified in Family Medicine
PROVIDING:


For ER waiting times, text ER to 23000
or visit lakecitymedical.com


LAKE CITY

MEDICAL CENTER
www.lakecitymedical.com

386-719-9000
Consult-A-Nurse 800-525-3248


* Primary Health Care
* Urgent Care of non critical injuries
and illnesses
* Occupational Medicine
* Physicals: back to school, sports,
and occupational
* Injections and inoculation


* Minor laceration repair
* Treatment of minor burns or scrapes
* Workers' Compensation Injury
* Motor Vehicle Accidents
* Wellness screenings
* Health Counseling


1500 North Ohio Avenue

386-330-0100

*AXbw- *jefcomie,


556412-F


4-


PAGE 2B


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22,2009





THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009 THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL PAGE 3B


3/4 of all U.S. adults
have read a newspaper in print or online in the past week.
Those 170 million adults do more than read, they are actively
engaged with the advertising in it. If you want both reach
and engagement, you want newspapers today.


41%
say newspapers are
the medium used
most to check out
ads, more than all
electronic media
(TV, radio, Internet)
combined.


82%
took some action as
a result of a print
newspaper ad in the
past 30 days. 59%
clipped a coupon,
52% bought some-
thing advertised and
45% visited a store.


39%
followed up a newspa-
per ad online in some
way. 33% went to a
website after seeing
a print newspaper ad
and 21% conducted an
online search.


36%
who said they had
not read a newspaper
in the past week,
USED a newspaper
during that same week.
Usage included:
19% checking sales
in local stores, 15%
clipping a coupon, 14%
checking the weather
and 10% checking
movie listings.


82%
used a preprinted
insert in the past 30
days. Adults keep
inserts 4.4 days. 59%
used inserts to com-
pare prices, 55% used
to compare one cir-
cular to another, 52%
saved until visiting
the store and 43%
used to make an
unplanned purchase.


80%
of U.S. adults report
looking at advertising
when reading the
paper.


Scarborough Research 2008 How America Shops and Spends/ MORI Research 2009

Newspaper advertising. A destination, not a distraction.
www.newspapermedia.com


Newspaper Association of America 4401 Wilson Blvd., Suite 900, Arlington, VA 22203 571.366.1000


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22,2009


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 3B


553923-F










Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens presents



its family-friendly Halloween event


The Jacksonville Zoo
and Gardens announced
its 22nd annual fall festi-
val, Spooktacular, on
October 22-25 and 29-31
from 6:30 p.m. to 9:00
p.m.
Families who come to
this year's magical
Spooktacular event will
experience the magic of
seeing the land of Pump-
kinville come alive with
hundreds of pumpkins,
fun, candy and excite-
ment. New this year are
the Pharaoh's Tomb,
with its funny mummy,
and the Abandoned
Mine Shaft. This merry-
not-scary fall festival
also showcases the Pi-
rate's Cove featuring
seafaring men and
women who entertain
guests and fend off the
alligators. Guests can
come in their favorite


costume and enjoy trick-
or-treating, music, danc-
ing, food, a giant slide,
and bounce houses all
while viewing some of
their favorite zoo ani-
mals. Guests will also
have the opportunity to
take photographs with
Jazoo or one his friends
and visit with the Pump-
kinville People, scare-
crows, frog prince,
fairies and many more.
Spooktacular is Jack-
sonville's premier Hal-
loween event for safe,
family fun and entertain-
ment and is presented
by Pepsi.
Spooktacular is the
Zoo's largest fundraiser,
with all proceeds bene-
fiting the Jacksonville
Zoo and Gardens and
going to the care and
feeding of the animals.
Admission is $8 for


members and $9 for non-
members, and children
under 3 are free. Chil-
dren also receive a free
glow-in-the-dark neck-
lace with paid admis-
sion. For more informa-
tion, or to purchase tick-
ets in advance for $1 off,
visit http://www.jack-
sonvillezoo.org.
For over 90 years, the
Jacksonville Zoo and
Gardens has been dedi-
cated to inspiring the
discovery and apprecia-
tion of wildlife through
innovative experience in
a caring environment.
From the beginning in
1914, with an animal col-
lection that consisted of
only one red deer fawn,
the Jacksonville Zoo and
Gardens has become one
of the top zoos in the na-
tion, now with more
than 1,400 rare and exot-


ic animals and over 1,000 Aquariums and the cated on Jacksonville_
unique plant species. World Association of north side at 370 Zoc
The Zoo is a non-profit Zoos and Aquariums. It Parkway, one-half milh
organization and an ac- is open year-round, sev- east from 1-95. For mor
credited member of the en days a week, from 9 information, go to jack
Association of Zoos and a.m. to 5 p.m. and is lo- sonvillezoo.org.


Crenshaw recognizes military

aviators and service volunteers


Submitted
WASHINGTON, DC-
Congressman Ander
Crenshaw announced
his support for passage
of two House Resolu-
tions that recognize 100
years of dedicated ser-
vice from military avia-
tors (H.Res. 445) and the
valuable role of family
readiness volunteers in
supporting service
members (H. Res. 408).
"Service members and
volunteers who tireless-


