Group Title: Jasper news (Jasper, Fla.)
Title: The Jasper news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028306/00294
 Material Information
Title: The Jasper news
Uniform Title: Jasper news (Jasper, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jasper news
Publisher: F.M. DeGraffenried
Place of Publication: Jasper, Fla.
Jasper, Fla
Publication Date: September 4, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jasper (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hamilton County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hamilton -- Jasper
Coordinates: 30.518889 x -82.951111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 21, 1890)-
General Note: Editor: Jno. M. Caldwell, <1890>.
General Note: Publisher: W.L. Whitfield, <1904>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028306
Volume ID: VID00294
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33315707
alephbibnum - 000579542
lccn - sn 95047198

Full Text



Juvenile arrested in White Springs burglary Story below

nflaonline.com


Today's Weather


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.CORRECTION



Primary election results


Last week's Jasper News
contained several
misstatements of fact
concerning the Aug. 26
primary election. For one
thing, we wrongly reported
winners in both school
board contests. In fact,
either race has been
decided. A Nov. 4 runoff


will determine who sits on
the school board in districts
2 and 3.
In addition, we omitted
.the name of a candidate in
the county commission
district 5 runoff and
misreported the party
affiliation of another.
Once again (see related


story, this page), we
apologize.,
Here are the corrected
lineups for the Nov. 4 runoff
elections in all three races.
County Commission
District 5
Richie McCoy (R)
Harry D. "Buster"


Oxendine (D)
Hillard Tanner (NPA)
School Board District 2
Gary Godwin
Ronald Hobbs
School Board District 3
Mary Nell Bryant
Jeanie Daniels


Last week's

election coverage:


An apology

By Robert Bridges
Group Editor
Suwannee Democrat, Jasper '
News, Mayo Free Press,
Branford News
Last week's Jasper News
misreported the results of three


SEE APOLOGY, PAGE 2A


County Commission District 5


School Board District 2


School Board District 3


a,


Richie McCoy
'4
41


Harry D. "Buster"
Oxendine


Hillard Tanner


Gary Godwin


Jeanie Daniels


Juvenile arrested in

White Springs burglary

By Jo Ross
A juvenile has been arrested in the Aug. 28 burglary of
Suwannee Hardware in White Springs, according to a
report from the White Springs Police Department. The
suspect's name was not released due to his age.
Merchandise and jewelry were reported stolen, say
authorities.
This is the second time Suwannee Hardware has been
burglarized in the last 60 days, according to White Springs
Police Chief Ken Brookins..
SEE JUVENILE, PAGE 2A


Suwannee Hardware in White'Springs was burglarized last week..
- Photo: Candice Pike


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Car flips; driver escapes serious harm


Christina Rowell, oi Lloyd escaped injury in this crash on SR 6. Phrc:oTara lcLeoa


By Jo Ross
A 19-year-old Lloyd woman who
told authorities she may have fallen
asleep at the wheel escaped serious


injury when her vehicle became
airborne and overturned on SR 6 on
SEE CAR, PAGE 2A


County gets big money for rec facilities

Grants total more than $270,000


472546-F


By Jo Ross
District 10 State Representative Will
SKendrick was on hand recently to award two
grants to Hamilton County. The awards, which
totaled $271,221.68, will be used to expand and
improve the recreational facilities for the
county. The Jennings City Park will receive
$135,610.84 and the soccer complex in Jasper,
the same amount.
The Florida Department of Environmental


SEE COUNTY AGE 2A-


SPictured
from left:
Commissioner
bonnie
Morgan,
Recreation
Director
Chuck Burnett,
State
Representative
Will Kendrick
and
Commissioner
Lewis Vaughn.
--I


I Il
i- Pu x /I


I For Kids2 & Uder
No Purchase Necessary
Must Present Coupon
Limit 1 Per Person -


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, ? ^' f


as





Am.. 9.- THE JASPER... NE.- ... .-1 L B 4 -


Last week's

election coverage:


An apology.

Continued From Page 1A

races in the Aug. 26 primary: school
board contests in districts 2 and 3,
and the county commission race in
district 5. We reported winners in
both school board races even
though the contests have yet to be
decided. (The two candidates we
said had won must still compete in
a Nov. 4 runoff.) As for the county
commission race, we left out the
name of one candidate in the
upcoming runoff and got wrong the
party affiliation of.another. To those
of you with whom we haven't
spoken personally, we apologize.
We learned of the mistakes at 8
a.m. last Thursday, two hours after
the paper was delivered, and took
action immediately. A correction
was posted on our Website
(www.nflaonline.com) within
minutes. We then set about
notifying those who lacked Internet
access or who aren't in the habit of
reading us online. By the end of
business on Thursday, fluorescent
pink corrections had been posted at
newsstands and vending racks
throughout the county. Hopefully,
no one bought a paper from that
point on without first being
informed of the errors our election
story contained.
That wasn't enough, of course.
We're also running a corrected
version of the facts in a prominent
place on today's front page (see
story, Page 1A).
As to what went wrong, chalk it
uip to a combination of technical
problems and human error. In the
meantime, we've taken steps to
reduce the odds of something like
this happening again.
The Jasper News has been here a
long time. We value your trust and
will do what it takes to keep it.
Please feel free. to contact us with
your thoughts on this or any other
matter:
Robert Bridges may be reached at
800-525-4182 or ,
robert.bridges@gaflnews.com.


Continued From Page 1A

"I want the town of
White Springs to be a safe
place to live and work,"
. said Stephanie Horne,
owner of Suwannee
Hardware. "Our police
department is doing a great


job with the limited
resources they have. We
(White Springs) have had at
least 10 burglaries in the
past 90 days. Our residents
are coming together to
discuss ways our citizens
can help our community."
Brookins said arrests


have been made in all the
recent cases, but that more
charges are pending.
"Everybody talks "about
the state of the economy,"
said Brookins when asked
about the increase in
criminal activity. "Most of
us get a second job to get


by. A criminal just gets
more aggressive. We need
more funding for more
officers and more
equipment to counter these
incidents."
According to reports, the
break in occurred during
the early morning hours.


County gets big money for rec facilities


Continued From Page 1A

Protection's (DEP) Florida Recreation
Development Assistance Program
(FRDAP) has awarded $24 million in
grants across Florida. Six million of
those dollars have gone to counties in .
District 10.
"Outdoor recreation areas and
facilities are a vital part of Florida's
economy, drawing both Floridians and
visitors to experience the state's
natural resources," said DEP Secretary
Michael W. Sole.
Kendrick said that serving on the
committee to oversee the FRDAP
grants has allowed him to feel that he
has helped to create a part of a child's


Car flips;

driver escapes

serious harm

Continued From Page 1A

August 26, according to Florida
Highway Patrol reports.
Christina Rowell was traveling
east when her 2004 Pontiac
drifted onto the right shoulder
and struck two mailboxes and a
culvert, said FHP. The vehicle
then became airborne and
overturned while crashing
through a fence, coming to rest
right side up, witnesses told
authorities.
Rowell was lifeflighted to
Shands atUF and later released..
Reports indicate Rowell was
charged with careless driving


I a


Thank you, Hamilton County, for electing me as
your Tax Collector. I humbly appreciate the votes
and support throughout the campaign. I also want
to thank Charlene and Cecil for running
campaigns we can all be proud of.


Thank you,
Mary Sue Adams
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Mary Sue Adams (Democrat) for Tax Collector, Hamilton County









A -
N YOU*





A 5
"OnAugst26 ouelete
rntob ou et tt JRI
Attrny fr he 9hid Jdiia
Cici coein lu ba
Dixe, amitoLfaytt. -SAEATONYEET

'Idisn, uwnne an Talo


life.
Said Lewis Vaughn, speaking on
behalf of the Hamilton County Board
of County Commissioners, "We would
like to thank Representative Kendrick
for what he's done for our recreation
department. Not only recreation, but
for all of Hamilton County. We truly
hate to see him leave for he has been a
friend to our community."
Kendrick cannot seek reelection due
to term limits.
"I want to develop a recreation
program and complex that all kids and
residents in our community can take
pride in," said Hamilton County
Recreation Director Chuck Burnett.
Jennings Town Councilwoman


Samantha Prueter was approached by
Jennings resident Carmen Jones, who
wanted to help make a positive change
in the community. After researching
the avenues open for financing,
Prueter set to work.
"The Jennings City Park on Bee
Street is to be refurbished. There will
be updates to the ball field, basketball
court, playground and restrooms. A
concession stand will be added," said
Prueter. "It is true that 'with God all
things are possible' because without
Him none of this would have been
possible. We had less than one week to
write the grant and postmark it. This
was the first grant we wrote."
See more photos on Page lB.


Clean energy best economic
stimulus, says Audubon


Submitted
Audubon of Florida has ramped up its
efforts to convince Florida state agencies
to stimulate economic growth by
increasing the percentage of electricity
produced from renewable sources, such
as solar, to 20 percent by the year 2020,
and by aggressively decreasing the state's
demand for energy through efficiency
and conservation programs.
Audubon of Florida Policy Director
Eric Draper presented comments at the
Public Service Commission recently,
telling energy regulators that setting
aggressive targets for electricity supplied
by solar energy could generate thousands
of'jobs and billions of dollars of
investment. Audubon is also proposing
that the Governor's Climate Action Team
,tap a position to reduce demand for
. electricit) throughggressive-energ- -
-e an conservation standards.

CABLE PRICES

OBSCENE?



c-" -b l~f'S


L -O RINGS AND THINGS INC
386.792-1528
OAR. 1150 NW HWY. 41 SUITE #6
ml .. .... .. 473253-F

* i

URGENT ALERT
Thank you to all the voters and
supporters of Harry Oxendine
and for your continued
support on Nov. 4, for
County Commissioner District 5.

Your Candidate,
Harry Oxendine
Paid for and approved by Harry Oxendine, candidate for
S : Hamilton County Commisslioner District 5 473050-F on


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SALE All Crape Myrtle's 20%
Regularly priced starting at $6.99.


The PSC is currently creating rules for
what is known as a Renewable Portfolio
Standard (RPS) for Florida, which will
require electricity generators to provide a
percentage of electricity from clean
energy sources. The Legislature told the
PSC to write new rules requiring utilities
to either build or buy solar power and
other renewable energy.
-In comments Draper pointed out that
the number one goal for a renewable
standard is to wean Florida off
environmentally damaging and expensive
fossil fuels.
"The Legislature anticipated in passing
HB 7135 that the economy would be
stimulated by new sources of renewable
energy. With record numbers of our
citizens unemployed, Florida cannot-
afford-to let the PSC fail to pass an
ambitious renewable energy plan. And
our strategy to combat global warming


must start with energy
conservation." Draper told
the PSC. "We propose that
Florida create two new
industries one that
increases our electricity
production from renewable
sources, such as solar, and
one devoted to making our
homes and offices more
energy efficient. Both
industries would create
jobs, and the net result
would drive down the cost
of energy for all
Floridians, which would
pump more money into the
state's economy.
Modernizing our state's "
electricity supply and
demand infrastructure
creates jobs and stimulates
technological innovation,
and it lowers our
emissions of greenhouse
gas pollution, helping
protect us from the
potentially devastating
effects of global climate
change. It's a win, win,
win situation."


Sales prices good thru 9/9/09
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(386) 362-2333
Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m.-5:30 pm. 11TH STREET
Saturday 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. zj
Closed Sunday 0 ,
"For over 30 Years" 0
WWW.NOBLESGREENHOUSE.COM
466600-F


Juvenile arrested in White Springs burglary


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 4,2008


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAiGE 2A


YOU





THURSDAY RFPTEMBER 4. 2008


THE JASPER NEWS. Jasper. FL


TWHE iSP:



THERE IS li
NOTHING TO
DO IN WHITE sale in the and a kid's area at the play-
SPRINGS. How ground with garn and prizes for the kids to
many times have I play. This event is c led with the free evening
heard that said, performances at t Fir Saturday Coffeehouse"'
both by residents at 7 p.m. in the park audi orium. It is an "open
and friends from mike" family friendly venue that includes songs,
the big city? Far stories, music and poetry. The talent at the Cof-
too many, if you feehouse is often amazing and always entertain-
ask me. The thing ing. Coffee and desserts will be available for sale.
that is really irksome is that it simply isn't true. The White Springs Library is such a nice place
This weekend's "First Saturday Art in the Park" to visit. The staff there is always friendly and
at the Stephen Foster State Park is certainly a helpful and the selection of books, tapes and
noteworthy example. Once again, the world is videos is amazingly large for such a small li-
coming to White Springs. brary. Housed in a historic building, the library
"Art in the Park" is designed to be ail inexpen- has an impressive collection of historic photos
sive weekend for local folks. There will be 15 and publications about White Springs. The gar-
demonstrators on hand. Their crafts include, den outside is beautiful and very well cared for.
chair caning, stained glass, walking sticks, two It almost seems like a contradiction that such a
different pottery techniques, garden trough mak- quaint, small library housed in a historic build-
ing, jewelry, calligraphy, fruit and vegetable can- ing could have such nice computers available for
ning, quilting, smocking and other fabric arts. public use and their new and improved website
Throughout the day there will be inexpensive is amazing! Go to www.neflin.org/srrl/and ,
mini workshops on many of these crafts so peo- check it out. It has too many features to list here
ple can actually create a work of art. but I will mention a few. You can look up your
There will also be hotdogs and popcorn for current personal library account to check for due


feinwhitesprings@gmail.cor1

dates and other account information. The entire
library catalog is online. You will find access to
the Florida Electronic Library, Chilton Online
Automotive Repair Manuals, the www.linc-
cweb.org/catalog?libcode=flccl700&index=SU"
North Florida Community College Library Cata-
log, and you will find links to many area web-
sites including schools, government offices,
newspapers, blogs and sites that are just plain
fun. There is an "Ask a Librarian" chat feature
too, for that personal touch. I got on the website
and didn't come up for air for the longest time,
spending an enjoyable afternoon there, cruising
their connections, having fun and learning a lot.
Check it out; you will be glad you did. So until
next week, from the cultural event and entertain-
ment center of Hanfilton County with the high
tech historic library, I've said enough, but you
haven't. So, I'm reminding you that I would love
to hear. from you with your input about life in
White Springs.

Walter McKenzie
lifeinwhitesprings@gmail. corn
397-2420


Letter to the Editor


Dear Editor,

The serenity of small
town America has been
recently shattered due
to the crime wave that
has taken place in
White Springs during
the past three months.
Suwannee Hardware
and Supply, located on
US 41 North, has been
only one of many busi-
nesses attacked during
this outbreak. 'Yet all is
hnotsst:- 'This commu-
nity has decided to ban
together and partner
with the White Springs


Police force and our
newly appointed Chief
of Police, Ken
Brookins, in hopes of
forming a local Task
Force to help address
the problems. The '
community was well
represented at the Au-
gust Town Council'
Meeting where resi-
dents as well as busi-
ness owners spoke di-:
Srectly to the Council
i memberss. -' '
Concerned citizens in'
this small town are
now organizing to call
.an Old FashiQn Town


Meeting of the people.
The meeting place is
yet to be announced
due to a few obstacles
which stand in the
way. The town owns a
Community Center in
which the Town Coun-
cil has been meeting
since its recent renova-
tion, yet the citizens of
White Springs were re-
cently told they had to
rent the building for a
-fee of $100 for this ,
To'n 'Mletidg. These.
concerned citizens
were also told that not
more than one council-


man could attend the
open forum due to the
State mandated Sun-
shine Laws. The Town
Manager suggested the
citizens type up some-
thing for the Town at-
torney to review prior
to the assembly.
Although there are a
few obstacles, the citi-
zens' of White Springs
will assemble and dis-
cuss the crime problem
in an open forum
SOMEWHERE within
this community. Our
folks areconcerned
about one another and
are willirig abWIa't"'
ever it takes to ensure
their safety within their
own community. We as


a community are in
hopes our local gov-
ernment will "rally the
cause" as the citizens
attempt to address the


needs of small town
America.

Stephanie Jerrell Horne
White Springs


Thank you the citizens of this
county for your prayers, vote and
support during my campaign for
Tax Collector! I am so grateful for
the hospitality shown to
me during this time.
It has truly been a blessing!
S Again,
THANK YOU,
Charlene Robinson
Paid political advertisement paid for and approved by Charlene Robinson,
candidate for Hamilton County Tax Collector 473671-F


/SA


FRM~i~!


" A/


PAGE 3A


I I Ijl l I "IVI""I -, -- I .-- .







OPINION







o0Dvrl ea- -


n ccaae Conten_


w



.


a a S a


a l trrlom ommferci


ews rov es


Local Party Leader supports "Stuff-N-Fluff"
effort to break Guinness world record


Submitted
Noah's Ark Animal
Workshop has 'part-
nered with the Girl
Scouts of Southeast
Florida in an attempt to
break a current Guin-
ness World Record the
"Largest Gathering of
Plush Toys." According
to Vickie Strickland,
White Springs resident
and party leader for
Noah's Ark Animal
Workshop, the effort is
an exciting event for all
representatives of the
company. On Saturday,
Sept. 6, company repre-
sentatives will join the
,girls at the Roger Dean
Stadium in Jupiter, in
an effort to break the
.record, said Dina Ami-
co-Kriescher, president
and founder of Noah's
Ark.
"I know that I speak
on behalf of Noah's Ark


party leaders when I say
I am thrilled about this
event and support the
company's efforts to give
back to the community.
Making dreams come
true is what:Noah's Ark
Animal Workshop was
founded on, so we are all
excited the company has
agreed to partner with
this particular chapter of
the Girl Scouts to-bring
smiles and to also break
a record," Strickland
said,. .. ..
- As the company that
inaugurated 'We Come
to You' "Stuff-N-Fluff"
workshop parties, which
stimulate imagination,
inspiration and enthusi-
asm,. Noah's Ark has do-
nated 3,000 unstuffed
teddy bears and stuffing
materials to the event.
The Girl Scouts and their
families will come to-
gether with Florida
Noah's Ark leader Elaine


Amico, to take the field
for a massive, hands-on
teddy bear stuffing pro-
duction line, stuffing a
teddy with their own
hands and then making
a special wish on a Rain-
bow Star before tucking
it inside the bear in an
attempt to break the cur-
rent .Guinness World
Record. The current
record is a 'Gathering of
2,304 Plush Toys' set in
December 2006.
Community service is
a cornerstone of who the
Girl Scouts are and what
they do, so they have de-
cided to make this a.
community service pro-
ject as well, and have se-
lected several agencies
that will be the benefi-
ciaries of these teddy
bears. Each of the select-
ed. agencies, such as the
local American Red
Cross Chapters, Project.
-Night .Night of Florida,
and are law enforcement
and fire rescue agencies
play an important role in
meeting the needs of


children in and after cri-
sis.
"Entertaining White
Springs-area- children,
making them feel, good,
laugh and smile, even if
it's just for a moment, is
what I try to incorporate
here with my business in
the local community.
Through the efforts of
the Girl Scouts of South-
east Florida, their fami-
lies and local Noah's Ark
leader Amico, over 3,000
teddy bears, will 1e de-
livering smiles and Rain-
bow Star sunshine to
area children in need. I
feel honored to be a part
of a company doing an
event like this," Strick-
land said.
For more information
about Noah's Ark Ani-
mal Workshop contact
Vickie Strickland at 397-
2975. For more informa-
tion about Girl Scouts of
Southeast Florida, con-
tact Lori Sullivan at 954-
739-7600, ext. 219, or vis-
it www.broward-
girlscouts.org.


SAFE


SOUND

And serving our neighbors
With 10 locations over 150 employees and
621 million dollars in assets, First Federal is a
major steward of North Florida s economy We
put deposits to work in our communities s to help
families accomplish their dreams We are strong
and able to continue [his mission because.
Capital -P.s of June 30 2008, FFBF capital
is al a record higri of $63 million FFBF has
over $5 million in reserves Our financial
S strength was recently rated. 'A Excellent" by
The SIreel cornm. an independent provider of
ratings of financial service companies
Regulatory Supervision, OTS First
Federal is examined by the Office or Thrift
Supervision, an agency of the United States
Government OTS supervises financial
institutions performance soundness and risk
managerrient OTS ranks First Federal as
Well Capitalized "
FDIC First Federal deposits are insured by
the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation up
to $100.000 per depositor, and up to
$. 250 000 per depositor for retirement
accounts
S Rest insured


B A N [,i L 0 L R 1 D A


Fall Vegetable

Gardening

Workshop


The Suwannee Coun-
ty UF/IFAS Extension
Office is offering a Fall
Vegetable Gardening
Workshop. The first one
wil be on Wednesday,
Sept. 10, from 9:30 a.m.
until 12 p.m. and will be
repeated on Thursday,
Sept. 11, from 6 p.m. un-
til 8:30 p.m. for those of
you who work.
Site selection, seed se-
lection, irrigation cali-


bration, small space al-
ternatives, soil solariza-
tion, micro-irrigation
and cold protection are
some of the topics to be
discussed.
If you would like to
attend one of the ses-
sions contact Carolyn
Saft or Pam Burke at the
Suwannee County Ex-
tension Office at 386-
362-2771. Please register
by Sept. 8.


EXTRA! EXTI
Do you know where to purc
the Jasper News?
HERE'S WHERE!!
JASPER
Baya Pharmacy (US 41 coin ra,
Fast Track 103 (US 41), Fast Track 404 (1-75
Hitchcock's Foodway (US 41)
Jasper Hardware (Central Ave. NW c
Jasper Post Office (MLK Dr. coin
Joy Foods (US 41 coin rack)
P-- it Stop (US 41), Raceway (SR
S&M Discount (US 41), S&S 16 (U:
S&S 30 (1-75 and SR 6), S&S 49 (1-75 ar


hase


CK)
5and US 12
oin rack)
rack)
6)
S 41)
id US 129)


JENNINGS
Fast Track 402 (1-75 and CR 143)
Jennings Outdoor Store (1-75 and CR 143)
S&S 31 (US 41), Step Inn (1-75 and CR 143)
WHITE SPRINGS
Gate (1-75 and CR 136), Munchies (US
S&S 8 (US 41), S&S 32 (US 41)
S&S 35 (1-75 and CR 136)
\ Stormant's Grocery (US 41)


29)


41)


OTHER LOCATIONS
Mini Mart (SR 6/Crossroads)
R J's Deli (SR 6/Crossroads)
Suwannee River Food Store (Hobby's US 129)


I


Avai


e 3Jasper Wrens
Published weekly every Thursday. USPS #755-980
Office located at 105 NE 2nd Avenue,
Bank of America, Jasper, FL 32052
Phone (386) 792-2487 FAX (386) 792-3009
E-mail address: jaspemewsl@alltel.net
Myra Regan .............. .Publisher
Robert Bridges ............ Group Editor
Jo Ross ...... . . ..... .... Reporter .
Candice Pike .............. .Administrative Assistant
Periodicals postage paid at Jasper, FL,
Annual subscription rate is $17 in county,
$25 out of county and out of state.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
The Jasper News, 105 NE 2nd Ave.,-Jasper, FL 32052

Letter to the Editor and Article Policy
Letters to the Editor and news articles can be mailed,
FAXed or dropped off at the news office located in the
Bank of America Building, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.
till 5 p.m.
Letters to the Editor should be typed, double-spaced if
possible, brief and to the point, approximately 150 to 200
words or less. Not all letters are published. To be consid-
ered for publication Letters to the Editor must be signed,
include the writer's address and phone number, and in
the Jasper News' office on Friday before 5 p.m.
News Releases, 400 or less words, should be typed, dou-
ble-spaced if possible, brief and to the point. Not all articles.
are published.
Letters and articles may be edited to fit available spdce.
Well written letters/articles require less editing.
To mail your letter/article, send it to: The Jasper News,
105 NE 2nd Ave., Jasper, FL 32052 or FAX it to: 792-3009.


Mom b t r
FDIC www.ffsb.com 386-792-2400 / 201 2nd Ave. SE, Jasper, FL 32052
1 I-ENDER I


THE JASPER NEWSJaspar, FL


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 4,2008


PAGE 4A






THUIQ JPMflA IL-FPTI FR& 208 HE ASPR EWSIJ-t, FLPAG 5


Mr. and Mrs. Kory Lamont Taylor

to renew their vows of marriage

Mrs. Tenika Marshall Taylor is a 2005 graduate of Hamilton County High
School, Jasper, Florida, and is on Active Duty in the United States Air Force
currently stationed at Misawa Air Base, Japan. She is the daughter of Mrs.
Helen Marshall and Mr. Wallace Marshall of White Springs, Florida.
Mr. Kory Lamont Taylor is a 2004 graduate of Charles B. Avcock High
School, Pikedille, North Carolina and is also on Active Duty in Misawa Air
Base, Japan. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Terry Taylor of Goldsboro, North
Carolina.
The happy couple will renew their vows on Saturday, October 4, 2008, at
2:00 p.m., at New Jerusalem Baptist Church, White Springs, Florida. Recep-
tion will follow at Winfield Recreation Park, Inc., Lake City, Florida.
All family and friends are invited to attend. The couple is registered at
JCPenny.com. Additional gifts are welcome including gift cards, etc.


Award Winning Yearbook Staff





rine.
Residents of Hamil-
ton County are also in-
vited to donate items to
be sent to the soldiers.
Specifically requested
items are jerky, Slim
Jim's, M & M's, Oreos
(of any kind), wet
wipes, and new sports
or outdoor magazines.
The Jasper Library has a
longer list which can be
picked up there. Items
can also be dropped off
at the Jasper Library
during regular hours.
Join the VFW as it en-
courages and supports
our troops.


Long Branch Congregational Methodist
Church holds dinner and Gospel Sing
The Long Branch Congregation Methodist
Church, located on CR 135, in White Springs, will be
hosting a chicken pilau supper and a Gospel Sing on
Saturday, Sept. 6. The supper will be served (eat in
or take out) starting at 5 p.m. and the singing will
start at 7 p.m. There will be no special group. Local
singers from the church and other churches will be
singing. Everyone is invited to come sing. Donations
will be taken for the pilau supper.


LCCC hosts College Night


Tuesday, Sept. 16,
--from 5-p-.m.until-p.m.,
Lake City Community
College (LkCC) will host
its 22nd'annual College
Night for LCCC stu-
dents; high school stu-
dents from the 10th,
11th, and 12th grades;
parents; and individuals
exploring career and ed-
ucational opportunities
in higher education.
Doors will be open to
guests at 5 p.m. in the
Lake City Community
College Conference Cen-
ter (Bldg. 010) on the
campus.
Colleges and universi-
ties from throughout the
state of Florida, Georgia
and Alabama will be
represented. Colleges
confirming their interest
in meeting area students
are the University of
Florida, Florida State
University, Florida Agri-


cultural and Mechanical
University, University of-
Central Florida, Univer-
'"ity -6bf South Florida,
and University of West
Florida, Florida Atlantic
University, Lynn Uni-
versity, and Saint Leo
University among oth-
ers. Participants will be
able to talk one-on-one
with college representa-
tives to compare oppor-
tunities in higher educa-
tion.
Programs at Lake City
Community College will
be represented along
with the other institu-
tions of higher educa-
tion. Adult students are
invited to explore educa-
tion and retraining pro-
grams to enhance or ex-
pand their career skills.
For more information,
contact the LCCC Re-
cruiter's office -at 386-
754-4246.


Nature photography workshop offered
at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge


Submitted
Join Nature Photogra-
pher and former Jack-
sonville Camera Club
president John Reed on
Sept. 20 and Sept. 21, at
Okefenokee National
Wildlife Refuge to learn
basic fundamental nature
photography concepts at
one of the nation's most
unique ecosystems. Dur-
ing Saturdayfs session,
participants will learn
first-hand what it takes to
get those great wildlife
photos. Participants will
then practice what they
learned during Sunday's
half-day field trip in the
refuge.
Saturday's classroom
session runs from 8 a.m.
until 4:30 p.m. at the Oke-
fenokee National Wildlife
Refuge Administrative
Offices, located approxi-
mately seven miles south-
west of Folkston, Ga., off
Hwy. 121/23. Partici-
pants must provide their
own camera and equip-
ment for the workshop.
Bring lunch or choose


from a variety of selec-
tions offered at Okefeno-
kee Adventures Swamp
Caf6, located next to the
Visitor Center.
The Sunday field trip
will run from 7 a.m. to 11
a.m. Participants should
wear comfortable cloth-
ing and shoes for walking
outdoors, and in case of
rain, bring appropriate
covers to protect their
camera equipment. The
field trip may be can-
celled in the event of se-
vere inclement weather.
Pre-Registration is re-
quired for this workshop!
There will be a $25 regis-
tration fee, payable by
cash or check, and class
size is limited to 24 partic-
ipants. The $5 entrance
fee into Okefenokee
NWR is not included in
the registration fee.
To register and for
more information, con-
tact the Okefenokee Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge
Visitor Center at 912-496-
7836 from 9am until 5
p.m. daily.