NOTICE OF LAND USE CHANGE
The Board of County Commissioners of Hamilton County, Florida proposes to regulate the use of land within the area as shown on the map below by amending
the Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan, hereinafter referred to as the Comprehensive Plan, as follows:
CPA 09-4, is an application by the Board of County Commissioners, to amend the Future Land Use Plan Map of the Comprehensive Plan by changing the future
land use classification from AGRICULTURAL-4 (less than or equal to 1 dwelling unit per 5 acres) to PUBLIC on the property described, as follows:
A parcel of land lying within Section 11, Township 1 North, Range 12 East, Hamilton County, Florida. Being more particularly described, as follows: The
Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 11, the East 1/2 of the East 1/2 of said Section 11 and the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section
11.
Containing 240.00 acres, more or less.
LESS AND EXCEPT
A parcel of land lying within Section 11, Township 1 North, Range 12 East, Hamilton County, Florida. Being more particularly described, as follows: That portion
of the East 1/2 of the East 1/2 of said Section 11 lying North of the Northerly right-of-way line of New Hope Church Road; and that portion of the East 1/2 of the
East 1/2 of said Section 11 lying East of the Easterly right-of-way line of Northwest 69th Boulevard and those lands lying within the right-of-way for New Hope
Church Road.
Containing 123.00 acres, more or less.
Less and Except
A parcel of land lying within Section 11, Township 1 North, Range 12 East, Hamilton County, Florida. Being more particularly described, as follows: Commence
at the Northwest corner of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 11; thence South 00027'00" East, a distance of 15.06 feet to the South right-of-
way line of the New Hope Church Road; thence North 87 54'00" East, along the South right-of-way line of said New Hope Church Road, a distance of 200.00
feet; thence South 00 27'00" East 657.23 feet to Point of Beginning; thence North 89 47'00" West 199.92 feet; thence South 00 27'00" East 217.89 feet; thence
South 89 47'00" East 199.92 feet; thence North 00 27'00" West 217.89 feet to Point of Beginning.
Containing 1.00 acres, more or less.
Less and Except
A parcel of land lying within Section 11, Township 1 North, Range 12 East, Hamilton County, Florida. Being more particularly described, as follows: Commence
at the Northwest corner of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 11; thence South 00 27'00" East, along the West line of the Southwest 1/4 of
the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 11, a distance of 449.59 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue South 00 27'00" East, along the West line of said
Southwest 1/4 of Southeast 1/4 of said Section 11, a distance of 217.89 feet; thence North 89 33'00" East 199.92 feet; thence North 00 27'00"West 217.89 feet;
thence South 89 33'00"West 199.92 feet to the Point of Beginning.
Containing 1.00 acres, more or less.
Less and Except
A parcel of land lying within Section 11, Township 1 North, Range 12 East, Hamilton County, Florida. Being more particularly described, as follows: Commence
at the Northwest corner of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 11; thence South 00 27'00" East, along the West line of the Southwest 1/4 of
the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 11, a distance of 15.06 feet to the South right-of-way line of New Hope Church Road; thence South 89 47'00" East, -, ,.,i.
South right-of-way line of said New Hope Church Road, 200.00 feet; thence South 00 27'00" East 422.13 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence South ,,
East 267.41 feet; thence South 89 47'00" East 814.57 feet; thence North 031'00" West 267.41 feet; thence North 89 47' West 814.38 feet to the Point of
Beginning.
Containing 5.00 acres, more or less.
Less and Except
A parcel of land lying within Section 11, Township 1 North, Range 12 East, Hamilton County, Florida. Being more particularly described, as follows: Commence
at the Northwest corner of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 11; thence South 00 27'00" East, along the West line of the Southwest 1/4 of
the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 11, a distance of 15.06 feet to the South right-of-way line of New Hope Church Road; thence South 89 47'00" East, ,.ii .,-
South right-of-way line of said New Hope Church Road, 200.00 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence South 00 27'00" East 422.13 feet; thence South : 4 ,
East 30.00 feet; thence North 00 27'00" West 422.13 feet to the South right-of-way line of New Hope Church Road; thence North 89 47'00" West, along the
South right-of-way line of said New Hope Church Road 30.00 feet to the Point of Beginning.
Containing 0.30 acres, more or less.
Less and Except
A parcel of land lying within Section 11, Township 1 North, Range 12 East, Hamilton County, Florida. Being more particularly described, as follows: Commence
at the Northwest corner of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 11; thence South 00 27'00" East, along the West line of the Southwest 1/4 of
the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 11, a distance of 15.06 feet to the South right-of-way line of New Hope Church Road; thence South 89 47'00" East, along the
South iriht ..f "-., line of said New Hope Church Road, a distance of 200.00 feet; thence South 00 27'00" East 698.54 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence
South i,, -.,,, East 145.20 feet; thence South 89 47'00" East 300.00 feet; thence North 00 27'00" West 145.20 feet; thence North 89 47'00" West 300.00 feet
to the Point of Beginning.
Containing 1.00 acres, more or less.
Less and Except
A parcel of land lying within Section 11, Township 1 North, Range 12 East, Hamilton County, Florida. Being more particularly described, as follows: Commence
at the Southwest corner of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 11; thence North 00 27'00" West 44.88 feet; thence North 89 31'00" East
989.53 feet; thence South 01 03'00" East approximately 45.00 feet; thence South 89 24'00"West approximately 990.00 feet to the Point of Beginning.
Containing 1.02 acres, more or less.
Less and Except
A parcel of land lying within Section 11, Township 1 North, Range 12 East, Hamilton County, Florida. Being more particularly described, as follows: Commence
at the Northwest corner of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 11; thence South 00 27'00" East, along the West line of the Southwest 1/4 of
the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 11, a distance of 15.06 feet to the South right-of-way line of New Hope Church Road and the Point of Beginning; thence
continue South 00 27'00" East 433.59 feet; thence North 89 33'00" East 199.92 feet; thence North 00 27'00" West 439.34 feet to the South right-of-way line of
New Hope Church Road; thence South 87 54'00" West, along the South right-of-way line of said New Hope Church Road, a distance of 200.00 feet to the Point
of Beginning.
Containing 2.00 acres, more or less.
All said lands containing 105.68 acres, more or less.


Hamilton


rI:l Incop oml aAt
cR"1 B mww La.LMu i"
Ro 4

LmAdou 0 B1yA* ftn Co y*CM -*-4AfLd

The first of two public hearings will be conducted by the Board of County Commissioners to consider the amendment, conduct a first reading of the ordinance
adopting the amendment and to consider transmittal of the amendment to the Florida Department of Community Affairs. The Board of County Commissioners
meeting will be held on November 3, 2009 at 9:00 a.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the Board of County Commissioners Meeting Room,
County Courthouse, located at 207 Northeast First Street, Jasper, Florida. The title of said ordinance reads, as follows:
AN ORDINANCE OF HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AMENDING THE FUTURE LAND USE PLAN MAP OF THE HAMILTON COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN, UNDER THE AMENDMENT PROCEDURES ESTABLISHED IN SECTIONS 163.3161 THROUGH 163.3215, FLORIDA STATUTES, AS AMENDED,
PURSUANT TO AN APPLICATION, CPA 09-4, BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS; PROVIDING FOR CHANGING THE LAND USE
CLASSIFICATION FROM AGRICULTURAL-4 (LESS THAN OR EQUAL TO 1 DWELLING UNIT PER 5 ACRES) TO PUBLIC OF CERTAIN LANDS WITHIN THE
UNINCORPORATED AREA OF HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA; PROVIDING SEVERABILITY; REPEALING ALL ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT; AND
PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE
The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any interested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any continuation of the
public hearing shall be announced during the public hearing and that no further notice concerning the matter will be published.
At the aforementioned public hearing, all interested persons may appear and be heard with respect to the amendment, and the ordinance adopting said
amendment, on the date, time and place as referenced above.
Copies of the amendment, and the ordinance adopting said amendment, are available for public inspection at the Office of the Land Use Administrator, located at
204 Northeast First Street, Room 1, Jasper, Florida, during regular business hours.
All persons are advised that, if they decide to appeal any decisions made at the public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings and, for such purpose,
they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
555491-F


ly dedicate themselves
to our great nation de-
serve official recognition
from Congress," said
Crenshaw, a Member of
the House Appropria-
tions Subcommittee on
Military Construction
and Veterans Affairs.
"Jacksonville has been
the home of military avi-
ation for decades and
was the birthplace of the
Navy Blue Angels. I'm
proud to back a bill that
recognizes the100 years
of achievements and
sacrifices of our military
aviators. Additionally,
family readiness volun-
teers, including those in
the local branches of the
Navy and Marine Corps
Relief Society, the USO,


s
)o
e
e
2-


and the Wounded War-
rior Project, spend hours
and hours each week
helping out other mili-
tary families. Without
the work of these steady
volunteers, the chal-
lenges of military life
would be much more
difficult."
Both pieces of legisla-
tion passed the House of
Representatives by voice
vote on Wednesday, Oc-
tober 14 and now move
to the United States Sen-
ator for consideration.
H. Res. 408 was intro-
duced by Congress-
woman Susan Davis (D-
CA), and H. Res. 445
was introduced by Con-
gressman Pete Olson (D-
TX).


Hamilton County

Legislative Delegation

Hearing date announced


MADISON State
Representative Leonard
Bembry (D-Greenville)
has announced the
Hamilton County Leg-
islative Delegation will
hold its annual meeting
on Tuesday, October
27th at 9:00 AM. The
meeting will be held in
the Hamilton County
Commission Chambers
at the Hamilton County
Courthouse, located at
207 NE 1st Street, Jasper,
Florida.
Representative Bem-
bry stated "This is a
prime opportunity for
the citizens and public
officials of Hamilton
County to meet with
their Legislators and in-
form them of what is im-
portant to their commu-
nity." The Hamilton
County Legislative Dele-
gation includes Senator
Charles Dean and Rep-
resentative Leonard Be-
mbry.
If any member of the
public would like to ad-


dress the delegation,
please contact Mickie
Salter in Representative
Bembry's office at 850-
973-5630 or
Mickie.salter@myflori-
dahouse.gov to be
placed on the agenda.
Appearance cards will
also be available at the
hearing for anyone who
wishes to be heard. If
you are presenting a
handout to the delega-
tion, please have at least
six (6) copies available.
NOTICE REGARD-
ING THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES
ACT OF 1990. In accor-
dance with the Ameri-
cans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing
special accommodations
to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact
the OFFICE OF STATE
REPRESENTATIVE
LEONARD BEMBRY no
later than seven (7) days
prior to the proceeding
at (850) 973-5630, Madi-
son, Florida.


Community Calendar


Oct. 8-Nov. 6 Artist
John Rice retrospective
exhibit of his work at
Levy Performing Arts
Center in Lake City.
Sponsored by Art Mat-
ters, public invited to at-
tend. Call 386-697-4622
for more information.
Oct. 23, 24, 30, 31 -
First Annual Fall Festi-
val, Central Avenue,
downtown Jasper.
Oct. 25 Divonia
Baptist Church, 7563 US
Hwy 129 S in Jasper,
hosts their Homecom-
ing services at 11 a.m.
Dinner and singing to
follow.
Oct. 27 The Hamil-
ton County Alcohol and
Other Drug Prevention
Coalition will hold a
meeting to discuss the
future of our youth and
the safety of our com-
munity at 9:30 a.m. at
the school board meet-
ing room in the JRE Lee
Complex, 4280 SW CR
152. Public is urged to
attend.
Oct. 28 The Lady of
the Lake Quilting Guild
will hold it's monthly
meeting on Wednesday,
October 28, 2009 at 9:30
AM at the Teen Town


533 NW Desoto St, Lake
City, FL. (2 blocks north
of Duval (US 90) on
Lake Jeffery Rd.
Oct. 29 Hamilton
County Brotherhood
will be meeting at 7:00
at the 1st Baptist Church
in White Springs. All are
invited. Any questions,
call Chuck Fultz at 386-
855-1737.
Nov. 14 The ninth
annual North Florida
Shoe Box Run to benefit
of Operation Christmas
Child. Staging areas:
Gainesville Harley-
Davidson & Buell,
Gainesville, FL, Office
Depot, 5850 Ramona
Blvd, Jacksonville, FL.
Call 850-556-1787 or
e m a i 1
suwanneeocc@aol.com
for more information.
Monthly Meetings:
The Jasper Revitaliza-
tion Committee meets
the 3rd Thursday of
each month at 6 p.m. in
the Jasper City Hall.
Bible Baptist Church
opens their clothes clos-
et on the 2nd Saturday
of each month from
lp.m-3p.m. Call 792-
0720 for more informa-
tion.