Sentinel Upstage
Players
announce fall
production
The NFCC Sentinel
Upstage Players will
hold open auditions for _
"All Over But The
Shooting" at 7 p.m., on
both Monday, Sept. 8, This Summer fiv
and Tuesday, Sept. 9, at nalism training ii
Van H. Priest Auditori- other yearbook
um, NFCC campus, peted and all fiv
Madison. NFCC stu- plaque for best t
dents, employees and best ever. In add
members of the commu- very own Will H
nity are invited to audi- County High Sch
tion. Rehearsals begin in to print, but are
September. be fifty dollars.
"All Over But The book staff would
Shooting" by Lee ad in this year's
Mueller is a murder Sheriff's Office.
mystery and will be pre-
sented Nov. 13, 14 and
16 at the Wardlaw-
Smith-Goza Conference <', 'C~
Center. The mystery be-
gins as a colorful group .
of actors arrive to audi-
tion for an upcoming
play. Before the audi- ,
tions are complete, a 0'_
murder takes place and
the group spirals into
mass chaos and suspi- -I
don.
NFCC's Dr. Jessica
Webb directs this fun
produetiontrFor more iin-
formation about audi-
'tioning, rehearsals or the '
play, contact Denise Bell .<: ,
at 850-973-9481 or
belld@nfcc.edu.


FIRST ADVENT CHRISTIAN
N.W. 15th Avenue Jasper
Rev. Fran Wood
Sunday
Sunday School.................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship.................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday
Prayer Fellowship..................6:30 p.m.
416349-F

JASPER FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
207 N.E. 2nd Street, Jasper 792-2658
Pastor: Roger Hutto
Sunday
Sunday School..... ..... ................ 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship...............................11:00 a.m.
Youth Choir.................... ................. 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship.................................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Wednesday Night Supper ..................6.....6 p.m.
Youth & Children Activities &
Prayer Meeting.................................... 6:30 p.m.
416351-F
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
SR 6 West, 6592 NW 48th St.,
Jennings, FL 32053
938-5611
Pastor:Jeff Cordero
Sunday Schol................................ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship...........................11:00 a .m.
u 0..-r-. runn W-I unvorrnu W-.I rluunlg,


ve members of the Hamilton County Chariot Yearbook Staff attended jour-
n Gainesville. There, they competed in a theme packet competition against
staffs from all across Florida. This was the first tine they had ever com-
'e members are newcomers to yearbook. They were proudly awarded a
heme package. This year's book is already on its way to being one of the
ition to a great theme, this year's book will be dedicated in memory of our
leirs. If you are interested in reserving a copy, please contact Hamilton
0ool or log on to www.yearbookordercenter.com. Books cost eighty dollars
currently on sale for forty five dollars. After November third, the price will
Please support the yearbook so that we can keep costs down. The year-
1 like to thank the following businesses, whom have already purchased an
book: Bass, Dr. Smith, B.J. Wrecker, Joe's Garage, First Federal, and The
(Photo Submitted)






Whoop-to-do,
!.0 II 0,



*1 .,: u 1







Love, your brother
S'** J 473256F


SUNRISE BAPTIST CHURCH
U.S. 129 3 miles North of Jasper ,
Pastor: Rev. Gene Speight
Bible Study ........................................ 9:30 a.m.
Sunday School................................ 10:00 a.m.
Church ............................ ........ 11:00a.m.
' 416352-F
CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1/2 mile East on Hwy. 6, Jasper, Fl 32052
792-2275 S.Wendell Hill, Pastor
Sunday
Sunday School.................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..................11:00 a.m..
Children's Church.................11:00 a.m.
Church Training......................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting....................7:00 p.m.
416350-F

CHURCH OF CHRIST
N.W. 3rd St., Jasper
Bldg.: 792-2277
Sunday
Sunday School.......................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...... .............. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship......................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Evening..............................:.........6:00 p.m .
416354-F


ounuay Evening Worship, routhn appening,
RA's, GA's .............................6:00 p.m. FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Wednesday 405 Central Ave., Jasper, FL
Supper.............................................. 6:00 p.m. Pastor Dale Ames
Prayer Meeting, Discipleship class for adults, Phone 386-792-1122
Youth activities, Children's Choirs.....6:30 p.m. Sunday
Van pick-up upon request Sunday School.............................9:45 a.m.
416353-F Morning Worship........... 11:00 a.m.
D *I Wednesday
(A k [ I J il Bible Study.....................................4:45 p.m.
w /R S \ choir Practice........................6:00 p.m.
Family Night Dinner 3rd Wednesday
Clothes loset 4th Saturday 1 -5pm
7 M \416361-F


To place your ad inside

the Church Directory

please call

386-362-1734 ext. 141

or 1-800-525-4182


GREATER POPLAR SPRINGS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
OF JASPER
702 S.W. Martin Luther King Drive, Jasper
Pastor: J.T. "Billy" Simon
386-792-2912
Communion: Every 3rd Sunday
Sunday School .. ................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship............................ 11:00 a.m.
Children's Church............................11:00 a.m.
Weekly Schedule
Monday Brotherhood Meeting...........7:00 p.m.
Monday after 1st Sunday
Deaconess Society Meeting.........6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Missionary Socity................6:30 p.m.
Tuesday Youth & Childrens Activity...6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Midweek
Service & Lunch.... .............12:00 noon
Wednesday Prayer Meeting
and Bible Study ..............................6:30 p.m.
Saturday Choir Rehersal..:.............12:00 noon
471911-F


BURNHAM CHRISTIAN CHURCH
4520 NW CR 146, Jennings, FL 32053
938-1265
Pastor: Robert Carter
Sunday
Sunday School........... ............9:45 a.m.
Worship..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Service .............................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday,
Prayer Meeting...............................7:00 p.m.
416358-F


BLESSED ASSURANCE
MINISTRIES
402 NE Hatley St., Jasper, FL
Pastor- Wyndell Mathis
Phone- 386-792-2869
Sunday School... ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship.................... 19:45 a.m.
Evening Worship........................ 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Night Prayer....................5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Worship... 7:00 p.m.
471910.F

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
204 N.W. 3rd Avenue, Jasper, 792-2258
Pastor: Rev. Doug Hilliard, 792-8412
SUNDAY
Sunday School ...................... 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service......................1..... 11:00 a.m.
WEDNESDAY
Prayer in Fellowship Hall...............9:00 a.m.
Choir Practice................................ 7:30 p.m,
416355-F,
CATHOLllCHlllC!


ST. THERESE CATHOLIC CHURCH
Three miles north of Jasper U.S. 41
P.O. Box 890, Jasper, FL 32052
Rectory U.S. 90 E.,
Live Oak, FL
(386) 364-1108
Sunday MASS 8:00 a.m.
416360-F


To list your church on our church
directory, please call Nancy at
1-800-525-4182


Support our troops


Patriot Day, which
honors the nearly 3,000
people killed on 9/11,
will be commemorated
on Thursday, Sept. 11,
by members of VFW
Post 8095 and their
wives as they pack box-
es to send to deployed
military in Iraq and
Afghanistan. Hamilton
Countians who have
loved ones serving in
either war zone are in-
vited to bring the
names and addresses
by the VFW at 5 p.m.
and a box will be
mailed to that
soldier / airman / Ma-


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 5A


THURSDAY. SEPTMBER-4,2008





PA1r_ DA TE-APE-NW. a-e -L1HRSAY EPEME-4-20


Tourist

Development

Council

meeting time

change
We would like to alert
the public to a time
change. On Wednesday
Aug. 13, at the Tourist
Development Council
meeting, the board voted
to change the time of the
meeting to 1 p.m. Their
meetings are on the Sec-
ond Wednesday of each,
month and the change
will be effective begin-
ning Sept. 10. The public
is welcome to attend all
meetings held by the
Tourist Development
Council.

Suwannee
River
Quilt Show
and Sale
The Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center
State Park will host the
20th Ainual- Suwannee
River Quilt Show and
Sale /with the theme,
"Turiing Twenty on the
Suwvannee," on Oct. 17,
through Oct. 19, from 9
a.m. until 5 p.m., with
more than 200 quilts.
/Admission is $3. per per-
son.
Workshops, vendors,
boutiques, demonstra-
tions, lectures, antique
quilts, a block contest
and door prizes will also
be featured. The 20th
Anniversary Celebration
will be held on Saturday,
Oct. 18.
For more information
on the show or how to
enter contact Kelly
Green at 397-4478. To
learn more about' the
park visit ww.FloridaS-
tateParks.org / stephen-
foster.


McCormick honored at luncheon


Hamilton County Honored one. of its own on Tuesday Aug. 5, with a surprise luncheon for the Honorable John McCormick, County Attorney. The lun-
cheon hosted by Board of County Commissioners, Constitutional Officers and Staff was to celebrate over fifty years of honorable service as a member
of the Florida Bar Association, which in itself is no minor accomplishment, but more importantly, it represents approximately 50 years of service to the
citizens of Hamilton County in several different aspects. In the mid-1950's a young attorney tired of practicing law in south Florida and returned home
to Hamilton County. John McCormick served as the Mayor of the Town of White Springs and also served as the White Springs Magistrate Judge for sev-
eral years. He must have been good at this, because in 1959 he was elected to the Office of County Judge, where he served the people of Hamilton Coun-
ty with great distinction for 12 years. Following his tenure as Judge, he became the County Attorney a position he has held for over 35 years. John Mc-
Cormick or Mr. John as he is affectionately and respectfully known by many of us has dedicated his life to public service. He is active in our local com-
munity as well as our region and state. He is a true southern gentleman and highly respected throughout the State of Florida. He has served the best in-
terests of the citizens of Hamilton County throughout his tenure. Thank you Mr. John and congratulations on your accomplishments.
(Photo by Rob Wolfe, PCS)


Dulcimer Retreat at State Park


The Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental
Protection's Stephen
Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park is now
accepting registration
for the Suwannee Dul-
cimer Retreat on Nov.
14 through Nov. 15.
This two day event of-
fers participants in-
depth instruction and
techniques on the
mountain dulcimer,
hammered dulcimer
and autoharp musical
instruments.
The Suwannee Dul-
cimer Retreat is a cele-
bration of traditional
music with workshops
offered for beginning,
intermediate and ad-
vanced students, taught
by nationally recog-


nized instructors from
throughout the United
States. Concerts will be
held on Friday and Sat-
urday evenings in the
park auditorium at 7
p.m. Tickets for public
admission are $10.
Admission to the two-_
day event is $85, which
includes all workshops,
jam sessions, concerts
and discussion groups.
Registration is now
open and forms are
available at www.Flori-
daStateParks.org / stephe
nfoster/Events.cfm. Af-
ter Oct. 15, there is. a $15
late registration fee.
For more information
on the Suwannee Dul-
cimer Retreat, call Kelly
Green at 397-4478 or toll
free 1-877-635-3655.


472247-F


Tips on what to do

after an auto accident


Car accidents can
happen in the blink of
an eye. According to
Car-Accidents.net,
they nccur approxi-
mately 6.4 million
times each year.
Although being in-
volved in a car acci-
dent can be over-
whelming, knowing
.what to do in the mo-
ments following a
fender-bender can help
alleviate some of the
stress and confusion of
the situation.
The service special-
ists at Chrysler, Jeep
and Dodge offer the
following tips on how
to handle a car acci-
dent:,
Don't leave the vehi-
cle. Following an acci-
dent, most drivers will
want to exit their vehi-
cles to check for dam-
age or speak with oth-
ers involved. Ideally,


drivers should call the
police and remain in
their cars until the au-
thorities arrive.. Dri-
vers can protect them-
selves both physical-
ly and legally by re-
maining in their vehi-
cles and allowing the
police to process the
scene.
Carry a disposable
camera. Although the
police report should
capture the details of
the accident, it is al-
ways helpful to take
photos for your own
documentation.
After police are noti-
fied, call a towing ser-
vice. You should know
exactly who is towing
your vehicle and
where it will be taken.
For easy access, keep a
small business card in
your wallet that con-
tains the numbers of
several tow-truck com-


panies and your deal-
ership's service depart-
ment.
Call your insurance
company. Most people
think of this as some-
thing to do later, but
calling from the scene
will help to expedite
the processing and ad-
ministering of your
claim. And, you will
be able to relay accu-
rate information in
real time instead of re-
lying on memory.
Get several estimates
on vehicle damage. Re-
view these reports
carefully to under-
stand what you are
paying and what the
insurance company
will cover. Don't be
afraid to ask questions.
Reputable repair shops
will gladly address
questions regarding
the required repairs.


-1-u ~


Dear Friends,
Please except my sincere appreciate for the support I
received in the Aug. 26 Primary.
I will always be an advocate for child and public
education.
Again, thank you and God bless you.


Have a good week Hamilton County.
I LOVE YOU.
JOHNNY BULLARD
Paid political advertisement, paid for and approved by Johnny Bullard, candidate Hamilton County Superintent of Schools





1 a LLoffi t 4Vo of2 bi t'at 3.

-q want to tfiank /ou fo' youWL

uotFi and' i//o'zt in tfns

cTzy.k 26t/ Pimnar L&ation.

Jl/fa i 9 taf kIihi o/2/o'twzlity to asJk g9ow

aontinau' iUO/ o'tn in tf /aomniny Elation.

f ORI .EIou7I ELf andO a/#z2aiati youz s/2o'zt.


Pad Poltcal Advertisement Paid For And Approved by Mary Nell Bryant, Hamilton County School Board District 3 Candidate


Paid Political Advertisement Paid For And Approved by Mary Nell Bryant, Hamilton County School Board District 3 Candidate P!


NOTICE OF




PUBLIC




AUCTION

On Friday, September 19, 2008, at 11:00 a.m., the City of Jasper will hold a
public auction to sell the following described real property located at 415 Palmetto
Avenue:

Beginning at a point on the Eastern Boundary of the G.S.&F, Railroad
where the Northern boundary of Palmetto Avenue intersects said
G.S.&F. Railroad; thence run Easterly along the Northern boundary of
Palmetto Avenue, a distance of 228 feet to an iron stake for the Point of
Beginning; thence run in a Northwesterly direction perpendicular to
Northern boundary of Palmetto Avenue, 104 feet, more or less to the
Southern boundary of a lane; thence in a Northerly direction along
Southern boundary of said lane 175 feet; thence in a Southeasterly
direction perpendicular to Palmetto Avenue to Northern boundary of
Palmetto Avenue; thence in a Southwesterly direction along Northern
boundary of Palmetto Avenue to Point of Beginning; containing .44
acres, more or less, the said tract being in Lot 3 of Block 133, according
to Lang's Retrace Survey map of the City of Jasper, Florida, in Hamilton
County

This auction shall take place at the property address.

The terms of the auction are as follows:
/
* The lowest acceptable bid is $10,000. All bids below this amount will be
rejected.
* The property will be sold without any warranties or representations by the City
of Jasper. The buyer will purchase the property in its current condition.
Buyers are encouraged to inspect the property prior to the auction.
* The successful bidder will be required to deliver to the City a non-refundable
deposit equal to ten percent (10%) of the successful bid immediately upon
conclusion of the auction. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid at
City Hall before 5:00 p.m. on the date of the auction. The non-refundable
deposit and final payment shall be by cash or certified check.
* The successful bidder will receive a special warranty deed to the property. The
City does not warrant title and will not provide title insurance. Buyers
wishing to do so shall be responsible for any title search or the procurement of
title insurance.

All potential bidders are encouraged to inspect the property prior to the auction.
The property may be inspected between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m., or by
contacting City Hall.


HIMISIMMINE


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 4,2008


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGF SA


(-Witptfi









Sports


Thr 34easper 4,r0

Section B
Thursday, September 4, 2008


Hamilton County receives $271,233.68 in grants


See story on Page 1A


-.






Current Jennings City Park on Bee Street. (Staff Photo)


"Fighting Trojans"
2008 Hamilton County High School
Varsity Football


Fri. Sept. 5 Suwannee Co.
Fri. Sept. 12 Union County


Awaav
Away


2008 Hamilton County Middle

Grades (7th, 8th, 9th) Football Schedule
Thurs. Sept. 4 Fort White Honie 7th, Sth,
Thurs. Sept.1.8 Suwannee Co. Away 7th, 8th


"Lady Trojans"
2008 Hamilton County High School
JV/Varsity Volleyball


Representative Kendrick, Mayor Barrett, Councilwomen Prueter and Citizen Advocate Car-
men Jones. (Staff Photo)


7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.


7:00 p.m.
7:00 p m.


Commissioner Ronnie Morgan, Councilwoman Prueter,Advocate Carmen Jones, and
Representative Will Kendrick. (Staff Photo)


Sept. 4 Suwannee Co. Away
Sept. 9 Florida High Home


5:00/ 6:30 Great Opportunity for Hunters at
5:30/7:00 Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge


ARE YOU READY FOR

SOME FOOTBALL

Youth Football and Cheerleading sign-ups
at Hamilton County Parks and Recreations
Welcome to another season of gridiron action. We look forward to a great year
for you as parents and for the chidlreh as players. Applications will be accepted
until Friday, Sept. 5.
If you are interested in playing football or cheerleading this year you can sign-
up at the Hamilton County Recreation Center between the hours 8 a.m. until 5
p.m., Monday through Friday.
Registration fee will be $50.
For more information contact the Hamilton County Recreation center, located
at 4525 SW 107th Ave., in Jasper, at 792-3098 or visit online at www.hcrecre-
ation.com.

PeeWee Flag / Cheer: 5-6 years old not 7 before Sept. 1, 2007
Junior Flag/Cheer: 7-8 years old not 9 before Sept. 1, 2007
PeeWee Tackle/Cheer: 9-10 years old not 11 before Sept. 1, 2007
Junior Tackle/ Cheer: 11-12 years old not 13 before Sept. 1



Hamilton on the Move

September Meeting
By Heather M. Futch
4-H/ FCS Agent Hamilton County,

On Sept. 11, we will have our next Hamilton on the Move meeting. It vill
be held at the Hamilton County Extension office at 5 p.m. Be sure not to
miss out on this one! We will be talking about recipes and food and chang-
ing our habits to make a healthy lifestyle. Hope to see you there.
Call 792-1276 to register by Sept. 10, at 4:30 p.m. Future meeting dates
are: Oct. 7, Nov. 6, and Dec. 9.


Suwannee Chapter of the Florida

Trail Association monthly meeting


The Suwannee Chapter of the
Florida Trail Association will hold
its monthly meeting on Monday,
Sept. 8, at the Suwannee River Wa-
ter Management District Office from
7 p.m. until 9 p.m., on US 90 and
CR 49, two miles east of Live Oak.
The Public is welcome.
The program will. feature Cindy:
Johnson of the SRWMD who will
show a ;teiry compelling video enti-
tled,"Spring Heartland" produced
by springs, expert and video graph-
er, We Skiles. Then she will ad-


dress the Ichetucknee Partnership
whose mission to "promote the en-
vironmental and economic well be-
' -ing of the Ichetucknee Spring shed,
through locally-led, voluntary, in-
centive-based programs."
After the presentation stay for a
discussion abqut the 'Suwannee
Chapter's upcoming activities,;
many of which are open to the pub-
lic.
For more information contact,
Sylvia Dunnam at 386-362-3256 or
Stephanie, Sikora at 386-208-1381.


Okefenokee Nationatl-Wildlife,' :- '".
Refuge will be hosting its annual
Suwannee Canal Deer and Hog Hunt
on Friday, Oct. 24, and Saturday, Oct.
25, at the Suwannee Canal Recreation
Area near Folkston, Ga. Over 651
acres are reserved for up to 30
hunters. An additional 561 acres are
reserved on Chesser Island for up to
10 wheelchair hunters only. The hunt
is for deer (either sex, limit 2 per day).
and feral hogs (either sex, no limit)


d and ruinstwo hours before sunrise un-
til noon. Hunters are required to use
shotgun slugs or muzzleloaders only.
If selected, each hunt permit will cost
$12.50. Deer taken do not c9unt
against the state limit,.and a special
refuge tag will be provided upon'
check-out for each deer taken. Contact
the refuge Visitor Center at 912-496-
7836 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. daily
for additional information and regula-
tions.


Trojan Season Tickets on Sale Now


Carol O'Cain, Athletic
Director at. Hamilton
County High School, an-
nounces that Trojan Sea-
son Football Tickets are
now on sale in the athlet-
ic office for $35 each.
Mrs. O'Cain would like
to encourage all previ-
ous season ticket holders
and new recruits to re-
serve your seats within
the next few weeks prior
to the first regular sea-


son home game on Fri-
day, Sept. 19, against
Chiefland at 7:30 p.m.
. The Varsity Trojans
will be traveling to Mayo
on Friday, Aug. 29, to
play the Lafayette Coun-
ty Hornets at 7:3P p.m. in
a Pre-Season Jamboree.
Our seventh and
eighth grade team will
open up on Thursday,
Sept. 4, as they host the
Fort White Indians at 7


p.m.
Make plans to come
out and support the Tro-
jans. Coach Al Nelson,
our new head football
coach,-and the coaching
staff are anticipating a
great season.
The Administration,
staff and students and
Hamilton County High
School appreciates- the
continued support of the
community.


Jumpstart college savings


By Alicia King

Families can finan-
cially prepare for their
children's and grand-
children's college edu-
cation by using this
year's income tax re-
turn or economic stim-
ulus check to enroll in
the tax-free Florida
College Investment
Plan*.
The Florida College
Investment Plan is a
529 college savings
plan that allows fami-
lies to save tax-free for
their children's and
grandchildren's future


college education. It is
managed by the Florida
Prepaid -College Board,
a state agency, and was
established in 2002.
With the Florida Col-
lege Investment Plan,
families can save at a
pace that fits their bud-
get. They can begin
with either a $250 con-
tribution or a $25 a
month automatic bank
withdrawal. They de-
cide how much they
can afford to increase
their college savings.
The plan can be used
for qualified higher ed-
ucation expenses at ac-


credited public and pri-
vate universities, col-
leges and technical
schools throughout the
US. Families may re-
ceive information and
enroll online at
www.florida529plans.c
om or by calling 1-800-
552-GRAD.
For more informa-
tion contact Diane
Hirth, Florida Prepaid
College Board, at 850-
488-8514 or e-mail her
at
diane.murdock@myflor
idaprepaid.com.

SEE JUMPSTART, PAGE 2B


Correction:

In the Aug. 21'edition of the Jasper News, the Old Fashioned Golden Rule Day was
held at West Lake bhurclf of God in Jennings. The paper printed Westwood
SChur'h of,G01C We.apologized' for this mistake.


Thu.
Tue.






THPJSPR.EW. "aI. T


ARREST

REPORTS
Editor's note: The Jasper
News prints the entire ar-
rest record each week. If
your name appears here
and you are later found not
guilty or the charges are
dropped, we will be happy
to make note of this in the
newspaper when judicial
proof is presented to us by
you or the authorities.
The following abbrevi-
ations are used below:
DAC Department of
Agriculture Commission
DOA Department of
Agriculture
DOT Department of
Transportation
FDLE Florida De-
partment of Law En-
forcement


FHP Florida High-
way Patrol
FWC Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission
HCDTF Hamilton
County Drug Task Force
HCSO Hamilton
County Sheriff's Office
ICE Immigration and
Custom Enforcement
JAPD Jasper Police
Department
JNPD Jennings Police
Department
OALE Office of Agri-
cultural Law Enforce-
ment
P&P Probation and
Parole
SCSO Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office
WSPD White Springs
Police Department
Aug. 25, Terence. E.
Mitchell, 32; 3627 NW


21st Circle, Jennings; vi-
olation of probation;
HCSO.
Aug. 25, Amanda K.
Wallace, 35; 7345 Good-
hope Rd., Naylor, Ga.;
driving while license
suspended (knowingly);
HCSO.
Aug. 25, Derrick D.
Walker, 29; 101 Fir St.,
Live Oak; no valid dri-
ver's license; JAPD.
Aug. 26, Nieto
Salguero-Rigoberto,
2475 Jason Industrial
Park, Winston, Ga.; op-
erating a commercial
motor vehicle without
valid driver's license;
DOT. *
Aug. 27, Donald D.
Smith, 26; 417 First St.,
Polk City; violation of
probation for possession
of controlled substance


Flood waters pose health risks


Submitted

Tropical storms and
hurricanes can cause
flooding. Although skin
contact with flood wa-
ters does niot, by itself,
pose.a serious health
risk, health hazards are
a concern when waters
become contaminated.
Flood waters may con-
tain fecal material, as-
sociated bacteria and
viruses. The Depart-
ment of Heath (DOH)
recommends the fol-
lowing precautions to ,
prevent possible illness
from flood waters.
Wash your hands
with soap and water
that has been boiled or
disinfected before
preparing or eating
food, after toilet use, af-
ter participating in
flood cleanup activities,
and after handling arti-
cles contaminated with
flood water or sewage.
Avoid eating or
drinking anything that
has been contaminated'
with flood waters.
Do not wade through
standing water. If you
do, bathe and put on
clean clothes as soon as
possible.
Avoid contact with
flood waters if you
have open cuts or'
sores. If you have any
open cuts or. sores and
cannot avoid contact
with flood waters, keep


them as clean as possi-
ble by washing well
with soap to control in-
fection. If a wound de-
velops redness,
swelling, or drainage,
seek immediate med-
ical attention. Residents
who sustain lacerations
and / or puncture .
wounds and have not
had a tetanus vaccina-
tion within the past 10
years require a tetanus
booster.
If there is a back flow
of sewage into your
house, wear rubber
boots and waterproof
gloves during cleanup.
Remove and discard
absorbent household
materials, such as wall
covering, cloth, rugs,
and sheetrock. Clean
walls and hard-sur-
faced floors with soap
and water and disinfect
with a solution of 1/4
cup of bleach to one
gallon of water. Thor-
oughly disinfect food
contact and clothing in
hot water. Air dry larg-
er items in the sun and
.spray them with a dis-
infectant. Steam clean
all carpeting.
If your plumbing is
functioning slowly or
sluggishly, you should:
Conserve water as
much as possible; the
less water used the less
sewage the septic tank
must process. Minimize
use of your washing


machine. Go to a laun-
dromat. Rental' of a
portable toilet for a
temporary period may
be another option.
Do not have the sep-
tic tank pumped. Ex-
ceptionally high water
tables might crush a
septic tank that was
pumped dry. If the fun-
damental problem is
high ground water,
pumping the tank does
nothing to solve that
problem.
If you cannot use
your plumbing without
creating a sanitary nui-
sance, i.e., without
sewage being nothing
to solve that problem.
Do not have the sep-
tic tank and drainfield
repaired until the
ground has dried. Of-
ten systems are com-
pletely functional when
unsaturated conditions
return. Any repair must
be permitted and in-
spected by your county
health department.
For further informa-
tion contact your local
county health depart-
ment or visit
www.doh.state.fl.us or
www.FloridaDisaster.o
rg.
The Florida Emer-
gency Information Line
is 1-800-342-3557.
The Public Informa-
tion Emergency Sup- -
port Function is 1-850-
921-0384.


with intent to sell/deliv-
er, importing controlled
substance, driving while
license suspend/re-
voked; HCSO.
Aug. 27, Felicia D.
Jones, 43; 3704 NW 100th
Ave., Jasper; violation of
probation for burglary of
a structure; JAPD.
Aug. 28, Carlos R.
Johnson, 41; P.O. Box
968, Jasper; violation of
probation, possession of
controlled substance (co-
caine); HCSO.
Aug. 28, Eugene J.
Archie Jr., 32; 496 NW
Long St., Lake City; ut-
tering a forged, check,
grand theft; JAPD.
Aug. 28, William H.
Kramer, 37; 1209 Maple-
wood Dr., hold for
Suwannee County Sher-
iff's Office, in to serve 90


Jasper Legals
CONCURRENT NOTICE
NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO
SIGNIFICANT IMPACT AND
NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST
RELEASE OF FUNDS
September 4, 2008
City of Jasper
208 W. Hatley Street
Jasper, FL 32052
386/792-1212
These notices shall satisfy two separate
but related procedural requirements for
activities to be undertaken by the City of
Jasper.
REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS.
On or about September 24. 2008, the City
of Jasper will submit, a request to the
Florida Department of Community Affairs
.for the release of Community Develop-'
ment Block Grant funds under Title .I of
the Housing and Community Develop-
ment Act, as amended, to undertake a
project to provide Wastewater Treatment"
Plant and Water Distribution System im-
provements, as follows: (1) Installation of
a filter by-pass line, refurbishment of the
existing filter, and installation of two alum
feed pumps; and (2) Construction of ap-'
proximately 3,600 LF of 12" water trans-
mission main along Central Avenue gen-
erally between SW 10th Street and
NW/NE 3rd Street; and installation of new
isolation valves along the route. The total
project cost, including construction, engi-
neering and,administration is estimated to
be $730,000. Approximately $80,000 of
that amount will be from the Florida De-
partment of Environmental Protection for
Wastewater Treatment Plant improve-
ments.
FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT
The City of Jasper has determined that
the project will have no significant impact
on the human environment. Therefore, an
Environmental. Impact Statement under
the National Environmental Policy Act of
* 1969 (NEPA) is not required. Additional
project information is contained in the En-
vironmental Review Record (ERR) on file
at the Office of City. Clerk, Jasper City
Hall, 208 W. Halley. Street, Jasper, Florida
and' may be examined or copied week-
days between 8:00 A.M to 5:00 P.M.
PUBLIC COMMENTS
Any individual, group, or agency may sub-
mit written comments on the ERR to the
City Managers Office. AlI comments must
be received by 5:00 o.m.. Monday. Sep-
tember 22. 2008. Comments will be con-
sidered prior to the City of Jasper re-
questing a release of funds. Comments
should specify which notice they are ad-
dressing.
RELEASE OF FUNDS
The City of Jasper certifies to the Florida
Department of Community Affairs and
HUD.that Ann Lessman in her capacity as
Mayor consents to accept the jurisdiction
of the Federal Courts if an action is
brought to enforce responsibilities in rela- -


SEvts, please ct 792-2487 1-800-525 .182
drt .W y event n th] Community Events, please(optact OSlie ~aeper News (386) 792-2487 1-800-525-4182


Sept. 5 Alapaha River Band of
Cherokee Inc. Free Food Service
Pantry from 12 p.m. until 3 p.m.