PAGE 4B


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22,2009


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL





THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL

UF MEDICAL NEWS


Grant to help UF doctors deliver


cancer care to needy Floridians


Submitted
GAINESVILLE, Fla. <
The University of Flori-
da is one of three acade-
mic medical centers in
Florida that will provide
screening and care for
colorectal cancer under a
new $850,000 grant from
the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention.
"Only a minority of
Floridians ever receives
colon cancer screening,"


said Thomas George,
M.D., director of UF's
gastrointestinal oncolo-
gy program and a mem-
ber of the UF Shands
Cancer Center. "We are
targeting people with
the most to gain. For
them, this screening
could mean the differ-
ence between life and
death."
"Colon cancer screen-
ing under the grant is


UF STUDY:

Tai Chi can help

people with

diabetes lower

glucose levels


targeted at those ages 50
to 64 with little or no
health insurance cover-
age," said Susan Flem-
ing, R.N., cancer pro-
gram administrator with
the Florida Department
of Health. Shands at UF,
along with grant part-
ners Jackson Memorial
Hospital at the Universi-
ty of Miami and Moffitt
Cancer Center in Tampa,
will provide follow-up
care at no charge for any
cancers detected in the
screening.
Program organizers
are working with local
county public health
units, the College of
Medicine Equal Access
Clinic and selected facul-
ty practices to help iden-
tify people who may be
eligible for the screening


at UF.
The five-year program
began July 1, 2009, and
services are slated to be-
gin Jan. 1.
Part of the grant funds
will be used for colorec-
tal cancer education and
awareness. Other grant
efforts will seek to iden-
tify the cultural, geo-
graphic and other barri-
ers that can deter people
from getting screened
for colon cancer.
In 2009, colorectal can-
cer will claim about
50,000 lives in the United
States, about evenly di-
vided between men and
women, according to the
American Cancer Soci-
ety. Florida colorectal
cancer deaths during
2009 are estimated to be
about 3,500.


@ y







s

Program organizers are working with local county public
health units, the College of Medicine Equal Access Clinic
and selected faculty practices to help identify people who
may be eligible for the screening at UF.


GAINESVILLE, Fla. <
A regular tai chi exercise
program can help people
better control their dia-
betes and lower glucose
levels, according to a
University of Florida
study.
In a study of adults di-
agnosed with type 2 dia-
betes, those who partici-
pated in a supervised tai
chi exercise program
two days a week with
three days of home prac-
tice for six months sig-
nificantly lowered their
fasting blood glucose
levels, improved their
management of the dis-
ease, and enhanced their
overall quality of life, in-
cluding mental health,
vitality and energy.
"Tai chi really has sim-
ilar effects as other aero-
bic exercises on diabetic
control. The difference
is tai chi is a low-impact
exercise, which means
that it's less stressful on
the bones, joints and
muscles than more
strenuous exercise," said
Beverly Roberts, Ph.D.,
R.N., the Annabel Davis
Jenks endowed profes-
sor at the UF College of
Nursing.
Roberts, with Rhayun
Song, Ph.D., R.N., of
Chungham National
University, studied tai
chi's effect on older Ko-
rean residents. The re-
search was featured in
the June issue of The
Journal of Alternative
and Complementary
Medicine.
About 23.6 million
children and adults in
the United States, or 7.8
percent of the popula-
tion, have diabetes. It oc-
curs when the body does
not produce or properly
use insulin, a hormone
that is needed to convert
sugar, starches and other
food into energy needed
for daily life.
Risk factors include
obesity, sedentary
lifestyle, unhealthy eat-
ing habits, high blood
pressure and cholesterol,
a history of gestational
diabetes and increased
age, many of which can
be reduced through ex-
ercise.
"People assume that
for exercise to be benefi-
cial you have to be huff-
ing and puffing, sweat-
ing and red-faced after-
ward," Roberts said.
"This may turn people
off, particularly older
adults. However, we
have found that activi-
ties like tai chi can be just
as beneficial in improv-
ing health."
Tai chi is an ancient
Chinese martial art that
combines deep breath-
ing and relaxation with
slow, gentle circular
movements. This low


impact exercise uses
shifts in body position
and stepping in coordi-
nation with arm move-
ments.
Sixty-two participants,
mostly Korean women,
took part in the study.
Half the group partici-
pated in at least 80 per-
cent of two supervised
sessions one hour per
week, with three days of
home practice for six
months, and the other
half served as a control
group. Those who com-
pleted the sessions had
significantly improved
glucose control and re-
ported higher levels of
vitality and energy.
"Those who participat-
ed in the tai chi sessions
actually had lower blood
glucose at three and six
months," Roberts said.
"Those individuals also
had lower hemoglobin
Alc, which means they
had better diabetic con-
trol."
In addition to im-
proved blood glucose
levels, participants also
reported significantly
improved mental health.
"This was very encour-
aging especially since
people with less depres-
sion are typically more
active and independent,"
Roberts said.
Tai chi has also been
used for people with
arthritis and disabilities
to increase balance, mus-
cle strength and mobility
and to reduce the risk of
falls. It is worth investi-
gating its effects in other
conditions, especially in
older people, Roberts
said.
"Tai chi provides a
great alternative for peo-
ple who may want the
benefits of exercise on
diabetic control but may
be physically unable to
complete strenuous ac-
tivities due to age, condi-
tion or injury," Roberts
said. "Future studies
could examine if tai chi
could similarly benefit
conditions such as osteo-
porosis or heart disease."
Since tai chi is an exer-
cise that involves so
many parts of the body
and also helps to relax
the mind, it is more like-
ly participants will ad-
here to the exercise, said
Paul Lam, M.B.B.S., a
lecturer with the Univer-
sity of South Wales
School of Public Health
and Community Medi-
cine and a practicing
family physician in Syd-
ney, Australia.
"This study shows that
tai chi can have a signifi-
cant effect on the man-
agement and treatment
of diabetes; a significant
and growing health
challenge for all Western
countries," Lam said.


UF researchers find triggers

in cells' transition from

colitis to cancer


Submitted
GAINESVILLE, Fla. --
University of Florida re-
searchers have grown tu-
mors in mice using cells
from inflamed but non-
cancerous colon tissue
taken from human pa-
tients, a finding that
sheds new light on colon
cancer and how it might
be prevented.
Scientists observed
that cancer stem cells
taken from the gastroin-
testinal system in pa-
tients with a chronic di-
gestive disease called ul-
cerative colitis will trans-
form into cancerous tu-
mors in mice.
The finding, now on-
line and to be featured
on the cover of the
Thursday (Oct. 15) issue
of Cancer Research, may
help explain why pa-
tients with colitis have
up to a 30-fold risk of de-
veloping colon cancer
compared with people
without the disease.
New understanding of
the link between colitis
and cancer could lead to
diagnostic tests that
would evaluate tissue
taken from patients with
colitis for signs of cancer
stem cell development,
thereby identifying pa-
tients who may be at
greater risk for cancer.
"Ultimately it would
be great if we could pre-
vent colitis or treat colitis
so it never gets to the
cancerous stage," said
UF colorectal surgeon
Emina Huang, M.D.,
who is a member of the
Program in Stem Cell Bi-
ology and Regenerative
Medicine at UF's McK-
night Brain Institute and
the UF College of Medi-
cine.
Although colonoscopy
is very effective in
screening and prevent-
ing colon cancer for most
people, for patients with
colitis no diagnostic tests
work well because the
inflamed tissue makes
identification of pre-can-
cerous changes difficult.
According to the
Crohn's and Colitis
Foundation of America,
approximately 700,000
people have colitis in the
United States. The Na-
tional Cancer Institute
estimates that cancer of
the colon and rectum
will claim the lives of
about 50,000 people this
year.
UF scientists gathered
colitic tissue from hu-
mans and chemically
screened it for colon can-
cer stem cells, also called


tumor initiating cells.
These cells were then
isolated and monitored
in mice to see if tumors
would grow.
Huang said these find-
ings shed light on that


fact that it may not be
just the cancer "seed"
cell, but the "soil" in this
case inflamed colon tis-
sue that plays a role in
the development of can-
cer.


"Is it the seed, is it the
soil or is it their interac-
tion?" she said. "We
think probably both, but
now we have a new way
to look at it and a new
method of attack."


New understanding of the link between colitis and cancer could lead to diagnostic tests that
would evaluate tissue taken from patients with colitis for signs of cancer stem cell devel-
opment, thereby identifying patients who may be at greater risk for cancer.


Notice of Public Hearing on

Comprehensive Plan Amendment


Town of Jennings, FL

The Town Council of the Town of Jennings, Florida, will hold a public
hearing on the following item on November 3, 2009, at 7:00 pm at
Town Hall, 1199 Hamilton Ave, Jennings Florida.

The Town Council will consider the following ordinance on first reading
for adoption and transmittal of the included amendment to the Town's
comprehensive plan to the Florida Department of Community Affairs:

ORDINANCE 2009-04: AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF
JENNINGS, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR AN AMENDMENT TO THE
TOWN'S COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; AMENDING THE CAPITAL
IMPROVEMENTS ELEMENT FIVE-YEAR SCHEDULE OF CAPITAL
IMPROVEMENTS; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING
FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

The proposed ordinance may be inspected by the public at City Hall,
1199 Hamilton Ave, on October 28, 2009, and thereafter between the
hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM weekdays.

Interested parties are encouraged to appear at the hearing and provide
comments regarding the proposed amendment to the Town's Five Year
Schedule of Capitol Improvements.

APPEAL: NECESSITY OF RECORD

Notice is given pursuant to Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes that if
any person desires to appeal any action taken by the City Council at the
above hearing you will need to insure a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made. The City Council assumes no responsibility for
furnishing said record, however, the hearings will be audio recorded by
the City Council for public use.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, any persons)
with a disability requiring reasonable accommodation in order to
participate in this meeting should call Town Hall at 386-938-4131 at
least 48 hours prior to this public meeting.
556090-F


PAGE 5B





THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


Gotta


Gripe?


Brought to you by the Division of Consumer Services


Have you ever had a question, concern, prob-
lem, or complaint you could not resolve, because
you could never figure out which resource to con-
tact? We can help! This is a quick reference guide
to help Florida consumers find the information
and assistance they need from state agencies.
The subjects listed below were selected to an-
swer questions most frequently asked of the Flori-
da Department of Agriculture and Consumer Ser-
vices. Many other services are available from fed-
eral, local and private organizations. If you have a
question about a service not included in the index
or need additional information or assistance, visit
our website at www.800helpfla.com or call us at
1-800-HELP-FLA (435-7352). Spanish speaking
consumers may call 1-800-FL-AYUDA (352-9832).

A
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services (DACS)
Division of Consumer Services
Terry Lee Rhodes Building
2005 Apalachee Parkway, Tallahassee, FL 32301
1-800-HELP-FLA (435-7352) En Espanol: 1-800-FL-
AYUDA (352-9832)
Out of State: (850) 488-2221 Lemon Law:
P1-800-321-5366
www.800helpfla.com
B
Florida Department of Financial Services (DFS)
200 East Gaines Street, Tallahassee, FL 32399-0300
Consumer Helpline: 1-800-342-2762 Main Num-
ber: 1-850-413-3100
www.fldfs.com
C
Florida Department of Business and Professional
Regulation (DBPR)
1940 North Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL
32399-1027
(850) 487-1395 www.myflorida.com/dbpr/
D
Florida Department of Children and
Families (DCF)
1317 Winewood Boulevard
Building 1, Room 202, Tallahassee, FL 32399-0700
Main Number: (850) 487-1111 Abuse Registry: 1-
800-962-2873
www.myflorida.com/ cf_web
E
Florida Department of Community Affairs (DCA)
2555 Shumard Oak Boulevard, Tallahassee, FL
32399-2100
Main Number: (850) 488-8466
www.dca.state.fl.us
F
Florida Department of Corrections (DC)
2601 Blairstone Road, Tallahassee, FL 32399-2500
Main Number: 1-888-558-6488 Duty Officer: (850)
488-5021
www.dc.state.fl.us
G
Florida Department of Education (DOE)
Turlington Building, Suite 1514
325 West Gaines Street, Tallahassee, FL 32399-0400
Main Number: (850) 245-0505 www.fldoe.org
H
Florida Department of Elder Affairs (ELDER)
4040 Esplanade Way, Tallahassee, FL 32399-7000
Main Number: 1-800-963-5337 http:/ /elderaf-
fairs.state.fl.us
I
Florida Department of Environmental
Protection (DEP)
3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, M.S. 49
Tallahassee, FL 32399-3000
Citizens Services: (850) 245-2118
www.dep.state.fl.us
J
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC)
620 South Meridian Street, Tallahassee, FL 32399-
1600
Main Number: (850) 488-4676
http:/ /myfwc.com
K
Florida Department of Health (DOH)
2585 Merchants Row Boulevard,
Tallahassee, FL 32399
Main Number: (850) 245-4321
www.doh.state.fl.us
L
Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA)
2727 Mahan Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32308
1-888-419-3456 http: / / ahca.myflorida.com
M
Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor
Vehicles (HSMV)
2900 Apalachee Parkway, Tallahassee, FL
32399-0500
Customer Service Center: (850) 922-9000
Complaint Against Dealer: (850) 617-2000
Emergency-Florida Highway Patrol:
1-800-525-5555
www.hsmv.state.fl.us
N
Florida Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ)
2737 Centerview Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3100
(850) 488-1850
www.djj.state.fl.us
O0
Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE)


P.O. Box 1489, Tallahassee, FL 32302-1489
Information Office: (850) 410-7000
www.fdle.state.fl.us


Type of business
or concern


Reference letter
for state agencies
listed below this table.