Sept. 6 Long Branch
Congregational Methodist Church,
located on CR 135, in White Springs
will be hosting a chicken pilau supper
and a gospel sing. Dinner will begin
(eat in o,r take out) at 5 p.m. and sing
will begin at 7
p.m. Donations will be taken for the
pilau supper. Everyone is invited to
attend.


Sept. 9 Second Annual Hamilton
County Extension 4-H Open House
from 4:30 p.m. until 6:30 p.m. at the
Hamilton County Extension office,
located at 1143 Hwy 41 NW, in Jasper.
For more information call 792-1276.


Sept. 11 Hamilton on the Move will
meet at the Hamilton County


To advertise your event in the Community
Events, please contact 1te 3aasptr Neuws
4,68.F (386) 792-2487 1-800-525-4182


Extension office at 5 p.m. Call 792-1276
to register.


Sept. 19 Alapaha River Band of
Cherokee Inc. Free Food Service Pantry
from 12 p.m. until 3 p.m.


Oct. 2 Hamilton County Fair Events
Day at the Hamilton County Arena in
Jasper beginning at 8 a.m. with Swine
Show Exhibits Check-in. BBQ supper
will be available for $6 per plate.


Oct. 17 Oct. 19 20th Annual
Suwannee River Quilt Show and Sale at
the Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m.
Admission is $3 per person.
For more information call Kelly Green at
397-4478 or visit www.FloridaState
Parks.org/stephenfoster.


National Freedom litel
No roaming orlong-distance chaeson the National Freedom network.

Add Ilnes & sham your minutes .20 each/mo )
500 urcl..... m c..ir....cle< >
Add line. & anhre your mirlutes 9.99 each/rno
-*BB.99 BO Unlrmatd unumid 4030 y
a. 2100 unllmitl Unllmitd ll
U140.9 4000 uniimid unliiod2 2 0 my Caiclo o0
9. 6000 uo..I..v.. Un. .. llmll 0
Rings and Things, Inc. u1150US lwy.4,1,site6,t
Your local aulhorizedAlol Wireless dealer pr, F, 32052
464612-F Addtllonal charges apply to il rate plns. 386-792-1528


days; HCSO.
Aug. 29, Edward Rop-
er, 66; 476 NW Bison Ct.,
White Springs; violation
of probation, hold for
Columbia County Sher-
iff's Office, driving while
license suspended; FHP.
Aug. 29, Charlie Mc-
Quay, 40; 2429 SW SR 14,
Madison; child support;
HCSO.
Aug. 29, Robert Mc-
Clain Sr., 61; 3022 NW
49th Ave., Jennings; in
serving third weekend;
HCSO.
Aug. 29, Vicki A. El-
more, 58; 16381 Pearl.
Dr., White Springs; in
serving third weekend;
HCSO.
Aug. 29, Marcus D.
Thompson, 27; 724
Chainbridge Dr., Jasper;
in to serve weekend;

tion to the environmental review process
and that these responsibilities have been
satisfied. The State's approval of the cer-
tification satisfies its responsibilities un-
der NEPA and related laws and authori-
ties and allows the City of Jasper to use
the CDBG funds.
OBJECTIONSTO RELEASE OF FUNDS
HUD will accept objections to its release
of fund and the City of Jasper certification
for a period of fifteen days following the
anticipated submission date or its actual
receipt of the request (whichever is later)
only if they are on one of the following
bases: (a) the certification was not exe-
cuted by the Certifying Officer of the City
of Jasper; (b) the City of Jasper has omit-
ted a step or failed to make a decision or
finding required by HUD regulations at 24
CFR part 58; (c) the grant recipient has
committed funds or Incurred costs not au-
thorized by 24 CFR Part 58 before ap-
proval of a release of funds by the State;
or (d) another Federal agency acting pur-
suant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has submitted
a written finding that the project is unsat-
isfactory from the standpoint of environ-.
mental quality. Objections must be pre-
pared and submitted in accordance with
the required procedures (24 CFR Part 58,
Sec. 58.76) and shall be addressed to the
Florida Department of Community Affairs,
CDBG Program, 2555 Shumard Oak
Boulevard, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-
2100. Potential objectors should contact
the City of Jasper to verify the actual last
day of the objection period.
Ann Lessman, Mayor
Certifying Officer
9/4
LEGAL NOTICE
There will be a Contractors meeting held
on Wednesday, September 24,2008 be-
ginning at 9:00 a.m. in the conference
room at Suwannee River Economic-
Council, Inc., Administration Building,
1171 Nobles Ferry Road, Bmilding #2,
Live. Oak. This meeting is mandatory for
all contractors interested in doing contract
work with the Home Repair Programs for
SREC, Inc. There will be no exceptions.
All contractors should bring, proof of in;.
surances (Liability and Workers Compen-
sation and/or an Exemption Card), cur-
,i ai Ou,-t.r, e r, and proof of ln-
.:.;.,'p,:,.ih.:.-,r, ,I ,ppin,.r ,h
9/4IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
.THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HAMILTON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 24-2008-CA-000229
INDAYMAC BANK F.S.B.,
Plaintiff,


TIEUVAN P. PHAN, et al,
Defendantss,
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: TIEUVAN P. PHAN
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
468 Bohemia Pkwy
Sayville, Ny 11782


Jumpstart

Continued From Page 1B

*The Florida Col-
lege Investment Plan is
not a prepaid plan. In-
vestments in the plan
are not insured or
guaranteed, and you
could lose all or a por-
tion of your invest-


HCSO.
Aug. 30, Sipp D.
Pierce, 29; 11944 CR 249,
Jasper; failure to appear
for violation of noise or-
dinance; FHP.
Aug. 30, Whitley Mer-
ritt, 55; 1716 S. Patterson
St., Valdosta; in serving
fourth weekend of 15
weekend sentence;
HCSO.
Aug. 30, Scott B.
Breaux, 38; 8277 Dusty
Miller, Pinetta; driving
while license suspended;
FHP.
Aug. 30, Dennis M.
McClain, 42; P.O. Box
357, Jennings; hold for
Brook County Sheriff's
Office; HCSO.
Aug. 30, Barbara G.
McNeal, 43; P.O. Box
443, Jennings; battery;
HCSO.

CURRENT ADDRESS;
UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDI-
VIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS:
.UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the following
property in HAMILTON County, Florida:
PART OF THE SOUTH HALF (SOUTH
1/2) OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER
(SOUTHWEST 1/4) OF SECTION 18,
TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 14 EAST,
HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS: FOR POINT OF REFER-
ENCE, COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF SAID SOUTHWEST
1/4; THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DE-
GREES 01 MINUTES 43 SECONDS
WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF
SAID SECTION 18, A DISTANCE OF
671.55 FEETTOTHE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 88
DEGREES 01 MINUTES 43 SECONDS
WEST, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE, A
DISTANCE OF 672.78 FEET; THENCE
RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 22 MINUTES
29 SECONbS EAST, A DISTANCE OF
1311.06 FEET;THENCE RUN SOUTH 88
DEGREES 14 MINUTES 01 SECONDS
EAST, A DISTANCE OF 672.72 FEET;
THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 22
MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 1313.47 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING SUBJECT TO
EXISTING COUNTY ROAD RIGHT OF
WAY.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses within 30 days after the first publi-
cation, if any, on Florida Default Law
iGroup, PL., Plaintiffs attorney, whose ad-
dress is 9119 Corporate takeDrive, Suite
300, Tampa, Florida 33634, agpd file the
original with this Coudr[ eithd'-6before ser-
vice on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once each
week for two consecutive weeks in The
Jasper News.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court on this 2'1st day of August, 2008.
Greg Godwin
Clerk of the Court
By: /a/ Kristy Morgan
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the American with Dis-
abilities Act of 1990, persons needing a
special accommodation to participate in
this proceeding should contact the ASA
Coordinator no later than seven (7) days
prior to the proceedings contact clerk of
the court 207 N.E. first Room 106 Jasper
(TDD) (386)-792-0857.
9/4, 9/11


merit. Participation in
the plan will be sold
only by means of a
Disclosure Statement
and Participation
Agreement. A copy of
each will be sent to
you upon request; you
should read them he-
fore investing.


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THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 4,2008


DA 2B OR





THURSDAY.. SEPTEMBER 4. 208TEJSE ESJseFAE3


Norris Notes

By Lillian Norris

Suddenly it is fall, or is it? Monday
morning I realized that school is in ses-
sion (so far I haven't heard "the wheels
on the bus," maybe they aren't coming
by my house now, or I have not been at
the right place at the right time. School
is in session and going strong, it is our
hope that the students, teachers, staff
and all employees (and parents) have a
good year, watch for all as we travel,
and, be safe. Athletic activities are up
and busy; support our athletes, coach-
es and their staff, have a good year. If
you cannot support by your presence,
let the coaches and players know you
wish for them a successful season.
It has been good to see Judy Smith a
couple of times recently, she has al-
ways been one of our excellent teach-
ers who has retires, her husband Philip
retired, and they are enjoying their re- *
tirement, we note that they are active
in their church, we get the newsletter,
from New Hope, and they are a very
busy congregation and staff. I do ap-
preciate the news from the churches by
email, bulletins and mail and will be
trying to get news in more timely. I
had to get a new printer (was still us-
ing the original one and had to get a
new computer first) so guess that
means the original printer was a good
one. Thanks to help from others
(namely Jordon who installed it, and
later Adam, Mitchells and Ben it is up
and running).
In case you did not see or hear about
it, as of Wednesday Virgie Cone has
celebrated her 100th birthday, at Hey-
wood Estates in Greenville, SC. I still
have her address if you are interested
in contacting her, it is never too late to
remember our loved ones who have
contributed so much love and care for
our community. Alice Jones and I, and
Lillian Cason from Lake City, had
many wonderful sessions with her
serving on the North Florida Mental
Health Board together, through these
trips we made contact again with
many friends in our area, with one
family, the Lewis family, former resi-
dents, the young men, Bucky, John and
Paul, are all in the Lake Butler area,
now and doing well. You will heat
more from us about Virgie in the com-
ing days. .
Packages for Veterans will be mailed'
out again on Thursday, Sept. 11, (an
appropriate date isn't it?)
We have made use of the new rail-
ings on 15th Avenue, in the area in
front of Suwannee Valley Nursing
Center. When our children were at the
Middle -School, walking in that area
and traveling through there, there was
not even a paved sidewalk. Now, it is
hoped that the drivers will slow down
in that area, I realize it is a straight way
from the caution light at, Martin Luther
King Drive through to #41,. there are
many people walking, riding bikes,
golf carts, etc. Remember, drive safely,
and protect our children (old folks,
too) and yourself.
Tell me* 'what's happening," we
know about the weather and the poli-
tics and pray for all those involved in
any way, let us know about what is go-
ing on with you.


f A special thank
you to the young
woman who is a
cashier at Foodway,
I will get her name
last week in unpack-
ing my buggy had
left my billfold in the buggy, for some
reason I went back in a few minutes,
had not missed it, as I went into the
store someone spoke to me, called me
by name, the cashier asked if I was
Mrs. Norris, when I said yes, she in-
formed me that she had seen a billfold
in the buggy, turned it into the office,
she went to the office and brought it
out to me. After my experience with
the help of the police department and
things like this help to remind me how
fortunate to live among the people in
Hamilton County. There are problems
everywhere, count the blessings of liv-
ing where we are and be thankful for
the good in our lives here.
There is now a new doorbell at my
back door (in the garage), had trouble
getting everything all together, but
thanks to friends Joe and Doris
Mitchell, Doris ordered one like theirs
and Joe said anyone could install it,
Ben took care of that and I can even
hear it down the hall. The ones we had
when we moved here over 40 years
ago had. finally given up. My commu-
nication is being improved, what with
the doorbell, the computer back in
business, and my friend Kathy Strick-
land provided me with phones for my
birthday, I have three scattered
throughout my house, Ben hooked
them up for me (Rodney had even in-
stalled the batteries before Kathy gave
them to me). I guess you can see that I
feel truly blessed with family and
friends.
We went to Lake City to celebrate
Ben's birthday Tuesday night, Mary-
beth stopped by on her way to Jordan's
ball game in Cross City (volleyball),
Kaleb came by on his way back to
Cuthbert GA to college earlier this
week. I know you must have news
about your family, and your children
and young people, call or email or
write.
The ladies at First Baptist prepared
luncheon for the family of Audrey
Wetherington after church Sunday
and prior to burial. It was good to vis-
it with Don and family and friends, we
fondly remember Audrey, had a nice
email contact as long as she was able to
communicate, she was a special lady
and will be missed by all who, knew
her and her family.
I celebrated my birthday this year at
Cracker Barrell, one of my favorite eat-
ing places, now I have moved ahead of
Joe and Doris Mitchell land Jack Vin-
son, and some of my lady friends from
breakfast.
We are enjoying our, new minister
and his contribution to our church and
our fellowship. He is Reverend Parrish
Jones and his first fellowship with us
was Sunday afternoon at a "peanut
boiling", it was a fun time for every-
one, we are fortunate to have him with
us, he is also teaching our adult Sun-
day School class which is very interest-
ing.
Call or email, or write, soon,
Until next week
Lillian Norris
Norris Notes
norrislw@alltel.net
792-215


Farm Bureau Bank announces

new CD, Money Market rates


Farm Bureau Bank is
pleased to announce that
rates have been raised on
all Certificates of Deposit.
Members can invest
with confidence in the se-
cure FDIC insured ac-
counts, and earn some of
the highest CD rates in
the nation. With terms
ranging from 3 months to
5 years, and several spe-
cial promotional terms,
Farm Bureau Bank CDs
provide members with in-
vestment options that fit
their.individual needs.
Visit www.farmbu-


reaubank.com for CD rate
information.
Farm Bureau Bank also
has a special offer for
Money Market savings
accounts available only to
Farn Bureau members.
Members who deposit
$10,000 or more into a
Farm Bureau Bank Mon-
ey Market account will
earn a guaranteed mini-
mum 3.50% Annual Per-
ceritage Rate on their bal-
ances through October 31.
This account allows mem-
bers to keep their money
liquid while earning high-


Art in the Park


The Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental
Protection's Stephen Fos-
ter Folk Culture Center
State Park will host "Art
in the Park" to be held the
first Saturday of each
month from 9 a.m. until 5
p.m.
Crafters will demon-
strate pottery, fabric arts,
stained glass, quilting,
jewelry making and


many other crafts. Work-
shops will be available for
several of the crafts for a
small fee: The workshops
are first come, first served.
The event will be free
. with paid park admission
of $4 per vehicle up to
eight persons.
For more information
call 397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfostercso.or
'g.


er interest than traditional
passbook savings ac-
counts. Visit www.farm-
bureaubank.com for full
terms and conditions.
For more information
about these accounts, or
any other Farm Bureau
Bank products and ser-
vices, contact the Bank at
1-800-492-3276.


NFCC Awards Hamilton County student
book scholarship at Orientation
North Florida Com .. : ,--
munity College . .--...
awarded freshman m .e ,..
April Bishop of '-
Hamilton County a .
$250 book scholar- -
ship at its new stu- '
dent orientation held
at NFCC's Fine Arts
Auditorium Aug. 16.
Bishop was one
among two selected i -,!"
to play NFCC's "Who -
Wants to Win a Book
Scholarship," a game
NFCC staff patterned -."
after the popular
game show "Who
Wants to be a Mil-
lionaire." Bishop, sit-
ting, is pictured with
NFCC English- in- -.- .
structor Susan Tay-

(Photo Submitted) .

Federal Financial Aid Available


Lake City Communi-
ty College is pleased to
announce that the Pa-
tient Care Technician
program has been ap-
proved for Federal Fi-
nancial Aid.. This pro-
gram, which incorpo-
rates Nursing Assis-


tant, Home Health
Aide, Phlebotomy, and
EKG, prepares individ-
uals for, entry-level po-
sitions in the health-
care field. '
Individuals seeking
information about this
program should con-


tact the Allied Health
Advisor, Ann Tison, at
386-754-4304 for addi-
tional information.
Individuals seeking
information about fi-
nancial aid should con-
tact the financial aid of-
fice at 386-754-4283.


Clean Energy Best Economic

Stimulus for Florida


Audubon of Florida
today ramped up its ef-
forts to convince Florida
state agencies to stimu-
late economic growth by
increasing the percent-
age of electricity pro-
duced from renewable
sources, such as solar, to
20% by the year 2020,
and by aggressively de-
creasing the state's de-
mand for energy
through efficiency and
conservation programs.
Audubon of Florida
Policy Director Eric
Draper presented, com-
ments at the Public Ser-
vice Commission (PSC)
recently, telling energy
regulators that setting
aggressive targets for
electricity supplied by
solar energy could gen-
erate thousands of jobs
and billions of dollars of
investment. ,Audubon is
also proposing that the
Governor's Climate Ac-
tion Team take a posi-
tion to reduce demand
for electricity through
aggressive energy effi-
ciency and conservation
standards.
The PSC is currently
creating rules for what is
known as a Renewable
Portfolio Standard (RPS)
for Florida, which will
require electricity gener-
ators to provide a per-
centage of electricity
from clean energy
sources. The Legislature
told the PSC to write
new rules requiring util-
ities to either build or
buy solar power and
other renewable energy.
In comments Draper
pointed out that the
number one goal for a
renewable standard is to
wean Florida off envi-


ronmentally damaging
and expensive fossil fu-
els. .
"The Legislature antic-
ipated in passing HB
7135 that the economy
would be stimulated by
new sources of renew-
able energy. With record
numbers of our citizens
unemployed, Florida
cannot afford to let the
PSC fail to pass an ambi-
tious renewable energy
.plan. And our strategy
to combat -global warm-
ing-must start with ener-
Sgy conservation." Drap-
er told the. PSC. "We
propose. that Florida cre-
ate two new industries -
one that increases our
electricity production
from renewable sources,
such as solar, and one
devoted to making our
homes and offices more
energy efficient. Both in-
dustries would create
jobs, and the net result
would drive down the
cost -of energy for all
Floridians, which would
pump more money into
the state's economy.
Modernizing our state's
electricity .supply. and
demand infrastructure
creates jobs and stimu-
lates technological inno-
vation, and it lowers our


emissions of greenhouse,
gas pollution, helping
protect us from the po-
tentially devastating ef-
fects of global climate
change. It's a win, win,
win situation."
Multiple studies na-
tionwidce have found
that a serious commit-
ment to producing clean,
renewable energy cre-
ates new, good, paying
manufacturing and ser-
vice jobs across the
country. Already 25
states have renewable
;.energy portfolios, and
are taking advantage of
the economic opportuni-
ties clean energy indus-
tries have to offer. Addi-
tionally, studies show
that clean energy may
create significantly more
jobs than fossil energy
per dollar invested.
"Audubon is better
known for bird conser-
vation than economics."
Draper continued "But it
should be a no-brainer to
our state leaders that by
investing in renewable
energy and energy effi-
ciency we can stimulate
Florida's economy and
improve the quality of
our life and save .our
wildlife. It's that sim-
ple."


SWUho Ya Gonna Call?
i These rea Businesses fire Ready To Serve You



Home Town Care, Inc.
Durable Medical Equipment
.107 Hatley St. W., Jasper, FL
At Home Town Care, we carry an exclusive selection of medical equipment
and supplies backed by caring, professional and courteous staff.
24 Hour Emergency Service Delivery & Set-up
Sales & Rentals
Now accepting Evercare Insurance
-Ph: 386-792-3550 *Toll Free: 866-851-6897
Fax: 386-792-3560 472543-F

Call Louise at

386-792-2487

for more details.

Deadline:

Thursday 5 p.m.


Hamilton County's

Service

Directory
460568-F


~1
Xasprr


DECLASSIFIED


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 3B


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 4,2008








Counselor's Corner


By: Paula G. Williams, HCHS Middle
Grades Guidance Counselor
Welcome back to a brand new school
year. Our 2008-2009 theme is "The su-
per highway to your fortune is at
HCHS!" Thank you for a great turnout
at Open House. Seeing the students so
excited and filled with anticipation
was great. We appreciate all of the
many parents ,and community folk
who came out just to say hello and re-
tirees Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Chandler and
Mr. Ron Hobbs who have volunteered
to help in any way the past few years.
A hearty welcome is extended to all
of the new staff members and we hope
the community will come out and
meet them.
A special thanks to Pastor Jeff and
Pam Cordero who brought out fresh
baked cookies from the New Hope
Baptist Church Family and Pastor
Timmy Dyke and Calvary Baptist
Church who treated the entire staff to
a delicious luncheon during pre-plan-
ning. These thoughtful acts from the
community mean so much and we ap-
preciate you praying for and with us.
Parents are encouraged to visit the.
school and stay in touch with your
child's teachers. Get involved early to
avoid problems later.
The Journalism (early birds) class is
up and running for those students
who can get to school by 8:15 a.m.
Contact Ms. A. Taylor for more infor-
mation.


Get ready for the annual Parent
Night on Thursday, Sept.. 18, from
5:30 p.m. until 7 p.m. Come and hear
the short presentations and share with
your child's teachers. We will have
door prizes like last year and I hope
you will not miss this learning oppor-
tunity and fun educational event.
Progress reports will be sent home on
this date as well. Please call to find out
how you can help.
The Varsity Football team will travel
to Live Oak on tomorrow. Kick-off is
7:30 p.m. Please put on your red spirit
colors and travel on over to Suwannee
County to support our Trojan team.
Please learn/practice the Hamilton
County High School Alma Mater
along with your children. We plan to
sing it at events and programs like we
did in years gone by.
HCHS Alma Mater
There's a place of truth and learning,
That we love so well;
It's our own, our Alma Mater,
Let her praises swell.
Hamilton, Hamilton,
You will never fail.
We will ever loyal be,
Hamilton, all hail!
Come by room #127 at Hamilton
County High School if I can be of as-
sistance to you don't hesitate to call me
at 792-6540 or email- me at
Williams_p2@firn.edu.
Guidance-serving children in an
awesome way every day!
Asia,


S ) -





Staff introduces themselves. (Photo Submitte


p.. ,,,
e ." . .


Plpf'P h Sbmitted)
24








Principal Maceo Howell welcomes the group. (Photo Submitted)


An awesome Open House turnout. (Photo Submitted)


Find your fortune in Guidance where are team will help you. (Photos Submitted)


An awesome Open House turnout. (Photo Submitted)


Pastor Dyke leads group in prayer. (Photo Submitted)


J


-


4


I


Students early wait in line for schedule pick-up. (Photo Submitted)


Ms. Taylor sports a matching top and purse with the school theme graphics.
(Photo Submitted)


Students early wait in line for schedule pick-up. (Photo Submitted)


Students early wait in line for schedule pick-up. (Photo Submitted)


74 rid,





r .'


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 4,2008


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PACGE 4BR








^ Central Hamilton Elementary "

I Open House/Meet the Teachers


Welcome to the 2008-09 School year!!!
Open House/Meet the Teachers activities at CHE
was held on Thursday, Aug. 14, with principle
Marjorie A. Cooks.
;H..,-'-- - ,.. I - *,'.-_" '.... -,


- .-..
*u :~
'I


I;: ~
L ~


le,


4, 1


GARDEN
PATCH

Use your green thumb
for a great lawn
Submitted
Revitalizing a dead or weed-stricken lawn is some-
thing that is often difficult to do. Consider starting
from scratch so there will be a blank .canvas on
which to grow a healthy, beautiful lawn. But where
to start? Here are some tips anyone with even a
moderate green thumb can handle:
Know what type of grass you should plant. Differ-
ent regions of the country and their climates respond
better to certain types of grass, than others. In the
southern United States, for instance, Bermuda grass,
Carpet grass or Korean Lawngrass are among the
best choices. Before planting or buying any grass
seed, consult with a local lawn care professional at
the nearest hardware or garden-supply store.
Next prepare the land for planting. Remove all de-
bris from the yard, including any trash in the yard,
wood, large roots and even stones. The presence of
trash such as broken glass or even faded paper prod-
ucts such as cups or bags is not only unsafe for the
environment, but it can prove harmful to anyone
who might be out in the yard once the grass grows,
especially for children.
SOnce debris is removed, continue to prepare for
planting by using a spade or rake to smooth the soil.
Next loosen the soil as well, something that can be
done with a garden rake. Any unsightly areas, such
as humps, or ditches, should either be smoothed out
or filled in, depending on which is appropriate. This
can be done with some soil and should-not prove, too
costly.
. Spread the seed. If the lawn is not particularly big,
scatter the seed by hand. If the lawn is larger, a drop
spreader, which is sold at any hardware store, will
do the trick. When spreading with a drop spreader,
use the suggested amount of seed on the bag (even a
little less seed should do the trick) and make-sure it
is spread out in the rows evenly in the same direc-
tion. Once sowed the first part of the lawn in one di-
rection, crisscross back over that part at a 90-degree
angle, making sure to keep equal distance and cali-
brate the spreader at the same speed.
Mulch is an important step because it will keep the
soil moist and conducive to growing grass. Mulch
with just about anything, such as topsoil, straw or
even dried manure. Keep mulch at about a quarter-
inch, as this is just a precautionary step to ensure the
lawn will grow in nicely and shouldn't be overdone.
Water after mulch is in place. Again, however, ex-
ercise caution, as too much water sprayed at too high
a setting means it is possible to wash away the
seeds. Soak the soil about six inches deep. Seeds will
not begin to germinate for at least seven days, so
water for at least that long and possibly longer.
Three to four times a day at a light setting is a good
rule of thumb to follow.
Once those seedlings begin to grow in, sit back and
enjoy the new lawn!


Second
Annual
Hamilton
County
Extension
4-H Open
House
Our second annual 4-
H Open House will be
Sept. 9, from 4:30 p.m.
until 6:30 p.m. Represen-
tatives from each of the
clubs we have will be
present and you'll have
the opportunity to see
what we've done in the
past year and what we
have planned for the
next year! We'd like to
get you involved' with
our plans by either be-
coming a member or a
volunteer! Stop by and
stay a minute or stop by
and stay to talk!
For more information
contact the Hamilton
County Extension, locat-
ed at 1143 US Hwy 41
NW, in Jasper, at 792-
1276, or e-maill Heather
Futch at hfutch@ufl.edu.
The office is located'next
door to the' Hamilton
County Courthouse An-
nex and the 911 Mapping
Complex.


t ~


DO YOU SMOKE?

DO YOU DIP?

DO YOU SPIT?


FREE
Nicotine Replacement
Patches provided!,


___ Do you wmnt to qWat?
Free Group Sessions -
Tuesdays, September 9th October 14th
6-7:30 pm at Jasper Courthouse Annex


866-341-2730


I 4ti5Hk t


To Register call:
Hamilton CHD 386-792-6844 or


IQuitline I


(Photos Submitted)


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 4,2008


THE JASPER NEWS,_Jasper, FL


PAGE 5B






S OD III T.... PR.EW....-.......THR...DAY--F- .EPEM --42


The Police Officer's Prayer


Sergeant Emily Lumpkin receives a certificate of appreciation from Rev.
Raymond Mickler and several youth from the Beliville Church on July 28.
The certificate contained the Police Officer's Prayer:
0 Almighty GOD, Whose great power and eternal wisdom embraces the universe, watch
over all police and law enforcement officers.. Protect them from harm in the performance
of their duty to stop crime, robberies,.riots, and violence. We pray, help them keep our
streets and homes safe day and night. We commend them to your loving care because
their duty is dangerous. Grant them your unending strength and courage in their daily as-
signments. Dear GOD, protect these brave officers, grant them your almighty protection,
unite them safely with their families after duty ends, Amen. Poem from Maryland F.O.P.
(Photo Submitted)



Employment Connections


expands mobile services

Employment Connections has an- On the Career Coach, individuals
nounced the expansion of its mobile can explore careers, conduct interest
services in Hamilton County. The new inventories, register for and access
"Career Coach" has Florida Ready to
been deployed to Work, receive assis-
serve the County tance with resumes,
three days per job, search, apply
month, an increase for jobs and receive
from the previous career counseling.
schedule of just Employment
once per month. Connections office
The Career is located at 200 W.
Coach will be at Base Street, 2nd
the Hamilton Floor, in Madison.
County Adminis- Call 866-367-4758
trative Complex or visit www.Em-
(the old high ploymentConnec-
school) on the first tions.org for more
and second Tues- information and a
days of every month, 9 a.m. until 4 complete mobile services schedule.
p.m. It will also be parked at the Jen- Employment Connections is a service
nings Public Library on thethird Tues- of the North Florida Workforce Devel-
day of each month, 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. opment Board.


Country and bluegrass music

set for this week at Spirit of

the Suwannee Music Park ,


Submitted

Storms will come and
go, but at the Spirit of
the Suwannee Music
Park in Live Oak, there
is always music. This
weekend's no. excep-,
tion. Featured for this
weekend will be Harold
White and the Country
Masters on Friday
night, Sept. 5 and Ernie
Evans and Southern
Lite Saturday night,
Sept. 6.
Herold White has
been in the business of
making music almost
his entire life. He was
born into a musical
family and was singing
before he began school.
Although born in Hazel,
Kentucky, he grew up
in Live Oak, Florida,
making his first public
appearance at age 15
with the world famous
bluegrass group of Jim
and Jesse. Jim and Jesse,
along with the famous
Stanley Brothers and
other great bluegrass
performers, all were
part of a weekly radio
show broadcast to 26
states from a Live Oak
tobacco sales barn for
several years. Since that
time he's performed on
TV, radio, in Las Vegas,
owned night clubs
where he performed
and moved about
America performing his
music. He's played on
the Ernest Tub Show,
recorded in the Buck
Owens recording studio
in Bakersfield, Califor-
nia with the Buckaroos,
been on stage with Min-
nie Pearl and Steve


Spurrier and many oth-
r celebrities. Herold re-
rned to Suwannee
County several years
ago where he built a
new recording studio
last year. Maverick Pro-
ductions has all the lat-
est in digital equipment.
Herold produces and
engineers all recordings.
!Herold White and the
buntry Masters con-
sists of Herold, Tom
'Bright on lead guitar,
Mike Riley on drums
and Perry Miller on
bass. You're in for a real
treat' when you hear this
group. Come prepared
to get up and dance
when you hear one of
your favorite songs
from this band. To learn
more about Herold, go
to HeroldWhite.Com.
On Saturday night it's
time for some great
bluegrass music. If you
love bluegrass, you
know Ernie Evans and
Southern Lite out of
Jacksonville. One of the
Southeast's most popu-
lar bluegrass bands, the
band was hired as a
backup band for the
late, great fiddler player
Vassar Clements in
2001, giving the band
the jumpstart it needed
for success after a time
of retirement. The Jack-
sonville band now has
four members who take
their music seriously.
Their music gives a .
fresh sound to traditi6di-
al and contemporary
bluegrass. Ernie Evans,
playing, since he was 12,
leads the group. Ie and-
Debi also have a blue-
grass show the Debi &


Ernie Sunday Afternoon
Breakdown on Jack-
sonville radio station
WFCF 88.5 FM. In
Southern Lite, Debi
plays bass and sings,
while Dave McBrady
and Anthony Poli also
lend their musical tal-
ents to Ernie's to make
the band one of the best
bluegrass bands
around. The group fre-
quently plays at area
festivals and is now
coming to the SOSMP
for your musical enjoy-
ment this Saturday
night. Come prepared
to have a fun night and
enjoy great bluegrass
music!
Music starts at 7 p.m.,
Friday and Saturday.
Admission Friday night
is free, while admission
Saturday night is $10
per person. As always,
the SOS Caf6 and
Restaurant will be serv-
ing dinner and bever-
ages at regular prices
during the evening. The
Music Hall opens at 6
p.m so come on out ear-
ly and get a good seat,
have a great dinner and
just enjoy a first class
evening out. Bring some
friends to share in the
fun.
If you have questions
call the SOSMP at 386-
364-1683 or go to the
website at musi-
cliveshere.com where
you can check out our.'
calendar of events, find
out about overnight ac-
commodations and
leaarn about all the
amenities at the
SOSMP. Ya'll come see
us, you hear!


White House Drug Czar awards

$24.4 million to local youth drug


Submitted

John Walters, Dir
of National Drug Co
trol Policy (ONDCP
recently announce
the award of $24.4 r
lion in Drug Free Co
munities (DFC) grand
to 199 communities
across the country..
additional $55 millii
released in July, sup
ports the continuati
of awards to 568 Dr
Free Communities
coalitions and 17 D]
Mentor Continuatio
coalitions. 'Including
new grantees, the D
Free Communities S
port Program now
serves communities
all 50 States, the Dis
of Columbia, Puerto
Rico, American Sam
Palau and the Virgir
lands. Drug Free Co
munity coalitions w
collaboratively at
local level to prevent
and reduce drug an
cohol abuse among
youth.
In addition, 14 ne
grants totaling near
million were award
through the DFC Su
port Mentoring Pro
gram. These funds
help existing DFC
grantees to develop
more selfsupporting
community anti-dr
coalitions.
Director Walters
"Youth drug use ha
dropped 24 percent
since-2001, due in la


prevention programs
part to the active and giou
effective engagement of gani
sector strong community anti- and']
on- drug coalitions. The ex- sion
), pertise, time, and talent men
ed of those involved with Th
nil- Drug Free Community were
om- coalitions helps make appl
nts the drug problem and com]
the related public proc
An health and safety conse- match
on, quences smaller. Our awai
P- young people are least
on healthier, our communi- ry of
ug ties are safer, and our on si
Nation is stronger be- duct
FC cause of the work of repr
n Drug Free Community twel
g the coalitions, and we are of th
)rug proud to support their velo
5up- efforts." to re
"The Drug-Free Com- abus
in munities program helps in a
strict communities get the of th
D hard work of preven- Cr
ioa, tion done," said SAMH- Druj
n Is- SA Administrator Terry Act'
em- Cline, Ph.D, "By con- Free
'ork necting local programs, grand
the systems, and funding bipa
it streams through these Con;
id al- new grants, the full Pres
force of the community fund
will be brought to bear Dece
w, on preventing drug gres
ly $1 abuse and promoting Pres
ed healthy, productive law
ip- lives." sion
- The DFC program Con
will provides grants of .up to .
$625,000 over five years the I
to community organiza- conj'
g tions that facilitate citi- SAIM
ug zen participation in lo- M
cal drug prevention ef- abo0
said, forts. Coalitions are Com
LS comprised of communi- is av
ty leaders, parents, wwi
arge- youth, teachers, reli- polii


s and fraternal or-
zations, health care
business profes-
als, law enforce-
t, and the media.
e 199 new grantees
e selected from 419
icants through a
petitive peer review
ess. To qualify for
:hing grants, all
rdees must have at
t a six-month histo-
f working together
substance abuse re-
ion initiatives, have
esentation from
ve specific sectors
he community, de-
p a long-term plan
'duce substance
se, and participate
national evaluation
he DFC program.
eated under the
g-Free Communities
of 1997, the Drug-
Communities Pro-
n has earned strong
rtisan support from
gress and is one of
ident Bush's major
ling priorities. In
ember of 2006, Con-
s passed and the
ident signed into
a five-year exten-
of the Drug-Frqe
ununities Act.
INDCP administers
DFC program in
unction with
IHSA.
ore information
ut the Drug-Free
imunities Program
available at
w.whitehousedrug-
cy.gov/dfc


United Way Kicks Off Annual

Community Fundraising Campaign


United Way of
Suwannee Valley cor-
dially invites all busi-
ness leaders and com-
munity members to at-.
tend our annual com-
munity fundraising
campaign kick-off event
at 5:30 p.m. on Thurs-
day, Sept. 11, at Lake
City Community Col-
lege's Pine Square, an
outdoor pavilion which
lends an appropriate at-
mosphere for the fami-
ly-friendly celebration.
This year's United
Way community
fundraising campaign
theme matches the na-
tional theme of "LIVE
UNITEDTM." The event
will again feature activi-
ties for children includ-
ing a bounce house, bal-
loon creations, by John
Wheeler, sidewalk chalk
art; coloring and tattoos.
The dinner, which will
be served at 6 p.m., will
be catered by High
Power Vending, the
LCCC food service
provider. The dinner in-
cludes fresh cooked
hamburgers with
cheese, lettuce, tomatoes
and onions, on a fresh
roll; grilled jumbo hot
dogs; homemade potato
dill salad; savory baked
beans; homemade cook-
ies; chilled watermelon
slices; bottled water and
iced tea. Guests attend-
ing United Way's annu-
al community campaign
kick-off celebration will
also be treated to a per-
formance by the Lake
City Community Col-
lege Choir, which is al-
ways the highlight of
the event.
"The national theme is
'LIVE UNITED' with an
admonishment to 'Give.
Advocate. Volunteer,"
said Mike McKee, chair
of the United Way Com-
munications Committee,
which i responsible for
planningithh campaign
events. "Through partic-
ipation in United Way,
we can all 'LIVE UNIT-


ED,'" sharing our time,
talents and resources for
the common good of
our community."
"United Way of
Suwannee Valley is all
about families," said Joe
Flanagan, president of
the United Way of
Suwannee Valley Board
of Directors. "Our Unit-
ed Way community im-
pact initiatives and affil-
iated agencies provide
services to residents
ranging from infants to
our seniors. And all are
invited and encouraged
to join our community
in celebrating our local
United Way and in sup-
porting our annual com-
munity fundraising
campaign."
The event begins at
5:30 p.m. Reservations
are required and may be
made by contacting the
United Way office at
386-752-5604 by Sept. 4.
The cost of the dinner is
$10 per person'for both
adults and children..Ta-
bles of eight can be re-
served by either families
or businesses. Make
checks payable to Unit-
ed Way of Suwannee
Valley, Inc. 325 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Lake
City, FL 32055.
In addition to con-
ducting the annual com-
munity fundraising
campaign which the
September 11 event
kicks off, our United
Way is the organization
which brought the Com-
munity Foundation and
the Food Bank of
Suwannee Valley to our
community. Volunteers,
with staff leadership
from our United Way,
developed the Suwan-
nee Valley Long Term
Recovery Committee to
assist at-risk residents in
their recovery from the
2004 hurricanes by pro-
viding home repairs or
mobile home replace-
ments utilizing grant
funds secured by our
United Way. After sub-


sequently assisting evac-
uees from the 2005 hur-
ricanes and survivors of
the 2006 Christmas Day
tornado, the Long Term
Recovery Committee is
assisting survivors of
the March 7 tornado
which struck Lake City.
Our United Way's ser-
vice to our- community
as the lead agency for
the homeless coalition
continues as does its
Success By 6 early
childhood initiative,
which was sidelined
due to the disaster re-
covery efforts.
Current initiatives
also include the cultiva-
tion of the Suwannee
Valley Community Or-
ganizations Active in
Disaster (COAD), transi-
tion-of the Suwannee
Valley Long Term Re-
dovery Committee to a
long-term recovery or-
ganization and United
Way's efforts to imple-
ment 2-1-1 information
and referral services.
United Way of Suwan-
nee Valley is currently
convening community
partners to provide in-
come tax assistance
through Economic Stim-
ulus Payment filing and
development of a Vol-
unteers in Tax Assis-
tance (VITA) initiative.
United Way of
Suwannee Valley is a
community impact and
fundraising organiza-
tion which, utilizing
volunteers on all levels,
advances the common
good by identifying un-
met community needs
and seeking to alleviate
those needs through
United Way of Suwan-
nee Valley initiatives
and the funding of 23
affiliated health and hu-
man service agencies.
Qur community's
support of United Way
enables the continued
services of the affiliated
agencies and United
Way community initia-
tives.


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2008 .


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


DACG R





North Florida Focus September 3 4, 2008


ClassifiedsE 386-362-1734

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ 8 0 0 5 2 5 4 1 8 2
C1 ss--~ ris ~- -. e E mpl* General Merchandise Bargain Basom5- nl

r Employment PernaltemsR


www.nflaonline.com


*

*


t
I

l


Keai Estate ONLY05
A oile1 100 150NLY5
Automobile CALL TODAY


Help Wanted

Advent Christian Village
Dowling Park, FL..
"ON THE BANKS OFTHE
SUWANNEE RIVER"
CHILD CARE WORKER
FT/PT, pre-schoolers/fun
facility; must be CDA certified
or willing to obtain
certification. Must enjoy
children.
Competitive wages & benefits
for FT positions; onsite
daycare/fitness/nature trails.
Apply in person at Personnel
Office (Carter Village Hall)
Mon. through Fri. from 9:00am
until 4:00pm, or fax
resume/credentials to 386-
658-5160.
EOE/Drug-Free Workplace
/Criminal background checks
required. For the most current
in job vacancies, call 386-
658-5627 or visit
www.acvillage.net
24 hrs./day, 7 days/week

FirstDay
COMMERCIAL LOAN
PROCESSOR
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position 'available for a
Commercial Loan Processor.
This position is responsible for
documentation and transaction
managementS, coordinates loan
closings and other .duties as
required. Preferred applicants
will have prior experience in this
field. Applications, may be
obtained from any First Federal
branch and submitted to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029, Lake
City, Fl. 32056. Equal
Employment Opportunity
Employer.


SFirstDay
FINANCE DIRECTOR
Hamilton County Clerk of court
is accepting applications for the
position of finance Director. Full
time management level position.
Responsibilities include, but are
not limited to: all bookkeeping
functions for County and Clerk,
payroll, budgeting, state and
federal reporting, compliance
with Florida Statues. Applicant
must be self motivated, possess
a positive a positive attitude and
be detail oriented.
Position requires a BA in
Accounting and working
experience in governmental
accounting. Starting salary
commensurate with experience.
SFor consideration 'all resume
must be submitted to the Office
of the Clerk of Circuit Court, 207
N.E.. 1st Street Room 106,
Jasper, Florida 32052 no later
than 3:00 p.m. on Friday,
September 12, 2008.
MAINTENANCE MAN WANTED
with knowledge of plumbing,
electric and carpentry. Tools
required. Transportation a must.
Drug free workplace. Call (386)
330-2567
OWNER OPERATORS
WANTED for over the road
flatbed positions.. Minimum. 2
years experience, and clean
CbL. We are also hiring owner
operators with their own trailers..
Call 386-590-1980 or 386-776-.
1620.
SEASONAL EMPLOYMENT
Suwannee River Peanut
'Company is accepting
applications for seasonal
employment for the 2008 peanut
season. Please apply in person
on the days of August 29, 2008
or September 5, 2008 from 1:00'
PM until 5 PM at Suwannee
River Peanut. Company located
four miles west of 1-75 on Road
#6.


BUSINESSES


RentaIlI.4ssixailnce
1,* 2,3. & .4 BR HC ,& Non-
HC Acsible ar nt

705 NNX Di i -L i -Oe k
386-364-7936
TDD=TY 711
E-A HL ii,.. t oet :!I. r1


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living
2 bedroom duplex.
Call 362-3110.
t.0 r..


^ i lTin e to Upgrade.





., i.




Y -. ---. T.
If you're searching for that perfect set of wheels,
look no further than www.nflaonline.com'

-" .p-'/ ,'f '. ,, .-*


Classifieds

work for

you so you


don't have


to do the

work


SERVICES


Rimnalaistu.-~anov ma% Ia, a.jabir
2 %L'".BR H -. "'rime'


W; Ns Dr eL O~.Fl-
386-364-7936
Eq ii, -m ....i.


127 Howard Street E.,
Live Oak, FL
Phone: 386-362-4539
Toll Free:
1-800-557-7478
Se hablo Espanol


DUILI i2N "UUi/ on 5 renceu acre, m vWisteria ,,oous. JUst runutes irom town on p\ecu
road. Energy efficient construction. Renai instant after r heater. Walk in pantry. Corian
kitchen counter tops. double sinks-, in M/B, his/her closets. Covered back porch, spa. out
building w/air conditioned room. Workshop & farm shelter. 5289.00-0. Call Lori Alban
208-4446. MLS#66819.


BEALTIFliL HOME completely furnished \%ith all amemties 2005. 2136 sqft. 3/2 on 5
complete\ fenced acres $267.500. Owner moniated. bring all reasonable offers Call Ric
Donoan. 5911-129S or Tonya Edwards 386-984-5446 MLS#67026
HOMESTEAD- Three bedroom. two bath 1.601)1 sq ft log home sits on 10 acres Home has.
big porches.. 25\S26 barn/iorkshop and is located on pated road. $250.0U0. Call Ronnie
Poole. 208-3175 MNILS6bS879 ,
GETAWAY FROM IT ALL. Nestled in a beauulul rustic setting at the end of a dead in lane
20 acres with older DWMH. In ground pool, pole barn or carport Small -storage shed. All
this for $199.500. Property\ has 2 wells and 2 ,-epties, and can be s-old in 10 acre parcel,
Bring us some offers. Call Carolyn Spilatore, 208-4828 or Rhonda NMiller. 208-5553
MLS#66570
HIDDEN OAKS...(98th Place), 2+ acres, wooded, just off paved road. $37,900. Call Glenda
McCall, 208-5244. MLS#63524
5 ACRES- Has 421' of paved road frontage. Owner will finance. $46,500. Call Ronnie
Poole, 208-3175 MLS#64987
OWNER MOTIVATED- Nice wooded lot between Madison and Live Oak not far from US
90. A nice wooded tract (2 acres) at a great value. $15,000. Call Sherrel McCall, 688-7563
MLS#65184
4 ACRES in a nice country setting. Close to the river with boat ramp access. Property
includes a 1997 SWMH with lots of potential. Priced right at $39,000. Call Ric Donovan,
590-1298. MLS#67739

www.oolerealty.com 472777
472777-F


FirstDay
EMPLOYMENT AVAILABLE
New to Lake Ciy or Live Oak'
Tireda ':i loi',ng Ic.r w.-,rk on your
. owrn' Poi,l,ons are available
INDUSTRIAL a11 Srm-is, must be
able to lift up to 701bs Drug
Screens & Backgro.urd Crec-cK
CLERICAL' All Levels
Fal resumrre to 386-755-7911 or
C311 38dc-755-1991 ior an appi
WAL-STAF Personnel
Special Notices









et S. -AI - -


ATTENTION
ADVERTISERS
CHECK YOUR AD
*PROOFREAD YOUR AD.
Any error must be reported
the 'first day ol puolicalorn
Should the error rnniliri
resp.:inse credit wl apply only
10 the thrsI run date.
The Sourr, Georgia Media
Group is nol hable lor any loss
or expense Ihai results from
publicallor, :r omissior,

Lawns/Landscaping

FirstDay
ALLIS CHALMERS 620: Tractor,
Beiiy Moer. 'Scrape Blade, 33.
hitch, Hydraulics Front & Rear,
$3100 386-963-2527.


R -- --- Linda Roddenberryl
Live iljst.:


386-755-6600
Toll Free 1-877-755-6600
540 W. Duval Street,
Lake City, Florida 32055
lindarodd@msn.com
www.hallmarklakecity.com


Ja.sper. FL 32052 A 'X.
2bed!I bath home on
1/2 acre lot in Lynn Lake. .
Priced to sell for $5Q,900. -'
Broker/Owner oF

BEST OF THE BEST REAL ESTATE COMPANY 2008
IHA--- W 7&-
[B gs^^ 386-755-6600
......Toll Free 1-877-755-6600
540 W. Duval Street,
Lake City, Florida 32055
erail
lh3llmark0i ,comcasi nel
G wwrw hallmarklakeoitv.com
,SE HABLA ESPANOL

FEATURED PROPERTY:
(GRHANDDADD\ I0kIS
( _.~_ _',_C ;e__e I 'He l i t. PR h
7im)"l H .me f. 1Pleri
0-. -4 See ip" .'[i*R\
tIheI I h ; ':" r,: i o["iu,1





p .,.r ,I r ..r.. i . ..' 1 d, iJ T p,:, .1
the spot for your mobile home or site Quigley 386- 935-2556
t0 ACRESust outsideofFt white. Clear $120,060"386 65445 Call Margaret
the 'spot for your mobile home o'r site Quigley 386-935-2.556


built. MLS 61128 Call Sharon Selder 386-
365-1203,
4 ACRES in the country at a great price!
$37,500 MLS 61628 Call Paula Lawrence


1.25 ACRES in great location for
Gainesville commuters! Save gas and
Gainesville taxes! MLS 64742 Call Julia
DeJesus 386-344-1590
.'.-- 1 F


Each Kit In
S2 AIl-Wea
* Successal
"Get Top
SPre-Sal


ciuee

cludes:
3ther Fluorescent "For Sale" Signs
Ful Tips
p Dollar for Your Used Car"
e Checklist


FirstDay
SEPTEMBER SPECIAL:
Centipede Sod @ $95.00 per
pallei Delivery & Installation
Available. Call Parker Sod at
386-963-5616

Business
Opportunities
FirstDay
AVON REPS NEEDED in Ihis
area. Start your o*n business
now: Start-up kit available Call
Cindy 850-843-5550 or toll free
877-203-4428.
Miscellaneous
CALL JUNK JOE: $250-$500
Cash for junk vehicles. Remove
any kind of scrap metal. FREE
PickrUp. 386-867-1396 or 386-
,755-9183

FirstDay
CARRIER A/C 3 1/2 TON:
Reverse Cycle, w/ strip heat.
;Comp set .'includes Thermo.
Removed from home 6/ 08 for
larger unit. AS IS. $50.0 386-
963-2527.

Home Care
FirstDay
WANTED HOUSEKEEPER
COMPANION, must like dogs
and have valid drivers license.
Salary is negotiable. Call 386-
935-2574 between 2-4pm

Vocational

Want to be a CNA?
Don'twait to wait?
Express Training Services
is now offering our quality
Exam Prep Classes in Lake
City. Class sizes limited.
Next class 9/8/2008.
Call 386-755-4401


LOOKING FOR A
HOME INSPECTOR?
Call

Dial's Inspection
Services
386-364-4434 or.
386-590-6534
Please visit our website:
www.suwanneevalleyinspections.com-




You can Reach
Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper
Network in Florida
and throughout
the Nation.
Call Nancy at

386-362-1734
416625-F


Ge, ou -Cr orSae-i


Sell Your Car for "Top Dollar"


* Vehicle Options Window Display
* E-Z Closing Forms
including Deposit Form & Bill of Sale


Run your Car For Sale classified in the Wednesday
North Florida Focus & Friday Suwannee Democrat
Classifieds and get the Car Kit for FREE.*
Deadline for placing your ad is Friday at 11:00 a.m.


'Not valid with the S18.95 special


I set oi wneets I







PAGE 2, SEPTEMBER 3-4,2008- NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


386-362-1734


LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call Suwannee County
Animal Control at 386-208-0072.
M-F from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.

Garage/Yard Sales

THE
" VTALDOSTA
I /DAILY
V TIMES

2008 FALL
YARD
SALE.
And MARKET

Saturday, October 11
7am -1 pm
Lowndes Co. Civic
Center
Hwy. 84 East, Valdosta
Call Today To Reserve
Your Booth Spacel

Inside Space $35 each
Outside Space $25 each
229-244-1880 or
1-800-600-4838, ask
for the Classified Dept.
Sell your yard sale items!
Arts & Crafts Vendors
Welcome!
Retail Stores Welcomel
A great opportunity to
clear out end-of-season
merchandise!

ESTATE SALE: 9/5 & 9/6 10-3
At 10326 70th St. Live Oak.
Furniture & Misc Items.
SPECTACULAR YARD SALE Fri
5th & Sat 6th 8-5. Corner
Westmoreland & Pearl. Rain or
Shine. Great bargains, Coll.
Glassware, Old .Jewelry, Hsld
Items, Furniture, Tools, Girl's
School Dresses.
YARD SALE: Sept 3rd-, 4th,
5th, 6th Antiques, Oak Singer
Sewing Machine, Curio Desk
Cabinet, Lamps, Silverware,
Coca Cola Items, Washer-Dryer,
glassware, Clothes, Pokemon &
Yu-Gi-OhI Cards & Games, Lots
more.
Follow signs at corner of CR49 &
CR252 or 129 & 252. Call 386-
364-6012 for early preview.


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE 1-800-525-4182
- .. . .-.* --. ->- -, ., .- -- -- !-.T: *.' . '" ", '-,".. - .i -. .& ff- a'Ia' ^'elal^,a-,* 'i Y;- EI tltr".


Apartments for Rent

FirstDay
LAFAYETTE APTS.
Available Now 3BD HC Non-
HC Accessible Apartments.
Rental assistance. Laundry
facility & playgrpund. We pay
water, sewer & garbage. 176 SE
Land Avenue, Mayo, FL. PH:
386-294-2720, TDD/TTY 711.
Equal Housing Opportunity.