Accountants C
Acupuncturists K
Adult Abuse D
Aging H
Airports V
Alcoholic Beverages C
Architects C
Banking B
Barbers C
Bingo P
Boat Registration M
Business Opportunities A
Business Schools G
Cable TV A
Cars M
Cemeteries B
Charities/Solicitors A
Child Abuse D
Child Support T
Chiropractors K
Colleges & Universities G
Company Background Checks A
Concealed WeaponLicensure A
Condominiums C
Contractors C
Cooperatives A
Corporations U
Correctional Facilities F
Cosmetologists C
Credit B
Credit Unions B
Dance Studios A
Dentists/Hygienists K
Dietitians/Nutritionists K
Disability Assistance Z
Disabled Parking V
Do Not Call List (Florida) A
Domestic Security 0
Driver Licenses M
Driving Schools M
Education/Schools G
Elderly H
Elderly Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation D
Elections U
Electrical Contractors C
Elevators C
Endangered Species I
Energy Efficiency E
Finance Companies B
Fire Safety B
Florida Lottery Q
Food Safety A
Food Stamp Programs D
Fresh Water Fishing Licenses J
Game Promotions A


P
Florida Department of Legal Affairs (OAG)
Office of the Attorney General
The Capitol, PL-01 Tallahassee, FL 32399-1050
(850) 414- 3990 Fraud Hotline: 1-866-966-7226
www.myfloridalegal.com
Q
Florida Lottery (DOL)
250 Marriott Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32301
Main Number: (850) 487-7787
www.flalottery.com
R
Florida Department of Military Affairs (DMA)
St. Francis Barracks
82 Marine Street, St. Augustine, FL 32084
(904) 823-0364 www.dma.state.fl.us
S
Public Service Commission (PSC)
2540 Shumard Oak Boulevard, Tallahassee, FL
32399-0850
Main Number: 1-800-342-3552 Local Number:
(850) 413-6344
www.psc.state.fl.us
T
Florida Department of Revenue (DOR)
5050 West Tennessee Street, Tallahassee, FL
32399-0100
Main Number: 1-800-352-3671 Local Number:
(850) 488-6800
http://dor.myflorida.com/dor/
U
Florida Department of State (DOS)
500 South Bronough Street, Tallahassee, FL
32399-0250
(850) 245-6500 www.dos.state.fl.us
V
Florida Department of Transportation (DOT)
605 Suwannee Street, Tallahassee, FL 32399-0450
Main Number: 1-866-374-3368 Local Number:
(850) 414-4100
www.dot.state.fl.us
W
Florida Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA)
Mary Grizzle Building, Room 311-K
11351 Ulmerton Road, Largo, FL 33778-1630
(727) 518-3202 www.floridavets.org


Health Studios
Hearing Specialists
Highways
Hospitals
Hotels/Motels
Hunting Licenses
Interior Designers
Immunization
Insurance
Juvenile Offenders
Landfills
Landlord/Tenants
Land Planning
Landscape Architect
Land Surveying
Lemon Law-New Cars
Lemon Law-Pets
Loan Companies
Marriage & Family Therapists
Mental Health Counselors
Medicaid Programs
Medical
Missing Children
Mobile Homes
Mobile Home Parks
Mortgage Brokers
Mosquito Control
Motor Vehicle Repair
Moving Companies
Nursing Homes
Opticians/Optometrists
Pawn Shops
Pesticides
Petroleum
Pharmacists
Physical Therapists
Physicians/Nurses
Pollution Control
Public Utilities
Real Estate/Land Sales
Real Estate Brokers/ Salesmen
Restau rants
Saltwater Licenses
Seafood
Security Brokers
Social Workers
State Parks
Talent Agencies
Taxes
Telemarketing
Time-Share Property
Travel Companies
Unemployment Compensation
Vehicle Registration
Veterans
Veterinarians
Vocational Education
Worker's Compensation
Youth Services


X
Agency for Workforces Innovation (AWI)
107 East Madison Street, Tallahassee, FL 32399-4120
Main Number: 1-800-342-3450 Local Number: (850)
245-7105
www.floridajobs.org
Y
Executive Office of the Governor (EOG)
The Capitol
Tallahassee, FI 32399-0001
Citizens' Assistance: (850) 488-4441
www.flgov.com
Z
Agency for Persons with Disabilities (APD)
4030 Esplanade Way, Suite 380
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0950
Main Number: (850) 488-4257
http:/ /apd.myflorida.com/

Preventing Problems
The best way to avoid consumer problems is to be
alert and informed. Before buying a product or in-
vesting money, inquire about the person or business.
Ask friends, relatives or other knowledgeable people
for recommendations. Give us a call at 1-800-HELP-
FLA (435-7352) to check the complaint history of a
business.
The Division of Consumer Services is the state's
clearinghouse for consumer complaints, protection
and information. The division has responsibility for
regulating various business industries operating in
Florida and conducts investigations of unfair and de-
ceptive trade practices. Our main focus is to educate
Florida consumers!
The division distributes a wide range of consumer
publications available online or in brochure format
free of charge. Visit us online at
www.800helpfla.com, or give us a call at 1-800-
HELP-FLA (435-7352) and a Consumer Education
Specialist will be happy to assist you in finding the
information you need.
Visit our website for a complete A-Z Resource
Guide listing at www.800helpfla.com.
An informed consumer is the best protection
against fraud and deception !
n/C


PAGE 6B


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22,2009






THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009


Jasper Legals
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY
AFFAIRS NOTICE OF INTENT TO
FIND THE HAMILTON COUNTY
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
AMENDMENTS) IN COMPLIANCE
DOCKET NO. 09-1-NOI-2401-(A)-(I)