Houses for Rent

FirstDay
$OWNER FINANCING$
O'Brien 3/2 DWMH $750
(2 Acres) 1 yr Option@
5% of purchase price
24 Hr Info Line 866-877-8661
HOUSE 3Bd/2Ba, in peaceful
country setting. Wood Floors,
CHA, covered carport, on paved
road, Jn-McAlpin. $800 mo 1st,
last, sec. 352-338-7670


Each Kit includes:
* 3 Bright 11; x 14" All-weather Signs
* Over 275 Pre-Priced Labels
* Successful Tips for a "No Hassle" Sale
Pre-Sale Checklist
Sales Record Form


Run your Yard Sale in the

Wednesday North Florida Focus &

Friday Suwannee Democrat Classifieds

and get the Yard Sale Kit for FREE.
Deadline for placing your yard sale is Friday at 11:00 a.m.
S, ,_416 1-F


HOUSE FOR RENT 3Bd/2Ba.
Brick, In Live Oak $750 mo, lst,
Last, Sec. Only serious inquiry
pis. Call 386-362-6556 or 386-
590-7765 Ask for Amanda

Mobile Homes for Rent

AVAILABLE 2 & 3 Bedroom-
Mobile Homes. Prices very
depending on size. Located In
Live Oak. Call 386-364-7660


FirstDay
DWMD, 3Bd/2Ba on 1 AcreM
land..
$650 mo, 1sti last, security. 3
miles from Live Oak ofi paved
road. W/D included. Very clean &
quiet. No Pets. 386209-2340

MH 2Bd/2Ba $450 mo. 1st &
Security. In Mayo. Six month
lease, Rental application
required. W/D hookup, Carport.
-386-294-2943.



The Meadows Aprs., 1600. S.E Helvenston
St. bve Oak FL32064 (386)362-6397
'. 2 & 3 Dedrooms CHIA patos, carpel &
mini blinds Laundry facitiy on property
Office hours 9 am to 5 pmn Equal Housing
Opportunity, Voice TTY access 711
& ..47687"9-F


MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT
AND 3 BEDROOM in White
Springs area: Contact Charles 3
386-867-2337 .

FirstDay
SWMH 3Bd/2Ba BETWEEN
LIVE OAK AND MAYO. $600mo,
1st, last, & sec. Located at 138th
St. off Hwy 51. 386-776-1559 dr
386-965-5586
RV/Camper Lots for
Rent ,
I WANT TO RENT YOUR 3
ACRES OR MORE, must have
water, electric & septic.
352-615-7679
Homes for Sale
FirstDay
BEAUTIFUL NEW
CONSTRUCTION HOME, on
over 2 acres with over 2400 sq ft.
4Bd/3Ba & Loft area. Many
extras priced far below appraised
value at only $235,000. Call
Carrie Cason, Westfield Really
Group
386-623-2806.
LAMONT, FL convenient to
Tallahassee, Madison, & Perry.
3Bd/2Ba, 1800 sq ft. Catnedril
SCeiling, Lots of Closets, 2
cleared acres, pond, 10 acres
total. $159,900. 850-838-1168
www.budchute.com


Wanted at the Suwannee County

Mall/Old Winn Dixie

Experienced Business Owners
for the following businesses:

Indoor Iiflatables/Jump Arena
Indoor Paintball
Arcade
SIndoor Laser Tag
Family Disco .
Indoor Skate Park
Snack Bar to service all
Batting Cages
Party Rental/Event Organizer
Go-Karts
Antique Dealers
Indoor Flea Market
...and more!!

Up to 12,000 square feet currently available-
for immediate occupancy.
Up to 6 months free rent for qualified tenants.
Please contact 727-580-1717





IREALTO0
529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389,
Evening 362-2990


(1) Hamilton Co: 4 acres on CR
143 with well, septic & service
pole, 10x12 storage, nice grass &
trees. Good Buy @ $47,500.
(2) Off CR 49 10 acres in grass
with scattered trees,'surveyed
into two 5 acre tracts, 3 sides
fenced. Priced to sell at $4,900
per acre.
(3) 161st Road: 9.82 acres in
grass with some nice trees with a
3/4 bedroom, 3-1/2 bath, CHIAC
home with fireplace, kitchen
furnished. containing
approximately 2350 sq. ft. heated
area, 10's30' storage, good area.
Reduced to $273,900.
(4) Off CR136: 5 acre partially
wooded some grass. Will work
for land home package. Reduced
to $39,900.
(5) Suwannee River: One acre
wooded tract on paved road with
107 fL on water, elevation survey
buildable, good buy @ $72,000.
(6) Off CR 349: 10acre wooded
tract with a two bedroom CH/AC
log home in excellent condition
cont approx. 1200 sq. ft. under
roof, 30'v40' pole barn. Reduced
to $175,000.
t7 Suwannee River: 1.6 acre
wooded tract with 100 ft. on the
alter, together wiih a 3 bedroom,
2 1/2 bath CH&AC DWMH cont.
approx. 1700 sq. ft. with
detached storage. Priced to sell
@ $145,000.
(8) Branford area: 15 acres In
good cropland, with county roads
and fence on three sides.
Excellent location near US 27 &
US 129. Bring all offers.
(9) Live Oak Area: New 3
bedroom, 2 bath CH/AC home,
kitchen furnished, parking pad1
sewer & water, will work for
S.H.I.P. 100 "c financing.
Reduced to $102,500.
(10) Dixie Co: Off CR 349, 8
acres (4-2 ac. tracts) wooded on
county road. $11,500 per tract.
(11) Industrial Park: 1.13 acre
corner tract good exposure.
Reduced to $34,500.
(12) 40 acres with 835 ft. on
paved road in 13 year old planted
pines. Priced to sell at Reduced to
189.600.
(13) Suwannee River: 4
contiguous lots on the water each
with 100' frontage, good county


road. Have 100 year flood. Good
buy C@ $60,000 per lot. Will
Divide.. ,
(14) Near City: 2 ac. with 3/2
home cont. approx. 1280 sq. ft.
under roof, kitchen furnished,
carport. $83,250.
(15) Luraville Area: Fly-in
Community 15 acre wooded large
trees, good county road. Priced to
sell @ $5,995 per acre.
k16) Hamilton Co.: 9 acres + on
CR 143 with a 3 bedroom 2 bath
CH&AC home constructed in
2002 containing approx. 2300 sq.
ft. under roof. 30'x50' barn, well
established fish pond, partially
fenced. Priced to sell @ $192,500.
(17) Hamilton Co: 5 ac. wooded
with survey. Secluded on county
road. Priced to sell @ $35,000.
(18) 3 Rivers Estate: One acre
wooded tract on paved road will
work for a land home package.
Reduced to $11,500. ;
(19) Suwannee Valley Estates: 4
acre wooded tract on county
road. $29,900.
(20) Off CR 136 East: 40 acre
tract partially wooded, some
grass small pond, fenced. Good
area $8,900 per acre.
(21) Suwannee River: Near
Suwannee Springs and Music
Park. Wooded lot with 145 ft on
the water, electricity to property
buildable adjoins SRWM. Priced
to sell @ $45,000.
(22) Off CR 51: 20 acres in grass
with some large oaks. well, septic
partially fenced, corner tract,
survey, $6,900 per acre.
(23) Madison Co.: 40 acres in 16
year old slash planted pines off
CR 255 good elevation. Good buy
at $4,500 per acre.
(24) Off 16th Street, 4 wooded
lots with utilities by property
$4,000 per lot.
(25) Branford area: four 1 acre
tracts on county road (2 wells &
septic) near the river, backs up to
SRWMD. Good.buy @ $45,000.
(26) Suwannee River home: nice
two bedroom two story CH&AC
home South of Branford, kitchen
furnished, beautiful view of river
from rear, screen porch. Good
area priced to sell @ $215,000.
(27) Farms of 10 Mill Hollow: 4
acres in grass/cropland with
scattered trees. $32.500. 4,-


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA-.


PAGE 2, SEPTEMBER 3 4,2008 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


XARD

S A IL Er-wr








* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS SEPTEMBER 3-4,2008, PAGE 3


386-362-1734


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LAND OWNERS! New 4 SPECIAL FIRST TIME BUYERS
Mobile Homes for Sale Bedroom turn key, ready to move PROGRAM 4 Bedroom 2 Bath
in on your land zero down on Land $699- Month 386-288-
FirstDay $499.00 month with approved 4560
credit
DWMH 3Bd/2Ba & .5 Acres 386-365-5129 LOW CREDIT, NO CREDIT? I
$89,900 between Live Oak & May Be Able to help You Buy A
Lake City POSSIBLE FINANCE WE PAY CASH FOR GOOD Home, To Find Out Call
ASSIST. Secluded, Storage USED HOMES 1990 OR 386-288-4560
Building, New Paint & Flooring. NEWER
Appliances, CHA, Large Master 386-365-5129 PRICE REDUCED TO LAND
Suite, Imm. Possession. 386- O SELL 28 OWNRS...2008 3 ero. 2
963-2222 or.305-586-5143. DESPERAE TO SELL 2L8k eoiyn -i uble.,de $S2 W0 do..,
_____ cres Between Lake,.City and S96.8 per monir, INCLUDES
FirstDaV ""'ldit!)ak Can Possibly Be Zorfed 4W* 4'rtinffcleps, and a'c
Commercial Make Offer 386-365-5370
USED SINGLE WIDE Mobile, 386-365-5129
Home $10,500. Call Rick: 386- MOVE IN READY..Live Oak City
752-1452 MUST SELL: 2 BED ROOM Limits, 1,711 So Ft 3/2 Screen


GREAT DEAL $500 Above
Factory Invoice On 3 Left Over
Fleetwood Mobile Homes Save
$1000'S Call Mr Mott 386-752-
3839.
2008 4Bd/2 Ba Mobile Home.
for $42,995. Includes Delivery,
Set Up, CHA, Skirting & Steps.
Call
Rick 386-752-8196
FirstDay
MOBILE 1992 24X44 2Bd/2Ba
Good Condition
$9,500 850-973-2353
1991 12x52 2Bd/1Ba
Sound Condition
$5,500 850-973-2353


Go to suwannee
democrat.comr
and look under
Local Happenings
for:

Calendar
of Events


Double and
single wide
mobile homes
for rent on
their own lots
in the
Live Oak area.

Ask for
Larry Olds

386-362-2720
420281-F

FOR RENT-
3BR, 2BA DWMH,
CENTRAL H/A.
FIRST MONTH'S
RENT PLUS
DEPOSIT TO
MOVE IN.
WATER, SEWER
& GARBAGE
INCLUDED.
NO PETS
386-330-2567
460183-F


MFG HOME On 1 Acre Fenced
& Landscaped on Paved Road
Workshop, Covered Parking
$459 Per Month With Approved
Credit 386-365-5129
MANUFACTURED HOME With
As Little As $500.00 Down. T4
See If You Qualify Call'
386-288-4560


















-FOR RENT-
2 or 3 BR
Singlewide
mobile home,
Central W/A.
First month's
rent plus deposit
to move in.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
No pets.
386-330-2567
460182-F



Mobile Homes
and
Land for sale.
Financed
by owner.

Ask for
Larry Olds.

386-362-2720


Patio 2 Car Carport, Huge 36 X
40 Garage, Fenced Call Cindy Acreage
386-365-5370
LAFAYETTE COUNTY -.
DOUBLEWIDE IN WOODGATE 10 AC,"Hwy 51 North of Mayo
Best Offer Over $35,000 For Near River, $74,900
-Quick Sale 386-365-5370 n


FOR SALE BY OWNER (5) New
Spec Homes in Upscale
Subdivision For Immediate
SLquidaion, Call Siev_3-3,6.-35-
8549 .
FOR SALE BY OWNER (14)
Used 2 Bedroom Doublewides
Several 3,4, and 5 Bedrooms
Must Go Make Offer
386-365-8549


Adoption
Pregnant? Considering adoption? A
successful educated woman seeks to adopt,
and needs your help! Will be a loving full-
time mom. Financial security. Expenses
paid. Call' Lisa. (800)900-2980, pin 00. FL
Bar# 0150789.
Announcements
Run your ad STATEWIDE! Run your
classified ad in over 100 Florida
newspapers reaching over 4 MILLION
readers. Call this newspaper or (866)742-
1373 for more details or visit: www.florida-
classifieds.com.
Auctions
AUCTION 144 Acres Divided Cherokee
.County, NC Tues., Sept. 9 6:00 p.m. This
bank owned property is surrounded by
national forest and conservation lands. Two
tracts totaling 144 acres, just off U.S. Hwys.
74,19,129. Access roads have been added-
for development. Bid online. or at the
auction. Sale Site: Holiday Inn Express,
Murphy, NC, Terms: Pay 10% down, 10%
buyer's premium. For detailed Information,
call (800)479-1763 or go online to
www.johndixon.com "NCAL#6397 John
Dixon & Associates Auctions-Marketing.
GIGANTIC 3-DAY Auction September
10,11,12,2008. Montgomery, Alabama.
Single, Tandem & Tri-Axle Dumps, Mack
Roll Off Trucks, Truck Tractors, Lowboys,
Crawler Loaders & Tractors, Excavators,
Motor Graders & Scrapers, Backhoes,
Rubber Tired Loaders, Articulating Dumps.
Compactors Grinders, Forklifts, Paving,
Skidders, Feller Bunchers, Log Loaders,
Farm Tractors. J.M. Wood Auction Co., Inc.
.(334)264-3265. Bryant Wood AL LIC
#1137.
REAL ESTATE AUCTION Waterfront
Lots on Kerr Scott Lake, Wilkes County,
NC. September 11 at 6 p.m. Iron Horse
Auction, (800)997-2248. NCAL3936'.
www.ironhorseauction.com.
Auto Donations
DONATE VEHICLE RECEIVE $1000
GROCERY COUPON NOAH'S ARC
SUPPORT NO KILL SHELTERS,
RESEARCH TO ADVANCE
VETERINARY TREATMENTS FREE.
TOWING, TAX DEDUCTIBLE, NON-
RUNNERS ACCEPTED (866)912-GIVE.
Building Supplies
METAL ROOFING. Buy direct from
manufacturer. Over 20 colors in stock,
several profiles to choose from. Quick
turnaround. Delivery available. (352)498-
0778, (888)393-0335.
www.GulfCoastSupply.com.
Business Opportunities
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn
$800 in a day? 30 Local Machines and


1 acres RV/Mobile Home lots,
Branford area, $15,000
SUWANNEE COUNTY.
6-acres. ,?ark hike, V .,
Near Airport, $49,900
LOW 60" OWr 0
OWNER FINANCING
1-941-778-7980/7565
www.landcallnow.com


Candy $9,995. (888)629-9968 B02000033.
CALL US: We will not be undersold!
Generate Extra Income in as little as 48
hours up to $3,500/wk or more. No
selling No MLM. Call: (800)659-7781 or
visit: www.mygoldplan.com/goodlife
OWN A RECESSION Proof Business
Established accounts' with the average
owner Earning over 200K a year call 24/7
(866)622-8892 Code X.
Employment Services
Post Office Now Hiring! Avg Pay $20/hr or
$57K/yr Including Federal Benefits and OT.
Placed by adSource not affiliated w/USPS
who hires. Call (866)713-4492.
Learn to Operate a Crane or Bull Dozer
Heavy Equipment Training. National
Certification. Financial & Placement
Assistance. Georgia School of Construction.
www.Heavy5.com Use code "FLCNH" or
call (866)218-2763.
Health
Do you Experience Anxiety? There are
answers in this book. Buy and read Self
Analysis by L. Ron Hubbard. Price $15.00.
Hubbard Dianetics Foundation (813)872-
0722 ~ E-mail cofstampa@gmail.com.
Help Wanted
Guaranteed Weekly Settlement Check. Join
Wil-Trans Lease Operator Program. Get the
Benefits of Being a Lease Operator without
any of the Risk. (866)906-2982. Must be
23.
Industrial / Commercial Telemarketing
Work from Anywhere. No investment
Required 'buildingpro.com
billh@buildingpro.com.
DRIVERS: CALL ASAP! $$ Sign-On
Bonus $$ 35-41cpmn Earn over $1000
weekly! Excellent Benefits Need CDL-A &
3 mos recent OTR (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com.
Homes For Rent
Venice New 1 and 2 bedroom homes from
$900 per month in active lifestyle
community with waterfront sites, resort
amenities, on-site activities and events.
(866)823-9860.
Homes For Sale
Bank Special! 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms,
large lot! Make offer! Gracious Living
Realty. www.graciousliving.org e-mail:
william@graciousliving.org (800)749-5263
Bank says "Sell, Sell, Sell!"


Autos for Sale
PONTIAC 1995 GRAND AM:
White, V-6 Engine, New Tires,
Awesome AM/FM, CD Stereo.
$1200 386-658-1909

Call 386-
362-1734 to
place your
classified ad.


Miscellaneous
AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for. high
paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid if qualified
- Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation
Institute of Maintenance (888)349-5387.
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal,
*Computers, *Criminal Justice. Job
placement assistance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified. Call (866)858-
2121, www.CenturaOnline.com.
NOW W.-NA'F ABLE! 2008 POST OFFICE
JOBS. $18-$20/HR. NO EXPERIENCE,
PAID TRAINING, FED. BENEFITS,
VACATIONS. CALL (800)910-9941
TODAY! REF #FL08.
Real Estate
East Tennessee affordable lake lots and
-hgmes minutes from the Great Smoky
Mountains on pristine Norris Lake. Call
Lakeside Realty @(888)291-5253 or visit
www.lakesiderealty-tn.com.
STEAL MY MARSHFRONT Owner
sacrifice!!! Drop dead gorgeous Marshfront.
My neighbor paid $389,900: I'll sell mine
for less than the bank repo's. My six figure
loss is your gain. $229,900. Call: (877)913-
5253.
VIRGINIA MOUNTAINS 2 acres on
mountain .top near New River State Park,
great fishing, view, private. $29,500 must
sell, call owner (866)789-8535.
Rocky Mountain Log Cabin 35+ Acres w/
Log cabin $289,900 Access to 1,000's acres
of Federal Rec. Land. Priatle setting w/
Ponderosa Pines.N Minutes to world- class
fishing & hunting. 1 Hour to skiing. Call
(866)OWN-LAND x4264.
Real Estate Auctions
FORECLOSED HOME ,AUCTION
FLORIDA STATEWIDE 600+ Homes
MUST BE SOLD! Free Catalog (800)616-
6716 USHomeAuction.com.




AN F
ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA

Classified j Display Metro Daily


Legal Services
ARRESTED? NEED A LAWYER?
Felonies... Misdemeanors State/Federal All
Criminal Charges Protect Your Rights A-A- f W e e
A Attorney Referral Service Statewide 24 W eek of Sept. 3, 20 8
Hours (800)733-5342. L )
416418-F A


NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS SEPTEMBER 3 4,2008, PAGE 3


-1-1 of


0 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


m : I -






PAE4 ETME -,08 OT LRD OU LSIIDMREPLC WNLOLNO EVN OT LRD N OT ERI


Volunteer now!
SHINE volunteers needed
in Suwannee County
SHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders)
needs volunteers in Suwannee County. A program of the
Florida Department of Elder Affairs providing free, unbi-
ased counseling to Medicare recipients needs volunteers.
Help seniors in your hometown community: answer
Medicare questions and resolve problems make informed
choices about their health insurance; save money on their
prescription medications; inform them of Medicaid pro-
grams for which they may be eligible. Comprehensive
training provided at no cost, mileage expenses reim-
bursed, basic computer skills needed. Bilingual persons
are encouraged to apply. Call the Elder Helpline today
toll-free at 800-262-2243 and tell them you'd like to
learn more about volunteering with SHINE.

Apply now!
Miss and Little Miss Suwannee Valley
Pageant
Suwannee River Woman's Club is now accepting ap-
plications for the 2008-2009 Miss and Little Miss
Suwannee Valley Pageant. Packets can be picked up at
Lisa's Salon in Live Oak. Info: Ashley Lundy, 386-362-
2326 or ashleylundy@yahoo.com.

Attention to graduates
of SHS class of 1998!
Members of the Suwannee High School class of 1998
are planning a 10 year class reunion. Contact information
is needed for all classmates. (Name, address, phone num-
ber and email address.) If anyone knows someone who
graduated with this class, please let them know their in-
formation is needed in order for them to receive an invi-
tation. Info: Prell Gwinn, glachrisha@hotmail.com or
386-209-2340.

Register now!
Descendants of Calhoun family plan
reunion in 2009
Descendants of the late Sarah Calhoun, Eva Calhoun
and Thomas Calhoun are invited to a family reunion to
be held next year. Info: misstheresamartin@yahoo.com
or predop@aol.com.

Notice!.
FDACS re-offers Southern Pine Beetle
Prevention Cost-Share Program
Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services Division
of Forestry is re-offering the Southern Pine Beetle Pre-
vention Cost Share Program to eligible non-industrial
private forest landowners Applications will be evaluated
on a first-received, first-served basis. The program offers
up to 50 percent cost reimbursement for pre-commercial
thinning, prescribed burning and mechanical underbrush
treatments in existing pine stands, and a $50 per acre in-
centive payment for landowners who conduct a first
pulpwood thinning. In addition, landowners may apply to
receive up to 50 percent reimbursement for the cost of
longleaf seedlings and $25 per acre in planting cost as-
sistance to establish a longleaf pine plantation. Qualified
landowners may apply for up to two approved practices
per year. The minimum tract size requirement is 10 acres
and funding requests may not exceed $10,000. Info/ap-
plications: 386-364-5314 or www.fl-dof.com.

Register now!
Sept. 2 thru Sept: 27
Suwannee County Emergency
Services to offer
CERT Academy training
Suwannee County emergency Services will hold
Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Acade-
my training Tuesdays and Thursdays beginning Tuesday,
Sept. 2 and will end with an overview and drill Satur-
day, Sept. 27 at Suwannee County Emergency Manage-
ment, Douglass Center Complex, 617 Ontario Avenue
SW, Suite 200, Li\ e Oak. Classes are free and open to
the public. Times for all classes will be 1830 until 2130
hours (6:30 'until 9:30 p.m.) except for last class which
will be announced later. Info/registration: Sharon or


Kimberly, 386-364-3405.

Register now!
Sept. 4
Florida Pecan Growers Association
to meet
The 2008 Florida Pecan Field Day and the annual
meeting of the Florida Pecan Growers Association will
be held Thursday, Sept. 4 at Suwannee Valley Research
& Education Center (SVREC) on CR 136 northeast of
Live Oak. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. Lunch provid-
ed, register in advance. Info/registration for lunch:
Suwannee County Extension office, 386-362-2771.

Make plans to attend!
Sept. 7-19
11th Annual Autumn Artfest
Live Oak Artists Guild will present the 11th Annual
Autumn Artfest from Sept. 7-19 at Suwannee River Re-
gional Library, 1848 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak. The exhibit
features the work of talented artists from North Florida
and South Georgia. A kick-off reception will be held.
from 2-4 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 7. Exhibit will be open dur-
ing regular library hours.

Register now!
Deadline Sept. 8,
Fall vegetable gardening workshop"
Suwannee County UF/IFAS Extension Office is offer-
ing a fall vegetable gardening workshop Wednesday,
Sept. 10 from 9:30 a.m-noon or Thursday, Sept. 11 fromn
6-8:30 p.m. for those who work. Site selection, seed se-
lection, irrigation calibration, small space alternatives,
soil solarization, micro-irrigation and cold protection are
some of the topics to be discussed. Please register by
Monday, Sept. 8. Info/registration: Carolyn Saft or Pam
Burke, 386-362-2771.

Register now!
Note change in date!
Sept. 8
Live Oak Senior Citizens to meet
Live Oak Senior Citizens will meet at 10:30 a.m.,
Monday, Sept. 8 at Exhibition II Building, Coliseum
Complex, 1302 SW Eleventh St., Live Oak. The group
meets the first Monday of each month. Escorted tours are
available, prices vary. Deposits due at registration, bal-
ance due before trip. Schedule: Alhambra Dinner The-
atre, Oct. 11; Biltmore Estate and Asheville, S.C., Nov.
3-6; Bahamas, Nov. 10-15; Radisson Opryland "A Coun-
ty Christmas," Dec. 15-18; _Canadian Train Odyssey,
May 29-31. Info: Walter and Charlene Howell, 386-842-
2241.

Register now!
Sept.,8-9
NFCC Sentinel Upstage Players
to hold auditions
North Florida Community College Sentinel Upstage
Players will hold open auditions for "All Over But The
Shooting," a murder mystery by Lee Mueller, at 7 p.m.,
Monday-Tuesday, Sept. 8-9 at Van H. Priest Auditorium,
NFCC campus, Madison. Open to NFCC students, em-
ployees and members of the community. The play will be
presented Nov. 13, 14 and 16 at Wardlaw-Smith-Goza
Conference Center. Info: Denise Bell, 850-973-9481 or
belld@nfcc.edu.

Register now!
Sept. 9, 11, 16 and 18
NFCC to offer EMT refresher course
An EMT refresher course will be offered at North
Florida Community College for licensed professionals
from 4-10 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays, Sept. 9, 11, 16
and 18. Students must attend all four days to get credit
for the class, The course will be held at NFCC's Career
and Technical Education Center, Building 13,.Room 13.0
on the Madison campus. Updates on HIV/AIDS and
CPR. Info/legistration: Mac Leggett, 850-973-1673.

Order tickets now!
Oct. 2-4
Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park
to host Suwannee River'Jubilee


The annual fall Suwannee River Jubilee Southern
Gospel will be held Thursday-Saturday, Oct. 2-4 at
Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak. Fea-
tured groups: Dove Brothers, Dixie Melody Boys, Black-
wood Brothers and the Dixie Echoes. Info: Tickets at ju-
bilee@dixieechoes.com; camping reservations at 386-
364-1683, music lives here.com.

Register now!
Oct. 4
Anna Miller Circle Fifth Annual
Fishing Tournament
Anna Miller Circle of Live Oak Elks Lodge 1165 will
sponsor its Fifth Annual Fishing Tournament in Stein-
hatchee, Saturday, Oct. 4 at River Haven Marina. Entry
fee: $30 per person. Weigh-in from 1-4 p.m. Prizes total
$1,500, plus free drawings and give-aways. Redfish: 1st
place-$500; Redfish: 2nd place-$250; Trout: 1st place-
$500; Trout: 2nd place-$250; Boat rental and lodging
available at local marinas. Fundraiser benefits handi-
. capped children of Florida. Info/entry forms: Terri John-
sonr, 386-776-776-2508, Helen Pratt, .396-364-4979 or
River Haven Marina & Motel, 352-498-0709.

Apply now!
Deadline Oct. 14 /
FWC to accept applications
for special-opportunity
spring turkey hunts
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion will accept 2009 special-opportunity spring turkey
hunt applications from 10 a.m. (EDT), Tuesday, Sept. 9.
Deadline midnight (EDT), Tuesday, Oct. 14. Cost: $5,
nonrefundable. Random drawing for permits. Permit fee:
$50 $175. ,Info/applications: FWC regional offices,
county tax collectors' offices or at any license agent,
MyFWC.com/hunting, www.wildlifelicense.com.

Notice!
Oct. 18
SHS class of 1968 to hold reunion
The Suwannee High School graduating qlass of 1968
is planning a 40th class reunion for Saturday, Oct. 18.
All graduates of the 1968 class (or anyone who attended
SHS as a freshman during the 1964-65 term but did not
continue on to graduate) are invited to attend. Info: San-
dra Robinson Starling, 386-776-1250, Gwen Tomlinson
Dixon, 386-208-0022 or email to gwendixon@wind- *
stream.net.

Register or buy tickets now!
Nov. 14-15
Stephen Foster State Park to host
Suwannee Dulci merRetreaj
The Florida Departnent of'EnvironmenttalProtectio's
Stephen Foster Folk Culture'Center State Park in White
Springs is now accepting registration for the Suwannee
Dulcimer Retreat to be held Friday-Saturday, Nov. 14-
15. Nationally recognized instructors. Tickets: Concerts
$10 each or two-day event $85. Registration late fee of
$15 after Oct. 15. Info/registration: Kelly Green, 386-
397-4478 or toll free 877-635-3655 or www.FloridaS-
tateParks.org/stephenfoster/Events.cfm.

Wednesday
Sept. 3
Early Learning Coalition AdHoc
Mini-Grant Committee to meet
Early Learning Coalition of Florida's Gateway, Inc.
AdHoc Mini-Grant Committee meeting will be held at
10 a.m., Wednesday, Sept. 3 at the "new" Coalition of-
fice, 1104 SW Main Blvd., Lake City. Info: Stacey Net-
ties, 386-752-9770.

Wednesday
Sept. 3
Office hours with State
Representative Debbie Boyd's staff
in Branford
A member of State Representative Debbie Boyd's (D-
Newberry) staff will be visiting Branford on the first
Wednesday afternoon of every'month so the citizens of
CONTINUED ON PAGE 8


Classitieds As Individual AsYoA.


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PAGE 4, SEPTEMBER 3 4,2008 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


0 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINECOM SERVING NORTH FL6RIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


t .


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* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Take


HfIealth to


We


From shopping for a wheelchair

to "fast and effective relief"

Sufferer relieved from acute diabetic nerve pain


A common complication of diabetes is
damage to the nerves that allow patients to
feel sensations such as numbness and
debilitating pain. This condition is called
diabetic nerve pain. While less than 3
percent of the general population is affected,
eventually 60 percent of diabetics will
develop some degree of nerve damage in
their feet or hands.
According to the American Diabetes
Association, 'more than 20.8 million
Americans have diabetes. By the end of the
decade, this
number is ,- ;
expected to rise
even more. '.. -,
Diabetic nerve -.- V: .
pain occurs when
high blood sugar
levels damage
nerves, producing
symptoms in
approximately 40
percent of
diabetics.
Mostly it affects
the hands and feet,
with symptoms of
numbness, ranging
from mild to severe, and pins and needles
pain. Limbs feel alternately burning hot and
icy cold, accompanied by sharp or dull pain
and muscle fatigue:
Treating diabetes may halt progression and
improve symptoms of the neuropathy, but
recovery is slow. The painful sensations of
diabetic nerve pain may become so severe it
can lead to depression in some patients.
This chronic painful condition is often
puzzling and frustrating for patients and
physicians, as it is difficult to diagnose and
seems to respond poorly to standard pain
therapies. Countless American diabetics


HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH,
D.D.S, P.A.
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak, FL
(386) 362-6556
1-800-829-6506
(Out of Suwannee County)


Y 01t1Foj aIoad A
* Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy
* Specializing In Arthritis Fibromyalgia Geriatrics Spinal &
Joint Pain Sports Injuries *Work Injuries Pediatrics
SManual Therapy Lymphedema
Locally Owned & Operated
Live Oak 208-1414 Medicare, Protegrity
Lake City 755-8680 Blue Cross, Av Med
Jasper 792-2426 Medicaid-pediatrics
Branford 935-1449 Workers Comp
Mayo 294-1407 Most Other Insurance Plans
A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency
Email: info@healthcorerehab.com
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Nor






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rything For Your
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y Owned & Operated
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have suffered from peripheral nerve pain for
years with no relief in sight until now.
A topical pain reliever Neuragen,
developed by Origin BioMed Inc., a
Halifax-based manufacturer of over-the-
counter topical drug products, is finally
providing relief for sufferers of nerve pain.
Neuragen is a topical preparation
scientifically studied since the early 1990s.
Recent clinical studies at Louisiana State
University have confirmed the efficacy of
Neuragen in the treatment of post-shingles
neuralgia and
.: other types of
nerve pain. It was
,,y Ffound to provide
substantial relief in
85 percent of
patients.
>.^. '. ^ :Neuragen is now
.*...- .:.-^ available
nationally through
select
CVS/pharmacy
stores and leading
pharmacies across
the country. The
9t, increased
availability of this
effective treatment option is welcome news
for patients.
Diabetic nerve pain sufferer, Ron Morrison
developed so much discomfort from his
condition in-his legs and feet that, he was
"seriously shopping for a wheelchair
because it was becoming too difficult to
stand and walk," he admitted. "I was
introduced to a wonderful new product at
my local pharmacy, Neuragen that provided
relief from this burning sensation in my feet
and have been using this product ever since.
It has returned quality back to my life.'"
More information on Neuragen and
neuropathy is available at
www. originbiomed.com and
www.diabetes.org.
To place an ad on this
Ophthalmology page, please call
GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D. Nancy at
522 South Ohio Avenue a 386-362-1734 Ext. 103


(386) 330-6260 or 1-800-435-3937
Ronald R Foreman, O.D.. P.A Frank A. Broom, Ill, 0.0
Kimbeily M Broome, O.D. Julie L. Owens, O.D.
North
Florida
EyeCare
Examination and Treatment of the Eye
Eyeglasses and Contact Lenses
PHONE (386) 362-5055 522 S. Ohio Ave.
FAX (386) 208-8660 Live Oak, Florida 32064
g g 4-


Heartland
REHABILITATION SERVICES
Sandy Laxton, PTA
Kalie Hingson, PTA
Lisa Garrett, PTA
AQUATIC THERAPY
Workers Compensation, Industrial
Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation,
Job/Workers Site Analysis Orthopedic/Sports
Medicine, Pediatrics Providers
Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS Providers
405 11th St., Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 364-5051


41tI=.


Your



Heart


NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS ~SEPTEMBER 3 4,2008, PAGE 5


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PAGE 6, SEPTEMBER 3-4, 200g NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


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Tips for Celebrating Parenting Milestones

FAMILY FEATURES


O nce upon a time, welcoming baby meant throwing
a shower for the expectant mom and sending a con-
gratulations card with a gift to the happy couple after.
the little one arrived. But today's parents are putting their own
personal spin on stork deliveries by spicing up many time-
honored traditions. Inspired by Web sites, blogs and e-zines
that are overflowing with an endless supply of information on
emerging decor trends and niche products, many first-time
parents add their own'personal flare to their celebrations as a
way to define and differentiate their new family as they
welcome a new member.
"We've noticed that parents-to-be of today are changing
traditions to be more relevant to their lifestyles," explained
'Angela Thompson, American Greetings trend spotter. "Just as
they celebrated their weddings in unique ways, it comes as no
surprise that moms and dads of today are putting their own
spin on starting a family and all of the celebrations that
surround this exciting milestone."

More Involved Fathers
The landscape of family dynamics has changed in recent
years, resulting in more dads being involved in both pre-baby
and new parent responsibilities. From attending showers
alongside the mom-to-be to arranging for paternity leave, dads
of today are nurturing their relationship with their new infant
son or daughter from the start.
"Recent national studies show there's a shift toward a more
egalitarian approach in many marriages, ranging from home-
making responsibilities to childcare to decision-making in the
family," Thompson said.


Creative Shower Ideas
When it comes-to welcoming baby, today, it's all about '
creativity and personalization. Thompson recommends
tailoring baby showers to the personalities and lifestyles
of the expectant couple. Here are a few of her favorite
ideas:

Couples Showers:
* Skip the pastels and stuffed animals and opt for a more
neutral setting for mixed gatherings. A shower barbecue,.
picnic or brunch would be a good choice for showers
where men will be invited.
* Theme the decorations around important life stages of the
young couple. Borrow a few comical baby, childhood,
high school,.college and wedding photos of the mom-and.
dad-to-be from their families and make color copies to
create fun centerpieces, invitations and mobiles,
* For a much-appreciated surprise gift, consider having
everyone chip in on a "babymoon" for the expectant
parents so they can relax and enjoy some time for them-
selves before the new baby arrives. Depending on budget,
-this can be as simple as a one-day spa getaway or as
lavish as a week-long resort trip. (Consider creating
"vouchers" redeemable for the babymoon so the couple
can determine the best time to get away.)


This trend extends to baby showers, too. What used to ,
be considered a "girls only event" where the expectant mom
was showered with gifts from her friends, is-increasingly
becoming a couples activity. Many new baby shower cards
reflect this trend, and are geared to the couple, not just the
expectant mom.
Thompson noted that several cards from the Target col-
lection illustrate this trend, including a cream-colored card
decorated with orange topstitching that reads, "4 out of
5 babies agree ...You'll be terrific parents." Another is
inscribed with the words: "mommy-to-be," "daddy-to-be"
and "baby-to-be" on the front, and the message inside
says: "I now pronounce you mommy and daddy-to-be,
and soon, you can kiss the cutie pie."

Planning vs. Being Surprised
Some couples prefer to plan every detail in advance while
others prefer the excitement and delight of being surprised.
Medical technology has.long made it possible to determine the
sex of the baby before birth, and today's advances even allow
for 3-D images of the baby's facial features and other details
while still in the womb, but research shows about 30 percent
of all prospective parents are opting to be surprised.
"From play dates and planned activities for the kids to .
jam-packed schedules at work, our lives can be pretty regi-
mented these days," Thompson said. "Waiting until birth can
be a fun way for prospective parents to dream and anticipate
together during the course of the pregnancy, and to heighten
the.wonder of the miracle on delivery day. And we've also
heard that some.parents are waiting so they can focus on
celebrating the birth of a healthy baby, regardless of the sex."
The nature-inspired hues of soft apple green, yellow, aqua
and melon that are abundant in home d6cor are also showing
up more frequently in tle nursery, and since they are gender-
neutral, these colors work especially well for parents-to-be
who are holding out until delivery day.
"Gender-neutral colors have several advantages,"
Thompson said. "Not only are they ideal for baby shower
decorations and infant clothing when the sex of the baby
is unknown, but they can make the transition from nursery
to toddler's bedroom much-easier by avoiding a complete
decorating overhaul. When you see the baby department



Pregnancy is no longer just about Mom and baby.
Dads are getting more involved in the excitement
-and anticipation of itall. As a result, gifts and cards
are now more widely available for parents-to-be,
not just the expectant mom.








Creating standout shower gifts is easy with a touch
of imagination. Check the Internet for creative
inspiration, and then add your own personal
touches. Try decorating gift boxes and gift bags
with a cascade of baby pacifiers, a contemporary
crisscross of ribbon or raffia, or perhaps attach a
baby toy, like a cute rubber ducky or rattle.



Second and Third Babies:r
Traditional etiquette says baby showers are for first
babies only to help new parents stock up on all the
necessities. However, the impending arrival of any baby
still deserves to be celebrated! For "repeat parents,"
consider having each guest prepare and freeze a special
meal, so that after the baby is bom, the couple will have
* more time to spend with their expanding family.
* Parents with more than one child will be exceptionally
busy. While they might not need more "things," they
would certainly appreciate the gift of extra time. Host
an informal gathering and ask each guest to create a
coupon redeemable for a personal service, like a free
babysitting session, or an "errand afternoon" to drop
off dry cleaning and pick up groceries.


and card racks at places like Target, you'll see just how
popular these colors are now for infant toys, apparel
and gifts."
Part of the joy for the 70 percent of couples who choose
to know the sex is shopping ahead for adorable outfits and
nursery accessories in pink or blue. "When friends and
family shop for the parents-to-be and the new baby, they
tend to look for items with little 'extras' that add a keepsake
quality to their gift, so many of the cards at Target this year
arc bejauiIil, el cnibliidiJ-.. inh pink and blue ginghamn or
Calico b ., '-quill labri.., JalA ,hed bulion decorj, ions, ,I eli
and saun ribt'b:,r e'. cen Ij. and cr,:icheied rrnis," addcd
Thviimpsoii. "iThc,'re Jdesgnrid io be sa'. ed in .crjpbook or
spc iul bo.. fur the ihrld .. look bc:.k n .ve rs floin nuoi and
f-el ihe l .c i[.:liii:nit and lu.c f'll bh, all ,hen the. % ere born


.














A growing number of parents-
to-be are opring to wait unril
birth to know the se\ of their
babik. Cute baby shower
cards, likr this fuT felt-
coiered one from Targti,
send well wishes in gender-
neutral colors.


First Babies:
. If the expectant mom or couple is into crafting, a
scrapbooking shower can be fpn and helpful at the
same time. Chip in on a blank scrapbook, and ask
each guest to bring a supply of papers, trims, appliques
and embellishments for creating a baby scrapbook.
In today's digital age, make sure Mom and Dad-to-be
are prepared with the latest equipment for capturing
every early moment by throwing a tech-themed shower.
Divide up the cost of a high-quality digital camera or
camcorder among the guests, but hold off giving it to the
couple until the end. As they unwrap the accessories,
like a carrying case, memory cards, discs and photo or
video editing software, be sure to capture all of the
action on the camera or camcorder as the photos or
video from the shower are an extra special gift. Not only
Will you be sure the couple can record everything that
happens with their new family, but you'll also know that
the photos or video from the shower are a permanent
reminder of their excitement at this special time.
i Pick a specific baby theme for your.shower like a
"baby bath time shower" or "baby safety shower" and
ask each guest to bring gifts supporting that specific
theme. This is an especially good idea for parents-to-be
who are having multiple showers.



Fabric embellishments, appliques and delicate
"extras" are popular on everything from infant
clothing to toys and even cards, including these
designs from American Greetings.


For the single parent, adoptive family
and other special situations:
"The great news about welcoming baby is that the rules
have changed to accommodate today's diverse lifestyles,
needs and personal preferences," Thompson said. "There
are single parents, adoptive parents and blended families
to consider when welcoming new babies. And there are
more twins and .triplets these days, too. The Internet is a
great resource for shower and gift ideas that will work for
a variety of special pregnancies."
"American Greetings has cards for every kind of parent
and family, and there are even cards for big brothers and
sisters so they don't feel left.out with all the excitement
over the new baby," Thompson said. "But don't forget
about offering words of encouragement during the last
few weeks leading up to the birth. We now have special
cards that acknowledge how stressful and uncomfortable
the last few weeks can be on moms but still celebrate the
excitement to come."
Target is also offering a series of baby cards that are
blank inside. These can be used for congratulating parents
on the birth of triplets, announcing milestones like baby's
first steps, sending thank-you notes for baby gifts or expres-
sing gratitude to friends and family for their support.
"The most important thing to remember these days
when welcoming a new baby is to consider the needs of
the couple, and then tailor the arrangements accordingly,"
advised Thompson. "Browse the Internet for inspiration,
and then add your own personal spin to shower theme or
gifting ideas. Stores like Target make it easy to stock up
on shower supplies and unique gift items in one handy
convenient location. With all the choices available today,
it's easy to create an event to remember."


PAGE 6, SEPTEMBER 3 4,2006 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


0 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA






These local businesses are here to take good care of-


4' 1 4


TO PLACE AN AD, CALL (386) 36273

DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT 2:00 PM
,., ,. ... ., _/.


*14
'4 ~'


'U


ABBEY MINI STORAGE
All New Units .
5X15 5X20 10X15 10X20 15X20
Units located at 607 Goldkist Blvd.
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak
3045300


I-


Trees, Trimmed or Removed Firewood
Licensed & Insured Free Estimates

TREE WORK
Bucket Truck and Climbing

963-5026


Drigger's Heating,
Air Conditioning
and Refrigeration
Residential and Commercul
18113 Eergr'en Me. 03860364-5734
Li'e Oak, FL 32064 Clark Dri2ger., O ter
License CAC025404 .....:,. E



I B-IN ORS, INC.
Complete Tree Service
J Licensed & Insured


Owners:
Keith & Glenda Hudson
9351 2 20th Streei
O'Bien. FL.32071 A
Phone 386-935-1993 "
Fax 386-935-3321 ,Ai.


ir~w


&C Metal Roofing
uli e $$$$$SAVE$$$$$
Quality Metal Roofing & Accessories At Discount Prices"


3' wide gahalume
3'wide painted
2'ivide 5-v


Cut to your desited lengths!
*Deliverv Senice A% Aiable
.4sk about steel buildings


Gulf Coast Supply & Mfg. Inc.
CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-393-0335


ONE STOP
SOLUTIONS
NEW HOME PREWIRE
ADD OR MOVE OUTLET
DIGITAL ANTENNAS
(386) 209-7286
or (386) 209-7623


47278- 47578


i~4~1J~WA


TO PLACE AN
AD, CALL'
(386) 362-1734.
DEADLINE IS
FRIDAY AT.
2:00 P.M.


Rick Lem ,t01 Il Ndu ,n H"
P0 B,, y t


BUILDERS SUPPLY
,,PECk LiZ[Ni_- [TiV i.,LIT'i fKODICTS S 5 LEs ND SERVICE
A l f".f. ;."-.. .r .,'. l J. I-. ]J Fllcpl .....Il l L L,', M li'tl S lT> ll.
Mobile: 18511 672-0397 SBS Office: (229) 242-4750
Fa: 851) 584- 4 SBS Fa: 229 2-6113



LIVE OAK
MINI STORAGE
* 5x15 5x20 10x15 10x20
CLIMATE CONTROLLED STORAGE
5x5*5x10*10x10*10x20
Units located on Gold Kist Road
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak 364-6626



LAKEWOOD
APARTMENTS
IN LIVE OAK

Quiet country living 2 bedroom duplex
Call 362-3110


II -


LUXURY LIMOUSINE
OF NORTH FLORIDA, INC.
let' t i l iti .p' rt a l r ai ro frlI l/it ordiial' "

LARRY PARKER OWNER
(386) 752-7754
22036 45th Dr Phone: 386-935-2540
Lake City, FL 32024 Cell: 386-288-2201


- .l-


Grindift.g


Bush Hogging Landclearing Hauling
Stump Removal Discing Fencing

BILL'S BACKHOE
& LAND CLEARING
~ FREE Estimates


12150 196th Terrace
O'Brien, FL 32071


-U


BaH
Woodworks
The Stair People
Interior/Exterior-Stairs/Stair Parts
All Types of Mouldings-Flooring/Siding
LET US RUN YOUR WOOD
Architectural Millwork/Shutters
Hardwoods/Exotic Woods/Plywood
Turnings 386-755-2556 Columns






.owa
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PLACEANAD

L (386) 3 624734k

-.DEADLINE

IDAY AT 2:00 RIM.
** *' *,. -o*. ,',' *'* ^**


'. . ..* :. ". *


IRON-FREE WELL
WATER COMPANY, INC.
625 SE 259th St.
Cross Citr. FL 32628
NO SALT SYSTEM!
Lo%%, lo\% maintenance. Takes out Iron.
sulfur, tannin and bacteria.
The no-nonsense system
1-352-356-0474 or 1-800-437-1128


I


NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS SEPTEMBER 3 4,2008, PAGE 7


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CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA,


454686-F







PAGE 8,SPEBR3-,20-NRHFOIA FOCS UCASFItE DMARKTPA E W.FANIECM-SIV OT LRD N OT ERI


Continued From Page 4
Branford will have an opportunity to meet personally
with staff and discuss issues. The staff member will be
available from 2-5 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 3 in Branford
City Hall.

Thursday
Sept. 4
Office hours with State
Representative Debbie Boyd's staff
in Mayo
A member of State Representative Debbie Boyd's (D-
Newberry) staff will be visiting Mayo on the first Thurs-
day morning of every month so the citizens of Lafayette
County will have an opportunity to meet personally with
staff and discuss issues. The staff person will be avail-
able from 9:30 a.m.-noon, Thursday, Sept. 4 in Lafayette
County Commissioners Board Room.

Thursday
Sept. 4
Office hours with State
Representative Debbie Boyd's staff
in Live Oak
A member of State Representative Debbie Boyd's (D-
Newberry) staff will be visiting Live Oak on the first
Thursday afternoon of every month so the citizens of
Suwannee County will have an opportunity to meet per-
sonally with staff and discuss issues..The staff member
will be available from 1:30-5 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 5 in
the Live Oak City Hall's Council Meeting Room.

Thursday
Sept. 4
Health Horizons to meet
Healthy Horizons, a chronic illness support group, will
meet a 7 pm., Thursday, Sept. 4 at Christ Central Min-
istries Church, 1550 Walker Avenue SW, Live Oak. All
who live with a chronic condition are encouraged to at-
tend. Group discussions, educational materials and
friendly support are provided to enable all to live to their
fullest potential. Open to all community members. Info:
Church, 386-208-1345.

Thursday
Sept. 4
Democratic Executive Committee
meeting
Suwannee County Democratic Committee'will meet at
7 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 4, at Live Oak City Hall, 101
White Ave. SE, Live Oak. All Democrats are invited to
join us in participating in the Democratic Process. Meet-
ings are held the first Thursday of each month.
Info/RSVP for dinner: Monica, 386-330-2036.

Friday
Sept. 5
Free Gospel Concert in Lee
Free Gospel Concert will be held at 6:30 p.m., Friday,
Sept. 5 at Lee Worship Center Church, 397 Magnolia
Drive, Lee. The event is held every first Friday of the
month. Proceeds benefit the building fund of the church.
Bring a covered dish, meat will be provided. If you Want
to get on the show, call Allen,. 850-971-4135 home, or
850-673-9481 cell.

Friday
Sept. 5
Alapaha River Band of Cherokee Inc.


Free Food Service Pantry
Alapaha River Band of Cherokee, Inc. Free Food Ser-
vice Pantry, a non-profit organization, will give away
free food to anyone in need from noon-3 p.m., Friday,
Sept. 5 at 3589 NW 28th Terrace, Jennings. Info: Chief
Joan Nelson, 386-938-4625 or 386-938-3609, or
www.thealapahariverbandofcherokeeinc.com.

Saturday
Sept. 6
Bluegrass Pickin in Trenton
Suwannee Valley Bluegrass Pickin will be held at 6
p.m., Saturday, Sept. 6 at Otter Springs Resort Lodge,
6470 SW 80th Ave., Trenton. It is free to the public.
Info: Cloud Haley, toll-free 800-990-5410.

Saturday
Sept. 6
Stephen Foster State Park-First
Saturday Coffeehouse
The First Saturday Coffeehouse will be held at 7 p.m.,
Saturday, Sept. 6 at Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park in White Springs. Songs, stories, music or po-
etry may be performed at this open stage night held in
the park auditorium. Coffee and desserts available for
sale. Fees: This event is free! Info: 386-397-4331 or
www.FloridaStateParks.org/stephenfoster.

Saturday
Sept. 6
Neveils, Nevils, Carroll, Jowers family
reunion
The Neveils, Nevils, Carroll, Jowers family reunion
will be held from 10 a.m. until evening, Saturday, Sept. 6
in pavilion #3 by the playground at Suwannee River
State Park. The park is 8-10 miles west of Live Oak off
US 90. This is potluck so bring your favorite dishes and
plan on sharing with everyone. Plan on eating around,
noon. Bring cameras, family photos and stories to share.
Copier available. Entrance fee: $4 per car. Spread the
news to your family. Info: Maria Neveils, 602-276-3161
(home), 480-287-1336 celll) or marlaneveils62@myfam-
"ily.com or Bill Neveils, 706-374-2951 (home), 770-656-
2737 (cell) or bneveils@tds.net.

Monday
Sept. 8
Suwannee Chapter of the Florida
Trail Association to meet
Suwannee Chapter of the Florida Trail Association
(FTA) will meet from 7-9 p.m., Monday, Sept. 8 at
Suwannee River Water Management District (SRWMD)
on US 90 and CR 49, 2 miles east of Live Oak. The pub-
lic is welcome! Cindy Johnson of SRWMD will present
"Spring Heartland" video and discuss Ichetucknee Part-
nership. Update on upcoming hikes and trips. Info: chap-
ter chair, Sylvia Dunnam, 386-362-3256,
dunnams@windstream.net or Stephanie Sikora, 386-208-
1381.

Monday
Sept. 9, 11, 16 and 18
NFCC to offer EMT refresher course
An EMT refresher course will be offered at North
Florida Community College for licensed professionals
from 4-10 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays, Sept. 9, 11, 16
and 18. Students must attend all four days to get credit
for the class. The course will be held at NFCC's Career
and Technical Education Center,-Building 13, Room 130
on the Madison campus. Updates on HIV/AIDS and
CPR. Info/registration: Mac Leggett, 850-973-1673.
Sept. 12 '
Millennium
Nights
Millennium Nights will be held from 7-10 p.m., Fri-
day, Sept. 12 at Millennium Park, downtown Live Oak.
Featuring country/western, gospel, bluegrass and
karaoke. Bring your lawn chair and enjoy the fun. Food
and drink available. No admission charge. To be on the
program call Herold White, 386-362-3263 or 386-590-
0129.









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Iik jofhthrthan www.nflaonline.com


Note change in date!
Sept. 13
Will and Emma Clark family reunion
The Will and Emma Clark family reunion will be held
Saturday, Sept. 13 from 11 a.m.-4 p.m: at Clayland Bap-
tist Church recreation center. All relatives and friends of
Brian, Lucius, Cleveland and Ernest Clark, Ola Clark
Baxter and Lottie Clark Sapp are invited to come and
bring a covered dish and a drink to share. Please bring
any pictures and historic information to share with all.
Hope to see you there for lots of fun and fellowship.
Info: Dorie Peterson, 386-208-5159.
Sept. 13
LCCC 2008-2009 Lyceum Series
to present The James King Band
Lake City Community College 2008-2009 Lyceum Se-
ries will present The James King Band at 7:30 p.m., Sat-
urday, Sept. 13. James King in Levy Performing Arts
Center, Lake City. Enjoy traditional, hard mountain,
foot-stomping and inspirational bluegrass. Call the box
office at 386-754-4340 for a new brochure, season ticket
prices. Info/Lyceum Series: Mark Kirby, 386-754-4274,
kirbymn@lakecitycc.edu.
Sept. 15,
Live On Stage Theatre Group to hold
auditions
Live On Stage Theatre Group will hold auditions for
"Christmas Thieves" by Greg Oliver Bodine from 7-9
p.m., Monday, Sept. 15 at Live Oak Artist Guild.
(LOAG) Gallery and Cultural Arts Center, 213 Second
St. NW, Live Oak. Info: 386-364-5099.
Sept. 15,
St. Luke's Busy Hands for Babies
to old Dollar Daze.sale
St. Luke's Busy Hands for Babies will hold Dollar
Daze sale from 7 a.m. 2 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 13 inside
at St. Luke's Episcopal Church, 1391 SW Eleventh St.,
Live Oak, across from the Garden Club. Clothing, books
and many real bargains. Come and see how far your dol-
lars can go.
Sept. 16
Live Oak Garden Club Night
Bloomers invite public to meeting
The Night Bloomers group of Live Oak Garden Club
cordially invite you to attend its monthly meeting at 7
p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 16 at the clubhouse and enjoy a pro-
gram on "Fall Gardening." Guest Speaker: Linda Lan-
drum, North Florida Research & Educational Center.
Info: Teresa Lewellyn at 386-842-5972.
Sept. 19 .
Alapahq River Band of Cherokee Inc.
Free Food Service Pantry ,.
Alapaha River Band of Cherokee, Inc. Free Food Ser-
vice Pantry, a non-profit organization, will give away
free food to anyone in need from noon-3 p.m., Friday,
Sept. 19 at 3589 NW 28th Terrace, Jennings. Info: Chief
Joan Nelson, 386-938-4625 or 386-938-3609, or
www.thealapahariverbandofcherokeeinc.com.
Sept. 19
SHS Band offers barbecue chicken
lunch/dinners/slabs of ribs
Sound of Suwannee Marching Band will hold a barbe-
cue lunch/dinner from 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Friday, Sept. 19 in
the parking lot of Cheek and Scott Drugs, Inc., South
Oaks Square, US 129 South, Live Oak. Featuring Porta-
Pit BBQ & Catering, Valdosta, Ga. Me nu: 1/2 chicken,
baked beans, potato salad and Texas toast. Cost: $7. Slab
of ribs: $18, available after 4 p.m. Proceeds will help
purchase new band uniforms. Delivery of five or more
dinners. Info: Shellie Carroll, 386-208-2112.


CONTINUED ON PAGE 11


and

rj Market

Saturday, October 11
7am-1 pm
Lowndes Co. Civic Center
Hwy. 84 East, Valdosta

Call Today To Reserve
Your Booth Space!
Inside Space $35 each
Outside Space $25 each
Sell Your Yard Sale Items!
Arts & Crafts Vendors Welcome!
Retail Stores Welcome!
A great opportunity to clear out
end-of-season merchandise!