The Department gives notice of its intent
to find the Amendment(s) to the Compre-
hensive Plan for Hamilton County adopt-
ed by Ordinance No. 2009-07 and 2009-
08 on September 15, 2009, IN COMPLI-
ANCE, pursuant to Sections 163.3184,
163.3187 and 163.3189, F.S.
The adopted Hamilton County Compre-
hensive Plan Amendment(s) and the De-
partment's Objections, Recommenda-
tions and Comments Report, (if any), are
available for public inspection Monday
through Friday, except for legal holidays,
during normal business hours, at the Of-
fice of the County Coordinator, 313 Hatley
Street Northeast, Suite 2, Jasper, Florida
32052.
Any affected person, as defined in Sec-
tion 163.3184, F.S., has a right to petition
for an administrative hearing to challenge
the proposed agency determination that
the Amendment(s) to the Hamilton Coun-
ty Comprehensive Plan is In Compliance,
as defined in Subsection 163.3184(1),
F.S. The petition must be filed within
twenty-one (21) days after publication of
this notice, and must include all of the in-
formation and contents described in Uni-
form Rule 28-106.201, F.A.C. The petition
must be filed with the Agency Clerk, De-
partment of Community Affairs, 2555
Shumard Oak Boulevard, Tallahassee,
Florida 32399-2100, and a copy mailed or
delivered to the local government. Failure
to timely file a petition shall constitute a
waiver of any right to request an adminis-
trative proceeding as a petitioner under
Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. If a
petition is filed, the purpose of the admin-
istrative hearing will be to present evi-
dence and testimony and forward a rec-
ommended order to the Department. If
no petition is filed, this Notice of Intent
shall become final agency action.
If a petition is filed, other affected persons
may petition for leave to intervene in the
proceeding. A petition for intervention
must be filed at least twenty (20) days be-
fore the final hearing and must include all
of the information and contents described
in Uniform Rule 28-106.205, F.A.C. A pe-
tition for leave to intervene shall be filed at
the Division of Administrative Hearings,
Department of Management Services,
1230 Apalachee Parkway, Tallahassee,
Florida 32399-3060. Failure to petition to
intervene within the allowed time frame
constitutes a waiver of any right such a
person has to request a hearing under
Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., or to
participate in the administrative hearing.
After an administrative hearing petition is
timely filed, mediation is available pur-
suant to Subsection 163.3189(3)(a), F.S.,
to any affected person who is made a par-
ty to the proceeding by filing that request
with the administrative law judge as-
signed by the Division of Administrative
Hearings. The choice of mediation shall
not affect a party's right to an administra-
tive hearing.
Mike McDaniel, Chief
Office of Comprehensive Planning
Department of Community Affairs
2555 Shumard Oak Boulevard
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2100
10/22

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 09-64-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
TINA LOUISE DIXON, deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Tina
Louise Dixon, deceased, whose date of
death was July 31, 2009, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Hamilton County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is
207 NE First Street, Jasper, FL 32052.
The names and addresses of the person-
al representative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this no-
tice is October 15, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/: Paul Hendrick
PAUL HENDRICK
Florida Bar No. 142421
Law Office of Ralph R. Deas
306 NE First Street
Jasper, FL 32052
Telephone: 386-792-2755
Fax: 386-792-7395


10/22, 10/29


Personal Representative:
By/s/: Thomas J. Murphy
Thomas J. Murphy
1766 NW 3rd Way
Jennings, FL 32053


NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME
LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09,
FLORIDA STATUTES
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the un-
dersigned, desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
SUWANNEE HARDWARE AND FEED
located at:
16660 SPRING ST
WHITE SPRINGS, FL 32096
in the County of HAMILTON
in the City of WHITE SPRINGS, Florida
intends to register the said name with the
Division of Corporations of the Florida
Department of State,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dated at WHITE SPRINGS, Florida, this
16th day of October, 2009.
10/22

NOTICE OF HEARING
The Hamilton County School Board will
conduct a public hearing on Tuesday, No-
vember 17, 2009. It will be conducted at
the conclusion of the regular business
meeting, which will begin at 6:00 p.m. in
the Board Room of the school district ad-
ministration building in Jasper, Florida.
The purpose of the hearing is to consider
changes to the following school board
policies:
2. 02 Organization, Membership & Offi-
cer of the Board Revise
3.10 Flag display and Pledge
Revise


3.31 Automatic External Defibrillators
Adopt
5.08 Post Secondary Vocational Pro-
grams
Revise
5.141 Anabolic Steroid Testing For Stu-
dent Athletes Adopt
5.21 Prohibition of Harassment-Students
Repeal
5.23 Drug & Alcohol Testing of Student
Athletes Revise
5.37 Student Use of Cell Telephones,
Pagers, &
Other Communication Devices
Revise
5.711 Parental Access to Information
Revise
6.112 License of School Bus Operator
Adopt
6.15 Educational Paraprofessionals and
Aides Revise
6.321 Health Insurance Premiums
Revise
6.431 Prohibition of Harassment
Repeal
7.08 Inventories and Property Records
Revise
8.03 Inspections
Revise
8.05 Disaster Preparedness
Revise
8.13 Student Transportation
Revise
Reason for changes: various
Authority: 1001.41, 1001.42, F. S.
Estimated economic impact: minimum
A complete copy of these rules are avail-
able for review at the office of the Super-
intendent of Schools; Jasper, Florida.
HAMILTON COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
By: /s/Martha Butler
Martha Butler
Superintendent
If a person decides to appeal any deci-
sion made by the Board, with respect to
any matter considered at this hearing,
that person will need a record of the pro-
ceedings; and for such purpose that per-
son may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which
record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
10/22


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL



Arrest Reports


Editor's note: The
Jasper News prints the en-
tire arrest record each
week. If your name ap-
pears here and you are lat-
er found not guilty or the
charges are dropped, we
will be happy to make note
of this in the newspaper
when judicial proof is pre-
sented to us by you or the
authorities.
The following abbre-
viations are used below:
DAC Department of
Agriculture Commis-
sion
DOA Department of
Agriculture
DOT Department of
Transportation
FDLE Florida De-
partment of Law En-
forcement
FHP Florida High-
way Patrol
FWC Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission
HCDTF Hamilton
County Drug Task Force
HCSO Hamilton
County Sheriff's Office
ICE Immigration and
Custom Enforcement
JAPD Jasper Police