Call The Classified
THE Marketplace
DOSTAL 229-244-1880
TIMES 1-800-600-4838

^468947bs


PAGE 8, SEPTEMBER 3 4,2008 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


4559iO-F


N CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SEAVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGfA


I"





M ULOCir AiI CU ivmnrkFTPI AfL E:- WWW N141LMAOIV INCOME SEVIG-NRT-FLRIAAD-OUT-GORGA.ORH.FORDA OCS .SETEMER3.-.208,PAE


ivI


With


Parkin son's-
P rl


Disease


Managing exercise, diet and

medication for an active life


FAMILY FEATURES
n estimated 1 million Americans live with Parkinson's disease (PDI -
an age-related degenerative neurological disorder. Many struggle
with tremors, stiffness, slowness of movement and impaired balance
According to the National Parkinson Foundation, although the a' er.we
age of onset is 60, it is estimated that five to 10 percent of all persons
with PD are diagnosed prior to age 40. The cause of PD is unknown, and there is
presently no cure; however there are treatment options to help manage the sympionms.
Dr. Ramon L. Rodriguez, director of clinical services at the University of FlJondj 's
Movement Disorders Center, sees Parkinson's patients on a daily basis. While he is
familiar with the challenges they face, Rodriguez believes these patients can experience
a fulfilling life.
"Even though there is no cure for Parkinson's," Rodriguez says, "it is possible for
patients to learn how to live well through a combination of activities and tree nrne tis I liat
can help control the symptoms of the disease."
Depending on the individual patient's history and the progression of the disejas. a persri's
physician may prescribe any of several medical or surgical treatments available jnd JI.,w % ill
emphasize the importance of an ongoing commitment to regular exercise, rest and proper diet.
There are several medications available to treat Parkinson's disease, including once-dJail
medications that can help people manage the symptoms of the disease.
Many people living with Parkinson's have found both traditional and create w v.a s oi sucCesv.t ull,
manage the disease and live their lives to the fullest. According to the Natiobal Parkinmson Foundaiion
Education Series resource guides, the following are a few tips on managing PD.


* Exercise Regularly
If you have Parkinson's disease, exercise is
eirremel imp.prtanit. Recent research shows
that regular exercise can help people with PD
stay more flexible, improve posture and make
overall movement easier.
*Eat Right
People with PD are at an increased risk for
malnutrition. Yet, with attention to diet, people
with PD can feel better, ward -off nutrition-
related diseases and prevent hospitalization.


* Find the Right Treatment for You
Medical research has provided us with
numerous medications which, when used
alone, or more often in proper, combination,
can provide significant relief of the symptoms
of Parkinson's disease. Intelligent use of these
medications can enhance a patient's quality
of life.
* Make Time for Rest
Sleep plays a vital role in maintaining mental
health and performance for:all human beings.
It is especially important for individuals with'
PD, who require significant levels of energy
to function at their greatest ability.


Increased PD Incidence


Shown in Hispanics

A study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology in 2003 examined how Parkinson's disease
(PD) varies by age; gender and race/ethnicity. Like previous studies, it found that the rate of PD rises
. sharply as Americans age. However, the study also.revealed that PD, incidence was the highest among
both Hispanic men and women of all the groups studied.
According to Dr. RamonL. Rodriguez, director of clinical services
HaCia at the University of Florida's Movement Disorders Center, Hispanics
adelanteoften do nothave access to the information they need the most.
d la l "Unfortunately, there are not a lot of resources for Spanish-
2'ediddn speaking patients dealing with Parkinson's disease," Rodriguez says.
"Some Parkinson's advocacy groups and companies, such as Teva
SI Neuroscience, Inc., currently are launching Hispanic initiatives
designed to educate.and increase awareness about PD through the
development of Spanish language resources."
"Moving Forward," Teva's practical guide to living with PD,
recently was translated into Spanish. The Spanish version is titled,
"Hacia adelante," a comprehensive tool that outlines what to expect
when a person is diagnosed with PD, where to find help and resources,
how to explain Parkinson's to family and friends, and other useful
information. To obtain a free copy of the resource guide, ask your
.. ... ',p-,.', physician to contact their Teva representative, or visit
con i entermedad de P rkinon www.parkinsonshealth.com.
.U21St r


Art for a Cause
lena Tuero was only in her mid-20s when she began experi-
encing disturbing symptoms, such as loss of balance and
tremors. By 27, she was diagnosed with young-onset
Parkinson's. For the next 17 years, Tuero fought a losing battle
with the disease as it slowly stole her most basic capabilities, like
walking, dressing and feeding herself.
Then, in 2003, Tuero underwent a successful surgical procedure,
and, with a combination of PD medications, is now better able to
control her symptoms. As a way to express her emotions at the
time, Tuero picked up a paintbrush to release them on canvas -
and hasn't stopped since.
"When you have Parkinson's disease, the idea of picking up a
paintbrush is as remote as entering a figure skating competition,"
Tuero explains. "I don't know how long this will last, or what the
future holds for me, but I'm determined to cherish every second
of my life."
Today, Tuero has completed more than 100 paintings, which she
donates to help raise money for a cure for Parkinson's. She also
created an informational Web site on Parkinson's disease in Spanish
for people living with PD (www.maldeparkinson.org). The site
includes the inspiring story of how Tuero has overcome struggles
with PD to live a full and active life, as well as links to other
Parkinson's sites, publications and information of interest.


08289401/080207


Parkinson's Disease
Information Online
General information:
* Information on signs, symptoms and
Iteatmeuts iu .:pijrki vsonsheallh.com
* American Parkinson Disease Association
-- I wr aptlaparkAunin.org
* Nanonal Parkinson Foundaution -
111n'ill tiI h son. o01
a Parkmson's Disease Foiundtion -
iwai pdl org
* TIh' Parkinson Alluince -
it it-i park4isonalhance oig
Information available in Spanish:
* National Library of Medicine online -
wil nlm.nih gormetdhneplus, 'panih'
parinsonsm.dicaew hnml
* Lintis io Spansli-ljnguage information
about PD, current publications and oiher
iiinfoiirmion in Spjnisih -
vwir' pdblogger ,'om
* rree guide to10 liing with PD in Spanish,
"HacIa adeljnte" and English, "Moving
-ormard" -
witparkins.m.heallkh comin TakeControl'
* Spanish larigujge se created bh Elena
Tiicro -w iin uMdldeparknsomn.or


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I.




AIE


shopping ..>


FAMILY FEATURES
It's out there, it's easy and, believe it or not, it saves you money. Online shopping is a booming business that has witnessed consumers spend
more than $34 billion in 2007. While most people turn to online shopping for the sake of convenience, savvy shoppers have discovered that
many retailers now offer savings for online purchases through the use of coupon codes. The key: finding the codes.
In 2003, entrepreneur Scott Kluth decided to find the codes for consumers by creating CouponCabin.com, a Web site that houses a database
with thousands of coupons and deals from over 950 online stores across the country. By using CouponCabin.com to connect shoppers with
coupon codes from popular merchants, Kluth has helped millions of consumers save time and money on their online purchases. With five years
of experience in online couponing, Kluth has learned a series of tips to help you save the most money.


Money saving tips


for online shopping

Understanding coupon codes
Coupon codes are not often found on a given retailer's Web site; rather, they
are usually given to repeat customers as a means to reward frequent purchases.
Online coupon codes are specific to a given merchant and often have terms that,
exclude certain brands or products. Codes tend to have a specific offer attached,
such as free shipping or a 15 percent discount for an entire order, and are usually
applied automatically to a purchase.


Finding the best coupon codes
* Ensure that the coupon site allows you to
search by store to view an alphabetical
list of a% ailable merchants, or b\ cate-
gory :o find a deal on a specific
item.
* Be conscious of shipping and
handling fees, as in many
cases a free shipping discount
could be of greater sa% wings
than a lI or 15 percent oft
coupon
i* Seek out specialty coupon
codes that are geared to a
specific audience le g.,
mothers of young g children)
for those unique purchases
as retailers %kill focus
on their market. Other
special) sites (e.g ,
Restaurant.comi % ork
directly ~ ith coupon sites
like CouponCabin.com
to offer exclusive
savings.


Using online s
coupon codes
Coupor codes are eas s
to use, pamcularl. asq
many online retailers
will prompt the con-
sumer to enter the code so
during the checkout process. 4
After finding a coupon on a .. -
Web site. shoppers should click
on the associated link to shop at
the merchant's sNite, It Js at the checkout
that consumers will be prompted to enter their coupon code, sometimes also
referred to as a "promotional code."
It is important to verify that the savings afforded by the coupon has been
applied to the shopping cart before completing the order. Be mindful that
coupon codes often have expiration dates.
Maximizing savings with coupon sites
A reliable and innovative coupon site should:
* Be easy to navigate
* Be updated throughout the day
* Test the coupon codes to ensure accuracy
* Not require you to provide any personal information
* Provide reviews for the merchants listed on the site
n Offer a weekly newsletter containing the top coupons


Security tips for online shopping


A recent online shopping report released by Pew Internet
& American Life Project showed that 78 percent of people
polledfild online shopping convenient and 68 percent
agree that it saves them time. Despite this high propensity
to shop over the Internet, three-quarters of people surveyed
still do not feel comfortable releasing personal and/or credit
card information over the Web.
To maximize personal security when shopping, consider
the following precautions to ensure online transactions are
as safe as possible.

Shop at secure Web sites
Check to see if a Web site is secure by
looking for the locked yellow padlock on
the status bar of the site. The presence of
this padlock demonstrates that site uses
specific encryption methods to ensure
that hackers cannot steal personal and/or
credit card information.


Research the Web site before
placing an order
Try to do business with companies that you
know and trust. If a company is unfamiliar to
you, make 'sure you do the appropriate back-
ground research to know as much as you can
before buying their products..


Check the Web site address
Before submitting any personal or payment details to a host
company, look at the rectangular window at the top of the
screen to \ erify that the Web site address is correct and that
.\ou are dealing with the right company.

Read the privacy and security policies
Consumers should make a point of searching for and read-
ing through the privacy policy before submitting personal
information to an online retailer. Any reputable e-commerce
site offers information about how the company processes
orders. if the company intends to share information with a
third part) or affiliate and how the affiliate intends to use
this information:

Never release Social Security number
It is important to understand that consumers should not
release a Social Security number when shopping online.
Merchants do not require this information when processing
online orders, and releasing this information puts the con-
sumer at risk for identity theft.

Disclose the bare minimum
While there is a certain amount of personal information
required to process an online order (e.g., name and address),
online merchants often try to obtain further details about
personal lifestyle and annual income. As this information is
primarily used to target consumers for marketing purposes,
it is important to refrain from entering such information to
avoid spam, direct mailings and solicitor calls.
Keep passwords private
Most reputable e-commerce Web sites require that users log
in with a username and password before placing an order.


Maximize safety by choosing a password that is at least
eight characters long, includes letters and numbers and is
not based on personal information, such as:
*: Date of birth
Mother's maiden name
Driver's license number
Social Security number

Pay using a safe method
The safest way to shop online is with a credit card, as
consumers are protected under the federal Fair Credit
Billing Act. If a problem arises, shoppers have the right to
dispute charges' to. a credit card and withhold payment for
-the sake of a creditor investigation. In the event that an
investigation reveals that a credit card was used without
authorization, consumers are only responsible for covering
the first $50 in charges. It is helpful'to restrict online
payments to one credit card to make it easier to detect
wrongful credit charges.

Consider single-use card numbers
To maximize security when shopping online, some credit
card companies have started to offer single-use card numbers
that can be used at an online store. These randomly gener-
ated.numbers can only be used at a particular Web site
and for a limited period of.time. In the event that a hacker
obtains personal credit card information during the submis-
sion process, they will not be able to use this number for a
purchase anywhere else.
While the single-use card seems like an ideal solution, it
may still be difficult to use them in certain shopping situa-
tions. For example, consumers purchasing movie or airline
tickets are often asked to show a physical credit card to
complete the transaction. In this situation, showing the
vendor a physical card when a single-use virtual number
has been used will not confirm the purchase.

.Pay attention to shipping details
According to the law, a company must ship a consumer's
order within the timeframe stated in its advertisement. If no
time frame is outlined, the retailer must adhere fo one of
the following:
Ship the order within 30 days of purchase
Provide the consumer with an Option Notice prompting
the consumer to either cancel and receive a refund for the
order or agree to the delay

Print copies of orders
After placing an order, the host site should generate a
confirmation page that includes the following information:
Cost of the order
Customer information
Product information
Confirmation number
It is important to print at least one copy of this confirma-
tion page in addition to the page that outlines the host site's
company information (i.e., company name, postal address,
phone number, legal terms and conditions as well as the
return policy). Consumers should keep these printouts for at
least the period covered by the return and/or warranty policy.


d


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Continued From Page 8

Sept. 19-20
Suwannee County Historical Museum
Association to present Railroad Days
Suwannee County Historical Museum Association will
present Railroad Days Friday-Saturday, Sept. 19-20. Fri-
day events: beginning at 8 a.m., old-fashioned farmer's
market and quilt show; LifeSouth blood drive; field trip
tours; Suwannee County Jeopardy games; and at 6 p.m.,
oral history video presentation; Saturday, 8 a.m.-6 p.m.:
arts and crafts vendors; classic car show; local entertain-
ment; children's activities; book signing opportunities by
local authors; historic tours and programs; and drawings.
for several door prizes. Info: 386-362-1776 or
www.suwanneemuseum.org.

Sept. 19 and Oct. 17
Citizens for Positive Progress to host
candidates
Citizens for Positive Progress will host several candi-
dates for local offices at its monthly meetings on the fol-
lowing dates, Friday, Sept. 19 and Friday, Oct. 17. The
meetings are held at American Legion Post #107 located
at 10726 142nd St., McAlpin, 8 miles south of Live Oak,
just off US 129. A "potluck" supper will begin at 6:30
p.m., followed by the meeting. Everyone is invited come
to these meetings and hear what these candidates have to
say. This is an excellent opportunity for you, the people
of Suwannee County, to meet the candidates face to face
and make your decision on who you want to vote into.
the respective offices. Bring your family members,
friends and neighbors. Be informed!
Sept. 20
Birding walk at Suwannee River State
Park
Friends of Suwannee River State Park' will hold a bird-
ing walk Saturday, Sept. 20 at Suwannee River State
Park, US 90 West, Live Oak; meet at park 8 a.m.; bring
water, binoculars and favorite bird ID book; wear com-
fortable shoes or boots. Park entrance fees apply. Info:
Membership Chair Walter Schoenfelder, 850-971-5354,
wbs@surfbest.net or 386-362-2746, fosrsp@surfbest.net.
Sept. 20
Suwannee River Bluegrass Association
to hold potluck dinner
Suwannee River Bluegrass Association will hold its
third Saturday of the month potluck dinner at 6 p.m.,
Saturday, Sept. 20 in the "Pickin' Shed" at Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park, US 129 North, Live Oak. Come
with your instrument or just listen to the music. Info:
386-362-2456.
Sept. 26
Millennium Nights
Millennium Nights will be held from 7-10 p.m., Fri-
day, Sept. 26 at Millennium Park, downtown Live Oak.
Featuring country/western, gospel, bluegrass and
karaoke. Bring your lawn chair and enjoy the fun. Food
and drink available. No admission charge. To be on-the
program call Herold White, 386-362-3263 or 386-590-
0129.

Sept. 27
Fall Festival at St. Francis Xavier
Catholic Church in Live Oak
St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church will hold its annual


Allen Boyd (D-North Florida) Staff Branford third
Wednesday; Town Hall, Council Chambers; Branford; 1-
2:30 p.m.; trained staff visits to assist constituents; Info:
202-225-5235, www.house.gov/boyd/. .
Allen Boyd (D-North Florida) Staff Live Oak third
Wednesday; City Council Chambers, City Hall, 101 SE
White Ave., Live Oak; 9:30-11:30 a.m.; trained staff visits
to assist constituents; Info: 202-225-5235,
www.house.gov/boyd/.
State Representative Debbie Boyd's staff holds office
hours in Branford, Mayo and Live Oak A member of
State Representative Debbie Boyd's (D-Newberry) staff
will visit Branford in Suwannee County on the first
Wednesday afternoon of every month and in Mayo in
Lafayette County and Live Oak in Suwannee County on
the first Thursday of every month so the citizens will have
an opportunity to meet personally with staff ahd discuss
issues. Schedule- Branford 2-5 p.m., Wednesdays in
Branford City Hall; 9:30 a.m.-noon, Thursdays in
Lafayette County Commissioners Board Room; and 1:30-
5 p.m., Thursdays .in the Live Oak City Hall's Council
Meeting Room.
Alzheimer's Support Group third Thursday (except
December) at 3:30 p.m.; Good Samaritan Center, Dowling
Park. Info: Angie Paarlberg, 386-658-5594.
American Legion Post 59 third Tuesday, 7 p.m., Sis-
tef's Restaurant, Branford.
American Legion Post 107 The Harry C. Gray II
Memorial American Legion Post No. 107 business meet-
ing, first Thursday at noon and third Thursday at 6:30
p.m., at 10726 142nd St., east of US 129 (Blue Lake
Road), McAlpin. This is to accommodate both those who
cannot travel after dark and those who work during the
day. Info: Richard Buffington, 386-364-5985.
American Legion Auxiliary Unit No. 107 first Satur-
day; 10 a.m.; Harry C. Gray I Memorial American Legion
Post No. 107, 10726 142nd Rd., Live Oak. Info: Tanya
Lees, 386-364-8331.
American Legion Post 132 second Tuesday; 7 p.m.;
Wellborn Masonic Lodge, on CR 137, downtown Well-
born; Info: Gerald McKean, 386-963-5901.
Bible college classes offered Third Saturday, from 2-
5 p.m. at 104 Beech St., NE, Live Oak. Yearning to learn
more about the Word? Can't attend classes full time?


Fall Festival from 8 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 27 on
the church grounds on East US 90, Live Oak. Food, en-
tertainment and a car show will fill up the day. The flea
market promises to be the biggest ever with all sorts of
exotic treasures and finds. There will be carnival games
for the children, crafts for sale, snow cones and cotton
candy for your sweet tooth. Come out for an hour or for
the day and enjoy the excitement.
Sept. 27
Magnolia Farms Fall Farm Festival
Organic fall farm festival will be held at Saturday,
Sept. 27 at Magnolia Farms, Live Oak. Special guests
UF/IFAS small farms team will present 15 educational
workshops. Schedule available at Web site. Info: 386- '
364-6450 or magnoliafarms.org.

Free with park admission!
Sept. 27-Nov. 1
Wild Adventures to present Haunted
Adventures Nites
Wild Adventures Theme Park will present Haunted
Adventures Nites Sept. 27-Nov. 1. Park is located at 1-75
Exit 13, Valdosta, Ga. Info/tickets: 229-219-7080,
wildadventures.net.
Thru Sept. 28
Driver's license checkpoints
The Florida Highway Patrol will conduct driver's li-
cense and vehicle inspection checkpoints through Sept.
28 on Brown Road, CR 252, CR 252-A, CR 252-B, CR
25-A, SR 47, SR 341, US 441, US 41, CR 245, CR 238,
CR 135, Turner Road, SR 100, Trotter's Road, Fairfield
Farms Road, CR 250, CR 349, SR 247 and SR 25 in Co-
lumbia County; CR 132, CR 136, CR 136-A, CR 137,
CR 249, CR 250, CR 252, CR 349, CR 49, CR 795, SR
20, SR 247, SR 10, SR 51, US 129 and Mitchell Road in
Suwannee County; and CR 136, CR 152, CR 143, CR
249, CR 137, CR 251, CR 146, CR 135, CR 141, CR
150, CR 145 and US 41, SR 6, SR 25 in Hamilton Coun-
ty. Recognizing the danger presented to the public by.de-
fective vehicle equipment, troopers will concentrate their
efforts on vehicles being operated with defects such as
bad brakes, worn tires and defective lighting equipment.
In addition, attention will be directed to drivers who
would violate the driver license laws of Florida. The Pa-
trol has found these checkpoints to be an effective means
of enforcing the equipment and driver's license laws of
Florida while ensuring the protection of all motorists.
Oct. 2
Democratic Executive Committee
meeting
Suwannee County Democratic Committee will meet at
7 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 2, at Live Oak City Hall, 101
White Ave. SE, Live Oak. All Democrats are invited to
join us in participating in the Democratic Process. Meet-
ings are held the first Thursday of each month.
Info/RSVP for dinner: Monica, 386-330-2036.
Oct. 2 *
Health Horizons to meet
Healthy Horizons, a chronic illness support group, will
meet a 7 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 2 at Christ Central Min-
istries Church, 1550 Walker Avenue SW, Live Oak. All
who live with a chronic condition are encouraged to at-
tend. Group discussions, educational materials and
friendly support are provided to enable all to live to their
fullest potential. Open to all community members. Info:
' Church, 386-208-1345.


Maybe this is your answer. Info: Dr. Simpson, 386-364-
1607 or 386-344-4192.
Bluegrass Pickin Suwannee Valley Bluegrass
Pickin first Saturday, 7 p.m., Otter Springs Resort
Lodge, 6470 SW 80th Ave., Trenton. It is free to the pub-
lic, in a nice, air-conditioned building. Info: Cloud H4ley,
toll-free 800-990-5410..
Branford Camera Club third Thursday; 7:30 p.m.;,
Branford Library; second Thursday; Note: no August or
December meeting; Info: Carolyn Hogue, 386-935-2044.
Chamber of Commerce Suwannee County.- second
Thursday; 7:30 a.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak; Info:
386-362-307,1.
Christian Mission in Action first Tuesday, 6 p.m., at
Triumph the Church and Kingdom of God in Christ Youth
Center, 12001 NW Seventh St., Live Oak; Info: Audrey
Sharpe, 386-364-4560.
Christian Mission in Action Ministry free food and
clothing give-away, second Saturday, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., at
John H. Hale Community Park and Recreation Center,
Duval Street, Live Oak; Info: Audrey Sharpe, 386-364-
4560.
Citizens for Positive Progress third Friday, 6:30 p.m.
at American Legion Post 107, 10726 142nd St., McAlpin,
off US 129 South. Potluck supper before the meeting.
Info:-Ana Smith, 386-364-5584.
Council for Progress of Suwannee County second
Tuesday; 7:30 a.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak; Info:
386-362-3071.
Cub Scout Pack No. 408-Tiger, Wolf, Bears and We-
belos dens (grades one five) every Tuesday, Aug.-May
only; 6:30-8 p.m. at First Baptist Church, Live Oak.
Disabled American Veterans Chapter No. 126 sec-
ond Thursday; 6 p.m.; 226 Parshley St., S.W, Live Oak;
Info: 386-362-1701. .
Disaster Animal Response Team (DART) first Tues-
day, 5:30 p.m., Companion Animal Hospital, 605 N.
Houston Street, Live Oak. DART helps out with pets, live-
stock, horses, birds and all animals during natural disas-
ters. Volunteers needed. Info: 386-208-0072.
Dowling Park Volunteers first Saturday; 1100 hours
(11 a.m.); training each following Saturday at 1100 (11
a.m.); 22992 CR 250, Live Oak.
Drug Free Coalition of Suwannee County last


Order tickets now!,
Oct. 2-4
Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park
to host Suwannee River Jubilee
The annual fall Suwannee River Jubilee Southern
Gospel will be held Thursday-Saturday, Oct. 2-4 at
Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak. Fea-
tured groups: Dove Brothers, Dixie Melody Boys,. Black-
wood Brothers and the Dixie Echoes. Info: Tickets at ju-
bilee@dixieechoes.com; camping reservations at 386-
364-1683, music lives here.com.

Oct. 3
Free Gospel Concert in Lee
Free Gospel Concert will be held at 6:30 p.m., Friday,
Oct. 3 at Lee Worship Center Church, 397 Magnolia Dri-
ve, Lee. The event is held every first Friday of the
month. Proceeds benefit the building fund of the church.
Bring a covered dish, meat will be provided. If you want
to get on the show, call Alen, 850-971-4135 home, or
850-673-9481 cell.

Oct. 4
Bluegrass Pickin in Trenton
Suwannee Valley Bluegrass Pickin will be held at 6
- p.m., Saturday, Oct. 4 at Otter Springs Resort Lodge,
6470 SW 80th Ave., Trenton. It is free to the public.
Info: Cloud Haley, toll-free 800-990-5410.
Oct. 4-Nov. 1
Magnolia Farms
Pumpkin Patch
and Corn Maze
You are invited to the Pumpkin Patch and Corn Maze
at Magnolia Farms, Live Oak. Open Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5
p:m., Oct. 4-Nov 1. Info: 386-364-6450 or magnolia-
farms.org.

Register now!
Oct. 6
Live Oak Senior Citizens to meet
Live Oak Senior Citizens will meet at 10:30 a.m.,
Monday, Oct. 6 at Exhibition II Building, Coliseum
Complex, 1302 SW Eleventh St., Live Oak. The group
meets the first Monday of each month. Escorted tours are
available, prices vary. Deposits due at registration, bal-
ance due before trip. Schedule: Alhambra Dinner The-
atre, Oct. 11; Biltmore Estate and Asheville, S.C., Nov.
3-6; Bahamas, Nov. 10-15; Radisson Opryland "A Coun-
ty Christmas," Dec. 15-18; Canadian Train Odyssey,
May 29-31. Info: Walter and Charlene Howell, 386-842-
2241.

Oct. 17
Citizens for Positive Progress,
to host candidates
Citizens for Positive Progress will host several candi-
dates for local offices at its monthly meeting Friday, Oct.
17 at American Legion Post #107 located at 10726
142nd St., McAlpin, 8 miles south of Live Oak, just off
US 129. A "potluck" supper will begin at 6:30 p.m., fol-
lowed by the meeting. Everyone is invited come to these.
meetings and hear'what these candidates have to say.
This is an excellent opportunity for you, the people of.
Suwannee County, to meet the candidates face to face
and make your decision on who you want to vote into
the respective offices. Bring your family members,
friends and neighbors. Be informed!


Thursday, 5:30 p.m. at 813 Pinewood Way, Live Oak.
Info: Mary Taylor, 386-362-2272, suwannee coali-
tion@mac.com, www.drugfreesuwannee.com.
Fibromyalgia support group first Monday, 6 p.m., at
Suwannee River Regional Library, 1848 Ohio Avenue
South, Live Oak. Feel free to bring family members. Info:
386-842-5206.
Florida Gateway Charter Chapter of the American
Business Women's Association second Thursday; 6
p.m.; locations change; Info: Sandy Harrison, 386-754-
0434 or 386-752-0516.
Friends of Suwannee River State Park second Tues-
day; 10 a.m., board meeting; Suwannee River.State Park,
US 90 West, Live Qak; Birding walks for 2008 will be
held these Saturdays only: Sept. 20 and Oct. 25; meet at
park 8 a.m.; bring water, binoculars and favorite bird ID
book; wear comfortable shoes or boots. Park entrance fees
apply. Info: Membership Chair Walter Schoenfelder, 850-
971-5354, wbs@surfbest.net or 386-362-2746,
fosrsp@surfbest.net.
Ft. White Quilt Sisters last Saturday, 9 a.m.-until, at
Ft. White Town Hall near Library. Quilters of all skill lev-
els are welcome to join us for a relaxing time of fun, fel-
lowship and of course quilting. No dues or fees required -
just the love and desire to quilt. Bring your lunch and
quilting make new quilting friends. Info: 386-497-4179.
Food free to anyone in need Alapaha River Band of
Cherokee, Inc., a non-profit organization, will give away
free food to. anyone in need first and third Fridays, from
noon-3 p.m. at Free Food Service Pantry, 3589 NW 28th
Terrace, Jennings. NOTE: Closed Friday, July 4. Info:
Chief Joan Nelson, 386-938-4625 or 386-938-3609, or
www.thealapahariverbandofcherokeeinc.com.
GFWC Woman's Club of Live Oak first Friday;
noon; 1308 Eleventh Street, Live Oak.
Girl Scout Leaders, Girl Scouts of Gateway Council
- first Monday; 7 p.m.; First Advent Christian Church,
Live Oak; Info: Peggy Rudser, membership specialist, 212
N. Marion Ave., Suite 230, Lake City, FL 32055, 386-758-
3230 or toll-free 866-295-1727.
Hamilton County Governmental, Bellville Volunteer
Fire/Rescue executive board second Monday, 7 p.m.


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NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS SEPTEMBER 3.- 4,2008, PAGE 11


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Hamilton County Alcohol and Other Drug Preven-
tion Coalition fourth Wednesday; 9:30-11 a.m., Harnil-
ton County School Board meeting room, JRE Lee Admin-
istrative Complex, Jasper; Info: Grace McDonald, 386-
938-4911, mcdonaldgl@alltel.net
Hamilton County Board of Commissioners first
Tuesday, 9 a.m., and third Tuesday at 6 p.m., County
Commissioners' Board Room, courthouse, Jasper.
Hamilton County Chamber of Commerce, Inc. first
Thursday; 6 p.m.; 1153 US 41 NW, Suite 4, Jasper (cour-
thouseannex); Info: 386-792-1300.
Hamilton County Council on Aging, Inc. needs vol-
unteers; home-delivered meals program; Info: Mazel
Spencer; 1509 S.W. First Street, Jasper, 386-792-1136.
Hamilton County Democratic Party 7 p.m., second
Monday, Jasper Public Library. All registered Democrats
are invited to coqpe. Info: Rhett Bullard, 386-303-2039.
Hamilton County Development Authority second
Thursday; 7 p.m., at 1153 US 41 NW, Suite 4, Jasper
(courthouse annex); Info: 386-792-6828.
Hamilton County Pink Ladies second Tuesday,
10:30 a.m., odd months meeting held at Suwannee Valley
Nursing Center, 427 NW 15th Ave., Jasper; even months
at Trinity Community Hospital, 506 NW 4th St. Jasper.
They hold fund-raisers to benefit nursing center and hos-
pital.
Hamilton County Planning and Zoning Board sec-
ond, Tuesday, 6 p.m.; Hamilton County Board of County
Commissioners meeting room,' Hamilton County Court-
house, Jasper; open to the public.
Hamilton County Riding Club first Saturday; 5 p.m.,
meeting-games; Hamilton County Arena, Jasper; third
Saturday; 5 p.m.; trail ride-dinner, location announced at
the first Saturday meeting; new members welcome; Info:
386-792-2725.
Hamilton County School Board board meetings, sec-
ond Monday (third Monday during June and July); School
Board workshops-fourth Mondays -- as needed. For times
and locations, visit the district's Web site at
www.firn.edu/schools/hamilton/hamilton.
Hamilton County Tourist Development Council -
second Wednesday; noon; 1153 US 41-NW, Suite 4, Jasper
(courthouse annex); Info: 386-792-6828.
Healthy Horizons, a chronic illness support group -
meets at 6:30 p.m., second and third Thursdays at Christ
Central Ministries, 1550 Walker Ave. SW, Live Oak.
Group discussion, educational materials and friendly sup-
port provided to enable all to live to their fullest potential.
All who live with a chronic condition are invited to attend.
Open to all members of the community. Info: Church,
386-208-1345..
Home and Community Educators (HCE) first.
Wednesday, 9:30 a.m., at Suwannee County Extension Of-
fice, Coliseum Complex, 1302 Eleventh Street, Live Oak;
new members x welcome; Pleasant Hill-second Monday, at
10 a.m.; McAlpin Community Center, McAlpin; Former-
ly known as Pleasant Hill Home Extension Club. Short
business meeting, followed by a workshop of different
projects for the community. Visitors are always welcome.
Info:' Donna Wade, president, 386-963-3516, or Barbara
Parks, 386-,362-3044. Happy Homemakers-second
Wednesday; Suwannee County Coliseum Complex, 1302
Eleventh Street, Live Oak. Info: 386-362-2771.
Homeless Services Network of Suwannee Valley -
second Tuesday, 4 p.m. at' Columbia County Public Li-,
brary, Lake, City. United Way of Suwannee Valley serves'
as the lead agency for the Homeless Services Network.of
Suwannee Valley, which serves the counties of Columbia,
Suwannee, Lafayette and Hamilton. The network includes
agencies and individuals interested in the services avail-
able to those who are homeless or threatened with home-
lessness. Agency representatives, individuals, homeless
and formerly homeless, with an interest in the needs of
those who are experiencing homelessness or are threat-
ened with homelessness are encouraged to attend.
Humane Society, Suwannee Valley Animal Shelter
second Monday; noon; at the shelter located on Bisbee
Loop, south entrance, in Lee off CR 255, Madison Coun-
ty; Info: toll-free 866-Adoptl2, 866-236-7812,
www.geocities.com/suwanneehs.
Jasper City Council Meeting second Monday; 6
p.m.; Jasper City Hall.
Jennings Town Council Meeting first Tuesday; 7
p.m.; Jennings Town Hall.
White Springs Town Council Meeting: second Tues-
day; 7 p.m.; White Springs Town Hall.
Lady of the Lake Quilting Guild fourth Wednesday,
in Lake City; for anyone interested in quilts and the art of
quilting; the quilting public is invited. Info: Sandy Lind-
fors, president, 386-362-6850, riverfolk@alltel.net or
Joan Murray, 386-758-5980.
Leona 4-H Community Club first Monday; 7 p.m.;
home of Avon and Betty Hicks, 6107 180th St., McAlpin;
Info: Betty Hicks, 386-963-4205; Pam Nettles, 386-963-
1236.
Lion's Club second Tuesday and fourth Tuesday; 7
p.m.; Farm Bufireau meeting room; Info: Homer Scroggin,
386-364-4098.
Live Oak Artist Guild first Tuesday; 7 p.m.; 213 NW
Second St., Live Oak; Artwalk from 7-9 p.m., third Fri-
day. Artwalk End of the Season Celebration will be Friday,
June 20. Artwalk will resume again Friday, Oct. 17. Info:
386-364-5099 or Linda Ruwe, 386-362-0985.
Live Oak Artist Guild's Theater group meets third
Monday, 6 p.m., Cultural Arts and Gallery, 213 Second St.
NW, Live Oak. Members of the community are encour-
aged to join them.
Live Oak Garden Club September-May; Morning
Glories-third Friday; Night Bloomers-third Tuesday, 1302


S.W. Eleventh Street, Live Oak.
Live Oak Senior Citizens first Monday; 10:30 a.m.;
Exhibition II Building, Coliseum Complex, 1302 SW
Eleventh St., Live Oak; escorted tours available, prices
vary; Deposits due at registration, balance due before trip.
Info: Walter and Charlene Howell, 386-842-2241.
GFWC Woman's Club of Live Oak first Friday at
noon; 1308 Eleventh Street, Live Oak.
Suwannee Valley Humane Society Animal Shelter -
second Monday; noon; at the shelter locatedon Bisbee


Loop, south entrance, in Lee off CR 255, Madison Coun-
ty; Info: toll-free 866-Adoptl2, 866-236-7812,
www.geocities.com/suwanneehs.
Live Oak, Suwannee County Recreation Board sec-
ond Wednesday; 5:30 p.m. Suwannee Parks & Recreation
offices, 1201 Silas Drive, Live Oak; Info: 386-362-3004.
MADD Dads Third Thursday; 7 p.m.; Suwannee
County Courthouse.
Man To Man Group second Thursday; 7 p.m.; Mar-
vin E. Jones Building, Dowling Park; free; refreshments
provided; Info: American Cancer Society toll-free 800-
ACS-2345 or the local office toll-free 888-295-6787
(Press 2) Ext. 114.
Market Days Advent Christian Village first Satur-
day; 8 a.m.-1 p.m.; Space-first-come, first-serve basis, $10
each; Village Square shops open; Info: Lodge Office 386-'
658-5200. /
-McAlpin Community Club second Monday; 7 p.m.;
covered dish dinner first; everyone welcome; purpose to
acquaint members of the community of services available
in the county; Info: Donna Wade, 386-935-3516 or Shirley
Jones, 386-963-5357; building rental: Leslie Owens, 386-
364-3400.
MOAA (Military Officers Association of America) -
fourth Thursday, 6:30 p.m., at Elks Cluhib,'Lake City; for-
mer and present officers meet for dinner and program;
Info: Dennis Tarkington, 386-719-7092 or Tandy Carter,
386-719-9706.
MOMS Club second Wednesday; 11:15 a.m. at the
fellowship hall of Bethel Missionary Baptist Church, go
West on US 90 seven miles from 1-75, and 1-1/2 miles
from the Columbia/Suwannee County line, 12 miles from
Live Oak; Info: 386-397-1254, MOMSClubofLiveQak-
LakeCityFl@alltel.net
NationaL Active and Retired Federal Employees
(N.A.R.F.E.) Association third Tuepday; 11:30 a.m.; at
628 SE Allison Ct., Lake City; guest speakers; all present
and retired federal employees invited; Info: Miriam Stan-
ford, 386-755-0907; .386-755-8570,
purvislkcty@aol.com; or 386-752-6593, rhurstl67@com-
cast.net.. .
North Florida Chapter of Newborns in Need first
Tuesday; 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; in the small conference room at
Suwannee River Regional Library, 1848 US 129 South,
Live Oak.. Please join them if you crochet, knit, sew, serge
or can cut out or package. Help them take care of the pre-
mature babies in our area. Info: Mabel Grahanm, 386-590-
4075.
North Florida Conservation and Airboat Alliance -
second Tuesday; 7 p.m.; John H. Hale Community Park &
Recreation Center, 215 NE Duval St., Live Oak; all meet-
ings covered dish; airboaters and sportsmen working to
keep public lands and waterways open for everyone to use
and enjoy. No December meeting. President Winston
Williams; Vice President Garry Garrison; Secretary-
Treasurer Patty'Wood-Williams. Info: Winston Williams,
386-362-6716; or e-mail pattyarinwood@realtyagent.coi6n
North Florida Hope Share second Tuesday, 6 p.m.,
Suwannee County Sheriff's Office, Criminal Division
Training Room, (old Mastec building), 1902 NE Duval
St., Live,Oak. Non-profit support group for grieving par-
ents and family members. Light refreshments served. Info:
Missy Norris, 386-364-3789 or 386-364-4064.
Nursing Mom's Group second Friday; 10 a.m.;
Suwannee River Regional Library, Live Oak; Info:
Michelle, 386-776-2955.
Pink Ladies of Jasper second Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.,
odd months meeting held .at Suwannee Valley Nursing
Center, 427 NW 15th Ave., Jasper; even months at Trinity.
Community Hospital, 506 NW 4th. St. Jasper. They hold
fund-raisers to benefit nursing center and hospital. .
Pleasant Hill Home and Community Education
(HCE) Club, formerly known as Home Extension Club
second Monday, 10 a.m., McAlpin Commimity Center
Small business meeting, followed by a workshop of dif-
ferent projects for the community. Visitors are always wel-
come. Info; Donna Wade, president, 386-963-3516, or
Barbara Parks, 386-362-3044.
Remembering the Loss of Your Baby first Thursday;
11:30 a.m.-l p.m.;' Hospice of North Central Florida,
North Building Counseling Room, 4305 NW 90th Blvd.,
Gainesville; open support group for families who have
experienced the loss of a baby; Info: Cheryl Bailey, 352-
692-5107, toll-free 800-816-0596.
SHINE Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders -
Advent Christian Village Dowling Park trained vol-
unteers help elders and their caregivers 'in Dowling Park
area of Suwannee County to understand Medicare and
other health insurance programs make informed decisions
on insurance, Medicare Prescription Drug Cards and on
discounted prescription drug programs and eligibility re-
quirements; free; Info: appointment 386-658-3333 or
386-658-5329; Florida Department of Elder Affairs toll-
free 800-262-2243, Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
SHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders)
Branford statewide program of the Florida Department
of Elder Affairs. Free unbiased Medicare counseling pro-
vided. Trained SHINE Volunteers offer information and
assistance with Medicare, Medicare Prescription Drug
Plans, Medicare supplemental insurance, Medicaid pro-
grams, and prescription assistance programs offered by
pharmaceutical companies. They can also provide valu-
able information about Medicare to persons soon to turn
65. Call the following number and they will refer you to
the shine counseling site at Branford Public Library or a
shine counselor will call you if you cannot visit this site.
Info: Elder Helpline, toll-free 800-262-2243.
SHINE Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders -
Jasper Monday-Friday, 1-4 p.m.; Hamilton Pharmacy
Assistance Program, Sandlin Building, 204 NE 1st Street,
Jasper; trained volunteers help elders and their caregivers


in Suwannee County to understand Medicare and other
health insurance programs make informed decisions on in-
surance, Medicare Prescription Drug Cards and on dis-
counted prescription drug programs and eligibility re-
quirements; free; Info: Florida Department of Elder Af-
fairs toll-free 800-262-2243, Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m.-
4:30 p.m.
SHINE Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders -
Live Oak second Monday, 1-3 p.m. or second Thursday,
1:30-2:30 p.m.; Suwannee River Regional Library, US


129 South, Live Oak; trained volunteers help elders and
their caregivers in Suwannee County to understand
Medicare and other health insurance programs make in-
formed decisions on insurance, Medicare Prescription
Drug Cards and on discounted prescription drug programs
and eligibility requirements; free; Info: Florida Depart-
ment of Elder Affairs toll-free 800-262-2243, Monday -
Friday, 8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
SHINE Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders -
White Springs first and third Thursday; 9:30-11:30
a.m.; Library, 12797 Roberts Street, White Springs; free;
trained volunteers help elders and their caregivers in
Suwannee County to understand Medicare and other
health insurance programs make informed decisions on in-
surance, Medicare Prescription Drug Cards and on dis-
counted prescription drug programs -and eligibility re-
quirements; Info; Florida Department of Elder Affairs toll-
free 800-262-2243, Monday -.Friday, 8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
Suwannee Chapter of the Florida Trail Association -
second Monday; 7-9 p.m.; Suwannee River Water 'Man-
agement District, US 90 and CR 49, Live Oak; Info: Sam
Bigbie, 386-362-5090; Don Neale, 386-362-4850; Sylvia
Dunnam, 386-362-3256.
Suwannee County Animal Control Governing Board
at 5 p.m., second Tuesday at Suwannee River Regional
Library, 1848 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak. Public invited. Info:
386-364-1860.
Suwvannee County Cattlemen's Association third
Thursday; 6:30 p.m.; Farmers Co-op meeting room; Info:
Herb Rogers, 386-362-4118.
Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce second
Thursday; 7:30 a.m., 816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak; Info:
386-362-3071.
Suwannee Countyi Council for Progress of Suwan-
nee County second Tuesday; 7:30 a.m.; 816 South Ohio
Ave. Live Oak; Info: 386-362-3071.
Suwannee County Conservation District third
Thursday, 7 p.m., at Suwannee Riyer Water Management
District Office, US 90 and CR 49, Live Oak. Open to the
public. Info: District Office, 386-362-2622, ext. 3.
Suwannee County Democratic Executive Committee
first Thursday, 7 p.m., Live Oak City Hall, 101 White
Ave. SE, Live Oak; All welcome. Info: Monica, 386-330-
2036.
Suwannee County Development Authority second
Tuesday; 5:30 p.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak; Info:
386-362-3Q71.
Suwannee County Tourist Development Council -
fourth Tuesday; 1 p.m." 816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak;
Info: 386-362-3071.
Suwannee County Senior Citizens -- first Monday;
10:30 a.m., Exhibition II Building, Coliseum Complex,
1302 SW Eleventh St., Live Oak; escorted tours available,
prices vary; Deposits due at registration, balance due be-
fore trip. Info: Walter and Charlene Howell, 386-842-
2241.
Suwannee Elementary School (SES) School Adviso-
ry Council (SAC) meets at 6 p.m., third Tuesday, in the
'media center at SES, 1748 South Ohio/Martin Luther
King Jr. Avenue, Live Oak. All interested parties are wel-
come to attend..
Suwannee High School (SHS) Band Boosters sec-
ond Thursday, 6:30 p.m., in the band room at Suwannee
High School, Live Oak.
Suwannee River Valley Archaeology Society third
Tuesday; public library, Branford; Info: 386-935-4901.
Suwannee Valley Bluegrass Pickin first Saturday, 7
p.m., Otter Springs Resort Lodge, 6470 SW 80th Ave.,
Trenton. It is free to the public, in a nice, air-conditioned
building. Info: Cloud Haley, toll-free 800-990-5410.
,Suwannee Valley Builders Association second
Thursday; 6 p.m.; Cheryl's Noon Buffet, Fifth Street, Live
Oak; $5 per person for meal and meeting.
Suwannee Valley Genealogical Society first Thurs-
day; 7 p.m., Wilbur St., Live Oak; Open Tuesdays and
.Thursdays, 9 a.m.-noon and 1-5 p.m.; Info: 386-330-0110.
Suwannee Valley Humane Society Animal Shelter -
second Monday; noon; at the shelter located on Bisbee
Loop, south entrance, in Lee off CR 255, Madison Coun-,
ty; Info: toll-free 866-Adoptl2, 866-236-7812,
www.geocities.com/suwanneehs.
Suwannee Valley Quilters first and third Thursday;
10 a.m.; Info: Jane, 386-776-2909 after 4 p.m.
Suwannee Valley Kennel Club third Tuesday; 7:30
p.m.; Hospitality and Recreational Building, Columbia
County Fairgrounds, Lake City.
Tourist Development Council Suwannee County -
fourth Tuesday; 1 p.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak;
Info: 386-362-3071.
Vision SSeeds, Inc. second Tuesday, 6 p.m. promptly,
at location to be announced. Spiritual-Social-Educational-
Economic Development. Save our children! Unity in
Christ Jesus-Empowerment. All are welcome. Info: Otha
White Sr., president, 386-364-1367.
Vivid Visions, Inc. first Monday; 5:30 p.m.; Douglass
Center Conference Room; a shelter and outreach agency
for victims of domestic violence; Info: 386-364-5957.
Wellborn Community Association (WCA) second
Thursday; 7 p.m.; Wellborn Community Center; Info:
- Bonnie Scott, 386-963-4952, 386-208-1733-leave a mes-
sage.. WCA fund-raiser to benefit building fund Blue-
berry Pancake Breakfast first Saturday; center of Well-
born, Andrews Square; blueberry pancakes, sausage and
orange juice or coffee. Blueberry Festival first Satur-
day in June each year.
Wellborn Neighborhood Watch last Thursday, 7
p.m., Blake Lowe Building, 1517 4th Ave., Wellborn;
Info: Bruce or Jane, 386-963-3196.
White Springs Town Council Meeting: second Tues-
day; 7 p.m.; White Springs Town Hall.
The White Springs Folk Club 2007-2008 season fea-


tures performances by well known artists at Telford Hotel,
River Street, White Springs. Dinner and lodging are also
available, call 386-397-2000 for reservations. Concert
room opens at 6:30 p.m. A reception, drawing and inter-
mission performance session featuring local/regional per-
formers will follow. Cost: $12.50 per person at the door,
performance and reception. Info: Club, 386-397-2420 or
mckenziew@alltel.net.
GFWC Woman's Club of Live Oak first Friday at
noon; 1308 Eleventh Street, Live Oak.'


PAGE 12, SEPTEMBER 3 4,2008 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


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U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS SEPTEMBER 3-4,2008, PAGE 13


o triie after a


.---,n--


i".4 3^f


Sustainable Seafood Choices fortheTable


FAMILY FEATURES

L en Peterson surveys the vast silver ocean from his gillnet boat, F/VHeather
Anne. Around him is Taku Inlet, 15 miles south of Juneau, Alaska, where
the mighty Taku River spills into the Pacific Ocean after winding for miles
through pristine wilderness. Snowcapped mountains soar in the distance,
etched by fjords where glaciers crash into the sea, and whales spout and
feed. Ahead are the pristine waters of one of the earth's most unspoiled
natural marine environments, home to a bounty of seafood, from wild salmon to cod
and Alaska pollock, sole, black cod, halibut, weathervane scallops and the mighty
king crab.
Len Peterson is typical of Alaska fishermen: Fully aware of the role conservation
plays in creating the sustainable fisheries supporting their lifestyle and livelihood.
They have built their businesses to reflect their beliefs and respect for the wild seafood
they harvest.
"We will never catch the last fish," Len says. "We all understand fish are a finite
resource. But there will always be fish in these waters for my daughter and son-in-law
and our future grandchildren to catch. It's a choice, a responsibility, and a commitment
far more important than a huge commercial harvest."
Sustainable living is about making choices that can be sustained within a limited
amount of resources. More Americans today are making sustainable choices when it
comes to transportation, housing, energy and even food.
Some industries, like the Alaska fishing industry, have been putting sustainability
into practice for years, and that means that shoppers have more options when it comes
to making food choices that are good not just for them, but for the future.
Maintaining a balance between harvested quantities and the number of fish required
to maintain a long-term healthy population without compromising the ecosystem is the
standard definition of sustainability. The State of Alaska's definition for its fishing
industries goes farther by adding multiple proactive efforts.
Alaska's number one priority: Protecting future fish stocks and their habitat for future
generations. In this effort, Alaska takes a precautionary approach to guarantee fishery
stocks and ecosystem needs are met first and foremost.
Scientific research is the foundation of Alaska's fisheries management policies and is
used to establish both the numbers and the health of each individual species. Unbreak-
able harvest limits are then set, and fishing completely stops when these harvest limits,
or quotas, are reached.
Working with several different agencies of state, federal and international govern-
ments, Alaska has developed a variety of comprehensive management methods that are
considered a model of sustainability for the entire world. No Alaska species has ever
been listed as threatened or endangered. Salmon harvests in particular have risen signif-
icantly above historical levels.
What does this mean when you walk up to the fish counter in your supermarket
and buy two pounds of Alaska cod for dinner? You can be assured the fish has been
harvested with the future in mind. It's a top-quality product whether flash-frozen at sea
or delivered fresh to the market. The wild Alaska seafood you eat tonight represents a
dynamic fishing industry following the world's most rigorous management practices to
ensure a sustainable food and protect its.natural habitat. You're doing your part to sup-
port that commitment by making a responsible choice to purchase and eat sustainably
harvested seafood.
To learn more about Alaska's fisheries management practices, visit alaskaseafood.org.


Make Mine

Wild

From Alaska
believe it or not, your choices at the seafood
counter will affect the future, and you have a
choice about creating that future. By choosing
wild, natural, sustainable seafood from Alaska, you
help protect the environment and ensure there will be
fish tomorrow and for future generations.
Alaska Seafood at a Glance
Alaska's clean, bountiful waters yield an abundance
of both finfish and shellfish. All species are harvested
following strict management practices that maintain
the long-term health of both fish and the natural
environment while allowing maximum yields. The
result is delicious seafood ready for grilling, broiling,
sauteing and poaching and your dining pleasure.
For more information about Alaska seafood, recipes
and nutrition details, visit alaskaseafood.org.
Salmon
There are five wild Alaska salmon species:
king (also called Chinook), coho, keta, pink
and sockeye.
Whitefish Varieties
This group includes cod, Alaska pollock,
halibut, black cod, rockfish and sole, which
, are harvested year-round.
Shellfish
Alaskan waters yield king crab and snow
crab, harvested during winter, Dungeness
crab, harvested from June until December,
and Alaska weathervane scallops, harvested
from July through December.


NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS SEPTEMBER 3 4,2008, PAGE 13


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PAGE 14. SEPTEMBER 3-4.2008- NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


You


fo


r a Snack Attack





'N, I.I.- IL i t % .,ES

o you fight food cravings but feel guilty
for snacking? Snacking doesn't have to
be off-limits when you're trying to eat
healthy or lose weight. In fact, snacking
can be an important part of your diet if
Sou kno how to make the right choices.

Better Bites


When 'ou get a snack
cra, ing, it's all right to
give in if you know
how to make the most
of our snack options.
Look for snacks that
pack a big nutrient
bang. Not only are they
better for you, but they
may help ou feel more
full than your normal
snack kould. Here are
a fel ideas:
Crunch. Snacks
Apples and.
breadsticks
Carrot, celery
or green pepper
sticks


American
Heart
Association
Products displaying the
heart-check mark meet.
American Heart Association
food criteria for saturated
fat and cholesterol for
healthy people over age 2.
heartcheckmark.org


-mo






a-M

C U


- -


Whole-Grain Goodness
The fiber found in unrefined whole-grain foods can help lower
your blood cholesterol, which is important in preventing heart
disease and stroke. When looking for a whole-grain snack:
a Choose foods such as whole wheat, oats and oatmeal, rye,
barley and corn. Also include popcorn, brown rice, wild rice,
buckwheat, bulgur (cracked wheat), millet, quinoa and
sorghum.
* Choose breads and other foods that list whole grains as the
first item in the ingredient list.
* Aim for about 25 gramins of fiber a day.
To make shopping easier, look for the American Heart Associa-
tion's heart-check mark. The mark identifies products that meet
the association's criteria for being high in whole grains and fiber
and low in saturated fat and cholesterol.


Zucchini circles
Broccoli or cauliflower spears
Unsalted rice cakes
MunchN Snacks
Unsalted sunflower seed '
Whole-grain breads or to st '
Cherry towates ''
--- plam, low-fat or rn -id
Linsalted nuts
Sweet Bites
Thin slice of angel food cake
Bdked apple
Frozen bananas or grapes
Fresh fruit
Raisins
Thirst Quenchers
Fat-free milk,
Unsweetened juice%
Low-sodium mixid'vegetable juices
Water

Sneaky Sugars
Many snack foods and drinks have added sugar. While
they taste good, they tend to be low in vitamins and
minerals and higher in calories. And they probably
won't make you feel full, so you could be tempted.to
overeat.
You might not recognize some of the hidden sugars
listed on food labels. Here are some other names that
sugar goes by: sucrose, glucose, fructose, maltose,
de.ftrowe, corn syrups, high-fructose corn syrup, con-
ccnlrated fruit juice and honey.

When to Eat
Three regular meals a day? Five smaller ones? Which
is better and where do snacks fit in?
Choose what works best for you. The main goal is
to not overeat. Some people find it easier to control
the amount they eat with four or five small meals.
Eating just once or twice a day may lead to overeating
because you are hungry. Most people do just fine with
three daily meals with a healthy snack in between, if
they feel hungry.
Healthy snacking doesn't have to mean boring,
tasteless food. There are plenty of good-for-you
choices with loads of flavor. The American Heart
Association can help. Visit heartcheckmark.org to
build your free;, personalized, heart-healthy grocery
list. The list includes various categories including
snacks.
Snack attacks don't have to control you if you
make the right choices, you can enjoy a snack -
guilt-free.


Shop smart. Live well. Look for the heart-check mark!
Products bearing the heart-check mark meet the American Heart Association's nutrition criteria per
standard serving size to be:
a Low in fat (3 grams or less)
* Low in saturated fat (1 gram or less)
* Limited in trans fat (less than .5 grams)
* Low in cholesterol (20 milligrams or less)
* Moderate in sodium, with 480 inilligrams or less for individual foods and
* Contain at least 10 percent of the Daily Value of one or more of these naturally occurring nutrients:
protein, vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, iron or dietary fiber
Additionally:
* Seafood, game meat, meat and poultry, as well as whole-grain products, main dishes and meals must
meet additional nutritional requirements.


PAGE 14, SEPTEMBER 3 4,2008 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


0 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


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EMPLOYEE PRICING

AVAILABLE
Durangos, Nitros, Commanders, Grand
Cherokees, Libertys, Grand Caravans,
All 2500 & 3500's


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2008 Jeep
Grand Cherokee
MSRP .... $29,680
Stk# J28255


2009 CALLNGR

$32,90 o


won't


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competitors
to advertise
them!!!


2008 Dodge Journey SXT
MSRP..............$22,985
Discount................-2,685
Owner Loyalty..........-500
$19,800 or


s249 a month


Payments are with Chrysler Financial @72 months 4.9/5.99 payments reflect 20% down of MSRP w.a.c., tax, title, ga warranty rights excluded. Pictures are for Illustration
purposes only. Vehicles must be in dealer stock and are subject to prior sale. Some restrictions apply to the gas card. See sales person for details.


-2


7-1*11


Exit 22 &


1-75 (Just 100 yards off 1-75)


2008 Jee
Command
MSRP . . $29
Stk# J28237


8 Dodge
Arango
* . $29,865
k# 28092


)08 Jeep Wrangler
Unlimited
MSRP .... $22,750
Stk# J28260


2008 Dodge Quad
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Stk# 27009


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PAGE 16, SEPTEMBER 3 4, 2008 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


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