Department
JNPD Jennings Po-
lice Department
OALE Office of Agri-
cultural Law Enforce-
ment
P&P Probation and
Parole
SCSO Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office
WSPD White Springs
Police Department
Oct. 12, William T.
Jones, 33; 1332 Bee
Street, Jennings;
forgery, uttering a
forgery; HCSO
Oct. 13, Cynthia
Denise Mays, 49; 511 NE
1st Avenue, Jasper; fail-
ure to appear; HCSO
Oct. 13, Anton Devane
Corbett, 24; 1773 NW
6th Trail, Jennings; sale
of cocaine, possession of
cocaine with intent to
sell, trafficking in Oxy-
codone, possession of
propoxyphene (Darvo-
cet), possession of co-
caine;
Oct. 13, Robert H.
Becker, 46; 102 Bluebird
Lane, Knapp, WI; dri-
ving while license sus-
pended, failure to stop


for inspection; DOA
Oct. 13, Berry Feldon
Selph, Jr., 49; 4051 NE
149th Court, Williston,
Florida; violation of pro-
bation/driving under
the influence; HCSO
Oct. 14, Ben Daniels,
45; PO Box 244, Jen-
nings; sale of controlled
substance (cocaine),
possession of controlled
substance (cocaine);
HCSO
Oct. 14, Markeith
Hawkins, 27; 1278
Stephens Street, Jen-
nings: 3 counts posses-
sion of marijuana within
1,000 feet of church, 3
counts sale of marijuana
within 1,000 feet of
church; DTF
Oct. 15, Jeffrey Gandy,
Sr., 42; 1411 Berry Street,
Jennings; sale of mari-
juana within 1,000 feet
of a church, possession
of marijuana within
1,000 feet of a church;
HCSO
Oct. 15, Patricia Cor-
nelius Whetstone, 29;
1078 Mary Street, Jen-
nings; sale of cocaine
within 1,000 feet of


PAGE 7B


park, possession of co-
caine within 1,000 feet of
park, violation of proba-
tion; HCSO
Oct. 15, Crystal
Monique Edwards, 21;
300 N. Chanbridge Dri-
ve, Apt. E-1, Jasper; sale
of cocaine within 1,000
feet of church, posses-
sion of cocaine within
1,000 feet of church, vio-
lation of probation;
HCSO
Oct. 15, Theron Lamar
Jackson, Jr., 51; 309 SW
Bristol Avenue, Jasper;
sale of cocaine within
1,000 feet of church, pos-
session of cocaine within
1,000 feet of church, vio-
lation of probation; DTF
Oct. 15, Taneisha
Chandale Hall, 24; 309
SW Bristol Avenue,
Jasper; sale of cocaine
within 1,000 feet of
church, possession of co-
caine within 1,000 feet of
church, hold for Gads-
den, Lake, and Volusia
Counties; DTF
Oct. 17, Juan Manuel
Gomez, 47; in transit; vi-
olation of probation;
HSCO.


University to host symposium




on offshore energy


Submitted
The energy needs of
the United States and
the financial condition
of the state of Florida
have prompted a re-
newed consideration of
oil and gas activity off
the Florida coast. As
the Legislature deliber-
ates this issue, The
Florida State University
will bring together ex-
perts from around the
nation to share their in-
formed views on
coastal drilling at the
Florida Symposium on
Offshore Energy, Part I:
Oil and Gas. (A follow-
up event, the Florida
Symposium on Off-
shore Energy, Part II:
Sustainable and Alter-
native Energy, is cur-
rently being planned
for the spring of 2010.)
The Oil and Gas
portion of the sympo-
sium is scheduled to
take place Monday, No-
vember 2, 2:30 p.m. at


the University Center
Club Building B, Doak
Campbell Stadium,
Florida State Universi-
ty, Tallahassee, Florida.
Although offshore
energy production has
a long history in the
coastal United States,
Florida is a unique case
because of its geology
and environment. This
event will provide in-
formed commentary
and moderated discus-
sion of issues at the
forefront of prospects
for oil and gas produc-
tion in Florida waters.
Expert panels will con-
sider aspects of three
interwoven topic areas:
Energy Resources
and Development:
What is the expected
magnitude of hydrocar-
bon reserves located off
Florida's coast, and
what are the realistic
timelines for produc-
tion?
Economics and


Revenue: What is the
experience of other
coastal states with re-
spect to effective regu-
lation and revenue
from energy resources
in state and federal wa-
ters?
Environment and
Technology: How does
the marine environment
of the Florida coast dif-
fer from other coastal
regions and what possi-
bilities does 21st-centu-
ry technology offer for
minimizing negative ef-


fects?
Members of the pub-
lic are welcome to at-
tend the symposium;
the cost to register is
$50. To register online,
visit
http:/ /campus.fsu.edu
/ energy no later than
Friday, Oct. 30. Please
note that seating is lim-
ited for this event.
Symposium attendees
will have the opportu-
nity to ask questions of
each of the panels and
in a concluding plenary


session, as well as dur-
ing a mixer following
the formal event.
"The purpose of this
event is to bring togeth-
er groups of recognized
experts who will articu-
late scholarship-derived
issues that should be
addressed in any near-
shore drilling strategy
the state proposes," said
David Cartes, the direc-
tor of Florida State's In-
stitute for Energy Sys-
tems, Economics and
Sustainability.


Mantengase Informado



Lea los avisos oficiales que afectan su vida.


Monthly Meetings:
The Jasper Revitalization Committee meets the
3rd Thursday of each month at 6 p.m. in the Jasper
City Hall.

Bible Baptist Church opens their clothes closet
on the 2nd Saturday of each month from 1p.m-
3p.m. Call 792-0720 for more information


TABE tests
Monday Thursday
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment):
TABE (Test of Adult Basic Education) at NFCC
Testing Center (Bldg. #16), Madison. TABE is re-
quired for acceptance into vocational/technical pro-
grams. Photo ID required. Pre-registration & sched-
uling time & date are required. To register please
call 850-973-9451.



Sam


Busque los avisos oficiales de la Florida en la red en:



www.floridapublicnotices.com


550849-F





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PAGE 8B


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22,2009


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